WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer biomarker consensus

  1. On consensus biomarker selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambin Anna

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent development of mass spectrometry technology enabled the analysis of complex peptide mixtures. A lot of effort is currently devoted to the identification of biomarkers in human body fluids like serum or plasma, based on which new diagnostic tests for different diseases could be constructed. Various biomarker selection procedures have been exploited in recent studies. It has been noted that they often lead to different biomarker lists and as a consequence, the patient classification may also vary. Results Here we propose a new approach to the biomarker selection problem: to apply several competing feature ranking procedures and compute a consensus list of features based on their outcomes. We validate our methods on two proteomic datasets for the diagnosis of ovarian and prostate cancer. Conclusion The proposed methodology can improve the classification results and at the same time provide a unified biomarker list for further biological examinations and interpretation.

  2. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Cancer Biomarker: Consensus and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar R. Padhani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available On May 3, 2008, a National Cancer Institute (NCI-sponsored open consensus conference was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, during the 2008 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Meeting. Approximately 100 experts and stakeholders summarized the current understanding of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI and reached consensus on the use of DW-MRI as a cancer imaging biomarker. DW-MRI should be tested as an imaging biomarker in the context of well-defined clinical trials, by adding DW-MRI to existing NCI-sponsored trials, particularly those with tissue sampling or survival indicators. Where possible, DW-MRI measurements should be compared with histologic indices including cellularity and tissue response. There is a need for tissue equivalent diffusivity phantoms; meanwhile, simple fluid-filled phantoms should be used. Monoexponential assessments of apparent diffusion coefficient values should use two b values (> 100 and between 500 and 1000 mm2/sec depending on the application. Free breathing with multiple acquisitions is superior to complex gating techniques. Baseline patient reproducibility studies should be part of study designs. Both region of interest and histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient measurements should be obtained. Standards for measurement, analysis, and display are needed. Annotated data from validation studies (along with outcome measures should be made publicly available. Magnetic resonance imaging vendors should be engaged in this process. The NCI should establish a task force of experts (physicists, radiologists, and oncologists to plan, organize technical aspects, and conduct pilot trials. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network infrastructure may be suitable for these purposes. There is an extraordinary opportunity for DW-MRI to evolve into a clinically valuable imaging tool, potentially important for drug development.

  3. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  4. Identification of consensus biomarkers for predicting non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan-Han; Tung, Chun-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGHCs) is currently relying on two-year rodent bioassays. Toxicogenomics biomarkers provide a potential alternative method for the prioritization of NGHCs that could be useful for risk assessment. However, previous studies using inconsistently classified chemicals as the training set and a single microarray dataset concluded no consensus biomarkers. In this study, 4 consensus biomarkers of A2m, Ca3, Cxcl1, and Cyp8b1 were identified from four large-scale microarray datasets of the one-day single maximum tolerated dose and a large set of chemicals without inconsistent classifications. Machine learning techniques were subsequently applied to develop prediction models for NGHCs. The final bagging decision tree models were constructed with an average AUC performance of 0.803 for an independent test. A set of 16 chemicals with controversial classifications were reclassified according to the consensus biomarkers. The developed prediction models and identified consensus biomarkers are expected to be potential alternative methods for prioritization of NGHCs for further experimental validation.

  5. Validation of New Cancer Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, Michael J; Sturgeon, Catherine M; Söletormos, Georg;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers are playing increasingly important roles in the detection and management of patients with cancer. Despite an enormous number of publications on cancer biomarkers, few of these biomarkers are in widespread clinical use. CONTENT: In this review, we discuss the key steps...... in advancing a newly discovered cancer candidate biomarker from pilot studies to clinical application. Four main steps are necessary for a biomarker to reach the clinic: analytical validation of the biomarker assay, clinical validation of the biomarker test, demonstration of clinical value from performance...... of the biomarker test, and regulatory approval. In addition to these 4 steps, all biomarker studies should be reported in a detailed and transparent manner, using previously published checklists and guidelines. Finally, all biomarker studies relating to demonstration of clinical value should be registered before...

  6. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudit Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person’s genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed.

  7. Cancer Biomarkers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    [[{"fid":"175","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Cancer Biomarkers Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400","style":"width: 400px; height: 266px;","class":"i | Research to identify, develop and validate biomarkers for early cancer detection and risk assessment.

  8. Rectal cancer radiotherapy: Towards European consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Vincenzo (Cattedra di Radioterapia, Univ. Cattolica S.Cuore, Rome (Italy)), E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Glimelius, Bengt (Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Background and purpose. During the first decade of the 21st century several important European randomized studies in rectal cancer have been published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized. This article summarizes the consensus about imaging and radiotherapy of rectal cancer and gives an update until May 2010. Methods. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each committee member commented and voted, sentence by sentence three times. Sentences which did not reach agreement after voting round no 2 were openly debated during the Conference in Perugia (Italy) December 2008. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', 'minimum consensus'. Results. The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only three (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Considerable progress has been made in staging and treatment, including radiation treatment of rectal cancer. Conclusions. This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe. In spite of substantial progress, many research challenges remain

  9. Epigenetic biomarkers in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaudha, Krishna K; Verma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma or HCC) is a major cancer worldwide. Research in this field is needed to identify biomarkers that can be used for early detection of the disease as well as new approaches to its treatment. Epigenetic biomarkers provide an opportunity to understand liver cancer etiology and evaluate novel epigenetic inhibitors for treatment. Traditionally, liver cirrhosis, proteomic biomarkers, and the presence of hepatitis viruses have been used for the detection and diagnosis of liver cancer. Promising results from microRNA (miRNA) profiling and hypermethylation of selected genes have raised hopes of identifying new biomarkers. Some of these epigenetic biomarkers may be useful in risk assessment and for screening populations to identify who is likely to develop cancer. Challenges and opportunities in the field are discussed in this chapter.

  10. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Mudit Verma; Mukesh Verma; Payal Patel

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high ris...

  11. Imaging biomarker roadmap for cancer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, James P. B.; Aboagye, Eric O.; Adams, Judith E.; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.; Barrington, Sally F.; Beer, Ambros J.; Boellaard, Ronald; Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Brady, Michael; Brown, Gina; Buckley, David L.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Clarke, Laurence P.; Collette, Sandra; Cook, Gary J.; deSouza, Nandita M.; Dickson, John C.; Dive, Caroline; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L.; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gallagher, Ferdia A.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Gillies, Robert J.; Goh, Vicky; Griffiths, John R.; Groves, Ashley M.; Halligan, Steve; Harris, Adrian L.; Hawkes, David J.; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Huang, Erich P.; Hutton, Brian F.; Jackson, Edward F.; Jayson, Gordon C.; Jones, Andrew; Koh, Dow-Mu; Lacombe, Denis; Lambin, Philippe; Lassau, Nathalie; Leach, Martin O.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Leen, Edward L.; Lewis, Jason S.; Liu, Yan; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Manoharan, Prakash; Maxwell, Ross J.; Miles, Kenneth A.; Morgan, Bruno; Morris, Steve; Ng, Tony; Padhani, Anwar R.; Parker, Geoff J. M.; Partridge, Mike; Pathak, Arvind P.; Peet, Andrew C.; Punwani, Shonit; Reynolds, Andrew R.; Robinson, Simon P.; Shankar, Lalitha K.; Sharma, Ricky A.; Soloviev, Dmitry; Stroobants, Sigrid; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Taylor, Stuart A.; Tofts, Paul S.; Tozer, Gillian M.; van Herk, Marcel; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Wason, James; Williams, Kaye J.; Workman, Paul; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Brindle, Kevin M.; McShane, Lisa M.; Jackson, Alan; Waterton, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Imaging biomarkers (IBs) are integral to the routine management of patients with cancer. IBs used daily in oncology include clinical TNM stage, objective response and left ventricular ejection fraction. Other CT, MRI, PET and ultrasonography biomarkers are used extensively in cancer research and drug development. New IBs need to be established either as useful tools for testing research hypotheses in clinical trials and research studies, or as clinical decision-making tools for use in healthcare, by crossing ‘translational gaps’ through validation and qualification. Important differences exist between IBs and biospecimen-derived biomarkers and, therefore, the development of IBs requires a tailored ‘roadmap’. Recognizing this need, Cancer Research UK (CRUK) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) assembled experts to review, debate and summarize the challenges of IB validation and qualification. This consensus group has produced 14 key recommendations for accelerating the clinical translation of IBs, which highlight the role of parallel (rather than sequential) tracks of technical (assay) validation, biological/clinical validation and assessment of cost-effectiveness; the need for IB standardization and accreditation systems; the need to continually revisit IB precision; an alternative framework for biological/clinical validation of IBs; and the essential requirements for multicentre studies to qualify IBs for clinical use. PMID:27725679

  12. Novel technologies and emerging biomarkers for personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianda; Hegde, Priti S; Clynes, Raphael; Foukas, Periklis G; Harari, Alexandre; Kleen, Thomas O; Kvistborg, Pia; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T; Page, David B; Robins, Harlan; Song, Wenru; Stack, Edward C; Wang, Ena; Whiteside, Theresa L; Zhao, Yingdong; Zwierzina, Heinz; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fox, Bernard A

    2016-01-01

    The culmination of over a century's work to understand the role of the immune system in tumor control has led to the recent advances in cancer immunotherapies that have resulted in durable clinical responses in patients with a variety of malignancies. Cancer immunotherapies are rapidly changing traditional treatment paradigms and expanding the therapeutic landscape for cancer patients. However, despite the current success of these therapies, not all patients respond to immunotherapy and even those that do often experience toxicities. Thus, there is a growing need to identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers that enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions between the immune system and cancer. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) reconvened an Immune Biomarkers Task Force to review state of the art technologies, identify current hurdlers, and make recommendations for the field. As a product of this task force, Working Group 2 (WG2), consisting of international experts from academia and industry, assembled to identify and discuss promising technologies for biomarker discovery and validation. Thus, this WG2 consensus paper will focus on the current status of emerging biomarkers for immune checkpoint blockade therapy and discuss novel technologies as well as high dimensional data analysis platforms that will be pivotal for future biomarker research. In addition, this paper will include a brief overview of the current challenges with recommendations for future biomarker discovery.

  13. Galectins as Cancer Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Vitaly; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Raz, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Galectins are a group of proteins that bind β-galactosides through evolutionarily conserved sequence elements of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Proteins similar to galectins can be found in very primitive animals such as sponges. Each galectin has an individual carbohydrate binding preference and can be found in cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. They also can be secreted through non-classical pathways and function extra-cellularly. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate a correlation between galectin expression and tumor progression and metastasis, and therefore, galectins have the potential to serve as reliable tumor markers. In this review, we describe the expression and role of galectins in different cancers and their clinical applications for diagnostic use. PMID:23658855

  14. Galectins as Cancer Biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balan, Vitaly; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Raz, Avraham, E-mail: raza@karmanos.org [Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, 110 E. Warren Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2010-04-20

    Galectins are a group of proteins that bind β-galactosides through evolutionarily conserved sequence elements of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Proteins similar to galectins can be found in very primitive animals such as sponges. Each galectin has an individual carbohydrate binding preference and can be found in cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. They also can be secreted through non-classical pathways and function extra-cellularly. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate a correlation between galectin expression and tumor progression and metastasis, and therefore, galectins have the potential to serve as reliable tumor markers. In this review, we describe the expression and role of galectins in different cancers and their clinical applications for diagnostic use.

  15. Galectins as Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Balan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Galectins are a group of proteins that bind β-galactosides through evolutionarily conserved sequence elements of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD. Proteins similar to galectins can be found in very primitive animals such as sponges. Each galectin has an individual carbohydrate binding preference and can be found in cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. They also can be secreted through non-classical pathways and function extra-cellularly. Experimental and clinical data demonstrate a correlation between galectin expression and tumor progression and metastasis, and therefore, galectins have the potential to serve as reliable tumor markers. In this review, we describe the expression and role of galectins in different cancers and their clinical applications for diagnostic use.

  16. Lack of consensus in biomarker measurement to diagnose PCI-related myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Dakhiel, Zaid; Rune Larsen, Søren; Svenstrup Poulsen, Tina

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate if biomarker sampling in PCI has adhered to the 2 000 consensus document for the diagnosis of procedure-related myocardial infarction (MI). Design. Firstly, a review of relevant papers from 2000 to September 2007 was done. Secondly, in October 2007, a questionnaire addressing...

  17. Quantitative imaging as cancer biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankoff, David A.

    2015-03-01

    The ability to assay tumor biologic features and the impact of drugs on tumor biology is fundamental to drug development. Advances in our ability to measure genomics, gene expression, protein expression, and cellular biology have led to a host of new targets for anticancer drug therapy. In translating new drugs into clinical trials and clinical practice, these same assays serve to identify patients most likely to benefit from specific anticancer treatments. As cancer therapy becomes more individualized and targeted, there is an increasing need to characterize tumors and identify therapeutic targets to select therapy most likely to be successful in treating the individual patient's cancer. Thus far assays to identify cancer therapeutic targets or anticancer drug pharmacodynamics have been based upon in vitro assay of tissue or blood samples. Advances in molecular imaging, particularly PET, have led to the ability to perform quantitative non-invasive molecular assays. Imaging has traditionally relied on structural and anatomic features to detect cancer and determine its extent. More recently, imaging has expanded to include the ability to image regional biochemistry and molecular biology, often termed molecular imaging. Molecular imaging can be considered an in vivo assay technique, capable of measuring regional tumor biology without perturbing it. This makes molecular imaging a unique tool for cancer drug development, complementary to traditional assay methods, and a potentially powerful method for guiding targeted therapy in clinical trials and clinical practice. The ability to quantify, in absolute measures, regional in vivo biologic parameters strongly supports the use of molecular imaging as a tool to guide therapy. This review summarizes current and future applications of quantitative molecular imaging as a biomarker for cancer therapy, including the use of imaging to (1) identify patients whose tumors express a specific therapeutic target; (2) determine

  18. Diagnostic and prognostic epigenetic biomarkers in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Pinheiro, Pedro; Montezuma, Diana; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Growing cancer incidence and mortality worldwide demands development of accurate biomarkers to perfect detection, diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring. Urologic (prostate, bladder, kidney), lung, breast and colorectal cancers are the most common and despite major advances in their characterization, this has seldom translated into biomarkers amenable for clinical practice. Epigenetic alterations are innovative cancer biomarkers owing to stability, frequency, reversibility and accessibility in body fluids, entailing great potential of assay development to assist in patient management. Several studies identified putative epigenetic cancer biomarkers, some of which have been commercialized. However, large multicenter validation studies are required to foster translation to the clinics. Herein we review the most promising epigenetic detection, diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for the most common cancers.

