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Sample records for cancer bladder volume

  1. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cor......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS......: The correlation between the relative bladder volume (RBV, defined as repeat scan volume/planning scan volume) and the margins required to account for internal motion was first studied using a series of 20 bladder cancer patients with weekly repeat CT scanning during treatment. Both conformal RT (CRT) and IGRT...... were simulated; in the latter translational movement of the bladder was accounted for by isocentre shifting. Further analysis of bladder volumes and margins was performed using a second series of eight patients with twice-weekly repeat CT scanning. In an attempt to control bladder volume variation...

  2. Evaluating Variations of Bladder Volume Using an Ultrasound Scanner in Rectal Cancer Patients during Chemoradiation: Is Protocol-Based Full Bladder Maintenance Using a Bladder Scanner Useful to Maintain the Bladder Volume?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong In Yoon

    Full Text Available The maintenance of full bladder is important to reduce radiation-induced toxicities and maintain the therapeutic consistency in locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT. So, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of protocol-based full bladder maintenance by assessing bladder volume variation using an ultrasound bladder scanner to maintain bladder volume.From March 2011 to May 2011, twenty consecutive rectal cancer patients receiving external beam RT participated in this prospective study. Protocol-based full bladder maintenance consisted of education, training and continuous biofeedback by measuring bladder volume. Bladder volume was measured by bladder scan immediately before simulation CT scan and before each treatment three times weekly during the RT period. The relative bladder volume change was calculated. Intra-patient bladder volume variations were quantified using interquartile range (IQR of relative bladder volume change in each patient. We compared intra-patient bladder volume variations obtained (n=20 with data from our previous study patients (n=20 performing self-controlled maintenance without protocol.Bladder volumes measured by bladder scan highly correlated with those on simulation CT scan (R=0.87, p<0.001. Patients from this study showed lower median IQR of relative bladder volume change compared to patients of self-controlled maintenance from our previous study, although it was not statistically significant (median 32.56% vs. 42.19%, p=0.058. Upon logistic regression, the IQR of relative bladder volume change was significantly related to protocol-based maintenance [relative risk 1.045, 95% confidence intervals (CI 1.004-1.087, p=0.033]. Protocol-based maintenance included significantly more patients with an IQR of relative bladder volume change less than 37% than self-controlled maintenance (p=0.025.Our findings show that bladder volume could be maintained more consistently during

  3. The Impact of Bladder Volume on Acute Urinary Toxicity during Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

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    Lee, Ji Hae; Suh, Hyun Suk; Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Re Na; Kim, Myung Soo [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were found to reduce the incidence of acute and late rectal toxicity compared with conventional radiation therapy (RT), although acute and late urinary toxicities were not reduced significantly. Acute urinary toxicity, even at a low-grade, not only has an impact on a patient's quality of life, but also can be used as a predictor for chronic urinary toxicity. With bladder filling, part of the bladder moves away from the radiation field, resulting in a small irradiated bladder volume; hence, urinary toxicity can be decreased. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of bladder volume on acute urinary toxicity during RT in patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Forty two patients diagnosed with prostate cancer were treated by 3DCRT and of these, 21 patients made up a control group treated without any instruction to control the bladder volume. The remaining 21 patients in the experimental group were treated with a full bladder after drinking 450 mL of water an hour before treatment. We measured the bladder volume by CT and ultrasound at simulation to validate the accuracy of ultrasound. During the treatment period, we measured bladder volume weekly by ultrasound, for the experimental group, to evaluate the variation of the bladder volume. Results: A significant correlation between the bladder volume measured by CT and ultrasound was observed. The bladder volume in the experimental group varied with each patient despite drinking the same amount of water. Although weekly variations of the bladder volume were very high, larger initial CT volumes were associated with larger mean weekly bladder volumes. The mean bladder volume was 299{+-}155 mL in the experimental group, as opposed to 187{+-}155 mL in the control group. Patients in experimental group experienced less acute urinary toxicities than in control group, but the difference was not

  4. Bladder volume variations of cervical cancer patient in radiation therapy using ultrasonography

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    Gong, Jong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The bladder volume change was measured using ultrasonography for helping decrease the side effects and other organ variations in the location of radiation therapy for cervical cancer patients. An experiment was performed targeting patients who were treated with radiation therapy at PNUH within the period from September to December 2015. To maintain the bladder volume, each patient was instructed to drink 500 cc water before and after CT simulation, 60 minutes before the dry run. Also, the bladder volume was measured in each patient CT scan, and a 3D conformal therapy plan was designed. The bladder volumes measured before and after the CT simulation, dry run, and radiation treatment planning were compared and analyzed. The average volume and average error of the bladder that were obtained from the measurement based on the CT scan images had the lowest standard deviation in the CT simulation. This means that the values that were obtained before and after the CT simulation were statistically relevant and correlative. Moreover, the bladder volume measured via ultrasonography was larger size, the average volume in the CT scan. But the values that were obtained Dry run and after the CT simulation were not statistically relevant. Drinking a certain amount of water helps a patient maintain his/her bladder volume for a dry run. Even then, it is difficult to maintain the bladder volume for the dry run. Also, whether or not the patients followed the directions for the dry run correctly is important.

  5. Comparison of doses according to change of bladder volume in treatment of prostate cancer

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    Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    In the case of radiation therapy for prostate cancer, a balloon infused with a certain amount of air through the anus is used to reduce rectal dose. Because of the reason, radiation therapy for prostate cancer has acquired CBCT for daily image induction. In order to maintain the anatomical structure most similar to the first CT taken before treatment, it is pretreated, but it can not be said to be perfectly consistent. In two actual treatment regimens, the volume of the bladder was measured as 45.82 cc and 63.43 cc, and the equivalent diameter was 4.4 cm and 4.9 cm. As a result of this study, the mean volume of the bladder was estimated to be 56.2 cc, 105.6 cc by 20 CBCT. The mean dose of CBCT was 1.74% and the mean Bladder mean dose was 96.67%. In case B, PTV mean dose was 4.31%, Bladder mean Dose was estimated to be 97.35%. The changes in the volume of the bladder resulted in changes in the dose of PTV and bladder. The correlation coefficient of bladder dose according to the change of bladder volume showed linearity of mean dose R2= -0.94. The correlation coefficient of the PTV dose according to the volume change of the bladder showed linearity of mean dose R2= 0.04. It was found that the dose change of PTV was larger than that of bladder according to the change of bladder volume.

  6. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

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    ... Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Research Network Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium Get Involved Ways to ... us? Who we are The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) is a community of patients, caregivers, survivors, ...

  7. Interfractional variation in bladder volume and its impact on cervical cancer radiotherapy: Clinical significance of portable bladder scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huanli; Jin, Fu; Yang, Dingyi; Wang, Ying; Li, Chao; Guo, Mingfang; Ran, Xueqi; Liu, Xianfeng; Zhou, Qi; Wu, Yongzhong

    2016-07-01

    A constant bladder volume (BV) is essential to direct the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors with precision. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in BV and their impact on cervical cancer RT and to assess the clinical significance of a portable bladder scanner (BS) in achieving a constant BV. A standard bladder phantom (133 ml) and measurements of actual urine volume were both used as benchmarks to evaluate the accuracy of the BS. Comparisons of BS with computed tomography (CT), cone-beam CT (CBCT), and an ultrasound diagnostic device (iU22) were made. Twenty-two consecutive patients with cervical cancer treated with external beam radical RT were divided into an experimental group (13 patients) and a control group (9 patients). In the experimental group, the BV was measured multiple times by BS pre-RT until it was consistent with that found by planning CT. Then a CBCT was performed. The BV was measured again immediately post-RT, after which the patient's urine was collected and recorded. In the control group, CBCT only was performed pre-RT. Interfractional changes in BV and their impact on cervical cancer RT were investigated in both groups. The time of bladder filling was also recorded and analyzed. In measuring the volume of the standard bladder phantom, the BS deviated by 1.4% in accuracy. The difference between the measurements of the BS and the iU22 had no statistical significance (linear correlation coefficient 0.96, P affected the target position in the superior-inferior (SI) direction but had little or no effect in the anterior-posterior and right-left directions. Based on the collected data, the target displacement in the SI direction was reduced from 2.0 to 0.4 mm, while the CTV-to-PTV (CTV: clinical target volume; PTV: planning target volume) margin in the SI direction was reduced from 11.1 to 6.4 mm. The BV increased by 3.7 ± 1.0 ml/min (range, 1.7-4.7 ml/min), which depended on the amount of water ingested by the patient (R = 0.96, P

  8. Hereditary bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    First degree relatives of patients with bladder cancer have a two-fold increased risk of bladder cancer but high-risk bladder cancer families are extremely rare. There is no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern that can explain the increased familial risk. This makes classical linkage studies for the

  9. Evaluating Variations of Bladder Volume Using an Ultrasound Scanner in Rectal Cancer Patients during Chemoradiation: Is Protocol-Based Full Bladder Maintenance Using a Bladder Scanner Useful to Maintain the Bladder Volume?: e0128791

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong In Yoon; Yoonsun Chung; Jee Suk Chang; Joo Yong Lee; Soo Jung Park; Woong Sub Koom

    2015-01-01

      Purpose The maintenance of full bladder is important to reduce radiation-induced toxicities and maintain the therapeutic consistency in locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  11. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  12. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

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    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    possibility with long-term administration, the dose should be decreased to 16,000 IU after 3 years. High doses of beta-carotene should be avoided based on a large clinical trial reporting a 25% increase in the number of cases of prostate cancer and a statistically significant increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Vitamin B6 has been studied in several clinical trials in bladder cancer. The US-based Veterans Administration cooperative study found benefit for vitamin B6 when given as a single agent. Data for vitamins C and E are insufficient to recommend either agent as stand-alone treatment. Nonetheless, each of these vitamins is known to have beneficial effects, including improved function of the immune system. It is possible that only a small percentage of patients with bladder cancer respond to vitamins B6, C, or E, yet each is safe, nontoxic, and inexpensive. In an effort to pool the efficacy of individual agents and to increase the power of study, the authors evaluated the combination of vitamins A, B6, C, and E in a double-blind trial. The observed 50% 5-year reduction in tumor recurrence was highly significant and greater than would be expected for any of the individual ingredients and suggests that combinations of nutritional agents may be most appropriate. A large-volume study along similar lines is being conducted. Among the numerous other compounds and dietary substances purported to have chemopreventive effect, soybeans, garlic, and green tea stand out as having the greatest promise and can freely be recommended to patients. For synthetically synthesized agents such as celecoxib, piroxicam, or DFMO, recommendations must be deferred until the results of clinical trials are conclusively in favor of their use. Many of the dietary factors found to be protective against bladder cancer are being investigated in other cancers and are beneficial to general health. Although naturally occurring nutrients are ideal, especially because the delicate balance of various

  13. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Associations Between Travel Distance, Hospital Volume, and Outcomes Following Radical Cystectomy in Patients With Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Leilei; Taylor, Benjamin L; Mamtani, Ronac; Christodouleas, John P; Guzzo, Thomas J

    2018-01-02

    To explore the associations between travel distance, hospital volume, and outcomes following radical cystectomy (RC) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). The 2006 to 2013 National Cancer Database was queried to identify patients with MIBC who underwent RC. Multivariable regressions alternately including travel distance, hospital volume, and both in the models were used. Travel distances and hospital volumes were categorized by quartiles. Outcomes of interest were overall survival and quality-of-care indicators. A total of 6551 patients were included in the final cohort. When only travel distance or hospital volume was included in the multivariable regression model, fourth quartiles of both variables were associated with improved overall survival. When both travel distance and hospital volume were included in the model, only hospital volume was found to be associated with overall survival. Sensitivity analyses with both travel distance and hospital volume considered as continuous variables showed similar results. Patients who underwent RC in high-volume hospitals were more likely to receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, have 10 or more lymph nodes removed, but also had higher odds of surgical delay (>3 months) in the full models adjusting for travel distance. This National Cancer Database-based study suggests that the association between longer travel distance and improved overall survival (distance bias effect) after RC for MIBC is mainly mediated by higher hospital volume. The benefits of having RC at high-volume hospitals may outweigh the potential disadvantages of longer travel distance, which further supports the continued regionalization of RC and cancer care for MIBC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Bladder Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Treatment Bladder Cancer Screening Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends on ...

  16. Bladder volume estimation from electrical impedance tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebusch, Thomas; Nienke, Steffen; Santos, Susana Aguiar; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitous knowledge of bladder volume is of great interest to patients whose perception of bladder volume is impaired. A promising approach to provide frequent bladder volume estimates to the patient are automatic and noninvasive measurements by electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Previous studies have shown a linear correlation of abdominal electrical impedance and bladder volume. In this article, we present two methods to extract a volume estimate from EIT measurements. One method is based on the global impedance from a reconstructed image, the second method is based on a singular value decomposition of the raw voltage measurement vector. A performance evaluation in presence of noise is performed.

  17. Superficial Bladder Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Schenkman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer treatment remains a challenge despite significant improvements in preventing disease progression and improving survival. Intravesical therapy has been used in the management of superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder (i.e. Ta, T1, and carcinoma in situ with specific objectives which include treating existing or residual tumor, preventing recurrence of tumor, preventing disease progression, and prolonging survival. The initial clinical stage and grade remain the main determinant factors in survival regardless of the treatment. Prostatic urethral mucosal involvement with bladder cancer can be effectively treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG intravesical immunotherapy. Intravesical chemotherapy reduces short-term tumor recurrence by about 20%, and long-term recurrence by about 7%, but has not reduced progression or mortality. Presently, BCG immunotherapy remains the most effective treatment and prophylaxis for TCC (Ta, T1, CIS and reduces tumor recurrence, disease progression, and mortality. Interferons, Keyhole-limpet hemocyanin (KLH, bropirimine and Photofrin-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT are under investigation in the management of TCC and early results are encouraging. This review highlights and summarizes the recent advances in therapy for superficial TCC.

  18. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  19. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about the genes and chromosome associated with bladder cancer FGFR3 HRAS RB1 TP53 TSC1 chromosome 9 Related Information ... Radvanyi F. Novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations in bladder cancer previously identified in non-lethal skeletal disorders. Eur ...

  20. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi Jeanet; Nørgaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results...

  1. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuge O

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Oliver Fuge,1 Nikhil Vasdev,1 Paula Allchorne,2 James SA Green2 1Department of Urology, Lister Hospital, Stevenage, UK; 2Department of Urology, Bartshealth NHS Trust, Whipps Cross Rd, London, UK Abstract: It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest

  2. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  3. External Validation and Optimization of International Consensus Clinical Target Volumes for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in Bladder Cancer

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    Reddy, Abhinav V. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christodouleas, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wu, Tianming [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Smith, Norman D.; Steinberg, Gary D. [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: International consensus (IC) clinical target volumes (CTVs) have been proposed to standardize radiation field design in the treatment of patients at high risk of locoregional failure (LRF) after radical cystectomy. The purpose of this study was to externally validate the IC CTVs in a cohort of postsurgical patients followed up for LRF and identify revisions that might improve the IC CTVs' performance. Methods and Materials: Among 334 patients with pT3 to pT4 bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy, LRF developed in 58 (17%), of whom 52 had computed tomography scans available for review. Images with LRF were exported into a treatment planning system, and IC CTVs were contoured and evaluated for adequacy of coverage of each LRF with respect to both the patient and each of 6 pelvic subsites: common iliac (CI) region, obturator region (OR), external and internal iliac region, presacral region, cystectomy bed, or other pelvic site. Revisions to the IC contours were proposed based on the findings. Results: Of the 52 patients with documented LRF, 13 (25%) had LRFs that were outside of the IC CTV involving 17 pelvic subsites: 5 near the CI CTV, 5 near the OR CTV, 1 near the external and internal iliac region, and 6 near the cystectomy bed. The 5 CI failures were located superior to the CTV, and the 5 OR failures were located medial to the CTV. Increasing the superior boundary of the CI to a vessel-based definition of the aortic bifurcation, as well as increasing the medial extension of the OR by an additional 9 mm, decreased the number of patients with LRF outside of the IC CTV to 7 (13%). Conclusions: Modified IC CTVs inclusive of a slight adjustment superiorly for the CI region and medially for the OR may reduce the risk of pelvic failure in patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy.

  4. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose-volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose-volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Perna, Lucia; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro; Fiorino, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose-wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose-volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose-volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80-0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66-0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001).

  6. Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)

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    Huddart, Robert A., E-mail: robert.huddart@icr.ac.uk [Institute of Cancer Research, Royal Marsden NHSFT (National Health Service Foundation Trust) (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Institute of Cancer Research (United Kingdom); Hussain, Syed A. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Jenkins, Peter [Gloucestershire Hospitals NHSFT (United Kingdom); Rawlings, Christine [South Devon Healthcare NHSFT (United Kingdom); Tremlett, Jean [Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals (United Kingdom); Crundwell, Malcolm [Royal Devon and Exeter NHSFT (United Kingdom); Adab, Fawzi A. [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Sheehan, Denise [Royal Devon and Exeter NHSFT (United Kingdom); Syndikus, Isabel [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHSFT (United Kingdom); Hendron, Carey [University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel [Institute of Cancer Research (United Kingdom); James, Nicholas D. [University of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 × 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT − sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval −7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (−12.8%, 14.6%) in the “per-protocol” population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  7. Novel Multisensor Probe for Monitoring Bladder Temperature During Locoregional Chemohyperthermia for Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Technical Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijsen, Debby E.; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Schooneveldt, Gerben; Sijbrands, Jan; Hulshof, Maarten C.; de la Rosette, Jean; de Reijke, Theo M.; Crezee, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose: The effectiveness of locoregional hyperthermia combined with intravesical instillation of mitomycin C to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is currently investigated in clinical trials. Clinically effective locoregional hyperthermia delivery necessitates adequate thermal dosimetry; thus, optimal thermometry methods are needed to monitor accurately the temperature distribution throughout the bladder wall. The aim of the study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of a novel intravesical device (multi-sensor probe) developed to monitor the local bladder wall temperatures during loco-regional C-HT. Materials and Methods: A multisensor thermocouple probe was designed for deployment in the human bladder, using special sensors to cover the bladder wall in different directions. The deployment of the thermocouples against the bladder wall was evaluated with visual, endoscopic, and CT imaging in bladder phantoms, porcine models, and human bladders obtained from obduction for bladder volumes and different deployment sizes of the probe. Finally, porcine bladders were embedded in a phantom and subjected to locoregional heating to compare probe temperatures with additional thermometry inside and outside the bladder wall. Results: The 7.5 cm thermocouple probe yielded optimal bladder wall contact, adapting to different bladder volumes. Temperature monitoring was shown to be accurate and representative for the actual bladder wall temperature. Conclusions: Use of this novel multisensor probe could yield a more accurate monitoring of the bladder wall temperature during locoregional chemohyperthermia. PMID:24112045

  8. Stages of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through the urethra and leaves the body. Enlarge Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and female urinary system (right panel) showing the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Urine is made in the renal tubules and collects in the renal pelvis of ...

  9. [Surgical treatment of urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Martov, A G; Darenkov, S P; Kamalov, A A; Kudriavtsev, Iu V

    1999-01-01

    Ultrasonic transabdominal and transrectal investigations, computed tomography, endoscopic photodynamic studies, polyfocal biopsy of the urinary bladder were used in examination of 1238 patients which were diagnosed to have urinary bladder cancer. 894 patients underwent transurethral resection of the bladder. Morphologically, cancer of the urinary bladder has an inductory effect on intact parts of the bladder mucosa. This means that even most radical resection does not eliminate grounds for a new tumor growth. Radical cystectomy was performed in diffuse papillomatosis, multiple stage T2 tumors of high-grade malignancy, tumors at stage T3, T4, Nx, MO, in rapid recurrent tumors after conservative or operative treatment.

  10. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  11. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  12. Mitomycin C Intravesical Chemotherapy in Conjunction With Synergo® Radiofrequency-Induced Hyperthermia for Treatment of Carcinoma in Situ Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Unresponsive to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, With or Without Papillary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-04

    Bladder Cancer; Bladder Neoplasm; Bladder Tumors; Cancer of Bladder; Cancer of the Bladder; Malignant Tumor of Urinary Bladder; Neoplasms, Bladder; Urinary Bladder Cancer; Carcinoma in Situ of Bladder; Papillary Carcinoma of Bladder (Diagnosis); BCG-Unresponsive Bladder Cancer

  13. Bladder cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1982-11-01

    A randomized controlled prospective evaluation of intravesical and percutaneous bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy was done in 57 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. In addition, 9 patients at high risk for tumor recurrence were treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin produced a self-limited cystitis and 1 complication (hydronephrosis) of immunotherapy was observed. Of the 57 randomized patients 54 were followed for 3 to 30 months. Tumor recurrence was documented in 13 of 26 controls (50 per cent) and only 6 of 28 patients (21 per cent) treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (p equals 0.027, chi-square). The interval free of disease was prolonged significantly with bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment (p equals 0.014, generalized Wilcoxon test). Importantly, a simple purified protein derivative skin test distinguished those patients who responded to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy from those who did not. Only 1 of 17 treated patients (6 per cent) whose purified protein derivative test converted from negative to positive had tumor recurrence compared to 5 recurrences (38 per cent) among the 13 patients whose test remained negative or had been positive before treatment (p equals 0.022, chi-square). Bacillus Calmette-Guerin was given to 10 patients with stage B transitional cell carcinoma who were not candidates for cystectomy and 7 are free of disease. Of 5 patients with carcinoma in situ 3 remain free of tumor after bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment and 5 of 6 who had multiple recurrences after intravesical chemotherapy responded favorably to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy.

  14. An improved distance-to-dose correlation for predicting bladder and rectum dose-volumes in knowledge-based VMAT planning for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Phillip D. H.; Carver, Robert L.; Fontenot, Jonas D.

    2018-01-01

    The overlap volume histogram (OVH) is an anatomical metric commonly used to quantify the geometric relationship between an organ at risk (OAR) and target volume when predicting expected dose-volumes in knowledge-based planning (KBP). This work investigated the influence of additional variables contributing to variations in the assumed linear DVH-OVH correlation for the bladder and rectum in VMAT plans of prostate patients, with the goal of increasing prediction accuracy and achievability of knowledge-based planning methods. VMAT plans were retrospectively generated for 124 prostate patients using multi-criteria optimization. DVHs quantified patient dosimetric data while OVHs quantified patient anatomical information. The DVH-OVH correlations were calculated for fractional bladder and rectum volumes of 30, 50, 65, and 80%. Correlations between potential influencing factors and dose were quantified using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (R). Factors analyzed included the derivative of the OVH, prescribed dose, PTV volume, bladder volume, rectum volume, and in-field OAR volume. Out of the selected factors, only the in-field bladder volume (mean R  =  0.86) showed a strong correlation with bladder doses. Similarly, only the in-field rectal volume (mean R  =  0.76) showed a strong correlation with rectal doses. Therefore, an OVH formalism accounting for in-field OAR volumes was developed to determine the extent to which it improved the DVH-OVH correlation. Including the in-field factor improved the DVH-OVH correlation, with the mean R values over the fractional volumes studied improving from  ‑0.79 to  ‑0.85 and  ‑0.82 to  ‑0.86 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. A re-planning study was performed on 31 randomly selected database patients to verify the increased accuracy of KBP dose predictions by accounting for bladder and rectum volume within treatment fields. The in-field OVH led to significantly more

  15. An improved distance-to-dose correlation for predicting bladder and rectum dose-volumes in knowledge-based VMAT planning for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Phillip D H; Carver, Robert L; Fontenot, Jonas D

    2017-11-13

    The overlap volume histogram (OVH) is an anatomical metric commonly used to quantify the geometric relationship between an organ at risk (OAR) and target volume when predicting expected dose-volumes in knowledge-based planning (KBP). This work investigated the influence of additional variables contributing to variations in the assumed linear DVH-OVH correlation for the bladder and rectum in VMAT plans of prostate patients, with the goal of increasing prediction accuracy and achievability of knowledge-based planning methods. VMAT plans were retrospectively generated for 124 prostate patients using multi-criteria optimization. DVHs quantified patient dosimetric data while OVHs quantified patient anatomical information. The DVH-OVH correlations were calculated for fractional bladder and rectum volumes of 30, 50, 65, and 80%. Correlation between potential influencing factors and dose were quantified using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (R). Factors analyzed included the derivative of the OVH, prescribed dose, PTV volume, bladder volume, rectum volume, and in-field OAR volume. Out of the selected factors, only the in-field bladder volume (mean R = 0.86) showed a strong correlation with bladder doses. Similarly, only the in-field rectal volume (mean R = 0.76) showed a strong correlation with rectal doses. Therefore, an OVH formalism accounting for in-field OAR volumes was developed to determine the extent to which it improved the DVH-OVH correlation. Including the in-field factor improved the DVH-OVH correlation, with the mean R values over the fractional volumes studied improving from -0.79 to -0.85 and -0.82 to -0.86 for the bladder and rectum, respectively. A re-planning study was performed on 31 randomly selected database patients to verify the increased accuracy of KBP dose predictions by accounting for bladder and rectum dose within treatment fields. The in-field OVH led to significantly more precise and fewer unachievable KBP predictions

  16. Bladder cancer; Cancer de la Vessie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointreau, Y. [Service de radiotherapie, centre regional universitaire de cancerologie Henry-S.-Kaplan CHU de Tours, Hpital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais de Tours, GICC, 37 - Tours (France); CNRS, UMR 6239 -Genetique, Immunotherapie, Chimie et Cancer-, 37 - Tours (France); CHRU de Tours, laboratoire de pharmacologie-toxicologie, 37 - Tours (France); Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, 72 - Le Mans (France); Klotz, S.; Durdux, C. [Service d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Denis, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, 72 - Le Mans (France)

    2010-07-01

    Bladder cancer is an urologic common tumor after prostate carcinoma. Radical treatment of localized invasive tumor is based on cystectomy. Surgical mutilation could be important when Bricker's urinary derivation is performed. Moreover, delayed metastasis frequently appeared in spite of radical surgery. Thus, chemoradiotherapy is a valid alternative treatment to cystectomy for selected patients. Cisplatin or derivatives are usually concurrently administered to radiation therapy up to 60 - 65 Gy. Patients undergo control cystoscopy at mid-time of treatment in order to select responders from non responders. For majority of cases, the empty bladder should be entirely treated with added margins (about 20 mm) to build the PTV. Control assessment could be improved by echography, cone beam imaging as well as bladder fiduciaries implantation before treatment. From a case report, this review summarizes the technical aspects of radiation therapy (GTV, CTV and PTV, organs at risk, planning) and main acute and late related toxicities. (authors)

  17. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-09-27

    To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding author. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  18. HAMLET treatment delays bladder cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hou, Yuchuan; Svensson, Majlis; Holmqvist, Bo; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-04-01

    HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that kills different types of cancer cells. Recently we observed a rapid reduction in human bladder cancer size after intravesical HAMLET treatment. In this study we evaluated the therapeutic effect of HAMLET in the mouse MB49 bladder carcinoma model. Bladder tumors were established by intravesical injection of MB49 cells into poly L-lysine treated bladders of C57BL/6 mice. Treatment groups received repeat intravesical HAMLET instillations and controls received alpha-lactalbumin or phosphate buffer. Effects of HAMLET on tumor size and putative apoptotic effects were analyzed in bladder tissue sections. Whole body imaging was used to study HAMLET distribution in tumor bearing mice compared to healthy bladder tissue. HAMLET caused a dose dependent decrease in MB49 cell viability in vitro. Five intravesical HAMLET instillations significantly decreased tumor size and delayed development in vivo compared to controls. TUNEL staining revealed selective apoptotic effects in tumor areas but not in adjacent healthy bladder tissue. On in vivo imaging Alexa-HAMLET was retained for more than 24 hours in the bladder of tumor bearing mice but not in tumor-free bladders or in tumor bearing mice that received Alexa-alpha-lactalbumin. Results show that HAMLET is active as a tumoricidal agent and suggest that topical HAMLET administration may delay bladder cancer development. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Elective bladder-sparing treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendínez-Cano, G; Rico-López, J; Moreno, S; Fernández Parra, E; González-Almeida, C; Camacho Martínez, E

    2014-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localised muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We offer a bladder-sparing treatment with TURB +/- Chemotherapy+Radiotherapy to selected patients as an alternative. We analyze, retrospectively, 30 patients diagnosed with MIBC from March 1991 to October 2010. The mean age was 62.7 years (51-74). All patients were candidates for a curative treatment, and underwent strict selection criteria: T2 stage, primary tumor, solitary lesion smaller than 5cm with a macroscopic disease-free status after TURB, negative random biopsy without hydronephrosis. Staging CT evaluation was normal. Restaging TURB or tumor bed biopsy showed a disease-free status or microscopic muscle invasion. 14 patients underwent TURB alone, 13 TURB+Chemotherapy and 3 TURB+Chemotherapy+Radiotherapy. The mean follow up was 88.7 months (19-220). 14 patients remained disease free (46.6%), 10 had recurrent non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (33%). 81.3% complete clinical response. 71% bladder preserved at 5-years. Overall, 5-years survival rate was 79% and 85% cancer-specific survival rate. Although radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localised MIBC, in strictly selected cases, bladder-sparing treatment offers an alternative with good long term results. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  1. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Julie

    2007-11-01

    flow within the tumoral area. In addition, NIRF studies of Gd-Cy5.5 confirmed its temporal distribution between CD31-positive blood vessels and LYVE-1 positive lymphatic vessels. Conclusion SV40-lacZ mice permit the visualization of lymphatics during bladder cancer progression. Gd-Cy5.5, as a double contrast agent for NIRF and MRI, permits to quantify delivery, transport rates, and volumes of macromolecular fluid flow through the interstitial-lymphatic continuum. Our results open the path for the study of lymphatic activity in vivo and in real time, and support the role of lymphangiogenesis during bladder cancer progression.

  2. NOTCH pathway inactivation promotes bladder cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraver, Antonio; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Cash, Timothy P.; Mendez-Pertuz, Marinela; Dueñas, Marta; Maietta, Paolo; Martinelli, Paola; Muñoz-Martin, Maribel; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Cañamero, Marta; Roncador, Giovanna; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Grivas, Dimitrios; de la Pompa, Jose Luis; Valencia, Alfonso; Paramio, Jesús M.; Real, Francisco X.; Serrano, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    NOTCH signaling suppresses tumor growth and proliferation in several types of stratified epithelia. Here, we show that missense mutations in NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 found in human bladder cancers result in loss of function. In murine models, genetic ablation of the NOTCH pathway accelerated bladder tumorigenesis and promoted the formation of squamous cell carcinomas, with areas of mesenchymal features. Using bladder cancer cells, we determined that the NOTCH pathway stabilizes the epithelial phenotype through its effector HES1 and, consequently, loss of NOTCH activity favors the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Evaluation of human bladder cancer samples revealed that tumors with low levels of HES1 present mesenchymal features and are more aggressive. Together, our results indicate that NOTCH serves as a tumor suppressor in the bladder and that loss of this pathway promotes mesenchymal and invasive features. PMID:25574842

  3. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Agrawal, Sachin; Bläckberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has evolved from the first reports on bladder endoscopy and transurethral resection to the introduction of adjuvant intravesical treatment. However, disease recurrence and progression remain an ongoing risk, placing a heavy burden...

  4. Tetrachloroethylene exposure and bladder cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Straif, Kurt; Ruder, Avima

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified tetrachloroethylene, used in the production of chemicals and the primary solvent used in dry cleaning, as "probably carcinogenic to humans" based on limited evidence of an increased risk of bladder cancer in dry...... cleaners. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the epidemiological evidence for the association between tetrachloroethylene exposure and bladder cancer from published studies estimating occupational exposure to tetrachloroethylene or in workers in the dry-cleaning industry. METHODS: Random-effects meta-analyses were......-analysis demonstrates an increased risk of bladder cancer in dry cleaners, reported in both cohort and case-control studies, and some evidence for an exposure-response relationship. Although dry cleaners incur mixed exposures, tetrachloroethylene could be responsible for the excess risk of bladder cancer because...

  5. Occupational variation in incidence of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; MacLeod, Jill; Demers, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare occupational variation of the risk of bladder cancer in the Nordic countries and Canada. Methods: In the Nordic Occupational Cancer study (NOCCA), 73 653 bladder cancer cases were observed during follow-up of 141.6 million person......-years. In the Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC), 8170 cases were observed during the follow-up of 36.7 million person-years. Standardised incidence ratios with 95% CI were estimated for 53 occupations in the NOCCA cohort and HR with 95% CIs were estimated for 42 occupations in the CanCHEC. Results......: Elevated risks of bladder cancer were observed among hairdressers, printers, sales workers, plumbers, painters, miners and laundry workers. Teachers and agricultural workers had reduced risk of bladder cancer in both cohorts. Chimney-sweeps, tobacco workers and waiters had about 1.5-fold risk in the Nordic...

  6. Comparison of adaptive radiotherapy techniques for external radiation therapy of canine bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieset, Jessica R; Harmon, Joseph F; Johnson, Thomas E; Larue, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Daily bladder variations make it difficult to utilize standard radiotherapy as a primary treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Our purpose was to develop a model comparing dose distributions of image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy (ART) techniques for canine bladder cancer. Images were obtained retrospectively from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans used for daily positioning of four dogs undergoing fractionated image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Four different treatment plans were modeled for each dog, and dosimetric data were compared. Two plans were developed using planning target volumes based on planning computed tomography (CT) bladder volume. These plans then used bony anatomy or soft tissue anatomy for daily positioning and dosimetric modeling. The third plan type was a hybrid IGRT and ART technique utilizing a library of premade anisotropic planning target volumes using bladder wall motion data and selection of a "plan-of-the-day" determined from positioning CBCT bladder volumes. The fourth plan was an ART technique that constructed a new planning target volume each day based on daily bladder volume as determined by pretreatment CBCT. Dose volume histograms were generated for each plan type and dose distribution for the bladder and rectum were compared between plan types. Irradiated rectal volume decreased and irradiated bladder volume increased as plan conformality increased. ART provided the greatest rectal sparing, with lowest irradiated rectal volume (P radiotherapy techniques for canine bladder cancer showed significant reduction in rectal volume irradiated when compared to nonadaptive techniques, while maintaining appropriate bladder coverage. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  7. Narrow band imaging for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Y. Hsueh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Narrow band imaging (NBI is a newly developed technology aiming to provide additional endoscopic information for patients with bladder cancer. This review focuses on the diagnostic accuracy and treatment outcome using NBI cystoscopy for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Current results showed improved sensitivity of NBI cystoscopy compared to conventional white light cystoscopy, although lower specificity and increased false-positive results were reported using NBI cystoscopy. The treatment outcome using NBI technology in transurethral resection of bladder tumor had a positive impact while decreased number of residual tumors and tumor recurrence at follow-up were reported. In the future, the application of NBI technology might refine the treatment and follow-up protocol in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. However, this large scale prospective studies are required to confirm the real cost-effectiveness of this new technology.

  8. Chemoimmunotherapy of murine bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L; Livingston, R B

    1981-11-01

    The lethality of invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) has prompted a search for effective, minimally toxic, adjuvant therapy. Such agents were evaluated in a murine bladder cancer (MBT2) model which parallels the clinical disease. One hundred C3H/He mice were inoculated i.d. with 2.5 x 10(4) viable MBT2 tumor cells and randomized to receive either normal saline (control), cis-Platinum (CPT), cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), BCG, (CY + MTX), or (CY + MTX + BCG). Chemotherapy was given intraperitoneally weekly starting on day 7 after inoculation. Immunotherapy was given intralesionally on days 1 and 10 only. All mice were treated for 5 weeks followed by 5 weeks of observation. At 5 weeks, tumors of mice receiving cyclophosphamide alone or either of the combinations of therapy were smaller (P less than 0.01) than tumors of controls or other single agents alone. Each regimen increased survival, but only the combination regimen increase survival significantly (P less than 0.01). In the doses and schedule used in this model. Combination chemotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy significantly delay tumor growth and increase duration of survival (P less than 0.01) when compared with controls or single agent groups.

  9. Progress in Personalizing Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum-based chemotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer. However, there are currently no methods to predict chemotherapy response in this disease setting. A better understanding of the biology of bladder cancer has led to developments of molecular biomarkers that may help guide clinical decision making. These biomarkers, while promising, have not yet been validated in prospective trials and are not ready for clinical applications. As alkylating agents, platinum drugs kill cancer cells mainly through induction of DNA damage. A microdosing approach is currently being tested to determine if chemoresistance can be identified by measuring platinum-induced DNA damage using highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry technology. The hope is that these emerging strategies will help pave the road towards personalized therapy in advanced bladder cancer.

  10. Management of Bladder Cancer After Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirdag, C; Citgez, S; Talat, Z; Onal, B

    2017-03-01

    In renal transplant recipients, the risk of developing bladder cancer and rate of diagnosis of advanced staged bladder cancer are generally higher than the general population. Also, it is more challenging to treat renal transplant recipients than the regular patient population. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of radical cystectomy (RC) and urinary diversion with ileal conduit in renal transplant recipients. We identified 2 patients with prior history of renal transplantation who underwent RC and ileal conduit urinary diversion for bladder cancer. Preoperative clinical and demographic data were presented and outcomes were assessed. The RC and ileal conduit urinary diversion were performed in the first patient 56 months after renal transplantation and in the second patient 64 months after renal transplantation. Clinical staging was high-grade T2 transitional cell cancer of the bladder for patient 1 and T2 with pure squamous cell cancer of the bladder for patient 2. No perioperative or postoperative complication and no graft dysfunction occurred in either patient. Our experience demonstrated that RC with ileal conduit reconstruction in renal transplant recipients is safe and feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Epigenetics of Kidney Cancer and Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Amanda M.; Cairns, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Summary This review focuses on the epigenetic alterations of aberrant promoter hypermethylation of genes, histone modifications or RNA interference in cancer cells. The current knowledge of hypermethylation of allele(s) in classical tumor suppressor genes in inherited and sporadic cancer, candidate tumor suppressor and other cancer genes is summarized gene by gene. Global and array-based studies of tumor cell hypermethylation are discussed. The importance of standardization of scoring of the methylation status of a gene is highlighted. The histone marks associated with hypermethylated genes, and the microRNAs with dysregulated expression, in kidney or bladder tumor cells are also discussed. Kidney cancer has the highest mortality rate of the genitourinary cancers. There are management issues with the high recurrence rate of superficial bladder cancer while muscle invasive bladder cancer has a poor prognosis. These clinical problems are the basis for translational application of gene hypermethylation to the diagnosis and prognosis of kidney and bladder cancer. PMID:22126150

  12. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia Maria Tullia

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram...

  13. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  14. Tobacco smoking and risk of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    Tobacco smoking is the main known cause of urinary bladder cancer in humans. In most populations, over half of cases in men and a sizeable proportion in women are attributable to this habit. Epidemiological studies conducted in different populations have shown a linear relationship between intensity and duration of smoking and risk. Quitting smoking reduces the risk of bladder cancer. Smoking black (air-cured) cigarettes results in a higher risk than smoking blond (flue-cured) tobacco cigarettes; results on inhalation patterns and use of filter are not consistent. Cigar and pipe smoking also increases the risk of bladder cancer; data on other tobacco products are limited. The evidence for non-transitional bladder carcinoma is limited, but consistent with an increased risk. The available evidence does not point towards a different carcinogenic effect of tobacco smoking in men and women or in whites and blacks. Data on involuntary smoke and use of smokeless tobacco products are limited, but do not suggest an increased risk of bladder cancer.

  15. Thulium laser treatment for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent innovations in thulium laser techniques have allowed application in the treatment of bladder cancer. Laser en bloc resection of bladder cancer is a transurethral procedure that may offer an alternative to the conventional transurethral resection procedure. We conducted a review of basic thulium laser physics and laser en bloc resection procedures and summarized the current clinical literature with a focus on complications and outcomes. Literature evidence suggests that thulium laser techniques including smooth incision, tissue vaporization, and en bloc resection represent feasible, safe, and effective procedures in the treatment of bladder cancer. Moreover, these techniques allow improved specimen orientation and accurate determination of invasion depth, facilitating correct diagnosis, restaging, and re-evaluation of the need for a second resection. Nonetheless, large-scale multicentre studies with longer follow-up are warranted for a robust assessment. The present review is meant as a quick reference for urologists.

  16. Extensive xanthogranulomatous cystitis mimicking bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomatous cystitis (XC is a rare benign disease of unknown etiology. A 39-year-old female presented with 2 month history of urgency, dysuria, lower abdominal mass. On physical examination a hard hypogastric mass was present fixed to the rectus muscle. Computerized tomography (CT abdomen showed heterogeneous enhancing mass arising from the anterior bladder wall with infiltration of the overlying parietal wall. Cystoscopy revealed extensive growth involving the entire wall of the bladder. A biopsy showed cystitis with focal areas suggestive of urothelial neoplasia of unknown malignant potential. Suspecting bladder cancer, we proceeded with radical cystectomy with ileal conduit. Histopathology revealed cystitis cystica with XC of the entire bladder. This is, to our knowledge, the first time that a case has been found to be so extensive with infiltration of the parietal wall and second time that radical cystectomy has been performed for XC.

  17. Targeting glycogen metabolism in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritterson Lew, Carolyn; Guin, Sunny; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Metabolism has been a heavily investigated topic in cancer research for the past decade. Although the role of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) in cancer has been extensively studied, abnormalities in other metabolic pathways are only just being understood in cancer. One such pathway is glycogen metabolism; its involvement in cancer development, particularly in urothelial malignancies, and possible ways of exploiting aberrations in this process for treatment are currently being studied. New research shows that the glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL) is a novel tumour suppressor in bladder cancer. Loss of AGL leads to rapid proliferation of bladder cancer cells. Another enzyme involved in glycogen debranching, glycogen phosphorylase, has been shown to be a tumour promoter in cancer, including in prostate cancer. Studies demonstrate that bladder cancer cells in which AGL expression is lost are more metabolically active than cells with intact AGL expression, and these cells are more sensitive to inhibition of both glycolysis and glycine synthesis--two targetable pathways. As a tumour promoter and enzyme, glycogen phosphorylase can be directly targeted, and preclinical inhibitor studies are promising. However, few of these glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors have been tested for cancer treatment in the clinical setting. Several possible limitations to the targeting of AGL and glycogen phosphorylase might also exist.

  18. THE MOLECULAR PATHOGENESIS OF BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nemtsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review describes the current views on urothelial carcinoma carcinogenesis. Based on the up-todate genetic studies, molecular pathways determining the development of superficial and invasive bladder cancers are considered. It was demonstrated that the development of noninvasive bladder tumors occurred predominantly through oncogenes activation, while the genesis of invasive cancer is based on inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Principal mechanisms of multiple and recurrent bladder tumors development are discussed including its monoclonal and oligoclonal models.One of the most promising nowadays approaches is the determination of new generation markers, such as molecular genetic abnormalities in the hereditary apparatus of the cell underlying its malignant transformation. Molecular markers' panels used for diagnostics, prognosis, and monitoring of urothelial carcinoma patients are analyzed.

  19. General Information about Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through the urethra and leaves the body. Enlarge Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and female urinary system (right panel) showing the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Urine is made in the renal tubules and collects in the renal pelvis of ...

  20. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X chr...

  1. Cofilin 1 promotes bladder cancer and is regulated by TCF7L2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Housheng; He, Fengrong; Xu, Congjie; Zhou, Jiaquan; Li, Daoyuan; Li, Guoping; Xu, Jianbing; Wu, Qinghui; Chen, Jianxiang; Su, Liangju; Wang, Weifu; Zhang, Shufang

    2017-01-01

    Earlier reports demonstrated that Cofilin expression is increased in bladder cancer samples, though its function remains unknown. Here, we found that Cofilin 1 expression was higher in bladder cancer tissues than in paracancerous tissues. Overexpression of Cofilin 1 promoted, while Cofilin 1 knockdown inhibited, proliferation, migration, and invasion in the T24 and RT4 bladder cancer cell lines. In addition, Cofilin 1 overexpression increased, while Cofilin 1 knockdown decreased, bladder tumor volumes in mouse xenograft experiments. Transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) targeted the promoter of the Cofilin 1 gene, and TCF7L2 knockdown or mutations in the Cofilin 1 promoter dramatically decreased Cofilin 1 transcription. TCF7L2 promoted cell proliferation and migration and increased Cofilin 1 protein levels in RT4 and T24 cells. Thus, TCF7L2 contributed to Cofilin 1-induced promotion of bladder cancer development by binding to the Cofilin 1 promoter and increasing its expression. PMID:29190896

  2. Quality of Life Outcomes for Bladder Cancer Patients Undergoing Bladder Preservation with Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael A; Goenka, Anuj

    2015-11-01

    For patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, the decision to undergo radical cystectomy or bladder preservation treatment must incorporate survival differences, toxicity, and quality of life. Our objective was to review patient-reported outcomes for bladder preservation treatment with a focus on patients eligible for radical cystectomy, for whom a comparison of patient-reported outcomes is most relevant. Peer-reviewed, English-language manuscripts in MEDLINE and PubMed databases were examined from 1996 through 2014. Subject headings included quality of life, bladder cancer, bladder sparing, bladder preservation, radiation, and radiotherapy. Prospective and retrospective studies of patient-reported outcomes in patients undergoing bladder preservation with radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Two prospective studies and four retrospective studies were identified. Several weaknesses from these studies were identified including small sample sizes, variable time points of assessment, variation in treatment regimens, and failure to use validated or condition-specific questionnaires. From the available data, bladder preservation appears to result to similar or better general quality of life compared to radical cystectomy with satisfactory urinary and sexual function reported in most series. In general, bladder preservation resulted in more gastrointestinal symptoms than radical cystectomy. This is one of the first reviews on the subject of patient-reported outcomes for bladder preservation in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Although the data are limited, this review may provide a framework for developing well-designed, prospective comparisons of treatment for this patient cohort.

  3. Impact of proteomics on bladder cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, Julio E; Gromova, Irina; Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    Detecting bladder cancer at an early stage and predicting how a tumor will behave and act in response to therapy, as well as the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention, are among the main areas of research that will benefit from the current explosion in the number of powerful...

  4. Screening for Bladder and Other Urothelial Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer is the focus of this summary. Enlarge Anatomy of the male urinary system (left panel) and female urinary system (right panel) showing the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Urine is made in the renal tubules and collects in the renal pelvis of ...

  5. Bladder cancer: molecular determinants of personalized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cheng, Liang; Moch, Holger; Scarpelli, Marina; Reymundo, Carlos; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular and genetic studies have provided new perspectives on the histologic classification of bladder tumors. Recent developments in the field of molecular mutational pathway analyses based on next generation sequencing technology together with classic data derived from the description of mutations in the FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3) gene, mutations on TP53 gene, and cDNA technology profiling data gives support to a differentiated taxonomy of bladder cancer. All these changes are behind the use of non-traditional approach to therapy of bladder cancer patients and are ready to change our daily practice of uro-oncology. The observed correlation of some molecular alterations with tumor behavior and the identification of their targets at cellular level might support the use of molecular changes together with morphological data to develop new clinical and biological strategies to manage patients with urothelial cancer. The current review provides comprehensive data to support personalized therapy for bladder cancer based on an integrated approach including pathologic and clinical features and molecular biology.

  6. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphisms at Familial Bladder Cancer: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Ceylan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the seventh most common cancer in men in the world, it is the second most seen cancer after lung cancer and the first in urogenital tumours in Turkey. Many molecular epidemiologic studies have been reported to investigate the associations between the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and bladder cancer risk. In this report, a family with transitional bladder cancer have also MTHFR A1298C heterozygosity which supports the association between MTHFR variants and bladder cancer. This %uFB01nding should be further validated by prospective and larger studies with more diverse ethnic groups.

  7. Bladder Cancer: A Simple Model Becomes Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Giovanni Battista Di; Gulia, Caterina; Cristini, Cristiano; Fraietta, Giorgio; Marini, Lorenzo; Grande, Pietro; Gentile, Vincenzo; Piergentili, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in developed countries and it is also characterized by a high number of recurrences. Despite this, several authors in the past reported that only two altered molecular pathways may genetically explain all cases of bladder cancer: one involving the FGFR3 gene, and the other involving the TP53 gene. Mutations in any of these two genes are usually predictive of the malignancy final outcome. This cancer may also be further classified as low-grade tumors, which is always papillary and in most cases superficial, and high-grade tumors, not necessarily papillary and often invasive. This simple way of considering this pathology has strongly changed in the last few years, with the development of genome-wide studies on expression profiling and the discovery of small non-coding RNA affecting gene expression. An easy search in the OMIM (On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man) database using “bladder cancer” as a query reveals that genes in some way connected to this pathology are approximately 150, and some authors report that altered gene expression (up- or down-regulation) in this disease may involve up to 500 coding sequences for low-grade tumors and up to 2300 for high-grade tumors. In many clinical cases, mutations inside the coding sequences of the above mentioned two genes were not found, but their expression changed; this indicates that also epigenetic modifications may play an important role in its development. Indeed, several reports were published about genome-wide methylation in these neoplastic tissues, and an increasing number of small non-coding RNA are either up- or down-regulated in bladder cancer, indicating that impaired gene expression may also pass through these metabolic pathways. Taken together, these data reveal that bladder cancer is far to be considered a simple model of malignancy. In the present review, we summarize recent progress in the genome-wide analysis of bladder cancer, and analyse non

  8. Mechanisms of disease: The epidemiology of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelucchi, Claudio; Bosetti, Cristina; Negri, Eva; Malvezzi, Matteo; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2006-06-01

    Mortality from bladder cancer has shown downward trends over the last 2 decades in several western European countries (albeit 10-15 years later than similar trends in the US), but is still increasing in some eastern European countries. Tobacco smoking and occupational exposure to aromatic amines are the two major established environmental risk factors for bladder cancer. Controlling exposure to these factors has been an important contributor to the reduction in bladder cancer mortality, particularly among men. Diet could influence bladder carcinogenesis, as many compounds contained in foods--and their metabolites--are excreted through the urinary tract. Fruit and vegetable consumption was inversely related with bladder cancer in many studies, but no consistent association has emerged between intake of related micronutrients and reduced risk of bladder cancer. Other widely investigated lifestyle habits are probably not associated with risk of developing bladder cancer (e.g. coffee consumption, artificial sweetener use, hair dyes) or are difficult to assess (e.g. fluid intake). Infections and stones in the urinary tract might cause chronic irritation of the bladder epithelium, and thus increase bladder cancer risk. First-degree relatives of bladder cancer patients have a 50-100% increased relative risk of developing the disease, a risk that could be even higher when the proband is diagnosed at an early age.

  9. Cytotoxic and toxicogenomic effects of silibinin in bladder cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silibinin is a natural phenol found in the seeds of the milk thistle plant. Recent data have shown its effectiveness forpreventing/treating bladder tumours. Therefore, in this study we investigated the cytotoxic and toxicogenetic activityof silibinin in bladder cancer cells with different TP53 statuses. Two bladder urothelial ...

  10. Cytotoxic and toxicogenomic effects of silibinin in bladder cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-16

    Dec 16, 2016 ... Silibinin is a natural phenol found in the seeds of the milk thistle plant. Recent data have shown its effectiveness for preventing/treating bladder tumours. Therefore, in this study we investigated the cytotoxic and toxicogenetic activity of silibinin in bladder cancer cells with different TP53 statuses. Two bladder ...

  11. Dietary factors associated with bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika Piyathilake

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is biologically plausible for dietary factors to influence bladder cancer risk considering that beneficial as well as harmful components of a diet are excreted through the urinary tract and in direct contact with the epithelium of the bladder. However, studies that investigated the association between dietary factors and bladder cancer (BC risk have largely reported inconsistent results. The macronutrient intake and risk of BC could have yield inconsistent results across studies because of lack of details on the type, source and the quantities of different dietary fatty acids consumed. There is evidence to suggest that consumption of processed meat may increase BC risk. Dietary carbohydrate intake does not appear to be directly associated with BC risk. Even though a large number of studies have investigated the association between fruit/vegetable consumption/micronutrients in those and BC risk, they have yielded inconsistent results. Gender-specific subgroup analysis, details of how fruits and vegetables are consumed (raw vs. cooked, adequate control for smoking status/aggressiveness of the cancer and consideration of genetic make-up may clarify these inconsistent results. There is no strong evidence to suggest that supplementation with any common micronutrient is effective in reducing BC risk. These limitations in published research however do not totally eclipse the observation that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables and low in processed meat along with especially smoking cessation may convey some protective effects against BC risk.

  12. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    chemotherapy. Systemic cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is the only current modality that has been shown in phase 3 trials to improve survival in responsive patients with advanced urothelial cancer. A panel of international experts has formulated grade A through D recommendations for the management......To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review...... the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed...

  13. Pad-weighing test performed with standardized bladder volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lose, G; Rosenkilde, P; Gammelgaard, J

    1988-01-01

    with a standardized bladder volume (50% of the cystometric bladder capacity). Twenty-five female patients with stress or mixed incontinence underwent two separate tests. Test-retest results were highly correlated (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001). Nonetheless, analysis of test-retest differences revealed a variation up...... to +/- 24 g between two tests. It is concluded that this setup (i.e., standardized bladder volume) of the one-hour pad-weighing test allows for a more reliable assessment of urinary incontinence for quantitative purposes.......The result of the one-hour pad-weighing test proposed by the International Continence Society has been demonstrated to depend on the urine load during the test. To increase reproducibility of the pad-weighing test by minimizing the influence of variation in urine load the test was done...

  14. Loss of Cell Differentiation in HPV-Associated Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, D A; Ermilova, V D; Zavalishina, L E; Andreeva, Yu Yu; Matveev, V B; Frank, G A; Volgareva, G M

    2016-05-01

    Medical histories of 101 urothelial bladder cancer patients were compared with the results of morphological analysis and biomolecular detection of human papilloma viruses (HPV) in the tumor specimens. DNA of HPV16 (the major type of virus responsible for appearance of cervical carcinoma) was detected in 38 specimens, while mRNA of E6 and E7 oncogenes and E7 oncoprotein of HPV16 were observed in 13 specimens. HPV-positive bladder cancer was characterized by higher degree of cell anaplasia than HPV-negative cancer; in the primary bladder tumor, HPV was detected more often than in recurrent bladder cancer. These data attest to involvement of HPV16 in the genesis of bladder cancer. No correlations of HPV status of bladder tumor with patient's sex, age, and invasion into the muscle layer were revealed.

  15. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  16. Targeting canine bladder transitional cell carcinoma with a human bladder cancer-specific ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine if a human bladder cancer-specific peptide named PLZ4 can target canine bladder cancer cells. Experimental Design The binding of PLZ4 to five established canine invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC cell lines and to normal canine bladder urothelial cells was determined using the whole cell binding assay and an affinitofluorescence assay. The WST-8 assay was performed to determine whether PLZ4 affected cell viability. In vivo tumor-specific homing/targeting property and biodistribution of PLZ4 was performed in a mouse xenograft model via tail vein injection and was confirmed with ex vivo imaging. Results PLZ4 exhibited high affinity and specific dose-dependent binding to canine bladder TCC cell lines, but not to normal canine urothelial cells. No significant changes in cell viability or proliferation were observed upon incubation with PLZ4. The in vivo and ex vivo optical imaging study showed that, when linked with the near-infrared fluorescent dye Cy5.5, PLZ4 substantially accumulated at the canine bladder cancer foci in the mouse xenograft model as compared to the control. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance PLZ4 can specifically bind to canine bladder cancer cells. This suggests that the preclinical studies of PLZ4 as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic agent can be performed in dogs with naturally occurring bladder cancer, and that PLZ4 can possibly be developed in the management of canine bladder cancer.

  17. Noninvasive Evaluation of Bladder Wall Mechanical Properties as a Function of Filling Volume: Potential Application in Bladder Compliance Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Nenadic

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method to monitor bladder wall mechanical properties as a function of filling volume, with the potential application to bladder compliance assessment. The proposed ultrasound bladder vibrometry (UBV method uses ultrasound to excite and track Lamb waves on the bladder wall from which its mechanical properties are derived by fitting measurements to an analytical model. Of particular interest is the shear modulus of bladder wall at different volumes, which we hypothesize, is similar to measuring the compliance characteristics of the bladder.Three experimental models were used: 1 an ex vivo porcine model where normal and aberrant (stiffened by formalin bladders underwent evaluation by UBV; 2 an in vivo study to evaluate the performance of UBV on patients with clinically documented compliant and noncompliant bladders undergoing UDS; and 3 a noninvasive UBV protocol to assess bladder compliance using oral hydration and fractionated voiding on three healthy volunteers.The ex vivo studies showed a high correlation between the UBV parameters and direct pressure measurement (R2 = 0.84-0.99. A similar correlation was observed for 2 patients with compliant and noncompliant bladders (R2 = 0.89-0.99 undergoing UDS detrusor pressure-volume measurements. The results of UBV on healthy volunteers, performed without catheterization, were comparable to a compliant bladder patient.The utility of UBV as a method to monitor changes in bladder wall mechanical properties is validated by the high correlation with pressure measurements in ex vivo and in vivo patient studies. High correlation UBV and UDS in vivo studies demonstrated the potential of UBV as a bladder compliance assessment tool. Results of studies on healthy volunteers with normal bladders demonstrated that UBV could be performed noninvasively. Further studies on a larger cohort are needed to fully validate the use of UBV as a clinical tool for bladder compliance assessment.