  19. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikezie O. Madu, Yi Lu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form.A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues.Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of

  20. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Yi

    2010-10-06

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form.A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues.Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  1. Cellular Proteases as Cancer Biomarkers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Röthlisberger

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades a variety of biomolecules have been proposed as diagnostic biomarkers and predictors of severity for transmissible and nontransmissible diseases. Studies in a range of cancers have revealed many biomarkers with great potential in cancer diagnosis, in establishing tumor stage, progression, and response to therapies; such as the Kallikrein and Metalloproteinase families. Traditionally blood (serum and tissue have been the main biological sources of biomarker discovery, but in the past decade urine has emerged as a promising source of cancer biomarkers. In this review we will focus on two large families, the Kallikrein family of serine proteases discovered in serum, and the Metalloproteinase family of zinc proteases discovered in urine, as potential cancer biomarkers.

  2. Cancer and molecular biomarkers of phase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, Kim; Enghusen Poulsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    as molecular genetic biomarkers of risk. GSTM(my)1 has been associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and bladder cancer and GSTP(pi)1 with prostate cancer. UGT1A1*28 and *37 are both associated with an increased risk of breast cancer as is SULT1A1*2. The presence of UGT1A1...

  3. A Delphic consensus assessment: imaging and biomarkers in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor disease management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Oberg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the clinical management of neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN is exacerbated by limitations in imaging modalities and a paucity of clinically useful biomarkers. Limitations in currently available imaging modalities reflect difficulties in measuring an intrinsically indolent disease, resolution inadequacies and inter-/intra-facility device variability and that RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria are not optimal for NEN. Limitations of currently used biomarkers are that they are secretory biomarkers (chromogranin A, serotonin, neuron-specific enolase and pancreastatin; monoanalyte measurements; and lack sensitivity, specificity and predictive capacity. None of them meet the NIH metrics for clinical usage. A multinational, multidisciplinary Delphi consensus meeting of NEN experts (n = 33 assessed current imaging strategies and biomarkers in NEN management. Consensus (>75% was achieved for 78% of the 142 questions. The panel concluded that morphological imaging has a diagnostic value. However, both imaging and current single-analyte biomarkers exhibit substantial limitations in measuring the disease status and predicting the therapeutic efficacy. RECIST remains suboptimal as a metric. A critical unmet need is the development of a clinico-biological tool to provide enhanced information regarding precise disease status and treatment response. The group considered that circulating RNA was better than current general NEN biomarkers and preliminary clinical data were considered promising. It was resolved that circulating multianalyte mRNA (NETest had clinical utility in both diagnosis and monitoring disease status and therapeutic efficacy. Overall, it was concluded that a combination of tumor spatial and functional imaging with circulating transcripts (mRNA would represent the future strategy for real-time monitoring of disease progress and therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Lung cancer biomarkers in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Corradi, Massimo; Mazzone, Peter; Mutti, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Methods for early detection of lung cancer, such as computerized tomography scanning technology, often discover a large number of small lung nodules, posing a new problem to radiologists and chest physicians. The vast majority of these nodules will be benign, but there is currently no easy way to determine which nodules represent very early lung cancer. Adjuvant testing with PET imaging and nonsurgical biopsies has a low yield for these small indeterminate nodules, carries potential morbidity and is costly. Indeed, purely morphological criteria seem to be insufficient for distinguishing lung cancer from benign nodules at early stages with sufficient confidence, therefore false positives undergoing surgical resection frequently occur. A molecular approach to the diagnosis of lung cancer through the analysis of exhaled breath could greatly improve the specificity of imaging procedures. A biomarker-driven approach to signs or symptoms possibly due to lung cancer would represent a complementary tool aimed at ruling out (with known error probability) rather than diagnosing lung cancer. Volatile and nonvolatile components of the breath are being studied as biomarkers of lung cancer. Breath testing is noninvasive and potentially inexpensive. There is promise that an accurate lung cancer breath biomarker, capable of being applied clinically, will be developed in the near future. In this article, we summarize some of the rationale for breath biomarker development, review the published literature in this field and provide thoughts regarding future directions.

  5. Consensus Guidelines for CSF and Blood Biobanking for CNS Biomarker Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Teunissen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are being used in clinical practice. Anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies in serum are currently useful for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, but we could expect novel CSF biomarkers that help define prognosis and response to treatment for this disease. One of the most critical factors in biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies performed by single centers. Collaboration between investigators is needed to establish large biobanks of well-defined samples. A key issue in collaboration is to establish standardized protocols for biobanking to ensure that the statistical power gained by increasing the numbers of CSF samples is not compromised by pre-analytical factors. Here, consensus guidelines for CSF collection and biobanking are presented, based on the guidelines that have been published by the BioMS-eu network for CSF biomarker research. We focussed on CSF collection procedures, pre-analytical factors and high quality clinical and paraclinical information. Importantly, the biobanking protocols are applicable for CSF biobanks for research targeting any neurological disease.

  6. DNA Methylation Biomarkers: Cancer and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mikeska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are naturally-occurring characteristics by which a particular pathological process or disease can be identified or monitored. They can reflect past environmental exposures, predict disease onset or course, or determine a patient’s response to therapy. Epigenetic changes are such characteristics, with most epigenetic biomarkers discovered to date based on the epigenetic mark of DNA methylation. Many tissue types are suitable for the discovery of DNA methylation biomarkers including cell-based samples such as blood and tumor material and cell-free DNA samples such as plasma. DNA methylation biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic and predictive power are already in clinical trials or in a clinical setting for cancer. Outside cancer, strong evidence that complex disease originates in early life is opening up exciting new avenues for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers for adverse early life environment and for estimation of future disease risk. However, there are a number of limitations to overcome before such biomarkers reach the clinic. Nevertheless, DNA methylation biomarkers have great potential to contribute to personalized medicine throughout life. We review the current state of play for DNA methylation biomarkers, discuss the barriers that must be crossed on the way to implementation in a clinical setting, and predict their future use for human disease.

  7. Proteome-based biomarkers in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Sun; Ann H Rosendahl; Daniel Ansari; Roland Andersson

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, as a highly malignant cancer and the fourth cause of cancer-related death in world, is characterized by dismal prognosis, due to rapid disease progression, highly invasive tumour phenotype, and resistance to chemotherapy. Despite significant advances in treatment of the disease during the past decade,the survival rate is little improved. A contributory factor to the poor outcome is the lack of appropriate sensitive and specific biomarkers for early diagnosis. Furthermore, biomarkers for targeting, directing and assessing therapeutic intervention, as well as for detection of residual or recurrent cancer are also needed. Thus, the identification of adequate biomarkers in pancreatic cancer is of extreme importance. Recently, accompanying the development of proteomic technology and devices, more and more potential biomarkers have appeared and are being reported. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of proteome-based biomarkers in pancreatic cancer, including tissue, serum, juice, urine and cell lines. We also discuss the possible mechanism and prospects in the future. That information hopefully might be helpful for further research in the field.

  8. DETECTION OF CANCER BIOMARKERS WITH NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer biomarkers with high precision is critically important for cancer therapy. A variety of sensors based on different nanostructured materials have attracted intensive research interest due to their potential for highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer biomarkers. This review covers the use of a variety of nanostructured materials, including carbon nanotubes, silicon nanowires, gold nanoparticles and quantum dots, in the fabrication of sensors. Emphases are placed on how the detection systems work and what detection limits can be achieved. Some assays described in this review outperform established methods for cancer biomarker detection. It is highly promising that these sensors would soon move into commercial-scale production and find routine use in hospitals.

  9. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene methylation need to be standardised, simplified and evaluated in external quality assurance programmes. It is concluded that methylated genes have the potential to provide a new generation of cancer biomarkers.

  10. [Consensus for the prevention of cervical cancer in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kably Ambe, Alberto; Ruiz Moreno, José Antonio; Ponce, Eduardo Lazcano; Vargas Hernández, Victor Manuel; Aguado Pérez, Rogelio A; Alonso de Ruiz, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    Cervical cancer remains a serious public health problem in the world; that is why the Mexican Federation of Schools of Obstetrics and Gynecology convened the elaboration of a consensus that is devoted this number of Ginecologia y Obstetricia de Mexico. In recent years has strengthened perceptions (public and private) in the need for preventive strategies in the medium and long terms. The development of effective vaccines against the human papilloma virus and the application of new methods of detection from viral DNA (completely automated for personal application) allow some degree of optimism. It is proposed a consensus with general recommendations in two consecutive stages: (a) primary prevention consisting of education for the prevention of cervical cancer and universal immunization and (b) secondary prevention by early detection of infections or injuries that could favor carcinogenesis. The consensus reviewed characteristics of available vaccines in detail and proposes strategies for implementation in Mexican population. Also, check out main methods of early detection of infection (or predisposing lesions) and suggests public and private strategies for implementation. Consensus places particular emphasis on early immunization for female population and correct use of methods for detection of infections or injuries that might cause cervical cancer.

  11. Using Aptamers for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Min Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded synthetic DNA- or RNA-based oligonucleotides that fold into various shapes to bind to a specific target, which includes proteins, metals, and molecules. Aptamers have high affinity and high specificity that are comparable to that of antibodies. They are obtained using iterative method, called (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment SELEX and cell-based SELEX (cell-SELEX. Aptamers can be paired with recent advances in nanotechnology, microarray, microfluidics, and other technologies for applications in clinical medicine. One particular area that aptamers can shed a light on is biomarker discovery. Biomarkers are important in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In this paper, we will describe ways in which aptamers can be used to discover biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  12. Current early diagnostic biomarkers of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Qu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa has become to have the highest incidence and the second mortality rate in western countries, affecting men's health to a large extent. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA was discovered to help diagnose the cancer in an early stage for decades, its specificity is relative low, resulting in unnecessary biopsy for healthy people and over-treatment for patients. Thus, it is imperative to identify more and more effective biomarkers for early diagnosis of PCa in order to distinguish patients from healthy populations, which helps guide an early treatment to lower disease-related mortality by noninvasive or minimal invasive approaches. This review generally describes the current early diagnostic biomarkers of PCa in addition to PSA and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of these biomarkers.

  13. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic;

    2015-01-01

    panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent......The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary...

  14. Biomarkers for Basal-like Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Choo, Jennifer R.; Torsten O. Nielsen

    2010-01-01

    Initially recognized through microarray-based gene expression profiling, basal-like breast cancer, for which we lack effective targeted therapies, is an aggressive form of carcinoma with a predilection for younger women. With some success, immunohistochemical studies have attempted to reproduce the expression profile classification of breast cancer through identification of subtype-specific biomarkers. This review aims to present an in depth summary and analysis of the current status of basal...

  15. Lung cancer biomarkers: State of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha Subramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, with the highest incidence and mortality amongst all cancers. While the prognosis of lung cancer is generally grim, with 5-year survival rates of only 15%, there is hope, and evidence, that early detection of lung cancer can reduce mortality. Today, only computed tomography screening has shown to lead to early detection and reduction in mortality, but is limited by being anatomic in nature, unable to differentiate between inflammatory and neoplastic pathways, and therefore, susceptible to false positives. There is increasing interest in biomarkers for lung cancer, especially those that predict metastatic risk. Some biomarkers like DNA mutations and epigenetic changes potentially require tissue from the at-risk site; some like serum proteins and miRNAs are minimally invasive, but may not be specific to the lung. In comparison, emerging biomarkers from exhaled breath, like volatile organic compounds (VOC, and exhaled breath condensate, e.g., small molecules and nucleic acids, have the potential to combine the best of both. This mini review is intended to provide an overview of the field, briefly discussing the potential of what is known and highlighting the exciting recent developments, particularly with miRNAs and VOCs.

  16. Current Status of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki M. Velonas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of cancer-related death of men globally. Since its introduction, there has been intense debate as to the effectiveness of the prostate specific antigen (PSA test as a screening tool for PCa. It is now evident that the PSA test produces unacceptably high rates of false positive results and is not prognostic. Here we review the current status of molecular biomarkers that promise to be prognostic and that might inform individual patient management. It highlights current efforts to identify biomarkers obtained by minimally invasive methods and discusses current knowledge with regard to gene fusions, mRNA and microRNAs, immunology, and cancer-associated microparticles.

  17. Urinary biomarkers for prostate cancer: a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daphne Hessels; Jack A Schalken

    2013-01-01

    Although the routine use of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing has undoubtedly increased prostate cancer (PCa) detection,one of its main drawbacks is its lack of specificity.As a consequence,many men undergo unnecessary biopsies or treatments for indolent tumours.PCa-specific markers are needed for the early detection of the disease and the prediction of aggressiveness of a prostate tumour.Since PCa is a heterogeneous disease,a panel of tumour markers is fundamental for a more precise diagnosis.Several biomarkers are promising due to their specificity for the disease in tissue.However,tissue is unsuitable as a possible screening tool.Since urine can be easily obtained in a non-invasive manner,it is a promising substrate for biomarker testing.This article reviews the biomarkers for the non-invasive testing of PCa in urine.