  18. The prognostic significance of DAPK1 in bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Yun Xie

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in men, however, there was only limited effective treatment for invasive bladder cancer. DAPK1 has been shown to play important role in apoptosis and autophagy to suppress cancer progression. Previous results have shown that DAPK1 promoter was hypermethylated in the majority of bladder cancer specimens, however, the prognostic significance of DAPK1 in bladder cancer has yet to be demonstrated. In the present study, we found that DAPK1 expression was negatively associated with tumor stage and a low level expression of DAPK1 in bladder cancer specimens were associated with shorter survival in bladder cancer patients in 3 independent bladder cancer datasets (n = 462. Further investigation showed that FGFR3 knockdown resulted in downregulation of DAPK1 in bladder cancer cell line, suggesting that FGFR3 may be an upstream factor of DAPK1. Further analysis of the 3 independent bladder cancer datasets have identified ACOX1, UPK2, TRAK1, PLEKHG6 and MT1X genes had their expression significantly correlated with that of DAPK1. Knockdown of DAPK1 in bladder cancer T24 cells resulted in downregulation of ACOX1, UPK2 and TRAK1. Interestingly, TRAK1, by itself, was a favorable prognostic marker in the 3 independent bladder cancer datasets. Importantly, by using connectivity mapping with DAPK1-associated gene signature, we found that vemurafenib and trametinib could possibly reverse DAPK1-associated gene signature, suggesting that inhibition of Raf/MEK pathway may be a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer. Indeed, treatment of vemurafenib in T24 bladder cancer cells resulted in upregulation of DAPK1 confirming our connectivity mapping, while knockdown of DAPK1 resulted in reduced sensitivity towards inhibition of Braf signaling by vemurafenib. Together, our results suggest that DAPK1 is an important prognostic marker and therapeutic target for bladder cancer and have identified

  19. The prognostic significance of DAPK1 in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian-Yun; Chen, Peng-Chen; Zhang, Jia-Li; Gao, Ze-Shou; Neves, Henrique; Zhang, Shu-Dong; Wen, Qing; Chen, Wei-Dong; Kwok, Hang Fai; Lin, Yao

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in men, however, there was only limited effective treatment for invasive bladder cancer. DAPK1 has been shown to play important role in apoptosis and autophagy to suppress cancer progression. Previous results have shown that DAPK1 promoter was hypermethylated in the majority of bladder cancer specimens, however, the prognostic significance of DAPK1 in bladder cancer has yet to be demonstrated. In the present study, we found that DAPK1 expression was negatively associated with tumor stage and a low level expression of DAPK1 in bladder cancer specimens were associated with shorter survival in bladder cancer patients in 3 independent bladder cancer datasets (n = 462). Further investigation showed that FGFR3 knockdown resulted in downregulation of DAPK1 in bladder cancer cell line, suggesting that FGFR3 may be an upstream factor of DAPK1. Further analysis of the 3 independent bladder cancer datasets have identified ACOX1, UPK2, TRAK1, PLEKHG6 and MT1X genes had their expression significantly correlated with that of DAPK1. Knockdown of DAPK1 in bladder cancer T24 cells resulted in downregulation of ACOX1, UPK2 and TRAK1. Interestingly, TRAK1, by itself, was a favorable prognostic marker in the 3 independent bladder cancer datasets. Importantly, by using connectivity mapping with DAPK1-associated gene signature, we found that vemurafenib and trametinib could possibly reverse DAPK1-associated gene signature, suggesting that inhibition of Raf/MEK pathway may be a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer. Indeed, treatment of vemurafenib in T24 bladder cancer cells resulted in upregulation of DAPK1 confirming our connectivity mapping, while knockdown of DAPK1 resulted in reduced sensitivity towards inhibition of Braf signaling by vemurafenib. Together, our results suggest that DAPK1 is an important prognostic marker and therapeutic target for bladder cancer and have identified possible therapeutic

  20. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-02

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  1. Real-time bladder volume monitoring by the application of a new implantable bladder volume sensor for a small animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sup Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although real-time monitoring of bladder volume together with intravesical pressure can provide more information for understanding the functional changes of the urinary bladder, it still entails difficulties in the accurate prediction of real-time bladder volume in urodynamic studies with small animal models. We studied a new implantable bladder volume monitoring device with eight rats. During cystometry, microelectrodes prepared by the microelectromechanical systems process were placed symmetrically on both lateral walls of the bladder, and the expanded bladder volume was calculated. Immunohistological study was done after 1 week and after 4 weeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of the microelectrode. From the point that infused saline volume into the bladder was higher than 0.6 mL, estimated bladder volume was statistically correlated with the volume of saline injected (p<0.01. Additionally, the microelectromechanical system microelectrodes used in this study showed reliable biocompatibility. Therefore, the device can be used to evaluate changes in bladder volume in studies with small animals, and it may help to provide more information about functional changes in the bladder in laboratory studies. Furthermore, owing to its biocompatibility, the device could be chronically implanted in conscious ambulating animals, thus allowing a novel longitudinal study to be performed for a specific purpose.

  2. Oncolytic Viruses in the Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle G. Potts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder carcinoma is the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Up to 85% of patients with bladder cancer are diagnosed with a tumor that is limited to the bladder mucosa (Ta, T1, and CIS. These stages are commonly termed as non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Although the treatment of NMIBC has greatly improved in recent years, there is a need for additional therapies when patients fail bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that bladder cancer may be an ideal target for oncolytic viruses engineered to selectively replicate in and lyse tumor cells leaving normal cells unharmed. In support of this hypothesis, here we review current treatment strategies for bladder cancer and their shortcomings, as well as recent advancements in oncolytic viral therapy demonstrating encouraging safety profiles and antitumor activity.

  3. Artificial intelligence and bladder cancer arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, P J; Catto, J W F; Abbod, M F; Linkens, D A; Herr, A; Pilarsky, C; Wissmann, C; Stoehr, R; Denzinger, S; Knuechel, R; Hamdy, F C; Hartmann, A

    2007-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is a heterogenous disease whose management is dependent upon the risk of progression to muscle invasion. Although the recurrence rate is high, the majority of tumors are indolent and can be managed by endoscopic means alone. The prognosis of muscle invasion is poor and radical treatment is required if cure is to be obtained. Progression risk in non-invasive tumors is hard to determine at tumor diagnosis using current clinicopathological means. To improve the accuracy of progression prediction various biomarkers have been evaluated. To discover novel biomarkers several authors have used gene expression microarrays. Various statistical methods have been described to interpret array data, but to date no biomarkers have entered clinical practice. Here, we describe a new method of microarray analysis using neurofuzzy modeling (NFM), a form of artificial intelligence, and integrate it with artificial neural networks (ANN) to investigate non-muscle invasive bladder cancer array data (n=66 tumors). We develop a predictive panel of 11 genes, from 2800 expressed genes, that can significantly identify tumor progression (average Logrank p = 0.0288) in the analyzed cancers. In comparison, this panel appears superior to those genes chosen using traditional analyses (average Logrank p = 0.3455) and tumor grade (Logrank, p = 0.2475) in this non-muscle invasive cohort. We then analyze panel members in a new non-muscle invasive bladder cancer cohort (n=199) using immunohistochemistry with six commercially available antibodies. The combination of 6 genes (LIG3, TNFRSF6, KRT18, ICAM1, DSG2 and BRCA2) significantly stratifies tumor progression (Logrank p = 0.0096) in the new cohort. We discuss the benefits of the transparent NFM approach with respect to other reported methods.

  4. Urology and nephrology update: bladder and kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, David C; Fox, Cara-Louise

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that bladder and kidney cancers would be diagnosed in approximately 140,000 Americans in 2013, with approximately 30,000 dying from these cancers. Urinary tract cancers affect men more commonly than they do women, and the median age at diagnosis is 65 years. Major risk factors for these cancers include tobacco smoking, certain chemical exposures, family history, age, and obesity. Unexplained hematuria in adults should be evaluated to exclude bladder and kidney cancer. Staging of bladder and kidney cancer should be based on the TNM staging system, which, along with tumor grade, provides important treatment and prognostic information. Urothelial cell carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer; it also can occur in the kidneys or ureters. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer. Treatment options for bladder cancer vary widely, depending on the grade of the cancer. Early non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer may be removed cystoscopically and/or treated with intravesical immunotherapy or chemotherapy, whereas patients with muscle-invasive bladder tumors typically require surgery. Management of kidney cancer is almost always surgical, unless the patient is too ill to undergo surgery or chooses palliative care. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  5. DNA methylation-based biomarkers in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandimalla, Raju; van Tilborg, Angela A; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2013-06-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the Western world. Increasing evidence has shown that DNA methylation in bladder cancer is expansive and is implicated in pathogenesis. Furthermore, distinct methylation patterns have been identified between non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), as well as between FGFR3-mutant and wild-type tumours. Given these distinctions in expression, methylated genes have been proposed as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for patients with bladder cancer. Indeed, several studies have revealed that methylated genes--including CDH1, FHIT, LAMC2, RASSF1A, TIMP3, SFRP1, SOX9, PMF1 and RUNX3--are associated with poor survival in patients with MIBC. Further validation of these markers for prognostication as well as surveillance (of patients with NMIBC) is required. Validated markers for progression, diagnosis, survival and BCG response will contribute to clinical decision-making and individualized treatment.

  6. The efficacy of Apaziquone in the treatment of bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caramés Masana, Francisco; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Bladder cancer is nowadays a common tumor. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has still chances of recurrence and progression in spite of surgery and adjuvant treatments. New therapies are being developed to reduce these percentages with less adverse effects - Apaziquone (EO9)

  7. DWI as an Imaging Biomarker for Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Takahara, Taro; Kwee, Thomas C.; Waseda, Yuma; Kobayashi, Shuichiro; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    OBJECTIVE. DWI has been increasingly applied in the management of bladder cancer. In this article, we discuss the role of DWI as an imaging biomarker for bladder cancer. CONCLUSION. The DWI signal is derived from the motion of water molecules, which represents the physiologic characteristics of the

  8. Incidence of bladder cancer in a one-stop clinic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Meyer JP, Persad R, Gillat DA. The use of BCG in superficial bladder cancer. Postgrad Med J 2002;78:449-54. Cite this article as: Yakasai A, Allam M, Thompson AJ. Incidence of bladder cancer in a one-stop clinic. Ann Afr Med. 2011;10:112-4. Source of Support: Nil, Con.ict of Interest: None declared.

  9. A Case of Multiple Myeloma Following Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shafi, Hamid; Vakili Sadeghi, Mohsen; Ghorbani, Hosein; Sharbatdaran, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Second primary malignancy following multiple myeloma (MM) was reported several years ago. There are also rare reports of cases with synchronous MM and other malignancies. To our knowledge, only one case of MM following bladder cancer has been reported in the literature. Here, we report the second case occurred three months after diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  10. Prognostic relevance of urinary bladder cancer susceptibility Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenhuis, A.J.; Dudek, A.M.D.; Verhaegh, G.W.C.T.; Witjes, J.A.; Aben, K.K.H.; Marel, S.L. van der; Vermeulen, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, susceptibility loci have been identified for urinary bladder cancer (UBC) through candidate-gene and genome-wide association studies. Prognostic relevance of most of these loci is yet unknown. In this study, we used data of the Nijmegen Bladder Cancer Study (NBCS) to perform a

  11. Recent developments in the management of bladder cancer: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Angela B

    2017-11-17

    An upsurge of advances in the management of bladder cancer has rapidly occurred over the past 2 years. In this issue, recent developments in the management of bladder cancer will be discussed, including the emerging role of immunotherapy, biomarkers, and advanced imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fangchinoline Induces Apoptosis, Autophagy and Energetic Impairment in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Fan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Tetrandrine and Fangchinoline (Fcn are two natural products that are found in Stephania tetrandra. Tetrandrine is a known anti-bladder cancer compound, but the effects of Fcn on bladder cancer have been previously unclear. In the present study, we focused on the anti-tumor effects of Fcn on bladder cancer. Methods and Results: We treated T24 and 5637 bladder cancer cell lines with Fcn in vitro. We observed that Fcn inhibited the viability of bladder cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The expression of PCNA, a biomarker of proliferation, was down-regulated. Fcn treatment induced both apoptosis and autophagy in bladder cancer cells, as shown by the increased cleavage of caspase-3, an up-regulated LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and the down-regulated p62 level. Blocking autophagy with 3-MA (3-Methyladenine enhanced Fcn-induced apoptosis, indicating that Fcn-induced autophagy was adaptive. Additionally, we observed that Fcn treatment inhibited mTOR and reduced the intracellular ATP levels. The exogenous addition of methyl pyruvate (MP to compensate metabolic substrates alleviated Fcn-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Conclusions: Our data indicated that Fcn caused an impairment in energy generation, which led to apoptosis and adaptive autophagy in bladder cancer. These results demonstrated that Fcn may be a potential candidate for use in the prevention and treatment of bladder cancer.

  13. [Fluorescent diagnostics of urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Kamalov, A A; Kudriavtsev, Iu V; Tokarev, F V

    2000-01-01

    Introduction of optic markers in screening for cancer of the urinary bladder (UB) raises diagnostic significance of UB cystoscopy. Application of intravesical form of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), precursor of photodynamically active protoporphirine IX, prevents complications in systemic use of tetracycline or hepatoprophirines. Fluorescent cystoscopy with 5-ALA (n = 59) was made in 51 patients treated in the Research Institute of Urology. UB cancer was detected in 32 patients. This procedure proved highly sensitive and specific (97.0 and 75.6%, respectively, being much more effective than standard cystoscopy and biopsy in the white light (85.1 and 81.4%, respectively). Specificity of fluorescent cystoscopy is much higher in detection of tumors and pretumor lesions (88.4%). Fluorescent diagnosis is expected to become a gold standard in the program of UB cancer detection.

  14. Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy: BCG and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Askeland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG has become the predominant conservative treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Its mechanism of action continues to be defined but has been shown to involve a T helper type 1 (Th1 immunomodulatory response. While BCG treatment is the current standard of care, a significant proportion of patients fails or do not tolerate treatment. Therefore, many efforts have been made to identify other intravesical and immunomodulating therapeutics to use alone or in conjunction with BCG. This paper reviews the progress of basic science and clinical experience with several immunotherapeutic agents including IFN-α, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-10.

  15. Radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokdal, Lars; Høyer, Morten; von der Maase, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The exact value of radiotherapy in the treatment of muscle-invasive       bladder cancer is difficult to establish, as most studies exploring this       issue are retrospective with different procedures for selecting patients       for treatment, as well as varying treatment strategies. An estimate...... of the       5-year overall survival rate following radiotherapy is approximately 35%       in consecutive-selected patients and approximately 25% in       negative-selected patients...

  16. Use of thiazolidinediones and risk of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bazelier, Marloes T; de Vries, Frank; Vestergaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pioglitazone, a drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with bladder cancer in observational studies. Diabetes mellitus itself has also been linked with bladder cancer. The objective was to estimate the risk of bladder cancer for diabetic patients using......) of bladder cancer were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Time-dependent adjustments were made for age, comorbidity, and drug use. Four different treatment stages were defined: current use of either a biguanide or a sulfonylureum (stage 1), current use of a biguanide and a sulfonylureum...... at the same time (stage 2), current use of TZDs (stage 3) and current use of insulin (stage 4). RESULTS: Compared with non-diabetic controls, patients using antidiabetic medication experienced a 1.3-fold increased risk of bladder cancer (adjusted HR 1.3 [95%CI 1.2-1.4]). No major differences were observed...

  17. Epigenetics application in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb-de la Rosa, Alfredo; Acker, Matthew; Kumar, Raj A; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2015-10-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the Western world. Patients with bladder cancer require close monitoring, which may include frequent cystoscopy and urine cytology. Such monitoring results in significant health care cost. The application of epigenetics may allow for a risk adapted approach and more cost-effective method of monitoring. A number of epigenetic changes have been described for many cancer sites, including the urinary bladder. In this review, we discuss the use of epigenetics in bladder cancer and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A comprehensive search of the English medical literature was conducted in PubMed using the terms microRNA regulation, DNA methylation, histone modification and bladder cancer. The most important epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA regulation. Both DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation have been associated with higher rate of cancer. The association of epigenetic changes with bladder cancer has led to the research of its diagnostic and prognostic implications as well as to the development of novel drugs to target these changes with the aim of achieving a survival benefit. Recently, epigenetics has been shown to play a much greater role than previously anticipated in the initiation and propagation of many tumors. The use of epigenetics for the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer is an evolving and promising field. The possibility of reversing epigenetic changes may facilitate additional cancer treatment options in the future.

  18. A comparison of three different adaptive strategies in image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Soendergaard, Jimmi; Petersen, Joergen B. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Noerrebrogade 44, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)), E-mail: annveste@rm.dk; Hoeyer, Morten; Muren, Ludvig Paul (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Noerrebrogade 44, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    The urinary bladder shows considerable individual variation in shape and position during a course of radiotherapy (RT). In this study we have developed and compared three different adaptive RT (ART) strategies for bladder cancer involving daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging and plan selection. Material and methods. Ten patients treated for bladder cancer had daily CBCTs acquired that were registered online using bony anatomy registration. Seven patients received intensity modulated RT (IMRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique to the bladder and pelvic lymph nodes. Three patients received treatment to the bladder only. Retrospectively, we compared three ART strategies that were all based on daily selection of the most suitable plan from a library consisting of three IMRT-plans corresponding to a small, medium and large target volume. ART method A utilised population-based margins while methods B and C used the bladder as seen on CBCT-scans from the first week of treatment; method B without delineation of the bladder on CBCT and method C with delineation of the bladder. Total dose distributions were calculated using the planning CT. For each patient, we calculated ratios of the dose volume histograms (DVHs) for the three ART strategies relative to non-adaptive therapy. Results. The inter-patient variation was large for all three ART strategies. The mean ratios of the volumes receiving 57 Gy or more (corresponding to 95% of prescribed dose) for methods A, B and C were 0.66 (SD: 0.11), 0.67 (SD: 0.13) and 0.67 (SD: 0.16) respectively when compared to the non-adaptive plan. Conclusion. When using any of the ART strategies, it is possible to reduce significantly the volumes receiving high doses compared to the use of a standard non-adaptive plan. The differences in dose volume parameters between the three methods were small compared with the differences from the standard plan.

  19. Molecular basis of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hussain, Turki O; Akhtar, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a relatively common and potentially life-threatening neoplasm. The diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma usually entails a lifelong surveillance to detect recurrent disease. In recent years, significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis in urinary bladder. An early step in the process of carcinoma development is establishment of a premalignant abnormal urothelial patch that may give rise to various types of urothelial carcinoma and may provide a fertile ground for development of multifocal synchronous and metachronous tumors. Two distinct molecular pathways are involved. Low-grade papillary carcinoma is associated with mutation in the FGFR3 or in some cases mutations in RAS genes. High-grade in situ/muscle-invasive carcinoma on the other hand is characterized by alteration of p53 and pRB. Loss of function of these key genes, which play a crucial role in the control of cell cycle, leads to accumulation of additional mutations and deletions of genes resulting in an aggressive phenotype. It is hoped that a thorough understanding of the molecular basis of urothelial cancer will facilitate early diagnosis and will lead to development of new modalities for the management and treatment of these carcinomas.

  20. Active surveillance for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Miyake

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is known to be a heterogeneous malignancy that requires varying treatment modalities and follow-up schedules. Low-grade Ta papillary tumors are categorized as low-risk NMIBC because of their favorable prognosis. There is an expanding movement that overdiagnosis and overtreatment should be avoided considering the economic impact and the patients’ quality of life. It has been over 10 years since the initial assessment of active surveillance for low-risk NMIBC suggested its feasibility and safety. However, urologists are still unfamiliar with this treatment option, which can be ideal in appropriately selected patients. In this review article, we focus on active surveillance for low-risk NMIBC and discuss the evidence and rationale for this treatment option. There are several issues to resolve in order to advocate active surveillance as a standard option in selected patients. A specific follow-up protocol including intervals of cystoscopy, urine cytology, urine markers, and other radiographic examinations need to be optimized and validated. Finally, we integrate the available data into the follow-up strategy and propose a new surveillance protocol for active surveillance of recurrent low-risk bladder cancer.

  1. A review of plan library approaches in adaptive radiotherapy of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Shane D; Leech, Michelle M

    2018-01-04

    Large variations in the shape and size of the bladder volume are commonly observed in bladder cancer radiotherapy (RT). The clinical target volume (CTV) is therefore frequently inadequately treated and large isotropic margins are inappropriate in terms of dose to organs at risk (OAR); thereby making adaptive radiotherapy (ART) attractive for this tumour site. There are various methods of ART delivery, however, for bladder cancer, plan libraries are frequently used. A review of published studies on plan libraries for bladder cancer using four databases (Pubmed, Science Direct, Embase and Cochrane Library) was conducted. The endpoints selected were accuracy and feasibility of initiation of a plan library strategy into a RT department. Twenty-four articles were included in this review. The majority of studies reported improvement in accuracy with 10 studies showing an improvement in planning target volume (PTV) and CTV coverage with plan libraries, some by up to 24%. Seventeen studies showed a dose reduction to OARs, particularly the small bowel V45Gy, V40Gy, V30Gy and V10Gy, and the rectal V30Gy. However, the occurrence of no suitable plan was reported in six studies, with three studies showing no significant difference between adaptive and non-adaptive strategies in terms of target coverage. In addition, inter-observer variability in plan selection appears to remain problematic. The additional resources, education and technology required for the initiation of plan library selection for bladder cancer may hinder its routine clinical implementation, with eight studies illustrating increased treatment time required. While there is a growing body of evidence in support of plan libraries for bladder RT, many studies differed in their delivery approach. The advent of the clinical use of the MRI-linear accelerator will provide RT departments with the opportunity to consider daily online adaption for bladder cancer as an alternate to plan library approaches.

  2. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Grace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bladder cancer is the commonest malignancy of the urinary tract. In this review, we look at the latest developments in the diagnosis and management of this condition. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are the most important tools in the diagnosis and follow-up of bladder cancer. Various alternatives have been investigated, either to reduce the frequency of cystoscopy, or improve its sensitivity for detection of tumors. These include urine-based markers and point-of-care tests. Narrow-band imaging and photodynamic diagnosis/blue-light cystoscopy have shown promise in improving detection and reducing recurrence of bladder tumors, by improving the completion of bladder resection when compared with standard resection in white light. The majority of patients with a new diagnosis of bladder cancer have non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, which requires adjuvant intravesical chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy. Recent developments in post-resection intravesical regimens are discussed. For patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, both laparoscopic radical cystectomy and robot-assisted radical cystectomy have been shown to reduce peri-operative morbidity, while being oncologically equivalent to open radical cystectomy in the medium term. Bladder-preserving strategies entail resection and chemoradiation, and in selected patients give equivalent results to surgery. The development, advantages, and disadvantages of these newer approaches are also discussed.

  3. Radiomics assessment of bladder cancer grade using texture features from diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xiaopan; Tian, Qiang; Li, Baojuan; Wu, Yuxia; Yang, Zengyue; Liang, Zhengrong; Liu, Yang; Cui, Guangbin; Lu, Hongbing

    2017-11-01

    To 1) describe textural features from diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps that can distinguish low-grade bladder cancer from high-grade, and 2) propose a radiomics-based strategy for cancer grading using texture features. In all, 61 patients with bladder cancer (29 in high- and 32 in low-grade groups) were enrolled in this retrospective study. Histogram- and gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM)-based radiomics features were extracted from cancerous volumes of interest (VOIs) on DWI and corresponding ADC maps of each patient acquired from 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A Mann-Whitney U-test was applied to select features with significant differences between low- and high-grade groups (P classifier using the optimal feature subset achieved the best performance in bladder cancer grading, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 0.861, 82.9%, 78.4%, and 87.1%, respectively. Textural features from DWI and ADC maps can reflect the difference between low- and high-grade bladder cancer, especially those GLCM features from ADC maps. The proposed radiomics strategy using these features, combined with the SVM classifier, may better facilitate image-based bladder cancer grading preoperatively. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1281-1288. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. SU-F-T-397: Evaluating the Impact of Bladder Filling Status for the Organs at Risk Dose Distribution in Cervical Cancer Patients with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, JY [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Hong, DL [The First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of bladder filling status of the organs at risk (OARs) on dose distribution during intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer patients. Methods: Twelve cervical cancer patients treated with IMRT were selected for this study. The prescription dose was 45Gy/25 fractions with the 6 MV photon beam. All patients performed two CT scans, one with an empty bladder, the other one with bladder filled. For the registration of two CT scans, the fusion was automatically carried out upon the bony anatomy. The OARs (bladder, rectum, pelvic bone and small intestine) were delineated to planning CT to evaluate the dose distributions. These dose distributions were compared between empty bladder and bladder filling. Results: The bladder volume with empty bladder and bladder filling was 403.2±124.13cc and 101.4±87.5cc, respectively. There were no statistical differences between empty bladder and bladder filling in the mean value of pelvic bone V10Gy, V20Gy, V40Gy; rectum V40Gy and V45Gy. The bladder V40Gy and V45Gy were lower in the bladder filling group than in the empty bladder group (63.7%±5.8% vs 87.5%±7.8%, 45.1%±9.5% vs 62.4%±11.8%, respectively). The V45Gy for small intestine in the bladder filling group was significantly less than the empty bladder group (146.7cc±95.3cc vs 245.7cc±101.8cc). Conclusion: Our study finds that the bladder filling status did not have a significant impact on dose distribution in the rectum and pelvic bone. However, the changes of bladder filling have a large impact on bladder and small intestine doses. A full bladder is strongly recommended during treatment for cervical cancer patients.

  5. Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder cancer in ex vivo urine cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, C. Y.; Ng, B. K.; Razul, S. Gulam; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Tan, P. H.; Chin, William

    2006-02-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth common malignant disease worldwide, accounting for 4% of all cancer cases. In Singapore, it is the ninth most common form of cancer. The high mortality rate can be reduced by early treatment following precancerous screening. Currently, the gold standard for screening bladder tumors is histological examination of biopsy specimen, which is both invasive and time-consuming. In this study ex vivo urine fluorescence cytology is investigated to offer a timely and biopsy-free means for detecting bladder cancers. Sediments in patients' urine samples were extracted and incubated with a novel photosensitizer, hypericin. Laser confocal microscopy was used to capture the fluorescence images at an excitation wavelength of 488 nm. Images were subsequently processed to single out the exfoliated bladder cells from the other cells based on the cellular size. Intensity histogram of each targeted cell was plotted and feature vectors, derived from the histogram moments, were used to represent each sample. A difference in the distribution of the feature vectors of normal and low-grade cancerous bladder cells was observed. Diagnostic algorithm for discriminating between normal and low-grade cancerous cells is elucidated in this paper. This study suggests that the fluorescence intensity profiles of hypericin in bladder cells can potentially provide an automated quantitative means of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  6. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Igor Tsaur; Karen Nelson; Jesco Pfitzenmaier; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as...

  7. Vinflunine in the treatment of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Bachner

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mark Bachner, Maria De Santis3rd Medical Department – Center for Oncology and Hematology, Kaiser Franz Josef-Spital der Stadt Wien, and Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute for Applied Cancer Research Vienna (LBI-ACR VIEnna, Cluster Translational Oncology, Kaiser Franz Josef-Spital der Stadt Wien, and Applied Cancer Research – Institution for Translational Research Vienna (ACR-ITR VIEnna/CEADDP, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Vinflunine (VFL is a third-generation bifluorinated semi-synthetic vinca alkaloid obtained by superacidic chemistry from its parent compound, vinorelbine. As with the other vinca alkaloids, the main antineoplastic effects of VFL arise from its interaction with tubulin, the major component of microtubules in mitotic spindles. In contrast to other vinca alkaloids, VFL shows some distinctive properties in terms of tubulin binding, possibly explaining its superior antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo compared with vinorelbine as well as its excellent safety profile. In transitional cell carcinoma (TCC, two single-agent phase II trials were performed testing VFL in platinum-pretreated patients, showing moderate response rates and promising disease control rates. Therefore, the first phase III trial in modern times for second-line TCC of the urothelium was designed in order to further investigate the activity of VFL. First results were presented at the 2008 ASCO conference. VFL appears to be a possible treatment option for patients with TCC progressing after first-line platinum-containing chemotherapy.Keywords: vinflunine, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder, bladder cancer, chemotherapy, second-line chemotherapy

  8. [Electrovaporization in the treatment of bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Martov, A G; Gushchin, B L; Kudriavtsev, Iu V; Sysoev, P A

    1998-01-01

    Specialists of the Research Institute of Urology have practiced combination of transurethral resection (TUR) with electrovaporization in endoscopic treatment of bladder cancer (BC) since 1995. A total of 46 patients with transient cell BC (29 males and 17 females aged 49-87) stage Ta-T1 (32 patients) and T2-T3b (14 patients) underwent TUR or electrovaporization (if morphologically verified) of the exophytic part of the tumor. In addition, electrovaporization of the base of the tumor was made. Main indications for such treatment were standard indications for TUR in contraindications for more radical treatment. 6-24-month follow-up was possible in 23(71.9%) patients with superficial BC (group 1) and in 9(64.2%) patients with invasive BC (group 2). Endoscopically, the recurrence was detected in 3(13%) and 5(55.5%) patients of group 1 and 2, respectively. They were reoperated on with electrovaporization. It is inferred that TUR-vaporization of the bladder is an effective endoscopic treatment of superficial BC. Electrovaporization is a good palliative treatment in patients with invasive BC when radical surgery is impossible. It inhibits the progression of the disease, prevents hemorrhages due to the tumor destruction, reduces intraoperative blood loss, improves endoscopic visualization. It may also increase the operation ablasticity.

  9. A case-control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Chun; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2013-03-15

    Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. This case-control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening.

  10. Occupation and Risk of Bladder Cancer in Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadkhale, Kishor; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to describe the variation of bladder cancer incidence according to occupational categories in the Nordic countries. METHODS: The study cohort comprised 15 million individuals older than 30 years who participated in one or more population censuses in 1960.......74; 95% CI 0.70 to 0.78), and farmers (0.70; 95% CI 0.68 to 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: The SIR of bladder cancer was overall similar across the Nordic countries. The study suggests that occupation is evidently associated with bladder cancer risk....

  11. Prostate cancer treated with image-guided helical TomoTherapy {sup registered} and image-guided LINAC-IMRT. Correlation between high-dose bladder volume, margin reduction, and genitourinary toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdz, Sonia; Wendt, Thomas G. [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jena (Germany); Schwedas, Michael; Salz, Henning [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Section of Medical Physics, Jena (Germany); Foller, Susan [University Hospital Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Urology, Jena (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    We compared different image-guidance (IG) strategies for prostate cancer with high-precision IG intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using TomoTherapy {sup registered} (Accuray Inc., Madison, WI, USA) and linear accelerator (LINAC)-IMRT and their impact on planning target volume (PTV) margin reduction. Follow-up data showed reduced bladder toxicity in TomoTherapy patients compared to LINAC-IMRT. The purpose of this study was to quantify whether the treatment delivery technique and decreased margins affect reductions in bladder toxicity. Setup corrections from 30 patients treated with helical TomoTherapy and 30 treated with a LINAC were analyzed. These data were used to simulate three IG protocols based on setup error correction and a limited number of imaging sessions. For all patients, gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was documented and correlated with the treatment delivery technique. For fiducial marker (FM)-based RT, a margin reduction of up to 3.1, 3.0, and 4.8 mm in the left-right (LR), superior-inferior (SI), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions, respectively, could be achieved with calculation of a setup correction from the first three fractions and IG every second day. Although the bladder volume was treated with mean doses of 35 Gy in the TomoTherapy group vs. 22 Gy in the LINAC group, we observed less GU toxicity after TomoTherapy. Intraprostate FMs allow for small safety margins, help decrease imaging frequency after setup correction, and minimize the dose to bladder and rectum, resulting in lower GU toxicity. In addition, IMRT delivered with TomoTherapy helps to avoid hotspots in the bladder neck, a critical anatomic structure associated with post-RT urinary toxicity. (orig.) [German] Wir haben im Rahmen der Prostatakarzinombehandlung verschiedene bildgefuehrte (IG) Strategien der hochpraezisen intensitaetsmodulierten Radiotherapie (IMRT) unter Einsatz der Tomotherapie (TomoTherapy {sup registered}, Accuray Inc., Madison

  12. Bladder cancer in HIV-infected adults: an emerging concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Chawki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As HIV-infected patients get older more non-AIDS-related malignancies are to be seen. Cancer now represents almost one third of all causes of deaths among HIV-infected patients (1. Albeit bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancy worldwide (2, only 13 cases of bladder cancer in HIV-infected patients have been reported in the literature so far (3. Materials and Methods: We conducted a monocentric study in our hospital. We selected all patients who were previously admitted (from 1998 to 2013 in our hospital with diagnoses of HIV and bladder cancer. The objective was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of bladder cancers in HIV-infected patients in our hospital. Results: Based on our administrative HIV database (6353 patients, we found 15 patients (0.2% with a bladder cancer. Patients’ characteristics are presented in Table 1. Patients were mostly men and heavy smokers. Their median nadir CD4 cell count was below 200 and most had a diagnosis of AIDS. A median time of 14 years was observed in those patients, between the diagnosis of HIV-infection and the occurrence of bladder cancer, although in patients much younger (median age 56 than those developing bladder cancer without HIV infection (71.1 years (4. Haematuria was the most frequent diagnosis circumstance in HIV-infected patients who had relatively preserved immune function on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Histopathology showed relatively advanced cancers at diagnosis with a high percentage of non transitional cell carcinoma (TCC tumor and of TCC with squamous differentiation, suggesting a potential role for human papilloma virus (HPV co-infection. Death rate was high in this population. Conclusions: Bladder cancers in HIV-infected patients remain rare but occur in relatively young HIV-infected patients with a low CD4 nadir, presenting with haematuria, most of them being smokers, and have aggressive pathological features that are associated with

  13. Rationale for an early detection program for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarand V Khochikar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : A total of 356,557 new cases were diagnosed annually worldwide in 2009, it was estimated that 52,810 new patients were to be diagnosed with bladder cancer and there were 10,180 projected deaths from the disease in the USA. Despite being the fourth commonest cancer in men, we do not have an early detection/screening program for bladder cancer. The review was aimed at looking at the evidence for the rationale for an early detection program for bladder cancer. Materials and Methods : A detailed search on bladder cancer epidemiology, diagnosis, pathology, tumor markers, treatment outcomes, screening, morbidity and mortality of bladder cancer was carried out on Pubmed central/Medline. Original articles, review articles, monograms, book chapters on bladder cancer, text books on urological oncology, oncology and urology were reviewed. The latest information for new articles before publication was last accessed in June 2010. Discussion and Conclusions : Bladder cancer is the fourth commonest cancer in men, the annual death rate from this disease is significant and every year there is an increase in its incidence globally. The prognosis of bladder cancer is stage and grade dependent; the lower the stage (T2 or less the better is the survival. Delay in the diagnosis and treatment does alter the overall outcome. Therefore, there is a clear need for early detection of bladder cancer and screening program. Although we do not have an ideal marker for bladder cancer, it is time we maximize the potential of markers such as UroVysion, NMP22 along with cytology to start such a program. May be as a first step the early detection and screening program could be started in high-risk population. It is not worth waiting till we find the best marker as it would be unfair to our patients. The fear of unnecessary tests and treatment in bladder cancer after its detection in screening program is without any substance. The cost-effectiveness of such a program

  14. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, M.R.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Vight, L.P. van der; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Visser, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was

  15. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  16. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  17. The softening of human bladder cancer cells happens at an early stage of the malignancy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge R. Ramos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Various studies have demonstrated that alterations in the deformability of cancerous cells are strongly linked to the actin cytoskeleton. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM, it is possible to determine such changes in a quantitative way in order to distinguish cancerous from non-malignant cells. In the work presented here, the elastic properties of human bladder cells were determined by means of AFM. The measurements show that non-malignant bladder HCV29 cells are stiffer (higher Young’s modulus than cancerous cells (HTB-9, HT1376, and T24 cell lines. However, independently of the histological grade of the studied bladder cancer cells, all cancerous cells possess a similar level of the deformability of about a few kilopascals, significantly lower than non-malignant cells. This underlines the diagnostic character of stiffness that can be used as a biomarker of bladder cancer. Similar stiffness levels, observed for cancerous cells, cannot be fully explained by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton since it is different in all malignant cells. Our results underline that it is neither the spatial organization of the actin filaments nor the presence of stress fibers, but the overall density and their 3D-organization in a probing volume play the dominant role in controlling the elastic response of the cancerous cell to an external force.

  18. [Diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Darenkov, S P; Chernyshev, I V; Martov, A G; Stupak, N V

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a retrospective analysis of the results of transurethral conservative and radical operations in 125 patients with invasive cancer of the urinary bladder (UB) treated in the Research Institute of Urology throughout 1992-2002. Transurethral resection (TUR) of the UB was made in 72 patients. Stages pT2a, pT2b, T3 and T4 were diagnosed in 23 (31.9%), 18 (25%), 14 (19.5%) and 17 (23.6%) cases, respectively. 53 patients with advanced invasive UB cancer have undergone radical cystectomy varying by the method of urine derivation. Stages pT2N0M0, pT3aN0M0, pT3bN0M0, pT4aN0M0 and N1-2 were registered in 4 (7.5%), 13 (25%), 21 (40%), 7 (12.5%) and 8 (15%) patients, respectively. UB cancer recurrences after TUR occurred in 12 (16.7%) patients with stage pT2a, in 8 (11.1%) patients with stage pT2b. Three-year overall and recurrence-free survival after TUR at stage T2 reached 97.5 +/- 3.2 and 47.4 +/- 2.8, respectively, at stage T3 and T4--57.1 +/- 4.3 and 26.6 +/- 3.4%, respectively. Postcystectomy distant metastases to the lungs, bones and iliac lymph nodes after treatment were detected in 3, 2 and 3 patients, respectively. One patient had a local pelvic recurrence. For all 53 patients a 2-year corrected survival made up 68 +/- 12.0%. Thus, transurethral electrosurgery is an effective treatment of invasive UB cancer; the only radical surgical treatment for invasive UB cancer is cystectomy.

  19. Bladder cancer mortality after spinal cord injury over 4 decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Laura S; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Lloyd, L Keith

    2015-06-01

    We estimate bladder cancer mortality in people with spinal cord injury compared to the general population. Data and statistics were retrieved from the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center and the National Center for Health Statistics. The mortality experience of the 45,486 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury treated at a Spinal Cord Injury Model System or Shriners Hospital was compared to the general population using a standardized mortality ratio. The standardized mortality ratio data were further stratified by age, gender, race, time since injury and injury severity. Our study included 566,532 person-years of followup between 1960 and 2009, identified 10,575 deaths and categorized 99 deaths from bladder cancer. The expected number of deaths from bladder cancer would have been 14.8 if patients with spinal cord injury had the same bladder cancer mortality as the general population. Thus, the standardized mortality ratio is 6.7 (95% CI 5.4-8.1). Increased mortality risk from bladder cancer was observed for various ages, races and genders, as well as for those injured for 10 or more years and with motor complete injuries. Bladder cancer mortality was not significantly increased for ventilator users, those with motor incomplete injuries or those injured less than 10 years. Individuals with a spinal cord injury can potentially live healthier and longer by reducing the incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. Study findings highlight the need to identify at risk groups and contributing factors for bladder cancer death, leading to the development of prevention, screening and management strategies. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural biology and management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Tyson, Mark D; Clark, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... in low-risk patients. SUMMARY: NMIBC represents a variety of disease states and continues to pose management challenges. As our understanding of tumor biology improves and technology advances, achieving better outcomes through individualized care may be possible....

  1. Economic Burden of Bladder Cancer Across the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Jose; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Sullivan, Richard; Witjes, J Alfred

    2016-03-01

    More than 120,000 people are diagnosed annually with bladder cancer in the 28 countries of the European Union (EU). With >40,000 people dying of it each year, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer. However, to date, no systematic cost-of-illness study has assessed the economic impact of bladder cancer in the EU. To estimate the annual economic costs of bladder cancer in the EU for 2012. Country-specific cancer cost data were estimated using aggregate data on morbidity, mortality, and health care resource use, obtained from numerous international and national sources. Health care costs were estimated from expenditures on primary, outpatient, emergency, and inpatient care, as well as medications. Costs of unpaid care and lost earnings due to morbidity and early death were estimated. Bladder cancer cost the EU €4.9 billion in 2012, with health care accounting for €2.9 billion (59%) and representing 5% of total health care cancer costs. Bladder cancer accounted for 3% of all cancer costs in the EU (€143 billion) in 2012 and represented an annual health care cost of €57 per 10 EU citizens, with costs varying >10 times between the country with the lowest cost, Bulgaria (€8 for every 10 citizens), and highest cost, Luxembourg (€93). Productivity losses and informal care represented 23% and 18% of bladder cancer costs, respectively. The quality and availability of comparable cancer-related data across the EU need further improvement. Our results add to essential public health and policy intelligence for delivering affordable bladder cancer care systems and prioritising the allocation of public research funds. We looked at the economic costs of bladder cancer across the European Union (EU). We found bladder cancer to cost €4.9 billion in 2012, with health care accounting for €2.9 billion. Our study provides data that can be used to inform affordable cancer care in the EU. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  2. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  3. Incidence of bladder cancer in a one-stop clinic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Keywords: Bladder cancer, postmenopausal bleeding, transvaginal scan. Résumé. Objectif: Le but de cette étude est de .... among 118 women with PMB. There were only two cases of cervical cancer detected with TVS in ... which can present with similar symptoms. References. 1. Cancer Reseach UK.

  4. Pattern of Bladder Cancer at University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is endemic to Zambia and is associated with changes in the patterns of both AIDS and non- AIDS defining cancers. Bladder cancer is one malignancy that has been noted to increase in the era of HIV/ AIDS epidemic. This study sought to describe the pattern of cancer of the ...

  5. Noninvasive multianalyte diagnostic assay for monitoring bladder cancer recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shore ND

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neal D Shore,1 Cecilia A Fernandez,2 Anthony P Shuber21Carolina Urologic Research Center/Atlantic Urology Clinics, Myrtle Beach, SC, 2Predictive Biosciences Inc, Lexington, MA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to establish the clinical performance of a urine-based assay, called a multianalyte diagnostic readout, in monitoring for bladder cancer recurrence.Methods: This was a prospective, multicenter, single assessment observational study. The multianalyte diagnostic readout uses a combination of one protein and three DNA biomarkers. Urine samples from 733 patients undergoing monitoring for bladder cancer recurrence were analyzed for matrix metalloproteinase-2 levels, the presence of mutant FGFR3 DNA, and hypermethylation of the NID2 and VIM genes. The probability of a patient having (positive predictive value or not having (negative predictive value recurrent bladder cancer was determined by FGFR3 alone or all four biomarkers combined, respectively.Results: Cystoscopy/biopsy diagnosed 63 patients with bladder cancer recurrence at the time of study assessment. The four-biomarker assay identified 237 patients as having a low probability of disease recurrence, 231 of whom were determined by cystoscopy as not having recurrent cancer, resulting in a negative predictive value of 97.5% at 90.5% sensitivity. The FGFR3 assay identified 49 patients with FGFR3 mutations, 19 of whom were confirmed by biopsy as having cancer, resulting in a positive predictive value of 38.8%, with 95.5% specificity.Conclusion: The urine-based multianalyte diagnostic readout assay was able to delineate the patient population into those highly likely to have bladder cancer recurrence, those unlikely to have recurrent disease, and those with an average risk for bladder cancer recurrence.Keywords: FGFR3, matrix metalloproteinase-2, NID2, VIM, recurrent bladder cancer

  6. Deep Sequencing of Urinary RNAs for Bladder Cancer Molecular Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Mandy L Y; Mach, Kathleen E; Sinha, Rahul; Wu, Fan; Trivedi, Dharati R; Altobelli, Emanuela; Jensen, Kristin C; Sahoo, Debashis; Lu, Ying; Liao, Joseph C

    2017-07-15

    Purpose: The majority of bladder cancer patients present with localized disease and are managed by transurethral resection. However, the high rate of recurrence necessitates lifetime cystoscopic surveillance. Developing a sensitive and specific urine-based test would significantly improve bladder cancer screening, detection, and surveillance.Experimental Design: RNA-seq was used for biomarker discovery to directly assess the gene expression profile of exfoliated urothelial cells in urine derived from bladder cancer patients (n = 13) and controls (n = 10). Eight bladder cancer specific and 3 reference genes identified by RNA-seq were quantitated by qPCR in a training cohort of 102 urine samples. A diagnostic model based on the training cohort was constructed using multiple logistic regression. The model was further validated in an independent cohort of 101 urines.Results: A total of 418 genes were found to be differentially expressed between bladder cancer and controls. Validation of a subset of these genes was used to construct an equation for computing a probability of bladder cancer score (PBC) based on expression of three markers (ROBO1, WNT5A, and CDC42BPB). Setting PBC = 0.45 as the cutoff for a positive test, urine testing using the three-marker panel had overall 88% sensitivity and 92% specificity in the training cohort. The accuracy of the three-marker panel in the independent validation cohort yielded an AUC of 0.87 and overall 83% sensitivity and 89% specificity.Conclusions: Urine-based molecular diagnostics using this three-marker signature could provide a valuable adjunct to cystoscopy and may lead to a reduction of unnecessary procedures for bladder cancer diagnosis. Clin Cancer Res; 23(14); 3700-10. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in prostate and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Yiannis; Hadjipavlou, Marios; Khan, Shahid; Rane, Abhay

    2013-12-01

    To provide an overview of the scientific and clinical studies underlying the most common vitamin and herbal preparations used in prostate and bladder cancer and evaluate the evidence behind them. A literature search was undertaken on PubMed using various keywords relating to the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in prostate and bladder cancer.Vitamin E and selenium supplementation can potentially have adverse effects by increasing the risk of prostate cancer. Initial clinical studies of pomegranate and green tea, investigating their chemotherapeutic properties in prostate and bladder cancer have yielded encouraging results. Curcumin, resveratrol, and silibinin have potential anticancer properties through multiple molecular targets; their clinical effectiveness in prostate and bladder cancer is yet to be evaluated. Zyflamend, like PC-SPES, is a combined CAM therapy used in prostate cancer. Acupuncture is popular among patients experiencing hot flushes who are receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Conclusive evidence for the use of CAM in prostate and bladder cancer is lacking and not without risk.

  8. Omega-3 Fatty Acids Inhibit Tumor Growth in a Rat Model of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmiro Parada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 (ω-3 fatty acids have been tested on prevention and treatment of several cancer types, but the efficacy on “in vivo” bladder cancer has not been analyzed yet. This study aimed at evaluating the chemopreventive efficacy of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA mixture in an animal model of bladder cancer. Forty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups during a 20-week protocol: control; carcinogen—N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl nitrosamine (BBN; ω-3 (DHA + EPA; and ω-3 + BBN. BBN and ω-3 were given during the initial 8 weeks. At week 20 blood and bladder were collected and checked for the presence of urothelium lesions and tumors, markers of inflammation, proliferation, and redox status. Incidence of bladder carcinoma was, control (0%, ω-3 (0%, BBN (65%, and ω-3 + BBN (62.5%. The ω-3 + BBN group had no infiltrative tumors or carcinoma in situ, and tumor volume was significantly reduced compared to the BBN (0.9 ± 0.1 mm3 versus 112.5 ± 6.4 mm3. Also, it showed a reduced MDA/TAS ratio and BBN-induced serum CRP, TGF-β1, and CD31 were prevented. In conclusion, omega-3 fatty acids inhibit the development of premalignant and malignant lesions in a rat model of bladder cancer, which might be due to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic properties.

  9. Synchronous triple urogenital cancer (renal cancer, bladder cancer, prostatic cancer). A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Tsuyoshi; Honda, Masahito; Momohara, Chikahiro; Komori, Kazuhiko; Fujioka, Hideki [Osaka Police Hospital (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    A case of synchronous triple urogenital cancer, which was comprised of renal cell carcinoma of the left kidney, transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, and adenocarcinoma of the prostate, is reported. A 72-year-old Japanese male patient was referred to our outpatient clinic with the complaint of asymptomatic hematuria. At that time, his serum of level of PSA was elevated to 20 ng/ml. Cystourethroscopy showed a papillary bladder tumor and coagula through the left urinary orifice. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion measuring about 6 cm by 5 cm in the left kidney. Angiography showed a hypervascular lesion measuring about 6 cm by 5 cm at the same site. Double cancer, consisting of renal cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder, was suspected and we performed left total nephroureterectomy, hilar lymphadenectomy, and transurethral rection of the bladder tumor, one month later. At the same time, we performed a biopsy of the prostate. Histological diagnosis was renal cell carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder. Histological diagnosis of the prostate biopsy was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Since this case fulfilled the criteria of Warren and Gates, it was classified as synchronous triple urogenital cancer. A review of the literature revealed 17 authentic cases of triple urogenital cancer, of which 14 and 10 cases were reported as a combination of renal cancer, bladder cancer and prostatic cancer, in the world and in Japan, respectively. Furthermore, he had been exposed to the atomic bomb explosion in Hiroshima in 1945. This carcinogenic precursor may be related to the development of the triple cancer. (author)

  10. Hypertension, diuretics and antihypertensives in relation to bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuejuan; Castelao, J.Esteban; Yuan, Jian-Min; Groshen, Susan; Stern, Mariana C.; Conti, David V.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationships between hypertension, hypertension medication and bladder cancer risk in a population-based case–control study conducted in Los Angeles. Non-Asians between the ages of 25 and 64 years with histologically confirmed bladder cancers diagnosed between 1987 and 1996 were identified through the Los Angeles County Cancer Surveillance Program. A total of 1585 cases and their age-, gender- and race-matched neighborhood controls were included in the analyses. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between history of hypertension, medication use and bladder cancer risk. A history of hypertension was not related to bladder cancer; however, among hypertensive individuals, there was a significant difference in bladder cancer risk related to the use of diuretics or antihypertensive drugs (P for heterogeneity = 0.004). Compared with individuals without hypertension, hypertensive individuals who regularly used diuretics/antihypertensives had a similar risk [odds ratio (OR) 1.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86–1.30], whereas untreated hypertensive subjects had a 35% reduction in risk (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.48–0.88). A greater reduction in bladder cancer risk was observed among current-smokers (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.27–0.71) and carriers of GSTM1-null (homozygous absence) genotypes (OR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22–0.85). Similarly, among smokers with GSTM1-null genotype, levels of 4-aminobiphenyl-hemoglobin adducts were significantly lower among untreated hypertensive individuals (45.7 pg/g Hb) compared with individuals without hypertension (79.8 pg/g Hb) (P = 0.009). In conclusion, untreated hypertension was associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer. PMID:20732908

  11. Adaptive plan selection vs. re-optimisation in radiotherapy for bladder cancer: a dose accumulation comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Søndergaard, Jimmi; Elstrøm, Ulrik Vindelev; Høyer, Morten; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2013-12-01

    Patients with urinary bladder cancer are obvious candidates for adaptive radiotherapy (ART) due to large inter-fractional variation in bladder volumes. In this study we have compared the normal tissue sparing potential of two ART strategies: daily plan selection (PlanSelect) and daily plan re-optimisation (ReOpt). Seven patients with bladder cancer were included in the study. For the PlanSelect strategy, a patient-specific library of three plans was generated, and the most suitable plan based on the pre-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) was selected. For the daily ReOpt strategy, plans were re-optimised based on the CBCT from each daily fraction. Bladder contours were propagated to the CBCT scan using deformable image registration (DIR). Accumulated dose distributions for the ART strategies as well as the non-adaptive RT were calculated. A considerable sparing of normal tissue was achieved with both ART approaches, with ReOpt being the superior technique. Compared to non-adaptive RT, the volume receiving more than 57 Gy (corresponding to 95% of the prescribed dose) was reduced to 66% (range 48-100%) for PlanSelect and to 41% (range 33-50%) for ReOpt. This study demonstrated a considerable normal tissue sparing potential of ART for bladder irradiation, with clearly superior results by daily adaptive re-optimisation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Molecular Pathogenesis of Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. van Tilborg (Angela)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe bladder is a hollow organ in the small pelvis. It stores urine that is produced when the kidneys filter the blood. Four different layers, the epithelium, lamina propria, muscularis, and connective tissue, define the bladder wall. The epithelium consists of 7 to 10 cell layers

  13. Bladder cancer in cancer patients: population-based estimates from a large Swedish study

    OpenAIRE

    Bermejo, J Lorenzo; Sundquist, J; Hemminki, K

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study quantified the risk of urinary bladder neoplasms in cancer patients taking into account the age at first diagnosis, the gender of the patients and the lead time between diagnoses. Methods: We used standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) to compare the incidence of bladder tumours in 967?767 cancer patients with the incidence rate in the general Swedish population. A total of 3324 male and 1560 female patients developed bladder tumours at least 1 year after first cancer dia...

  14. Treatment of bladder cancer in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Erlich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As the population ages and life expectancy increases in the human population, more individuals will be diagnosed with bladder cancer (BC. The definition of who is elderly is likely to change in the future from the commonly used cut-off of ≥75 years of age. Physiological rather than chronological age is key. BC care in the elderly is likely to become a very common problem in daily practice. Concerns have been raised that senior BC patients are not given treatments that could cure their disease. Clinicians lack quantitative and reliable estimates of competing mortality risks when considering treatments for BC. Majority of patients diagnosed with BC are elderly, making treatment decisions complex with their increasing number of comorbidities. A multidisciplinary approach to these patients may be a way to incorporate discussion from various disciplines regarding treatment options available. Here we review various treatment options for elderly patients with muscle invasive BC and nonmuscle invasive BC. We include differences in treatments from robotic versus open radical cystectomy, various urinary diversion techniques, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and combination treatments. In clinical practice, treatment decisions for elderly patients should be done on a case-bycase basis, tailored to each patient with their specific histories and comorbidities considered. Some healthy elderly patients may be better candidates for extensive curative treatments than their younger counterparts. This implies that these important, life-altering decisions cannot be solely based on age as many other factors can affect patient survival outcomes.

  15. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bazzaz Pishtewan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations.

  16. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Mahantshetty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods : This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1, after 50 ml (series 2, and 100 ml (series 3 bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results : The mean (± SD bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25 cc, 116.2 (± 28 cc, and 172.9 (± 29 cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm 3 ,1 cm 3 , 2 cm 3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm 3 , 1 cm 3 , and 2 cm 3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1 compared to full bladder (series 3 (p = 0.03 was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions : Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume

  17. Bladder cancer, a review of the environmental risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letašiová Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological studies and reviews have been performed to identify the causes of bladder cancer. The aim of this review is to investigate the links between various environmental risk factors and cancer of the bladder. Methods A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Scholar Google and Russian Google databases to identify reviews and epidemiological studies on bladder cancer risk factors associated with the environment published between 1998 and 2010. Only literature discussing human studies was considered. Results Smoking, mainly cigarette smoking, is a well known risk factor for various diseases, including bladder cancer. Another factor strongly associated with bladder cancer is exposure to arsenic in drinking water at concentrations higher than 300 µg/l. The most notable risk factor for development of bladder cancer is occupational exposure to aromatic amines (2-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl and benzidine and 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline, which can be found in the products of the chemical, dye and rubber industries as well as in hair dyes, paints, fungicides, cigarette smoke, plastics, metals and motor vehicle exhaust. There are also data suggesting an effect from of other types of smoking besides cigarettes (cigar, pipe, Egyptian waterpipe, smokeless tobacco and environmental tobacco smoking, and other sources of arsenic exposure such as air, food, occupational hazards, and tobacco. Other studies show that hairdressers and barbers with occupational exposure to hair dyes experience enhanced risk of bladder cancer. For example, a study related to personal use of hair dyes demonstrates an elevated bladder cancer risk for people who used permanent hair dyes at least once a month, for one year or longer. Conclusion Smoking, in particular from cigarettes, exposure to arsenic in drinking water, and occupational exposure to aromatic amines and 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline

  18. The role of oxidative stress in bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sawicka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The review of the knowledge concerning the impact of oxidative and nitrosative stress on signaling pathways and transcription factors involved in the formation of bladder cancer was prepared. In the industrialized countries, bladder cancer is the fourth most frequently occurring malignant tumors. Recent studies indicate the involvement of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the formation and development of this disease. Red-ox disorders are characteristic for both, the initiation and progression of bladder cancer. There are observed changes in the activity of transcription factors, such as nuclear factor NF-kB; transcription factors: AP-1, Nrf2 and STAT3 and hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1α. In addition, studies indicate a role for oxidative stress in the regulation of MAPK cascade and its involvement in carcinogenesis consisting bladder. Examples of kinases belonging to the MAPK family are ERK kinases, which expression is proportional to the severity and malignant of bladder cancer. Nitric oxide also plays an important role in tumor biology. Overproduction of NO can both inhibit and promote tumor growth, depending on its concentration, duration of action and tumor microenvironment. Numerous studies show that the bladder cancer is characterized by an intensified production of NO. Reactive forms of nitrogen, similar to oxygen free radicals, could cause oxidative and nitrosative damage to DNA and have capacity to post-translational modification of proteins. In contrast to the ROS, which overproduction result from exposure to carcinogenic xenobiotic, nitrogen oxide in high level is produced during inflammation. Sustained iNOS activity therefore plays an important role in carcinogenesis associated with the inflammatory response, characteristic also for bladder cancer.

  19. PET/Computed Tomography in Renal, Bladder, and Testicular Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Choyke, Peter L

    2015-07-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/computed tomography (CT) is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in urooncology. In both bladder and renal cancers, there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder, and testicular cancers. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. PET/CT in renal, bladder and testicular cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Physician, Chief; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/CT is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in uro-oncology as well. In both bladder and renal cancer there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with only limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced in these malignancies. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder and testicular cancer. PMID:26099672

  1. Unusual asymptomatic presentation of bladder cancer metastatic to the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunchi, Francesca; Vasuri, Francesco; Valerio, Vagnoni; Montagnani, Ilaria; Nelli, Federico; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Raspollini, Maria Rosaria

    2017-06-01

    Penile metastasis is an extremely rare event and mainly originate from primary pelvic tumor sites such us urinary bladder, gastro-intestinal tract and prostate and more rarely from respiratory system, bone tumors and melanoma. Here we describe the unusual presentation of two bladder urothelial cancer metastatic to the penis with no relevant clinical symptoms. Namely, a 69 years-old man with a warthy lesions of the foreskin and the glans misunderstood for a condylomata that at histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed a bladder urothelial carcinoma; and a 71 years-old man with reddish skin lesion of the glans, a previous history of bladder and urethral carcinoma and histological pagetoid spread of urothelial cancer to the glans. Recurrent bladder urothelial carcinoma is usually a visceral disease that rarely presents as a superficial asymptomatic skin lesion. The two reported cases were asymptomatic superficial penis metastases with a relatively slow growth and a fairy good prognosis after conservative surgical approach. Accurate clinical examination of the penis is mandatory for males with history of bladder cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Pseudotumoral Malacoplakia of the Bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ra

    dilatation on the right side and a solid bladder mass 10 cm in diameter suspicious of bladder cancer. Transurethral resection of the tumor was incomplete, due to the large volume of the bladder mass. Histological examination of the resected .... essential steps in the killing of bacteria by phagocytosis13. Alterations in the ...

  3. Focus on urinary bladder cancer markers: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecke, T H

    2008-12-01

    Finding and development of new bladder cancer markers is still a very dynamic field. Because of the mass of all these markers it is impossible to report all of them. This paper reviews the role of bladder cancer markers in diagnosis and highlights the most important biomarkers studied and reported recently. A medline based literature search was performed to examine the field of bladder cancer markers. Major topics focus on selected bladder cancer markers from nearly all categories of the wide field of bladder cancer markers: Hematuria, FISH, FGFR3, SURVIVIN, u-PAR, TP53 mutation, HER-2/neu, TPA, NMP22, CK-19, CK-20, CYFRA 21-1. The use and clinical importance as diagnostic help are discussed. In this review a highlight to some of the most important markers was made. Further determination of recurrence and progression marker will contribute to establish better treatments for the individual patient. Molecular staging of urological tumors will allow selecting cases that will require systemic treatment. It is necessary and important to integrate under the same objectives basic and clinical research.

  4. New and promising strategies in the management of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, Andrea B; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Theodorescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a complex and aggressive disease for which treatment strategies have had limited success. Improvements in detection, treatment, and outcomes in bladder cancer will require the integration of multiple new approaches, including genomic profiling, immunotherapeutics, and large randomized clinical trials. New and promising strategies are being tested in all disease states, including nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), and metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC). Efforts are underway to develop better noninvasive urine biomarkers for use in primary or secondary detection of NMIBC, exploiting our genomic knowledge of mutations in genes such as RAS, FGFR3, PIK3CA, and TP53 and methylation pathways alone or in combination. Recent data from a large, randomized phase III trial of adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy add to our knowledge of the value of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with MIBC. Finally, bladder cancer is one of a growing list of tumor types that respond to immune checkpoint inhibition, opening the potential for new therapeutic strategies for treatment of this complex and aggressive disease.

  5. High risk bladder cancer : current management and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leliveld-Kors, Anna; Bastiaannet, Esther; Doornweerd, Benjamin H J; Schaapveld, Michael; de Jong, Igle J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN) and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. Materials and

  6. Economic Burden of Bladder Cancer Across the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leal, J.; Luengo-Fernandez, R.; Sullivan, R.; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than 120000 people are diagnosed annually with bladder cancer in the 28 countries of the European Union (EU). With >40000 people dying of it each year, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer. However, to date, no systematic cost-of-illness study has assessed the economic impact

  7. Determining patient preferences for improved chemotoxicity during treatment for advanced bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aristides, M.; Maase, Hans von der; Roberts, T.

    2005-01-01

    Determining patient preferences for improved chemotoxicity during treatment for advanced bladder cancer Conventional treatment for advanced bladder cancer is methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin plus cisplatin (MVAC), with a median survival of 1 year but significant toxicity. The newer combinat...

  8. 5-Aminolevulinic acid in intraoperative photodynamic therapy of bladder cancer (results of multicenter trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filonenko, E V; Kaprin, A D; Alekseev, B Y A; Apolikhin, O I; Slovokhodov, E K; Ivanova-Radkevich, V I; Urlova, A N

    2016-12-01

    The results of multicenter prospective trial for efficacy of combined modality treatment: transurethral resection (TUR)+photodynamic therapy (PDT) with alasens for bladder cancer are represented in the article. Trials were organized by Research Institute of Organic Intermediates and Dyes and conducted according to clinical protocol approved by Ministry of Health of Russia, at the sites of leading Russian cancer clinical centers. The trial included 45 subjects with verified diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients underwent TUR of bladder with simultaneous PDT as anti-relapse treatment. Alasens was administered to patients as intravesicular instillation of 3% solution in volume of 50ml with 1.5-2h exposure (prior to TUR). TUR was performed after instillation. PDT session was conducted immediately after the completion of TUR on a single occasion by means of combined local irradiation on tumor bed with diffuse irradiation on whole urinary bladder mucosa (light dose of local irradiation - 100J/cm2, diffuse irradiation - 20J/cm2). Good tolerance of the treatment was noticed, there were no complications. Among 45 patients included in the trial, 35 (78%) completed 12 month protocol follow-up without relapse. In our study PDT with alasens after TUR reported a recurrence rate of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer for 1st year after treatment of 22%. TUR with intraoperative PDT with 5-aminolevulinic acid may offer an alternative in the treatment of non-muscle-invasive intermediate and high-risk bladder cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Radical treatment of invasive bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Darenkov, S P; Chernyshev, N V; Sokolov, A E; Gorilovskiĭ, M L; Akmatov, N A; Samsonov, Iu V

    2003-01-01

    We have conducted a retrospective analysis of radical cystectomy in 53 patients (45 males and 8 females, 85 and 15%, respectively) with invasive bladder cancer (BC) treated in the Research Institute of Urology in 1997-2002. Stages T2N0M0, pT3aN0M0, T3bN0M0, pT4aN0M0, pT4aN1-2M0 were in 4 (7.5%), 13 (25%), 21 (40%), 7 (12.5%), 8 (15%) cases, respectively. Well differentiated transitional cell BC (G1) was detected in 1 (2%) patient, moderately differentiated (G2) in 16 (30%) cases, poorly differentiated (G3) in 36 (68%) patients. The following methods of urine derivation were used: orthotopic plastic surgery (n = 3, 6%), ureterocutaneostomy (n = 4, 8%), Mainz pouch II operation (n = 16, 30%), Hassan operation (n = 5, 9%), Bricker procedure (n = 22, 44%), transureteroanastomosis (n = 3, 6%). In the postoperative period there was one lethal outcome, early complications in 5 (9%) patients, late complications in 9 (17%) patients. Distant metastases to the lungs, bones and iliac lymph nodes after treatment were detected in 3, 2 and 3 patients, respectively. One patient had a local pelvic recurrence. For 53 patients 2-year corrected survival was 68 +/- 12.0%. We have come to the conclusion that the only radical surgical treatment of invasive BC is cystectomy, limitations to which are connected only with complexity of subsequent urine derivation.

  10. Tumour expression of bladder cancer-associated urinary proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Mårten; Segersten, Ulrika; Runeson, Marcus; Wester, Kenneth; Busch, Christer; Pettersson, Ulf; Lind, Sara Bergström; Malmström, Per-Uno

    2013-08-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: The current basis for diagnosis and prognosis in urinary bladder cancer is based on the pathologists' assessment of a biopsy of the tumour. Urinary biomarkers are preferable as they can be non-invasively sampled. Urinary cytology is the only test with widespread use but is hampered by poor reproducibility and low sensitivity. By studying the protein expression in bladder tumour tissue samples of proteins previously found in elevated levels in the urine of patients with bladder cancer, we have been able to show that these proteins originate from the tumour. The immunoreactivity of three of the investigated proteins increased with higher stage. Also a serine peptidase inhibitor was found to be predictive of progression from non-muscle-invasive to muscle-invasive tumours. To analyse the expression of five bladder cancer-associated urinary proteins and investigate if expression is related to the malignant phenotype of the tumour. To explore the possible prognostic value of these proteins. Urine samples, 16 from patients with bladder cancer and 26 from controls, were used in Western Blotting experiments. Tissue microarrays with bladder tissue from 344 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer between 1984 and 2005 was used in immunohistochemistry experiments. The proteins apolipoprotein E (APOE), fibrinogen β chain precursor (FGB), leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG1), polymerase (RNA) I polypeptide E (POLR1E), α1-antitrypsin (SERPINA1) and topoisomerase 2A (TOP2A) were probed with antibodies validated by the Human Protein Atlas. Increased expressions of APOE, FGB and POLR1E were correlated with increased tumour stage (P SERPINA1 in Ta and T1 tumours was found to increase the risk of tumour progression (hazard ratio 2.57, 95% confidence interval 1.13-5.87; P = 0.025) CONCLUSIONS: All proteins previously detected in urine from patients with bladder cancer were also expressed in bladder cancer tissue. The

  11. Prediction of Bladder Cancer Recurrences Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulueta Guerrero, Ekaitz; Garay, Naiara Telleria; Lopez-Guede, Jose Manuel; Vilches, Borja Ayerdi; Iragorri, Eider Egilegor; Castaños, David Lecumberri; de La Hoz Rastrollo, Ana Belén; Peña, Carlos Pertusa

    Even if considerable advances have been made in the field of early diagnosis, there is no simple, cheap and non-invasive method that can be applied to the clinical monitorisation of bladder cancer patients. Moreover, bladder cancer recurrences or the reappearance of the tumour after its surgical resection cannot be predicted in the current clinical setting. In this study, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to assess how different combinations of classical clinical parameters (stage-grade and age) and two urinary markers (growth factor and pro-inflammatory mediator) could predict post surgical recurrences in bladder cancer patients. Different ANN methods, input parameter combinations and recurrence related output variables were used and the resulting positive and negative prediction rates compared. MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) was selected as the most predictive model and urinary markers showed the highest sensitivity, predicting correctly 50% of the patients that would recur in a 2 year follow-up period.

  12. COMBINED TREATMENT OF LOCALLY-ADVANCED BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chernyshev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BC is an important clinical and scientific challenge. In 2013, in Russia, the absolute number of patients with first-ever diagnosis of bladder cancer was 12 992 people. There is an increasing proportion of detection of bladder cancer stage I–II disease patterns: 2003–50.8% in 2013–69.6%, while the number of newly diagnosed patients in III and IV clinical stages remains at 30%. The proportion of individuals who completed the treatment of the number of newly diagnosed patients with bladder cancer in 2013, was as follows: only surgical method — 65.4%, 33.5% combined. Purpose. Improvement of the results of treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. Materials and methods. The main treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is radical cystectomy. In the combined treatment of bladder cancer chemotherapy is the component that systemic exposure to the tumor, the way of regional and distant metastases. The study included 132 patients with locally advanced bladder cancer who were treated for 2005–2013, divided into four groups: NACT + CE — 27 people (20.5%, CE + ACT — 21 (15.9%, NACT + CE + ACT — 21 (15.9% only CE — 63 (47.7%. An important component of treatment has been the use of platinum (cisplatin or carboplatin in Schemes M–VAC and GP. An objective response is possible in 44.7%, and the stabilization process in 40.4% of patients.Results. The clinical effect is evaluated in all patients. In the group of NACT 21% of patients survived for more than 4 years, but did not survive the 5‑year mark. In the group of CE + ACT the indicator achieved only 3‑year survival rate, which amounted to 43%. In the group of CE — none of the patients did not live up to 3 years, with 2‑year survival rate was 30%. In the group of ACT + NCT + CE 3 patients (15% were alive at the time, passed the threshold of the 5‑year survival rate, there is no progression of cancer.Conclusion. Combined treatment mode NACT

  13. Optimizing the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer using fluorescence cystoscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draga, R.O.P.

    2013-01-01

    The gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer is transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT). A relative high recurrence rate and the need for repeated treatments make bladder cancer one the most expensive cancers from diagnosis till death of the patient. The TURBT

  14. Differential ectonucleotidase expression in human bladder cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Joséli; Bavaresco, Luci; Braganhol, Elizandra; Rockenbach, Liliana; Farias, Patrícia Fernandes; Wink, Márcia R; Azambuja, Alan A; Barrios, Carlos Henrique; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Oliveira Battastini, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most prevalent tumor in the genitourinary tract. Nucleotides are important molecules that regulate many pathophysiological functions in the extracellular space. Studies have revealed evidence of a relationship between purinergic signaling and urothelial malignancies. Nucleotide-mediated signaling is controlled by a highly efficient enzymatic cascade, which includes the members of the ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDases), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (E-NPPs), ecto-alkaline phosphatases, and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73. In an attempt to identify possible differential expression of ectonucleotidases during bladder cancer progression, a comparative analysis between RT4 (grade 1) and T24 (grade 3) bladder cancer cell lines was performed. In RT4 cells, the hydrolysis of tri- and diphosphate nucleosides was higher than monophosphonucleosides. T24 cells, however, presented the opposite profile, a low level of hydrolysis of tri- and diphosphate nucleosides and a high level of hydrolysis of monophosphates. Phosphodiesterase activity was negligible in both cell lines at physiological pH, indicating that these enzymes are not active under our assay conditions, although they are expressed in both cell lines. The T24 cells expressed NTPDase5 mRNA, while the RT4 cells expressed NTPDase3 and NTPDase5 mRNA. Both cell lines expressed ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 mRNA. The present work describes, for the first time, the differential pattern of ectonucleotidases in the more malignant bladder cancer cells compared with cells derived from an early stage of bladder cancer. Our results open new avenues for research into the physiological roles of this family of enzymes and their possible therapeutic potential in bladder cancer. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Smoking effect on secondary bladder cancer after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Takeuchi, Ario; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-10-01

    Although it is well known that radiotherapy for prostate cancer increases comorbid rate of secondary bladder cancer, the effect of aging and smoking with radiotherapy on incidence rate of secondary bladder cancer remains unknown. Then, this study investigated the combinational effect of external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer and aging or smoking on comorbid rate of secondary bladder cancer. This study included 754 Japanese patients with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy (n = 319) and radical prostatectomy (n = 435) from 2000 through 2013. The relationship between therapeutic modality for prostate cancer as well as age or smoking status and comorbid rate of secondary bladder cancer was examined. During the median follow-up period of 4.3 and 3.1 years, secondary bladder cancer occurred in 11 (3.4%) and 5 (1.1%) of patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy, respectively. The 5-year bladder cancer-free survival rate was 97.3% in the external beam radiotherapy group and 99.4% in the radical prostatectomy group. Age (hazard ratio = 1.15, P = 0.027) and ever smoking (hazard ratio = 5.65, P = 0.011) were significant predictive factors of secondary bladder cancer incidence in the external beam radiotherapy cohort, but not in the radical prostatectomy cohort. Inversely, among men with ever smoking, but not among older men, external beam radiotherapy (hazard ratio = 9.64, P = 0.0052) was a significant risk factor of secondary bladder cancer. Taken together, these findings suggest that smoking history might be one of criteria to choose radical prostatectomy than external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and that age would not be a criterion for therapeutic selection in terms of secondary bladder cancer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. The burden of bladder cancer care: direct and indirect costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossanen, Matthew; Gore, John L

    2014-09-01

    Bladder cancer is a common, complex, and costly disease. Every year in the USA, bladder cancer is responsible for 70 ,000 diagnosed cases and over 15, 000 deaths. Once diagnosed, patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) are committed to a lifetime of invasive procedures and potential hospitalizations that result in substantial direct and indirect costs. Bladder cancer is the most costly cancer among the elderly, estimated at nearly $4 billion per year, and has the highest cost of any cancer when categorized on a per patient basis. The direct economic cost of NMIBC is fueled by the need for lifelong cystoscopic examination and variations in treatment algorithms. This fiscal burden is further compounded by the indirect impact on psychological health and quality of life of patients and their families. Despite the development of new technologies, such as novel urinary biomarkers and innovative cystoscopic methods, no alternative to cystoscopic surveillance has been established. The management of patients with NMIBC is responsible for a substantial financial burden with indirect costs that extend beyond quantifiable direct costs.

  17. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari T. Syvänen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC in muscle-invasive bladder cancer was introduced several years ago. Despite the evidence supporting its use in clinical practice, only a minority of patients who undergo radical cystectomy receive preoperative chemotherapy. In addition, recommendations and methods to detect patients who would benefit the most from NAC are still unclear. The European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines panel on muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer recommends the use of cisplatin-based NAC for T2-T4a, cN0 M0 bladder cancer if the patient has a performance status ≥2 and if the renal function is not impaired, but the American Urological Association, for example, does not have any guideline recommendations on this topic at all. In this review we describe the current literature supporting NAC in association with radical cystectomy in muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Evidence acquisition was made searching the Medline database for original articles published before 1st February 2014, with search terms: “neoadjuvant chemotherapy”, “radical cystectomy”, and “invasive bladder cancer”.

  18. Micro-RNA profiling in kidney and bladder cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardo, Fedra; Liu, Chang Gong; Ferracin, Manuela; Calin, George A; Fassan, Matteo; Bassi, Pierfrancesco; Sevignani, Cinzia; Byrne, Dolores; Negrini, Massimo; Pagano, Francesco; Gomella, Leonard G; Croce, Carlo M; Baffa, Raffaele

    2007-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are a group of small noncoding RNAs with modulator activity of gene expression. Recently, micro-RNA genes were found abnormally expressed in several types of cancers. To study the role of the micro-RNAs in human kidney and bladder cancer, we analyzed the expression profile of 245 micro-RNAs in kidney and bladder primary tumors. A total of 27 kidney specimens (20 carcinomas, 4 benign renal tumors, and 3 normal parenchyma) and 27 bladder specimens (25 urothelial carcinomas and 2 normal mucosa) were included in the study. Total RNA was used for hybridization on an oligonucleotide microchip for micro-RNA profiling developed in our laboratories. This microchip contains 368 probes in triplicate, corresponding to 245 human and mouse micro-RNA genes. A set of 4 human micro-RNAs (miR-28, miR-185, miR-27, and let-7f-2) were found significantly up-regulated in renal cell carcinoma (P micro-RNAs miR-223, miR-26b, miR-221, miR-103-1, miR-185, miR-23b, miR-203, miR-17-5p, miR-23a, and miR-205 were significantly up-regulated in bladder cancers (P micro-RNA expression across various stages, whereas with increasing tumor-nodes-metastasis staging in bladder cancer, miR-26b showed a moderate decreasing trend (P = 0.082). Our results show that different micro-RNAs are deregulated in kidney and bladder cancer, suggesting the involvement of these genes in the development and progression of these malignancies. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of micro-RNAs in neoplastic transformation and to test the potential clinical usefulness of micro-RNAs microarrays as diagnostic and prognostic tool.

  19. Unusual presentation of metastatic gall bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To report the first case of rare isolated breast metastasis from carcinoma gall bladder. Single patient case report. A 35-year-old pre-menopausal female presented with 2 FNx01 2 cm right upper outer quadrant breast lump. Post-mastectomy, histology confirmed it to be metastatic adenocarcinoma positive for both Cytokeratin (CK 7 and CK20. Past history as told by the patient revealed that 2 years back, cholecystectomy was performed for gall stones, of which no histology reports were present; she had a port site scar recurrence which showed it to be adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy was advised which the patient did not complete. This is probably the first case reported of isolated breast metastasis from gall bladder carcinoma, diagnosed retrospectively. It also highlights the importance of adjuvant treatment in gall bladder malignancy.

  20. Impedance ratio method for urine conductivity-invariant estimation of bladder volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schlebusch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive estimation of bladder volume could help patients with impaired bladder volume sensation to determine the right moment for catheterisation. Continuous, non-invasive impedance measurement is a promising technology in this scenario, although influences of body posture and unknown urine conductivity limit wide clinical use today. We studied impedance changes related to bladder volume by simulation, in-vitro and in-vivo measurements with pigs. In this work, we present a method to reduce the influence of urine conductivity to cystovolumetry and bring bioimpedance cystovolumetry closer to a clinical application.

  1. p53 mutations in urinary bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Berggren, P; Steineck, G; Adolfsson, J; Hansson, J; Jansson, O; Larsson, P; Sandstedt, B; Wijkstr?m, H; Hemminki, K

    2001-01-01

    We have screened for mutations in exons 5?8 of the p53 gene in a series consisting of 189 patients with urinary bladder neoplasms. 82 (44%) neoplasms were lowly malignant (Ta, G1?G2a) and 106 (56%) were highly malignant (G2b?G4 or ?T1). Only one mutation was in a lowly malignant urinary bladder neoplasm, in total we found p53 mutations in 26 (14%) of the 189 patients. 30% of the samples had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for one or both of the p53 exogenic (CA)n repeat and the p53 intragenic (A...

  2. The impact of marriage on bladder cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelles, Jason L; Joseph, Sue A; Konety, Badrinath R

    2009-01-01

    Marital status has been found to influence survival in a number of malignancies. We examined data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer survival database to see if married patients with bladder cancer had a survival advantage vs. nonmarried patients. The SEER database contains data on 127,015 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer between 1973 and 2002. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses, we examined the impact of marital status (single, married, separated, divorced, or widowed) on survival after diagnosis with bladder cancer. Age, race, AJCC stage, radiation and chemotherapy, and cystectomy were other variables analyzed. Marital status did not appear to have a significant survival effect for women. However, men who were widowed had a risk of death of 1.74 relative to married men (95% CI 1.15, 2.26, P = 0.008). For widowed men over 70, this effect was even more pronounced, with a risk of death of 2.1 (95% CI 1.33, 3.31, P = 0.001). While we did not see any definite survival advantage to being married vs. not being married for patients who are diagnosed with bladder cancer, there is a significant risk to widowed men, particularly older widowed men. This risk is independent of age, race, stage, and may reflect the patient's willingness to seek medical treatment in addition to psychoneuroimmune factors.

  3. Deciphering the Roles of Thiazolidinediones and PPARγ in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Chiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of thiazolidinedione (TZD therapy in type II diabetic patients has proven useful in the lowering of blood glucose levels. However, recent investigations have shown that there may be potential health concerns associated, including the risk of developing bladder cancer as well as complications in the cardiovasculature. TZDs are ligands for the nuclear receptor PPARγ, and activation causes lipid uptake and insulin sensitization, both of which are critical processes for diabetic patients whose bodies are unable to utilize insulin effectively. Several studies have shown that PPARγ/TZDs decrease IGF-1 levels and, thus, reduce cancer growth in carcinomas such as the pancreas, colon, liver, and prostate. However, other studies have shed light on the potential of the receptor as a biomarker for uroepithelial carcinomas, particularly due to its stimulatory effect on migration of bladder cancer cells. Furthermore, PPARγ may provide the tumor-promoting microenvironment by de novo synthesis of nutrients that are needed for bladder cancer development. In this review, we closely examine the TZD class of drugs and their effects on PPARγ in patient studies along with additional molecular factors that are positive modulators, such as protein phosphatase 5 (PP5, which may have considerable implications for bladder cancer therapy.

  4. Bladder dose accumulation based on a biomechanical deformable image registration algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Else; Muren, Ludvig; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2012-01-01

    Variations in bladder position, shape and volume cause uncertainties in the doses delivered to this organ during a course of radiotherapy for pelvic tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of dose accumulation based on repeat imaging and deformable image registration (DIR......) to improve the accuracy of bladder dose assessment. For each of nine prostate cancer patients, the initial treatment plan was re-calculated on eight to nine repeat computed tomography (CT) scans. The planned bladder dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters were compared to corresponding parameters derived from...... DIR-based accumulations and DVH summation were small and well within 1 Gy. For the investigated treatment scenario, DIR- based bladder dose accumulation did not result in substantial improvement of dose estimation as compared to the straightforward DVH summation. Large variations were found...

  5. Classification of Bladder Cancer Patients via Penalized Linear Discriminant Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeisi Shahraki, Hadi; Bemani, Peyman; Jalali, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    Objectives: In order to identify genes with the greatest contribution to bladder cancer, we proposed a sparse model making the best discrimination from other patients. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 22 genes with a key role in most cancers were considered in 21 bladder cancer patients and 14 participants of the same age (± 3 years) without bladder cancer in Shiraz city, Southern Iran. Real time-PCR was carried out using SYBR Green and for each of the 22 target genes 2-Δct as a quantitative index of gene expression was reported. We determined the most affective genes for the discriminant vector by applying penalized linear discriminant analysis using LASSO penalties. All the analyses were performed using SPSS version 18 and the penalized LDA package in R.3.1.3 software. Results: Using penalized linear discriminant analysis led to elimination of 13 less important genes. Considering the simultaneous effects of 22 genes with important influence on many cancers, it was found that TGFβ, IL12A, Her2, MDM2, CTLA-4 and IL-23 genes had the greatest contribution in classifying bladder cancer patients with the penalized linear discriminant vector. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve revealed that the proposed vector had good performance with minimal (only 3) mis- classification. The area under the curve (AUC) of our proposed test was 96% (95% CI: 83%- 100%) and sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 90.5%, 85.7%, 90.5% and 85.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The penalized discriminant method can be considered as appropriate for classifying bladder cancer cases and searching for important biomarkers. Creative Commons Attribution License

  6. Bacillus Calmette–Guérin and Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad H.A. Razack

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the second most common cancer of the urinary tract, and overall it is among the top 10 cancers in men. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the most common type, with the majority being superficial disease, i.e. the tumour has not gone beyond the lamina propria. The main problem with superficial TCC is the high recurrence rate. Various forms of treatment methods have been attempted to reduce the recurrence rate, with intravesical bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG being the most successful to date. In fact, intravesical BCG is one of the most successful forms of immunotherapy in the treatment of any form of cancer. This article is a general review of BCG in bladder cancer with an emphasis on the indication and mechanism of action in reducing recurrence and progression.

  7. A randomized trial comparing bladder volume consistency during fractionated prostate radiation therapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, L.

    2014-01-10

    Organ motion is a contributory factor to the variation in location of the prostate and organs at risk during a course of fractionated prostate radiation therapy (RT). A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed with the primary endpoint to provide evidence-based bladder-filling instructions to achieve a consistent bladder volume (BV) and thus reduce the bladder-related organ motion. The secondary endpoints were to assess the incidence of acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients and patients’ satisfaction with the bladder-filling instructions.

  8. Preclinical dosimetry of magnetic fluid hyperthermia for bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea; Etienne, Wiguins; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-02-01

    Background Despite positive efficacy, thermotherapy is not widely used in clinical oncology. Difficulties associated with field penetration and controlling power deposition patterns in heterogeneous tissue have limited its use for heating deep in the body. Heat generation using iron-oxide super-paramagnetic nanoparticles excited with magnetic fields has been demonstrated to overcome some of these limitations. The objective of this preclinical study is to investigate the feasibility of treating bladder cancer with magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Methods The bladders of 25 female rats were injected with 0.4 ml of Actium Biosystems magnetite-based nanoparticles (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) via catheters inserted in the urethra. To assess the distribution of nanoparticles in the rat after injection we used the 7 T small animal MRI system (Bruker ClinScan, Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen, Germany). Heat treatments were performed with a small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder CO) with a goal of raising bladder temperature to 42°C in 1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that a MFH system provides well-localized heating of rat bladder with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues.

  9. Mycobacterium bovis endophthalmitis from BCG immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbrandy, S. J. F.; Schreuders, L. C.; de Smet, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report a patient who developed BCG endophthalmitis after BCG immunotherapy for bladder cancer. Comparison of this case with 2 other reported cases reveals a similar pattern of elderly, debilitated and immunocompromised patients with poor response to systemic antituberculous therapy in

  10. Role of hexaminolevulinate-guided fluorescence cystoscopy in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Grabe, Magnus; Haug, Erik Skaaheim

    2012-01-01

    Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) is an optical imaging agent used with fluorescence cystoscopy (FC) for the detection of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Guidelines from the European Association of Urology (EAU) and a recent, more detailed European expert consensus statement agree that HAL...

  11. Baicalein and U0126 suppress bladder cancer proliferation via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bladder cancer drugs investigation is full of challenge. Currently, the commonly used chemotherapy drugs in the clinic include methotrexate, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and fluorouracil. They have certain curative effect but the side effect is high. Therefore, new drug research is of great clinical significance [8]. Baicalein is a type ...

  12. Baicalein and U0126 suppress bladder cancer proliferation via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TUNEL and Annexin V/PI detection showed both baicalein and U0126 induced T24 cell apoptosis. Baicalein and U0126 significantly down-regulated MAPK signaling pathway related molecule activity in both mRNA and protein levels (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Baicalein and U0126 restrain bladder cancer cell proliferation and ...

  13. Baicalein and U0126 suppress bladder cancer proliferation via ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Baicalein and U0126 suppressed bladder cancer cell T24 proliferation by blocking cell cycle in G0~G1 phase. TUNEL and Annexin V/PI detection showed both baicalein and U0126 induced T24 cell apoptosis. Baicalein and U0126 significantly down-regulated MAPK signaling pathway related molecule activity in ...

  14. Licochalcone A exerts antitumor activity in bladder cancer cell lines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    State and Federal laws, standards of the US. Department of Health and Human Services, and guidelines established by Tulane University. Animal Care and Use Committee, accredited by. Association for the Assessment and. Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care [16]. Tumor cell line. The bladder cancer cell lines, ...

  15. 15 Pattern of bladder cancer at University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    Patients with bladder cancer who presented to the hospital during this period were recruited and parameters studied included patients demographics, HIV status .... prevalence of schistosomia infection isolated in malignant tissues. Table 2: Distribution of variables among patients. Gender number. Percentage. Mean age.

  16. A review of molecular biomarkers for bladder cancer | Miakhil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Numerous molecular markers for bladder cancer have been identified and investigated with various laboratory techniques. Molecular markers are isolated from tissue, serum and urine. They fall into proteomic, genetic and epigenetic categories. Some of molecular markers show promising results in terms of ...

  17. Identification of methylated genes associated with aggressive bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J Marsit

    Full Text Available Approximately 500,000 individuals diagnosed with bladder cancer in the U.S. require routine cystoscopic follow-up to monitor for disease recurrences or progression, resulting in over $2 billion in annual expenditures. Identification of new diagnostic and monitoring strategies are clearly needed, and markers related to DNA methylation alterations hold great promise due to their stability, objective measurement, and known associations with the disease and with its clinical features. To identify novel epigenetic markers of aggressive bladder cancer, we utilized a high-throughput DNA methylation bead-array in two distinct population-based series of incident bladder cancer (n = 73 and n = 264, respectively. We then validated the association between methylation of these candidate loci with tumor grade in a third population (n = 245 through bisulfite pyrosequencing of candidate loci. Array based analyses identified 5 loci for further confirmation with bisulfite pyrosequencing. We identified and confirmed that increased promoter methylation of HOXB2 is significantly and independently associated with invasive bladder cancer and methylation of HOXB2, KRT13 and FRZB together significantly predict high-grade non-invasive disease. Methylation of these genes may be useful as clinical markers of the disease and may point to genes and pathways worthy of additional examination as novel targets for therapeutic treatment.

  18. TREATMENT OF INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER IN PATIENT AFTER RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are case report and literature review of the treatment recurrent bladder cancer after kidney transplantation. Radical cystectomy and Bricker ileal conduit was performed. Detailed operative technique is described. Radical cystectomy is an effective curative treatment for recurrent disease. Bricker ileal conduit is safe and feasible in renal transplant patients. 

  19. Intraoperative radiotherapy in gynaecological and genito-urinary malignancies: focus on endometrial, cervical, renal, bladder and prostate cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krengli, Marco; Pisani, Carla; Deantonio, Letizia; Surico, Daniela; Volpe, Alessandro; Surico, Nicola; Terrone, Carlo

    2017-01-19

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) refers to the delivery of a single radiation dose to a limited volume of tissue during a surgical procedure. A literature review was performed to analyze the role of IORT in gynaecological and genito-urinary cancer including endometrial, cervical, renal, bladder and prostate cancers.Literature search was performed by Pubmed and Scopus, using the words "intraoperative radiotherapy/IORT", "gynaecological cancer", "uterine/endometrial cancer", "cervical/cervix cancer", "renal/kidney cancer", "bladder cancer" and "prostate cancer". Forty-seven articles were selected from the search databases, analyzed and briefly described.Literature data show that IORT has been used to optimize local control rate in genito-urinary tumours mainly in retrospective studies. The results suggest that IORT could be advantageous in the setting of locally advanced and recurrent disease although further prospective trials are needed to confirm this findings.

  20. Diagnostic value of urinary CK-20 RNA and VEGF in bladder cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the diagnostic value of urinary cytokeratin 20 (CK-20) RNA and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in comparison with urine cytology in the detection of bladder cancer. This study included 80 patients with bladder cancer, 20 patients with bilharzial bladder lesions and 20 ...

  1. Quantification of dose uncertainties for the bladder in prostate cancer radiotherapy based on dominant eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Richard; Acosta, Oscar; Lafond, Caroline; Espinosa, Jairo; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    In radiotherapy for prostate cancer the dose at the treatment planning for the bladder may be a bad surrogate of the actual delivered dose as the bladder presents the largest inter-fraction shape variations during treatment. This paper presents PCA models as a virtual tool to estimate dosimetric uncertainties for the bladder produced by motion and deformation between fractions. Our goal is to propose a methodology to determine the minimum number of modes required to quantify dose uncertainties of the bladder for motion/deformation models based on PCA. We trained individual PCA models using the bladder contours available from three patients with a planning computed tomography (CT) and on-treatment cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Based on the above models and via deformable image registration (DIR), we estimated two accumulated doses: firstly, an accumulated dose obtained by integrating the planning dose over the Gaussian probability distribution of the PCA model; and secondly, an accumulated dose obtained by simulating treatment courses via a Monte Carlo approach. We also computed a reference accumulated dose for each patient using his available images via DIR. Finally, we compared the planning dose with the three accumulated doses, and we calculated local dose variability and dose-volume histogram uncertainties.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the urinary bladder: cancer staging and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, E.A. [McMaster Univ. Medical Centre, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Jhaveri, K.S.; O' Malley, M.E.; Haider, M.A. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Univ. Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Kartik.Jhaveri@uhn.on.ca; Jewett, M.A.; Rendon, R.A. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Urology Univ. Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique for imaging bladder tumours. It offers distinct benefits over other imaging modalities owing to its superior contrast, spatial resolution, multiplanar capabilities, and the availability of a nonnephrotoxic contrast agent. The main indication for MRI of the urinary bladder is local staging of bladder cancers. MRI may also be used to evaluate undiagnosed bladder lesions. In some cases MRI may play an important role in early detection and characterizing of certain bladder lesions. This article provides an overview of MRI's role in bladder imaging with emphasis on local tumour staging. MRI features of various urinary bladder lesions are described. (author)

  3. Expression of estrogen receptors-alpha and -beta in bladder cancer cell lines and human bladder tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Steven S; Smith, Carolyn L; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Yu, Jiang; Kim, Isaac Y; Jian, Weiguo; Sonpavde, Guru; Ayala, Gustavo E; Younes, Mamoun; Lerner, Seth P

    2006-06-15

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) are known to mediate important physiologic responses as well as the growth of some tumors in response to estradiol stimulation. In a previous study the selective ER modulator raloxifene was shown to induce apoptosis in an ERbeta-positive bladder cancer cell line. However, the expression of ERbeta in human bladder cancer has not been thoroughly investigated. ERalpha and ERbeta expression in 224 bladder tumor samples was evaluated using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. Levels of ERalpha and ERbeta protein and mRNA expression were determined in several bladder cancer cell lines using quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. The effect of estradiol and antiestrogen treatments on RT4 bladder cancer cell growth was determined by cell proliferation assays. Analyses revealed that only 2 human bladder cancers weakly expressed ERalpha. In contrast, the expression of ERbeta was detected in 141 tumors (63%). ERbeta was expressed in 58% of WHO Grade 1 and 2 tumors, whereas 70% of Grade 3 tumors demonstrated expression (P = .085). Importantly, although only 53% and 55% of Ta and T1 tumors demonstrated ERbeta expression, 80% of T2, 81% of T3, and 75% of T4 tumors showed ERbeta expression. The differences in ERbeta expression between Ta/T1 and T2/T3/T4 tumors were found to be highly significant (P cell carcinomas had ERbeta expression (80%) comparable to that of muscle invasive bladder cancers. Western blot analysis detected ERbeta protein expression in each of the 5 bladder cancer cell lines tested, whereas no or very low levels of ERalpha were found. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that higher levels of ERbeta than ERalpha mRNA were present in 5637, T-24, TSU-Pr1, and TCC-Sup bladder cancer cells, whereas ER-alpha mRNA levels were greater than ERbeta in RT4 cells. Treatment with 17beta-estradiol modestly increased RT4 cell growth, whereas the antiestrogens, 4-hydroxtamoxifen, raloxifene, or

  4. The Relationship between Bladder Cancer and Epigenetic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Özen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers of urinary system and approximately 70% of the cases are low grade and non-muscle invasive. Because of the histological indicator inadequacy of heterogeneous tumors like bladder cancer, researchers tend to look into genetic and molecular markers. Furthermore, role of epigenetic changes in cancer biology to be more distinctive than other cellular changes was shown. Epigenetic changes include 3 main titles; DNA methylation, micro RNA regulation and histone modification. In the literature, many epigenetic changes were found to be associated with early detection of the disease, progression, patient prognosis, tumor recurrence, early relapse, higher pathologic stage, disease-specific survival. With the understanding of epigenetic changes better patient outcomes will be achieved in the future.

  5. Extent of lymphadenectomy in radical cystectomy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Sadaf

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefit of pelvic lymphadenectomy in patients with cancer of the urinary bladder remains controversial. Though the inclusion of lymph node dissection in conjunction with radical cystectomy for patients with clinically negative nodes is well accepted, however, the extent of the nodal dissection remains contentious, particularly in patients with gross disease and T1G3 cancer. The extent of the primary bladder tumor, number of lymph nodes removed and the lymph node tumor burden are important prognostic variables in patients undergoing cystectomy. We analyzed the impact of the extent of lymphadenectomy during radical cystectomy on survival in the contemporary literature. Methods A Pubmed search was carried out for the literature published over the last 15 years using bladder cancer, radical cystectomy, survival, lymphadenectomy and complications as the key words. We have discussed the extent of lymphadenectomy on survival and its anatomical basis to determine the optimal number of lymph nodes to be removed and the concept of node density. Results Evidence from contemporary literature indicate significantly increased survival rates after cystectomy in patients with bladder cancer diagnosed with stages III or IV disease who have had relatively more lymph nodes examined, suggesting that even some patients with higher stage disease may benefit from extended pelvic lymphadenectomy at the time of cystectomy. Studies also indicate that more extensive lymphadenectomy significantly improved the prognosis of patients with bladder cancer, not only by providing prognostic information but perhaps it is also due to its inherent therapeutic value. Conclusion Extended lymph node dissection improves local control and survival. However, in the absence of controlled randomized trial this remains a dubitable issue.

  6. Tobacco use, occupation, coffee, various nutrients, and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, G R; Burch, J D; Miller, A B; Cook, G M; Esteve, J; Morrison, B; Gordon, P; Chambers, L W; Fodor, G; Winsor, G M

    1980-04-01

    In a Canadian population-based case-control study of 480 males and 152 female case-control pairs, the relative risk for development of bladder cancer for ever used versus never used cigarettes was 3.9 for males and 2.4 for females, with a dose-response relationship in both sexes. A reduced risk was associated with the use of filter cigarettes compared to nonfilter cigarettes. After control for cigarette usage, a significant risk was noted for male pipe smokers. For male ex-smokers the risk after 15 years of no smoking was less than one-half that of current male smokers. Bladder cancer risk was found for workers in the chemical, rubber, photographic, petroleum, medical, and food processing industries among males and for workers occupationally exposed to dust or fumes among both sexes. Bladder cancer risk was elevated for males consuming all types of coffee, regular coffee, and instant coffee and for females consuming instant coffee, but no dose-response relationship was found. Risk was found for males consuming water from nonpublic supples but not for females. No risk was observed in males or females consuming nitrate-containing foods, beverages other than coffee, or fiddlehead greens. Hair dye usage in females and phenacetin usage in males and females carried no risk. Divergent findings by area for aspirin suggested that an overall association was not causal. Reevaluation of the data on artificial sweeteners confirmed a significant bladder cancer risk in males and a dose-response relationship. The cumulated population attributable risk for bladder cancer was 90% for males from cigarette smoking, industrial exposure, and exposure to nonpublic water supplies and 29% for females from cigarette smoking, industrial exposure, and instant coffee consumption.

  7. Improvement of the cytological diagnosis of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Leonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the comparative results of cytological examination of alcohol-induced bladder washouts by liquid-based cytology and conventional cytology in 323 patients, including 150 with suspected bladder cancer (BC and 173 patients after performed combination or combined treatment for BC. The performed investigation has established that the diagnostic value of liquid-based cytology in diagnosing BC and its local recurrences is 1.3-fold higher than that of conventional cytology.

  8. Improvement of the cytological diagnosis of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    M. G. Leonov; T. V. Shelyakina; A. A. Tkhagapso; Ya. Kh.-B. Ershova; S. A. Belyaeva

    2014-01-01

    The paper gives the comparative results of cytological examination of alcohol-induced bladder washouts by liquid-based cytology and conventional cytology in 323 patients, including 150 with suspected bladder cancer (BC) and 173 patients after performed combination or combined treatment for BC. The performed investigation has established that the diagnostic value of liquid-based cytology in diagnosing BC and its local recurrences is 1.3-fold higher than that of conventional cytology.

  9. Improvement of the cytological diagnosis of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Leonov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the comparative results of cytological examination of alcohol-induced bladder washouts by liquid-based cytology and conventional cytology in 323 patients, including 150 with suspected bladder cancer (BC and 173 patients after performed combination or combined treatment for BC. The performed investigation has established that the diagnostic value of liquid-based cytology in diagnosing BC and its local recurrences is 1.3-fold higher than that of conventional cytology.

  10. Urinary bladder cancer and the petroleum industry: a quantitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, Antonio Varo; Allam, Mohamed Farouk; Díaz-Molina, Carmen; Del Castillo, Amparo Serrano; Abdel-Rahman, Amira Gamal; Navajas, Rafael Fernández-Crehuet

    2006-12-01

    To estimate the pooled risk of petroleum industry for urinary bladder cancer. All observational studies that evaluated the association between urinary bladder risk and the petroleum industry were reviewed. We have only identified eight case-control studies. These studies were carried out between 1989 and 1995. Of the eight localized studies six were exclusively for males. The other two studies included both males and females, but none reported separately the risk among men and women. There was an obvious risk of petroleum industry in the pooled risk (odds ratio 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27-1.54). Also, Q test was not significant (P>0.1), denoting homogeneity across the pooled studies. Pooled analysis applying the random effect model was 1.50 (95% CI 1.29-1.75). Although our pooled estimate shows that the petroleum industry is associated with the risk of urinary bladder cancer, the eight studies were based on retrospective data from case-control studies. Further prospective studies evaluating the association between petroleum industry and urinary bladder cancer risk are strongly needed.

  11. The efficacy of Apaziquone in the treatment of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramés Masana, Francisco; de Reijke, Theo M

    2017-11-01

    Bladder cancer is nowadays a common tumor. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has still chances of recurrence and progression in spite of surgery and adjuvant treatments. New therapies are being developed to reduce these percentages with less adverse effects - Apaziquone (EO9) is an example. Areas covered: A literature search has been performed using Pubmed, UpToDate and Google verified information (mainly from Food and Drug Administration and Spectrum Pharmaceutics websites). We have included data from the most representative clinical trials and reviews published. Expert opinion: Apaziquone is considered a promising chemical agent if applied intravesically due mainly to its pharmacodynamics and safety profile. There is evidence for this with respect to adjuvant chemo ablative therapy and as a post-transurethral resection of bladder (TURB) single-dose regimen. As a result, new clinical phase III trials are needed both to evaluate its efficacy as an adjuvant therapy in the spectrum from intermediate- to high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer and to select the most appropriate candidates and treatment schedule. As a conclusion, Apaziquone is a good candidate to become a better alternative as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of NMIBC in the near future.

  12. Molecular genetic diagnosis of de novo and recurrent bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, G; Reinschmidt, G; Müller, S C

    1999-02-01

    Bladder cancer, the second most common urological tumor, is usually diagnosed by endoscopy and biopsy of the lower urinary tract. However, this procedure is expensive, can cause discomfort to the patient and is a source of infection. Commercially available diagnostic systems measure protein byproducts of bladder carcinoma in voided urine; their sensitivity is only between 60-80%. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based microsatellite analysis of the urine sediment (MAUS) is a noninvasive, inexpensive and easily performed analytical method which was introduced in the de novo diagnosis and follow-up of bladder cancer. By utilizing the PCR with 20 polymorphic microsatellite markers on different chromosomes and separating PCR products by electrophoresis on 7% denaturing polyacrylamide-formamide-urea slab gels, a 91% diagnostic sensitivity could be achieved. In order to minimize costs and analysis time, the separation and detection of PCR products was carried out by capillary array electrophoresis and two-color fluorescent primer labeling/laser beam detection in another study. The accuracy of both methods was the same. In either detection system, MAUS is an accurate and promising tool in the noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  13. Deregulation of Rab and Rab effector genes in bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel R Ho

    Full Text Available Growing evidence indicates that Rab GTPases, key regulators of intracellular transport in eukaryotic cells, play an important role in cancer. We analysed the deregulation at the transcriptional level of the genes encoding Rab proteins and Rab-interacting proteins in bladder cancer pathogenesis, distinguishing between the two main progression pathways so far identified in bladder cancer: the Ta pathway characterized by a high frequency of FGFR3 mutation and the carcinoma in situ pathway where no or infrequent FGFR3 mutations have been identified. A systematic literature search identified 61 genes encoding Rab proteins and 223 genes encoding Rab-interacting proteins. Transcriptomic data were obtained for normal urothelium samples and for two independent bladder cancer data sets corresponding to 152 and 75 tumors. Gene deregulation was analysed with the SAM (significant analysis of microarray test or the binomial test. Overall, 30 genes were down-regulated, and 13 were up-regulated in the tumor samples. Five of these deregulated genes (LEPRE1, MICAL2, RAB23, STXBP1, SYTL1 were specifically deregulated in FGFR3-non-mutated muscle-invasive tumors. No gene encoding a Rab or Rab-interacting protein was found to be specifically deregulated in FGFR3-mutated tumors. Cluster analysis showed that the RAB27 gene cluster (comprising the genes encoding RAB27 and its interacting partners was deregulated and that this deregulation was associated with both pathways of bladder cancer pathogenesis. Finally, we found that the expression of KIF20A and ZWINT was associated with that of proliferation markers and that the expression of MLPH, MYO5B, RAB11A, RAB11FIP1, RAB20 and SYTL2 was associated with that of urothelial cell differentiation markers. This systematic analysis of Rab and Rab effector gene deregulation in bladder cancer, taking relevant tumor subgroups into account, provides insight into the possible roles of Rab proteins and their effectors in bladder

  14. Deregulation of Rab and Rab Effector Genes in Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joel R.; Chapeaublanc, Elodie; Kirkwood, Lisa; Nicolle, Remy; Benhamou, Simone; Lebret, Thierry; Allory, Yves; Southgate, Jennifer; Radvanyi, François; Goud, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that Rab GTPases, key regulators of intracellular transport in eukaryotic cells, play an important role in cancer. We analysed the deregulation at the transcriptional level of the genes encoding Rab proteins and Rab-interacting proteins in bladder cancer pathogenesis, distinguishing between the two main progression pathways so far identified in bladder cancer: the Ta pathway characterized by a high frequency of FGFR3 mutation and the carcinoma in situ pathway where no or infrequent FGFR3 mutations have been identified. A systematic literature search identified 61 genes encoding Rab proteins and 223 genes encoding Rab-interacting proteins. Transcriptomic data were obtained for normal urothelium samples and for two independent bladder cancer data sets corresponding to 152 and 75 tumors. Gene deregulation was analysed with the SAM (significant analysis of microarray) test or the binomial test. Overall, 30 genes were down-regulated, and 13 were up-regulated in the tumor samples. Five of these deregulated genes (LEPRE1, MICAL2, RAB23, STXBP1, SYTL1) were specifically deregulated in FGFR3-non-mutated muscle-invasive tumors. No gene encoding a Rab or Rab-interacting protein was found to be specifically deregulated in FGFR3-mutated tumors. Cluster analysis showed that the RAB27 gene cluster (comprising the genes encoding RAB27 and its interacting partners) was deregulated and that this deregulation was associated with both pathways of bladder cancer pathogenesis. Finally, we found that the expression of KIF20A and ZWINT was associated with that of proliferation markers and that the expression of MLPH, MYO5B, RAB11A, RAB11FIP1, RAB20 and SYTL2 was associated with that of urothelial cell differentiation markers. This systematic analysis of Rab and Rab effector gene deregulation in bladder cancer, taking relevant tumor subgroups into account, provides insight into the possible roles of Rab proteins and their effectors in bladder cancer pathogenesis

  15. Multiplex PCR and Next Generation Sequencing for the Non-Invasive Detection of Bladder Cancer.

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    Douglas G Ward

    Full Text Available Highly sensitive and specific urine-based tests to detect either primary or recurrent bladder cancer have proved elusive to date. Our ever increasing knowledge of the genomic aberrations in bladder cancer should enable the development of such tests based on urinary DNA.DNA was extracted from urine cell pellets and PCR used to amplify the regions of the TERT promoter and coding regions of FGFR3, PIK3CA, TP53, HRAS, KDM6A and RXRA which are frequently mutated in bladder cancer. The PCR products were barcoded, pooled and paired-end 2 x 250 bp sequencing performed on an Illumina MiSeq. Urinary DNA was analysed from 20 non-cancer controls, 120 primary bladder cancer patients (41 pTa, 40 pT1, 39 pT2+ and 91 bladder cancer patients post-TURBT (89 cancer-free.Despite the small quantities of DNA extracted from some urine cell pellets, 96% of the samples yielded mean read depths >500. Analysing only previously reported point mutations, TERT mutations were found in 55% of patients with bladder cancer (independent of stage, FGFR3 mutations in 30% of patients with bladder cancer, PIK3CA in 14% and TP53 mutations in 12% of patients with bladder cancer. Overall, these previously reported bladder cancer mutations were detected in 86 out of 122 bladder cancer patients (70% sensitivity and in only 3 out of 109 patients with no detectable bladder cancer (97% specificity.This simple, cost-effective approach could be used for the non-invasive surveillance of patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers harbouring these mutations. The method has a low DNA input requirement and can detect low levels of mutant DNA in a large excess of normal DNA. These genes represent a minimal biomarker panel to which extra markers could be added to develop a highly sensitive diagnostic test for bladder cancer.

  16. Multiplex PCR and Next Generation Sequencing for the Non-Invasive Detection of Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Douglas G; Baxter, Laura; Gordon, Naheema S; Ott, Sascha; Savage, Richard S; Beggs, Andrew D; James, Jonathan D; Lickiss, Jennifer; Green, Shaun; Wallis, Yvonne; Wei, Wenbin; James, Nicholas D; Zeegers, Maurice P; Cheng, K K; Mathews, Glenn M; Patel, Prashant; Griffiths, Michael; Bryan, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Highly sensitive and specific urine-based tests to detect either primary or recurrent bladder cancer have proved elusive to date. Our ever increasing knowledge of the genomic aberrations in bladder cancer should enable the development of such tests based on urinary DNA. DNA was extracted from urine cell pellets and PCR used to amplify the regions of the TERT promoter and coding regions of FGFR3, PIK3CA, TP53, HRAS, KDM6A and RXRA which are frequently mutated in bladder cancer. The PCR products were barcoded, pooled and paired-end 2 x 250 bp sequencing performed on an Illumina MiSeq. Urinary DNA was analysed from 20 non-cancer controls, 120 primary bladder cancer patients (41 pTa, 40 pT1, 39 pT2+) and 91 bladder cancer patients post-TURBT (89 cancer-free). Despite the small quantities of DNA extracted from some urine cell pellets, 96% of the samples yielded mean read depths >500. Analysing only previously reported point mutations, TERT mutations were found in 55% of patients with bladder cancer (independent of stage), FGFR3 mutations in 30% of patients with bladder cancer, PIK3CA in 14% and TP53 mutations in 12% of patients with bladder cancer. Overall, these previously reported bladder cancer mutations were detected in 86 out of 122 bladder cancer patients (70% sensitivity) and in only 3 out of 109 patients with no detectable bladder cancer (97% specificity). This simple, cost-effective approach could be used for the non-invasive surveillance of patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers harbouring these mutations. The method has a low DNA input requirement and can detect low levels of mutant DNA in a large excess of normal DNA. These genes represent a minimal biomarker panel to which extra markers could be added to develop a highly sensitive diagnostic test for bladder cancer.

  17. Clinical Outcomes With Dose-Escalated Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Prospective Study

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    Murthy, Vedang, E-mail: vmurthy@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Masodkar, Renuka; Kalyani, Nikhil; Mahantshetty, Umesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Bakshi, Ganesh; Prakash, Gagan [Department of Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar [Department of Medical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India); Ghonge, Sujata; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Parel, Mumbai (India)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility, clinical outcomes, and toxicity in patients with bladder cancer treated with adaptive, image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder preservation as a part of trimodality treatment. The role of dose escalation was also studied. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with localized bladder cancer were enrolled in a prospective study. They underwent maximal safe resection of bladder tumor and concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with large tumors were offered induction chemotherapy. Radiation therapy planning was done using either 3 (n=34) or 6 (n=10) concentrically grown planning target volumes (PTV). Patients received 64 Gy in 32 fractions to the whole bladder and 55 Gy to the pelvic nodes and, if appropriate, a simultaneous integrated boost to the tumor bed to 68 Gy (equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions assuming α/β of 10 [EQD2]{sub 10} = 68.7 Gy). Daily megavoltage (MV) imaging helped to choose the most appropriate PTV encompassing bladder for the particular day (using plan-of-the-day approach). Results: Most patients (88%) had T2 disease. Sixteen patients (36%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A majority of the patients (73%) received prophylactic nodal irradiation, whereas 55% of the patients received escalated dose to the tumor bed. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 3-year locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival, and overall survival (OS) were 78%, 66%, and 67%, respectively. The bladder preservation rate was 83%. LRC (87% vs 68%, respectively, P=.748) and OS (74% vs 60%, respectively, P=.36) rates were better in patients receiving dose escalation. Instances of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was seen in 5 (11%) and 2 (4%) patients, respectively. There was no acute or late RTOG grade 3 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity. Conclusions: Adaptive IGRT using plan-of-the-day approach for bladder

  18. Effects of increasing carbon nanofiber density in polyurethane composites for inhibiting bladder cancer cell functions.