  18. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice.

  19. Current and emerging breast cancer biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer treatment has experienced several advancements in the past few decades with the discovery of specific predictive and prognostic biomarkers that make possible the application of individualized therapies. In addition to traditional prognostic factors of breast carcinoma, molecular biomarkers have played a significant role in tumor prediction and treatment. The most frequent genetic alterations of breast cancer are gained along chromosome 1q, 8q, 17q, 20q, and 11q and losses along 8p, 13q, 16q, 18q, and 11q. Interestingly, many of these chromosomal fragments harbor known proto oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2, p53, HER2-neu, cyclin D1, and cyclin E, which are briefly described in this review.

  20. Nanostructured optical microchips for cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhua; He, Yuan; Wei, Jianjun; Que, Long

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report the label-free detection of a cancer biomarker using newly developed arrayed nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) microchips. Specifically, the prostate cancer biomarker free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) has been detected with a mouse anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (mAb) as the receptor. Experiments found that the limit-of-detection of current nanostructured FPI microchip for f-PSA is about 10 pg/mL and the upper detection range for f-PSA can be dynamically changed by varying the amount of the PSA mAb immobilized on the sensing surface. The control experiments have also demonstrated that the immunoassay protocol used in the experiments shows excellent specificity and selectivity, suggesting the great potential to detect the cancer biomarkers at trace levels in complex biofluids. In addition, given its nature of low cost, simple-to-operation and batch fabrication capability, the arrayed nanostructured FPI microchip-based platform could provide an ideal technical tool for point-of-care diagnostics application and anticancer drug screen and discovery.

  1. Biomarkers and Pharmacogenetics in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunhai Xu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate identification and validation of biomarkers as well as pharmacogenetics are important in formulating patient-oriented, individualized chemotherapy or biological therapy in cancer patients. These markers can be especially valuable in pancreatic cancer, where high mortality and complex disease biology are frequently encountered. Recently, several advances have been made to further our knowledge in this specific area of pancreatic cancer. In the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting, researchers have presented several interesting results in biomarkers development: the identifications of 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that is associated with positive efficacy of gemcitabine (Abstract #4022; the introduction of circulating tumor cells as a prognostic markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Abstract #e14657; the re-affirmation of plasma cytidine deaminase (CDA as a positive predictive markers for gemcitabine efficacy, as well as the postulations that CDA*3 as a potential genotype marker to predict gemcitabine responses (Abstract #e14645; and finally the retrospective tumor tissues analysis in the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (AIO trial in an attempt for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway biomarker identifications (Abstract #4047

  2. Identification of a biomarker panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Bilbao Amaia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignancies arising in the large bowel cause the second largest number of deaths from cancer in the Western World. Despite progresses made during the last decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasias in the western countries. Methods A genomic study of human colorectal cancer has been carried out on a total of 31 tumoral samples, corresponding to different stages of the disease, and 33 non-tumoral samples. The study was carried out by hybridisation of the tumour samples against a reference pool of non-tumoral samples using Agilent Human 1A 60-mer oligo microarrays. The results obtained were validated by qRT-PCR. In the subsequent bioinformatics analysis, gene networks by means of Bayesian classifiers, variable selection and bootstrap resampling were built. The consensus among all the induced models produced a hierarchy of dependences and, thus, of variables. Results After an exhaustive process of pre-processing to ensure data quality--lost values imputation, probes quality, data smoothing and intraclass variability filtering--the final dataset comprised a total of 8, 104 probes. Next, a supervised classification approach and data analysis was carried out to obtain the most relevant genes. Two of them are directly involved in cancer progression and in particular in colorectal cancer. Finally, a supervised classifier was induced to classify new unseen samples. Conclusions We have developed a tentative model for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer based on a biomarker panel. Our results indicate that the gene profile described herein can discriminate between non-cancerous and cancerous samples with 94.45% accuracy using different supervised classifiers (AUC values in the range of 0.997 and 0.955.

  3. Definition and classification of cancer cachexia: an international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Kenneth; Strasser, Florian; Anker, Stefan D; Bosaeus, Ingvar; Bruera, Eduardo; Fainsinger, Robin L; Jatoi, Aminah; Loprinzi, Charles; MacDonald, Neil; Mantovani, Giovanni; Davis, Mellar; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Ottery, Faith; Radbruch, Lukas; Ravasco, Paula; Walsh, Declan; Wilcock, Andrew; Kaasa, Stein; Baracos, Vickie E

    2011-05-01

    To develop a framework for the definition and classification of cancer cachexia a panel of experts participated in a formal consensus process, including focus groups and two Delphi rounds. Cancer cachexia was defined as a multifactorial syndrome defined by an ongoing loss of skeletal muscle mass (with or without loss of fat mass) that cannot be fully reversed by conventional nutritional support and leads to progressive functional impairment. Its pathophysiology is characterised by a negative protein and energy balance driven by a variable combination of reduced food intake and abnormal metabolism. The agreed diagnostic criterion for cachexia was weight loss greater than 5%, or weight loss greater than 2% in individuals already showing depletion according to current bodyweight and height (body-mass index [BMI] definition and classification of cancer cachexia. After validation, this should aid clinical trial design, development of practice guidelines, and, eventually, routine clinical management.

  4. Alterations in inflammatory biomarkers and energy intake in cancer cachexia: a prospective study in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Asta; Wesseltoft-Rao, Nima; Iversen, Per Ole; Skjegstad, Grete; Holven, Kirsten B; Ulven, Stine; Hjermstad, Marianne J

    2016-06-01

    Chronic systemic inflammatory response is proposed as an underlying mechanism for development of cancer cachexia. We conducted a prospective study to examine changes in inflammatory biomarkers during the disease course and the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and cachexia in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. Twenty patients, median (range) age 67.5 (35-79) years, 5 females, were followed for median 5.5 (1-12) months. Cachexia was diagnosed according to the 2011 consensus-based classification system (weight loss >5 % past six months, BMI 2 %, or sarcopenia) and the modified Glasgow Prognostic score (mGPS) that combines CRP and albumin levels. Inflammatory biomarkers were measured by enzyme immunoassays. The patients had increased levels of most inflammatory biomarkers, albeit not all statistically significant, both at study entry and close to death, indicating ongoing inflammation. According to the consensus-based classification system, eleven (55 %) patients were classified as cachectic upon inclusion. They did not differ from non-cachectic patients with regard to inflammatory biomarkers or energy intake. According to the mGPS, seven (35 %) were defined as cachectic and had a higher IL-6 (p cachexia.

  5. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  6. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C Chadha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP. However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods: Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8, Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1 were obtained from four groups of men: (1 Controls (2 with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx (3 with clinically localized CaP and (4 with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results: TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93 and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97 were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP. The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997. The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992 and PSA (AUC = 0.963 levels. Conclusions: The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted.

  7. Identifying module biomarkers from gastric cancer by differential correlation network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoping Liu,1–3,* Xiao Chang1,3,* 1College of Statistics and Applied Mathematics, Anhui University of Finance and Economics, Bengbu, Anhui Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Collaborative Research Center for Innovative Mathematical Modeling, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gastric cancer (stomach cancer is a severe disease caused by dysregulation of many functionally correlated genes or pathways instead of the mutation of individual genes. Systematic identification of gastric cancer biomarkers can provide insights into the mechanisms underlying this deadly disease and help in the development of new drugs. In this paper, we present a novel network-based approach to predict module biomarkers of gastric cancer that can effectively distinguish the disease from normal samples. Specifically, by assuming that gastric cancer has mainly resulted from dysfunction of biomolecular networks rather than individual genes in an organism, the genes in the module biomarkers are potentially related to gastric cancer. Finally, we identified a module biomarker with 27 genes, and by comparing the module biomarker with known gastric cancer biomarkers, we found that our module biomarker exhibited a greater ability to diagnose the samples with gastric cancer. Keywords: biomarkers, gastric cancer, stomach cancer, differential network

  8. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. de; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Ares, L.P.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the Amst

  9. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  10. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  11. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A...

  12. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  13. Sparse discriminant analysis for breast cancer biomarker identification and classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shi; Daoqing Dai; Chaochun Liu; Hong Yan

    2009-01-01

    Biomarker identification and cancer classification are two important procedures in microarray data analysis. We propose a novel uni-fied method to carry out both tasks. We first preselect biomarker candidates by eliminating unrelated genes through the BSS/WSS ratio filter to reduce computational cost, and then use a sparse discriminant analysis method for simultaneous biomarker identification and cancer classification. Moreover, we give a mathematical justification about automatic biomarker identification. Experimental results show that the proposed method can identify key genes that have been verified in biochemical or biomedical research and classify the breast cancer type correctly.

  14. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Nils; Duffy, M.J; Napieralski, R.;

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that meas......Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested...... that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2...... for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene...

  15. Systems biology of cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sanga; Das, Smarajit; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems-biology is an ever-growing area of research due to explosion of data; how to mine these data and extract useful information is the problem. To have an insight on carcinogenesis one need to systematically mine several resources, such as databases, microarray and next-generation sequences. This review encompasses management and analysis of cancer data, databases construction and data deposition, whole transcriptome and genome comparison, analysing results from high throughput experiments to uncover cellular pathways and molecular interactions, and the design of effective algorithms to identify potential biomarkers. Recent technical advances such as ChIP-on-chip, ChIP-seq and RNA-seq can be applied to get epigenetic information transformed into a high-throughput endeavour to which systems biology and bioinformatics are making significant inroads. The data from ENCODE and GENCODE projects available through UCSC genome browser can be considered as benchmark for comparison and meta-analysis. A pipeline for integrating next generation sequencing data, microarray data, and putting them together with the existing database is discussed. The understanding of cancer genomics is changing the way we approach cancer diagnosis and treatment. To give a better understanding of utilizing available resources' we have chosen oral cancer to show how and what kind of analysis can be done. This review is a computational genomic primer that provides a bird's eye view of computational and bioinformatics' tools currently available to perform integrated genomic and system biology analyses of several carcinoma.

  16. Biomarkers for predicting complete debulking in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten Lindberg; Ottesen, Bent; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2014-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to construct and validate a model based on biomarkers to predict complete primary debulking surgery for ovarian cancer patients.......Aim: We aimed to construct and validate a model based on biomarkers to predict complete primary debulking surgery for ovarian cancer patients....

  17. Protein Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Misek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in breast cancer control will be greatly aided by early detection so as to diagnose and treat breast cancer in its preinvasive state prior to metastasis. For breast cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States, early detection does allow for increased treatment options, including surgical resection, with a corresponding better patient response. Unfortunately, however, many patients' tumors are diagnosed following metastasis, thus making it more difficult to successfully treat the malignancy. There are, at present, no existing validated plasma/serum biomarkers for breast cancer. Only a few biomarkers (such as HER-2/neu, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor have utility for diagnosis and prognosis. Thus, there is a great need for new biomarkers for breast cancer. This paper will focus on the identification of new serum protein biomarkers with utility for the early detection of breast cancer.

  18. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  19. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, Gil G. (Cheshire, CT); Ward, David C. (Las Vegas, NV); Bray-Ward, Patricia (Las Vegas, NV)

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  20. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2016-10-18

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  1. Clinical Use of Cancer Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söletormos, Georg; Duffy, Michael J; Othman Abu Hassan, Suher

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present an update of the European Group on Tumor Markers guidelines for serum markers in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Systematic literature survey from 2008 to 2013. The articles were evaluated by level of evidence and strength of recommendation. RESULTS: Because of its low...... for secondary cytoreductive surgery. CONCLUSIONS: At present, CA125 remains the most important biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer, excluding tumors of mucinous origin.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4...

  2. Plasma YKL-40: a potential new cancer biomarker?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Julia S; Schultz, Nicolai A; Jensen, Benny V

    2009-01-01

    tissue remodeling. Plasma levels of YKL-40 are elevated in a subgroup of patients with primary or advanced cancer compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but also in patients with many different diseases characterized by inflammation. Elevated plasma YKL-40 levels are an independent prognostic...... by inflammation. Large prospective, longitudinal clinical cancer studies are needed to determine if plasma YKL-40 is a new cancer biomarker, or is mainly a biomarker of inflammation....

  3. Biomarkers in the Detection of Prostate Cancer in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    establish ELISA and multiplex immunoassays using samples of serum which are less than 1 year old. The ELISA will focus on FABP5. The multiplex immunoassay ...prostate as “suspicious” for prostate cancer and molecular prostate cancer field effects. September 2015 16. Book Chapter in Press Burke HB , Grizzle WE...Burke HB , Grizzle WE. Clinical Validation ofMolecular Biomarkers in Translational Medicine in Biomarkers in Cancer Screening and Early Detection, Sudhir

  4. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the e...

  5. [Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: Brazilian consensus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa M Zanini; Rosário, Pedro W; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common manifestation of thyroid diseases. It is estimated that approximately 10% of adults have palpable thyroid nodules with the frequency increasing throughout life. The major concern on nodule evaluation is the risk of malignancy (5-10%). Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounts for 90% of all thyroid malignant neoplasias. Although most patients with cancer have a favorable outcome, some individuals present an aggressive form of the disease and poor prognostic despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Here, a set of clinical guidelines for the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or differentiated thyroid cancer was developed through consensus by 8 member of the Department of Thyroid, Sociedade Brasileira de Endocrinologia e Metabologia. The participants are from different reference medical centers within Brazil, to reflect different practice patterns. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the chairperson, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. All committee members further revised and refined the document. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information.

  6. Endometrial cancer risk prediction including serum-based biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortner, Renée T; Hüsing, Anika; Kühn, Tilman;

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer risk prediction models including lifestyle, anthropometric, and reproductive factors have limited discrimination. Adding biomarker data to these models may improve predictive capacity; to our knowledge, this has not been investigated for endometrial cancer. Using a nested case......-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, we investigated the improvement in discrimination gained by adding serum biomarker concentrations to risk estimates derived from an existing risk prediction model based on epidemiologic factors. Serum...... concentrations of sex steroid hormones, metabolic markers, growth factors, adipokines, and cytokines were evaluated in a step-wise backward selection process; biomarkers were retained at pdiscrimination was assessed using...