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    Tsang, Melissa; Chun, Young Wook; Im, Yeon Min; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-07-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is a versatile elastomer that is commonly used in biomedical applications. In turn, materials derived from nanotechnology, specifically carbon nanofibers (CNFs), have received increasing attention for their potential use in biomedical applications. Recent studies have shown that the dispersion of CNFs in PU significantly enhances composite nanoscale surface roughness, tensile properties, and thermal stability. Although there have been studies concerning normal primary cell functions on such nanocomposites, there have been few studies detailing cancer cell responses. Since many patients who require bladder transplants have suffered from bladder cancer, the ideal bladder prosthetic material should not only promote normal primary human urothelial cell (HUC) function, but also inhibit the return of bladder cancerous cell activity. This study examined the correlation between transitional (UMUC) and squamous (or SCaBER) urothelial carcinoma cells and HUC on PU:CNF nanocomposites of varying PU and CNF weight ratios (from pure PU to 4:1 [PU:CNF volume ratios], 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:4 composites to pure CNF). Composites were characterized for mechanical properties, wettability, surface roughness, and chemical composition by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and goniometry. The adhesion and proliferation of UMUC and SCaBER cancer cells were assessed by MTS assays. Cellular responses were further quantified by measuring the amounts of nuclear mitotic protein 22 (NMP-22), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Results demonstrated that both UMUC and SCaBER cell proliferation rates decreased over time on substrates with increased CNF in PU. In addition, with the exception of VEGF from UMUC (which was the same across all materials), composites containing the most CNF activated cancer cells (UMUC and SCaBER) the least, as shown by

  19. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

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    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-07-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  20. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for urachal and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo Jr, Jose R; Desai, Mihir; Canes, David; Frota, Rodrigo; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Moinzadeh, Alireza; Tuerk, Ingolf; Desai, Mahesh R; Gill, Inderbir S

    2008-12-01

    To report our initial experiences with laparoscopic partial cystectomy for urachal and bladder malignancy. Between March 2002 and October 2004, laparoscopic partial cystectomy was performed in 6 cases at 3 institutions; 3 cases were urachal adenocarcinomas and the remaining 3 cases were bladder transitional cell carcinomas. All patients were male, with a median age of 55 years (45-72 years). Gross hematuria was the presenting symptom in all patients, and diagnosis was established with trans-urethral resection bladder tumor in 2 patients and by means of cystoscopic biopsy in the remaining 4 patients. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy was performed using the transperitoneal approach under cystoscopic guidance. In each case, the surgical specimen was removed intact entrapped in an impermeable bag. One patient with para-ureteral diverticulum transitional cell carcinoma required concomitant ureteral reimplantation. All six procedures were completed laparoscopically without open conversion. The median operating time was 110 minutes (90-220) with a median estimated blood loss of 70 mL (50-100). Frozen section evaluations of bladder margins were routinely obtained and were negative for cancer in all cases. The median hospital stay was 2.5 days (2-4) and the duration of catheterization was 7 days. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Final histopathology confirmed urachal adenocarcinoma in 3 cases and bladder transitional cell carcinoma in 3 cases. At a median follow-up of 28.5 months (range: 26 to 44 months), there was no evidence of recurrent disease as evidenced by radiologic or cystoscopic evaluation. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy in carefully selected patients with urachal and bladder cancer is feasible and safe, offering a promising and minimally invasive alternative for these patients.

  1. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for urachal and bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose R. Colombo Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To report our initial experiences with laparoscopic partial cystectomy for urachal and bladder malignancy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between March 2002 and October 2004, laparoscopic partial cystectomy was performed in 6 cases at 3 institutions; 3 cases were urachal adenocarcinomas and the remaining 3 cases were bladder transitional cell carcinomas. All patients were male, with a median age of 55 years (45-72 years. Gross hematuria was the presenting symptom in all patients, and diagnosis was established with trans-urethral resection bladder tumor in 2 patients and by means of cystoscopic biopsy in the remaining 4 patients. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy was performed using the transperitoneal approach under cystoscopic guidance. In each case, the surgical specimen was removed intact entrapped in an impermeable bag. One patient with para-ureteral diverticulum transitional cell carcinoma required concomitant ureteral reimplantation. RESULTS: All six procedures were completed laparoscopically without open conversion. The median operating time was 110 minutes (90-220 with a median estimated blood loss of 70 mL (50-100. Frozen section evaluations of bladder margins were routinely obtained and were negative for cancer in all cases. The median hospital stay was 2.5 days (2-4 and the duration of catheterization was 7 days. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Final histopathology confirmed urachal adenocarcinoma in 3 cases and bladder transitional cell carcinoma in 3 cases. At a median follow-up of 28.5 months (range: 26 to 44 months, there was no evidence of recurrent disease as evidenced by radiologic or cystoscopic evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic partial cystectomy in carefully selected patients with urachal and bladder cancer is feasible and safe, offering a promising and minimally invasive alternative for these patients.

  2. The state and potential of social media in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveridge, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Social media sites and services have become intimately woven into our interpersonal communications and have begun to stake a visible place in healthcare. Disease-specific Twitter hashtags, online patient groups and participation by patients, practitioners and advocacy groups are emblematic of this new paradigm. A literature review and summary of resources and publications on bladder cancer and social media. A majority of Western patients have access to and use the Internet for health information. Urologists and oncologists have used bladder-cancer-specific messaging at international meetings infrequently as compared to prostate and other non-urologic cancers. An active community does participate in online discussion, with differences between medical practitioners and patients/advocates. Advice is given with the aim of unifying this discussion.

  3. Treatment of locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer

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    Makarand V Khochikar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a significant variation in the treatment strategies adopted for the treatment of locally advanced T3b, T4a, N1-3 and metastatic bladder cancer. There is increasing evidence that we would be able to offer them some benefit in terms of disease-free survival and improving the quality of life. This article is aimed at reviewing the current literature on the treatment strategies in locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: Extensive literature search was done on Medline/Pubmed from 1980-2007 using the key words - treatment of locally advanced, metastatic bladder cancer. Standard textbooks on urology, urologic oncology and monograms were reviewed. Guidelines such as National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, European Urology Association guidelines and American Urology Association guidelines were also studied. Results and Conclusions: There is a place for radical cystectomy in locally advanced T3b-T4 and N1-3 bladder cancer. Radical cystectomy alone rarely cures this subgroup of patients. There is increasing evidence that meticulous surgical clearance and extended lymphadenectomy has significant impact on disease-free survival. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been found to be effective in terms of recurrence-free survival and better than cystectomy alone. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy also has beneficial effects in terms of downstaging the disease and improving recurrence-free survival. This perioperative chemotherapy (adjuvant/neoadjuvant has 5-7% survival benefit and 10% reduction in the death due to cancer disease. Excellent five-year survival rates have been achieved in patients achieving pT0 stage at surgery following chemotherapy (around 80% and overall 40% five-year survival in node positive patients, which is promising. Though practiced widely, perioperative chemotherapy is not considered as a standard of care as yet. Current ongoing trials are likely to help us in

  4. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, smoking, and bladder cancer risk: findings from the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Mariana C.; Lin, Jie; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Kiltie, Anne E.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Tony; Benhamou, Simone; Taylor, Jack A.; Placidi, Donatella; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Steineck, Gunnar; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kogevinas, Manolis; Silverman, Debra; Malats, Nuria; Chanock, Stephen; Wu, Xifeng; Karagas, Margaret R.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Sak, Sei Chung; Choudhury, Ananya; Barrett, Jennifer H; Elliot, Faye; Corral, Román; Joshi, Amit D.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Vineis, Paolo; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Guarrera, Simonetta; Polidoro, Silvia; Allione, Alessandra; Gurzau, Eugen; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Kumar, Rajiv; Rudnai, Peter; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Campagna, Marcello; Arici, Cecilia; Park, SungShim Lani; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the most important and well-established bladder cancer risk factor, and a rich source of chemical carcinogens and reactive oxygen species that can induce damage to DNA in urothelial cells. Therefore, common variation in DNA repair genes might modify bladder cancer risk. In this study we present results from meta- and pooled analyses conducted as part of the International Consortium of Bladder Cancer. We included data on 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms corresponding to 7 DNA repair genes from 13 studies. Pooled- and meta-analyses included 5,282 cases and 5,954 controls of non-Latino white origin. We found evidence for weak but consistent associations with ERCC2 D312N (rs1799793) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.01–1.19; p = 0.021), NBN E185Q (rs1805794) (per allele OR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.01–1.18; p = 0.028), and XPC A499V (rs2228000) (per allele OR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.00–1.21, p = 0.044). The association with NBN E185Q was limited to ever smokers (interaction p = 0.002), and was strongest for the highest levels of smoking dose and smoking duration. Overall, our study provides the strongest evidence to date for a role of common variants in DNA repair genes in bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:19706757

  5. Genomic characterization of three urinary bladder cancer cell lines: understanding genomic types of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Leite, Rosário; Carreira, Isabel; Melo, Joana; Ferreira, Susana Isabel; Ribeiro, Ilda; Ferreira, Jaqueline; Filipe, Marco; Bernardo, Carina; Arantes-Rodrigues, Regina; Oliveira, Paula; Santos, Lúcio

    2014-05-01

    Several genomic regions are frequently altered and associated with the type, stage and progression of urinary bladder cancer (UBC). We present the characterization of 5637, T24 and HT1376 UBC cell lines by karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis. Some cytogenetic anomalies present in UBC were found in the three cell lines, such as chromosome 20 aneuploidy and the loss of 9p21. Some gene loci losses (e.g. CDKN2A) and gains (e.g. HRAS, BCL2L1 and PTPN1) were coincident across all cell lines. Although some significant heterogeneity and complexity were detected between them, their genomic profiles exhibited a similar pattern to UBC. We suggest that 5637 and HT1376 represent the E2F3/RB1 pathway due to amplification of 6p22.3, concomitant with loss of one copy of RB1 and mutation of the remaining copy. The HT1376 presented a 10q deletion involving PTEN region and no alteration of PIK3CA region which, in combination with the inactivation of TP53, bears more invasive and metastatic properties than 5637. The T24 belongs to the alternative pathway of FGFR3/CCND1 by presenting mutated HRAS and over-represented CCND1. These cell lines cover the more frequent subtypes of UBC and are reliable models that can be used, as a group, in preclinical studies.

  6. Bladder Cancer Stem-Like Cells: Their Origin and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohishi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BC, the most common cancer arising from the human urinary tract, consists of two major clinicopathological phenotypes: muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC and non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. MIBC frequently metastasizes and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. A certain proportion of patients with metastatic BC can achieve a remission with systemic chemotherapy; however, the disease relapses in most cases. Evidence suggests that MIBC comprises a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs, which may be resistant to these treatments and may be able to form new tumors in the bladder or other organs. Therefore, the unambiguous identification of bladder CSCs and the development of targeted therapies are urgently needed. Nevertheless, it remains unclear where bladder CSCs originate and how they are generated. We review recent studies on bladder CSCs, specifically focusing on their proposed origin and the possible therapeutic options based on the CSC theory.

  7. Definitions, End Points, and Clinical Trial Designs for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Recommendations From the International Bladder Cancer Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Sylvester, R.J.; Bohle, A.; Palou, J.; Lamm, D.L.; Brausi, M.; Soloway, M.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Colombel, M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide recommendations on appropriate clinical trial designs in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) based on current literature and expert consensus of the International Bladder Cancer Group. METHODS: We reviewed published trials, guidelines, meta-analyses, and reviews and

  8. Characterization of Uptake and Internalization of Exosomes by Bladder Cancer Cells

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    Carrie A. Franzen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder tumors represent a special therapeutic challenge as they have a high recurrence rate requiring repeated interventions and may progress to invasive or metastatic disease. Exosomes carry proteins implicated in bladder cancer progression and have been implicated in bladder cancer cell survival. Here, we characterized exosome uptake and internalization by human bladder cancer cells using Amnis ImageStreamX, an image cytometer. Exosomes were isolated by ultracentrifugation from bladder cancer culture conditioned supernatant, labeled with PKH-26, and analyzed on the ImageStreamX with an internal standard added to determine concentration. Exosomes were cocultured with bladder cancer cells and analyzed for internalization. Using the IDEAS software, we determined exosome uptake based on the number of PKH-26+ spots and overall PKH-26 fluorescence intensity. Using unlabeled beads of a known concentration and size, we were able to determine concentrations of exosomes isolated from bladder cancer cells. We measured exosome uptake by recipient bladder cancer cells, and we demonstrated that uptake is dose and time dependent. Finally, we found that uptake is active and specific, which can be partially blocked by heparin treatment. The characterization of cellular uptake and internalization by bladder cancer cells may shed light on the role of exosomes on bladder cancer recurrence and progression.

  9. Expression of Robo protein in bladder cancer tissues and its effect on the growth of cancer cells by blocking Robo protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Cheng, Hepeng; Xu, Weibo; Tian, Xin; Li, Xiaodong; Zhu, Chaoyang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the expression of Slit signaling protein ligand Robo protein in human bladder cancer and para-carcinoma tissue, and observe the tumor cell survival and growth by inoculating the bladder cancer cells with the blocked signaling protein into the subcutaneous tissue of nude mice. The expression of Robo protein was detected in T24 cells in human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma and cultivated human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma confirmed by pathological diagnosis. The cultivated T24 cells were coated by the protein antibody and human bladder uroepithelium carcinoma T24 tumor-bearing mice model was established. The tumor cell survival and growth were observed in the antibody coating group and non-coating group. The tumor body size was measured. The immunohistochemical detection showed that Robo protein isoforms Robo1 and Robo 4 were expressed in T24 cells of cancer tissues, paracarcinoma tissues and cultured human uroepithelium carcinoma. The expression of Robo1 was significantly higher than that of Robo4 (Pcancer cells could be detected in nodular tumor of mice in each group. The volume of the tumor-bearing mice in the nodular tumor of the non-coating group was larger than that of anti-Robol antibody coating group and the difference was statistically significant (P0.05); The difference was statistically significant compared with the anti-Robo1 antibody coating group (PRobo1 and Robo4 were expressed in human bladder cancer T24 cells. To block Robo4 signal protein had little effect on the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor and to block Robo1 signal protein would seriously affect the survival and growth of the transplantation tumor, suggesting that Robo1 might play an important role in the growth and metastasis of bladder cancer, and might become a new target for the treatment of human bladder cancer and drug research.

  10. Long noncoding RNA in prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens-Uzunova, Elena S; Böttcher, René; Croce, Carlo M; Jenster, Guido; Visakorpi, Tapio; Calin, George A

    2014-06-01

    Genomic regions without protein-coding potential give rise to millions of protein-noncoding RNA transcripts (noncoding RNA) that participate in virtually all cellular processes. Research over the last 10 yr has accumulated evidence that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often altered in human urologic cancers. To review current progress in the biology and implication of lncRNAs associated with prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. The PubMed database was searched for articles in the English language with combinations of the Medical Subject Headings terms long non coding RNA, long noncoding RNA, long untranslated RNA, cancer, neoplasms, prostate, bladder, and kidney. We summarise existing knowledge on the systematics, biology, and function of lncRNAs, particularly these involved in prostate, kidney, and bladder cancer. We also discuss the possible utilisation of lncRNAs as novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in urologic malignancies and portray the major challenges and future perspectives of ongoing lncRNA research. LncRNAs are important regulators of gene expression interacting with the major pathways of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Alterations in the function of lncRNAs promote tumour formation, progression, and metastasis of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. LncRNAs can be used as noninvasive tumour markers in urologic malignancies. Increased knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which lncRNAs perform their function in the normal and malignant cell will lead to a better understanding of tumour biology and could provide novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of urologic cancers. In this paper we reviewed current knowledge of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) for the detection and treatment of urologic cancers. We conclude that lncRNAs can be used as novel biomarkers in prostate, kidney, or bladder cancer. LncRNAs hold promise as future therapeutic targets, but more research is needed to gain a better

  11. Generation of potent cytotoxic T lymphocytes against in male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer by dendritic cells loaded with dying T24 bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eu Chang; Jung, Seung Il; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Je-Jung; Kwon, Dong Deuk

    2017-01-01

    In order to induce a potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy for bladder cancer, various tumor antigens can be loaded onto DCs. The aim of this study was to establish a method of immunotherapy for male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), using bladder cancer-specific CTLs generated in vitro by DCs. Monocyte-derived DCs from bladder cancer patients were induced to mature in a standard cytokine cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and PGE2: standard DCs, sDCs) or anα-type 1-polarized DC (αDC1) cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-α, IFN-γ, and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid) and loaded with the UVB-irradiated bladder cancer cell line, T24. Antigen-loaded αDC1s were evaluated by morphological and functional assays, and the bladder cancer-specific CTL response was analyzed by cytotoxic assay. The αDC1s significantly increased the expression of several molecules pertaining to DC maturation, regardless of whether or not the αDC1s were loaded with tumor antigens, relative to sDCs. The αDC1s demonstrated increased production of interleukin-12 both during maturation and after subsequent stimulation with CD40L that was not significantly affected by loading with tumor antigens as compared to that of sDCs. Bladder cancer-specific CTLs targeting autologous bladder cancer cells were successfully induced by αDC1s loaded with dying T24 cells. Autologous αDC1s loaded with an allogeneic bladder cancer cell line resulted in increased bladder cancer-specific CTL responses as compared to that with sDCs, and therefore, may provide a novel source of DC-based vaccines that canbe used in immunotherapy for male patients with NMIBC. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  12. Update on the management of invasive bladder cancer 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goethuys H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hans Goethuys,1 Hein Van Poppel1,21Department of Urology, Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium; 2Department of Urology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is a deadly disease for which a number of new approaches have become available to improve prognosis. A recent review emphasized the importance of timely indication of surgery and highlighted current views regarding the adequate extent of the surgery and the importance of lymph node dissection. Furthermore, treatment using neoadjuvant and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy has become more prominent, while cystectomy and diversion should be conducted only in experienced centers. Optimal methods of urinary diversion and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic cystectomy require further study.Keywords: bladder cancer, surgery, chemotherapy, urinary diversion

  13. [Treatment of infiltrating nonmetastatic bladder cancers in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintens, H; Guy, L; Mazerolles, C; Théodore, C; Amsellem, D; Roupret, M; Wallerand, H; Roy, C; Saint, F; Bernardini, S; Lebret, T; Soulié, M; Pfister, C

    2009-11-01

    Total cystectomy is the reference treatment for infiltrating nonmetastatic bladder cancers. With the progress in anesthesia and postoperative intensive care, this treatment can be applied to a population of elderly subjects provided there is a strict oncological and geriatric evaluation of the patient. Recent series reporting total cystectomies in subjects over 75 years of age report comparable morbidity and mortality rates to the general population. Strategies to preserve the vesical reservoir can be indicated in selected cases. Their objectives are to guarantee local control and follow-up identical to radical cystectomy, while preserving a functional bladder and good quality of life. The strategies including transurethral resection with radiochemotherapy are analyzed. Thus, with multidisciplinary consensus and adapted management, elderly patients with significant comorbidities should not be automatically excluded from access to effective treatment of these cancers. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The Use of Biomarkers for Bladder Cancer Diagnosis and Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubmüller, Bernhard; Roupret, Morgan; Briganti, Alberto; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer - a propensity that is associated with high recurrence and mortality rates. Various molecular alterations are reflected by diverse cellular morphological manifestations and vast tumor heterogeneity. Many biomarkers have been described that have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use, but most still remain investigational. The question how molecular markers can support surveillance of different patient groups is still a matter of controversy. However, it can be expected that major advancement in the understanding of molecular pathways involved in urothelial carcinogenesis will enable improved patient management. The scope of this review is to discuss the established diagnostic tests and urinary biomarkers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer.

  15. Bladder Metastasis of non-Small Cell Lung Cancer : an Unusual Cause of Hematuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karatas, O. Faruk; Bayrak, Reyhan; Yildirim, M. Erol; Bayrak, Omer; Cimentepe, Ersin; Unal, Dogan

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 2% of bladder malignancies are metastatic. The lung cancer makes metastasis sporadically to the bladder. A-69-year-old female patient presented with a history of pain in kidneys, vomiting and hematuria. Cystoscopic examination of the patient revealed small bladder capacity and solitary

  16. 3D vision on robot assisted brachytherapy catheter implantation in bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, G.A.H.J.; Steen-Banasik, E. van der; Wieringa F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Using strict criteria, solitary muscle invasive bladder cancer can be managed favorably in a bladder sparing manner with brachytherapy. Hollow catheters for afterloading radiotherapy are placed in the bladder wall. Until now, this is performed by open surgery. We replaced open surgery by laparoscopy

  17. [Case of heterochronous triple urogenital cancer (renal cell carcinoma, bladder cancer, prostatic cancer)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akiou; Tsuritani, Shinji; Takagawa, Kiyoshi; Fuse, Hideki

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of a 73-year-old male with heterochronous triple urogenital cancer. The patient was referred to our hospital because serum PSA was elevated (7.0 ng/ml) in 1998. Prostatic needle biopsy revealed prostatic cancer in the right lobe, and total prostatectomy was performed. The histopathological diagnosis was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (TlcNOMO). Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) was detected during an examination for microhematuria in 2002. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) procedure was performed, and the histopathological diagnosis was grade 2 urothelial carcinoma (pTa). A right renal mass was detected incidentally on follow-up CT for bladder cancer in 2008. Renal enucleation was performed in 2009. The histopathological diagnosis was grade 2 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (pTlaNXMO). NMIBC was detected on follow-up urethrocystoscopy in 2011. The TURBT procedure was performed, and the histopathological diagnosis was grade 2 urothelial carcinoma (pTa). On follow-up for urogenital cancer patients, it is important to investigate recurrence of the primary cancer and also heterochronous canceration of other urogenital organs.

  18. Perioperative search for circulating tumor cells in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Despite having an organ confined tumor stage at the time of radical cystectomy, a certain number of bladder cancer patients will develop local or distant metastases over time. Currently there are no reliable serum markers for monitoring and evaluating risk profiles of urothelial cancers. Several studies suggest that detection of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC may correlate with disease status and prognosis at baseline and early in the treatment of cancers. The presence of CTCs in whole blood before and during radical cystectomy could provide further information on disease status, and could be used as an indicator to determine the need for adjuvant or even perioperative chemotherapy. Methods From 03/2009 to 05/2009, five patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder participated in this study. All patients were admitted to the hospital for radical cystectomy (rCx. A standard or extended lymph node dissection was performed in all cases. Preoperative CT or MRI scans revealed no distant or local metastases. Median age was 66.8 years (55-81 yrs. After obtaining informed consent from each patient, approximately 30 mL of peripheral blood was taken immediately before rCx and again during surgical removal of the urinary bladder from the patients' body. As additional parameters, operation time (OR for surgical removal of the bladder and the amount of blood volume that was used for the detection of CTCs were recorded. Obtained blood samples were processed using the Cell-Search System (Veridex© within 48 hours of collection. CTCs were identified and quantitated using the Cell-Search System, followed by re-evaluation of the provided results by specially trained and experienced personal. (CS, SH Results CTCs were detected before and during surgical removal of the urinary bladder in one of five patients (20%. In the one patient positive for CTC, two CTCs were detected in the blood sample that was

  19. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. (West Virginia Univ. School of Medicine, Morgantown (USA))

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  20. Predicting Rectal and Bladder Overdose During the Course of Prostate Radiotherapy Using Dose-Volume Data From Initial Treatment Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, Vedang, E-mail: vmurthy@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital and Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India); Shukla, Pragya; Adurkar, Pranjal; Master, Zubin; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital and Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether information from the initial fractions can determine which patients are likely to consistently exceed their planning dose-volume constraints during the course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were recontoured on their daily megavoltage computed tomography scans and the dose was recalculated. The bladder and rectal volumes (in mL) receiving {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose in each fraction and in the original plans were recorded. A fraction for which the difference between planned and delivered was more than 2 mL was considered a volume failure. Similarly if the difference in the planned and delivered maximum dose (D{sub max}) was {>=}1% for the rectum and bladder, the fraction was considered a dose failure. Each patient's first 3 to 5 fractions were analyzed to determine if they correctly identified those patients who would consistently fail (i.e., {>=}20% of fractions) during the course of their radiotherapy. Results: Six parameters were studied; the rectal volume (RV) and bladder volumes (BV) (in mL) received {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose and maximum dose to 2 mL of the rectum and bladder. This was given by RV{sub 100}, RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, BV{sub 70}, RD{sub max}, and BD{sub max}, respectively. When more than 1 of the first 3 fractions exceed the planning constraint as defined, it accurately predicts consistent failures through the course of the treatment. This method is able to correctly identify the consistent failures about 80% (RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, and RV{sub 100}), 90% (BV{sub 70}), and 100% (RD{sub max} and BD{sub max}) of the times. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method accurately identifying patients who are likely to consistently exceed the planning constraints during the course of

  1. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet and risk of bladder cancer in the EPIC cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, G.; Ros, M.M.; Roswall, N.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Travier, N.; Tjonneland, A.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Sacerdote, C.; Tumino, R.; Ljungberg, B; Gram, I.T.; Weiderpass, E.; Skeie, G.; Malm, J.; Ehrnstrom, R.; Chang-Claude, J.; Mattiello, A.; Agnoli, C.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Boutron-Ruault, M.C.; Fagherazzi, G.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Nilsson, L.M.; Amiano, P.; Trichopoulou, A.; Oikonomou, E.; Tsiotas, K.; Sanchez, M.J.; Overvad, K.; Quiros, J.R.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Barricarte, A.; Key, T.J.; Allen, N.E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.; Riboli, E.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Palli, D.; Romieu, I.; Romaguera, D.; Gonzalez, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence of the protective role of the Mediterranean diet (MD) on cancer. However, to date no epidemiological study has investigated the influence of the MD on bladder cancer. We evaluated the association between adherence to the MD and risk of urothelial cell bladder cancer (UCC),

  2. Urinary long noncoding RNAs in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: new architects in cancer prognostic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Daniela; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; D'Elia, Carolina; Musi, Gennaro; de Cobelli, Ottavio; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cimmino, Amelia

    2017-06-01

    Several reports over the last 10 years provided evidence that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often altered in bladder cancers. lncRNAs are longer than 200 nucleotides and function as important regulators of gene expression, interacting with the major pathways of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A large number of lncRNAs has oncogenic function and is more expressed in tumor compared with normal tissues. Their overexpression may be associated with tumor formation, progression, and metastasis in a variety of tumors including bladder cancer. Although lncRNAs have been shown to have critical regulatory roles in cancer biology, the biological functions and prognostic values in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer remain largely unknown. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence suggests that several lncRNAs expression profiles in bladder malignancies are associated with poor prognosis, and they can be detected in biological fluids, such as urines. Here, we review current progress in the biology and the implication of lncRNAs associated with bladder cancer, and we discuss their potential use as diagnosis and prognosis biomarkers in bladder malignancies with a focus on their role in high-risk nonmuscle-invasive tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Long non-coding RNA ANRIL is up-regulated in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hongxue [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Department of Urology, Hospital of Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps, Urumqi 830002 (China); Li, Xuechao; Song, Yarong; Zhang, Peng; Xiao, Yajun [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Xing, Yifei, E-mail: yifei_xing@163.com [Department of Urology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2015-11-13

    Antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL) is a member of long non-coding RNAs and has been reported to be dysregulated in several human cancers. However, the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer remains unclear. This present study aimed to investigate whether and how ANRIL involved in bladder cancer. Our results showed up-regulation of ANRIL in bladder cancer tissues versus the corresponding adjacent non-tumor tissues. To explore the specific mechanisms, ANRIL was silenced by small interfering RNA or short hairpin RNA transfection in human bladder cancer T24 and EJ cells. Knockdown of ANRIL repressed cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis, along with decreased expression of Bcl-2 and increased expressions of Bax, cytoplasmic cytochrome c and Smac and cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. However, no change of cleaved caspase-8 level was observed. Furthermore, in vivo experiment confirmed that knockdown of ANRIL inhibited tumorigenic ability of EJ cells in nude mice. Meanwhile, in accordance with in vitro study, knockdown of ANRIL inhibited expression of Bcl-2 and up-regulated expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase-9, but did not affect cleaved caspase-8 level. In conclusion, we first report that ANRIL possibly serves as an oncogene in bladder cancer and regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. - Highlights: • We first report the role of ANRIL in bladder cancer. • ANRIL is obviously up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues. • ANRIL regulates bladder cancer cell proliferation and cell apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway.

  4. [Benzidine dyes and risk of bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, M; Yoshida, O

    1989-12-01

    Until the early 1970's there was little concern about dyes which contain benzidine as an integral part of their chemical structure. Furthermore, use of the finished dyes was not considered dangerous. To ascertain whether azo dyes are associated with risk of development of bladder tumors in workers who handpaint Yuzen-type silk kimonos in Kyoto, we investigated the disintegration of dyes to benzidine. In these studies, we found that in rats and mice benzidine-based dyes are metabolized to benzidine and that the azo linkage of benzidine dyes is reduced by Escherichia coli and soil bacteria. These experimental findings were reported previously. In this report, we outline an approach to these studies. Many of the dyes used to color paper, textiles, lipstick, bait used by fishermen, as well as hair dyes, and dyes used in research, for pharmaceutical products, and by defence personnel for the detection of liquid chemical warfare agents, have been shown to be potentially mutagenic or carcinogenic. We review the literature on these dyes.

  5. Estimation of bladder contractility from intravesical pressure-volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Christopher H; Gammie, Andrew; Drake, Marcus John; Abrams, Paul; Kitney, Darryl Graham; Vahabi, Bahareh

    2017-04-01

    To describe parameters from urodynamic pressure recordings that describe urinary bladder contractility through the use of principles of muscle mechanics. Subtracted detrusor pressure and voided flow were recorded from patients undergoing filling cystometry. The isovolumetric increase of detrusor pressure, P, of a voluntary bladder contraction before voiding was used to generate a plot of (dP/dt)/P versus P. Extrapolation of the plot to the y-axis and the x-axis generated a contractility parameter, vCE (the maximum rate of pressure development) and the maximum isovolumetric pressure, P0 , respectively. Similar curves were obtained in ex vivo pig bladders with different concentrations of the inotropic agent carbachol and shown in a supplement. Values of vCE , but not P0 , diminished with age in female subjects. vCE was most significantly associated with the 20-80% duration of isovolumetric contraction t20-80 ; and a weaker association with maximum flow rate and BCI in women. P0 was not associated with any urodynamic variable in women, but in men was with t20-80 and isovolumetric pressure indices. The rate of isovolumetric subtracted detrusor pressure (t20-80 ) increase shows a very significant association with indices of bladder contractility as derived from a derived force-velocity curve. We propose that t20-80 is a detrusor contractility parameter (DCP). Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1009-1014, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Design and evaluation of potentiometric principles for bladder volume monitoring: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Fan, Wen-Jia; Lai, Chien-Hung; Chen, Chun-Lung; Wei, Wei-Feng; Peng, Chih-Wei

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in microelectronics and wireless transmission technology have led to the development of various implantable sensors for real-time monitoring of bladder conditions. Although various sensing approaches for monitoring bladder conditions were reported, most such sensors have remained at the laboratory stage due to the existence of vital drawbacks. In the present study, we explored a new concept for monitoring the bladder capacity on the basis of potentiometric principles. A prototype of a potentiometer module was designed and fabricated and integrated with a commercial wireless transmission module and power unit. A series of in vitro pig bladder experiments was conducted to determine the best design parameters for implementing the prototype potentiometric device and to prove its feasibility. We successfully implemented the potentiometric module in a pig bladder model in vitro, and the error of the accuracy of bladder volume detection was wireless module, the design principles and animal experience gathered from this research can serve as a basis for developing new implantable bladder sensors in the future.

  7. Design and Evaluation of Potentiometric Principles for Bladder Volume Monitoring: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ching Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in microelectronics and wireless transmission technology have led to the development of various implantable sensors for real-time monitoring of bladder conditions. Although various sensing approaches for monitoring bladder conditions were reported, most such sensors have remained at the laboratory stage due to the existence of vital drawbacks. In the present study, we explored a new concept for monitoring the bladder capacity on the basis of potentiometric principles. A prototype of a potentiometer module was designed and fabricated and integrated with a commercial wireless transmission module and power unit. A series of in vitro pig bladder experiments was conducted to determine the best design parameters for implementing the prototype potentiometric device and to prove its feasibility. We successfully implemented the potentiometric module in a pig bladder model in vitro, and the error of the accuracy of bladder volume detection was <±3%. Although the proposed potentiometric device was built using a commercial wireless module, the design principles and animal experience gathered from this research can serve as a basis for developing new implantable bladder sensors in the future.

  8. Expression of Bmi-1 is a prognostic marker in bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li-Hua

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms of the development and progression of bladder cancer are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the expression of Bmi-1 protein and its clinical significance in human bladder cancer. Methods We examined the expression of Bmi-1 mRNA and Bmi-1 protein by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively in 14 paired bladder cancers and the adjacent normal tissues. The expression of Bmi-1 protein in 137 specimens of bladder cancer and 30 specimens of adjacent normal bladder tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. Statistical analyses were applied to test the relationship between expression of Bmi-1, and clinicopathologic features and prognosis. Results Expression of Bmi-1 mRNA and protein was higher in bladder cancers than in the adjacent normal tissues in 14 paired samples (P P P P P > 0.5. In superficial bladder cancers, the expression of Bmi-1 protein in recurrent cases was higher than in recurrence-free cases (62.5% versus 13.7%, P P P > 0.05. Five-year survival in the group with higher Bmi-1 expression was 50.8%, while it was 78.5% in the group with lower Bmi-1 expression (P P Conclusion Expression of Bmi-1 was greater in bladder cancers than in the adjacent normal tissues. The examination of Bmi-1 protein expression is potentially valuable in prognostic evaluation of bladder cancer.

  9. Cantharidin Induces Apoptosis Through the Calcium/PKC-Regulated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway in Human Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chin-Chuan; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Kuan-I; Huang, Kou-Tong; Lu, Tien-Hui; Fang, Kai-Min; Wu, Chin-Ching; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Lai, Chih-Ho; Su, Yi-Chang; Huang, Chun-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common malignancy worldwide. However, there is still no effective therapy for bladder cancer. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of cantharidin [a natural toxin produced (pure compound) from Chinese blister beetles (Mylabrisphalerata or Mylabriscichorii) and Spanish flies (Cantharis vesicatoria)] in human bladder cancer cell lines (including: T24 and RT4 cells). Treatment of human bladder cancer cells with cantharidin significantly decreased cell viability. The increase in the expressions of caspase-3 activity and cleaved form of caspase-9/-7/-3 were also increased in cantharidin-treated T24 cells. Furthermore, cantharidin increased the levels of phospho-eIF2α and Grp78 and decreased the protein expression of procaspase-12, which was accompanied by the increase in calpain activity in T24 cells. Cantharidin was capable of increasing the intracellular Ca (2+) and the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) in T24 cells. The addition of BAPTA/AM (a Ca (2+) chelator) and RO320432 (a selective cell-permeable PKC inhibitor) effectively reversed the increase in caspase-3 and calpain activity, the phosphorylation levels of PKC and eIF2α and Grp78 protein expression, and the decrease in procaspase-12 expression induced by cantharidin. Importantly, cantharidin significantly decreased the tumor volume (a dramatic 71% reduction after 21 days of treatment) in nude mice xenografted with T24 cells. Taken together, these results indicate cantharidin induced human bladder cancer cell apoptosis through a calcium/PKC-regulated ER stress pathway. These findings suggest that cantharidin may be a novel and potential anticancer agent targeting on bladder cancer cells.

  10. Management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Umberto; Bassi, Pierfrancesco; Sava, Teodoro; Monfardini, Silvio

    2004-12-01

    Bladder cancer is rare in patients below the age of 50 years, and most patients are in their 60s and 70s. Radical cystectomy is the preferred approach for patients with localized disease in most European countries and the USA, and evidence is growing in favor of neoadjuvant, platinum-based chemotherapy for patients at high risk of local and systemic relapse. Transurethral resection (TUR) followed by radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy appears to be a reasonable alternative, particularly in the UK and Canada. However, the elderly pose several treatment dilemmas, including the increased risk of perioperative complications, the management of orthotopic neobladder or different types of urinary diversion, as well as the higher risk of adverse events caused by pelvic radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy. Multidimensional parameters such as biologic prognostic factors, performance status, functional independence, comorbidities and cognitive function of the patient should be collected in order to tailor treatment to the patient's life expectancy and preferences. Optimized integration of TUR followed by bladder removal (or radiotherapy), with or without adjunctive chemotherapy, can be recommended for otherwise healthy patients. Palliative measures, such as TUR followed by external radiotherapy alone or monochemotherapy, should be reserved for partially impaired patients with moderate comorbidities, in order to maximize the balance of benefits and toxicities. This review summarizes recent data concerning surgery, radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy for bladder cancer in the elderly, and discusses pros and cons of the currently available therapeutic options.

  11. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  12. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  13. Prognostic factors in invasive bladder cancer; Facteurs pronostiques des tumeurs infiltrantes de vessie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maulard-Durdux, C.; Housset, M. [Hopital Tenon, 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-04-01

    In France, invasive bladder cancer is the more frequent urologic malignancy after prostate carcinoma. Treatment of bladder cancer is radical cystectomy. New therapeutic approaches such as chemo-radiation combination for a conservative procedure, neo-adjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy are still developing. In this way, a rigorous selection of patients is needed. This selection is based on prognostic criteria that could be divided into four groups: the volume of the tumor including the tumor infiltration depth, the nodal status, the presence or not of hydronephrosis and the residual tumor mass after trans-urethral resection; the histologic aspects of the tumor including histologic grading, the presence or not of an epidermoid metaplasia, of in situ carcinoma or of thrombi; the expression of tumor markers tissue polypeptide antigen, bladder tumor antigen; the biologic aspects of the tumor as ploidy, cytogenetic abnormalities, expression of Ki67, expression of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, expression of tumor antigens or growth factor receptors. This paper reviews the prognostic value of the various parameters. (authors)

  14. Bladder Cancer Incidence and Mortality: A Global Overview and Recent Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Sebastien; Ferlay, Jacques; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Znaor, Ariana; Jemal, Ahmedin; Bray, Freddie

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer has become a common cancer globally, with an estimated 430 000 new cases diagnosed in 2012. We examine the most recent global bladder cancer incidence and mortality patterns and trends, the current understanding of the aetiology of the disease, and specific issues that may influence the registration and reporting of bladder cancer. Global bladder cancer incidence and mortality statistics are based on data from the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organisation (Cancer Incidence in Five Continents, GLOBOCAN, and the World Health Organisation Mortality). Bladder cancer ranks as the ninth most frequently-diagnosed cancer worldwide, with the highest incidence rates observed in men in Southern and Western Europe, North America, as well in certain countries in Northern Africa or Western Asia. Incidence rates are consistently lower in women than men, although sex differences varied greatly between countries. Diverging incidence trends were also observed by sex in many countries, with stabilising or declining rates in men but some increasing trends seen for women. Bladder cancer ranks 13th in terms of deaths ranks, with mortality rates decreasing particularly in the most developed countries; the exceptions are countries undergoing rapid economic transition, including in Central and South America, some central, southern, and eastern European countries, and the Baltic countries. The observed patterns and trends of bladder cancer incidence worldwide appear to reflect the prevalence of tobacco smoking, although infection with Schistosoma haematobium and other risk factors are major causes in selected populations. Differences in coding and registration practices need to be considered when comparing bladder cancer statistics geographically or over time. The main risk factor for bladder cancer is tobacco smoking. The observed patterns and trends of bladder cancer incidence worldwide appear to reflect the prevalence of tobacco smoking

  15. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-12-15

    Although alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer, the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in bladder cancer. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from bladder cancer. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed promise in distinguishing bladder cancer from controls and also nonmuscle from muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer. In particular, we validated tumor-associated hypermethylation in the cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) promoters of bladder cancer tissues by bisulfite sequence analysis and methylation-specific PCR and also by in vitro treatment of T-24 bladder cancer cell line with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Furthermore, we showed that expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 was reduced significantly in an independent cohort of bladder cancer specimens compared with matched benign adjacent tissues. In summary, our findings identified candidate diagnostic and prognostic markers and highlighted mechanisms associated with the silencing of xenobiotic metabolism. The metabolomic signature we describe offers potential as a urinary biomarker for early detection and staging of bladder cancer, highlighting the utility of evaluating metabolomic profiles of cancer to gain insights into bioprocesses perturbed during tumor development and progression.

  16. PIXE analysis of cancer-afflicted human bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, G.J. Naga; Sarita, P.; Kumar, M. Ravi [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam (India); Reddy, S. Bhuloka [Swami Jnanananda Laboratories for Nuclear Research, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam (India)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technique was used for analysis of trace elements in small quantities of biological samples. Both the biological samples of normal and cancer-afflicted human bladder tissues were studied. The present experiment was performed using a 3 MV pelletron accelerator at the Institute of Physics in Bhubaneswar, India. A proton beam of 3 MeV energy was used to excite the samples. NIST SRM 1577b Bovine Liver Tissue was used as external standards for the determination of trace element concentration in the biological tissue samples. The elements CI, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Se were identified and their concentrations were estimated. The concentrations of Ti and Zn are lower (p < 0.005) and that of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Cu are significantly higher (p < 0.001) in cancerous tissues than that in normal tissues. The deficiency or excess of different trace elements observed in the cancer tissues relative to the normal tissues of bladder are correlated to the pathology of cancer. (author)

  17. An unusual case of cancer of the urachal remnant following repair of bladder exstrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, D M; Sabah, M; Conlon, P J; Mellotte, G J; Donovan, M G; Little, D M

    2011-12-01

    We report the first case of cancer of the urachal remnant following repair of bladder exstrophy, in a renal transplant recipient. A retrospective review of this clinical case and the associated literature were performed. This unusual case highlights two very rare entities. Bladder exstrophy has an incidence of 1 in 50,000 newborns, whereas urachal cancer accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumours.

  18. An unusual case of cancer of the urachal remnant following repair of bladder exstrophy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, D M

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report the first case of cancer of the urachal remnant following repair of bladder exstrophy, in a renal transplant recipient. METHOD: A retrospective review of this clinical case and the associated literature were performed. CONCLUSION: This unusual case highlights two very rare entities. Bladder exstrophy has an incidence of 1 in 50,000 newborns, whereas urachal cancer accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumours.

  19. An unusual case of cancer of the urachal remnant following repair of bladder exstrophy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, D M

    2009-03-18

    INTRODUCTION: We report the first case of cancer of the urachal remnant following repair of bladder exstrophy, in a renal transplant recipient. METHOD: A retrospective review of this clinical case and the associated literature were performed. CONCLUSION: This unusual case highlights two very rare entities. Bladder exstrophy has an incidence of 1 in 50,000 newborns, whereas urachal cancer accounts for less than 1% of all bladder tumours.

  20. An early marker of monoclonal light chain protein In bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, A. M. [ا م ابراهيم; Khalil, A. M.; Shaheen, F. A.; Hussein, M. M.; El-Shawarby, N. K.

    1994-01-01

    Bladder cancer complicating schistosomiasis is a major cause of cancer mortality in Egypt. It affects farmers who suffer from repeated and severe chronic schistosomal cystitis. The late presentation of this disease is probably due to the overlapping and similar symptoms of simple bilharzial cystitis and bladder carcinoma. The present work deals with study of the variation of low molecular weight proteins, immunoprotein-patterns present in both serum and urine in different groups of bladder ca...

  1. Activation of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 in Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van Oers, Johanna

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe identification of frequent FGFR3 mutations in superficial bladder cancer suggests that mutation of the FGFR3 gene is a key genetic event in the development of noninvasive bladder tumors. Furthermore, FGFR3 mutations were associated with a good prognosis, suggesting that the activation of FGFR3 has a beneficial effect during urothelial tumor formation. In this thesis, two aspects of FGFR3 mutations in bladder cancer have been investigated. First, the potential use of FGFR3 muta...

  2. Where are we with bladder preservation for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in 2017?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woodson Wade Smelser

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Bladder preservation is often considered for quality of life considerations or in the setting of multiple medical comorbidities, and this remains oncologically appropriate even in 2016 in highly selected patients with muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

  3. The Relationship between Food Intake and Bladder Cancer: A Case Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Bladder cancer is the second most common cancer of the urinary tract worldwide and the third most common cancer among Iranian males. Despite the relative high incidence of bladder cancer in Iran, no study has examined the relationship between dietary factors and bladder cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate this relationship. Methods: The present case-control study was carried out on fifty-five patients with bladder cancer and including 110 cancer-free patients as controls. Dietary intake was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire. To investigate the relationship between food items and bladder cancer, the subjects were classified according to the tertile of food items. The odds ratio was calculated for each tertile and the first tertile was considered as the reference group. Results: Our findings revealed that among food groups, animal fat (OR=19.76, fat (OR=12.92, junk foods (OR=8.1, organ meat (OR=5.47, processed meat (OR=5.34 and sweets (OR=3.62 were involved in the development of bladder cancer. In bladder carcinogenesis, an inverse association was recorded between consumption of low fat dairy products (OR=0.31, yoghurt (OR =0.14, fish (OR = 0.13, specific fruits (OR=0.13 and the development of bladder cancer. Conclusion: Animal products and sources of saturated fat are associated with an increased in risk of bladder cancer. The protective effect of olive oil, specific fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy fermented was observed to reduce the risk of bladder cancer.

  4. Agricultural exposure and risk of bladder cancer in the AGRIculture and CANcer cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Mathilde; Tual, Séverine; Lemarchand, Clémentine; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Velten, Michel; Marcotullio, Elisabeth; Baldi, Isabelle; Clin, Bénédicte; Lebailly, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Literature on agricultural activities and bladder cancer risk is scarce. However, farmers can be subjected to carcinogenic exposure (e.g. arsenic, previously used as a pesticide in France). This study aimed at assessing the role of a large range of agricultural activities and tasks on bladder cancer risk. The study population was the AGRIculture and CANcer cohort, a large prospective cohort of individuals affiliated to the agricultural health insurance scheme (MSA) in France. Incident bladder cancers were identified by cancer registries from enrolment (2005-2007) to 2009. Data on agricultural exposure during professional lifetime (5 animals, 13 crops, specific tasks) were obtained from the enrolment questionnaire. Associations between bladder cancer and agricultural exposure were analysed using a Cox model, adjusted for gender and smoking history. Among the 148,051 farm owners and workers included in this analysis, 179 incident bladder cancers were identified. We observed an elevated risk among field-grown vegetable workers [HR 1.89, 95% CI (1.20-2.99)], with an exposure-response relationship with duration of work [≥30 years: HR 2.54, 95% CI (1.11-5.83), p-trend = 0.02], and higher risk among women [HR 3.82, 95% CI (1.58-9.25), p-interaction = 0.05]. Non-significantly increased risks were also observed in greenhouse farmers (HR = 1.95), pea sowing (HR = 1.84), rape sowing (HR = 1.64); several tasks involving pesticide use, especially seed treatment (HR = 1.24); and in activities and tasks potentially exposing to arsenic compounds via pesticide use (HR = 1.49) or re-entry tasks (HR = 1.63). Our analyses raise the question of a possible link between agricultural activity, especially field-grown vegetables, and greenhouse cultivation and bladder cancer.

  5. Intravesical chemotherapy in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima P Porten

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is characterized by a tendency for recurrence and capacity for progression. Intravesical instillation therapy has been employed in various clinical settings, which are summarized within this review. Several chemotherapeutic agents have shown clinical efficacy in reducing recurrence rates in the post-transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT setting, including mitomycin C (MMC, doxorubicin, and epirubicin. Mounting evidence also supports the use of intravesical MMC following nephroureterectomy to reduce later urothelial bladder recurrence. In the adjuvant setting, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG immunotherapy is an established first-line agent in the management of carcinoma in situ (CIS and high-grade non muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma (UC. Among high and intermediate-risk patients (based on tumor grade, size, and focality improvements in disease-free intervals have been seen with adjunctive administration of MMC prior to scheduled BCG dosing. Following failure of first-line intravesical therapy, gemcitabine and valrubicin have demonstrated modest activity, though valrubicin remains the only agent currently Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved for the treatment of BCG-refractory CIS. Techniques to optimize intravesical chemotherapy delivery have also been explored including pharmacokinetic methods such as urinary alkalization and voluntary dehydration. Chemohyperthermia and electromotive instillation have been associated with improved freedom from recurrence intervals but may be associated with increased urinary toxicity. Improvements in therapeutic selection may be heralded by novel opportunities for genomic profiling and refinements in clinical risk stratification.

  6. Updated 2016 EAU Guidelines on Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Lebret, T.; Comperat, E.M.; Cowan, N.C.; Santis, M. de; Bruins, H.M.; Hernandez, V.; Espinos, E.L.; Dunn, J.; Rouanne, M.; Neuzillet, Y.; Veskimae, E.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Gakis, G.; Ribal, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Invasive bladder cancer is a frequently occurring disease with a high mortality rate despite optimal treatment. The European Association of Urology (EAU) Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer (MIBC) Guidelines are updated yearly and provides information to optimise diagnosis,

  7. Low ANXA10 expression is associated with disease aggressiveness in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munksgaard, P P; Mansilla, F; Brems Eskildsen, A-S

    2011-01-01

    Markers for outcome prediction in bladder cancer are urgently needed. We have previously identified a molecular signature for predicting progression in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. ANXA10 was one of the markers included in the signature and we now validated the prognostic relevance of ANXA...

  8. Interferon alfa in the treatment paradigm for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamm, D.; Brausi, M.; O'Donnell, M.A.; Witjes, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this article, we review the various options for and the potential role of interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) in the treatment of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). METHODS: PubMed was searched for journal articles on IFN-alpha use in treating bladder cancer. The references listed in

  9. Low dose intravesical heparin as prophylaxis against recurrent noninvasive (stage Ta) bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, M; Hermann, G G; Andersen, J P

    1990-01-01

    A controlled randomized clinical trial was conducted to examine the efficacy of topical low dose heparin (0.125 gm./l., 25,000 units per l.) as prophylaxis against recurrent noninvasive (stage Ta) transitional cell bladder cancer. Transurethral tumor resection was done with irrigation fluid......) bladder cancer....

  10. Variations in the Spatial Distribution of Gall Bladder Cancer: A Call ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [1] There is a marked variation on the geographic distribution of carcinoma gall bladder within this geographical region. GIS of cancer can identify key areas within a geographical region where the high AAR cannot be solely explained by known risk factors. AAR of gall bladder cancer ranges from 0.3 –7.4/100,000 population ...

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor targeting of replication competent adenovirus enhances cytotoxicity in bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, HG; Molenaar, B; van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Rodriguez, R; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR

    Purpose: We evaluated the delivery and oncolytic potential of targeted replication competent adenoviruses in bladder cancer lines. Materials and Methods: Seven established human bladder cancer tumor lines (5637, SW800, TCCsup, J82, Scaber, T24 and 253J) were studied for the expression of integrins

  12. Urinary bladder cancer risk factors: a Lebanese case- control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobeissi, Loulou Hassan; Yassine, Ibrahim Adnan; Jabbour, Michel Elias; Moussa, Mohamad Ahmad; Dhaini, Hassan Rida

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most incident malignancy among Lebanese men. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential risk factors associated with this observed high incidence. A case-control study (54 cases and 105 hospital-based controls) was conducted in two major hospitals in Beirut. Cases were randomly selected from patients diagnosed in the period of 2002-2008. Controls were conveniently selected from the same settings. Data were collected using interview questionnaire and blood analysis. Exposure data were collected using a structured face-to-face interview questionnaire. Blood samples were collected to determine N-acetyltransferase1 (NAT1) genotype by PCR-RFLP. Analyses revolved around univariate, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, along with checks for effect modification. The odds of having bladder cancer among smokers was 1.02 times significantly higher in cases vs. controls. The odds of exposure to occupational diesel or fuel combustion fumes were 4.1 times significantly higher in cases vs controls. The odds of prostate-related morbidity were 5.6 times significantly higher in cases vs controls. Cases and controls showed different clustering patterns of NAT1 alleles. No significant differences between cases and controls were found for consumption of alcohol, coffee, tea, or artificial sweeteners. This is the first case-control study investigating bladder cancer risk factors in the Lebanese context. Results confirmed established risk factors in the literature, particularly smoking and occupational exposure to diesel. The herein observed associations should be used to develop appropriate prevention policies and intervention strategies, in order to control this alarming disease in Lebanon.

  13. Designing the selenium and bladder cancer trial (SELEBLAT, a phase lll randomized chemoprevention study with selenium on recurrence of bladder cancer in Belgium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goossens Maria E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Belgium, bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in males (5.2% and the sixth most frequent cause of death from cancer in males (3.8%. Previous epidemiological studies have consistently reported that selenium concentrations were inversely associated with the risk of bladder cancer. This suggests that selenium may also be suitable for chemoprevention of recurrence. Method The SELEBLAT study opened in September 2009 and is still recruiting all patients with non-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder on TURB operation in 15 Belgian hospitals. Recruitment progress can be monitored live at http://www.seleblat.org. Patients are randomly assigned to selenium yeast (200 μg/day supplementation for 3 years or matching placebo, in addition to standard care. The objective is to determine the effect of selenium on the recurrence of bladder cancer. Randomization is stratified by treatment centre. A computerized algorithm randomly assigns the patients to a treatment arm. All study personnel and participants are blinded to treatment assignment for the duration of the study. Design The SELEnium and BLAdder cancer Trial (SELEBLAT is a phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, academic, double-blind superior trial. Discussion This is the first report on a selenium randomized trial in bladder cancer patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00729287

  14. Bladder dose accumulation based on a biomechanical deformable image registration algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, E S; Muren, L P; Sørensen, T S; Noe, K O; Thor, M; Petersen, J B; Høyer, M; Bentzen, L; Tanderup, K

    2012-11-07

    Variations in bladder position, shape and volume cause uncertainties in the doses delivered to this organ during a course of radiotherapy for pelvic tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of dose accumulation based on repeat imaging and deformable image registration (DIR) to improve the accuracy of bladder dose assessment. For each of nine prostate cancer patients, the initial treatment plan was re-calculated on eight to nine repeat computed tomography (CT) scans. The planned bladder dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were compared to corresponding parameters derived from DIR-based accumulations as well as DVH summation based on dose re-calculations. It was found that the deviations between the DIR-based accumulations and the planned treatment were substantial and ranged (-0.5-2.3) Gy and (-9.4-13.5) Gy for D(2%) and D(mean), respectively, whereas the deviations between DIR-based accumulations and DVH summation were small and well within 1 Gy. For the investigated treatment scenario, DIR-based bladder dose accumulation did not result in substantial improvement of dose estimation as compared to the straightforward DVH summation. Large variations were found in individual patients between the doses from the initial treatment plan and the accumulated bladder doses. Hence, the use of repeat imaging has a potential for improved accuracy in treatment dose reporting.

  15. Bladder wash cytology, quantitative cytology, and the qualitative BTA test in patients with superficial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, H. G.; van Balken, M. R.; Schamhart, D. H.; Peelen, P.; de Reijke, T.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.; Witjes, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Two new methods for the detection of transitional tumor cells in bladder wash (karyometry: QUANTICYT) and voided urine material (BARD BTA test) were compared with bladder wash cytology for the prediction of histology and tumor recurrence. Bladder wash material and voided urine were sampled from 138

  16. MIM, a Potential Metastasis Suppressor Gene in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Goo Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a modified version of the mRNA differential display technique, five human bladder cancer cell lines from low grade to metastatic were analyzed to identify differences in gene expression. A 316-bp cDNA (C11300 was isolated that was not expressed in the metastatic cell line TccSuP. Sequence analysis revealed that this gene was identical to KIAA 0429, has a 5.3-kb transcript that mapped to 8824.1. The protein is predicted to be 356 amino acids in size and has an actin-binding WH2 domain. Northern blot revealed expression in multiple normal tissues, but none in a metastatic breast cancer cell line (SKBR3 or in metastatic prostatic cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3. We have named this gene Missing in Metastasis (MIM and our data suggest that it may be involved in cytoskeletal organization.

  17. Constitutional and occupational risk factors associated with bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrís, J; Garcia, J; Berbel, O; Ortega, J A

    2013-09-01

    Bladder carcinoma (BC) is the fourth most common type of cancer in males from Western countries, with primary prevention an important healthcare challenge. We review the associated constitutional and occupational risk factors (RF), with greater or lesser scientific evidence, in the aetiology of BC. Literature review of the last 25 years of the constitutional and occupational RF associated with BC, conducted on MedLine, CancerLit, Science Citation Index and Embase. The search profiles were Risk factors/Genetic factors/Genetic polymorphisms/Epidemiology/Occupational factors and Bladder cancer. The main RF were a) age and gender (diagnosed at age 65 and over, with a 4:1 ratio of males to females); b) race, ethnicity and geographic location (predominantly in Caucasians and in Southern European countries); c) genetic (N-acetyltransferase-2 and glutathione s-transferase M1 gene mutations, which significantly increase the risk for BC); d) occupational, which represent 5%-10% of BC RF; and f) occupations with high BC risk, such as aluminium production, the manufacture of dyes, paints and colourings, the rubber industry and the extraction and industrial use of fossil fuels. BC is the end result of the variable combination of constitutional and environmental RF, the majority of which are unknown. The most significant constitutional RF are related to age, gender, race, ethnicity geographic location and genetic polymorphisms. The main occupational RF are those related to aromatic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Current animal models of bladder cancer: Awareness of translatability (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Xu, Ding; Pan, Chunwu; Ye, Min; Kang, Jian; Bai, Qiang; Qi, Jun

    2014-09-01

    Experimental animal models are crucial in the study of biological behavior and pathological development of cancer, and evaluation of the efficacy of novel therapeutic or preventive agents. A variety of animal models that recapitulate human urothelial cell carcinoma have thus far been established and described, while models generated by novel techniques are emerging. At present a number of reviews on animal models of bladder cancer comprise the introduction of one type of method, as opposed to commenting on and comparing all classifications, with the merits of a certain method being explicit but the shortcomings not fully clarified. Thus the aim of the present study was to provide a summary of the currently available animal models of bladder cancer including transplantable (which could be divided into xenogeneic or syngeneic, heterotopic or orthotopic), carcinogen-induced and genetically engineered models in order to introduce their materials and methods and compare their merits as well as focus on the weaknesses, difficulties in operation, associated problems and translational potential of the respective models. Findings of these models would provide information for authors and clinicians to select an appropriate model or to judge relevant preclinical study findings. Pertinent detection methods are therefore briefly introduced and compared.