  7. Clinical states model for biomarkers in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apolo, Andrea B; Milowsky, Matthew; Bajorin, Dean F

    2009-09-01

    Bladder cancer is a significant healthcare problem in the USA, with a high recurrence rate, the need for expensive continuous surveillance and limited treatment options for patients with advanced disease. Research has contributed to an understanding of the molecular pathways involved in the development and progression of bladder cancer, and that understanding has led to the discovery of potentially diagnostic, predictive and prognostic biomarkers. In this review, a clinical states model of bladder cancer is introduced and integrated into a paradigm for biomarker development. Biomarkers are systematically incorporated with predefined end points to aid in clinical management.

  8. Far Beyond the Usual Biomarkers in Breast Cancer: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Anjos Pultz, Brunna; da Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; de Faria, Paulo Rogério; Oliveira, Ana Paula Lima; de Araújo, Rogério Agenor; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Research investigating biomarkers for early detection, prognosis and the prediction of treatment responses in breast cancer is rapidly expanding. However, no validated biomarker currently exists for use in routine clinical practice, and breast cancer detection and management remains dependent on invasive procedures. Histological examination remains the standard for diagnosis, whereas immunohistochemical and genetic tests are utilized for treatment decisions and prognosis determinations. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive review of literature published in PubMed on breast cancer biomarkers between 2009 and 2013. The keywords that were used together were breast cancer, biomarkers, diagnosis, prognosis and drug response. The cited references of the manuscripts included in this review were also screened. We have comprehensively summarized the performance of several biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and predicted drug responses of breast cancer. Finally, we have identified 15 biomarkers that have demonstrated promise in initial studies and several miRNAs. At this point, such biomarkers must be rigorously validated in the clinical setting to be translated into clinically useful tests for the diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of drug responses of breast cancer. PMID:25057307

  9. Mapping ethical and social aspects of cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Anne

    2016-12-25

    Cancer biomarkers represent a revolutionary advance toward personalised cancer treatment, promising therapies that are tailored to subgroups of patients sharing similar generic traits. Notwithstanding the optimism driving this development, biomarkers also present an array of social and ethical questions, as witnessed in sporadic debates across different literatures. This review article seeks to consolidate these debates in a mapping of the complex terrain of ethical and social aspects of cancer biomarker research. This mapping was undertaken from the vantage point offered by a working cancer biomarker research centre called the Centre for Cancer Biomarkers (CCBIO) in Norway, according to a dialectic move between the literature and discussions with researchers and practitioners in the laboratory. Starting in the lab, we found that, with the exception of some classical bioethical dilemmas, researchers regarded many issues relative to the ethos of the biomarker community; how the complexity and uncertainty characterising biomarker research influence their scientific norms of quality. Such challenges to the ethos of cancer research remain largely implicit, outside the scope of formal bioethical enquiry, yet form the basis for other social and ethical issues. Indeed, looking out from the lab we see how questions of complexity, uncertainty and quality contribute to debates around social and global justice; undermining policies for the prioritisation of care, framing the stratification of those patients worthy of treatment, and limiting global access to this highly sophisticated research. We go on to discuss biomarker research within the culturally-constructed 'war on cancer' and highlight an important tension between the expectations of 'magic bullets' and the complexity and uncertainty faced in the lab. We conclude by arguing, with researchers in the CCBIO, for greater reflexivity and humility in cancer biomarker research and policy.

  10. Trends in Qualifying Biomarkers in Drug Safety. Consensus of the 2011 Meeting of the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agúndez, José A. G.; del Barrio, Jaime; Padró, Teresa; Stephens, Camilla; Farré, Magí; Andrade, Raúl J.; Badimon, Lina; García-Martín, Elena; Vilahur, Gemma; Lucena, M. Isabel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the consensus view on the use of qualifying biomarkers in drug safety, raised within the frame of the XXIV meeting of the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology held in Málaga (Spain) in October, 2011. The widespread use of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is a goal that scientists have long been pursuing. Thirty years ago, when molecular pharmacogenomics evolved, we anticipated that these genetic biomarkers would soon obviate the routine use of drug therapies in a way that patients should adapt to the therapy rather than the opposite. This expected revolution in routine clinical practice never took place as quickly nor with the intensity as initially expected. The concerted action of operating multicenter networks holds great promise for future studies to identify biomarkers related to drug toxicity and to provide better insight into the underlying pathogenesis. Today some pharmacogenomic advances are already widely accepted, but pharmacogenomics still needs further development to elaborate more precise algorithms and many barriers to implementing individualized medicine exist. We briefly discuss our view about these barriers and we provide suggestions and areas of focus to advance in the field. PMID:22294980

  11. Inconvenient truth: cancer biomarker development by using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tadashi

    2014-05-01

    A biomarker is a crucial tool for measuring the progress of disease and the effects of treatment for better clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic biomarkers are required in various clinical settings. The proteome, a functional translation of the genome, is considered a rich source of biomarkers; therefore, sizable time and funding have been spent in proteomics to develop biomarkers. Although significant progress has been made in technologies toward comprehensive protein expression profiling, and many biomarker candidates published, none of the reported biomarkers have proven to be beneficial for cancer patients. The present deceleration in biomarker research can be attributed to technical limitations. Additional efforts are required to further technical progress; however, there are many examples demonstrating that problems in biomarker research are not so much with the technology but in the study design. In the study of biomarkers for early diagnosis, candidates are screened and validated by comparing cases and controls of similar sample size, and the low prevalence of disease is often ignored. Although it is reasonable to take advantage of multiple rather than single biomarkers when studying diverse disease mechanisms, the annotation of individual components of reported multiple biomarkers does not often explain the variety of molecular events underlying the clinical observations. In tissue biomarker studies, the heterogeneity of disease tissues and pathological observations are often not considered, and tissues are homogenized as a whole for protein extraction. In addition to the challenge of technical limitations, the fundamental aspects of biomarker development in a disease study need to be addressed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  12. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    , the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference...

  13. Blood-Based Biomarkers of Early-Onset Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0214 TITLE: Blood -based biomarkers of early-onset breast cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nasim Ahmadiyeh...DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Blood -based biomarkers of early-onset breast cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1...While the normal breast is the ideal tissue in which to study this phenomenon, gene expression profiling of blood lymphocytes has been successfully

  14. MicroRNA signatures as clinical biomarkers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markou A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Athina Markou, Martha Zavridou, Evi S Lianidou Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells, Lab of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Abstract: Even if early lung cancer detection has been recently significantly improved, the invasive nature of current diagnostic procedures, and a relatively high percentage of false positives, is limiting the application of modern detection tools. The discovery and clinical evaluation of novel specific and robust non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of lung cancer at an early stage, as well as for better prognosis and prediction of therapy response, is very challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs can play an important role in the diagnosis and management of lung cancer patients, as important and reliable biomarkers for cancer detection and prognostic prediction, and even as promising as novel targets for cancer therapy. miRNAs are important in cancer pathogenesis, and deregulation of their expression levels has been detected not only in lung cancer but in many other human tumor types. Numerous studies strongly support the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in non-small-cell lung cancer, and there is increasing evidence that altered miRNA expression is associated with tumor progression and survival. It is worth mentioning also that detection of miRNAs circulating in plasma or serum has enormous potential, because miRNAs serve as non-invasive biomarkers not only for the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease, but also as novel response and sensitivity predictors for cancer treatment. In this review, we summarize the current findings on the critical role of miRNAs in lung cancer tumorigenesis and highlight their potential as circulating biomarkers in lung cancer. Our review is based on papers that have been published after 2011, and includes the key words “miRNAs” and “lung cancer”. Keywords: non-small-cell lung carcinoma, miRNAs, tumor biomarkers, circulating miRNAs, liquid

  15. Clinical Advances in Molecular Biomarkers for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Philip, Philip A.; Seema Sethi; Shadan Ali

    2013-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis is currently undergoing a paradigm shift with the incorporation of molecular biomarkers as part of routine diagnostic panel. The molecular alteration ranges from those involving the DNA, RNA, microRNAs (miRNAs) and proteins. The miRNAs are recently discovered small non-coding endogenous single-stranded RNAs that critically regulates the development, invasion and metastasis of cancers. They are altered in cancers and have the potential to serve as diagnostic markers for cancer...

  16. National consensus in China on diagnosis and treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xichun; Jiang, Zefei; Li, Huiping; Chen, Jiayi; Cui, Shude; Li, Qing; Liao, Ning; Liu, Donggeng; Liu, Jian; Lu, Jinsong; Shen, Kunwei; Sun, Tao; Teng, Yuee; Tong, Zhongsheng; Wang, Shulian; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Xiaojia; Wang, Yongsheng; Wu, Jiong; Yuan, Peng; Zhang, Pin; Zhang, Qingyuan; Zheng, Hong; Pang, Da; Ren, Guosheng; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Zhenzhou; Song, Erwei; Song, Santai

    2015-01-01

    The recently available guidelines on the management of advanced breast cancer (ABC) organized by Chinese Anti-Cancer Association, Committee of Breast Cancer Society (CACA-CBCS) do not elucidate ABC in details. To instruct clinicians in treatment of ABC, a Chinese expert consensus meeting on diagnosis and treatment of ABC was held in June 2014 and a consensus is developed. The following consensus provides the level of evidence and supporting documents for each recommendation, and introduces research topics to be urgently addressed. Notably, the consensus on diagnosis and treatment of ABC in China is developed to be applied nationwide. In different areas, multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) tailored to the each patient and the disease itself should be applied based on the basic principles of modern oncology. PMID:26605288

  17. Aberrant Glycosylation as Biomarker for Cancer: Focus on CD43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Maria Tuccillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is a posttranslational modification of proteins playing a major role in cell signalling, immune recognition, and cell-cell interaction because of their glycan branches conferring structure variability and binding specificity to lectin ligands. Aberrant expression of glycan structures as well as occurrence of truncated structures, precursors, or novel structures of glycan may affect ligand-receptor interactions and thus interfere with regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Indeed, aberrant glycosylation represents a hallmark of cancer, reflecting cancer-specific changes in glycan biosynthesis pathways such as the altered expression of glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Most studies have been carried out to identify changes in serum glycan structures. In most cancers, fucosylation and sialylation are significantly modified. Thus, aberrations in glycan structures can be used as targets to improve existing serum cancer biomarkers. The ability to distinguish differences in the glycosylation of proteins between cancer and control patients emphasizes glycobiology as a promising field for potential biomarker identification. In this review, we discuss the aberrant protein glycosylation associated with human cancer and the identification of protein glycoforms as cancer biomarkers. In particular, we will focus on the aberrant CD43 glycosylation as cancer biomarker and the potential to exploit the UN1 monoclonal antibody (UN1 mAb to identify aberrant CD43 glycoforms.

  18. Circulating Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Modifications as Biomarkers in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnena, Peter; Brown, James A. L.; Kerin, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally the stratification of many cancers involves combining tumour and clinicopathological features (e.g., patient age; tumour size, grade, receptor status and location) to inform treatment options and predict recurrence risk and survival. However, current biomarkers often require invasive excision of the tumour for profiling, do not allow monitoring of the response to treatment and stratify patients into broad heterogeneous groups leading to inconsistent treatment responses. Here we explore and describe the benefits of using circulating biomarkers (nucleosomes and/or modifications to nucleosomes) as a non-invasive method for detecting cancer and monitoring response to treatment. Nucleosomes (DNA wound around eight core histone proteins) are responsible for compacting our genome and their composition and post-translational modifications are responsible for regulating gene expression. Here, we focus on breast and colorectal cancer as examples where utilizing circulating nucleosomes as biomarkers hold real potential as liquid biopsies. Utilizing circulating nucleosomes as biomarkers is an exciting new area of research that promises to allow both the early detection of cancer and monitoring of treatment response. Nucleosome-based biomarkers combine with current biomarkers, increasing both specificity and sensitivity of current tests and have the potential to provide individualised precision-medicine based treatments for patients. PMID:28075351

  19. Cancer Salivary Biomarkers for Tumours Distant to the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Rapado-González

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of saliva as a diagnostic approach for systemic diseases was proposed just two decades ago, but recently great interest in the field has emerged because of its revolutionary potential as a liquid biopsy and its usefulness as a non-invasive sampling method. Multiple molecules isolated in saliva have been proposed as cancer biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, drug monitoring and pharmacogenetic studies. In this review, we focus on the current status of the salivary diagnostic biomarkers for different cancers distant to the oral cavity, noting their potential use in the clinic and their applicability in personalising cancer therapies.

  20. Mechanisms of CTC Biomarkers in Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    represents the most devastating and feared consequence of breast cancer . BCBM is usually fatal and is increasing in frequency with occult brain...metastatic breast cancer (stage IV) patients with or without clinically diagnosed BCBM employing multiparametric flow cytometry (FACS; ARIA IIID system)(10...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0214 TITLE: Mechanisms of CTC Biomarkers in Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dario

  1. Circulating neuroendocrine tumors biomarkers. Why? When? How? Suggestions for clinical practice from guidelines and consensus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Razzore; Giorgio Arnaldi

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NETs) are rare tumors that are increasing in incidence. NETs are characterized by heterogeneous biological behaviour, clinical presentation and course. A sensitive and speciifc diagnostic and prognostic circulating biomarker useful for all sites, grading and staging of neuroendocrine tumors is still an unmet need. The aim of this article was to review current neuroendocrine and oncologic scientiifc society guidelines and position statements, and propose recommendations for the most frequent clinical practice queries on circulating neuroendocrine tumors biomarkers. The authors searched for NCCN, NANETS, ESMO, ENETS, UKINETS, AME management guidelines or position statements available from PubMed up to 7th January 2016. From these results we chose guidelines or position statements published by scientiifc societies or institutions in USA, Europe and Italy with recognized expertise in neuroendocrine tumor patient management. The authors present suggestions for clinical practice based on this analysis.

  2. Sepsis in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: literature review and consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mirabile; G. Numico; E.G. Russi; P. Bossi; F. Crippa; A. Bacigalupo; V. De Sanctis; S. Musso; A. Merlotti; M.G. Ghi; M.C. Merlano; L. Licitra; F. Moretto; N. Denaro; O. Caspiani; M. Buglione; S. Pergolizzi; A. Cascio; J. Bernier; J. Raber-Durlacher; J.B. Vermorken; B. Murphy; M.V. Ranieri; R.P. Dellinger

    2015-01-01

    The reporting of infection/sepsis in chemo/radiation-treated head and neck cancer patients is sparse and the problem is underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of infecti

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation of Benign Thyroid Nodules and Recurrent Thyroid Cancers: Consensus Statement and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu [Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, So Lyung [Seoul St. Marys Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Radiofrequency ablation is a new non-surgical treatment modality for patients with benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers. The Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed recommendations for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules and recurrent thyroid cancers using radiofrequency ablation. These recommendations are based on evidence from the current literature and expert consensus

  4. Report from the 13th annual Western canadian gastrointestinal cancer consensus conference; calgary, alberta; september 8-10, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, M M; Pasieka, J; Dixon, E; McEwan, S; McKay, A; Renouf, D; Schellenberg, D; Ruether, D

    2012-12-01

    The 13th annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Calgary, Alberta, September 8-10, 2011. Health care professionals involved in the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purposes of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses current issues in the management neuroendocrine tumours and locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  5. Aberrantly methylated DNA as a biomarker in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Guldberg, Per;

    2013-01-01

    hypermethylation events, their use as tumor biomarkers is usually not hampered by analytical signals from normal cells, which is a general problem for existing protein tumor markers used for clinical assessment of breast cancer. There is accumulating evidence that DNA-methylation changes in breast cancer patients......Aberrant DNA hypermethylation at gene promoters is a frequent event in human breast cancer. Recent genome-wide studies have identified hundreds of genes that exhibit differential methylation between breast cancer cells and normal breast tissue. Due to the tumor-specific nature of DNA...... into subgroups based on DNA biomarkers may improve prognosis. Serial monitoring of DNA-methylation markers in blood during treatment may be useful, particularly when the cancer burden is below the detection level for standard imaging techniques. Overall, aberrant DNA methylation has a great potential...

  6. Pharmacogenomics: Biomarker-Directed Therapy for Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert T; Felsenstein, Kenneth M; Theodorescu, Dan

    2016-02-01

    The clinical management of bladder cancer has seen little change over the last three decades and there is pressing need to identify more effective treatments for advanced disease. Low clinical use of neoadjuvant therapies stems from historical limitations in the ability to predict patients most likely to respond to combination chemotherapies. This article focuses on recent molecular and genetic studies, highlighting promising clinical trials and retrospective studies, and discusses emerging trials that use predictive biomarkers to match patients with therapies to which they are most likely to respond. The implementation of predictive genomic and molecular biomarkers will revolutionize urologic oncology and the clinical management of bladder cancer.

  7. Computational and Experimental Approaches to Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzystanek, Marcin

    with a purely biological, experimental approach where the effects of treatment with cytotoxic agents or defects in DNA repair mechanisms can be individually quantified and turned into mutational signatures.In the second part of the thesis I present work towards identification and improvement of the current......Effective cancer treatment requires good biomarkers: measurable indicators of some biological state or condition that constitute the cornerstone of personalized medicine. Prognostic biomarkers provide information about the likely course of the disease, while predictive biomarkers enable prediction...... of a patient’s response to a particular treatment, thus helping to avoid unnecessary treatment and unwanted side effects in non-responding individuals.Currently biomarker discovery is facilitated by recent advances in high-throughput technologies when association between a given biological phenotype...

  8. The Present and Future of Prostate Cancer Urine Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Clark

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to successfully cure patients with prostate cancer (PCa, it is important to detect the disease at an early stage. The existing clinical biomarkers for PCa are not ideal, since they cannot specifically differentiate between those patients who should be treated immediately and those who should avoid over-treatment. Current screening techniques lack specificity, and a decisive diagnosis of PCa is based on prostate biopsy. Although PCa screening is widely utilized nowadays, two thirds of the biopsies performed are still unnecessary. Thus the discovery of non-invasive PCa biomarkers remains urgent. In recent years, the utilization of urine has emerged as an attractive option for the non-invasive detection of PCa. Moreover, a great improvement in high-throughput “omic” techniques has presented considerable opportunities for the identification of new biomarkers. Herein, we will review the most significant urine biomarkers described in recent years, as well as some future prospects in that field.

  9. Cancer Stem Cell Biomarker Discovery Using Antibody Array Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Rob; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease involving hundreds of pathways and numerous levels of disease progression. In addition, there is a growing body of evidence that the origins and growth rates of specific types of cancer may involve "cancer stem cells," which are defined as "cells within a tumor that possess the capacity to self-renew and to cause the development of heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor.(1)" Many types of cancer are now thought to harbor cancer stem cells. These cells themselves are thought to be unique in comparison to other cells types present within the tumor and to exhibit characteristics that allow for the promotion of tumorigenesis and in some cases metastasis. In addition, it is speculated that each type of cancer stem cell exhibits a unique set of molecular and biochemical markers. These markers, alone or in combination, may act as a signature for defining not only the type of cancer but also the progressive state. These biomarkers may also double as signaling entities which act autonomously or upon neighboring cancer stem cells or other cells within the local microenvironment to promote tumorigenesis. This review describes the heterogeneic properties of cancer stem cells and outlines the identification and application of biomarkers and signaling molecules defining these cells as they relate to different forms of cancer. Other examples of biomarkers and signaling molecules expressed by neighboring cells in the local tumor microenvironment are also discussed. In addition, biochemical signatures for cancer stem cell autocrine/paracrine signaling, local site recruitment, tumorigenic potential, and conversion to a stem-like phenotype are described.

  10. Novel biomarkers for cancer detection and prognostication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehra, N.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we used a variety of approaches for biomarker discovery; in Part I we assessed whether we could identify a non-invasive surrogate markers of angiogenesis, as new vessel formation plays critical roles in the growth and metastatic spread of tumors. Moreover, many agents targeting the va

  11. Hypermethylated DNA, a Biomarker for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Ladefoged; Krarup, Henrik Bygum; Sunesen, Kåre Gotschalck;

    2016-01-01

    and specific for CRC have been proposed. Articles describing the use of hypermethylated promoter regions in blood or stool as biomarkers for CRC were systematically reviewed. METHOD: The Medline, Web of Science, and Embase databases were used in a systematic literature search. Studies were included...

  12. MicroRNA Machinery Genes as Novel Biomarkers for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing-Tao; Wang, Jin; Srivastava, Vibhuti; Sen, Subrata; Liu, Song-Mei

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) directly and indirectly affect tumorigenesis. To be able to perform their myriad roles, miRNA machinery genes, such as Drosha, DGCR8, Dicer1, XPO5, TRBP, and AGO2, must generate precise miRNAs. These genes have specific expression patterns, protein-binding partners, and biochemical capabilities in different cancers. Our preliminary analysis of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium on multiple types of cancer revealed significant alterations in these miRNA machinery genes. Here, we review their biological structures and functions with an eye toward understanding how they could serve as cancer biomarkers.

  13. Involving Patients in a Multidisciplinary European Consensus Process and in the Development of a 'Patient Summary of the Consensus Document for Colon and Rectal Cancer Care'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, Petra G.; Taylor, Claire; Henning, Geoffrey; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Espin, Eloy; Wiggers, Theo; Gore-Booth, Jola; Moss, Barbara; Valentini, Vincenzo; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Context High-quality cancer care should be accessible for patients and healthcare professionals. Involvement of patients as partners in guideline formation and consensus processes is still rarely found. EURECCA, short for European Registration of Cancer Care, is the platform to improve outcomes of c

  14. Prognostic and predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer. Towards precision medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimers, Marlies Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to define prognostic and predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer for improved risk stratification and treatment benefit in the individual patient, with the introduction of precision medicine in the near future as the ultimate goal. By definition, precision medicine is

  15. Consensus report of the national cancer institute clinical trials planning meeting on pancreas cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philip A; Mooney, Margaret; Jaffe, Deborah; Eckhardt, Gail; Moore, Malcolm; Meropol, Neal; Emens, Leisha; O'Reilly, Eileen; Korc, Murray; Ellis, Lee; Benedetti, Jacqueline; Rothenberg, Mace; Willett, Christopher; Tempero, Margaret; Lowy, Andrew; Abbruzzese, James; Simeone, Diane; Hingorani, Sunil; Berlin, Jordan; Tepper, Joel

    2009-11-20

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality, despite significant improvements in diagnostic imaging and operative mortality rates. The 5-year survival rate remains less than 5% because of microscopic or gross metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. The Clinical Trials Planning Meeting in pancreatic cancer was convened by the National Cancer Institute's Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee to discuss the integration of basic and clinical knowledge in the design of clinical trials in PDAC. Major emphasis was placed on the enhancement of research to identify and validate the relevant targets and molecular pathways in PDAC, cancer stem cells, and the microenvironment. Emphasis was also placed on developing rational combinations of targeted agents and the development of predictive biomarkers to assist selection of patient subsets. The development of preclinical tumor models that are better predictive of human PDAC must be supported with wider availability to the research community. Phase III clinical trials should be implemented only if there is a meaningful clinical signal of efficacy and safety in the phase II setting. The emphasis must therefore be on performing well-designed phase II studies with uniform sets of basic entry and evaluation criteria with survival as a primary endpoint. Patients with either metastatic or locally advanced PDAC must be studied separately.

  16. Evaluating biomarkers to model cancer risk post cosmic ray exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Deepa M.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Blattnig, Steve R.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Doetsch, Paul W.; Dynan, William S.; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Kidane, Yared; Kronenberg, Amy; Naidu, Mamta D.; Peterson, Leif E.; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Saha, Janapriya; Snijders, Antoine M.; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Tang, Jonathan; Werner, Erica; Pluth, Janice M.

    2016-06-01

    Robust predictive models are essential to manage the risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Chronic exposure to cosmic rays in the context of the complex deep space environment may place astronauts at high cancer risk. To estimate this risk, it is critical to understand how radiation-induced cellular stress impacts cell fate decisions and how this in turn alters the risk of carcinogenesis. Exposure to the heavy ion component of cosmic rays triggers a multitude of cellular changes, depending on the rate of exposure, the type of damage incurred and individual susceptibility. Heterogeneity in dose, dose rate, radiation quality, energy and particle flux contribute to the complexity of risk assessment. To unravel the impact of each of these factors, it is critical to identify sensitive biomarkers that can serve as inputs for robust modeling of individual risk of cancer or other long-term health consequences of exposure. Limitations in sensitivity of biomarkers to dose and dose rate, and the complexity of longitudinal monitoring, are some of the factors that increase uncertainties in the output from risk prediction models. Here, we critically evaluate candidate early and late biomarkers of radiation exposure and discuss their usefulness in predicting cell fate decisions. Some of the biomarkers we have reviewed include complex clustered DNA damage, persistent DNA repair foci, reactive oxygen species, chromosome aberrations and inflammation. Other biomarkers discussed, often assayed for at longer points post exposure, include mutations, chromosome aberrations, reactive oxygen species and telomere length changes. We discuss the relationship of biomarkers to different potential cell fates, including proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and loss of stemness, which can propagate genomic instability and alter tissue composition and the underlying mRNA signatures that contribute to cell fate decisions. Our goal is to highlight factors that are important in choosing

  17. Evaluating biomarkers to model cancer risk post cosmic ray exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Deepa M; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Blattnig, Steve R; Costes, Sylvain V; Doetsch, Paul W; Dynan, William S; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Kidane, Yared; Kronenberg, Amy; Naidu, Mamta D; Peterson, Leif E; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L; Saha, Janapriya; Snijders, Antoine M; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Tang, Jonathan; Werner, Erica; Pluth, Janice M

    2016-06-01

    Robust predictive models are essential to manage the risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Chronic exposure to cosmic rays in the context of the complex deep space environment may place astronauts at high cancer risk. To estimate this risk, it is critical to understand how radiation-induced cellular stress impacts cell fate decisions and how this in turn alters the risk of carcinogenesis. Exposure to the heavy ion component of cosmic rays triggers a multitude of cellular changes, depending on the rate of exposure, the type of damage incurred and individual susceptibility. Heterogeneity in dose, dose rate, radiation quality, energy and particle flux contribute to the complexity of risk assessment. To unravel the impact of each of these factors, it is critical to identify sensitive biomarkers that can serve as inputs for robust modeling of individual risk of cancer or other long-term health consequences of exposure. Limitations in sensitivity of biomarkers to dose and dose rate, and the complexity of longitudinal monitoring, are some of the factors that increase uncertainties in the output from risk prediction models. Here, we critically evaluate candidate early and late biomarkers of radiation exposure and discuss their usefulness in predicting cell fate decisions. Some of the biomarkers we have reviewed include complex clustered DNA damage, persistent DNA repair foci, reactive oxygen species, chromosome aberrations and inflammation. Other biomarkers discussed, often assayed for at longer points post exposure, include mutations, chromosome aberrations, reactive oxygen species and telomere length changes. We discuss the relationship of biomarkers to different potential cell fates, including proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and loss of stemness, which can propagate genomic instability and alter tissue composition and the underlying mRNA signatures that contribute to cell fate decisions. Our goal is to highlight factors that are important in choosing

  18. Proteoglycans as potential microenvironmental biomarkers for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhovskih, Anastasia V; Aidagulova, Svetlana V; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2015-09-01

    Glycosylation changes occur widely in colon tumours, suggesting glycosylated molecules as potential biomarkers for colon cancer diagnostics. In this study, proteoglycans (PGs) expression levels and their transcriptional patterns are investigated in human colon tumours in vivo and carcinoma cells in vitro. According to RT-PCR analysis, normal and cancer colon tissues expressed a specific set of PGs (syndecan-1, perlecan, decorin, biglycan, versican, NG2/CSPG4, serglycin, lumican, CD44), while the expression of glypican-1, brevican and aggrecan was almost undetectable. Overall transcriptional activity of the PGs in normal and cancer tissues was similar, although expression patterns were different. Expression of decorin and perlecan was down-regulated 2-fold in colon tumours, while biglycan and versican expression was significantly up-regulated (6-fold and 3-fold, respectively). Expression of collagen1A1 was also increased 6-fold in colon tumours. However, conventional HCT-116 colon carcinoma and AG2 colon cancer-initiating cells did not express biglycan and decorin and were versican-positive and -negative, respectively, demonstrating an extracellular origin of the PGs in cancer tissue. Selective expression of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans syndecan-1 and perlecan in the AG2 colon cancer-initiating cell line suggests these PGs as potential biomarkers for cancer stem cells. Overall transcriptional activity of the HS biosynthetic system was similar in normal and cancer tissues, although significant up-regulation of extracellular sulfatases SULF1/2 argues for a possible distortion of HS sulfation patterns in colon tumours. Taken together, the obtained results suggest versican, biglycan, collagen1A1 and SULF1/2 expression as potential microenvironmental biomarkers and/or targets for colon cancer diagnostics and treatment.