  19. Work in the textile industry in Spain and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, C; Kogevinas, M; Silverman, D T; Turuguet, D; Tardon, A; Garcia-Closas, R; Carrato, A; Castaño-Vinyals, G; Fernandez, F; Stewart, P; Benavides, F G; Gonzalez, S; Serra, A; Rothman, N; Malats, N; Dosemeci, M

    2008-08-01

    Textile manufacturing is a complex industry that has frequently been associated with bladder cancer. However, results have not been consistent. This study investigated the risk of bladder cancer in Spanish textile workers. We analysed data from a multicentre hospital-based case-control study carried out in Spain (1998-2001) including 1219 cases of bladder cancer and 1271 controls. Of those, 126 cases and 122 controls reported a history of employment in the textile industry. Lifetime occupational history was obtained using a computer-assisted personal interview. Occupations, locations and materials used in the textile industry were assessed using a detailed questionnaire and expert assessment. Overall, no increased risk of bladder cancer was found for textile workers, including duration of employment analysis. Increased risks were observed for weavers (OR = 1.82, 95% CI 0.95 to 3.47), for workers in winding/warping/sizing (OR 4.11, 95% CI 1.58 to 10.71) and for those exposed to synthetic materials (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.00 to 3.56). Working for more than 10 years appeared to be associated with an increased risk for weavers (OR 2.27, 95% CI 0.97 to 5.34), for those who had ever worked in winding/warping/sizing (OR 11.03, 95% CI 1.37, 88.89), for workers in the weaving room (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.24 to 7.01) and for those exposed to synthetic (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.14 to 6.01) or cotton (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.87) materials. Statistically significant higher risks were also found for specific combinations of occupations or locations with exposure to synthetics and cotton. There was no overall increased risk for textile workers, but increased risks were found for specific groups of workers. Our findings indicate that observed risks in previous studies may be better evaluated by analysis of materials used or section worked within the industry and occupation.

  20. Lipiodol as a Fiducial Marker for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Freilich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT for bladder cancer.Materials and Methods Between 2011 and 2012, 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy. Ten to 15mL Lipiodol, using 0.5mL per injection, was injected into bladder submucosa circumferentially around the entire periphery of the tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. The authors looked at inter-observer variability regarding the size and location of the tumor bed (CTVboost on computed tomography scans with versus without Lipiodol.Results Median follow-up was 18 months. Lipiodol was visible on every orthogonal two-dimensional kV portal image throughout the entire, 7-week course of IGRT. There was a trend towards improved inter-observer agreement on the CTVboost with Lipiodol (p = 0.06. In 2 of 5 patients, the tumor bed based upon Lipiodol extended outside a planning target volume that would have been treated with a radiation boost based upon a cystoscopy report and an enhanced computed tomography (CT scan for staging. There was no toxicity attributable to Lipiodol.Conclusions Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost.

  1. Lipiodol as a Fiducial Marker for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freilich, Jessica M.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Shi, Ellen J.; Hunt, Dylan C.; Gupta, Shilpa; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder cancer; Materials and Methods: Between 2011 and 2012, 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy. Ten to 15mL Lipiodol, using 0.5mL per injection, was injected into bladder submucosa circumferentially around the entire periphery of the tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. The authors looked at inter-observer variability regarding the size and location of the tumor bed (CTVboost) on computed tomography scans with versus without Lipiodol. Results: Median follow-up was 18 months. Lipiodol was visible on every orthogonal two-dimensional kV portal image throughout the entire, 7-week course of IGRT. There was a trend towards improved inter-observer agreement on the CTVboost with Lipiodol (p = 0.06). In 2 of 5 patients, the tumor bed based upon Lipiodol extended outside a planning target volume that would have been treated with a radiation boost based upon a cystoscopy report and an enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan for staging. There was no toxicity attributable to Lipiodol: Conclusions: Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost. (author)

  2. Loss of 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Expression Contributes to Bladder Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng-Rogenski, Stephanie; Gee, Jason; Ignatoski, Kathleen Woods; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Bucheit, Amanda; Kintner, Hallie J.; Morris, David; Tallman, Christopher; Evron, Joshua; Wood, Christopher G.; Grossman, H. Barton; Lee, Cheryl T.; Liebert, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2, which is known to contribute to cancer progression, is inactivated by the catabolic enzyme, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (PGDH), which has tumor-suppressor activity in lung, colon, breast, and gastric cancers. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of PGDH in human bladder cancer tissue specimens and cell lines. Immunoperoxidase staining of bladder cancer tissues demonstrated that (1) PGDH is highly expressed by normal urothelial cells but (2) reduced in many low stage (Ta/Tis) bladder cancers, and (3) PGDH is completely lost in most invasive bladder cancers. Of eight cancer cell lines tested, only two relatively well-differentiated bladder cancer cell lines, RT4 and UM-UC9, expressed PGDH. Moreover, inhibition of PGDH expression in well-differentiated RT4 cells using small inhibitory RNA or short hairpin RNA resulted in a more aggressive phenotype with increased motility and anchorage-independent growth. Additionally, PGDH knockdown affected prostaglandin E2 signaling as measured by cAMP generation. These data indicate that loss of PGDH expression contributes to a more malignant bladder cancer phenotype and may be necessary for bladder cancer development and/or progression. PMID:20093479

  3. Endoscopic gold fiducial marker placement into the bladder wall to optimize radiotherapy targeting for bladder-preserving management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: feasibility and initial outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice M Garcia

    Full Text Available Bladder radiotherapy is a management option for carefully selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the inability to visualize the tumor site during treatment and normal bladder movement limits targeting accuracy and increases collateral radiation. A means to accurately and reliably target the bladder during radiotherapy is needed.Eighteen consecutive patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T1-T4 elected bladder-preserving treatment with maximal transurethral resection (TUR, radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. All underwent endoscopic placement of 24-K gold fiducial markers modified with micro-tines (70 [2.9×0.9 mm.]; 19 [2.1×0.7 mm. into healthy submucosa 5-10 mm. from the resection margin, using custom-made coaxial needles. Marker migration was assessed for with intra-op bladder-filling cystogram and measurement of distance between markers. Set-up error and marker retention through completion of radiotherapy was confirmed by on-table portal imaging.Between 1/2007 and 7/2012, a total of 89 markers (3-5 per tumor site were placed into 18 patients of mean age 73.6 years. Two patients elected cystectomy before starting treatment; 16/18 completed chemo-radiotherapy. All (100% markers were visible with all on-table (portal, cone-beam CT, fluoroscopy, plain-film, and CT-scan imaging. In two patients, 1 of 4 markers placed at the tumor site fell-out (voided during the second half of radiotherapy. All other markers (80/82, 98% were present through the end of radio-therapy. No intraoperative (e.g. uncontrolled bleeding, collateral injury or post-operative complications (e.g. stone formation, urinary tract infection, post-TUR hematuria >48 hours occurred. Use of micro-tined fiducial tumor-site markers afforded a 2 to 6-fold reduction in bladder-area targeted with high-dose radiation.Placement of the micro-tined fiducial markers into the bladder was feasible and associated with excellent retention-rate and no complications

  4. Immunomodulatory effects of recombinant BCG expressing pertussis toxin on TNF-alpha and IL-10 in a bladder cancer model

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    Ramos Kátia L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since successful treatment of superficial bladder cancer with BCG requires proper induction of Th1 immunity, we have developed a rBCG-S1PT strain that induced a stronger cellular immune response than BCG. This preclinical study was designed to compare the modulatory effects of BCG and rBCG-S1PT on bladder TNF-α and IL-10 expression and to evaluate antitumour activity. Methods For Experiment I, the MB49 bladder cancer cell line was used in C57BL/6 mice. Chemical cauterization of the bladder was performed to promote intravesical tumor implantation. Mice were treated by intravesical instillation with BCG, rBCG-S1PT or PBS once a week for four weeks. After 35 days the bladders were removed and weighed. TNF-〈 and IL-10 cytokine responses were measured by qPCR. Experiment II was performed in the same manner as Experiment I, except the animals were not challenged with MB49 tumor cells. Results: rBCG-S1PT immunotherapy resulted in bladder weight reduction, compared to the BCG and control group. There were increases in TNF-α in the BCG-treated group, as well as increases in TNF-α and IL-10 mRNA in the rBCG-S1PT group. Conclusion These data indicate a significant reduction of bladder tumor volume for the rBCG group, compared to the BCG and PBS groups. This suggests that rBCG could be a useful substitute for wild-type BCG and that the potential modulation between TNF-α and IL-10 cytokine productions may have therapeutic value.

  5. Cigarette Smoking, N-Acetyltransferase 2 Acetylation Status, and Bladder Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcus, P.M.; Hayes, R.B.; Vineis, P.

    2000-01-01

    Tobacco use is an established cause of bladder cancer. The ability to detoxify aromatic amines, which are present in tobacco and are potent bladder carcinogens, is compromised in persons with the N-acetyltransferase 2 slow acetylation polymorphism. The relationship of cigarette smoking with bladder...... to assess multiplicative gene-environment interaction without inclusion of control subjects. A case-series interaction odds ratio (OR) > 1.0 indicates that the relationship of cigarette smoking and bladder cancer risk is stronger among slow acetylators as compared with rapid acetylators. We observed...

  6. Urinary bladder cancer in dogs, a naturally occurring model for cancer biology and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Deborah W; Ramos-Vara, José A; Moore, George E; Dhawan, Deepika; Bonney, Patty L; Young, Kirsten E

    2014-01-01

    Each year more than 65,000 people are diagnosed with urinary bladder cancer, and more than 14,000 people die from the disease in the United States. Studies in relevant animal models are essential to improve the management of bladder cancer. Naturally occurring bladder cancer in dogs very closely mimics human invasive bladder cancer, specifically high-grade invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC; also referred to as invasive urothelial carcinoma) in cellular and molecular features; biological behavior, including sites and frequency of metastasis; and response to therapy. Canine bladder cancer complements experimentally induced rodent tumors in regard to animal models of bladder cancer. Results of cellular and molecular studies and -omics analyses in dogs are expected to lead to improved detection of TCC and preneoplastic lesions, earlier intervention, better prediction of patient outcome, and more effective TCC management overall. Studies in dogs are being used to help define heritable risks (through very strong breed-associated risk) and environment risks and to evaluate prevention and treatment approaches that benefit humans as well as dogs. Clinical treatment trials in pet dogs with TCC are considered a win-win scenario by clinician scientists and pet owners. The individual dog benefits from effective treatment, the results are expected to help other dogs, and the findings are expected to ultimately help humans with TCC. This article provides an overview of canine TCC, a summary of the similarities and differences between canine and human invasive TCC, and examples of the types of valuable translational research that can be done using dogs with naturally occurring TCC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Association of Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2) Genotypes with Bladder Cancer Risk in Taiwan.

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    Chang, Wen-Shin; Liao, Cheng-Hsi; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Hu, Pei-Shin; Wu, Hsi-Chin; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Hsu, Chang-Hsien; Hung, Yi-Wen; Bau, DA-Tian

    2016-09-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and its incidence is particularly high in many developed regions including southwestern Taiwan. However, the genetic contribution to the etiology of bladder cancer is not well-understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) genotypes with Taiwan bladder cancer risk. Three polymorphic variants of EZH2 were analyzed regarding their association with bladder cancer risk, and three hundred and seventy-five patients with bladder cancer and same number of age- and gender-matched healthy controls recruited were genotyped by the PCR-RFLP method. Among the three polymorphic sites examined, the genotypes of EZH2 rs887569 (C to T), but not rs41277434 (A to C) or rs3757441 (T to C), were positively associated with bladder cancer risk (p for trend =0.0146). Individuals with the EZH2 rs887569 TT genotypes were associated with decreased cancer risk than those with wild-type CC genotype. The stratified analyses showed that EZH2 rs887569 TT genotypes had protective effects on non-smokers but obviously not on smokers. Our findings provide evidence that the T allele of EZH2 rs887569 may be associated with the lower risk of bladder cancer development, especially among non-smokers. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Paradox of life among survivors of bladder cancer and treatments

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    Miriam Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE: To interpret the meanings attributed to the experience of bladder cancer among survivors in therapeutic follow-up. METHOD: Qualitative methodological approach, based on medical anthropology and narrative methodology. After approval by the research ethics committee of a public university hospital, data were collected from January 2014 to February 2015, by means of recorded semi-structured interviews, direct observation and field journal entries on daily immersion with a group of six men and six women, aged between 57 and 82 years, in therapeutic follow-up. Narratives were analyzed by means of inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: The meanings revealed difficulties with the processes of disease and treatment, such as breakdown of normal life, uncertainty about the future due to possible recurrence of the disease, difficulty with continuity of care and emotional control, relating it to conflicting ways of understanding the present life. Thus, the meaning of this narrative synthesis is paradox. CONCLUSION: Interpretation of the meaning of experience with bladder cancer among patients provides nurses with a comprehensive view of care, which encompasses biological, psychological and social dimensions, and thereby systematizes humanized care.

  9. Environmental non-occupational risk factors associated with bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrís, J; Berbel, O; Alonso-López, J; Garcia, J; Ortega, J A

    2013-10-01

    Bladder carcinoma (BC), due its high morbidity and relapsing course, generates significant economic and health care costs. Accordingly, review the environmental nonoccupational risk factors (RF), more or less evidence-based, in the etiology and pathogenesis of BC, because the involvement of urologists is essential for prevention. Review of the peer-reviewed literature (1987-2012) on nonoccupational environmental RF associated with BC retrieved from Medline, Embase and Science Citation Index. The search profiles have been "Risk factors/Epidemiology/Tobacco-smoking/Diet-nutrition-water-liquids/Radiation/Infectious/Farmacological drugs" and "Bladder cancer". Smoking was associated with 50% of BC in both sexes. Smokers have a 2-5 times higher risk than nonsmokers, directly proportional to the amount and duration of addiction. Drinking water contaminated with arsenic and chromium chlorination byproducts increases the risk of BC. High consumption of red meat and saturated fat may increase the risk, while high intake of fruits and vegetables decreases it. Patients treated with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and ionizing radiation have an increased risk of BC. Frequent and prolonged use of hair dyes and Schistosoma haematobium infestation increases the risk of BC. The reduction or the cessation of smoking decrease BC. The contaminant-free water consumption with the increase of vegetal foods favour BC prevention. Cancer survivors treated with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and radiation therapy should be monitored for early diagnosis of BC. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in urinary bladder cancer

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    Dayalu S.L. Naik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To evaluate the expression pattern of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in urinary bladder cancer and its association with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, epidermal growth factor (EGF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and high risk human papilloma virus (HPV types 16 and 18. Materials and Methods : Thirty cases of urothelial carcinoma were analyzed. EGFR, HER2, EGF, and IL-6 expressions in the tissue were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. For HPV, DNA from tissue samples was extracted and detection of HPV was done by PCR technique. Furthermore, evaluation of different intracellular molecules associated with EGFR signaling pathways was performed by the western blot method using lysates from various cells and tissues. Results : In this study, the frequencies of immunopositivity for EGFR, HER2, EGF, and IL-6 were 23%, 60%, 47%, and 80%, respectively. No cases were positive for HPV-18, whereas HPV-16 was detected in 10% cases. Overall, expression of EGFR did not show any statistically significant association with the studied parameters. However, among male patients, a significant association was found only between EGFR and HER2. Conclusions : Overexpression of EGFR and/or HER2, two important members of the same family of growth factor receptors, was observed in a considerable proportion of cases. Precise knowledge in this subject would be helpful to formulate a rational treatment strategy in patients with urinary bladder cancer.

  11. Advances in surgical management of muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Janet Baack; Shah, Jay B

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer remains a disease of the elderly with relatively few advances that have improved survival over the last 20 years. Radical cystectomy (RC) has long remained the principal treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). A literature search of PubMed was performed. The content was reviewed for continuity with the topic of surgical advances in MIBC. Articles and society guidelines were included in this review. Despite the associated morbidity, even in the elderly, RC is still a reasonable option. Modifications during RC may have a positive or negative impact on survival and quality of life. The extent of pelvic lymph node dissection is one such factor which may positively impact survival outcomes. In addition, preservation of pelvic organs, robotic surgery and the adoption of enhanced recovery after surgery principles continues to improve the postoperative recovery and quality of life in RC patients. There are some ongoing studies in many of these areas, but overall the new advances in MIBC may improve patient quality and quantity of life. The advances in surgical treatment of MIBC are important and the focus of the review here.

  12. [High oncogenic risk human papillomavirus and urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loran, O B; Sinyakova, L A; Gundorova, L V; Kosov, V A; Kosova, I V; Pogodina, I E; Kolbasov, D N

    2017-07-01

    To determine the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) of high oncogenic risk in the development of urinary bladder cancer. 100 patients (72 men and 28 women) aged 38 to 90 years (mean age 65+/-10 years) diagnosed with bladder cancer were examined and underwent treatment. Clinical assessment was complemented by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the presence of antiviral antibodies to herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), urethra scraping for detecting high oncogenic risk HPV. Tumor tissue was sampled for PCR virus detection. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to evaluate the components of lymphocyte-plasmocyte and leukocyte infiltrates and cytopathic changes in tumor tissue. There were positive correlations between cytopathic cell changes (koylocytosis and intranuclear inclusions, as manifestations of HPV) and the level of antiviral antibodies, the presence of viruses in the tumor, as well as with the components of the lymphoid-plasmocyte infiltrate. Negative correlations were found between the presence of papillomatosis and the above changes. Human papillomavirus is believed to be a trigger for the initiation of a tumor in young patients with a latent infection (CMV and EBV, HSV, HPV). Cytopathic changes (kylocytosis and intranuclear inclusions) were associated with the activity and morphological features of herpes-viral infections. Their degree varied depending on the stage of the process, but not on the anaplasia degree. Papillomatosis is associated with a more favorable course of the tumor process.

  13. Association of AKR1C3 Polymorphisms with Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiryakioglu, N Ozan; Tunali, Nagehan Ersoy

    2016-04-16

    Polymorphisms in the genes coding for the carcinogen metabolizing enzymes may affect enzyme activities and alter the activation and detoxification rates of the carcinogens. AKR1C3 is one of the very polymorphic xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation process. Here we aimed to investigate the association of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in AKR1C3, rs12529 (c.15C > G) and rs1937920 (12259 bp 3' of STP A > G) with urinary bladder cancer (UBC). Two-hundred fifty UBC cases and 250 control subjects were genotyped using the Polymerase Chain Reaction and Restriction Fragment Length method. Associations of the genotypes with UBC risk and tumor characteristics were assessed using logistic regression and Fisher's exact test. The results are corrected for multiple testing. We identified strong associations between the studied AKR1C3 variants and UBC risk. The homozygous variant genotype of rs12529 was found to be inversely associated with UBC, and rs1937920 was shown to be associated with increased risk of UBC. None of the genotypes were found to be significantly associated with tumor characteristics. We provided evidence that rs12529 and rs1937920 are significant in the molecular pathogenesis of UBC. However, the results presented here should be regarded as preliminary and might represent a first step of future larger studies aiming to better elucidate the role of AKR1C3 polymorphisms in the susceptibility to bladder cancer.

  14. The Immediate Results of Surgical Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei L. Charyshkin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the immediate results of the use of ureterointestinal anastomosis according to the Bricker technique at radical cystectomy (RC for bladder cancer (BC. Materials and Results: The study included 96 patients (11.5% women and 88.5% men with bladder cancer (BC, aged from 31 to 74 years (mean age 63.8±7.2, who underwent RC in the Lipetsk Regional Oncology Center, in the period from 2005 to 2014. Among the early postoperative complications, we identified dynamic ileus (16.7%, inflammatory complications of the surgical wound (12.5%, acute pyelonephritis (10.4%, and failure of ureterointestinal anastomosis (4.2%. The frequency of postoperative acute pyelonephritis corresponded to the findings of other authors. Two (2.1% patients died from early postoperative complications because of concomitant diseases (ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction; thus, postoperative mortality in the early postoperative period was 4.2%. Chronic pyelonephritis with chronic renal failure detected in 15(15.6% patients after one year after surgery was the most frequent late postoperative complication. The stricture of ureterointestinal anastomosis in 9(9.4% patients has been eliminated through relaparotomy and resection of anastomosis. The development of urolithiasis in 12(12.5% patients after one year after surgery has required the implementation of contact lithotripsy and litholytic therapy.

  15. Effect of sirolimus on urinary bladder cancer T24 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Leite, Rosario; Botelho, Pedro; Ribeiro, Eufemia; Oliveira, Paula A; Santos, Lucios

    2009-01-07

    Sirolimus is recently reported to have antitumour effects on a large variety of cancers. The present study was performed to investigate sirolimus's ability to inhibit growth in T24 bladder cancer cells. T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of sirolimus. MTT assay was used to evaluate the proliferation inhibitory effect on T24 cell line. The viability of T24 cell line was determined by Trypan blue exclusion analysis. Sirolimus inhibits the growth of bladder carcinoma cells and decreases their viability. Significant correlations were found between cell proliferation and sirolimus concentration (r = 0.830; p T24 bladder carcinoma cell line. The information from our results is useful for a better understanding sirolimus's anti-proliferative activity in the T24 bladder cancer cell line.

  16. Effect of sirolimus on urinary bladder cancer T24 cell line

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    Oliveira Paula A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirolimus is recently reported to have antitumour effects on a large variety of cancers. The present study was performed to investigate sirolimus's ability to inhibit growth in T24 bladder cancer cells. Methods T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of sirolimus. MTT assay was used to evaluate the proliferation inhibitory effect on T24 cell line. The viability of T24 cell line was determined by Trypan blue exclusion analysis. Results Sirolimus inhibits the growth of bladder carcinoma cells and decreases their viability. Significant correlations were found between cell proliferation and sirolimus concentration (r = 0.830; p Conclusion Sirolimus has an anti-proliferation effect on the T24 bladder carcinoma cell line. The information from our results is useful for a better understanding sirolimus's anti-proliferative activity in the T24 bladder cancer cell line.

  17. Prolonged cytotoxic effect of aqueous extracts from dried viscum album on bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker-Basler, N; Zuzak, T J; Eggenschwiler, J; Rist, L; Simões-Wüst, A P; Viviani, A

    2007-03-01

    Aqueous extracts from whole dried mistletoe (Viscum album L., Iscucin) are often used in anti-cancer treatment. We studied the effect of extracts obtained from mistletoe bushes that grew on different host trees on bladder cancer cells by means of MTT-colorimetric cell proliferation/survival assays. The extracts possessed concentration-dependent cytotoxic properties whose extent varied with the host tree, but did not always correlate with the corresponding mistletoe lectin content. A 2-hours treatment of bladder cancer cells triggered a later, strong cytotoxic effect. This prolonged effect suggests that instillation with Iscucin has therapeutic potential for bladder cancer patients.

  18. A DSP for sensing the bladder volume through afferent neural pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Arnaldo; Belghith, Abrar; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a digital signal processor (DSP) capable of monitoring the urinary bladder volume through afferent neural pathways. The DSP carries out real-time detection and can discriminate extracellular action potentials, also known as on-the-fly spike sorting. Next, the DSP performs a decoding method to estimate either three qualitative levels of fullness or the bladder volume value, depending on the selected output mode. The proposed DSP was tested using both realistic synthetic signals with a known ground-truth, and real signals from bladder afferent nerves recorded during acute experiments with animal models. The spike sorting processing circuit yielded an average accuracy of 92% using signals with highly correlated spike waveforms and low signal-to-noise ratios. The volume estimation circuits, tested with real signals, reproduced accuracies achieved by offline simulations in Matlab, i.e., 94% and 97% for quantitative and qualitative estimations, respectively. To assess feasibility, the DSP was deployed in the Actel FPGA Igloo AGL1000V2, which showed a power consumption of 0.5 mW and a latency of 2.1 ms at a 333 kHz core frequency. These performance results demonstrate that an implantable bladder sensor that perform the detection, discrimination and decoding of afferent neural activity is feasible.

  19. Genetic Alterations in the Molecular Subtypes of Bladder Cancer: Illustration in the Cancer Genome Atlas Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woonyoung; Ochoa, Andrea; McConkey, David J; Aine, Mattias; Höglund, Mattias; Kim, William Y; Real, Francisco X; Kiltie, Anne E; Milsom, Ian; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Lerner, Seth P

    2017-09-01

    Recent whole genome mRNA expression profiling studies revealed that bladder cancers can be grouped into molecular subtypes, some of which share clinical properties and gene expression patterns with the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer and the molecular subtypes found in other solid tumors. The molecular subtypes in other solid tumors are enriched with specific mutations and copy number aberrations that are thought to underlie their distinct progression patterns, and biological and clinical properties. The availability of comprehensive genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other large projects made it possible to correlate the presence of DNA alterations with tumor molecular subtype membership. Our overall goal was to determine whether specific DNA mutations and/or copy number variations are enriched in specific molecular subtypes. We used the complete TCGA RNA-seq dataset and three different published classifiers developed by our groups to assign TCGA's bladder cancers to molecular subtypes, and examined the prevalence of the most common DNA alterations within them. We interpreted the results against the background of what was known from the published literature about the prevalence of these alterations in nonmuscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancers. The results confirmed that alterations involving RB1 and NFE2L2 were enriched in basal cancers, whereas alterations involving FGFR3 and KDM6A were enriched in luminal tumors. The results further reinforce the conclusion that the molecular subtypes of bladder cancer are distinct disease entities with specific genetic alterations. Our observation showed that some of subtype-enriched mutations and copy number aberrations are clinically actionable, which has direct implications for the clinical management of patients with bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MicroRNA-221 silencing predisposed human bladder cancer cells to undergo apoptosis induced by TRAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Lu, Chao; Zhou, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Hang; Wang, Xin-Ru

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common type of urologic cancer in Chinese males. The 5-year survival rate of advanced bladder cancer is approximately 20%-40%. There is an obvious urgent need for novel and effective therapies against bladder cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of noncoding RNAs; suppressing miRNA-221 might prove beneficial in several cancers. To explore novel and effective therapies against bladder cancer, we explored the effects of miRNA-221 silencing on the survival of bladder cancer cells. Northern blot analysis was used to determine miRNA-221 expression levels in bladder cancer T24 cells, RT4 cells and human normal urothelial cells. miRNA-221 was silenced with antisense oligonucleotides in T24 cells and pro-apoptotic effect of necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) on miRNA-221-silenced cells was assessed with flow cytometry. The p27(kip1) protein expression in miRNA-221-silenced cells exposed to TRAIL was detected by Western blotting. The role of miRNA-221 silencing on T24 cell cycle phase distribution was investigated through flow cytometric analysis. Human miRNA-221 was significantly up-regulated in bladder cancer T24 cells and RT4 cells compared to human normal urothelial cells. T24 cell was TRAIL-resistant cell line. MiRNA-221 silencing predisposed T24 cells to undergo apoptosis induced by TRAIL and resulted in an up-modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1. MiRNA-221 suppression promoted the activation of caspase 3 induced by TRAIL in T24 cells. MiRNA-221 silencing rendered human bladder cancer T24 cells to undergo apoptosis induced by TRAIL. Our findings suggest a potential role of suppressing miRNA-221 in human bladder cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. EZH2 in Bladder Cancer, a Promising Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Rubio, Carolina; Segovia, Cristina; López-Calderón, Fernando F.; Dueñas, Marta; Paramio, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder Cancer (BC) represents a current clinical and social challenge. The recent studies aimed to describe the genomic landscape of BC have underscored the relevance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Among the epigenetic alterations, histone modifications occupied a central role not only in cancer, but also in normal organism homeostasis and development. EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2) belongs to the Polycomb repressive complex 2 as its catalytic subunit, which through the trimethylation of H3 (Histone 3) on K27 (Lysine 27), produces gene silencing. EZH2 is frequently overexpressed in multiple tumor types, including BC, and plays multiple roles besides the well-recognized histone mark generation. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on the oncogenic roles of EZH2 and its potential use as a therapeutic target, with special emphasis on BC pathogenesis and management. PMID:26580594

  2. EZH2 in Bladder Cancer, a Promising Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Rubio, Carolina; Segovia, Cristina; López-Calderón, Fernando F; Dueñas, Marta; Paramio, Jesús M

    2015-11-13

    Bladder Cancer (BC) represents a current clinical and social challenge. The recent studies aimed to describe the genomic landscape of BC have underscored the relevance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Among the epigenetic alterations, histone modifications occupied a central role not only in cancer, but also in normal organism homeostasis and development. EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2) belongs to the Polycomb repressive complex 2 as its catalytic subunit, which through the trimethylation of H3 (Histone 3) on K27 (Lysine 27), produces gene silencing. EZH2 is frequently overexpressed in multiple tumor types, including BC, and plays multiple roles besides the well-recognized histone mark generation. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on the oncogenic roles of EZH2 and its potential use as a therapeutic target, with special emphasis on BC pathogenesis and management.

  3. EZH2 in Bladder Cancer, a Promising Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Martínez-Fernández

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bladder Cancer (BC represents a current clinical and social challenge. The recent studies aimed to describe the genomic landscape of BC have underscored the relevance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Among the epigenetic alterations, histone modifications occupied a central role not only in cancer, but also in normal organism homeostasis and development. EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 belongs to the Polycomb repressive complex 2 as its catalytic subunit, which through the trimethylation of H3 (Histone 3 on K27 (Lysine 27, produces gene silencing. EZH2 is frequently overexpressed in multiple tumor types, including BC, and plays multiple roles besides the well-recognized histone mark generation. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on the oncogenic roles of EZH2 and its potential use as a therapeutic target, with special emphasis on BC pathogenesis and management.

  4. [Assessment of clinical features in solitary minimum size (<1 cm) bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kotaro; Nohda, Hideyuki; Funahashi, Makoto; Chiba, Kimio; Shinagawa, Toshihito; Mizuno, Nobuhiko; Fujikawa, Naoya; Murakami, Takayuki; Ikeda, Ichiro; Kono, Naomi

    2012-08-01

    We retrospectively evaluated primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed between 1999 and 2008 at 2 facilities (Kawasaki Municipal Hospital and Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital). Size (minimum-size solitary pTa bladder cancers less than 1 cm in diameter. The average follow-up period was 50.9 months. The recurrence rate of the minimum-size bladder cancer was significantly lower than that of bladder cancers of other sizes (1 to 3 cm or ≥ 3 cm). The 3-year non-recurrence rate was 80.7,71.0,and 62.9% in each group (minimum size bladder cancer (pTa) showed a significantly higher recurrence rate than the low-grade cases (P = 0.0101). Intravesical chemotherapy with anti-cancer drugs significantly reduced the intravesical recurrence rate in the low-grade minimum-size bladder cancer group (P = 0.0418). There was no statistically significant difference in either the average recurrence number or the rate of multiple recurrences between the minimum-size tumor group and the 1 to 3 cm tumor group. Minimum size bladder cancer had a lower recurrence rate than tumors of other sizes; however, there were no differences in other characteristics between the groups. Therefore, sufficient treatment, in accordance with the guidelines, should be administered for minimum size tumors as well as tumors of other sizes.

  5. Application of three-dimensional volumetric ultrasonography in patients with bladder cancer and its mimickers: A pictorial essay

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    Ko, Sujin; Hong, Seong Sook; Hwang, Ji Young; Kim, Hyun Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Various diseases of the urinary bladder can be demonstrated as being polypoid, a nodular bladder mass or as focal bladder wall thickening. This includes malignant or benign neoplasms, urinary stones, or other inflammatory bladder conditions. In daily practice many of these bladder diseases are easily confused with bladder cancer. On the other hand, ultrasonography (US) is safe and can be easily applied as a screening modality or an initial evaluating tool for urinary bladder disease. Furthermore, additional three-dimensional (3D) volumetric techniques can support more delicate delineation of these lesions. This study presents a 3D volumetric US for bladder lesions, and demonstrates various pathological conditions of the urinary bladder ranging from bladder cancer to other benign lesions.

  6. Oncogenic role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 in tumorigenesis of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandith, Arshad A; Shah, Zafar A; Siddiqi, Mushtaq A

    2013-05-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most common genitourinary tumor and constitutes a very heterogeneous disease. Molecular and pathologic studies suggest that low-grade noninvasive and high-grade invasive urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) arise via distinct pathways. Low-grade noninvasive UCC represent the majority of tumors at presentation. A high proportion of patients with low-grade UCC develop recurrences but usually with no progression to invasive disease. At presentation, a majority of the bladder tumors (70%-80%) are low-grade noninvasive (pTa). Several genetic changes may occur in bladder cancer, but activating mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) genes are the most common and most specific genetic abnormality in bladder cancer. Interestingly, these mutations are associated with bladder tumors of low stage and grade, which makes the FGFR3 mutation the first marker that can be used for diagnosis of noninvasive bladder tumors. Since the first report of FGFR3 involvement in bladder tumors, numerous studies have been conducted to understand its function and thereby confirm the oncogenic role of this receptor particularly in noninvasive groups. Efforts are on to exploit this receptor as a therapeutic target, which holds much promise in the treatment of bladder cancer, particularly low-grade noninvasive tumors. Further studies need to explore the potential use of FGFR3 mutations in bladder cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and in surveillance of patients with bladder cancer. This review focuses on the role of FGFR3 in bladder tumors in the backdrop of various studies published. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Generation of potent cytotoxic T lymphocytes against in male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer by dendritic cells loaded with dying T24 bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Chang Hwang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background In order to induce a potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in dendritic cell (DC-based immunotherapy for bladder cancer, various tumor antigens can be loaded onto DCs. Objective The aim of this study was to establish a method of immunotherapy for male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC, using bladder cancer-specific CTLs generated in vitro by DCs. Materials and Methods Monocyte-derived DCs from bladder cancer patients were induced to mature in a standard cytokine cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and PGE2: standard DCs, sDCs or anα-type 1-polarized DC (αDC1 cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-α, IFN-γ, and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and loaded with the UVB-irradiated bladder cancer cell line, T24. Antigen-loaded αDC1s were evaluated by morphological and functional assays, and the bladder cancer-specific CTL response was analyzed by cytotoxic assay. Results The αDC1s significantly increased the expression of several molecules pertaining to DC maturation, regardless of whether or not the αDC1s were loaded with tumor antigens, relative to sDCs. The αDC1s demonstrated increased production of interleukin-12 both during maturation and after subsequent stimulation with CD40L that was not significantly affected by loading with tumor antigens as compared to that of sDCs. Bladder cancer-specific CTLs targeting autologous bladder cancer cells were successfully induced by αDC1s loaded with dying T24 cells. Conclusion Autologous αDC1s loaded with an allogeneic bladder cancer cell line resulted in increased bladder cancer-specific CTL responses as compared to that with sDCs, and therefore, may provide a novel source of DC-based vaccines that canbe used in immunotherapy for male patients with NMIBC.

  8. ADAM15 Is Functionally Associated with the Metastatic Progression of Human Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Lorenzatti Hiles

    Full Text Available ADAM15 is a member of a family of catalytically active disintegrin membrane metalloproteinases that function as molecular signaling switches, shed membrane bound growth factors and/or cleave and inactivate cell adhesion molecules. Aberrant metalloproteinase function of ADAM15 may contribute to tumor progression through the release of growth factors or disruption of cell adhesion. In this study, we utilized human bladder cancer tissues and cell lines to evaluate the expression and function of ADAM15 in the progression of human bladder cancer. Examination of genome and transcriptome databases revealed that ADAM15 ranked in the top 5% of amplified genes and its mRNA was significantly overexpressed in invasive and metastatic bladder cancer compared to noninvasive disease. Immunostaining of a bladder tumor tissue array designed to evaluate disease progression revealed increased ADAM15 immunoreactivity associated with increasing cancer stage and exhibited significantly stronger staining in metastatic samples. About half of the invasive tumors and the majority of the metastatic cases exhibited high ADAM15 staining index, while all low grade and noninvasive cases exhibited negative or low staining. The knockdown of ADAM15 mRNA expression significantly inhibited bladder tumor cell migration and reduced the invasive capacity of bladder tumor cells through MatrigelTM and monolayers of vascular endothelium. The knockdown of ADAM15 in a human xenograft model of bladder cancer inhibited tumor growth by 45% compared to controls. Structural modeling of the catalytic domain led to the design of a novel ADAM15-specific sulfonamide inhibitor that demonstrated bioactivity and significantly reduced the viability of bladder cancer cells in vitro and in human bladder cancer xenografts. Taken together, the results revealed an undescribed role of ADAM15 in the invasion of human bladder cancer and suggested that the ADAM15 catalytic domain may represent a viable

  9. A KLM-circuit model of a multi-layer transducer for acoustic bladder volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merks, E J W; Borsboom, J M G; Bom, N; van der Steen, A F W; de Jong, N

    2006-12-22

    In a preceding study a new technique to non-invasively measure the bladder volume on the basis of non-linear wave propagation was validated. It was shown that the harmonic level generated at the posterior bladder wall increases for larger bladder volumes. A dedicated transducer is needed to further verify and implement this approach. This transducer must be capable of both transmission of high-pressure waves at fundamental frequency and reception of up to the third harmonic. For this purpose, a multi-layer transducer was constructed using a single element PZT transducer for transmission and a PVDF top-layer for reception. To determine feasibility of the multi-layer concept for bladder volume measurements, and to ensure optimal performance, an equivalent mathematical model on the basis of KLM-circuit modeling was generated. This model was obtained in two subsequent steps. Firstly, the PZT transducer was modeled without PVDF-layer attached by means of matching the model with the measured electrical input impedance. It was validated using pulse-echo measurements. Secondly, the model was extended with the PVDF-layer. The total model was validated by considering the PVDF-layer as a hydrophone on the PZT transducer surface and comparing the measured and simulated PVDF responses on a wave transmitted by the PZT transducer. The obtained results indicated that a valid model for the multi-layer transducer was constructed. The model showed feasibility of the multi-layer concept for bladder volume measurements. It also allowed for further optimization with respect to electrical matching and transmit waveform. Additionally, the model demonstrated the effect of mechanical loading of the PVDF-layer on the PZT transducer.

  10. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy improves survival outcome in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Sang Jun; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, Byung Hoon [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate survival rates and prognostic factors related to treatment outcomes after bladder preserving therapy including transurethral resection of bladder tumor, radiotherapy (RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy in bladder cancer with a curative intent. We retrospectively studied 50 bladder cancer patients treated with bladder-preserving therapy at Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center from January 1999 to December 2010. Age ranged from 46 to 89 years (median, 71.5 years). Bladder cancer was the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage II, III, and IV in 9, 27, and 14 patients, respectively. Thirty patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and 20 patients with RT alone. Nine patients received chemotherapy prior to CCRT or RT alone. Radiation was delivered with a four-field box technique (median, 63 Gy; range, 48.6 to 70.2 Gy). The follow-up periods ranged from 2 to 169 months (median, 34 months). Thirty patients (60%) showed complete response and 13 (26%) a partial response. All patients could have their own bladder preserved. Five-year overall survival (OS) rate was 37.2%, and the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 30.2%. In multivariate analysis, tumor grade and CCRT were statistically significant in OS. Tumor grade was a significant prognostic factor related to OS. CCRT is also considered to improve survival outcomes. Further multi-institutional studies are needed to elucidate the impact of RT in bladder cancer.

  11. Fruits and Vegetables Intake and Risk of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Liu, Tong-Zu; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Zhong-Hua; Li, Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clinical practice recommends eating ≥2.5 cups of fruits and vegetables (FVs) each day for cancer prevention, in which the evidence from epidemiological studies for the association between FVs intake and bladder cancer (BC) prevention is inconsistent. We searched the PubMed, Embase, and Willy online Library for relevant studies published up to September 27, 2014. Prospective cohort studies investigated FVs intake, and the risk of BC with ≥3 categories of exposure was included. A dose-response meta-analysis was carried out to evaluate the association between FVs intake and risk of BC. Fourteen cohorts with 17 studies including 9447 cases were identified. No evidence of nonlinear association was examined between FVs intake and risk of BC. The summarized relevant risk (RR) of every 0.2 serving increment a day was 1.00 (95%CI: 0.99, 1.00; P = 0.17; I2 = 41.7%; n = 14) for total fruits; 0.99 (95%CI: 0.96, 1.01; P = 0.28; I2 = 37.0%; n = 13) for total vegetables; and 0.99 (95%CI: 0.97, 1.01; P = 0.24; I2 = 57.5%; n = 8) for both FVs. In further analysis, we observed inverse association between every 0.2 serving increment of green leafy vegetables intake a day and risk of BC (RR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.96, 0.99; I2 = 0.0%; P vegetables (RR = 0.97, 95%CI: 0.93, 1.01; P = 0.19; I2 = 55.8%; n = 8) nor for citrus (RR = 1.00, 95%CI: 1.00, 1.00; P = 0.83; I2 = 0.0%; n = 7). Subgroup analysis showed consistent results. Little evidence supports a beneficial effect for total fruits, vegetables, both FVs, and citrus intake against bladder cancer. Green leafy vegetables may help prevent bladder cancer. PMID:25929912

  12. Rab23 is overexpressed in human bladder cancer and promotes cancer cell proliferation and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanjun; Han, Yushuang; Sun, Chaonan; Han, Chuyang; Han, Ning; Zhi, Weiwei; Qiao, Qiao

    2016-06-01

    Rab23 overexpression has been implicated in several human cancers. However, its expression pattern and biological roles in human bladder cancer have not been elucidated. In this study, we examined Rab23 expression in 93 bladder cancer specimens and analyzed its correlation with clinicopathological parameters. We found that Rab23 was overexpressed in 45 of 93 (48.3 %) cancer specimens. Significant association was found between Rab23 overexpression and tumor invasion depth (p = 0.0027). Rab23 overexpression also negatively correlated with FGFR3 protein expression (p = 0.021). We found that Rab23 expression was lower in normal bladder transitional cell line SV-HUC-1 than in bladder cancer cell lines BIU-87, 5637, and T24. We knocked down Rab23 expression in T24 cancer cells and transfected a Rab23 plasmid in the BIU-87 cell line. Rab23 depletion inhibited cell growth rate and invasion, while its overexpression resulted in increased cell growth and invasion. In addition, we demonstrated that Rab23 depletion decreased and its transfection upregulated expression of cyclin E, c-myc, and MMP-9. Furthermore, we showed that Rab23 knockdown inhibited NF-κB signaling and its overexpression upregulated NF-κB signaling. BAY 11-7082 (NF-κB inhibitor) partly inhibited the effect of Rab23 on cyclin E and MMP-9 expression. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that Rab23 overexpression facilitates malignant cell growth and invasion in bladder cancer through the NF-κB pathway.

  13. Cancer Immunoediting from Immunosurveillance to Tumor Escape in Microvillus-Formed Niche: A Study of Syngeneic Orthotopic Rat Bladder Cancer Model in Comparison with Human Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl-Jørgen Arum

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells can develop an attenuated immunogenicity and/or create an immunosuppressive microenvironment to prevent tumor eradication by host immune system, the so-called “cancer immunoediting” hypothesis. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for this hypothesis by using a rat orthotopic bladder cancer model. Fisher rats were inoculated with AY-27 cells (a Fisher rat bladder cancer cell line. Cultured cancer cells, rat and human bladder cancer tissues, and publicly available microarray data from human bladder cancer were analyzed by means of bioinformatics and morphology. Results showed that 12 of 24 differentially expressed pathways were concordant in connection to cell cycle and proliferation between rats and humans (both non-muscle-invasive and muscle-invasive tumors and that 11 of the 24 pathways, including major histocompatibility complex, were related to host immunosurveillance with activations of T cells and natural killer cells in rats. The altered pathways and morphogenesis of this rat model corresponded more closely with those of human muscle-invasive rather than non-muscle-invasive tumors. A unique ultrastructure displaying microvillus-formed niches was found in small areas within the tumor of both rats and humans. These niches were interconnected with desmosomes between cancer cells and without infiltration of lymphocytes. The expression of E-cadherin, selectins, PGP9.5, vascular endothelial growth factor, caspase-3, CD133, Oct-4, nestin, CD3, and CD45RA was lower in the tumor than in the adjacent normal epithelium. We suggest that the microvillus-formed niche that harbors a few implanted cancer cells might be the compartment that prevents the tumor eradication by the host immune system.

  14. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  15. Effect of sirolimus on urinary bladder cancer T24 cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira Paula A; Ribeiro Eufemia; Botelho Pedro; Pinto-Leite Rosario; Santos Lucios

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sirolimus is recently reported to have antitumour effects on a large variety of cancers. The present study was performed to investigate sirolimus's ability to inhibit growth in T24 bladder cancer cells. Methods T24 bladder cancer cells were treated with various concentrations of sirolimus. MTT assay was used to evaluate the proliferation inhibitory effect on T24 cell line. The viability of T24 cell line was determined by Trypan blue exclusion analysis. Results Sirolimus in...

  16. Inhibition of T24 and RT4 Human Bladder Cancer Cell Lines by Heterocyclic Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-feng ZHAO; Wang, Kai; Guo, Feng-Fu; Lu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background Bladder cancer is a major widespread tumor of the genitourinary tract. Around 30% of patients with superficial cancers develop invasive and metastatic pathology. Material/Methods Some new heterocyclic 4-methyl coumarin derivatives were designed using molecular modeling studies to evaluate their potential against bladder cancer lines T24 and RT-4. The designed compounds that showed good binding affinity to T24 and RT4 were synthesized, with excellent yield. The synthesized compounds...

  17. THE APOPTOTIC EFFECT OF SILIBININ ON TCC-SUB AND RT-4 HUMAN BLADDER CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    BAYRAM, Dilek; özgöçmen, meltem; Armağan, İlkay; Güneş, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the mostfrequent malignancies around the world. Bladder cancer has high rate ofrecurrence. Silibinin is a natural polyphenolic flavonoid isolated from seedextracts of the herb milk thistle (Silybum marianum) with antioxidant and anticancer properties. Silibinin was reported todepress cell growth and induce apoptosis in cancer cells. In this study,we aimed to investigate the inhibition of proliferation and induction ofapoptosis by silibinin with the TUNEL method in hum...

  18. Results of chemoradiotherapyfor muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Gumenetskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of chemoradiotherapy (CRT in 108 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer in whom surgery was contraindicated. The efficacies and toxicities of three variants of CRT were evaluated. Group 1 (neoadjuvant chemotherapy: 2–3 cycles of cisplatin-containing combination chemotherapy followed by a continuous course of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. Group 2: concurrent CRT – cisplatin i.v., 70–100 mg/m 2 during the first and last weeks of continuous-course EBRT. Group 3: sequential neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 2–3 cycles and concurrent CRT. The comparative analysis of long-term outcomes following CRT indicated an improvement in survival rates in group 3 in which the 5-and 10-year cancer-specific survival rates were 42,3 ± 8,8 % and 31,3 ± 9,4 %, respectively, compared with 28,6 ± 9,7 % and 28,6 ± 9,7 % in group 1, and 29,5 ± 8,5 % and 14,8 ± 7,4 % in group 2, respectively (р=0,093. Acute toxicity (GU Grade 1 or 2 arose more often from concurrent radiation and chemotherapy: in 40,0 % and 40,5 % of cases in groups 2 and 3, respectively, whereas in group 1 it occurred in 25,9 % of cases (р<0,2. Late radiation toxicity (GU Grade 2 occurred more often in the concurrent CRT groups: 11,4 % and 11,9 % versus 3,2 % in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group; Grade 3 was noted in 5,7 % and 2,4 % of patients in groups 2 and 3, respectively. The results indicated that chemoradiotherapy including neoadjuvant and concomitant chemotherapy improved the outcomes in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer in whom surgery was contraindicated. There was an acceptable rate of clinically significant complications.

  19. Animal model of naturally occurring bladder cancer: Characterization of four new canine transitional cell carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Development and further characterization of animal models for human cancers is important for the improvement of cancer detection and therapy. Canine bladder cancer closely resembles human bladder cancer in many aspects. In this study, we isolated and characterized four primary transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) cell lines to be used for future in vitro validation of novel therapeutic agents for bladder cancer. Methods Four K9TCC cell lines were established from naturally-occurring...

  20. A place for precision medicine in bladder cancer: targeting the FGFRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Martino, Erica; Tomlinson, Darren C; Williams, Sarah V; Knowles, Margaret A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder tumors show diverse molecular features and clinical outcome. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer has poor prognosis and novel approaches to systemic therapy are urgently required. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer has good prognosis, but high recurrence rate and the requirement for life-long disease monitoring places a major burden on patients and healthcare providers. Studies of tumor tissues from both disease groups have identified frequent alterations of FGFRs, including mutations of FGFR3 and dysregulated expression of FGFR1 and FGFR3 that suggest that these may be valid therapeutic targets. We summarize current understanding of the molecular alterations affecting these receptors in bladder tumors, preclinical studies validating them as therapeutic targets, available FGFR-targeted agents and results from early clinical trials in bladder cancer patients.

  1. Use of Aleuria alantia Lectin Affinity Chromatography to Enrich Candidate Biomarkers from the Urine of Patients with Bladder Cancer

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    Sarah R. Ambrose

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing a urine test to detect bladder tumours with high sensitivity and specificity is a key goal in bladder cancer research. We hypothesised that bladder cancer-specific glycoproteins might fulfill this role. Lectin-ELISAs were used to study the binding of 25 lectins to 10 bladder cell lines and serum and urine from bladder cancer patients and non-cancer controls. Selected lectins were then used to enrich glycoproteins from the urine of bladder cancer patients and control subjects for analysis by shotgun proteomics. None of the lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cancer cell lines over normal urothlelial cell lines or for urinary glycans from bladder cancer patients over those from non-cancer controls. However, several lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cell line glycans over serum glycans and are potentially useful for enriching glycoproteins originating from the urothelium in urine. Aleuria alantia lectin affinity chromatography and shotgun proteomics identified mucin-1 and golgi apparatus protein 1 as proteins warranting further investigation as urinary biomarkers for low-grade bladder cancer. Glycosylation changes in bladder cancer are not reliably detected by measuring lectin binding to unfractionated proteomes, but it is possible that more specific reagents and/or a focus on individual proteins may produce clinically useful biomarkers.

  2. Primary cT2 bladder cancer: a good candidate for radiotherapy combined with cisplatin for bladder preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takahiko; Nishijima, Jun; Miyachika, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakano, Shigeru; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2011-07-01

    Bladder preservation therapy (BPT) has been attempted for patients with localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the indication for BPT has not yet been established. To identify patients who are good candidates for BPT, we evaluated our long-term experience with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for bladder preservation. Between 1994 and 2009, 82 patients with bladder cancer (clinical stage T2-N0M0) without concurrent upper urinary tract urothelial cancer were treated with CRT. Before CRT, the patients had a biopsy or resection of the tumor by transurethral resection (TUR). The response to CRT was evaluated by TUR, urine cytology and computed tomography. Thirty-two cases (39.0%) had a pathological complete response (pCR) that was defined as no microscopic residual tumor in the bladder. After TUR, 69 cases (84.0%) achieved local control of the cancer, which was considered as a clinical complete response (cCR). There was no significant association between achievement of pCR and examined parameters. The long-term results of CRT were evaluated in cCR cases. The median follow-up was 42.8 months (range, 4.1-155.1). The 5-year overall survival rate was 77.7% and 5-year progression-free survival rate was 64.5%. Clinical T stage and type of tumor (primary or recurrence) were predictive factors for overall survival as well as progression-free survival. In addition, primary cT2 cases had significantly better prognosis than cT3-4 and recurrent cases in overall survival and progression-free survival (P= 0.008 and P= 0.046, respectively). Cases with a primary cT2 tumor could be good candidates for BPT with radiation combined with cisplatin.

  3. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Guy-Anne [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.; Faria, Sergio L.; Duclos, Marie [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sturgeon, Jeremy [Department of Medical Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  4. Bladder Function Preservation With Brachytherapy, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Limited Surger in Bladder Cancer Patients: Long-Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluwini, Shafak, E-mail: s.aluwini@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institution, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rooij, Peter H.E. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institution, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kirkels, Wim J.; Boormans, Joost L. [Department of Urology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institution, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karina K.; Wijnmaalen, Arendjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institution, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of a bladder preservation strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) using external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy/interstitial radiation therapy (IRT). Methods and Materials: Between May 1989 and October 2011, 192 selected patients with MIBC were treated with a combined regimen of preoperative external beam radiation therapy and subsequent surgical exploration with or without partial cystectomy and insertion of source carrier tubes for afterloading IRT using low dose rate and pulsed dose rate. Data for oncologic and functional outcomes were prospectively collected. The primary endpoints were local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), bladder function preservation survival, and salvage cystectomy-free survival. The endpoints were constructed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The mean follow-up period was 105.5 months. The LRFS rate was 80% and 73% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Salvage cystectomy-free survival at 5 and 10 years was 93% and 85%. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 65% and 46%, whereas cancer-specific survival at 5 and 10 years was 75% and 67%. The distant metastases-free survival rate was 76% and 69% at 5 and 10 years. Multivariate analysis revealed no independent predictors of LRFS. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥3 late bladder and rectum toxicity were recorded in 11 patients (5.7%) and 2 patients (1%), respectively. Conclusions: A multimodality bladder-sparing regimen using IRT offers excellent long-term oncologic outcome in selected patients with MIBC. The late toxicity rate is low, and the majority of patients preserve their functional bladder.

  5. Robotic Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer: Current Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Erdem Canda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The most effective local treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and non-invasive, high-grade bladder tumours that recur or progress despite intravesical therapies, is open radical cystectomy (RC, extended pelvic lymph node (LN dissection with urinary diversion. Performing these complex procedures using pure laparoscopy is extremely difficult. On the other hand, the surgical robot has the advantage of enabling the console surgeon to perform complex procedures more easily, providing three-dimensional (3D and magnified views, higher grades of wristed hand movements, and decreased hand tremor, while the fourth robotic arm offers additional assistance and tissue retraction which facilitates the learning curve. The number of centres performing robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is increasing. Although most of the centres perform extracorporeal urinary diversion following RARC, very few centres – including ours – have reported their outcomes on RARC with total intracorporeal urinary diversion. Some of the articles, comparing open RC versus RARC, have suggested similar outcomes in terms of operative time, mean LN yield, positive surgical margin (PSM rates, and complication rates, whereas others have suggested decreased estimated blood loss, transfusion rate, complications, length of hospital stay, wound problems, time to flatus, and time to regular diet in the postoperative period in RARC patients. The surgical technique of total intracorporeal RARC with urinary diversions is still evolving, and these complex robotic procedures seem to be technically feasible with good intermediate-term oncologic results, acceptable morbidities, excellent short-term surgical and pathological outcomes, and satisfactory functional results.

  6. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Harris, S C; Reyna, J A; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1980-07-01

    Thirty-seven patients were enrolled in a randomized prospective study to compare standard surgical therapy for superficial bladder cancer to standard therapy plus bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Side effects of BCG have been tolerated well and include dysuria in 95 per cent of the patients, urinary frequency in 83 per cent, hematuria in 39 per cent, fever in 22 per cent and nausea in 22 per cent. Of 19 control patients 8 (42 per cent) had recurrent tumors in the followup period, compared to 3 of 18 patients (17 per cent) treated with BCG. One patient treated wih BCG had 2 recurrences, yielding a recurrence rate of 22 per cent in the group receiving BCG compared to 42 per cent in controls. When the incidence of recurrent tumors in matched intervals before and after entry into the protocol is compared, no change in the rate of tumor recurrence (p equals 0.726 chi-square) occurred in controls, whereas tumor recurrences were reduced significantly in the group treated with BCG (p equals 0.010 chi-square). The reduction in tumor recurrence in patients treated with BCG compared to controls is statistically significant (p equals 0.029 chi-square). Of 4 patients who presented with new bladder tumors remain free of tumor after BCG therapy, while 2 of 5 comparable control patients developed recurrent tumors. Intravesical and percutaneous BCG immunotherapy appears to decrease the rate of tumor recurrence in patients followed for 1 year.

  7. Activation of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 in Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.M. van Oers (Johanna)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe identification of frequent FGFR3 mutations in superficial bladder cancer suggests that mutation of the FGFR3 gene is a key genetic event in the development of noninvasive bladder tumors. Furthermore, FGFR3 mutations were associated with a good prognosis, suggesting that the

  8. Role of urothelial cells in BCG immunotherapy for superficial bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, R. F. M.; Kurth, K.-H.; Schamhart, D. H. J.

    2004-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is used for the treatment of superficial bladder cancer, both to reduce the recurrence rate of bladder tumour and to diminish the risk of progression. Since its first therapeutic application in 1976, major research efforts have been

  9. Nitrate intake does not influence bladder cancer risk: The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.; Selen, R.F.M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: N-nitroso compounds, endogenously formed from nitrate-derived nitrite, are suspected to be important bladder carcinogens. However, the association between nitrate exposure from food or drinking water and bladder cancer has not been substantially investigated in epidemiologic studies.

  10. Stage-associated overexpression of the ubiquitin-like protein, ISG15, in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, JB; Jensen, Mads Aaboe; Borden, EC

    2006-01-01

    Bladder cancer is among the most prevalent malignancies, and is characterised by frequent tumour recurrences and localised inflammation, which may promote tissue invasion and metastasis. Microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression in normal bladder urothelium with that in tumours at d...

  11. Levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 in plasma and urine frompatients with bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten Andersen, MN; Brunner, N; Nielsen, HJ

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To assess the potential use of plasma and urine levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1) in urothelial cancer. Methods: TIMP-1 levels were determined in urine and plasma from healthy donors (n=26), patients with bacterial bladder infection (n=24), urothelial bladder adenoma...

  12. Chemohyperthermia in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: An overview of the literature and recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, Esmee I. M. L.; Crezee, Hans; de la Rosette, Jean J.; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is characterised by a high risk of recurrence for the present standard treatment of transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) followed by intravesical instillation of Mitomycin-C (MMC) or bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). To decrease this high recurrence

  13. Monitoring of the upper urinary tract in patients with bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinikanth Ayyathurai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper urinary tract (UUT transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is relatively rare tumor. Approximately 0.7-4% of patients with primary bladder cancer develops UUT-TCC. The symptoms related to an UUT-TCC often occur with an advanced stage which leads one to emphasize a surveillance strategy to monitor the UUT to allow for an earlier diagnosis. Although the risk of UUT-TCC after bladder cancer is well established, there is a paucity of recommendations suggesting the optimal method and frequency of monitoring the UUT and there is no consensus among them. This article reviews the recommendations on monitoring the UUT in patients with bladder cancer.

  14. The impact of bladder preparation protocols on post treatment toxicity in radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yat Man Tsang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The empty bladder preparation approach has non-inferior acute and intermediate post RT GI and GU toxicities in patients treated for localised prostate cancer with advanced radiotherapy techniques compared to the full bladder preparation.

  15. Finite element based bladder modeling for image guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; van de Kamer, Jeroen; Hulshof, Maarten; Remeijer, Peter; Lotz, Heidi; Bel, Arjan

    Purpose: A biomechanical model was constructed to give insight into pelvic organ motion as a result of bladder filling changes. Methods: The authors used finite element (FE) modeling to simulate bladder wall deformation caused by urine inflow. For ten volunteers, a series of MRI scans of the pelvic

  16. Does phosphorylation of cofilin affect the progression of human bladder cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Hong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We determined the differently expressed protein profiles and their functions in bladder cancer tissues with the aim of identifying possible target proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms for taking part in their progression. Methods We examined the expression of proteins by proteomic analysis and western blot in normal urothelium, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs, and muscle-invasive bladder cancers (MIBCs. The function of cofilin was analyzed using T24 human bladder cancer cells. Results The expression levels of 12 proteins were altered between bladder cancers and normal bladder tissues. Of these proteins, 14-3-3σ was upregulated in both NMIBCs and MIBCs compared with controls. On the other hand, myosin regulatory light chain 2, galectin-1, lipid-binding AI, annexin V, transthyretin, CARD-inhibitor of NF-κB-activating ligand, and actin prepeptide were downregulated in cancer samples. Cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor, was prominent in both NMIBCs and MIBCs compared with normal bladder tissues. Furthermore, we confirmed that cofilin phosphorylation was more prominent in MIBCs than in NMIBCs using immunoblotting and immunohistochemcal analyses. Epidermal growth factor (EGF increased the phosphorylation of cofilin and elevated the migration in T24 cells. Knockdown of cofilin expression with small interfering RNA attenuated the T24 cell migration in response to EGF. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the increased expression and phosphorylation of cofilin might play a role in the occurrence and invasiveness of bladder cancer. We suspected that changes in cofilin expression may participate in the progression of the bladder cancer.

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life after Cystectomy and Urinary Diversion for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Shih

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With multiple options for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy for bladder cancer that have comparable cancer control and complication rates, health-related quality of life (HRQOL has become an important consideration. This article reviews the methods for defining HRQOL, the challenges in measuring HRQOL in bladder cancer, and the literature comparing HRQOL after various methods of urinary diversion. Recent contributions include the validation of HRQOL instruments specific to bladder cancer and the publication of several prospective studies measuring HRQOL outcomes after cystectomy and urinary diversion. There is no convincing evidence from existing literature that any particular method of urinary diversion offers superior HRQOL outcomes. Rather, there is growing evidence that good HRQOL can be achieved with patient education and consideration of each patient's clinical and psychosocial situation. Future research should utilize the validated bladder cancer specific HRQOL instruments and perhaps explore the impact of preoperative counseling on postoperative HRQOL.

  18. Cigarette Smoking and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in Men and Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quirk Jeffrey T

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although cigarette smoking is a principal risk factor for bladder cancer in both men and women, few studies have statistically evaluated whether gender modifies the effect of smoking on bladder cancer risk. We initiated the present case-control study at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York, U.S., to provide further data on this important issue. We observed similar risk estimates for men and women with comparable smoking exposures, but did not observe a statistically significant interaction between gender and lifetime smoking exposure. We conclude that cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for bladder cancer in both sexes, but that gender does not modify the effect of smoking on bladder cancer risk.

  19. Opacification of urinary bladder and ureter at CT urography: effect of a log-rolling procedure and postvoiding residual bladder urine volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooah; Wang, Lihuan L; Heiken, Jay P; Siegel, Cary L; Hildebolt, Charles F; Bae, Kyongtae T

    2008-06-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the effect of a log-rolling procedure and postvoiding residual (PVR) bladder urine volume on opacification of urinary bladder and ureters at multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) urography. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was waived for this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study. Triple-phase 16- or 64-detector row CT urographic images in 166 patients (88 men, 78 women; mean age, 58.9 years; range, 22-89 years) were evaluated retrospectively. Immediately prior to excretory phase scanning, 67 patients did and 99 did not undergo a log-rolling procedure on the CT table. PVR bladder urine volume was quantified as the largest cross-sectional area of the bladder measured on unenhanced images (PVR values). The degree of bladder opacification was quantified as the percentage of the total cross-sectional area of the bladder that was opacified on excretory phase images. Ureteral opacification was quantified as the percentage of ureteral length that contained enhanced urine. On the basis of PVR values, patients were stratified into four subgroups (2000 to 3000 to 4000 mm(2)). The Wilcoxon rank sum and Student t tests were used to evaluate differences. Median degree of bladder opacification of the log-rolling versus non-log-rolling group was 100% versus 78% for PVR values of 2000 mm(2) or less (P .05). Use of a log-rolling procedure prior to excretory phase CT urography increases the percentage of bladder opacification in patients with PVR values of 4000 mm(2) or less. No difference in ureteral opacification was observed between the log-rolling and non-log-rolling groups. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  20. TRAIL-mediated signaling in prostate, bladder and renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel-Johnson, Christina

    2011-06-14

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a death receptor ligand that has the ability to preferentially initiate apoptosis in malignant cells with minimal toxicity to normal cells. TRAIL-based therapeutics, including recombinant TRAIL, TRAIL-receptor agonistic antibodies and TRAIL gene therapy, have now entered clinical trials. Although these therapeutics are promising, concerns regarding TRAIL resistance are causing research efforts to shift towards the identification of effective combination therapies. Small-molecule inhibitors, natural compounds, and drugs approved for treatment of diseases other than cancer have been shown to affect TRAIL receptors, antiapoptotic proteins and survival pathways in prostate, bladder and renal cell lines and in preclinical models. Changes in endogenous TRAIL and TRAIL receptor expression during the development of genitourinary malignancies and the way in which the expression pattern is affected by treatment are of great interest, and understanding the biological consequences of such changes will be important to maximize the potential of TRAIL-based therapeutics.

  1. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the gene coding for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been described and proposed to activate gene expression. OBJECTIVES: To investigate TERT mutation frequency, spectrum, association with expression and clinical outcome, and potential...... for detection of recurrences in urine in patients with urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A set of 111 UBCs of different stages was used to assess TERT promoter mutations by Sanger sequencing and TERT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by reverse transcription...... surveillance after diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive UBC (n=194), was tested using a SNaPshot assay. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Association of mutation status with age, sex, tobacco, stage, grade, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutation, progression-free survival, disease...

  2. An orthotopic xenograft model for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in mice: influence of mouse strain, tumor cell count, dwell time and bladder pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Doreen; Rieger, Christiane; Bergmann, Ralf; Ullrich, Martin; Meister, Sebastian; Toma, Marieta; Wiedemuth, Ralf; Temme, Achim; Novotny, Vladimir; Wirth, Manfred P; Bachmann, Michael; Pietzsch, Jens; Fuessel, Susanne

    2017-11-23

    Novel theranostic options for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer are urgently needed. This requires a thorough evaluation of experimental approaches in animal models best possibly reflecting human disease before entering clinical studies. Although several bladder cancer xenograft models were used in the literature, the establishment of an orthotopic bladder cancer model in mice remains challenging. Luciferase-transduced UM-UC-3LUCK1 bladder cancer cells were instilled transurethrally via 24G permanent venous catheters into athymic NMRI and BALB/c nude mice as well as into SCID-beige mice. Besides the mouse strain, the pretreatment of the bladder wall (trypsin or poly-L-lysine), tumor cell count (0.5 × 106-5.0 × 106) and tumor cell dwell time in the murine bladder (30 min - 2 h) were varied. Tumors were morphologically and functionally visualized using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Immunodeficiency of the mouse strains was the most important factor influencing cancer cell engraftment, whereas modifying cell count and instillation time allowed fine-tuning of the BLI signal start and duration - both representing the possible treatment period for the evaluation of new therapeutics. Best orthotopic tumor growth was achieved by transurethral instillation of 1.0 × 106 UM-UC-3LUCK1 bladder cancer cells into SCID-beige mice for 2 h after bladder pretreatment with poly-L-lysine. A pilot PET experiment using 68Ga-cetuximab as transurethrally administered radiotracer revealed functional expression of epidermal growth factor receptor as representative molecular characteristic of engrafted cancer cells in the bladder. With the optimized protocol in SCID-beige mice an applicable and reliable model of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer for the development of novel theranostic approaches was established.

  3. Therapeutic potential of thalidomide for gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yen Ta; Cheng, Chuan Chu; Chiu, Ted H; Lai, Pei Chun

    2015-11-01

    Controversial effects of thalidomide for solid malignancies have been reported. In the present study, we evaluate the effects of thalidomide for transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), the most common type of bladder cancer. Thalidomide precipitates were observed when its DMSO solution was added to the culture medium. No precipitation was found when thalidomide was dissolved in 45% γ-cyclodextrin, and this concentration of γ-cyclodextrin elicited slight cytotoxicity on TCC BFTC905 and primary human urothelial cells. Thalidomide-γ-cyclodextrin complex exerted a concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in TCC cells, but was relatively less cytotoxic (with IC50 of 200 µM) in BFTC905 cells than the other 3 TCC cell lines, possibly due to upregulation of Bcl-xL and HIF-1α mediated carbonic anhydrase IX, and promotion of quiescence. Gemcitabine-resistant BFTC905 cells were chosen for additional experiments. Thalidomide induced apoptosis through downregulation of survivin and securin. The secretion of VEGF and TNF-α was ameliorated by thalidomide, but they did not affect cell proliferation. Immune-modulating lenalidomide and pomalidomide did not elicit cytotoxicity. In addition, cereblon did not play a role in the thalidomide effect. Oxidative DNA damage was triggered by thalidomide, and anti-oxidants reversed the effect. Thalidomide also inhibited TNF-α induced invasion through inhibition of NF-κB, and downregulation of effectors, ICAM-1 and MMP-9. Thalidomide inhibited the growth of BFTC905 xenograft tumors in SCID mice via induction of DNA damage and suppression of angiogenesis. Higher average body weight, indicating less chachexia, was observed in thalidomide treated group. Sedative effect was observed within one-week of treatment. These pre-clinical results suggest therapeutic potential of thalidomide for gemcitabine-resistant bladder cancer.

  4. Websites on Bladder Cancer: an Appropriate Source of Patient Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Johannes; Paffenholz, Pia; Bolenz, Christian; von Brandenstein, Melanie; Cebulla, Angelika; Haferkamp, Axel; Kuru, Timur; Lee, Cheryl T; Pfister, David; Tsaur, Igor; Borgmann, Hendrik; Heidenreich, Axel

    2018-01-08

    A growing number of patients search for health information online. An early investigation of websites about bladder cancer (BCa) revealed mostly incomplete and particularly inaccurate information. We analyzed the quality, readability, and popularity of the most frequented websites on BCa. An Internet search on www.google.com was performed for the term "bladder cancer." After selecting the most frequented websites for patient information, HONcode quality certification, Alexa popularity rank, and readability scores (according to US grade levels) were investigated. A 36-point checklist was used to assess the content according to the EAU guidelines on BCa, which was categorized into seven topics. The popularity of the 49 websites analyzed was average, with a median Alexa popularity rank of 41,698 (interquartile range [IQR] 7-4,671,246). The readability was rated difficult with 11 years of school education needed to understand the information. Thirteen (27%) websites were HONcode certified. Out of 343 topics (seven EAU guideline topics each on 49 websites), 79% were mentioned on the websites. Of these, 10% contained incorrect information, mostly outdated or biased, and 34% contained incomplete information. Publically provided websites mentioned more topics per website (median [IQR] 7 [5.5-7] vs. 5.5 [3.3-7]; p = 0.022) and showed less incorrect information (median [IQR] 0 [0-1] vs. 1 [0-1]; p = 0.039) than physician-provided websites. Our study revealed mostly correct but partially incomplete information on BCa websites for patients. Physicians and public organizations should strive to keep their website information up-to-date and unbiased to optimize patients' health literacy.

  5. Validation and clinicopathologic associations of a urine-based bladder cancer biomarker signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Gomes-Giacoia, Evan; Dai, Yunfeng; Lawton, Adrienne; Miyake, Makito; Furuya, Hideki; Goodison, Steve; Rosser, Charles J

    2014-11-12

    To validate the expression of a urine-based bladder cancer associated diagnostic signature comprised of 10 targets; ANG, CA9, MMP9, MMP10, SERPINA1, APOE, SDC1, VEGFA, SERPINE1 and IL8 in bladder tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed on tumor specimens from 213 bladder cancer patients (transitional cell carcinoma only) and 74 controls. Staining patterns were digitally captured and quantitated (Aperio, Vista, CA), and expression was correlated with tumor stage, tumor grade and outcome measures. We revealed a positive association of 9 of the 10 proteins (excluding VEGF) in bladder cancer. Relative to control cases, a reduction in SDC1 and overexpression of MMP9, MMP10, SERPINE1, IL8, APOE, SERPINA1, ANG were associated with high stage bladder cancer. Reduced VEGF and increased SERPINA1 were associated with high-grade bladder cancer. Disease-specific survival was significantly reduced in tumors with high expression of SERPINE1 and/or IL8. These findings confirm that the proteins in a urine-based diagnostic signature are aberrantly expressed in bladder tumor tissues, and support the potential additional utility of selected biomarkers for the clinicopathological evaluation of excised tissue or biopsy material. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/13000_2014_200.

  6. Simple DVH parameter addition as compared to deformable registration for bladder dose accumulation in cervix cancer brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Else Stougård; Noe, Karsten Østergaaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Variations in organ position, shape, and volume cause uncertainties in dose assessment for brachytherapy (BT) in cervix cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate uncertainties associated with bladder dose accumulation based on DVH parameter addition (previously...... called "the worst case assumption") in fractionated BT. Materials and methods: Forty-seven patients treated for locally advanced cervical cancer were included. All patients received EBRT combined with two individually planned 3D image-guided adaptive BT fractions. D2 and D0.1 were estimated by DVH...

  7. Urine Telomerase for Diagnosis and Surveillance of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lamarca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer has increased incidence during last decades. For those patients with nonmuscle involved tumors, noninvasive diagnosis test and surveillance methods must be designed to avoid current cystoscopies that nowadays are done regularly in a lot of patients. Novel urine biomarkers have been developed during last years. Telomerase is important in cancer biology, improving the division capacity of cancer cells. Even urinary telomerase could be a potentially useful urinary tumor marker; its use for diagnosis of asymptomatic and symptomatic patients or its impact during surveillance is still unknown. Moreover, there will need to be uniformity and standardization in the assays before it can become useful in clinical practice. It does not seem to exist a real difference between the most classical assays for the detection of urine telomerase (TRAP and hTERT. However, the new detection methods with modified TeloTAGGG telomerase or with gold nanoparticles must also be taken into consideration for the correct development of this diagnosis method. Maybe the target population would be the high-risk groups within screening programs. To date there is no enough evidence to use it alone and to eliminate cystoscopies from the diagnosis and surveillance of these patients. The combination with cytology or FISH is still preferred.

  8. Alternative splicing in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer identified by exon-array analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Kasper; Sørensen, Karina D.; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie

    2008-01-01

    from colon, urinary bladder, and prostate. We identified 2069 candidate alternative splicing events between normal tissue samples from colon, bladder, and prostate and selected 15 splicing events for RT-PCR validation, 10 of which were successfully validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. Furthermore 23, 19......, and 18 candidate tumor-specific splicing alterations in colon, bladder, and prostate, respectively, were selected for RT-PCR validation on an independent set of 81 normal and tumor tissue samples. In total, seven genes with tumor-specific splice variants were identified (ACTN1, CALD1, COL6A3, LRRFIP2....... In conclusion, we identified and validated alternative splicing between normal tissue samples from colon, bladder, and prostate in addition to cancer-specific splicing events in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer that may have diagnostic and prognostic implications....

  9. Oncogenic activation of Pak1-dependent pathway of macropinocytosis determines BCG entry into bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Iyer, Gopa; Solit, David; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis that is used widely as a vaccine for tuberculosis and is used as an effective treatment for superficial bladder carcinoma. Despite being the most successful cancer biotherapy, its mechanism of action and response determinants remain obscure. Here we establish a model system to analyze BCG interaction with bladder cancer cells, using it to show that these cells vary dramatically in their susceptibility to BCG infection. Unexpectedly, the uptake of BCG by bladder cancer cells occurs by macropinocytosis rather than phagocytosis. BCG entry into bladder cancer cells relied upon Rac1, Cdc42 and their effector kinase Pak1. The difference in susceptibility between BCG-permissive and BCG-resistant bladder cancer cells was due to oncogenic activation of signaling pathways that activate macropinocytosis, with PI3K activation stimulating BCG uptake independently of Akt. Similarly, activated Ras strongly activated Pak1-dependent uptake of BCG. These results reveal that oncogenic activation of macropinocytosis determines BCG uptake by bladder cancer cells, implying that tumor responsiveness to BCG may be governed by the specific mutations present in the treated cancer cell. PMID:23378476

  10. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) expression in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Joshua I; Raman, Jay D; Kaag, Matthew; Bruggeman, Trey; Cates, Justin; Clark, Peter; DeGraff, David J

    2016-06-01

    Studies evaluating enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) expression and oncologic outcomes in bladder cancer have been discrepant. EZH2 expression in noninvasive bladder cancer is not well studied. We thus set out to address the discrepancy in previous reports, and to study expression of EZH2 in noninvasive bladder cancer and its associations, in a large cystectomy cohort. EZH2 expression was evaluated in tissue microarray material (invasive and noninvasive cancer). Associations between EZH2 expression and oncologic outcomes, tumor stage, and disease type were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed for EZH2 expression in the diagnosis of invasive carcinoma and flat carcinoma in situ (CIS) compared to benign urothelium. EZH2 expression was most common in CIS, followed by invasive carcinoma, noninvasive papillary urothelial carcinoma, and benign urothelium, in decreasing order (PEZH2 expression was not associated with oncologic outcomes, including recurrence-free survival and death from bladder cancer. The EZH2 expression status (positive or negative) of noninvasive and invasive carcinomas taken from the same bladder correlated (P = 0.05, Fisher exact). That EZH2 status of noninvasive and invasive cancer correlated in individual patients suggests that EZH2 may be a marker of lineage. EZH2 may offer diagnostic utility, particularly in flat urothelial CIS vs. benign urothelium. The present study supports that EZH2 expression in bladder cancer is not predictive of oncologic outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine inhibit bladder cancer cell growth by targeting basal autophagy and enhancing apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chia Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine (CQ and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, two antimalarial drugs, are suggested to have potential anticancer properties. in the present study, we investigated the effects of CQ and HCQ on cell growth of bladder cancer with emphasis on autophagy inhibition and apoptosis induction in vitro. The results showed that CQ and HCQ inhibited the proliferation of multiple human bladder cell lines (including RT4, 5637, and T24 in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, especially in advanced bladder cancer cell lines (5637 and T24 compared to immortalized uroepithelial cells (SV-Huc-1 or other reference cancer cell lines (PC3 and MCF-7. We found that 24-hour treatment of CQ or HCQ significantly decreased the clonogenic formation in 5637 and T24 cells compared to SV-Huc-1. As human bladder cancer tumor exhibits high basal level of autophagic activities, we detected the autophagic flux in cells treated with CQ and HCQ, showing an alternation in LC3 flux in CQ- or HCQ-treated cells. Moreover, bladder cancer cells treated with CQ and HCQ underwent apoptosis, resulting in increased caspase 3/7 activities, increased level of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, caspase 3, and DNA fragmentation. Given these results, targeting autophagy with CQ and HCQ represents an effective cancer therapeutic strategy against human bladder cancer.

  12. Downregulation of HIPK2 increases resistance of bladder cancer cell to cisplatin by regulating Wip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Lu, Yi; Xue, Wenrui; Xu, Yue; Zhu, Yichen; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy regimen is a reasonable alternative to cystectomy in advanced/metastatic bladder cancer, but acquisition of cisplatin resistance is common in patients with bladder cancer. Previous studies showed that loss of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) contributes to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. However, the role of HIPK2 in regulating chemoresistance of cancer cell is not fully understood. In the present study, we found that HIPK2 mRNA and protein levels are significantly decreased in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell in vivo and in vitro. Downregulation of HIPK2 increases the cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner during cisplatin treatment, whereas overexpression of HIPK2 reduces the cell viability. HIPK2 overexpression partially overcomes cisplatin resistance in RT4-CisR cell. Furthermore, we showed that Wip1 (wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1) expression is upregulated in RT4-CisR cell compared with RT4 cell, and HIPK2 negatively regulates Wip1 expression in bladder cancer cell. HIPK2 and Wip1 expression is also negatively correlated after cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that overexpression of HIPK2 sensitizes chemoresistant bladder cancer cell to cisplatin by regulating Wip1 expression. These data suggest that HIPK2/Wip1 signaling represents a novel pathway regulating chemoresistance, thus offering a new target for chemotherapy of bladder cancer.

  13. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine inhibit bladder cancer cell growth by targeting basal autophagy and enhancing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Lin, Ji-Fan; Wen, Sheng-I; Yang, Shan-Che; Tsai, Te-Fu; Chen, Hung-En; Chou, Kuang-Yu; Hwang, Thomas I-Sheng

    2017-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), two antimalarial drugs, are suggested to have potential anticancer properties. in the present study, we investigated the effects of CQ and HCQ on cell growth of bladder cancer with emphasis on autophagy inhibition and apoptosis induction in vitro. The results showed that CQ and HCQ inhibited the proliferation of multiple human bladder cell lines (including RT4, 5637, and T24) in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, especially in advanced bladder cancer cell lines (5637 and T24) compared to immortalized uroepithelial cells (SV-Huc-1) or other reference cancer cell lines (PC3 and MCF-7). We found that 24-hour treatment of CQ or HCQ significantly decreased the clonogenic formation in 5637 and T24 cells compared to SV-Huc-1. As human bladder cancer tumor exhibits high basal level of autophagic activities, we detected the autophagic flux in cells treated with CQ and HCQ, showing an alternation in LC3 flux in CQ- or HCQ-treated cells. Moreover, bladder cancer cells treated with CQ and HCQ underwent apoptosis, resulting in increased caspase 3/7 activities, increased level of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), caspase 3, and DNA fragmentation. Given these results, targeting autophagy with CQ and HCQ represents an effective cancer therapeutic strategy against human bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Downregulation of HIPK2 increases resistance of bladder cancer cell to cisplatin by regulating Wip1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lin

    Full Text Available Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy regimen is a reasonable alternative to cystectomy in advanced/metastatic bladder cancer, but acquisition of cisplatin resistance is common in patients with bladder cancer. Previous studies showed that loss of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2 contributes to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. However, the role of HIPK2 in regulating chemoresistance of cancer cell is not fully understood. In the present study, we found that HIPK2 mRNA and protein levels are significantly decreased in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell in vivo and in vitro. Downregulation of HIPK2 increases the cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner during cisplatin treatment, whereas overexpression of HIPK2 reduces the cell viability. HIPK2 overexpression partially overcomes cisplatin resistance in RT4-CisR cell. Furthermore, we showed that Wip1 (wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 expression is upregulated in RT4-CisR cell compared with RT4 cell, and HIPK2 negatively regulates Wip1 expression in bladder cancer cell. HIPK2 and Wip1 expression is also negatively correlated after cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that overexpression of HIPK2 sensitizes chemoresistant bladder cancer cell to cisplatin by regulating Wip1 expression.These data suggest that HIPK2/Wip1 signaling represents a novel pathway regulating chemoresistance, thus offering a new target for chemotherapy of bladder cancer.

  15. Nanotechnology in bladder cancer: current state of development and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Ben; Lin, Tzu-yin; Dall'Era, Marc; Pan, Chong-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is being developed for the diagnosis and treatment of both nonmyoinvasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and invasive bladder cancer. The diagnostic applications of nanotechnology in NMIBC mainly focus on tumor identification during endoscopy to increase complete resection of bladder cancer while nanotechnology to capture malignant cells or their components continues to be developed. The therapeutic applications of nanotechnology in NMIBC are to reformulate biological and cytotoxic agents for intravesical instillation, combine both diagnostic and therapeutic application in one nanoformulation. In invasive and advanced bladder cancer, magnetic resonance imaging with supraparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can improve the sensitivity and specificity in detecting small metastasis to lymph nodes. Nanoformulation of cytotoxic agents can potentially decrease the toxicity while increasing efficacy.

  16. FGFR3 and Cyclin D3 as urine biomarkers of bladder cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca, Ana; Requena, Maria J; Alvarez, Jose; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Raspollini, Maria R; Reymundo, Carlos; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic performance of FGFR3 and Cyclin D3 urinary protein levels in detecting bladder cancer recurrence. Urine of 321 patients in follow-up for bladder cancer and 150 non-neoplastic urine controls was included. Cytology, cystoscopy and FGFR3 and Cyclin D3 expression by western blot were performed. One hundred ten (34.3%) patients had evidence of tumor recurrence. The sensitivity and specificity of cytology/cystoscopy was 80 and 84%, and for FGFR3/Cyclin D3 was of 73 and 90%. Combined urinary FGFR3/Cyclin D3 expression shows improved detection rates for bladder cancer recurrence with high specificity and sensitivity, and within the same range of detection shown by cystoscopy, therefore supporting its potential use as noninvasive diagnostic biomarker for bladder cancer recurrence.

  17. Reduced LAK cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Petersen, K R; Steven, K

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (US-PBMC), phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC (PS-PBMC) and interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated PBMC (LAK cells) was assessed in patients with noninvasive and invasive transitional-cell bladder cancer and compared with those...... determined in healthy controls. The differences in the cytotoxicities were correlated with specific changes in the subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PBMC from 37 patients and 13 healthy controls were tested against the bladder cancer cell line T24 in 51Cr-release assays. The PBMC subsets...... that the reduced ability of bladder cancer patient PBMC to develop LAK-cell cytotoxicity is a result of a low incidence of CD56+ and CD57+ cells in the blood. These findings indicate that IL-2 therapy alone might not be a sufficient therapy of bladder cancer patients....

  18. Chemoradiation May Help Some Patients with Bladder Cancer Avoid Radical Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers in the United Kingdom have found that adding chemotherapy to radiation therapy as a treatment for bladder cancer may reduce the risk of a recurrence more than radiation alone, without causing a substantial increase in side effects.

  19. Metabolomic profiling reveals potential markers and bioprocesses altered in bladder cancer progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R; Fischer, Steven M; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J; Shi, Huidong; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Lotan, Yair; Weizer, Alon Z; Terris, Martha K; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    .... Subsequent enrichment-based bioprocess mapping revealed alterations in phase I/II metabolism and suggested a possible role for DNA methylation in perturbing xenobiotic metabolism in bladder cancer...

  20. Parthenolide Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Human 5637 Bladder Cancer Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Cheng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Parthenolide, the principal component of sesquiterpene lactones present in medical plants such as feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium, has been reported to have anti-tumor activity. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of parthenolide against bladder cancer and its mechanism of action. Treatment of bladder cancer cells with parthenolide resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability. Parthenolide induced apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 family proteins and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase degradation. Treatment with parthenolide led to G1 phase cell cycle arrest in 5637 cells by modulation of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated cyclin-dependent kinase 2. Parthenolide also inhibited the invasive ability of bladder cancer cells. These findings suggest that parthenolide could be a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of bladder cancer.

  1. Identification of differentially expressed proteins during human urinary bladder cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Ashfaque Ahmed; chang, Jong. w; Oh, Bong R.

    2005-01-01

    Comparative proteome analysis was performed between RT4 (grade-1) and T24 (grade-3) bladder cancer cell lines, in an attempt to identify differentially expressed proteins during bladder cancer progression. Among those relatively abundant proteins, seven spots changed more than two-fold reproducibly...... and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting using mass spectrometry and database search. We found most extensive and reproducible down-regulation of NADP dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase cytoplasmic (IDPc) and peroxiredoxin-II (Prx-II), in poorly differentiated T24 compared to well-differentiated RT4 bladder...... cancer cell line. Subsequent Western blotting analysis of human biopsy samples from bladder cancer patient revealed significant loss of IDPc and Prx-II in more advance tumor samples, in agreement with data on cell lines. These results suggest that loss of IDPc and Prx-II during tumor development may...

  2. A review on thiazolidinediones and bladder cancer in human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2014-01-01

    There is a concern of an increased risk of bladder cancer associated with the use of thiazolidinediones, a class of oral glucose-lowering drugs commonly used in patients with type 2 diabetes with a mechanism of improving insulin resistance. Human studies on related issues are reviewed, followed by a discussion on potential concerns on the causal inference in current studies. Pioglitazone and rosiglitazone are discussed separately, and findings from different geographical regions are presented. Randomized controlled trials designed for primarily answering such a cancer link are lacking, and evidence from clinical trials with available data for evaluating the association may not be informative. Observational studies have been reported with the use of population-based administrative databases, single-hospital records, drug adverse event reporting system, and case series collection. Meta-analysis has also been performed by six different groups of investigators. These studies showed a signal of higher risk of bladder cancer associated with pioglitazone, especially at a higher cumulative dose or after prolonged exposure; however, a weaker signal or null association is observed with rosiglitazone. In addition, there are some concerns on the causal inference, which may be related to the use of secondary databases, biases in sampling, differential detection, and confounding by indications. Lack of full control of smoking and potential biases related to study designs and statistical approaches such as prevalent user bias and immortal time bias may be major limitations in some studies. Overlapping populations and opposing conclusions in studies using the same databases may be of concern and weaken the reported conclusions of the studies. Because randomized controlled trials are expensive and unethical in providing an answer to this cancer issue, observational studies are expected to be the main source in providing an answer in the future. Furthermore, international comparison

  3. The FGFR3 mutation is related to favorable pT1 bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, Bas W G; van der Kwast, Theo H; Liu, Liyang; Fleshner, Neil E; Bostrom, Peter J; Vis, André N; Alkhateeb, Sultan S; Bangma, Chris H; Jewett, Michael A S; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Bapat, Bharati

    2012-01-01

    Stage pT1 bladder cancer comprises a heterogeneous group of tumors for which different management options are advocated. FGFR3 mutations are linked to favorable (low grade/stage) pTa bladder cancer while altered P53 is common in cases of high grade, muscle invasive (pT2 or greater) bladder cancer. We determined the frequency of FGFR3 mutations and P53 alterations in patients with pT1 bladder cancer and correlated these data to histopathological variables and clinical outcomes. We included 132 patients with primary pT1 bladder cancer from a total of 2 academic centers. A uropathologist reviewed the slides for grade and confirmed the pT1 diagnosis. FGFR3 mutation status was examined by SNaPshot® analysis and P53 expression was determined by standard immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses were used to assess progression. FGFR3 mutations were detected in 37 of 132 pT1 bladder cancer cases (28%) and altered P53 was seen in 71 (54%). Only 8% of patients had the 2 molecular alterations (p = 0.001). FGFR3 mutation correlated with lower grade and altered P53 correlated with high grade pT1 bladder cancer. Median followup was 6.5 years. FGFR3 mutation status and carcinoma in situ were significant for predicting progression on univariate and multivariate analyses but P53 status was not. FGFR3 mutations selectively identify patients with pT1 bladder cancer who have favorable disease characteristics. Further study may confirm that FGFR3 identifies those who would benefit from a conservative approach to the disease. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and bladder cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelao, J E; Yuan, J M; Gago-Dominguez, M; Yu, M C; Ross, R K

    2000-04-01

    Inclusion of phenacetin among 'proven' human carcinogens by the IARC in 1987, raised concerns about the carcinogenic potential of acetaminophen, its major metabolite. Acetaminophen has been implicated as a possible causal agent in the development of cancer of the renal pelvis. The bladder and renal pelvis, which derive from the same embryological structure, share the same transitional type of epithelium. Past studies have been inconclusive on the possible relationship among these analgesics and bladder cancer but no large, highly detailed study of this association has been conducted. A population-based case-control study conducted in Los Angeles, California, involved 1514 incident bladder cancer cases and an equal number of controls who were matched to the index cases by sex, date of birth (within 5 years) and race. Detailed information on medication use and prior medical conditions was collected through in-person interviews. Regular use of analgesics was not associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in either men or women. In fact, compared with non- or irregular users, regular analgesic users were at a decreased risk of bladder cancer overall (odds ratio (OR) = 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.68-0.96). However, there were clear differences in both the direction and strength of the associations between the different formulation classes of analgesics and bladder cancer risk. Intake of phenacetin was positively related to bladder cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner while intake of its major metabolite in humans, acetaminophen, was unrelated to risk. Intake of all classes of NSAIDs, except pyrazolon derivatives, were negatively associated with bladder cancer risk, with suggestive evidence that the protective effect varies in strength by subcategories of formulation. Acetic acids seemed to exhibit the strongest protective effect, whereas aspirin/other salicylic acids and oxicam showed the weakest protection.

  5. Inhibition of Bladder Cancer by Broccoli Isothiocyanates Sulforaphane and Erucin: Characterization, Metabolism and Interconversion

    OpenAIRE

    Abbaoui, Besma; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Ralston, Robin A.; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Clinton, Steven K.; Mortazavi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests diets rich in cruciferous vegetables, particularly broccoli, are associated with lower bladder cancer risk. Our objectives are to investigate these observations and determine the role of isothiocyanates in primary or secondary bladder cancer prevention. We initially investigate the mechanisms whereby broccoli and broccoli sprout extracts and pure isothiocyanates inhibit normal, non-invasive (RT4) and invasive (J82, UMUC3) human urothelial cell viability. Sulfor...

  6. Non-alcoholic beverages and risk of bladder cancer in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acosta Giselle

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bladder cancer is the fourth most frequent malignancy among Uruguayan men. A previous study from Uruguay suggested a high risk of bladder cancer associated with maté drinking. We conducted an additional case-control study in order to further explore the role of non-alcoholic beverages in bladder carcinogenesis. Methods In the time period 1996–2000, 255 incident cases with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and 501 patients treated in the same hospitals and in the same time period were frequency matched on age, sex, and residence. Both cases and controls were face-to-face interviewed on occupation, tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and intake of maté, coffee, tea, and soft drinks. Statistical analysis was carried out by unconditional multiple logistic regression. Results Ever maté drinking was positively associated with bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2–3.9 and the risk increased for increasing duration and amount of maté drinking. Both coffee and tea were strongly associated with bladder cancer risk (OR for coffee drinking 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.3; OR for tea drinking 2.3, 95% CI 1.5–3.4. These results were confirmed in a separate analysis of never-smokers. Conclusion Our results suggest that drinking of maté, coffee and tea may be risk factors for bladder carcinoma in Uruguay.

  7. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jiajia [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhu, Xi [Department of Urology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jie, E-mail: zhangjiebjmu@163.com [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We first demonstrated CXCL5 is highly expressed in human bladder tumor tissues and cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits proliferation, migration and promotes apoptosis in T24 cells. • CXCL5 knockdown inhibits Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in T24 cells. • CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression. - Abstract: CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Comparison of post contrast CT urography phases in bladder cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Malin; Dahlman, Par; Lonnemark, Maria; Brekkan, Einar; Wernroth, Lisa; Magnusson, Anders

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate which post-contrast phase(s) in a four-phase CT urography protocol is (are) most suitable for bladder cancer detection. The medical records of 106 patients with visible haematuria who underwent a CT urography examination, including unenhanced, enhancement-triggered corticomedullary (CMP), nephrographic (NP) and excretory (EP) phases, were reviewed. The post-contrast phases (n = 318 different phases) were randomized into an evaluation order and blindly reviewed by two uroradiologists. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with bladder cancer. Sensitivity for bladder cancer detection was 0.95 in CMP, 0.83 in NP and 0.81 in EP. Negative predictive value (NPV) was 0.99 in CMP, 0.96 in NP and 0.95 in EP. The sensitivity was higher in CMP than in both NP (p-value 0.016) and EP (p-value 0.0003). NPV was higher in CMP than in NP (p-value 0.024) and EP (p-value 0.002). In the CT urography protocol with enhancement-triggered scan, sensitivity and NPV were highest in the corticomedullary phase, and this phase should be used for bladder assessment. • More bladder tumours are detected during the corticomedullary phase than during other phases. • Sensitivity and NPV for bladder cancer detection were highest in corticomedullary phase. • The corticomedullary phase in CT urography should be used for bladder assessment.

  9. FGFR3-targeted mAb therapy for bladder cancer and multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Hadari, Yaron; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) have been implicated in severe skeletal dysplasias and in a variety of cancers. In their study in this issue of the JCI, Qing et al. used specific shRNA probes to demonstrate that FGFR3 functions as an important driver of bladder carcinoma cell proliferation (see the related article beginning on page 1216). A unique anti-FGFR3 mAb was shown to exhibit antitumor activity in human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro and in mouse bladder cancer o...

  10. Dose evaluation of organs at risk (OAR) cervical cancer using dose volume histogram (DVH) on brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif Wibowo, R.; Haris, Bambang; Inganatul Islamiyah, dan

    2017-05-01

    Brachytherapy is one way to cure cervical cancer. It works by placing a radioactive source near the tumor. However, there are some healthy tissues or organs at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum which received radiation also. This study aims to evaluate the radiation dose of the bladder and rectum. There were 12 total radiation dose data of the bladder and rectum obtained from patients’ brachytherapy. The dose of cervix for all patients was 6 Gy. Two-dimensional calculation of the radiation dose was based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) points or called DICRU while the 3-dimensional calculation derived from Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) on a volume of 2 cc (D2cc). The radiation dose of bladder and rectum from both methods were analysed using independent t test. The mean DICRU of bladder was 4.33730 Gy and its D2cc was4.78090 Gy. DICRU and D2cc bladder did not differ significantly (p = 0.144). The mean DICRU of rectum was 3.57980 Gy and 4.58670 Gy for D2cc. The mean DICRU of rectum differed significantly from D2cc of rectum (p = 0.000). The three-dimensional method radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was higher than the two-dimensional method with ratios 1.10227 for bladder and 1.28127 for rectum. The radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was still below the tolerance dose. Two-dimensional calculation of the bladder and rectum dose was lower than three-dimension which was more accurate due to its calculation at the whole volume of the organs.

  11. Endometriose Simulando Neoplasia Vesical Endometriosis Simulating Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Tobias-Machado

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: o acometimento do trato urinário pela endometriose é raro e quando ocorre, a bexiga é o órgão mais freqüentemente afetado. Observamos que algumas pacientes têm sido encaminhadas com o diagnóstico clínico de neoplasia vesical. Em geral, a literatura mostra relatos isolados de casos, tornando difícil a padronização de condutas. Tivemos por objetivo apresentar nossa experiência, mostrando os principais aspectos diagnósticos e terapêuticos desta entidade clínica. Métodos: avaliamos retrospectivamente os casos com diagnóstico de endometriose vesical por meio do arquivo do Departamento de Patologia, fazendo revisão dos dados clínicos de prontuário e convocando as pacientes para seguimento ambulatorial após tratamento. Resultados: os principais sinais e sintomas apresentados pelas pacientes foram disúria cíclica, massa e dor pélvica crônica. O diagnóstico presuntivo foi realizado mediante ultra-sonografia (USG, tomografia computadorizada (TC de abdome, cistoscopia e laparoscopia. O diagnóstico definitivo com confirmação anátomo-patológica foi obtido pela ressecção endoscópica em 3 casos e biópsia laparoscópica em 1 caso. As opções terapêuticas foram o tratamento medicamentoso exclusivo e a ressecção da lesão empregando a via endoscópica ou cistectomia parcial, sempre complementados por tratamento clínico adjuvante. Conclusões: revisamos os principais aspectos clínicos e terapêuticos da endometriose do trato urinário, lembrando que esta representa um importante diagnóstico diferencial de tumor vesical em mulheres jovens na idade reprodutiva.Purpose: urinary tract involvement by endometriosis is uncommon and the bladder is the most common site. We observed that clinical misdiagnosis of bladder cancer frequently is made. Because the disease is generally described in case reports there is not a consensual management. We present and discuss our experience of diagnostic and therapeutic issues

  12. A meta-analysis of alcohol intake and risk of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qiqi; Lin, Yiwei; Zheng, Xiangyi; Qin, Jie; Yang, Kai; Xie, Liping

    2010-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies have reported conflicting results relating alcohol intake to bladder cancer risk. A meta-analysis of cohort and case-control studies was conducted to pool the risk estimates of the association between alcohol intake and bladder cancer. Eligible studies were retrieved via both computer searches and review of references. We analyzed abstracted data with random effects models to obtain the summary risk estimates. Dose-response meta-analysis was performed for studies reporting categorical risk estimates for a series of exposure levels. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria of the meta-analysis. No association with bladder cancer was observed in either overall alcohol intake group (OR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.89-1.10) or subgroups stratified by sex, study design, geographical region, or smoking status. However, in the analysis by specific beverages, both beer (OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.96) and wine (OR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.71-1.00) consumption exhibited a negative dose-response relationship with bladder cancer. The overall current literature on alcohol consumption and the risk of bladder cancer suggested no association, while the consumption of beer and wine was associated with reduced risk of bladder cancer. Further efforts should be made to confirm these findings and clarify the underlying biological mechanisms.

  13. Accurate Risk Assessment of Patients with Asymptomatic Hematuria for the Presence of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Eugene K.; Tirsar, Lenuta-Ancuta; Schwentner, Christian; Hennenlotter, Joerg; Christos, Paul J.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Mian, Christine; Martini, Thomas; Pycha, Armin; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bladder cancer is frequently diagnosed during a workup for hematuria. However, most patients with microscopic hematuria and many with gross hematuria are not appropriately referred to urologists. We hypothesized that in patients presenting with asymptomatic hematuria, the risk of having bladder cancer can be predicted with high accuracy. Towards this end, we analyzed risk factors in patients with asymptomatic hematuria and developed a nomogram for the prediction of bladder cancer presence. Methods Data from 1,182 consecutive subjects without a history of bladder cancer undergoing initial evaluation for asymptomatic hematuria were collected at three centers. Clinical risk factors including age, gender, smoking status, and degree of hematuria were recorded. All subjects underwent standard workup including voided cytology, upper tract imaging, and cystourethroscopy. Factors associated with the presence of bladder cancer were evaluated by univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. The multivariable analysis was used to construct a nomogram. Internal validation was performed using 200 bootstrap samples. Results Of the 1,182 subjects who presented with asymptomatic hematuria, 245 (20.7%) had bladder cancer. Increasing age (OR=1.03, phematuria (OR=1.71, p=0.002), and positive cytology (OR=14.71, phematuria. We developed a nomogram to help optimize referral patterns (i.e., timing and prioritization) of patients with asymptomatic hematuria. PMID:23124847

  14. Exploring the FGFR3-related oncogenic mechanism in bladder cancer using bioinformatics strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Enguang; Zhou, Li; Yuan, Tan; Zhang, Chunying

    2017-03-20

    Aberrant activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is frequently observed in bladder cancer, but how it involved in carcinogenesis is not well understood. The current study was aimed to investigate the underlying mechanism on the progression of bladder cancer. The GSE41035 dataset downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus was used to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between bladder cancer cell line RT112 with or without depletion of FGFR3, and gene ontology enrichment analysis was performed. Then, FGFR3-centered protein-protein interaction (PPI) and regulatory networks were constructed. Combined with the data retrieved from GSE31684, prognostic makers for bladder cancer were predicted. We identified a total of 2855 DEGs, and most of them were associated with blood vessel morphogenesis and cell division. In addition, KIAA1377, POLA2, FGFR3, and EPHA4 were the hub genes with high degree in the FGFR3-centered PPI network. Besides, 17 microRNAs (miRNAs) and 6 transcriptional factors (TFs) were predicted to be the regulators of the nodes in PPI network. Moreover, CSTF2, POLA1, HMOX2, and EFNB2 may be associated with the prognosis of bladder cancer patient. The current study may provide some insights into the molecular mechanism of FGFR3 as a mediator in bladder cancer.

  15. [Reversion transcriptional expression of DAPK in bladder cancer T24 cells 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning-ru; Liu, Chun-xiao; Zheng, Shao-bo; Li, Hu-lin; Xu, Ya-wen; Xu, Kai

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the methylation status of the promoter of resion death associated protein kinase (DAPK) gene in bladder cancer cell (T24), and study the effect of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dc) on DAPK gene reactive expression in T24 and its inhibitory effect on T24. The bladder cancer cell T24 was treated with different doses of 5-aza-dc. The inhibitory effect and apoptosis rate were detected by MTT and flow cytometry, and the changes of DAPK mRNA and protein expression and the methylation status of DAPK promoter were assessed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and methylation specific PCR, respectively. The growth of bladder cancer cell was inhibited significantly and the maximal apoptosis rate detected by flow cytometry was (24.12-/+1.4)%. DAPK mRNA was not expressed in bladder cancer cell T24 in normal conditions. DAPK mRNA and protein re-expressed after 5-aza-dc (12.5 micromol/L) treatment in cell line T24 for 24 h, and DAPK promoter became unmethylated. The promoter methylation can be an important factor for silencing the expression of DAPK in bladder cancer cell. 5-aza-dc can inhibit the growth and induce apoptosis of bladder cancer cells through reversing unmethylation status of DAPK promoter.

  16. G-protein-coupled receptor 137 accelerates proliferation of urinary bladder cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiheng; Bi, Wenhuan; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Wenbo; Xia, Shujie; Liu, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a worldwide concern because of its level of incidence and recurrence. To search an effective therapeutic strategy for urinary bladder cancer, it is important to identify proteins involved in tumorigenesis that could serve as potential targets for diagnosis and treatment. G-protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) constitute a large protein family of receptors that sense molecules outside the cell and activate signal transduction pathways and cellular responses inside the cell. GPR137 is a newly discovered human gene encoding orphan GPRs. In this study, we aimed to investigate the physiological role of GPR137 in urinary bladder cancer. The effect of GPR137 on cell growth was examined via an RNA interference (RNAi) lentivirus system in two human urinary bladder cancer cell lines BT5637 and T24. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi could specifically suppressed GPR137 expression in vitro, resulting in alleviated cell viability and impaired colony formation, as well as blocks G0/G1 and S phases of the cell cycle. These results suggested GPR137 as an essential player in urinary bladder cancer cell growth, and it may serve as a potential target for gene therapy in the treatment of urinary bladder cancer. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. A proteomic study of potential VEGF-C-associated proteins in bladder cancer T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-hui; Qi, Fan; Zu, Xiong-bing; Cao, You-han; Miao, Jian-guang; Xu, Liang; Qi, Lin

    2012-11-01

    Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) has been found to play an important role in malignant progression of various cancer cells, in addition to lymphangiogenesis. However, the mechanisms involved are still largely unknown. Our early research has confirmed that the expression of VEGF-C in bladder cancer was markedly higher than that in normal bladder tissues. VEGF-C can also obviously promote proliferation and invasion of bladder cancer T24 cells. In the present work, we attempted to use proteomic analysis to screen out potential VEGF-C-associated proteins involved in malignant progression of the bladder cancer T24 cells. Lentivirus vector-based RNA interference (RNAi) was employed to diminish VEGF-C expression of bladder cancer T24 cells. Then we performed comparative proteome analysis to explore differentially expressed proteins in T24 cells with and without VEGF-C siRNA, by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Twenty-three proteins were identified. Some proteins (matrix metalloproteinase-9, Keratin 8, Serpin B5, Annexin A8) with significant differences were further confirmed by Western blotting. The 23 potential VEGF-C-associated proteins identified in our study provide us with further insights into the mechanism of VEGF-C promoting malignant progression of bladder cancer cells.

  18. Bladder cancer: Evaluation of staging accuracy using dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, A., E-mail: arajesh27@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital (United Kingdom); Sokhi, H.K.; Fung, R.; Mulcahy, K.A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital (United Kingdom); Bankart, M.J.G. [Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging bladder cancer and to assess whether dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences have any added benefit in staging. Materials and methods: Over a 22 month period, the MRI findings of 100 consecutive patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were reviewed. The T stage was assessed independently on T2-weighted imaging alone and in combination with gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The final histological diagnosis was considered the reference standard. Statistical analysis was performed to ascertain stage-by-stage accuracy. Accuracy of MRI in differentiating superficial ({<=}T1) from invasive ({>=}T2) and in differentiating organ-confined ({<=}T2) from non-organ-confined ({>=}T3) disease was assessed. Results: On a stage-by-stage basis, tumours were correctly staged using MRI in 63% of patients (observed agreement = 0.63, weighted kappa = 0.57). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between superficial ({<=}T1) from invasive ({>=}T2) disease was 78.2 and 93.3%. The observed agreement for this group was 85% (kappa = 70%; p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between organ-confined ({<=}T2) from non-organ confined ({>=}T3) disease was 90.5 and 60%. The observed agreement for this group was 89% (kappa = 30%; p < 0.01). Gadolinium-enhanced images improved staging in only three patients. Conclusion: In the present study MRI was found to be a moderately accurate tool in assessing the T stage. Agreement on a stage-by-stage basis was good. Agreement for differentiating between non-invasive versus muscle-invasive disease was good and that for organ-confined versus non-organ-confined disease was fair. Routine use of gadolinium-enhanced images is not routinely required.

  19. Oncogenic FGFR3 gene fusions in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah V; Hurst, Carolyn D; Knowles, Margaret A

    2013-02-15

    FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) is activated by mutation or over-expression in many bladder cancers. Here, we identify an additional mechanism of activation via chromosomal re-arrangement to generate constitutively activated fusion genes. FGFR3-transforming acid coiled coil 3 (TACC3) fusions resulting from 4p16.3 re-arrangements and a t(4;7) that generates a FGFR3-BAI1-associated protein 2-like 1 (BAIAP2L1) fusion were identified in 4 of 43 bladder tumour cell lines and 2 of 32 selected tissue samples including the tumour from which one of the cell lines was derived. These are highly activated and transform NIH-3T3 cells. The FGFR3 component is identical in all cases and lacks the final exon that includes the phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLCγ1) binding site. Expression of the fusions in immortalized normal human urothelial cells (NHUC) induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not PLCγ1. A protein with loss of the terminal region alone was not as highly activated as the fusion proteins, indicating that the fusion partners are essential. The TACC3 fusions retain the TACC domain that mediates microtubule binding and the BAIAP2L1 fusion retains the IRSp53/MIM domain (IMD) that mediates actin binding and Rac interaction. As urothelial cell lines with FGFR3 fusions are extremely sensitive to FGFR-selective agents, the presence of a fusion gene may aid in selection of patients for FGFR-targeted therapy.

  20. The 19q12 bladder cancer GWAS signal: association with cyclin E function and aggressive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yi-Ping; Kohaar, Indu; Moore, Lee E.; Lenz, Petra; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Tang, Wei; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Scott-Johnson, Alexandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Muchmore, Brian; Baris, Dalsu; Paquin, Ashley; Ylaya, Kris; Schwenn, Molly; Apolo, Andrea B.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Tarway, McAnthony; Johnson, Alison; Mumy, Adam; Schned, Alan; Guedez, Liliana; Jones, Michael A.; Kida, Masatoshi; Monawar Hosain, GM; Malats, Nuria; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardon, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Wu, Xifeng; Purdue, Mark; Andriole, Gerald L.; Grubb, Robert L.; Black, Amanda; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Vineis, Paolo; Siddiq, Afshan; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Severi, Gianluca; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth C.; Tjønneland, Anne; Brennan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Prescott, Jennifer; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Govannucci, Edward; Hunter, David; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Gapstur, Susan M.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Kooperberg, Charles; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Conti, David V.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Haiman, Christopher A.; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Porru, Stefano; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Grossman, H. Barton; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Fraumeni, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Silverman, Debra T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of bladder cancer identified a genetic marker rs8102137 within the 19q12 region as a novel susceptibility variant. This marker is located upstream of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes cyclin E, a cell cycle protein. We performed genetic fine mapping analysis of the CCNE1 region using data from two bladder cancer GWAS (5,942 cases and 10,857 controls). We found that the original GWAS marker rs8102137 represents a group of 47 linked SNPs (with r2≥0.7) associated with increased bladder cancer risk. From this group we selected a functional promoter variant rs7257330, which showed strong allele-specific binding of nuclear proteins in several cell lines. In both GWAS, rs7257330 was associated only with aggressive bladder cancer, with a combined per-allele odds ratio (OR) =1.18 (95%CI=1.09-1.27, p=4.67×10−5 vs. OR =1.01 (95%CI=0.93-1.10, p=0.79) for non-aggressive disease, with p=0.0015 for case-only analysis. Cyclin E protein expression analyzed in 265 bladder tumors was increased in aggressive tumors (p=0.013) and, independently, with each rs7257330-A risk allele (ptrend=0.024). Over-expression of recombinant cyclin E in cell lines caused significant acceleration of cell cycle. In conclusion, we defined the 19q12 signal as the first GWAS signal specific for aggressive bladder cancer. Molecular mechanisms of this genetic association may be related to cyclin E over-expression and alteration of cell cycle in carriers of CCNE1 risk variants. In combination with established bladder cancer risk factors and other somatic and germline genetic markers, the CCNE1 variants could be useful for inclusion into bladder cancer risk prediction models. PMID:25320178

  1. Raman microscopy of bladder cancer cells expressing green fluorescent protein

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    Mandair, Gurjit S.; Han, Amy L.; Keller, Evan T.; Morris, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Gene engineering is a commonly used tool in cellular biology to determine changes in function or expression of downstream targets. However, the impact of genetic modulation on biochemical effects is less frequently evaluated. The aim of this study is to use Raman microscopy to assess the biochemical effects of gene silencing on T24 and UMUC-13 bladder cancer cell lines. Cellular biochemical information related to nucleic acid and lipogenic components was obtained from deconvolved Raman spectra. We show that the green fluorescence protein (GFP), the chromophore that served as a fluorescent reporter for gene silencing, could also be detected by Raman microscopy. Only the gene-silenced UMUC-13 cell lines exhibited low-to-moderate GFP fluorescence as determined by fluorescence imaging and Raman spectroscopic studies. Moreover, we show that gene silencing and cell phenotype had a greater effect on nucleic acid and lipogenic components with minimal interference from GFP expression. Gene silencing was also found to perturb cellular protein secondary structure in which the amount of disorderd protein increased at the expense of more ordered protein. Overall, our study identified the spectral signature for cellular GFP expression and elucidated the effects of gene silencing on cancer cell biochemistry and protein secondary structure.

  2. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2 is a critical determinant of bladder cancer invasion.

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    Sounak Gupta

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer in males in the United States. Invasive behavior is a major determinant of prognosis. In this study, we identified mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2 as a central regulator of bladder cancer cell migration and invasion. mTORC2 activity was assessed by the extent of phosphorylation of Ser473 in AKT and determined to be approximately 5-fold higher in specimens of invasive human bladder cancer as opposed to non-invasive human bladder cancer. The immortalized malignant bladder cell lines, UMUC-3, J82 and T24 demonstrated higher baseline mTORC2 activity relative to the benign bladder papilloma-derived cell line RT4 and the normal urothelial cell line HU1. The malignant bladder cancer cells also demonstrated increased migration in transwell and denudation assays, increased invasion of matrigel, and increased capacity to invade human bladder specimens. Gene silencing of rictor, a critical component of mTORC2, substantially inhibited bladder cancer cell migration and invasion. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in Rac1 activation and paxillin phosphorylation. These studies identify mTORC2 as a major target for neutralizing bladder cancer invasion.