  19. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colorectal cancer clinical management: the pathologists expert review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirke, P; West, N P; Nagtegaal, I D

    2014-02-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20 years; however, a considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of Cancer Care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012, the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about cancer of the colon and rectum was held. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organizations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries.

  20. Non-invasive actionable biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current clinical setting, many disease management options are available for men diagnosed with prostate cancer. For metastatic prostate cancer, first-line therapies almost always involve agents designed to inhibit androgen receptor (AR signaling. Castration-resistant prostate cancers (CRPCs that arise following first-line androgen deprivation therapies (ADT may continue to respond to additional lines of AR-targeting therapies (abiraterone and enzalutamide, chemotherapies (docetaxel and cabazitaxel, bone-targeting Radium-223 therapy, and immunotherapy sipuleucel-T. The rapidly expanding therapies for CRPC is expected to transform this lethal disease into one that can be managed for prolonged period of time. In the past 3 years, a number of promising biomarkers that may help to guide treatment decisions have been proposed and evaluated, including androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, a truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain (LBD and mediate constitutively-active AR signaling. Putative treatment selection markers such as AR-V7 may further improve survival benefit of existing therapies and help to accelerate development of new agents for metastatic prostate cancer. In the metastatic setting, it is important to consider compatibility between the putative biomarker with non-invasive sampling. In this review, biomarkers relevant to the setting of metastatic prostate cancer are discussed with respect to a number of key attributes critical for clinical development of non-invasive, actionable markers. It is envisioned that biomarkers for metastatic prostate cancer will continue to be discovered, developed, and refined to meet the unmet needs in both standard-of-care and clinical trial settings.

  1. In vitro derby imaging of cancer biomarkers using quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Mee Hyang; Kim, Soonhag; Kang, Won Jun; Lee, Jung Hwan; Kang, Hyungu; Moon, Sung Hwan; Hwang, Do Won; Ko, Hae Young; Lee, Dong Soo

    2009-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), which have broad absorption with narrow emission spectra, are useful for multiplex imaging. Here, fluorescence derby imaging using dual color QDs conjugated by the AS1411 aptamer (targeting nucleolin) and the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (targeting the integrin alpha(v)beta(3)) in cancer cells is reported. Simultaneous fluorescence imaging of cellular distribution of nucleolin and integrin alpha(v)beta(3) using QDs enables easy monitoring of separate targets in the cancer cells and the normal healthy cells. These results suggest the feasibility of a concurrent visualization of QD-based multiple cancer biomarkers using small molecules such as aptamer or peptide ligands.

  2. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Tao, Meng-Hua, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-04-28

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  3. Tobacco carcinogens, their biomarkers and tobacco-induced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S

    2003-10-01

    The devastating link between tobacco products and human cancers results from a powerful alliance of two factors - nicotine and carcinogens. Without either one of these, tobacco would be just another commodity, instead of being the single greatest cause of death due to preventable cancer. Nicotine is addictive and toxic, but it is not carcinogenic. This addiction, however, causes people to use tobacco products continually, and these products contain many carcinogens. What are the mechanisms by which this deadly combination leads to 30% of cancer-related deaths in developed countries, and how can carcinogen biomarkers help to reveal these mechanisms?

  4. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the

  5. Consensus nomenclature for CD8+ T cell phenotypes in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetoh, Lionel; Smyth, Mark J.; Drake, Charles G.; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Apte, Ron N.; Ayyoub, Maha; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bonneville, Marc; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Esteban; Chen, Lieping; Colombo, Mario P.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Coukos, Georges; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dranoff, Glenn; Frazer, Ian H.; Fridman, Wolf-Hervé; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L.; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John; Knuth, Alexander; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Marincola, Francesco; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Odun, Kunle; Overwijk, Willem W.; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ribas, Antoni; Romero, Pedro; Schreiber, Robert D.; Schuler, Gerold; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Tartour, Eric; Valmori, Danila; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Wang, Ena; Zou, Weiping; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas preclinical investigations and clinical studies have established that CD8+ T cells can profoundly affect cancer progression, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Challenging the prevalent view that the beneficial effect of CD8+ T cells in cancer is solely attributable to their cytotoxic activity, several reports have indicated that the ability of CD8+ T cells to promote tumor regression is dependent on their cytokine secretion profile and their ability to self-renew. Evidence has also shown that the tumor microenvironment can disarm CD8+ T cell immunity, leading to the emergence of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. The existence of different types of CD8+ T cells in cancer calls for a more precise definition of the CD8+ T cell immune phenotypes in cancer and the abandonment of the generic terms “pro-tumor” and “antitumor.” Based on recent studies investigating the functions of CD8+ T cells in cancer, we here propose some guidelines to precisely define the functional states of CD8+ T cells in cancer. PMID:26137416

  6. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    incontinence and urinary urgency as well as sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, evidence from many sources suggests that most prostate cancers are...mainly surgery and radiation therapy, result in well documented significant morbidities, including significant lower urinary tract symptoms such as

  7. Chinese consensus on early diagnosis of primary lung cancer (2014 version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Qian, Gui-Sheng; Bai, Chun-Xue

    2015-09-01

    The incidence and mortality of lung cancer in China have rapidly increased. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in China, possibly because of the inadequate early diagnosis of lung cancer. Reaching a consensus on early diagnostic strategies for lung cancer in China is an unmet needed. Recently, much progress has been made in lung cancer diagnosis, such as screening in high-risk populations, the application of novel imaging technologies, and the use of minimally invasive techniques for diagnosis. However, systemic reviews of disease history, risk assessment, and patients' willingness to undergo invasive diagnostic procedures also need to be considered. A diagnostic strategy for lung cancer should be proposed and developed by a multidisciplinary group. A comprehensive evaluation of patient factors and clinical findings should be completed before treatment.

  8. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Conde-Muíño

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile’s ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  9. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice.

  10. Breast cancer in pregnancy: recommendations of an international consensus meeting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amant, F.; Deckers, S.; Calsteren, K. van; Loibl, S.; Halaska, M.; Brepoels, L.; Beijnen, J.; Cardoso, F.; Gentilini, O.; Lagae, L.; Mir, O.; Neven, P.; Ottevanger, N.; Pans, S.; Peccatori, F.; Rouzier, R.; Senn, H.J.; Struikmans, H.; Christiaens, M.R.; Cameron, D.; Bois, A. du

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide guidance for clinicians about the diagnosis, staging and treatment of breast cancer occurring during an otherwise uncomplicated pregnancy. METHODS: An international expert Panel convened to address a series of questions identified by a literature review and personal experience. I

  11. Chemoresistive Gas Sensors for the Detection of Colorectal Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Malagù

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous medical studies show that tumor growth is accompanied by protein changes that may lead to the peroxidation of the cell membrane with consequent emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs by breath or intestinal gases that should be seen as biomarkers for colorectal cancer (CRC. The analysis of VOCs represents a non-invasive and potentially inexpensive preliminary screening technique. An array of chemoresistive gas sensors based on screen-printed metal oxide semiconducting films has been selected to discriminate gases of oncological interest, e.g., 1-iodononane and benzene, widely assumed to be biomarkers of colorectal cancer, from those of interference in the gut, such as methane and nitric oxide.

  12. Implementation of Novel Biomarkers in the Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Management of Acute Kidney Injury: Executive Summary from the Tenth Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A.; Bouchard, Josee; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Siew, Edward D.; Endre, Zoltan H.; Goldstein, Stuart L.; Koyner, Jay L.; Macedo, Etienne; Doi, Kent; Di Somma, Salvatore; Lewington, Andrew; Thadhani, Ravi; Chakravarthi, Raj; Ice, Can; Okusa, Mark D.; Duranteau, Jacques; Doran, Peter; Yang, Li; Jaber, Bertrand L.; Meehan, Shane; Kellum, John A.; Haase, Michael; Murray, Patrick T.; Cruz, Dinna; Maisel, Alan; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Mehta, Ravindra L.; Shaw, Andrew D.; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Detection of acute kidney injury is undergoing a dynamic revolution of biomarker technology allowing greater, earlier, and more accurate determination of diagnosis, prognosis, and with powerful implication for management. Biomarkers can be broadly considered as any measurable biologic entity or process that allows differentiation between normal function and injury or disease. The ADQI (Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative) had its Ninth Consensus Conference dedicated to synthesis and formulation of the existing literature on biomarkers for the detection of acute kidney injury in a variety of settings. In the papers that accompany this summary, ADQI workgroups fully develop key concepts from a summary of the literature in the domains of early diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prognosis and management, and concurrent physiologic and imaging measures. PMID:23689652

  13. Report from the 13th Annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference; Calgary, Alberta; September 8–10, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, M.M.; Pasieka, J.; Dixon, E.; McEwan, S.; McKay, A.; Renouf, D.; Schellenberg, D.; Ruether, D.

    2012-01-01

    The 13th annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Calgary, Alberta, September 8–10, 2011. Health care professionals involved in the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purposes of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses current issues in the management neuroendocrine tumours and locally advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23300370

  14. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management.Abbreviations: 2DE: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; ABPP: activity-based protein profiling; CEA: carcinoembryonic antigen; CI: confidence interval; ESI: electrospray ionization; FP: fluorophosphonate; HPLC: high performance liquid chromatography; ICAT: isotope coded affi nitytags; IEF: isoelectric focusing; iTRAQ: isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification; LCMS: combined liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; LCMSMS: liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry; LOD: limit of detection; m/z: mass to charge ratio; MALDI: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization; MS: mass spectrometry; MUDPIT: multidimensional protein identification technology; NAF: nipple aspirate fluid; PMF: peptide mass fingerprinting; PSA: prostate specifi c antigen; PTMs: post-translational modifications; RPMA: reverse phase protein microarray; SELDI: surface enhanced laser desorption ionization; TOF: time-of-flight.

  15. Application of fuzzy consensus for oral pre-cancer and cancer susceptibility assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satarupa Banerjee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Health questionnaire data assessment conventionally relies upon statistical analysis in understanding disease susceptibility using discrete numbers and fails to reflect physician’s perspectives and missing narratives in data, which play subtle roles in disease prediction. In addressing such limitations, the present study applies fuzzy consensus in oral health and habit questionnaire data for a selected Indian population in the context of assessing susceptibility to oral pre-cancer and cancer. Methodically collected data were initially divided into age based small subgroups and fuzzy membership function was assigned to each. The methodology further proposed the susceptibility to oral precancers (viz. leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis and squamous cell carcinoma in patients considering a fuzzy rulebase through If-Then rules with certain conditions. Incorporation of similarity measures using the Jaccard index was used during conversion into the linguistic output of fuzzy set to predict the disease outcome in a more accurate manner and associated condition of the relevant features. It is also expected that this analytical approach will be effective in devising strategies for policy making through real-life questionnaire data handling.

  16. Biomarkers of ambient air pollution and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demetriou, Christiana A; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    The association between ambient air pollution exposure and lung cancer risk has been investigated in prospective studies and the results are generally consistent, indicating that long-term exposure to air pollution may cause lung cancer. Despite the prospective nature and consistent findings...... the relationships between ambient air pollution and biological markers of dose and early response. The evidence for each marker was evaluated using assessment criteria which rate a group of studies from A (strong) to C (weak) on amount of evidence, replication of findings, and protection from bias. Biomarkers...