  3. LncROR Promotes Bladder Cancer Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

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    Yi Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: LncRNA ROR, a tumor oncogene associated with various human cancers, has been reported to be involved in regulating various cellular processes, such as proliferation, apoptosis and invasion through targeting multiple genes. However, the molecular biological function in bladder cancer has not been clearly elucidated. The aim of this study is to explore ROR expression levels and evaluated its function in bladder cancer. Methods: LncRNA ROR expression levels in the 36 pairs of bladder cancer tissues (and corresponding non-tumor tissues and bladder cancer cells were assessed by qRT-PCR. MTT assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometric analysis, wound healing assay, cell transwell assays, attachment/detachment and western blotting were performed to assess the effects of ROR on proliferation, apoptosis, migration/invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT phenotypes in BC cells in vitro. ZEB1 is target of ROR. Rescue assays were performed to further confirm that ROR contributes to the progression of BC cells through targeting ZEB1. Results: LncRNA ROR was up-regulated in bladder cancer tissues (compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues and was almost overexpression in bladder cancer cells (compared with normal urothelial cell line SVHUC-1 cells. Increased lncRNA ROR expression significantly promoted tumor cells proliferation, inhibited cells apoptosis, facilitated cells metastasis and contributed to the formation of EMT phenotype. While down-regulated ROR could obviously inhibit cells proliferation, promote cells apoptosis, inhibit metastasis and reverse EMT to MET. ZEB1 was a target gene of ROR and was positive correlation with the level of ROR in cancer tissues. Conclusion: These results indicated that lncRNA ROR was associated with tumor progression in bladder cancer cells.

  4. The Effect of Smoking and Opium on Bladder Cancer in Yazd Province: A Case - Control Study

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    Mohammad Hassan Lotfi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bladder cancer is regarded as the most common urinary malignancy in the world. As other cancers, its incidence has increased in recent years. Hence, the present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between smoking and opium and bladder cancer in residents of Yazd province. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed on 200 patients with bladder cancer and 200 matched healthy individuals in Yazd province. Research data was gathered through interview and administration of a researcher-made questionnaire.  Furthermore, chi-square and regression tests were carried out with SPSS software (version 18. Results: The mean and standard deviation of age in case and control groups were reported to be 61.54 ± 13.61 and 61.45 ± 13.3 respectively. Education level, type of oil consumed, weekly frequency of smoking and fried foods, white meat, red meat consumption involve the predictive factors for bladder cancer; as consumption of hydrogenated fats, animal fats, fried foods more than 4 times per week and red meat had (OR=1.31;95% CL,0.63-2.71, (OR= 6.32;95% CL,2.03-19.8, (OR=2.86;95% CL,1.2-6.8 and (OR=51.18;95% CL,14.78-177.03 times greater risk for bladder cancer respectively and also low education level. White meat intake had a protective effect. Moreover, in line with increasing number of cigarettes per day, the risk of bladder cancer increased. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed that smoking and opium are risk factors of bladder cancer. Thus, appropriate training and intervention program need to be taken into account in order to prevent the cancer.

  5. [Bipolar plasma vaporization--new endoscopic technique in non-invasive bladder cancer].

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    Geavlete, B; Jecu, M; Multescu, R; Georgescu, D; Drăguţescu, M; Geavlete, P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a newly introduced endoscopic technique in the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), the bipolar plasma vaporization of bladder tumors (BPV-BT). Between May and November 2009, 72 consecutive patients presenting papillary bladder tumors over 1 cm underwent BPV-BT and a 3 months follow-up. Initial biopsy followed by plasma vaporization of the tumor and biopsies of the tumoral bed were performed in all cases. The follow-up protocol included abdominal ultrasonography, urinary cytology and cystoscopy at 3 months. BPV-BT was successfully performed in all cases. Multiple tumors were found in 45.9% and tumors over 3 cm in 33.3% of the cases. The mean tumoral volume was 10.5 ml. The mean operative time was 16 minutes, the mean hemoglobin decrease was 0.4 g/dl, the mean catheterization period was 2.3 days and the mean hospital stay was 3.4 days. There was no major intra- or postoperative complications. The pathological exam diagnosed 58.3% pTa, 30.6% pT1 and 11.1% pT2 cases. No tumoral base biopsies were positive for malignancy. The recurrence rate was 15.6% for the NMIBC patients, 13.3% for patients with single tumor under 3 cm and 16.3% in cases of single tumors over 3 cm or multiple tumors. Orthotopic recurrent tumors were encountered in 3.1% of the cases. BPV-BT seems to represent a promising endoscopic treatment alternative for NMIBC patients, with good efficacy, reduced morbidity, fast postoperative recovery and satisfactory follow-up parameters.

  6. Curcumin potentiates the antitumor effects of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin against bladder cancer through the downregulation of NF-kappaB and upregulation of TRAIL receptors.

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    Kamat, Ashish M; Tharakan, Sheeja T; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2009-12-01

    Although Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) intravesical therapy is a standard treatment for bladder cancer, eventual failure of response is a major problem. Treatments that can augment BCG therapy are urgently needed. We investigated whether curcumin, a component of Curcuma longa (also called turmeric), has potential to improve the current therapy using in vitro and in vivo MBT-2 murine tumor models. We found that curcumin potentiated BCG-induced apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells. BCG stimulated the release of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) from peripheral mononuclear neutrophils in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas curcumin enhanced the upregulation of TRAIL receptors. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that curcumin also suppressed the BCG-induced activation of the cell survival transcription factor NF-kappaB. In a syngeneic bladder cancer model, curcumin alone reduced the bladder tumor volume, but a significantly greater reduction was observed when BCG and curcumin were used in combination (P combination was also observed in tumor tissues. Overall, our results suggest that curcumin potentiates the antitumor effect of BCG through the inhibition of NF-kappaB and induction of TRAIL receptors in bladder cancer cells.

  7. Implementation of adaptive radiation therapy for urinary bladder carcinoma - Imaging, planning and image guidance

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    Tuomikoski, Laura; Collan, Juhani; Keyrilaeinen, Jani; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tenhunen, Mikko [Dept. of Oncology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)], e-mail: laura.tuomikoski@hus.fi; Korhonen, Juha [Dept. of Oncology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Clinical Research Inst. Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital Ltd, Helsinki (Finland); Visapaeae, Harri [Dept. of Oncology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Dept. of Urology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Sairanen, Jukka [Dept. of Urology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    Background: Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) for urinary bladder cancer has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional RT with potential to minimize radiation-induced toxicity to healthy tissues. In this work we have studied bladder volume variations and their effect on healthy bladder dose sparing and intra fractional margins, in order to refine our ART strategy. Material and methods: An online ART treatment strategy was followed for five patients with urinary bladder cancer with the tumors demarcated using Lipiodol. A library of 3-4 predefined treatment plans for each patient was created based on four successive computed tomography (CT) scans. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images were acquired before each treatment fraction and after the treatment at least weekly. In partial bladder treatment the sparing of the healthy part of the bladder was investigated. The bladder wall displacements due to bladder filling were determined in three orthogonal directions (CC, AP, DEX-SIN) using the treatment planning CT scans. An ellipsoidal model was applied in order to find the theoretical maximum values for the bladder wall displacements. Moreover, the actual bladder filling rate during treatment was evaluated using the CBCT images. Results: In partial bladder treatment the volume of the bladder receiving high absorbed doses was generally smaller with a full than empty bladder. The estimation of the bladder volume and the upper limit for the intra fractional movement of the bladder wall could be represented with an ellipsoidal model with a reasonable accuracy. Observed maximum growth of bladder dimensions was less than 10 mm in all three orthogonal directions during 15 minute interval. Conclusion: The use of Lipiodol contrast agent enables partial bladder treatment with reduced irradiation of the healthy bladder volume. The ellipsoidal bladder model can be used for the estimation of the bladder volume changes and the upper limit of the bladder wall movement during the treatment

  8. [The influence and mechanisms of purple sweet potato anthocyanins on the growth of bladder cancer BIU87 cell].

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    Li, W L; Ji, G H; Zhang, X Z; Yu, H Y

    2018-02-06

    Objective: To observe the effect of purple sweet potato anthocyanins on the proliferation of bladder cancer cell line BIU87 and to investigate the molecular mechanisms. Methods: Bladder cancer BIU87 cells were cultured and exposed to anthocyanins at the different concentrations of 100, 200, 400, and 800 μg/ml respectively. The growth inhibition of anthocyanins on BIU87 cells were evaluated by morphometry and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, and the cell apoptosis rate was detected by Flow cytometry (FCM). Results: Morphometry showed that the number of BIU87 cells decreased, the volume shrank, the intercellular space enlarged, the ability of cell adherence weakened, and the cell shape changed when the concentration of anthocyanins increased. CCK-8 assay showed that when 100, 200, 400, 800 μg/ml anthocyanins treated BIU87 cells for 48 h, the absorbance was 24 ± 0.07, 1.15 ± 0.11, 0.90 ± 0.08, 0.56 ± 0.09, respectively. Compared with the control group, anthocyanins-treated groups significantly inhibited the proliferation of BIU87 cells ( P sweet potato anthocyanins can inhibit the growth of bladder cancer BIU87 cells through inducing cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner.

  9. Systematic review of bladder cancer outcomes in patients with spina bifida.

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    Rove, K O; Husmann, D A; Wilcox, D T; Vricella, G J; Higuchi, T T

    2017-10-01

    In patients with congenital bladder anomalies, bladder augmentation is used as a last resort to reduce intravesical pressure, but concerns about malignant transformation in augmented patients were first raised in the 1980s. The best evidence to date indicates that augmentation does not appear to increase the risk of bladder cancer in spina bifida patients. To date, oncologic outcomes from patients with spina bifida with and without augmentation have only been available in small case reports. To systematically evaluate factors in myelomeningocele patients with bladder cancer, including bladder augmentation, that contribute to overall survival (OS). A systematic review using PubMed was conducted by cross referencing terms 'myelomeningocele,' 'cystoplasty,' 'bladder cancer' and respective synonyms according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Inclusion criteria were studies with patients with an underlying diagnosis of myelomeningocele and bladder cancer with data on age, stage, and mortality status. Studies were excluded for spinal cord injury, history of tuberculosis or schistosomiasis, or prior ureterosigmoidostomy. Fifty-two patients were identified from 28 studies with a median age at bladder cancer diagnosis of 41 years (range 13-73); 37 (71%) presented with stage III or IV bladder cancer. Overall survival at 1 year and 2 years was 48.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall survival was different between those with and without augmentation (P = 0.009) by log-rank analysis. No between-group differences in OS were seen based on age, management with indwelling catheter, diversion with ileal conduit or being on a surveillance program. Only stage remained a significant predictor of OS on multivariate analysis (HR 2.011, 95% CI 1.063-3.804, P = 0.032). Secondary analysis was performed after removing patients with gastric augmentation (n = 8), and no difference in OS was seen between patients with (n = 8

  10. Paradox of life among survivors of bladder cancer and treatments.

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    Lopes, Miriam; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2016-04-01

    To interpret the meanings attributed to the experience of bladder cancer among survivors in therapeutic follow-up. Qualitative methodological approach, based on medical anthropology and narrative methodology. After approval by the research ethics committee of a public university hospital, data were collected from January 2014 to February 2015, by means of recorded semi-structured interviews, direct observation and field journal entries on daily immersion with a group of six men and six women, aged between 57 and 82 years, in therapeutic follow-up. Narratives were analyzed by means of inductive thematic analysis. The meanings revealed difficulties with the processes of disease and treatment, such as breakdown of normal life, uncertainty about the future due to possible recurrence of the disease, difficulty with continuity of care and emotional control, relating it to conflicting ways of understanding the present life. Thus, the meaning of this narrative synthesis is paradox. Interpretation of the meaning of experience with bladder cancer among patients provides nurses with a comprehensive view of care, which encompasses biological, psychological and social dimensions, and thereby systematizes humanized care. Interpretar o significado atribuído à experiência do câncer de bexiga entre sobreviventes em seguimento terapêutico. Empregou-se a abordagem metodológica qualitativa, embasado pela antropologia médica e método narrativo. Após aprovação do Comitê de Ética, os dados foram coletados de janeiro 2014 a fevereiro de 2015, por meio de entrevistas semiestruturadas gravadas, observação direta e registros no diário de imersão com grupo de seis homens e seis mulheres, entre 57 e 82 anos, em seguimento terapêutico em um hospital público universitário. As narrativas foram analisadas por meio da análise temática indutiva. Os sentidos revelam as dificuldades com o processo da doença e do tratamento, como rupturas na vida, futuro incerto pela

  11. Robotic radical cystectomy in bladder cancer: is it the future?

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    Canda AE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Erdem Canda,1 Ali Fuat Atmaca,1 Muhammed Ersagun Arslan,2 Murat Keske,2 Ozer Ural Cakici,2 Serdar Cakmak,2 Davut Kamaci,2 Emre Urer21Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Ankara Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Yildirim Beyazit University, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Urology, Ankara Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Open radical cystectomy (RC is the gold standard surgical approach in the management of muscle invasive bladder cancer in addition to high-grade, recurrent, noninvasive tumors. With the development of surgical robotic technology, robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy (RARC is increasingly being performed as a minimally invasive surgical approach. A learning curve exists with a recommended case number of at least 20 RARC procedures in order to achieve satisfying outcomes in terms of operation time, complication rate, and oncological outcomes, including positive surgical margins (SMs and lymph node (LN yield. In the current literature, long-term outcomes of RARC are not yet available. Due to the outcomes of the published literature, RARC seems to have satisfactory oncologic and functional outcomes in addition to acceptable complication rates. Intraoperative blood loss and transfusion rates seem to be decreased in RARC series when compared to open approaches. On the other hand, a number of authors have reported decreased complication rates but increased operation time in the robotic approach. Similar oncologic results including positive SM rates and LN yields were detected in most comparative publications. Totally intracorporeal RARC with urinary diversion is a complex procedure and the number of centers performing this type of surgery is currently very limited. Although, it is still too early to make strict conclusions about RARC, RARC with intracorporeal urinary diversion has the potential to be the future of robotic bladder cancer surgery. Therefore, further prospective

  12. Scoring system development for prediction of extravesical bladder cancer

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    Prelević Rade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Staging of bladder cancer is crucial for optimal management of the disease. However, clinical staging is not perfectly accurate. The aim of this study was to derive a simple scoring system in prediction of pathological advanced muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC. Methods. Logistic regression and bootstrap methods were used to create an integer score for estimating the risk in prediction of pathological advanced MIBC using precystectomy clinicopathological data: demographic, initial transurethral resection (TUR [grade, stage, multiplicity of tumors, lymphovascular invasion (LVI], hydronephrosis, abdominal and pelvic CT radiography (size of the tumor, tumor base width, and pathological stage after radical cystectomy (RC. Advanced MIBC in surgical specimen was defined as pT3-4 tumor. Receiving operating characteristic (ROC curve quantified the area under curve (AUC as predictive accuracy. Clinical usefulness was assessed by using decision curve analysis. Results. This single-center retrospective study included 233 adult patients with BC undergoing RC at the Military Medical Academy, Belgrade. Organ confined disease was observed in 101 (43.3% patients, and 132 (56.7% had advanced MIBC. In multivariable analysis, 3 risk factors most strongly associated with advanced MIBC: grade of initial TUR [odds ratio (OR = 4.7], LVI (OR = 2, and hydronephrosis (OR = 3.9. The resultant total possible score ranged from 0 to 15, with the cut-off value of > 8 points, the AUC was 0.795, showing good discriminatory ability. The model showed excellent calibration. Decision curve analysis showed a net benefit across all threshold probabilities and clinical usefulness of the model. Conclusion. We developed a unique scoring system which could assist in predicting advanced MIBC in patients before RC. The scoring system showed good performance characteristics and introducing of such a tool into daily clinical decision-making may lead to more appropriate

  13. High risk bladder cancer: current management and survival

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    Anna M. Leliveld

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the pattern of care in patients with high risk non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC in the Comprehensive Cancer Center North-Netherlands (CCCN and to assess factors associated with the choice of treatment, recurrence and progression free survival rates. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 412 patients with newly diagnosed high risk NMIBC. Clinical, demographic and follow-up data were obtained from the CCCN Cancer Registry and a detailed medical record review. Uni and multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors related to choice of treatment and 5 year recurrence and progression free survival. RESULTS: 74/412 (18% patients with high risk NMIBC underwent a transurethral resection (TUR as single treatment. Adjuvant treatment after TUR was performed in 90.7% of the patients treated in teaching hospitals versus 71.8 % in non-teaching hospitals (p 80 years OR 0.1 p = 0.001 and treatment in non-teaching hospitals (OR 0.25; p < 0.001 were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. Tumor recurrence occurred in 191/392 (49% and progression in 84 /392 (21.4% patients. The mean 5-years progression free survival was 71.6% (95% CI 65.5-76.8. CONCLUSION: In this pattern of care study in high risk NMIBC, 18% of the patients were treated with TUR as single treatment. Age and treatment in non-teaching hospitals were associated with less adjuvant treatment after TUR. None of the variables sex, age, comorbidity, hospital type, stage and year of treatment was associated with 5 year recurrence or progression rates.

  14. Gender Disparities in Hematuria Evaluation and Bladder Cancer Diagnosis: A Population-Based Analysis

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    Garg, Tullika; Pinheiro, Laura C.; Atoria, Coral L.; Donat, S. Machele; Weissman, Joel S.; Herr, Harry W.; Elkin, Elena B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Men are diagnosed with bladder cancer at three times the rate of women. However, women present with advanced disease and have poorer survival, suggesting delays in bladder cancer diagnosis. Hematuria is the presenting symptom in a majority of cases. Our objective was to assess gender differences in hematuria evaluation in older adults with bladder cancer. Materials and Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer registry linked with Medicare claims, we identified Medicare beneficiaries aged 66 years or older diagnosed with bladder cancer between 2000 and 2007 with a claim for hematuria in the year prior to diagnosis. We examined the impact of gender and demographic and clinical factors on time from initial hematuria claim to urology visit; and time from initial hematuria claim to hematuria evaluation including cystoscopy, upper urinary tract imaging, and urine cytology. Results Of 35,646 patients with a hematuria claim in the year preceding bladder cancer diagnosis, 97% had a urology visit claim. The mean time to urology visit was 27 days (range 0-377), and the time to urology visit was longer for women than for men (adjusted hazard ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.87-0.92). Women were more likely to undergo delayed (after > 30 days) hematuria evaluation (adjusted odds ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.21). Conclusion We observed longer time to a urology visit for women than for men presenting with hematuria. These findings may explain stage differences in bladder cancer diagnosis and inform efforts to reduce gender disparities in bladder cancer stage and outcomes. PMID:24835058

  15. Sex disparities in diagnosis of bladder cancer after initial presentation with hematuria: a nationwide claims-based investigation

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    Cohn, Joshua A.; Vekhter, Benjamin; Lyttle, Christopher; Steinberg, Gary D.; Large, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Women have disproportionately higher mortality rates relative to incidence for bladder cancer. Multiple etiologies have been proposed, including delayed diagnosis and treatment. Guidelines recommend rule-out of malignancy in men and women presenting with hematuria. We aimed to determine the difference in timing from presentation with hematuria to diagnosis of bladder cancer in women versus men. Methods This is a retrospective population-based study examining the timing from presentation with hematuria to diagnosis of bladder cancer, based on data from the MarketScan databases, which include enrollees of more than 100 health insurances plans of approximately 40 large US employers from 2004 through 2010. All study patients presented with hematuria and were subsequently diagnosed with bladder cancer. The primary outcome measure was number of days between initial presentation with hematuria and diagnosis of bladder cancer by gender. Results 5416 men and 2233 women met inclusion criteria. Mean days from initial hematuria claim to bladder cancer claim was significantly longer in women (85.4 vs. 73.6 days, p6 month delays in bladder cancer diagnosis significantly higher (17.3% vs. 14.1%, phematuria and diagnosis of bladder cancer, with longer delays for women. This may be partly responsible for the gender-based discrepancy in outcomes associated with bladder cancer. PMID:24496869

  16. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation is associated with bladder cancer cell growth and survival

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    Hsieh Fu-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 signaling pathway plays an important role in several human cancers. Activation of Stat3 is dependent on the phosphorylation at the tyrosine residue 705 by upstream kinases and subsequent nuclear translocation after dimerization. It remains unclear whether oncogenic Stat3 signaling pathway is involved in the oncogenesis of bladder cancer. Results We found that elevated Stat3 phosphorylation in 19 of 100 (19% bladder cancer tissues as well as bladder cancer cell lines, WH, UMUC-3 and 253J. To explore whether Stat3 activation is associated with cell growth and survival of bladder cancer, we targeted the Stat3 signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells using an adenovirus-mediated dominant-negative Stat3 (Y705F and a small molecule compound, STA-21. Both prohibited cell growth and induction of apoptosis in these bladder cancer cell lines but not in normal bladder smooth muscle cell (BdSMC. The survival inhibition might be mediated through apoptotic caspase 3, 8 and 9 pathways. Moreover, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin and a cell cycle regulating gene (cyclin D1 was associated with the cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Conclusion These results indicated that activation of Stat3 is crucial for bladder cancer cell growth and survival. Therefore, interference of Stat3 signaling pathway emerges as a potential therapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  17. A study of an effective sunitinib–chemotherapeutic combination regimen for bladder cancer treatment using a mouse model

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    Dah-Shyong Yu

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Combination of the tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor sunitinib with gemcitabine chemotherapy synergistically enhances tumor cytotoxicity and may provide a new treatment modality for advanced bladder cancer.

  18. Possible disease remission in patient with invasive bladder cancer with D-fraction regimen

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    Rajamahanty, Srinivas; Louie, Brandon; O’Neill, Cormac; Choudhury, Muhammad; Konno, Sensuke

    2009-01-01

    Superficial bladder tumors are the most prevalent form of bladder cancers and transurethral resection is the primary surgical modality for those tumors. However, nearly 65% of patients will have tumor recurrence in five years while about 15% will have progression to muscle invasion. Thus, the primary therapeutic aim is to prevent multiple recurrences and progression to a more advanced, invasive disease. We here report an 87-year-old white male patient with invasive bladder cancer who received an unconventional oral regimen of D-fraction, the bioactive extract of Maitake mushroom (Grifola frondosa), following endoscopic transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Despite a high risk for disease recurrence, follow-up yet indicated no clinical evidence of progression of residual disease or recurrence of invasive cancer. It has been nearly two years but the patient remains remarkably well and appears to be in remission. To our knowledge, this is the first and only case report of possible disease remission in a bladder cancer patient after the two-year follow-up of D-fraction regimen, so that further studies with long terms are required for drawing a relevant conclusion. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that D-fraction is a natural agent that may have clinical implications in patients with superficial bladder tumors. PMID:20360882

  19. Mucoadhesive polyacrylamide nanogel as a potential hydrophobic drug carrier for intravesical bladder cancer therapy.

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    Lu, Shengjie; Neoh, Koon Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Mahendran, Ratha; Chiong, Edmund

    2015-05-25

    In this paper, amine-functionalized polyacrylamide nanogels (PAm-NH2) loaded with docetaxel (DTX) were evaluated as a mucoadhesive and sustained intravesical drug delivery (IDD) system for potential bladder cancer therapy. Nanogels have not been applied for such therapy before. The mucoadhesiveness of the PAm-NH2 nanogels, which is a critical factor for IDD application, was investigated using the mucin-particle method and by analyzing the direct attachment of the PAm-NH2 nanogels onto the luminal surface of porcine urinary bladder. DTX, as a model hydrophobic drug, was successfully loaded into hydrophilic PAm-NH2 nanogels with high loading efficiency (>90%), and sustained release of DTX from the nanogels over 9 days in artificial urine was achieved. The nanogels were also taken in by bladder cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The efficiency of the DTX-loaded nanogels in killing UMUC3 and T24 bladder cancer cells was determined to be equivalent to free DTX, and the morphology of the bladder urothelium was not adversely altered by the PAm-NH2 nanogels. These findings indicate that such mucoadhesive nanogels are potentially a promising candidate for intravesical delivery of hydrophobic drugs in bladder cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Consistent genomic alterations in carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder confirm the presence of two major pathways in bladder cancer development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zieger, Karsten; Marcussen, Niels; Borre, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer develops through different pathways, provisionally entitled "papillary" and "invasive." Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is thought to be the precursor of invasive bladder cancer. However, little is known about chromosomal alterations of these clinically important lesions, and the relations......Bladder cancer develops through different pathways, provisionally entitled "papillary" and "invasive." Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is thought to be the precursor of invasive bladder cancer. However, little is known about chromosomal alterations of these clinically important lesions......, and the relationship between chromosomal alterations and the different pathways. We laser-microdissected 12 CIS and 4 dysplasia samples concomitant to invasive bladder cancer. We determined genome-wide chromosome copy number changes and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) using Mapping 10K SNP microarrays. We further...... examined 48 high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers using SNP microarrays to reveal characteristic changes correlated with the CIS-phenotype. DNA copy-number changes were further validated using QPCR in 77 independent tumor samples. CIS was found to be chromosomal unstable in 8 of 12 cases...

  1. Is the inverse association between selenium and bladder cancer due to confounding by smoking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane Freeman, Laura E; Karagas, Margaret R; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison T; Colt, Joanne S; Jackson, Brian; Hosain, G M Monawar; Cantor, Kenneth P; Silverman, Debra T

    2015-04-01

    Selenium has been linked to a reduced risk of bladder cancer in some studies. Smoking, a well-established risk factor for bladder cancer, has been associated with lower selenium levels in the body. We investigated the selenium-bladder cancer association in subjects from Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont in the New England Bladder Cancer Case-Control Study. At interview (2001-2005), participants provided information on a variety of factors, including a comprehensive smoking history, and submitted toenail samples, from which we measured selenium levels. We estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals among 1,058 cases and 1,271 controls using logistic regression. After controlling for smoking, we saw no evidence of an association between selenium levels and bladder cancer (for fourth quartile vs. first quartile, odds ratio (OR) = 0.98, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77, 1.25). When results were restricted to regular smokers, there appeared to be an inverse association (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.58, 0.99); however, when pack-years of smoking were considered, this association was attenuated (OR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.68, 1.20), indicating potential confounding by smoking. Despite some reports of an inverse association between selenium and bladder cancer overall, our results, combined with an in-depth evaluation of other studies, suggested that confounding from smoking intensity or duration could explain this association. Our study highlights the need to carefully evaluate the confounding association of smoking in the selenium-bladder cancer association. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Nitrative DNA damage and Oct3/4 expression in urinary bladder cancer with Schistosomahaematobium infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ning [Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie (Japan); Thanan, Raynoo [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie (Japan); Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie (Japan); Kobayashi, Hatasu [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie (Japan); Hammam, Olfat; Wishahi, Mohamed; Leithy, Tarek El [Departments of Pathology and Urology, Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, Giza (Egypt); Hiraku, Yusuke [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie (Japan); Amro, EL-Karef [Department of Pathology and Matrix Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie (Japan); Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Oikawa, Shinji [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie (Japan); Ohnishi, Shiho [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie (Japan); Murata, Mariko [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie (Japan); Kawanishi, Shosuke, E-mail: kawanisi@suzuka-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie (Japan); Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie (Japan)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Oct3/4-positive cells increase in Schistosoma haematobium (SH)-associated bladder cancer. {yields} iNOS-dependent DNA lesion, 8-nitroguanine, was formed in Oct3/4-positive cells. {yields} 8-Nitroguanine formed in stem-like cells plays a role in SH-induced carcinogenesis. {yields} Mutant stem cells may participate in inflammation-related carcinogenesis. -- Abstract: To investigate whether mutant stem cells participate in inflammation-related carcinogenesis, we performed immunohistochemical analysis to examine nitrative and oxidative DNA lesions (8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG) and a stem cell marker Oct3/4 in bladder tissues obtained from cystitis and bladder cancer patients infected with Schistosomahaematobium (S. haematobium). We also detected the expression of nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which lead to 8-nitroguanine formation. The staining intensity of 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG was significantly higher in bladder cancer and cystitis tissues than in normal tissues. iNOS expression was colocalized with NF-{kappa}B in 8-nitroguanine-positive tumor cells from bladder cancer patients. Oct3/4 expression was significantly increased in cells from S. haematobium-associated bladder cancer tissues in comparison to normal bladder and cancer tissues without infection. Oct3/4 was also expressed in epithelial cells of cystitis patients. Moreover, 8-nitroguanine was formed in Oct3/4-positive stem cells in S. haematobium-associated cystitis and cancer tissues. In conclusion, inflammation by S.haematobium infection may increase the number of mutant stem cells, in which iNOS-dependent DNA damage occurs via NF-{kappa}B activation, leading to tumor development.

  3. Identification and replication of the interplay of four genetic high risk variants for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Ickstadt, Katja; Gerullis, Holger; Otto, Thomas; Roth, Emanuel; Volkert, Frank; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Moormann, Oliver; Banfi, Gergely; Nyirady, Peter; Vermeulen, Sita H; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D; Johnson, Alison; Karagas, Margaret R; Kogevinas, Manolis; Malats, Nuria; Schwenn, Molly; Silverman, Debra T; Koutros, Stella; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2017-09-27

    Little is known whether genetic variants identified in genome-wide association studies interact to increase bladder cancer risk. Recently, we identified two- and three-variant combinations associated with a particular increase of bladder cancer risk in a urinary bladder cancer case-control series (IfADo, 1501 cases, 1565 controls). In an independent case-control series (Nijmegen Bladder Cancer Study, NBCS, 1468 cases, 1720 controls) we confirmed these two- and three-variant combinations. Pooled analysis of the two studies as discovery group (IfADo-NBCS) resulted in sufficient statistical power to test up to four-variant combinations by a logistic regression approach. The New England and Spanish Bladder Cancer Studies (2080 cases and 2167 controls) were used as a replication series. Twelve previously identified risk variants were considered.The strongest four-variant combination was obtained in never smokers. The combination of rs1014971[AA] near APOBEC3A and CBX6, SLC14A1 exon SNP rs1058396[AG,GG], UGT1A intron SNP rs11892031[AA], and rs8102137[CC,CT] near CCNE resulted in an unadjusted odds ratio of 2.59 (95% CI = 1.93-3.47; P = 1.87×10-10), while the individual variant odds ratios ranged only between 1.11-1.30. The combination replicated in the New England and Spanish bladder Cancer Studies (ORunadjusted=1.60, 95% CI = 1.10-2.33; P = 0.013). The four-variant combination is relatively frequent, with 25% in never smoking cases and 11% in never smoking controls (total study group: 19% cases, 14% controls). In conclusion, we show that four high risk variants can statistically interact to confer increased bladder cancer risk particularly in never smokers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. The use of water-soluble mucoadhesive gels for the intravesical delivery of epirubicin to the bladder for the treatment of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatta, Dani; Cottrell, Lewis; Burnett, Bruce; Laverty, Garry; McConville, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    To develop an epirubicin-loaded, water-soluble mucoadhesive gels that have the correct rheological properties to facilitate their delivery into the bladder via a catheter, while allowing for their spread across the bladder wall with limited expansion of the bladder and increasing the retention of epirubicin in the bladder and flushing with urine. Epirubicin-loaded hydroxyl ethyl cellulose (HEC) and hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) gels were manufactured and tested for their rheological properties. Their ability to be pushed through a catheter was also assessed as was their in-vitro drug release, spreading in a bladder and retention of epirubicin after flushing with simulated urine. Epirubicin drug release was viscosity-dependent. The 1 and 1.5% HEC gels and the 1, 1.5 and 2% HPMC gels had the correct viscosity to be administered through a model catheter and spread evenly across the bladder wall under the pressure of the detrusor muscle. The epirubicin-loaded gels had an increased retention time in the bladder when compared with a standard intravesical solution of epirubicin, even after successive flushes with simulated urine. The increased retention of epirubicin in the bladder by the HEC and HPMC gels warrant further investigation, using an in-vivo model, to assess their potential for use as treatment for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. MOLECULAR GENETIC MARKERS AS PREDICTORS OF SUPERFICIAL BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Babayan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A system of clinical and morphological criteria is currently used to determine the pattern of superficial bladder cancer (SBC. However, this system does not completely reflect the clinical potential of SBC and needs additional markers. The purpose of this study was to search for and evaluate molecular genetic disorders as additional markers of the course of SBC. The diagnostic panel included the deletion of the loci 3р14, 9р21, 9q34, 17р13 (ТР53, mutations of exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene, and hypermethylation of the promoter regions of the RASSF1, RARB, p16, p14, CDH1 genes. The study was made on 108 matched samples (tumor/peripheral blood obtained from patients with SBC. The deletions of the loci 3р14, 9р21 and anomalous methylation of the RARb and p16 genes are markers of the worse course of SBC while FGFR3 gene mutation is a marker of better prognosis. In the context of estimation of the relapsing potential of a primary tumor, the 9p21 locus deletion is a marker associated with recurrence within the first year after malignancy resection. The group of molecular genetic markers determined by the authors for poor prognosis in combination with classical clinical and morphological criteria will specify the pattern of the course of the disease and its prognosis.

  6. Recognition and Treatment of BCG Failure in Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Lightfoot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with high-grade Ta, T1, or carcinoma in situ non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC are at high risk for recurrence and, more importantly, progression. Thus, both the American Urological Association and European Association of Urology recommend initial intravesical treatment with bacillus Calmette-Guerin(BCG followed by maintenance therapy for a minimum of 1 year. The complete response rate to BCG therapy in patients with high-risk NMIBC can be as high as ∼80%; however, most patients with high-risk disease suffer from recurrence. BCG failure can be further characterized into BCG refractory, BCG resistant, BCG relapsing, and BCG intolerant. Current recommendations include one further course of BCG or cystectomy. In patients who continue to fail conservative treatment and who refuse surgical therapy or are not surgical candidates, treatment options become even more complicated. In this setting, treatment options are limited and include repeat BCG treatment, an alternate immunotherapy regimen, chemotherapy, or device-assisted therapy. To date, however, further research is necessary for all secondary treatment options in order to determine which might be the most efficacious. All conservative treatments should be considered investigational. Currently, cystectomy remains the standard of care for high-risk patients who have failed BCG therapy.

  7. High-risk bladder cancer: improving outcomes with perioperative chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Y.C. Heng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite treatment with radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection, muscle invasive bladder cancer has a relapse rate of 50%. Patients can develop regionally advanced or metastatic disease that ultimately leads to death. The addition of neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy to reduce the risk of relapse and death has been extensively studied over the past two decades. Two contemporary trials coupled with a recent meta-analysis evaluating neoadjuvant chemotherapy demonstrated a modest but real improvement in overall survival. This has made neoadjuvant chemotherapy a standard of care. Clinical trials evaluating adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with high-risk disease have been plagued with statistical flaws and have, therefore, been unable to define the survival impact of this approach. It is hoped that ongoing adjuvant trials that are powered to detect small but meaningful clinical differences will clarify the benefit of chemotherapy after cystectomy. Since there are theoretical advantages and disadvantages to each of these approaches, both are widely used in North America. The evidence behind each approach and potential future developments in this field will be described.

  8. MOLECULAR GENETIC MARKERS AS PREDICTORS OF SUPERFICIAL BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Babayan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A system of clinical and morphological criteria is currently used to determine the pattern of superficial bladder cancer (SBC. However, this system does not completely reflect the clinical potential of SBC and needs additional markers. The purpose of this study was to search for and evaluate molecular genetic disorders as additional markers of the course of SBC. The diagnostic panel included the deletion of the loci 3р14, 9р21, 9q34, 17р13 (ТР53, mutations of exon 7 of the FGFR3 gene, and hypermethylation of the promoter regions of the RASSF1, RARB, p16, p14, CDH1 genes. The study was made on 108 matched samples (tumor/peripheral blood obtained from patients with SBC. The deletions of the loci 3р14, 9р21 and anomalous methylation of the RARb and p16 genes are markers of the worse course of SBC while FGFR3 gene mutation is a marker of better prognosis. In the context of estimation of the relapsing potential of a primary tumor, the 9p21 locus deletion is a marker associated with recurrence within the first year after malignancy resection. The group of molecular genetic markers determined by the authors for poor prognosis in combination with classical clinical and morphological criteria will specify the pattern of the course of the disease and its prognosis.

  9. Emerging intravesical therapies for management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Tomaszewski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J Tomaszewski, Marc C SmaldoneDepartment of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the second most common urologic malignancy, and 70% of patients present with superficial or nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is the most effective agent for preventing disease recurrence, and the only therapy able to inhibit disease progression. However, recurrence rates as high as 30% and significant local and systemic toxicity have led to increased interest in alternative intravesical therapies. In patients refractory or intolerant to BCG, BCG-interferon α2b, gemcitabine, and anthracyclines (doxorubicin, epirubicin, valrubicin have demonstrated durable clinical responses. Phase I trials investigating alternative cytotoxic agents, such as apaziquone, taxanes (docetaxel, paclitaxel, and suramin are reporting promising data. Novel immunomodulating agents have demonstrated promise as efficacious alternatives in patients refractory to BCG. Optimization of existing chemotherapeutic regimens using hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy, magnetically-targeted carriers, and liposomes remains an area of active investigation. Despite enthusiasm for new intravesical agents, radical cystectomy remains the treatment of choice for patients with NMIBC who have failed intravesical therapy and selected patients with naïve T1 tumors and aggressive features. This report provides a comprehensive review of contemporary intravesical therapy for NMIBC and refractory NMIBC, with an emphasis on emerging agents and novel treatment modalities.Keywords: transitional cell carcinoma, nonmuscle, invasive, intravesical therapy, BCG

  10. Inhibition of macrophage migration inhibitory factor decreases proliferation and cytokine expression in bladder cancer cells

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    Leifheit Erica C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of various inflammatory cytokines in maintaining tumor cell growth and viability is well established. Increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF has previously been associated with various types of adenocarcinoma. Methods MIF IHC was used to localize MIF in human bladder tissue. ELISA and Western blot analysis determined the synthesis and secretion of MIF by human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cells. The effects of MIF inhibitors (high molecular weight hyaluronate (HA, anti-MIF antibody or MIF anti-sense on cell growth and cytokine expression were analyzed. Results Human bladder cancer cells (HT-1376 secrete detectable amounts of MIF protein. Treatment with HA, anti-MIF antibody and MIF anti-sense reduced HT-1376 cell proliferation, MIF protein secretion, MIF gene expression and secreted inflammatory cytokines. Our evidence suggests MIF interacts with the invariant chain, CD74 and the major cell surface receptor for HA, CD44. Conclusions This study is the first to report MIF expression in the human bladder and these findings support a role for MIF in tumor cell proliferation. Since MIF participates in the inflammatory response and bladder cancer is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, these new findings suggest that neutralizing bladder tumor MIF may serve as a novel therapeutic treatment for bladder carcinoma.

  11. Down-regulation of S100C is associated with bladder cancer progression and poor survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Ashfaque Ahmed; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl; Meldgaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to identify proteins down-regulated during bladder cancer progression. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: By using comparative proteome analysis and measurement of mRNA, we found a significant down-regulation of S100C, a member of the S100 family of proteins, in T24 (grade 3......) as compared with RT4 (grade 1) bladder cancer cell lines. Moreover, quantification of the mRNA level revealed that decreased expression of the protein reflects a low level of transcription of the S100C gene. Based on this observation, we quantified the S100C mRNA expression level with real-time PCR in bladder...... (Ta). A negative correlation between S100C and histopathologic grade (P = 0.0003) was also observed. Furthermore, the papillary type showed higher expression of S100C than did the solid type of the tumor (P bladder...

  12. Association between metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes mellitus and oncological outcomes of bladder cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Salonia, Andrea; Autorino, Riccardo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Capogrosso, Paolo; Damiano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of several metabolic abnormalities, its prevalence is increasing worldwide. To summarize the most recent evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome, its components and the oncological outcomes in bladder cancer patients, a National Center for Biotechnology Information PubMed search for relevant articles either published or e-published up to March 2014 was carried out by combining the following Patient population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome terms: metabolic syndrome, obesity, body mass index, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, bladder cancer, risk, mortality, cancer specific survival, disease recurrence and progression. Metabolic syndrome is a complex, highly prevalent disorder, and central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension are its main components. Published findings would suggest that metabolic syndrome per se might be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in male patients, but it did not seem to confer a risk of worse prognosis. Considering the primary components of metabolic syndrome (hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia), available data are uncertain, and it is no possible to reach a conclusion yet on either a direct or an indirect association with bladder cancer risk and prognosis. Only with regard to type 2 diabetes mellitus, available data would suggest a potential negative correlation. However, as the evaluation of bladder cancer risk and prognosis in patients with metabolic disorders is certainly complex, further studies are urgently required to better assess the actual role of these metabolic disorders. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Next generation of optical diagnostics for bladder cancer using probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jen-Jane; Chang, Timothy C.; Pan, Ying; Hsiao, Shelly T.; Mach, Kathleen E.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Liao, Joseph C.

    2012-02-01

    Real-time imaging with confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) probes that fit in standard endoscopes has emerged as a clinically feasible technology for optical biopsy of bladder cancer. Confocal images of normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic urothelium obtained with intravesical fluorescein can be differentiated by morphologic characteristics. We compiled a confocal atlas of the urinary tract using these diagnostic criteria to be used in a prospective diagnostic accuracy study. Patients scheduled to undergo transurethral resection of bladder tumor underwent white light cystoscopy (WLC), followed by CLE, and histologic confirmation of resected tissue. Areas that appeared normal by WLC were imaged and biopsied as controls. We imaged and prospectively analyzed 135 areas in 57 patients. We show that CLE improves the diagnostic accuracy of WLC for diagnosing benign tissue, low and high grade cancer. Interobserver studies showed a moderate level of agreement by urologists and nonclinical researchers. Despite morphologic differences between inflammation and cancer, real-time differentiation can still be challenging. Identification of bladder cancer-specific contrast agents could provide molecular specificity to CLE. By using fluorescently-labeled antibodies or peptides that bind to proteins expressed in bladder cancer, we have identified putative molecular contrast agents for targeted imaging with CLE. We describe one candidate agent - anti-CD47 - that was instilled into bladder specimens. The tumor and normal urothelium were imaged with CLE, with increased fluorescent signal demonstrated in areas of tumor compared to normal areas. Thus, cancer-specificity can be achieved using molecular contrast agents ex vivo in conjunction with CLE.

  14. NONINVASIVE DIAGNOSIS OF BLADDER CANCER BY CROSS-POLARIZATION OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY: A BLIND STATISTICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Streltsova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Whether cross-polarization (CP optical coherence tomography (OCT could be used to detect early bladder cancer was ascertained; it was compared with traditional OCT within the framework of blind (closed clinical statistical studies. One hundred and sixteen patients with local nonexophytic (flat pathological processes of the bladder were examined; 360 CP OCT images were obtained and analyzed. The study used an OCT 1300-U CP optical coherence tomographer. CP OCT showed a high (94% sensitivity and a high (84% specificity in the identification of suspected nonexophytic areas in the urinary bladder.

  15. The First Report of Urothelial (Clear Cell Variant) Bladder Cancer in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkowitz, Shaul Yosef; Wadee, Reubina; Adam, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    Urothelial bladder tumours in childhood are extremely rare, with most cases being low grade, superficial disease of the papillary subtype with favourable outcomes. Urothelial (clear cell variant) carcinoma of bladder (UCCVCB) is an exceptional histological finding in both the adult and paediatric population. Herein we describe the first case of UCCVCB diagnosed in childhood. With this case being only the fourth report of confirmed muscle invasion in childhood, we discuss the entity of UCCVCB, and furthermore review all previously reported confirmed cases of childhood muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer, in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of oral administration of Shiquandabu pill combined with bladder perfusion chemotherapy on the postoperative recurrence and malignant degree of superficial bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of oral administration of Shiquandabu pill combined with bladder perfusion chemotherapy on the postoperative recurrence and malignant degree of superficial bladder cancer. Methods: A total of 102 patients with superficial bladder cancer who received transurethral resection of bladder tumor in our hospital between April 2012 and April 2015 were selected and randomly divided into combined group who received postoperative oral administration of Shiquandabu pill combined with bladder perfusion chemotherapy and routine group who received postoperative bladder perfusion chemotherapy, the postoperative tumor recurrence was followed up for 3 years, and the levels of tumor markers in serum as well as the expression levels of stem cell marker molecules and immunoregulation molecules in peripheral blood and recurrent lesions were determined. Results: Postoperative 1-year recurrence rate and postoperative 3-year recurrence rate of combined treatment group were significantly lower than those of routine group, and the mean recurrence time was significantly longer than that of routine group; 1 year after operation, serum VEGF, αFGF, 毬FGF, MMP2 and MMP9 levels were significantly lower than those of routine group, and ALDH1, Sox2, Nanog, CD47, CD133, B7-H1, PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were significantly lower than those of routine group; after tumor recurrence, ALDH1, Sox2, Nanog, CD47, CD133, B7-H1, PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA levels in recurrent lesions of combined treatment group were significantly lower than those of routine group. Conclusion: Oral administration of Shiquandabu pill combined with bladder perfusion chemotherapy has better effect on preventing postoperative recurrence of superficial bladder cancer than bladder perfusion chemotherapy alone, and it has regulating effect on tumor load, characteristics of stem cells and immune response after transurethral resection of bladder tumor.

  17. The prognostic factors affecting survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Woong Ki; Oh, Bong Ryoul; Ahn, Sung Ja; Nah, Byung Sik; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwang Sung; Ryu, Soo Bang; Park, Yang Il [Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    This study analyzed the prognostic factors affecting the survival rate and evaluated the role of radiation therapy in muscle-invading bladder cancer. Twenty eight patient with bladder cancer who completed planned definitive radiotherapy in the Departments of Therapeutic Radiology and Urology, Chonnam National University Hospital between Jan. 1986 to Dec. 1998 were retrospectively analyzed. The reviews were performed based on the patients' medical records. There were 21 males and 7 females in this study. The median of age was 72 years old ranging from 49 to 84 years. All patients were confirmed as having transitional cell carcinoma with histological grade 1 in one patient, grade 2 in 15, grade 3 in 9, and uniformed in 3. Radiation therapy was performed using a linear accelerator with 6 or 10 MV X-rays. Radiation was delivered daily with a 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fraction size by 4 ports (anterior-posterior, both lateral, alternatively) or 3 ports (Anterior and both lateral). The median radiation dose delivered to the isocenter of the target volume was 61.24 Gy ranging from 59 to 66.6 Gy. The survival rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was performed on the prognostic factors affecting the survival rate. The survival rate was 76%, 46%, 33%, 33% at 1, 2, 3, 5 years, respectively, with 19 months of median survival. The potential factors of age (less than 70 years vs above 70), sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hydronephrosis, T-stage (T3a vs T3b), TUR, chemotherapy, total duration of radiotherapy, radiation dose (less than 60 Gy vs above 60 Gy), and the treatment response were investigated with uni- and multivariate analysis. In univariate analysis, the T-stage ({rho} 0.078) and radiation dose ({rho} = 0.051) were marginally significant, and the treatment response ({rho} = 0.011) was a statistically significant factor on the survival rate. Multivariate analysis showed there were no significant prognostic factors affecting the survival

  18. Systemic granulomatous reaction secondary to treatment of bladder cancer with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giovanna Valentini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin is the elective treatment for transitional cell and in situ bladder carcinoma. Severe complications occur very seldom, but must be known and promptly recognized. We describe the case of a 48-year-old man, treated with chemo-immunotherapy ten years before for a follicular lymphoma, who developed a systemic granulomatous reaction after his twelfth intravescical BCG instillation for bladder cancer.

  19. Systemic granulomatous reaction secondary to treatment of bladder cancer with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giovanna Valentini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin is the elective treatment for transitional cell and in situ bladder carcinoma. Severe complications occur very seldom, but must be known and promptly recognized. We describe the case of a 48-year-old man, treated with chemo-immunotherapy ten years before for a follicular lymphoma, who developed a systemic granulomatous reaction after his twelfth intravescical BCG instillation for bladder cancer.

  20. Metabolomic Profiling Reveals Potential Markers and Bioprocesses Altered in Bladder Cancer Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Putluri, Nagireddy; Shojaie, Ali; Vasu, Vihas T; Vareed, Shaiju K.; Nalluri, Srilatha; Putluri, Vasanta; Thangjam, Gagan Singh; Panzitt, Katrin; Tallman, Christopher T.; Butler, Charles; Sana, Theodore R.; Fischer, Steven M.; Sica, Gabriel; Brat, Daniel J.; Shi, Huidong

    2011-01-01

    While alterations in xenobiotic metabolism are considered causal in the development of bladder cancer (BCa), the precise mechanisms involved are poorly understood. In this study, we used high-throughput mass spectrometry to measure over 2,000 compounds in 58 clinical specimens, identifying 35 metabolites which exhibited significant changes in BCa. This metabolic signature distinguished both normal and benign bladder from BCa. Exploratory analyses of this metabolomic signature in urine showed ...

  1. The route to personalized medicine in bladder cancer: where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Modena, Alessandra; Montironi, Rodolfo; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Martignoni, Guido; Cascinu, Stefano; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology and drug design have described novel targets in bladder cancer. EGFR, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), VEGFR, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, PD-1, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), Aurora kinase A, and miRNA are just examples of these opening frontiers. In addition, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) are promising candidates for future therapeutic approaches. Novel agents, combination, and sequences are emerging from the 747 clinical studies presently in course in bladder cancer to optimize patient outcomes. This report describes the emerging targets and provides an update on ongoing phase I, II, and III trials and preliminary results on targeted agents, used alone, in sequences, or in combination for patients with bladder cancer.

  2. Connexin 26 is Down-Regulated by KDM5B in the Progression of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enqing Xiong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 26 (Cx26 expression is down-regulated and KDM5B (H3K4 demethylase is up-regulated in the progression of bladder cancer, suggesting that Cx26 expression may be down-regulated by KDM5B in bladder cancer. To test the hypothesis, the HT1376 and T24 human bladder carcinoma cells were transfected with the plasmids pcDNA3.1-KDM5B, and caused the down-regulation of Cx26 expression. In contrast, the HT1376 and T24 cells transfected with the plasmids pTZU6+1-shRNA-KDM5B1 and pTZU6+1-shRNA-KDM5B2 caused the up-regulation of Cx26 expression. Immunohistochemistry and Spearman’s rank correlation analysis showed that the immunohistochemical expression of KDM5B and Cx26 was inversely related in bladder carcinoma tissues but no relationship in benign tissues. Taken together, these results indicate that KDM5B represses Cx26 expression in the bladder cancer development. Thus, a negative value to Cx26 immunohistochemical expression and a positive value to KDM5B immunohistochemical expression could be an ancillary diagnosis of primary bladder malignancy.

  3. Possible distinct molecular carcinogenic pathways for bladder cancer in Ukraine, before and after the Chernobyl disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimura, Keiichirou; Romanenko, Alina; Min, Wei; Salim, Elsayed I; Kinoshita, Anna; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Vozianov, Alexander; Fukushima, Shoji

    2004-04-01

    After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, the incidence of urinary bladder cancers in the Ukraine increased gradually from 26.2 to 43.3 per 100,000 people between 1986 and 2001. In the areas of low level but persistent cesium-137 (137Cs) radio-contamination, a unique atypical radiation-related urinary bladder cystitis named 'Chernobyl cystitis', a possible pre-neoplastic condition in humans, has been detected. We have previously documented high incidences of bladder lesions, including severe dysplasias and/or carcinoma in situ, in association with this cystitis and correlating with oxidative DNA damage. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying bladder carcinogenesis with this specific etiology, mutation analysis of p53 gene (exon 5-8) was performed for 11 and 18 paraffin-embedded bladder cancers in Ukrainians, respectively collected before and after the Chernobyl disaster. DNAs were extracted and subjected to nested PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis followed by direct DNA sequencing, as well as p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC). The incidences of p53 gene mutation were 54.5 and 16.7% for before and after the Chernobyl disaster, respectively, the difference being statistically significant. Also a tendency for higher p53 IHC score was apparent in the earlier group of lesions. No significant difference was noted for the proportions of historical types. These results point to possible distinct molecular carcinogenic pathways of bladder cancer formation, before and after the Chernobyl disaster, on the basis of variation in p53 gene alteration.

  4. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 is a rational therapeutic target in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Kilian M; McConkey, David J; Awrey, Shannon; Hegarty, Paul K; Qing, Jing; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Ashkenazi, Avi; Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin P; Black, Peter C

    2013-07-01

    Activating mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR3) have been described in approximately 75% of low-grade papillary bladder tumors. In muscle-invasive disease, FGFR3 mutations are found in 20% of tumors, but overexpression of FGFR3 is observed in about half of cases. Therefore, FGFR3 is a particularly promising target for therapy in bladder cancer. Up to now, most drugs tested for inhibition of FGFR3 have been small molecule, multityrosine kinase inhibitors. More recently, a specific inhibitory monoclonal antibody targeting FGFR3 (R3Mab) has been described and tested preclinically. In this study, we have evaluated mutation and expression status of FGFR3 in 19 urothelial cancer cell lines and a cohort of 170 American patients with bladder cancer. We have shown inhibitory activity of R3Mab on tumor growth and corresponding cell signaling in three different orthotopic xenografts of bladder cancer. Our results provide the preclinical proof of principle necessary to translate FGFR3 inhibition with R3Mab into clinical trials in patients with bladder cancer.

  5. Thymol inhibits bladder cancer cell proliferation via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Wen, Jia-Ming; Du, Chuan-Jun; Hu, Su-Min; Chen, Jia-Xi; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Zhang, Nan; Gao, Feng; Li, Shao-Jiang; Mao, Xia-Wa; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Ding, Ke-Feng

    2017-09-16

    Thymol is a phenolic compound with various pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-tumor effects. However, the effect of thymol on bladder cancer cell growth is still elusive. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of thymol in bladder cancer cells and its underlying mechanism. Thymol inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation in a dose and time-dependent manner. We also observed cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase after the treatment of thymol. Moreover, thymol could induce apoptosis in bladder cancer cells via the intrinsic pathway along with caspase-3/9 activation, release of cytochrome c and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. The activation of JNK and p38 was also critical for thymol-induced apoptosis since it was abrogated by the treatment of JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) but not ERK inhibitor (SCH772984). Furthermore, the generation of ROS (reactive oxygen species) was detected after the treatment of thymol. ROS scavenger NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) could block the thymol-triggered apoptosis and activation of MAPKs. These findings offer a novel therapeutic approach for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Involvement of Seladin-1 in goniothalamin-induced apoptosis in urinary bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yen, Heng Kai; Fauzi, Afifah-Radiah; Din, Laily Bin; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie J.; Meng, Chan Kok; Inayat-Hussain, Salmaan Hussain; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2014-01-01

    Background Selective Alzheimer Disease Indicator-1 (or Seladin-1) is a multifunctional protein first discovered by downregulation of its expression in Alzheimer’s disease. Interestingly, the expression of this protein is upregulated in several cancers, including primary bladder cancer. However, its role in cancer formation has yet to be discovered. Goniothalamin is a natural product that has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. In this study, we have elucidated ...

  7. Bladder cancer mortality trends and patterns in Córdoba, Argentina (1986-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pou, Sonia Alejandra; Osella, Alberto Ruben; Diaz, Maria Del Pilar

    2011-03-01

    Bladder cancer is common worldwide and the fourth most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men in Argentina. To describe bladder cancer mortality trends in Córdoba (1986-2006), considering the effect of age, period, and cohort, and to estimate the effect of arsenic exposure on bladder cancer, and its interaction with sex, while controlling by smoking habits and space and time variation of the rates. A joinpoint regression was performed to compute the estimated annual percentage changes (EAPC) of the age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) in an adult population from Córdoba, Argentina. A Poisson model was fitted to estimate the effect of age, period, and cohort. The influence of gender, tobacco smoking (using lung cancer ASMR as surrogate), and arsenic in drinking water was examined using a hierarchical model. A favorable trend (1986-2006) in bladder cancer ASMR in both sexes was found: EAPC of -2.54 in men and -1.69 in women. There was a decreasing trend in relative risk (RR) for cohorts born in 1931 or after. The multilevel model showed an increasing risk for each increase in lung cancer ASMR unit (RR = 1.001) and a biological interaction between sex and arsenic exposure. RR was higher among men exposed to increasing As-exposure categories (RR male low exposure 3.14, RR male intermediate exposure 4.03, RR male high exposure 4.71 versus female low exposure). A non-random space-time distribution of the rates was observed. There has been a decreasing trend in ASMR for bladder cancer in Córdoba. This study confirms that bladder cancer is associated with age, gender, smoking habit, and exposure to arsenic. Moreover, an effect measure modification between exposure to arsenic and sex was found.

  8. CDC91L1 (PIG-U) is a newly discovered oncogene in human bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Z.; Linn, J.F.; Wu, G.; Anzick, S.L.; Eisenberger, C.F.; Halachmi, S.; Cohen, Y.; Fomenkov, A.; Hoque, M.O.; Okami, K.; Steiner, G.; Engles, J.M.; Osada, M.; Moon, C.; Ratovitski, E.; Trent, J.M.; Meltzer, P.S.; Westra, W.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Sidransky, D.; Trink, B.