  17. Trace cancer biomarker quantification using polystyrene-functionalized gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Wei; Hajisalem, Ghazal; Lukach, Ariella; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Hof, Fraser; Gordon, Reuven

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polystyrene-functionalized gold nanorods (AuNRs) as a platform for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) quantification of the exogenous cancer biomarker Acetyl Amantadine (AcAm). We utilize the hydrophobicity of the polystyrene attached to the AuNR surface to capture the hydrophobic AcAm from solution, followed by drying and detection using SERS. We achieve a detection limit of 16 ng/mL using this platform. This result shows clinical potential for low-cost early cancer detection. PMID:25574423

  18. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    example the OncotypeDx assay has been calibrated and already validated precisely for this purpose. In addition, multiparametric MRI shows good ...testing. Cancer 119: 3906-3909, 2013. Zuxiong Chen, Zulfiqar G. Gulzar, Catherine A. St. Hill, Bruce Walcheck, James D. Brooks: Increased expression...Jamaspishvili T, Wei W, Feng Z, Good J, Hawley S, Fazli L, McKenney J, Simko J, Hurtado-Coll A, Carroll P, Gleave M, Lance R, Lin D, Nelson P, Thompson I

  19. The Significance of Proteomic Biomarkers in Male Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zografos, Eleni; Gazouli, Maria; Tsangaris, Georgios; Marinos, Evangelos

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer in men (MBC) is an uncommon malignancy and accounts for only 1% of all diagnosed breast cancers. By using genomic and transcriptomic approaches, researchers have been able to expand our insight into the genetic basis of breast cancer, by providing new biomarkers. We currently know that gene analysis by itself does not show the complete picture. Along with the genomic approach, proteomics are crucial for the improvement of breast cancer diagnosis, sub-classification, for predicting response to different treatment modalities and for predicting prognosis. There are great challenges in identifying discriminatory proteins and the use of specific techniques along with additional analytical tools is required. A number of techniques allow testing for proteins produced during specific diseases. In this review, an effort is made to summarize the studies and results linked to the implementation of proteomics in the field of MBC detection and diagnosis.

  20. MicroRNAs: Potential biomarkers in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    George, G. P.; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2010-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved small noncoding RNAs, also known as micromanagers of gene expression. Polymorphisms in the miRNA pathway (miR-polymorphisms) are emerging as powerful tools to study the biology of a disease and have the potential to be used in disease prognosis and diagnosis. Advancements in the miRNA field also indicate a clear involvement of deregulated miRNA gene signatures in cancers, and several polymorphisms in pre-miRNA, miRNA binding sites or targets hav...

  1. Functional Proteomics-Based Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    levels and regulation of stathmin in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells." Oncogene 22.55 (2003): 8924-8930. 11  Bankaitis-Davis, Danute, et...activator of transcription 6, phosphorylated Not Valid 56 149 * STATHMIN Stathmin 1 Validated 83 75 10 Survivin (BIRC5)baculoviral IAP repeat...Y182 34 FOXO3A 75 STATHMIN 117 BAD.PS112 35 P27 76 4EBP1 118 ER.ALPHA. 36 JNK 77 MCL1 118 ER.ALPHA.PS167 37 TAU 78 MIFT 119 ER.ALPHA 38 GATA3 79

  2. Biomarkers for diet and cancer prevention research: potentials and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cindy D DAVIS; John A MILNER

    2007-01-01

    As cancer incidence is projected to increase for decades there is a need for effec-tive preventive strategies. Fortunately, evidence continues to mount that altering dietary habits is an effective and cost-efficient approach for reducing cancer risk and for modifying the biological behavior of tumors. Predictive, validated and sensitive biomarkers, including those that reliably evaluate "intake" or exposure to a specific food or bioactive component, that assess one or more specific bio-logical "effects" that are linked to cancer, and that effectively predict individual "susceptibility" as a function of nutrient-nutrient interactions and genetics, are fundamental to evaluating who will benefit most from dietary interventions. These biomarkers must be readily accessible, easily and reliably assayed, and predictive of a key process(es) involved in cancer. The response to a food is determined not only by the effective concentration of the bioactive food component(s) reaching the target tissue, but also by the amount of the target requiring modification.Thus, this threshold response to foods and their components will vary from indi-vidual to individual. The key to understanding a personalized response is a greater knowledge of nutrigenomics, proteomics and metabolomics.

  3. Identifying Cancer Biomarkers Via Node Classification within a Mapreduce Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysir Hassan A. Soliman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Big data are giving new research challenges in the life sciences domain because of their variety, volume, veracity, velocity, and value. Predicting gene biomarkers is one of the vital research issues in bioinformatics field, where microarray gene expression and network based methods can be used. These datasets suffer from the huge data voluminous, causing main memory problems. In this paper, a Random Committee Node Classifier algorithm (RCNC is proposed for identifying cancer biomarkers, which is based on microarray gene expression data and Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI data. Data are enriched from other public databases, such as IntACT1 and UniProt2 and Gene Ontology3 (GO. Cancer Biomarkers are identified when applied to different datasets with an accuracy rate an accuracy rate 99.16%, 99.96% precision, 99.24% recall, 99.16% F1-measure and 99.6 ROC. To speed up the performance, it is run within a MapReduce framework, where RCNC MapReduce algorithm is much faster than RCNC sequential algorithm when having large datasets.

  4. Biomarkers for the clinical management of breast cancer: international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patani, Neill; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Dowsett, Mitch

    2013-07-01

    The higher incidence of breast cancer in developed countries has been tempered by reductions in mortality, largely attributable to mammographic screening programmes and advances in adjuvant therapy. Optimal systemic management requires consideration of clinical, pathological and biological parameters. Oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα), progesterone receptor (PgR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) are established biomarkers evaluated at diagnosis, which identify cardinal subtypes of breast cancer. Their prognostic and predictive utility effectively guides systemic treatment with endocrine, anti-HER2 and chemotherapy. Hence, accurate and reliable determination remains of paramount importance. However, the goals of personalized medicine and targeted therapies demand further information regarding residual risk and potential benefit of additional treatments in specific circumstances. The need for biomarkers which are fit for purpose, and the demands placed upon them, is therefore expected to increase. Technological advances, in particular high-throughput global gene expression profiling, have generated multi-gene signatures providing further prognostic and predictive information. The rational integration of routinely evaluated clinico-pathological parameters with key indicators of biological activity, such as proliferation markers, also provides a ready opportunity to improve the information available to guide systemic therapy decisions. The additional value of such information and its proper place in patient management is currently under evaluation in prospective clinical trials. Expanding the utility of biomarkers to lower resource settings requires an emphasis on cost effectiveness, quality assurance and possible international variations in tumor biology; the potential for improved clinical outcomes should be justified against logistical and economic considerations.

  5. Identification of prostate cancer biomarkers in urinary exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øverbye, Anders; Skotland, Tore; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd; Seierstad, Therese; Berge, Viktor; Sandvig, Kirsten; Llorente, Alicia

    2015-10-01

    Exosomes have recently appeared as a novel source of non-invasive cancer biomarkers since tumour-specific molecules can be found in exosomes isolated from biological fluids. We have here investigated the proteome of urinary exosomes by using mass spectrometry to identify proteins differentially expressed in prostate cancer patients compared to healthy male controls. In total, 15 control and 16 prostate cancer samples of urinary exosomes were analyzed. Importantly, 246 proteins were differentially expressed in the two groups. The majority of these proteins (221) were up-regulated in exosomes from prostate cancer patients. These proteins were analyzed according to specific criteria to create a focus list that contained 37 proteins. At 100% specificity, 17 of these proteins displayed individual sensitivities above 60%. Even though several of these proteins showed high sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer as individual biomarkers, combining them in a multi-panel test has the potential for full differentiation of prostate cancer from non-disease controls. The highest sensitivity, 94%, was observed for transmembrane protein 256 (TM256; chromosome 17 open reading frame 61). LAMTOR proteins were also distinctly enriched with very high specificity for patient samples. TM256 and LAMTOR1 could be used to augment the sensitivity to 100%. Other prominent proteins were V-type proton ATPase 16 kDa proteolipid subunit (VATL), adipogenesis regulatory factor (ADIRF), and several Rab-class members and proteasomal proteins. In conclusion, this study clearly shows the potential of using urinary exosomes in the diagnosis and clinical management of prostate cancer.

  6. Identifying gaps in the locoregional management of early breast cancer: highlights from the kyoto consensus conference.

    OpenAIRE

    Toi, Masakazu; Winer, Eric P.; INAMOTO, TAKASHI; BENSON, JOHN R.; Forbes, John F.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Robertson, John F. R.; Sasano, Hironobu; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Yamauchi, Akira; KLIMBERG, V. SUZANNE

    2011-01-01

    A consensus conference was held to investigate issues related to the local management of early breast cancer. Here, we highlight the major topics discussed at the conference and propose ideas for future studies. Regarding axillary management, we examined three major issues. First, we discussed whether the use of axillary reverse mapping could clarify the lymphatic system of breast and whether the ipsilateral arm might help avoid lymphedema. Second, the use of an indocyanine green fluorescent ...

  7. Targeting cancer testis antigens for biomarkers and immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: Current status and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil; Suri; Nirmala; Jagadish; Shikha; Saini; Namita; Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer ranks third among the estimatedcancer cases and cancer related mortalities in United States in 2014. Early detection and efficient therapy remains a significant clinical challenge for this disease. Therefore, there is a need to identify novel tumor asso-ciated molecules to target for biomarker development and immunotherapy. In this regard, cancer testis antigens have emerged as a potential targets for developing novel clinical biomarkers and immunotherapy for various malignancies. These germ cell specific proteins exhibit aberrant expression in cancer cells and contribute in tumorigenesis. Owing to their unique expression profile and immunogenicity in cancer patients, cancer testis antigens are clinically referred as the most promising tumor associated antigens. Several cancer testis antigens have been studied in colorectal cancer but none of them could be used in clinical practice. This review is an attempt to address the promising cancer testis antigens in colorectal cancer and their possible clinical implications as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets with particular focus on challenges and future interventions.

  8. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence for early breast cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian T; Zangar, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to inexpensively fabricate photonic crystal surfaces over substantial surface areas, they are amenable to single-use applications in biological sensing, such as disease biomarker detection in serum. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity, multiplexed biomarker detection in the context of breast cancer diagnosis. We will summarize recent efforts to improve the detection limits of such assays though the use of photonic crystal surfaces. Reduction of detection limits is driven by low autofluorescent substrates for photonic crystal fabrication, and detection instruments that take advantage of their unique features.

  9. A 2015 survey of established or potential epigenetic biomarkers for the accurate detection of human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, David E

    2016-07-01

    Context The silencing or activation of cancer-associated genes by epigenetic mechanisms can ultimately lead to the clonal expansion of cancer cells. Objective The aim of this review is to summarize all relevant epigenetic biomarkers that have been proposed to date for the diagnosis of some prevalent human cancers. Methods A Medline search for the terms epigenetic biomarkers, human cancers, DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs was performed. Results One hundred fifty-seven relevant publications were found and reviewed. Conclusion To date, a significant number of potential epigenetic cancer biomarkers of human cancer have been investigated, and some have advanced to clinical implementation.

  10. Telomerase promoter mutations in cancer: an emerging molecular biomarker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, João; Pinto, Vasco; Celestino, Ricardo; Reis, Marta; Pópulo, Helena; Boaventura, Paula; Melo, Miguel; Catarino, Telmo; Lima, Jorge; Lopes, José Manuel; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2014-08-01

    Cell immortalization has been considered for a long time as a classic hallmark of cancer cells. Besides telomerase reactivation, such immortalization could be due to telomere maintenance through the "alternative mechanism of telomere lengthening" (ALT) but the mechanisms underlying both forms of reactivation remained elusive. Mutations in the coding region of telomerase gene are very rare in the cancer setting, despite being associated with some degenerative diseases. Recently, mutations in telomerase (TERT) gene promoter were found in sporadic and familial melanoma and subsequently in several cancer models, notably in gliomas, thyroid cancer and bladder cancer. The importance of these findings has been reinforced by the association of TERT mutations in some cancer types with tumour aggressiveness and patient survival. In the first part of this review, we summarize the data on the biology of telomeres and telomerase, available methodological approaches and non-neoplastic diseases associated with telomere dysfunction. In the second part, we review the information on telomerase expression and genetic alterations in the most relevant types of cancer (skin, thyroid, bladder and central nervous system) on record, and discuss the value of telomerase as a new biomarker with impact on the prognosis and survival of the patients and as a putative therapeutic target.

  11. Circulating DNA as Potential Biomarker for Cancer Individualized Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shaorong; Liu Baorui; Lu Jianwei; Feng Jifeng

    2013-01-01

    Cancer individualized therapy often requires for gene mutation analysis of tumor tissue. However, tumor tissue is not always available in clinical practice, particularly from patients with refractory and recurrence disease. Even if patients have sufifcient tumor tissue for detection, as development of cancer, the gene status and drug sensitivity of tumor tissues could also change. Hence, screening mutations from primary tumor tissues becomes useless, it’s necessary to ifnd a surrogate tumor tissue for individualized gene screening. Circulating DNA is digested rapidly from blood, which could provide real-time information of the released fragment and make the real-time detection possible. Therefore, it’s expected that circulating DNA could be a potential tumor biomarker for cancer individualized therapy. This review focuses on the biology and clinical utility of circulating DNA mainly on gene mutation detection. Besides, its current status and possible direction in this research area is summarized and discussed objectively.

  12. Comparison of proteomic biomarker panels in urine and serum for ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Høgdall, Estrid;

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to confirm previously found candidate epithelial ovarian cancer biomarkers in urine and to compare a paired serum biomarker panel and a urine biomarker panel from the same study cohort with regard to the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the ...

  13. Enhancement of MS Signal Processing For Improved Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Qian

    Technological advances in proteomics have shown great potential in detecting cancer at the earliest stages. One way is to use the time of flight mass spectroscopy to identify biomarkers, or early disease indicators related to the cancer. Pattern analysis of time of flight mass spectra data from blood and tissue samples gives great hope for the identification of potential biomarkers among the complex mixture of biological and chemical samples for the early cancer detection. One of the keys issues is the pre-processing of raw mass spectra data. A lot of challenges need to be addressed: unknown noise character associated with the large volume of data, high variability in the mass spectroscopy measurements, and poorly understood signal background and so on. This dissertation focuses on developing statistical algorithms and creating data mining tools for computationally improved signal processing for mass spectrometry data. I have introduced an advanced accurate estimate of the noise model and a half-supervised method of mass spectrum data processing which requires little knowledge about the data.