    2004-01-01

    Genomic amplification at 20q11-13 is a common event in human cancers. We isolated a germline translocation breakpoint at 20q11 from a bladder cancer patient. We identified CDC91L1, the gene encoding CDC91L1 (also called phosphatidylinositol glycan class U (PIG-U), a transamidase complex unit in the

  9. Alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk : results from the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Volovics, A.; Dorant, E.; Goldbohm, A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    Although several epidemiologic studies have been conducted on alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk, the risk according to quantity and type of alcohol consumed is not clear. The authors investigated these associations in a large prospective cohort study on diet and cancer among 120,852

  10. A prospective study on active and environmental tobacco smoking and bladder cancer risk (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    Objective: In a prospective cohort study among 120,852 adult subjects the authors investigated the associations between cigarette, cigar, pipe, environmental tobacco smoking (ETS), and bladder cancer. Methods: In 1986 all subjects completed a questionnaire on cancer risk factors. Follow-up for

  11. BCG-unresponsive non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: recommendations from the IBCG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Colombel, M.; Sundi, D.; Lamm, D.; Boehle, A.; Brausi, M.; Buckley, R.; Persad, R.; Palou, J.; Soloway, M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with live attenuated BCG remains the standard of care for patients with high-risk and intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Most patients initially respond, but recurrence is frequent and progression to invasive cancer is a concern. No established

  12. Gall bladder cancer: a review | Dodiyi-manuel | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Gall bladder cancer is the most aggressive cancer and the commonest malignant tumor of the biliary tract worldwide.The incidence increases with age and women are more commonly affected. Surgical resection is the only chance for complete cure,however only 10% of patients are candidates for curative ...

  13. Urothelial cancer stem cells and epithelial plasticity: current concepts and therapeutic implications in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Minal

    2015-12-01

    Urothelial carcinoma is a highly heterogeneous disease that develops along two distinct biological tracks as evident by candidate gene analysis and genome-wide screening and therefore, offers different challenges for clinical management. Tumors representing the truly distinct molecular entities express molecular markers characteristic of a developmental process and a major mechanism of cancer metastasis, known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Recently identified subset of cells known as urothelial cancer stem cells (UroCSCs) in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) have self-renewal properties, ability to generate cellular tumor heterogeneity via differentiation and are ultimately responsible for tumor growth and viability. In this review paper, PubMed and Google Scholar electronic databases were searched for original research papers and review articles to extract relevant information on the molecular mechanisms delineating the relationship between EMT and cancer stemness and their clinical implications for different subsets of urothelial cell carcinomas. Experimental and clinical studies over the past few years in bladder cancer cell lines and tumor tissues of different cancer subtypes provide evidences and new insights for mechanistic complexity for induction of EMT, tumorigenicity, and cancer stemness in malignant transformation of urothelial cell carcinomas. Differentiation and elimination therapies targeting EMT-cancer stemness pathway have been proposed as cynosure in the molecular biology of urothelial cell carcinomas and could prove to be clinically beneficial in an ability to reverse the EMT phenotype of tumor cells, suppress the properties of UroCSCs, inhibit bladder cancer progression and tumor relapse, and provide rationale in the treatment and clinical management of urothelial cancer.

  14. RGD-modifided oncolytic adenovirus exhibited potent cytotoxic effect on CAR-negative bladder cancer-initiating cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, H; Shen, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, S.; Xiao, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, X-Y; Chu, L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-initiating cell (CIC) is critical in cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. The reverse expression pattern of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and ? ? integrin in bladder cancer decreases the infection efficiency of adenovirus. We constructed Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified oncolytic adenovirus, carrying EGFP or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene (OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-EGFP/TRAIL), and applied them to CAR-negative bladder cancer T24 cells and cancer-initiating T24...

  15. The UBC-40 Urothelial Bladder Cancer cell line index: a genomic resource for functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Julie; Rico, Daniel; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Auer, Herbert; Gómez, Gonzalo; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Pisano, David G; Schulz, Wolfgang A; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Carrato, Alfredo; Theodorescu, Dan; Chanock, Stephen; Valencia, Alfonso; Real, Francisco X

    2015-05-22

    Urothelial bladder cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease. Cancer cell lines are useful tools for its study. This is a comprehensive genomic characterization of 40 urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC) cell lines including information on origin, mutation status of genes implicated in bladder cancer (FGFR3, PIK3CA, TP53, and RAS), copy number alterations assessed using high density SNP arrays, uniparental disomy (UPD) events, and gene expression. Based on gene mutation patterns and genomic changes we identify lines representative of the FGFR3-driven tumor pathway and of the TP53/RB tumor suppressor-driven pathway. High-density array copy number analysis identified significant focal gains (1q32, 5p13.1-12, 7q11, and 7q33) and losses (i.e. 6p22.1) in regions altered in tumors but not previously described as affected in bladder cell lines. We also identify new evidence for frequent regions of UPD, often coinciding with regions reported to be lost in tumors. Previously undescribed chromosome X losses found in UBC lines also point to potential tumor suppressor genes. Cell lines representative of the FGFR3-driven pathway showed a lower number of UPD events. Overall, there is a predominance of more aggressive tumor subtypes among the cell lines. We provide a cell line classification that establishes their relatedness to the major molecularly-defined bladder tumor subtypes. The compiled information should serve as a useful reference to the bladder cancer research community and should help to select cell lines appropriate for the functional analysis of bladder cancer genes, for example those being identified through massive parallel sequencing.

  16. FGFR3 mutational status and protein expression in patients with bladder cancer in a Jordanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoor, Khaldon; Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Jaradat, Ziad; Alkhateeb, Asem; Jaradat, Saied; Al-Ghazo, Mohammed A; Matalka, Ismail; Musleh, Hisham; Haddad, Yazan

    2010-12-01

    Bladder cancer accounts for nearly 5% of all newly diagnosed cancers in Jordan, with a much higher frequency in males. Recent studies have shown that activating mutations in FGFR3 are the most common findings in non-invasive low grade bladder tumors. In this study, we, retrospectively, investigated a cohort of 121 bladder cancer patients with various grades and stages of the tumor for molecular changes in FGFR3. Overexpression of FGFR3 was observed in 49%, 34%, 15%, and 2% of pTa, pT1, pT2, and pT3 cases, respectively. Further, FGFR3 expression was positive in 45%, 26%, and 30% of G1, G2 and G3 cases, respectively. Mutational analysis of exons 7, 10 and 15 of FGFR3 identified four previously reported mutations, namely R248C (n=4; 10%), S249C (n=23; 59%), Y375C (n=7; 18%), G382R (n=4; 10%), and one novel mutation, G382E (n=1; 3%). Our results indicate that both mutations and overexpression of FGFR3 are correlated together, and are more prevalent in early stage (pTa and pT1) and low grade (G1 and G2) bladder tumors. Survival analysis showed no contribution of changes in FGFR3 on the patient's survival. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model analysis of overall survival for the following variables: age, gender, stage and grade of tumor, and FGFR3 (expression and mutation) revealed that age, stage and grade of tumor are independent predictors of overall survival in patients with bladder cancer. Our work is the first to address the molecular status of FGFR3 in Jordanian patients with bladder cancer, and provides further support for FGFR3 as a key player in the initiation of bladder tumors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bladder wall recurrence of prostate cancer after high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Hsu, I-Chow; Braunstein, Steve; Chang, Albert J; Simko, Jeffry P; Roach, Mack

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer seeding after needle biopsy has been reported in the perineum, rectal wall, and periprostatic soft tissue. In this article, we report the results of a localized prostate cancer recurrence in the bladder following protrusion of a single high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter through the bladder wall at the ultimate site of failure. A 62-year-old man with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma was treated with long-term androgen deprivation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation, and high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost. He developed biochemical recurrence 4 years after treatment, and a CT scan of the pelvis revealed a nodule in the posterior, inferior bladder wall. Surgical pathology following transurethral resection of tumor within the bladder was consistent with high-grade prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient's prostate-specific antigen level fell to the range of normal postoperatively, and whole body imaging, including a multi-parametric MRI of the prostate with diffusion and spectroscopy, failed to reveal any other sites of disease. Review of the CT scan obtained for dosimetry at the time of brachytherapy demonstrated a lone catheter protruding through the bladder wall at the site of eventual recurrence. The tumor recurred in the bladder 12 months later, once more without evidence of disease within the prostate itself or distantly, and the patient was started on salvage androgen deprivation therapy. This case is the first report of prostate cancer recurrence in the bladder wall after brachytherapy and raises questions about prostate cancer biology, brachytherapy technique, and the timing of brachytherapy boost relative to whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The economics of bladder cancer: costs and considerations of caring for this disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatek, Robert S; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Holmäng, Sten; Lee, Richard; Kim, Simon P; Stenzl, Arnulf; Lotan, Yair

    2014-08-01

    Due to high recurrence rates, intensive surveillance strategies, and expensive treatment costs, the management of bladder cancer contributes significantly to medical costs. To provide a concise evaluation of contemporary cost-related challenges in the care of patients with bladder cancer. An emphasis is placed on the initial diagnosis of bladder cancer and therapy considerations for both non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and more advanced disease. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Medline (1966 to February 2011). Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms for search criteria included "bladder cancer, neoplasms" OR "carcinoma, transitional cell" AND all cost-related MeSH search terms. Studies evaluating the costs associated with of various diagnostic or treatment approaches were reviewed. Routine use of perioperative chemotherapy following complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor has been estimated to provide a cost savings. Routine office-based fulguration of small low-grade recurrences could decrease costs. Another potential important target for decreasing variation and cost lies in risk-modified surveillance strategies after initial bladder tumor removal to reduce the cost associated with frequent cystoscopic and radiographic procedures. Optimizing postoperative care after radical cystectomy has the potential to decrease length of stay and perioperative morbidity with substantial decreases in perioperative care expenses. The gemcitabine-cisplatin regimen has been estimated to result in a modest increase in cost effectiveness over methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin. Additional costs of therapies need to be balanced with effectiveness, and there are significant gaps in knowledge regarding optimal surveillance and treatment of both early and advanced bladder cancer. Regardless of disease severity, improvements in the efficiency of bladder cancer care to limit unnecessary interventions and optimize effective

  19. Bladder cancer: Analysis of the 2004 WHO classification in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    schistosomal associated BCA as well as compare our findings with the 2004 WHO consensus classification of urothelial neoplasms and with other publications. Patients and methods: The archival materials of 180 urinary bladder specimens were ...

  20. Cytotoxic and toxicogenomic effects of silibinin in bladder cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    68

    Among urinary bladder tumors, urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is one of the ..... human hepatocellular (HuH7) and renal carcinoma (Caki-1) cells, this compound ..... oil (Java) attenuates cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, nephrotoxicity and.

  1. Phosphatidylserine targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes for photothermal ablation of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Needa A.; Davis, Carole; McKernan, Patrick; Hauser, Paul; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel; Silvy, Ricardo P.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2018-01-01

    Bladder cancer has a 60%–70% recurrence rate most likely due to any residual tumour left behind after a transurethral resection (TUR). Failure to completely resect the cancer can lead to recurrence and progression into higher grade tumours with metastatic potential. We present here a novel therapy to treat superficial tumours with the potential to decrease recurrence. The therapy is a heat-based approach in which bladder tumour specific single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are delivered intravesically at a very low dose (0.1 mg SWCNT per kg body weight) followed 24 h later by a short 30 s treatment with a 360° near-infrared light that heats only the bound nanotubes. The energy density of the treatment was 50 J cm‑2, and the power density that this treatment corresponds to is 1.7 W cm‑2, which is relatively low. Nanotubes are specifically targeted to the tumour via the interaction of annexin V (AV) and phosphatidylserine, which is normally internalised on healthy tissue but externalised on tumours and the tumour vasculature. SWCNTs are conjugated to AV, which binds specifically to bladder cancer cells as confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Due to this specific localisation, NIR light can be used to heat the tumour while conserving the healthy bladder wall. In a short-term efficacy study in mice with orthotopic MB49 murine bladder tumours treated with the SWCNT-AV conjugate and NIR light, no tumours were visible on the bladder wall 24 h after NIR light treatment, and there was no damage to the bladder. In a separate survival study in mice with the same type of orthotopic tumours, there was a 50% cure rate at 116 days when the study was ended. At 116 days, no treatment toxicity was observed, and no nanotubes were detected in the clearance organs or bladder.

  2. Phosphatidylserine targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes for photothermal ablation of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virani, Needa A; Davis, Carole; McKernan, Patrick; Hauser, Paul; Hurst, Robert E; Slaton, Joel; Silvy, Ricardo P; Resasco, Daniel E; Harrison, Roger G

    2017-11-21

    Bladder cancer has a 60-70% recurrence rate most likely due to residual tumour left behind after a transurethral resection (TUR). Failure to completely resect the cancer can lead to recurrence and progression into higher grade tumours with metastatic potential. We present here a novel therapy to treat superficial tumours with the potential to decrease recurrence. The therapy is a heat-based approach in which bladder tumour specific single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are delivered intravesically at a very low dose (0.1 mg SWCNT per kg body weight) followed 24 hours later by a short 30 second treatment with a 360°near-infrared light that heats only the bound nanotubes. The energy density of the treatment was 50 J cm-2, and the power density that this treatment corresponds to is 1.7 W cm-2, which is relatively low. Nanotubes are specifically targeted to the tumour via the interaction of annexin V (AV) and phosphatidylserine, which is normally internalized on healthy tissue but externalized on tumours and the tumour vasculature. SWCNTs are conjugated to AV, which binds specifically to bladder cancer cells as confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Due to this specific localization, NIR light can be used to heat the tumour while conserving the healthy bladder wall. In a short-term efficacy study in mice with orthotopic MB49 murine bladder tumours treated with the SWCNT-AV conjugate and NIR light, no tumours were visible on the bladder wall 24 hours after NIR light treatment, and there was no damage to the bladder. In a separate survival study in mice with the same type of orthotopic tumours, there was a 50% cure rate at 116 days when the study was ended. At 116 days, no treatment toxicity was observed, and no nanotubes were detected in the clearance organs or bladder. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. Genetic and immunologic determinants of intravesical BCG therapy in non-muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Krajewski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BCA is one of the most common cancers. In 2010 in Poland, 6296 people developed bladder cancer and 3110 people died of it. Immunotherapy with BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin is by far the most effective adjuvant therapy. Noninfiltrating muscle membrane changes, that is, stages Ta, Tis and T1 qualify for BCG immunotherapy. BCG immunotherapy comprises series of bladder instillations, containing attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis. The effectiveness of immunotherapy in non-invasive bladder cancer is 70% 5-year survival without recurrence of the tumor. The treatment leads to a reduction of the residual tumor mass, but also to the delay and/or prevention of relapse, disease progression and ultimately death. Cytokines, as key mediators of immune response, play an important role in the pathogenesis of bladder cancer, which occurrence is stimulated by the inflammatory process. BCG immunotherapy provokes an intensive immunological response by the increase of cytokine production. Genetic variants determine inter-individual differences in the incidence of this cancer, as well as the response to the therapy. This is evidenced by the presence of differences in genetic variants of cytokines correlated with the varied risk of bladder cancer incidence. It is believed that concentrations of particular cytokines in urine after installation of BCG may indicate response to the therapy. Increased levels of Th1 cytokines – IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α are correlated with longer survival time without recurrence, whereas high levels of Th2 cytokines such as IL-10, predict unsuccessful BCG therapy.

  4. [Genetic and immunologic determinants of intravesical BCG therapy in non-muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Wojciech; Kołodziej, Anna; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald

    2014-03-20

    Bladder cancer (BCA) is one of the most common cancers. In 2010 in Poland, 6296 people developed bladder cancer and 3110 people died of it. Immunotherapy with BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) is by far the most effective adjuvant therapy. Noninfiltrating muscle membrane changes, that is, stages Ta, Tis and T1 qualify for BCG immunotherapy. BCG immunotherapy comprises series of bladder instillations, containing attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis. The effectiveness of immunotherapy in non-invasive bladder cancer is 70% 5-year survival without recurrence of the tumor. The treatment leads to a reduction of the residual tumor mass, but also to the delay and/or prevention of relapse, disease progression and ultimately death. Cytokines, as key mediators of immune response, play an important role in the pathogenesis of bladder cancer, which occurrence is stimulated by the inflammatory process. BCG immunotherapy provokes an intensive immunological response by the increase of cytokine production. Genetic variants determine inter-individual differences in the incidence of this cancer, as well as the response to the therapy. This is evidenced by the presence of differences in genetic variants of cytokines correlated with the varied risk of bladder cancer incidence. It is believed that concentrations of particular cytokines in urine after installation of BCG may indicate response to the therapy. Increased levels of Th1 cytokines - IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α are correlated with longer survival time without recurrence, whereas high levels of Th2 cytokines such as IL-10, predict unsuccessful BCG therapy.

  5. Bladder cancer mortality in diabetics in relation to saccharin consumption and smoking habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, B; Doll, R

    1975-06-01

    The frequency with which diabetes mellitus was mentioned on the death certificates of 18,733 patients dying from bladder cancer has been compared with that of 19,709 patients dying from other cancers (excluding cancer of the lung and pancreas). The estimated relative risk of bladder cancer in diabetics was 0-98 with 95% confidence limits 0-70-1-38. There was no increase in risk of bladder cancer in patients with diabetes of long duration. Diabetics were shown by questionnaire to consume substantially more saccharin than non-diabetics, and the duration of regular saccharin use by diabetics was highly correlated with the duration of diabetes. There was therefore no evidence from this study that consumption of above average amounts of saccharin had led to bladder cancer in diabetics. The proporation of current smokers among diabetics was significantly less than among non-diabetics, and this may account for a low relative risk of lung cancer in the former (0-72).

  6. Radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis in bladder cancer cells with wild-type- p53 but not in p53-mutated bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Shirakawa, Toshiro; Zhang, Zhujun; Matsumoto, Akira; Fujisawa, Masato; Okada, Hiroshi; Kamidono, Sadao; Gotoh, Akinobu

    2003-12-01

    Purpose. It has been reported in several studies that the absence in cancer cells of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, mutations of which are frequently found in bladder cancer, increases their resistance to ionizing radiation. Other studies, however, suggest that mutations of the p53 gene could increase the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, although the evidence is still inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between p53 status and radiation response in five different bladder cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods. Five different human bladder cancer cell lines (KK47: with wt- p53, RT4: with wt- p53, T24: with mutated p53, 5637: with mutated p53, UM-UC-3: with mutated p53) were used in the study. Cells were irradiated with 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 Gy, then trypsinized and re-plated for clonogenic survival assay, quantitative RT-PCR assay, flow-cytometry analysis and TUNEL assay. Results. The clonogenic assay demonstrated that KK47 and RT4 had significantly higher radiosensitivity than other cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that radiation induced increased expression of p53, Bax, and p21 mRNA in KK47 and RT4. After irradiation, G1 cell-cycle arrest was observed in KK47 and RT4 under flow cytometry analysis, while T24, 5637, and UM-UC-3 showed an increase in the proportion of G2 cells. Increased cell apoptosis was also observed under TUNEL assay in KK47 and RT4, but not in other cell lines. It was demonstrated that ionizing radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis in bladder cancer cells with wt- p53 but not in those with mutated p53.

  7. Results from a Phase I Study of Lapatinib with Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Advanced or Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerbone, L; Sternberg, C N; Sengeløv, L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Lapatinib is a potent HER1 and HER2 inhibitor. Gemcitabine-cisplatin (GC) is a standard chemotherapy regimen for advanced/metastatic bladder cancer. This phase I study examined the safety of lapatinib in combination with GC in patients with bladder cancer. The primary aim...

  8. Personal hair dye use and the risk of bladder cancer: a case–control study from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, M.; Gago-Dominguez, M.; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B.; Kampman, E.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Several studies have suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer among hairdressers, who are occupationally exposed to hair dyes. There has also been concern about a possible increased risk of bladder cancer among users of hair dyes. However, the association between personal hair dye

  9. A germline homozygote deletion of the glutathione-s-transferase Mu 1 gene predisposes to bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mungan, N.A.; Aben, K.K.H.; Beeks, E.; Kampman, E.; Bunschoten, A.; Bussemakers, M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives: Numerous studies have shown smoking and specific occupational exposures to be risk factors for bladder cancer. The risk of bladder cancer may be modified by the activity of carcinogen metabolizing enzymes. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu1 enzyme (GSTM1) detoxifies

  10. A quantitative proteomic analysis uncovers the relevance of CUL3 in bladder cancer aggressiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Grau

    Full Text Available To identify aggressiveness-associated molecular mechanisms and biomarker candidates in bladder cancer, we performed a SILAC (Stable Isotope Labelling by Amino acids in Cell culture proteomic analysis comparing an invasive T24 and an aggressive metastatic derived T24T bladder cancer cell line. A total of 289 proteins were identified differentially expressed between these cells with high confidence. Complementary and validation analyses included comparison of protein SILAC data with mRNA expression ratios obtained from oligonucleotide microarrays, and immunoblotting. Cul3, an overexpressed protein in T24T, involved in the ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation of target proteins, was selected for further investigation. Functional analyses revealed that Cul3 silencing diminished proliferative, migration and invasive rates of T24T cells, and restored the expression of cytoskeleton proteins identified to be underexpressed in T24T cells by SILAC, such as ezrin, moesin, filamin or caveolin. Cul3 immunohistochemical protein patterns performed on bladder tumours spotted onto tissue microarrays (n = 284, were associated with tumor staging, lymph node metastasis and disease-specific survival. Thus, the SILAC approach identified that Cul3 modulated the aggressive phenotype of T24T cells by modifying the expression of cytoskeleton proteins involved in bladder cancer aggressiveness; and played a biomarker role for bladder cancer progression, nodal metastasis and clinical outcome assessment.

  11. CXCL5 knockdown expression inhibits human bladder cancer T24 cells proliferation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiajia; Zhu, Xi; Zhang, Jie

    2014-03-28

    CXCL5 (epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78) which acts as a potent chemoattractant and activator of neutrophil function was reported to play a multifaceted role in tumorigenesis. To investigate the role of CXCL5 in bladder cancer progression, we examined the CXCL5 expression in bladder cancer tissues by real-time PCR and Western blot, additionally, we used shRNA-mediated silencing to generate stable CXCL5 silenced bladder cancer T24 cells and defined its biological functions. Our results demonstrated that mRNA and protein of CXCL5 is increased in human bladder tumor tissues and cell lines, down-regulation of CXCL5 in T24 cells resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and increased cell apoptosis in vitro through Snail, PI3K-AKT and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These data suggest that CXCL5 is critical for bladder tumor growth and progression, it may represent a potential application in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. FGFR3-targeted mAb therapy for bladder cancer and multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadari, Yaron; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) have been implicated in severe skeletal dysplasias and in a variety of cancers. In their study in this issue of the JCI, Qing et al. used specific shRNA probes to demonstrate that FGFR3 functions as an important driver of bladder carcinoma cell proliferation (see the related article beginning on page 1216). A unique anti-FGFR3 mAb was shown to exhibit antitumor activity in human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro and in mouse bladder cancer or multiple myeloma xenograft tumor models bearing either wild-type or mutant FGFR3. These results suggest that clinical development of anti-FGFR3 mAbs should be considered for targeted therapy of cancer and other diseases.

  13. Saccharin, cyclamate, and human bladder cancer. No evidence of an association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, I I; Clark, J P

    1978-07-28

    An epidemiologic study designed to elucidate the possible roles of the artificial sweeteners saccharin and cyclamate in human urinary bladder cancer was recently completed. The previous intake of each of these substances among 519 patients with histopathologically confirmed bladder cancer and an equal number of matching controls in metropolitan Baltimore did not differ significantly in frequency, quantity, or duration. These normal findings persisted after simultaneous adjustment for the effects of smoking, occupation, age, diabetes mellitus, and a number of other potentially confounding factors. They are substantiated by the failure of the relative risk of bladder cancer to increase with increasing exposure to artificial sweeteners. It is concluded that neither saccharin nor cyclamate is likely to be carcinogenic in man, at least at the moderate dietary ingestion levels reported by the patient sample.

  14. Tunneling nanotubes promote intercellular mitochondria transfer followed by increased invasiveness in bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinjin; Zheng, Xiufen; Li, Fan; Yu, Yang; Chen, Zhong; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhihua; Xu, Hua; Yang, Weimin

    2017-02-28

    Intercellular transfer of organelles via tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) is a novel means of cell-to-cell communication. Here we demonstrate the existence of TNTs between co-cultured RT4 and T24 bladder cancer cells using light microscopy, fluorescence imaging, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Spontaneous unidirectional transfer of mitochondria from T24 to RT4 cells was detected using fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. The distribution of mitochondria migrated from T24 cells was in good agreement with the original mitochondria in RT4 cells, which may imply mitochondrial fusion. We detected cytoskeleton reconstruction in RT4-Mito-T24 cells by observing F-actin redistribution. Akt, mTOR, and their downstream mediators were activated and increased. The resultant increase in the invasiveness of bladder cancer cells was detected in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that TNTs promote intercellular mitochondrial transfer between heterogeneous cells, followed by an increase in the invasiveness of bladder cancer cells.

  15. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer invading urinary bladder treated with preoperative mFOLFOX6 and urinary bladder conserving surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Takeshi; Katayama, Kazuhisa; Takahashi, Yuji; Tanaka, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    A 69-year-old man visited our hospital because of melena and anemia. Colonoscopy revealed a type 3 tumor at sigmoid colon, and by abdominal CT, we detected a sigmoid colon cancer invading the urinary bladder with a single liver metastasis. The patient required sigmoidectomy with partial hepatectomy and total urinary bladder resection. Preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was initiated as a part of multidisciplinary therapy. After the 6th course was completed, CT revealed a reduction in the primary tumor's size and the disappearance of liver metastasis. After the 8th course was completed, we performed urinary bladder conserving sigmoidectomy. The pathological diagnosis of the surgical specimen was tub1, pSS, ly0, v0, pN0, and pStage II. Down-sizing chemotherapy might improve the quality of life(QOL)of colon cancer patients with extensive invasion of the urinary bladder.

  16. Dietary sources of N‐nitroso compounds and bladder cancer risk: Findings from the Los Angeles bladder cancer study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Catsburg, Chelsea E; Gago‐Dominguez, Manuela; Yuan, Jian‐Min; Castelao, J. Esteban; Cortessis, Victoria K; Pike, Malcolm C; Stern, Mariana C

    2014-01-01

    N‐Nitroso compounds (NOCs) have been proposed as possible bladder carcinogens. The main sources of exogenous exposure to NOCs are cigarette smoke and diet, particularly processed ( i . e ., nitrite‐treated) meats...

  17. Effect of laminin 332 on motility and invasion in bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Gu Kang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the correlation between laminin 332 and malignancy in bladder cancer patients, and, using a strain of invasive bladder cancer cells, determined whether laminin 332 causes bladder cancer motility and invasion. To investigate the correlation between laminin 332 g2 distribution and patient outcome, we performed a semiquantitative immunohistochemical analysis of 35 paraffin-embedded samples using the antibody D4B5, which is specific for the laminin 5 γ2 chain. To evaluate the role of laminin 332 in NBT-II cell motility and invasion, we used a scratch assay and the Boyden chamber chemoinvasion system. Tumor stage and grade were significantly correlated with a loss of laminin 332 γ2 chain from the basement membrane (p = 0.001 and its retention in the cytoplasm (p = 0.001 (Kruskal–Wallis test. Kaplan–Meier survival curves revealed an association between the risk of progression and cytoplasmic retention of the laminin 332 γ2 chain. In addition, an in vitro scratch assay showed an increase in the migration of cells treated with laminin 332 from their cluster. The Boyden chamber assay showed that laminin 332 potentiated NBT-II cell invasion. Immunohistochemistry results showed that bladder cancer patients with a higher malignancy expressed more laminin 332. The in vitro scratch and invasion assay showed that laminin 332 stimulated the motility and invasion of bladder cancer cells. The invasion assay explains the correlation between laminin 332 expression and bladder cancer malignancy.

  18. The effect of Pokemon on bladder cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changcheng; Zhu, Kai; Sun, Wei; Yang, Bin; Gu, Wenyu; Luo, Jun; Peng, Bo; Zheng, Junhua

    2014-01-24

    This study aimed at detecting Pokemon expression in bladder cancer cell and investigating the relationship between Pokemon and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, we investigated the functions of Pokemon in the carcinogenesis and development of bladder cancer. This study was also designed to observe the inhibitory effects of siRNA expression vector on Pokemon in bladder cancer cell. The siRNA expression vectors which were constructed to express a short hairpin RNA against Pokemon were transfected to the bladder cancer cells T24 with a liposome. Levels of Pokemon, E-cadherin and β-catenin mRNA and protein were examined by real-time quantitative-fluorescent PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The effects of Pokemon silencing on epithelial-mesenchymal transition of T24 cells were evaluated with wound-healing assay. Pokemon was strongly inhibited by siRNA treatment, especially siRNA3 treatment group, as it was reflected by Western blot and real-time PCR. The gene and protein of E-cadherin expression level showed increased markedly after Pokemon was inhibited by RNA interference. While there were no differences in the levels of gene and protein of β-catenin among five groups. The bladder cancer cell after Pokemon siRNA interference showed a significantly reduced wound-closing efficiency at 6, 12 and 24h. Our findings suggest Pokemon may inhibit the expression of E-cadherin. The low expression of E-cadherin lead to increasing the phenotype and apical-base polarity of epithelial cells. These changes of cells may result in the recurrence and progression of bladder cancer at last. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic diversity of urinary bladder cancer and the risk of recurrence based on mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traczyk-Borszynska, M; Borkowska, E; Jablonowski, Z; Jedrzejczyk, A; Pietrusinski, M; Kaluzewski, B; Sosnowski, M; Borowiec, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the genetic diversity of bladder cancer and determine the suitability of a proposed molecular marker panel to monitor the course of bladder cancer patients. The study involved 185 patients with diagnosed bladder cancer. The genetic diversity of the bladder cancer was evaluated by the prevalence of mutations in the TP53, HRAS, FGFR3 and WWOX genes. Mutations were detected in 62.2% of the tumor samples. The most frequently mutated genes were FGFR3 (49.7%) and TP53 (16.2%). No mutation was observed in the WWOX gene. FGFR3 mutations, contrary to TP53, correlated with lower tumor stage and grade, and the presence of multiple tumors. The risk of death was significantly higher in patients with TP53 mutant tumors (HR=3.12; 95%CI: 1.14-7.27; p=0.006) but lower in patients with FGFR3 mutations (HR=0.36; 95%CI: 0.15-0.87; p=0.002). None of the investigated genes was an independent predictor of disease-specific survival, recurrence-free survival or progression-free survival. The results confirm the existence of two alternative pathways of bladder cancer. However the presence of a high percentage of wild type variants in the higher stages of the disease suggest the existence of another pathway of molecular changes leading to the development of bladder cancer. Molecular analysis may have prognostic value and may facilitate the assignment of patients to appropriate forms of treatment - especially in the case of patients with a T1 tumor, where different mutational patterns were observed in each grade.

  20. [THE SOMATIC MUTATIONS AND ABERRANT METHYLATION AS POTENTIAL GENETIC MARKERS OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, D S; Kushlinskii, N E

    2016-02-01

    All around the world, more than 330 thousands cases of bladder cancer are registered annually hence representing actual problem of modern oncology. Still in demand are search and characteristic of new molecular markers of bladder cancer detecting in tumor cells from urinary sediment and having high diagnostic accuracy. The studies of last decade, especially using methods of genome-wide sequencing, permitted to receive a large amount of experimental data concerning development and progression of bladder cancer The review presents systematic analysis of publications available in PubMed data base mainly of last five years. The original studies of molecular genetic disorders under bladder cancer and meta-analyzes were considered This approach permitted to detected the most common local alterations of DNA under bladder cancer which can be detected using routine genetic methods indifferent clinical material and present prospective interest for development of test-systems. The molecular genetic markers of disease can be activating missense mutations in 7 and 10 exons of gene of receptor of growth factor of fibroblasts 3 (FGFR3), 9 and 20 exons of gene of Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bi-phosphate-3-kinase (PIK3CA) and mutation in -124 and -146 nucleotides in promoter of gene of catalytic subunit telomerase (TERT). The development of test-systems on the basis of aberrant methylation of CpG-islets of genes-suppressors still is seemed as a difficult task because of differences in pattern of methylation of different primary tumors at various stages of clonal evolution of bladder cancer though they can be considered as potential markers.

  1. A 3-plex methylation assay combined with the FGFR3 mutation assay sensitively detects recurrent bladder cancer in voided urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandimalla, Raju; Masius, Roy; Beukers, Willemien

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: DNA methylation is associated with bladder cancer and these modifications could serve as useful biomarkers. FGFR3 mutations are present in 60% to 70% of non–muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Low-grade bladder cancer recurs in more than 50% of patients. The aim of this study......, and nonmalignant urines (n = 130). Results: The 3-plex assay identified recurrent bladder cancer in voided urine with a sensitivity of 74% in the validation set. In combination with the FGFR3 mutation assay, a sensitivity of 79% was reached (specificity of 77%). Sensitivity of FGFR3 and cytology was 52% and 57......%, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of methylation and FGFR3 assays efficiently detects recurrent bladder cancer without the need for stratification of patients regarding methylation/mutation status of the primary tumor. We conclude that the sensitivity of this combination is in the same range...

  2. miR-1182 inhibits growth and mediates the chemosensitivity of bladder cancer by targeting hTERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jun [Department of Urology, Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University, 221 Yan An Road(w), Shanghai 200040 (China); Dai, Wenbin, E-mail: daiwenbin271@163.com [Department of Urology, Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University, 221 Yan An Road(w), Shanghai 200040 (China); Song, Jianming [School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, No.3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland 97239-3098, OR (United States)

    2016-02-05

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have been demonstrated to contribute to tumor progression and metastasis and proposed to be key regulators of diverse biological processes. In this study, we report that miR-1182 is deregulated in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. To characterize the role of miR-1182 in bladder cancer cells, we performed functional assays. The overexpression of miR-1182 significantly inhibits bladder cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, and invasion. Moreover, its up-regulation induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and mediated chemosensitivity to cisplatin in bladder cancer. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter assay and a rescue experiment indicated that miR-1182 directly targets hTERT by binding its 3′UTR. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that miR-1182 acts as a tumor suppressor and may be a potential biomarker for bladder cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  3. UCA1 involved in the metformin-regulated bladder cancer cell proliferation and glycolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian; Sun, Xiangzhou; Jiang, Xianhan

    2017-06-01

    Despite great scientific advances have been achieved in cancer treatment in recent years, the death rate of bladder cancer has been staying at a high level. Metformin, a widely-used and low-cost diabetes medicine, might have the potential of anticancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of metformin on bladder cancer cells and to identify potential molecular targets and signaling pathways. Bladder cancer 5637 cells transfected with either pcDNA/UCA1 vector or pcDNA3.1 empty vector were treated with various doses of metformin for different periods of time, and then cell proliferation and glycolysis were assessed. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were applied to examine the expression of long non-coding RNA UCA1 and mammalian target of rapamycin-signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway molecules. We found metformin inhibited bladder cancer cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. UCA1-overexpressed 5637 cells showed increased proliferation and glycolysis compared with control cells. Metformin downregulated both endogenous and exogenous UCA1 expression, leading to the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-hexokinase 2 signaling pathway. Our study provided the first evidence that metformin inhibited proliferation and glycolysis in cancer cells through regulation of long non-coding RNA UCA1. The discovery also suggested the important roles of long non-coding RNA in chemoprevention, which is a property of metformin.

  4. CDC91L1 (PIG-U) is a newly discovered oncogene in human bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongmin; Linn, Jürgen F; Wu, Guojun; Anzick, Sarah L; Eisenberger, Claus F; Halachmi, Sarel; Cohen, Yoram; Fomenkov, Alexey; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul; Okami, Kenji; Steiner, Gabriel; Engles, James M; Osada, Motonabu; Moon, Chulso; Ratovitski, Edward; Trent, Jeffrey M; Meltzer, Paul S; Westra, William H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Schoenberg, Mark P; Sidransky, David; Trink, Barry

    2004-04-01

    Genomic amplification at 20q11-13 is a common event in human cancers. We isolated a germline translocation breakpoint at 20q11 from a bladder cancer patient. We identified CDC91L1, the gene encoding CDC91L1 (also called phosphatidylinositol glycan class U (PIG-U), a transamidase complex unit in the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring pathway), as the only gene whose expression was affected by the translocation. CDC91L1 was amplified and overexpressed in about one-third of bladder cancer cell lines and primary tumors, as well as in oncogenic uroepithelial cells transformed with human papillomavirus (HPV) E7. Forced overexpression of CDC91L1 malignantly transformed NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of CDC91L1 also resulted in upregulation of the urokinase receptor (uPAR), a GPI-anchored protein, and in turn increased STAT-3 phosphorylation in bladder cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CDC91L1 is an oncogene in bladder cancer, and implicate the GPI anchoring system as a potential oncogenic pathway and therapeutic target in human cancers.

  5. [FRancilian Oncogeriatric Group (FROG)'s focus on management of elderly patients with bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebriou, Djamel; Avenin, Danièle; Caillet, Philippe; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Durdux, Catherine; Massard, Christophe; Culine, Stéphane

    2014-09-01

    Bladder cancer is diagnosed more often in the elderly. The most effective treatment strategies are mostly very aggressive and are not applicable to all patients in a very heterogeneous population. However, effective options exist to treat the most vulnerable subjects. A multidisciplinary approach including a geriatric assessment is essential for optimal adaptation of treatment. The FRancilian Oncogeriatric Group (FROG) conducted a comprehensive literature search in order to review the applicable therapeutic options according to oncological and geriatric settings. International recommendations are essential to harmonize the management of elderly patients with bladder cancer.

  6. Bladder cancer mortality in England and Wales in relation to cigarette smoking and saccharin consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bruce; Doll, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Cohort analyses of bladder cancer mortality rates in men and women in England and Wales have been compared with figures for the per caput consumption of saccharin and cigarette tobacco and with similar analyses of cigarette smoking habits. The increase in bladder cancer mortality rates in male cohorts born since 1870 can be attributed to cigarette smoking, and there is no evidence of any break in the continuity of the trends in either men or women which corresponds to the introduction of saccharin. PMID:4455341

  7. Selection of microsatellite markers for bladder cancer diagnosis without the need for corresponding blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Kompier, Lucie C; Lurkin, Irene

    2012-01-01

    . Moreover, stutter peaks may complicate the analysis. To use microsatellite markers for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer, we aimed to select markers without stutter peaks and a constant ratio between alleles, thereby avoiding the need for a control DNA sample. We investigated 49 microsatellite markers...... with tri- and tetranucleotide repeats in regions commonly lost in bladder cancer. Based on analysis of 50 blood DNAs the 12 best performing markers were selected with few stutter peaks and a constant ratio between peaks heights. Per marker upper and lower cut off values for allele ratios were determined...

  8. Androgenic dependence of exophytic tumor growth in a transgenic mouse model of bladder cancer: a role for thrombospondin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Jorge L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroid hormones influence mitogenic signaling pathways, apoptosis, and cell cycle checkpoints, and it has long been known that incidence of bladder cancer (BC in men is several times greater than in women, a difference that cannot be attributed to environmental or lifestyle factors alone. Castration reduces incidence of chemically-induced BC in rodents. It is unclear if this effect is due to hormonal influences on activation/deactivation of carcinogens or a direct effect on urothelial cell proliferation or other malignant processes. We examined the effect of castration on BC growth in UPII-SV40T transgenic mice, which express SV40 T antigen specifically in urothelium and reliably develop BC. Furthermore, because BC growth in UPII-SV40T mice is exophytic, we speculated BC growth was dependent on angiogenesis and angiogenesis was, in turn, androgen responsive. Methods Flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPDCT was used to longitudinally measure exophytic BC growth in UPII-SV40T male mice sham-operated, castrated, or castrated and supplemented with dihydrotestosterone (DHT. Human normal bladder and BC biopsies and mouse bladder were examined quantitatively for thrombospondin-1 (TSP1 protein expression. Results Mice castrated at 24 weeks of age had decreased BC volumes at 32 weeks compared to intact mice (p = 0.0071 and castrated mice administered DHT (p = 0.0233; one-way ANOVA, JMP 6.0.3, SAS Institute, Inc.. Bladder cancer cell lines responded to DHT treatment with increased proliferation, regardless of androgen receptor expression levels. TSP1, an anti-angiogenic factor whose expression is inhibited by androgens, had decreased expression in bladders of UPII-SV40T mice compared to wild-type. Castration increased TSP1 levels in UPII-SV40T mice compared to intact mice. TSP1 protein expression was higher in 8 of 10 human bladder biopsies of normal versus malignant tissue from the same patients. Conclusion

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-targeted Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) for the Treatment of EGFR-expressing Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Railkar, Reema; Krane, L Spencer; Li, Q Quentin; Sanford, Thomas; Siddiqui, Mohammad Rashid; Haines, Diana; Vourganti, Srinivas; Brancato, Sam J; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Agarwal, Piyush K

    2017-10-01

    The use of light as a means of therapy for bladder cancer has a long history but has been hampered by a lack of tumor specificity and therefore, damage to the normal bladder mucosa. Here, we describe a targeted form of phototherapy called photoimmunotherapy (PIT), which targets EGFR-expressing bladder cancer. Anti-EGFR antibody panitumumab was labeled with the photoabsorber (PA), IRDye 700Dx (IR700), to create a panitumumab-IR700 antibody-PA conjugate that is activated by near-infrared radiation (NIR). Bladder cancer tissue microarray (TMA) and bladder cancer cell lines were analyzed for expression of EGFR. Mechanism of PIT-induced cell death was studied using proliferation assays, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and production of reactive oxygen species. Finally, the in vivo effect was studied in xenografts. EGFR staining of TMAs showed that while most bladder cancers have expression of EGFR to a varying degree, squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) have the highest expression of EGFR. Panitumumab-IR700 activated by NIR light rapidly killed UMUC-5 cells, a bladder SCC line. Panitumumab alone, panitumumab-IR700 without NIR, or NIR alone had no effect on cells. TEM demonstrated that cell death is due to necrosis. Singlet oxygen species contributed toward cell death. NIR-PIT with panitumumab-IR700 reduced growth compared with only panitumumab-IR700-treated UMUC-5 xenograft tumors. PIT is a new targeted treatment for bladder cancer. Panitumumab-IR700-induced PIT selectively kills EGFR-expressing bladder cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and therefore warrants further therapeutic studies in orthotopic xenografts of bladder cancer and ultimately in patients. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2201-14. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S.

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  11. Factors affecting the timeliness and adequacy of haematuria assessment in bladder cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Brian; Perera, Marlon; Papa, Nathan; Bolton, Damien; Sengupta, Shomik

    2017-05-01

    To review the literature to identify factors affecting haematuria assessment in bladder cancer. We performed a systematic review in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Publications indexed in EMBASE and Medline (PubMed) in March 2016 were searched, using the keywords 'hematuria', 'urinary bladder neoplasm(s)' and 'bladder tumor'. Studies evaluating the timeliness and adequacy of haematuria assessment in the context of bladder cancer were included. Exclusion criteria included age <18 years, animal studies and non-English articles. Following our search strategy, a total of 17 articles were included in our study. All 17 studies commented on gender, with female gender associated with delayed and inadequate haematuria evaluation. Women waited longer than men for urological review (three studies) and bladder cancer diagnosis (three studies). Women were also less likely to be referred to urology (two studies), receive imaging (three studies) or have cystoscopy (two studies). In all, 10 studies commented on age, with the impression that advancing age is associated with a more thorough assessment. Smokers and those with microscopic haematuria appear to undergo a less thorough evaluation. Female gender is associated with sub-optimal haematuria evaluation, while older patients are evaluated more thoroughly. Smokers paradoxically undergo less comprehensive assessment. Further research on the impact of other factors is required. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Increased expression of transcription factor TFAP2α correlates with chemosensitivity in advanced bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann Jan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The standard treatment for patients with advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder is platin based chemotherapy. Only approximately 50% of the patients respond to chemotherapy. Therefore, molecular predictive markers for identification of chemotherapy sensitive subgroups of patients are highly needed. We selected the transcription factor TFAP2α from a previously identified gene expression signature for chemotherapy response. Methods TFAP2α expression and localization was assessed by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray (TMA containing 282 bladder cancer tumors from patients with locally advanced (pT2-T4b and N1-3 or metastatic (M1 disease. All patients had received cisplatin containing chemotherapy. Furthermore, QPCR analysis of three TFAP2α isoforms was performed on tumor specimens of advanced muscle invasive bladder cancers (T2-4. Using the bladder cell lines T24 and SW780 the relation of TFAP2α and cisplatin and gemcitabine sensitivity as well as cell proliferation was examined using siRNA directed TFAP2α knockdown. Results TFAP2α protein expression was analyzed on a TMA with cores from 282 advanced bladder cancer tumors from patients treated with cisplatin based combinational chemotherapy. TFAP2α was identified as a strong independent predictive marker for a good response and survival after cisplatin-containing chemotherapy in patients with advanced bladder cancer. Strong TFAP2α nuclear and cytoplasmic staining predicted good response to chemotherapy in patients with lymph node metastasis, whereas weak TFAP2α nuclear staining predicted good response in patients without lymph node metastasis. In vitro studies showed that siRNA mediated knockdown of TFAP2α increased the proliferation of SW780 cells and rendered the cells less sensitive to cisplatin and gemcitabine. In contrast to that T24 bladder cells with mutated p53 showed to be more drug sensitive upon TFAP2α depletion. Conclusions High

  13. Xanthogranulomatous Cystitis: A Challenging Imitator of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Ekici

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomatous cystitis is a rare, benign, chronic inflammatory disease of the bladder, mimicking malignancy with unknown etiology. Herein, we report a 57-year-old man who presented with pollakiuria, nocturia, dysuria, left flank pain, and a palpable mass on the right lower abdomen. Computerized tomography demonstrated an obstructing 10-mm stone in the lower third of the left ureter and a 6-cm solid mass on the right at the anterolateral wall of the bladder. The mass presented local perivesical invasion at the anterolateral side. Cystouretroscopy revealed a mass protruding into the bladder cavity with edematous smooth surface. Frozen section analysis of the partial cystectomy specimen could not rule out malignancy. Therefore, radical cystoprostatectomy and ureterolithotomy were performed. Histologically, fibrosis, numerous plasma cells, eosinophils, and, immunohistochemically, CD68-positive epithelioid and foamy macrophages were detected. Localized prostatic adenocarcinoma was also found. The present case of xanthogranulomatous cystitis is the 23rd to be reported in the world literature.

  14. Multilayer transducer for acoustic bladder volume assessment on the basis of nonlinear wave propagation.

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    Merks, Egon J W; van Neer, Paul; Bom, Nicolaas; van der Steen, Antonius F W; de Jong, Nico

    2009-10-01

    Catheterization remains the gold standard for bladder volume assessment, but it is invasive, uncomfortable to the patient and introduces the risk of infections and traumas. Acoustic measurement of the bladder volume reduces the need for a urinary catheter. Recently, a new method to non-invasively measure the volume of liquid filled cavities in vivo on the basis of nonlinear wave propagation has been introduced. To implement this method, two different multilayer ultrasound transducers were developed. Both transducers consisted of a first piezo-electric layer of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) to transmit waves at a fundamental frequency (2 MHz) and a second piezo-electric layer (copolymer) to receive a wide range of frequencies including harmonics. To suppress the inherent susceptibility of the film to electromagnetic waves, one of the two transducers, i.e., an "inverted" multilayer transducer, had the copolymer layer located inside the structure. The other multilayer transducer, i.e., a "normal" multilayer transducer, had the copolymer film located on the outside. Both transducers were compared with a commercially available broadband piezo-composite transducer, with respect to their transmit and receive transfer functions, their pulse-echo responses and their electromagnetic susceptibility (EMS) in reception. It was concluded that to measure up to at least the third harmonic frequency component with good sensitivity in combination with high transmit sensitivity at the fundamental frequency, a multilayer structure is preferred. To optimize for the EMS in reception, and hence also the signal-to-noise ratio, an inverted geometry, as proposed in this paper, was proven to be most effective.

  15. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume in the prognostic evaluation of primary flat carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Jacobsen, F

    1991-01-01

    Primary, flat carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder is rare and its behaviour is unpredictable. The aim of this retrospective study was to obtain base-line data and investigate the prognostic value of unbiased, stereological estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume, nuclear vv, in 78...... bladder biopsies from 22 patients with primary flat carcinoma in situ (Bergkvist grades III-IV). On average, nuclear vv was 77 microns 3 in nine biopsies with morphologically normal urothelium, 292 microns 3 in 56 isolated primary lesions and 266 microns 3 in lesions of luminal urothelium in 13 biopsies......, quantitative information, but their prognostic value in patients with primary flat carcinoma in situ of the bladder needs further clarification in larger data bases....

  16. Bladder cancer incidence among workers exposed to o-toluidine, aniline and nitrobenzene at a rubber chemical manufacturing plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreón, Tania; Hein, Misty J; Hanley, Kevin W; Viet, Susan M; Ruder, Avima M

    2015-01-01

    Background An earlier investigation found increased bladder cancer incidence among workers at a rubber chemical manufacturing plant that used o-toluidine, aniline and nitrobenzene. The cohort was expanded to include additional workers (n=1875) and updated through 2007 to assess bladder cancer with improved exposure characterisation. Methods Work histories were updated and exposure categories and ranks were developed for o-toluidine, aniline and nitrobenzene combined. Incident cancers were identified by linkage to six state cancer registries. Residency in time-dependent cancer registry catchment areas was determined. SIR and standardised rate ratios for bladder cancer were calculated by exposure category and cumulative rank quartiles for different lag periods. Cox regression was used to model bladder cancer incidence with estimated cumulative rank, adjusting for confounders. Indirect methods were used to control for smoking. Results Excess bladder cancer was observed compared to the New York State population (SIR=2.87, 95% CI 2.02 to 3.96), with higher elevations among workers definitely exposed (moderate/high) (SIR=3.90, 95% CI 2.57 to 5.68), and in the highest cumulative rank quartile (SIR=6.13, 95% CI 2.80 to 11.6, 10-year lag). Bladder cancer rates increased significantly with estimated cumulative rank (10-year lag). Smoking only accounted for an estimated 8% elevation in bladder cancer incidence. Conclusions Bladder cancer incidence remains elevated in this cohort and significantly associated with estimated cumulative exposure. Results are consistent with earlier findings in this and other cohorts. Despite other concurrent chemical exposures, we consider o-toluidine most likely responsible for the bladder cancer incidence elevation and recommend a re-examination of occupational exposure limits. PMID:24368697

  17. Clinical impact of bladder biopsies with TUR-BT according to cytology results in patients with bladder cancer: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto Kazuhiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There seems to be no consensus concerning taking bladder biopsies during transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT. We investigate the clinical significance of bladder biopsy with TUR-BT and the relationship between urinary cytology and the biopsy results. Methods We reviewed a total of 424 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer treated with TUR-BT between 1998 and 2005. Of the total, 293 patients also underwent a bladder biopsy. Biopsies from suspicious-appearing urothelium (N = 59 and those from normal-appearing urothelium (N = 234 were evaluated separately. Results Bladder cancer was observed in 23 cases (39.0% who underwent a biopsy of suspicious-appearing urothelium. Among these 23 cases, 9 cases with visible tumor resection had carcinoma in situ (CIS only in the biopsies from suspicious-appearing urothelium. Urinary cytology was negative in 3 of the 9 cases. Bladder cancer was observed in 26 cases (11.1% who underwent a biopsy of normal-appearing urothelium. Of them, 5 cases with visible tumors had CIS only in the multiple biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium. Urinary cytology was positive in all of the 5 cases. No upstaging or upgrading cases were found in these patients by the addition of these two types of biopsy. Furthermore, therapy was not altered in these patients. With or without bladder biopsy was not a significant factor for tumor recurrence in either the univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusions Based on the results, it is concluded the multiple biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium are not necessary in patients with negative cytology results because of the low detection rate and lack of influence on therapeutic decisions. Meanwhile, biopsy of suspicious-appearing urothelium is needed in patients with negative cytology results in order to detect CIS due to staging properties. This result supports a recent EAU guideline.

  18. Rare type of bladder cancer: Malign fibrous histiocytoma

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    Orcun Celik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Malignant fibrous histocytoma (MFH is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in adults. Urinary tract is a very rare location for MFH. Involvement of the bladder is more common in males and at the 6th decade of life. A case of MFH of the bladder with poor prognosis is presented. Prognostic factors for MFH are tumor grade, amount of invasion, age, tumor size, and histological type. Survival rate is very low and 3-year disease specific survival is approximately 40%.

  19. TPX2-p53-GLIPR1 regulatory circuitry in cell proliferation, invasion, and tumor growth of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Li, Qi; Yang, Juan; Qiao, Baoping

    2017-08-11

    The targeting protein for Xenopus kinesin-like protein 2 (TPX2) is associated with the metastasis and prognosis of bladder cancer. p53 is closely related to the progression of bladder cancer. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a p53 target gene with antitumor activity. This study aims to explore the interplay between TPX2, p53, and GLIPR1 and its correlation with cell proliferation, invasion, and tumor growth in bladder cancer. Here, Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that TPX2 at both mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated in bladder carcinoma tissues compared to their paired adjacent normal tissues. Additionally, tissues expressing high TPX2 level exhibited high p53 level and low GLIPR1 level. The expressions of TPX2 and p53 in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells (KK47 and RT4) were lower than those in muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells (T24, 5637, and UM-UC-3), while GLIPR1 showed the converse expression pattern. Further investigation revealed that TPX2 activated the synthesis of p53; and GLIPR1 is up-regulated by wild-type (wt)-p53 but not affected by mutated p53; Additionally, GLIPR1 inhibited TPX2. These data suggested a TPX2-p53-GLIPR1 regulatory circuitry. Meanwhile, TPX2 overexpression promoted while overexpression of GLIPR1 or p53 inhibited bladder cancer growth. Interestingly, in T24 cells with mutated p53, p53 silence suppressed bladder cancer growth. This study identified a novel TPX2-p53-GLIPR1 regulatory circuitry which modulated cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity of bladder cancer. Our findings provide new insight into underlying mechanisms of tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic options in bladder cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat (PXD101 suppresses bladder cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

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    Liebes Leonard

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment options for patients with recurrent superficial bladder cancer are limited, necessitating aggressive exploration of new treatment strategies that effectively prevent recurrence and progression to invasive disease. We assessed the effects of belinostat (previously PXD101, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, on a panel of human bladder cancer cell lines representing superficial and invasive disease, and on a transgenic mouse model of superficial bladder cancer. Methods Growth inhibition and cell cycle distribution effect of belinostat on 5637, T24, J82, and RT4 urothelial lines were assessed. Ha-ras transgenic mice with established superficial bladder cancer were randomized to receive either belinostat or vehicle alone, and assessed for bladder weight, hematuria, gene expression profiling, and immunohistochemistry (IHC. Results Belinostat had a significant linear dose-dependent growth inhibition on all cell lines (IC50 range of 1.0–10.0 μM. The 5637 cell line, which was derived from a superficial papillary tumor, was the most sensitive to treatment. Belinostat (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, 5 days each week for 3 weeks treated mice had less bladder weight (p WAF1 in the belinostat-treated mice. Gene expression profile analysis revealed 56 genes significantly different in the treated group; these included the upregulation of p21WAF1, induction of core histone deacetylase (HDAC, and cell communication genes. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that belinostat inhibits bladder cancer and supports the clinical evaluation of belinostat for the treatment of patients with superficial bladder cancer.

  1. Urine cell-free DNA integrity as a marker for early bladder cancer diagnosis: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Valentina; Calistri, Daniele; Tebaldi, Michela; Bravaccini, Sara; Gunelli, Roberta; Martorana, Giuseppe; Bertaccini, Alessandro; Serra, Luigi; Scarpi, Emanuela; Amadori, Dino; Silvestrini, Rosella; Zoli, Wainer

    2013-11-01

    Urine cell-free (UCF) DNA has recently been proposed as a potential marker for early bladder cancer diagnosis. It is known that normal apoptotic cells produce highly fragmented DNA while cancer cells release longer DNA. Therefore, we verified the potential role of UCF DNA integrity in early bladder cancer diagnosis. UCF DNA was isolated from 51 bladder cancer patients, 46 symptomatic patients, and 32 healthy volunteers. To verify UCF DNA integrity, sequences longer than 250 bp, c-Myc, BCAS1, and HER2, were quantified by real time PCR. At the best cutoff value of 0.1 ng/μl, UCF DNA integrity analysis showed a sensitivity of 0.73 (95% CI 0.61-0.85), and a specificity of 0.84 (95% CI 0.71-0.97) in healthy individuals and 0.83 (95% CI 0.72-0.94) in symptomatic patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.834 (95% CI 0.739-0.930) for healthy individuals and 0.796 (95% CI 0.707-0.885) for symptomatic patients. These preliminary data suggest that UCF DNA integrity is a potentially good marker for early noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer. Its diagnostic performance does not seem to vary significantly, even in an "at risk" population of symptomatic individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nano-BCG: A Promising Delivery System for Treatment of Human Bladder Cancer

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    Julieti Huch Buss

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG remains at the forefront of immunotherapy for treating bladder cancer patients. However, the incidence of recurrence and progression to invasive cancer is commonly observed. There are no established effective intravesical therapies available for patients, whose tumors recur following BCG treatment, representing an important unmet clinical need. In addition, there are very limited options for patients who do not respond to or tolerate chemotherapy due to toxicities, resulting in poor overall treatment outcomes. Within this context, nanotechnology is an emergent and promising tool for: (1 controlling drug release for extended time frames, (2 combination therapies due to the ability to encapsulate multiple drugs simultaneously, (3 reducing systemic side effects, (4 increasing bioavailability, (5 and increasing the viability of various