  14. Circulating exosomal microRNAs as biomarkers of colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Ogata-Kawata

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs have been attracting major interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers of cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the miRNA profiles of serum exosomes and to identify those that are altered in colorectal cancer (CRC. To evaluate their use as diagnostic biomarkers, the relationship between specific exosomal miRNA levels and pathological changes of patients, including disease stage and tumor resection, was examined. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Microarray analyses of miRNAs in exosome-enriched fractions of serum samples from 88 primary CRC patients and 11 healthy controls were performed. The expression levels of miRNAs in the culture medium of five colon cancer cell lines were also compared with those in the culture medium of a normal colon-derived cell line. The expression profiles of miRNAs that were differentially expressed between CRC and control sample sets were verified using 29 paired samples from post-tumor resection patients. The sensitivities of selected miRNAs as biomarkers of CRC were evaluated and compared with those of known tumor markers (CA19-9 and CEA using a receiver operating characteristic analysis. The expression levels of selected miRNAs were also validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses of an independent set of 13 CRC patients. RESULTS: The serum exosomal levels of seven miRNAs (let-7a, miR-1229, miR-1246, miR-150, miR-21, miR-223, and miR-23a were significantly higher in primary CRC patients, even those with early stage disease, than in healthy controls, and were significantly down-regulated after surgical resection of tumors. These miRNAs were also secreted at significantly higher levels by colon cancer cell lines than by a normal colon-derived cell line. The high sensitivities of the seven selected exosomal miRNAs were confirmed by a receiver operating characteristic analysis. CONCLUSION: Exosomal miRNA signatures appear to mirror pathological changes of CRC patients and

  15. Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0113 TITLE: Genetic and epigenetic biomarkers for recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Beadchip microarray, high density beadchip, for this study. This array includes 485,577 CpG sites and covers CpGs in 99% of genes and 96% of CpG ...differentially methylated CpG sites in 17 genes between recurrent and non-recurrent tumor tissues, with a false discovery rate (FDR) [12] q-value less than

  16. Blood-based biomarkers of aggressive prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Men Long Liong

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Prostate cancer is a bimodal disease with aggressive and indolent forms. Current prostate-specific-antigen testing and digital rectal examination screening provide ambiguous results leading to both under-and over-treatment. Accurate, consistent diagnosis is crucial to risk-stratify patients and facilitate clinical decision making as to treatment versus active surveillance. Diagnosis is currently achieved by needle biopsy, a painful procedure. Thus, there is a clinical need for a minimally-invasive test to determine prostate cancer aggressiveness. A blood sample to predict Gleason score, which is known to reflect aggressiveness of the cancer, could serve as such a test. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood mRNA was isolated from North American and Malaysian prostate cancer patients/controls. Microarray analysis was conducted utilizing the Affymetrix U133 plus 2·0 platform. Expression profiles from 255 patients/controls generated 85 candidate biomarkers. Following quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis, ten disease-associated biomarkers remained for paired statistical analysis and normalization. RESULTS: Microarray analysis was conducted to identify 85 genes differentially expressed between aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 and controls. Expression of these genes was qRT-PCR verified. Statistical analysis yielded a final seven-gene panel evaluated as six gene-ratio duplexes. This molecular signature predicted as aggressive (ie, Gleason score ≥8 55% of G6 samples, 49% of G7(3+4, 79% of G7(4+3 and 83% of G8-10, while rejecting 98% of controls. CONCLUSION: In this study, we have developed a novel, blood-based biomarker panel which can be used as the basis of a simple blood test to identify men with aggressive prostate cancer and thereby reduce the overdiagnosis and overtreatment that currently results from diagnosis using PSA alone. We discuss possible clinical uses of the panel to identify men more likely to benefit from

  17. Computational protein biomarker prediction: a case study for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Bao-Ling

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent technological advances in mass spectrometry pose challenges in computational mathematics and statistics to process the mass spectral data into predictive models with clinical and biological significance. We discuss several classification-based approaches to finding protein biomarker candidates using protein profiles obtained via mass spectrometry, and we assess their statistical significance. Our overall goal is to implicate peaks that have a high likelihood of being biologically linked to a given disease state, and thus to narrow the search for biomarker candidates. Results Thorough cross-validation studies and randomization tests are performed on a prostate cancer dataset with over 300 patients, obtained at the Eastern Virginia Medical School using SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We obtain average classification accuracies of 87% on a four-group classification problem using a two-stage linear SVM-based procedure and just 13 peaks, with other methods performing comparably. Conclusions Modern feature selection and classification methods are powerful techniques for both the identification of biomarker candidates and the related problem of building predictive models from protein mass spectrometric profiles. Cross-validation and randomization are essential tools that must be performed carefully in order not to bias the results unfairly. However, only a biological validation and identification of the underlying proteins will ultimately confirm the actual value and power of any computational predictions.

  18. Pathological examination of breast cancer biomarkers: current status in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shinobu

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews the current status of pathological evaluation for biomarkers in Japan. The introduced issues are the international trends for estimation of biomarkers considering diagnosis and treatment decision, and pathological issues under discussion, and how Japanese Breast Cancer Society (JBCS) members have addressed issues related to pathology and biomarkers evaluation. As topics of immunohistochemical study, (1) ASCO/CAP guidelines, (2) Ki67 and other markers, (3) quantification and image analysis, (4) application of cytologic samples, (5) pre-analytical process, and (6) Japan Pathology Quality Assurance System are introduced. Various phases of concepts, guidelines, and methodologies are co-existed in today's clinical practice. It is expected in near future that conventional methods and molecular procedures will be emerged, and Japanese Quality assurance/Quality control (QA/QC) system will work practically. What we have to do in the next generation are to validate novel procedures, to evaluate the relationship between traditional concepts and newly proposed ideas, to establish a well organized QA/QC system, and to standardize pre-analytical process that are the basis of all procedures using pathological tissues.

  19. Colon Cancer Biomarkers To Identify Patients Suitable For Therapeutic Intervention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  20. Quantitative network measures as biomarkers for classifying prostate cancer disease states: a systems approach to diagnostic biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Dehmer

    Full Text Available Identifying diagnostic biomarkers based on genomic features for an accurate disease classification is a problem of great importance for both, basic medical research and clinical practice. In this paper, we introduce quantitative network measures as structural biomarkers and investigate their ability for classifying disease states inferred from gene expression data from prostate cancer. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by using eigenvalue and entropy-based graph invariants and compare the results with a conventional biomarker analysis of the underlying gene expression data.

  1. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading of prostate cancer - An ISUP consensus on contemporary grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egevad, Lars; Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Samaratunga, Hemamali

    2016-06-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) has issued guidelines for the grading of prostate cancer based on a consensus conference held in 2014. The recommendations resulting from the 2014 consensus conference were a further development of 2005 ISUP modified Gleason grading. In the 2014 system, morphological criteria are clarified, including updated definitions of Gleason pattern 4. In addition to the continued reporting of Gleason scores, we also recommend that Gleason scores ≤6, 3 + 4 = 7, 4 + 3 = 7, 8 and 9-10, respectively, be reported as five groups, i.e. ISUP grades 1-5. This new grading system has the dual benefit of predicting patient outcome as well as facilitating patient communication.

  2. Circulating protein and antibody biomarker for personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianda

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapies are revolutionizing standard cancer treatments. Immune checkpoint inhibitors likely function to enhance the tumor specific antigen response in order to achieve favorable clinical outcomes. Thus, continuous efforts to identify the common tumor-specific antigens are essential for the broad clinical application of these therapies. Several immunoproteomics approaches have been used in order to screen for this specificity. In a recent article from Jhaveri and colleagues published in the February issue of Cancer Immunology Research, antibody biomarkers were screened in pancreatic cancer patients who received allogeneic, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor-secreting pancreatic cancer vaccine (GVAX) by using a serum antibody-based SILAC immunoprecipitation (SASI) approach. Using this assay, several new tumor antigens (MYPT1, PSMC5 and TRFR) were identified that were found to have significantly different expression in tumors compared with normal tissue. Moreover, patients with detectable antibodies showed improved disease-free survival after GVAX therapy. These targets need to be further validated to determine the full spectrum of tumor antigen immunogencity and their potential clinical application. In addition to antibodies, circulating protein, DNA and RNA in peripheral blood are under clinical investigation as liquid biopsies and have the potential to provide guidance for future personalized cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M; Goel, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colonic epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer "epigenome" has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, are presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC.

  4. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arron Thind

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication.

  5. The Janus serum bank and biomarkers of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Gislefoss

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Janus serum bank, established in 1973, contains sera stored at –25 degrees collected from 330,000 originally healthy individuals. The number of cancer cases have increased from zero in 1973 to more than 50,000 in 2005, including invasive and non-invasive cancers. Information on cases have been obtained by coupling the Janus file against the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The sera have been used in over 70 different cancers research projects, usually in case-control studies and in collaboration with national and international research groups. The type of biomarker analysed include antibodies against Chlamydia, CMV, Epstein Barr virus, HPV and Helicobacter pylori. Leptin, long chain fatty acids, androgens and other hormones, vitamins as well as environmental toxins such as organochlorines are other types of cancer biomarkers investigated. Mutation analyses (BRCA-1 etc have been possible using PCR and the trace amounts of DNA remaining in the sera.Janus serum bank ble etablert i 1973 og inneholder sera lagret ved –25 grader, innsamlet fra 330.000 opprinnelig friske personer. Antall krefttilfeller har steget fra null i 1973 til over 50.000 i år 2005, inkludert både invasiv og ikke-invasiv kreft. Informasjon om kasus er tilgjengelig ved å koble Janus-filene mot Kreftregisterets databaser. Serumprøvene er blitt benyttet i over 70 forskjellige kreftforskningsprosjekter, som oftest i kasus-kontroll studier og i samarbeide med en rekke nasjonale og internasjonale forskningsgrupper. Mange ulike biomarkører på kreft er blitt analysert, bl.a. antistoffer mot Chlamydia, CMV, Epstein Barr virus, HPV og Helicobacter pylori. Leptin, lange fettsyrer, androgener og andre hormoner, vitaminer såvel som miljøgifter av typen organiske klorforbindelser er eksempler på andre kreftbiomarkører som er undersøkt. Det har også vært mulig å gjøre mutasjonsanalyser (BRCA-1 etc ved å bruke PCR til å amplifisere opp den spormengden DNA som finnes i serum.

  6. Validation of Candidate Serum Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers for Early Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Su

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have previously analyzed protein profi les using Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectroscopy (SELDI-TOF-MS [Kozak et al. 2003, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100:12343–8] and identified 3 differentially expressed serum proteins for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer (OC [Kozak et al. 2005, Proteomics, 5:4589–96], namely, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I, transthyretin (TTR and transferin (TF. The objective of the present study is to determine the efficacy of the three OC biomarkers for the detection of early stage (ES OC, in direct comparison to CA125.Methods: The levels of CA125, apoA-I, TTR and TF were measured in 392 serum samples [82 women with normal ovaries (N, 24 women with benign ovarian tumors (B, 85 women with ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (LMP, 126 women with early stage ovarian cancer (ESOC, and 75 women with late stage ovarian cancer (LSOC], obtained through the GOG and Cooperative Human Tissue Network. Following statistical analysis, multivariate regression models were built to evaluate the utility of the three OC markers in early detection.Results: Multiple logistic regression models (MLRM utilizing all biomarker values (CA125, TTR, TF and apoA-I from all histological subtypes (serous, mucinous, and endometrioid adenocarcinoma distinguished normal samples from LMP with 91% sensitivity (specifi city 92%, and normal samples from ESOC with a sensitivity of 89% (specifi city 92%. MLRM, utilizing values of all four markers from only the mucinous histological subtype showed that collectively, CA125, TTR, TF and apoA-I, were able to distinguish normal samples from mucinous LMP with 90% sensitivity, and further distinguished normal samples from early stage mucinous ovarian cancer with a sensitivity of 95%. In contrast, in serum samples from patients with mucinous tumors, CA125 alone was able to distinguish normal samples from LMP and early stage ovarian cancer with a sensitivity of

  7. Gradually implemented new biomarkers for prognostication of breast cancer : complete case analysis may introduce bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathy, Nirmala Bhoo; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Taib, Nur Aishah; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Yip, Cheng Har

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Many recent studies investigated the prognostic value of new biomarkers in breast cancer using data from cancer registries. Some of these studies were conducted using only patients for whom biomarker status was available (or tested). Using human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) a

  8. A Preliminary Analysis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Biomarkers in Serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE-YUAN XIAO; YING TANG; XIU-PING WEI; DA-CHENG HE

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify potential serum biomarkers that could be used to discriminate lungcancers from normal. Methods Proteomic spectra of twenty-eight serum samples from patientswith non-small cell lung cancer and twelve from normal individuals were generated by SELDI(Surfaced Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization) Mass Spectrometry. Anion-exchange columns wereused to fractionate the sera into 6 designated pH groups. Two different types of protein chip arrays,IMAC-Cu and WCX2, were employed. Samples were examined in PBSII Protein Chip Reader(Ciphergen Biosystem Inc) and the discriminatory profiling between cancer and normal samples wasanalyzed with Biomarker Pattern software. Results Five distinct potential lung cancer biomarkerswith higher sensitivity and specificity were found, with four common biomarkers in both IMAC-Cuand WCX2 chip; the remaining biomarker occurred only in WCX2 chip. Two biomarkers wereup-regulated while three biomarkers were down-regulated in the serum samples from patients withnon-small cell lung cancer. The sensitivities provided by the individual biomarkers were 75%-96.43%and specificities were 75%-100%. Conclusions The preliminary results suggest that serum is acapable resource for detecting specific non-small cell lung cancer biomarkers. SELDI massspectrometry is a useful tool for the detection and identification of new potential biomarker ofnon-small cell lung cancer in serum.

  9. Expert consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of cancer-related depressed mood state based on Chinese medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This consensus statement is organized into six parts: 1) Definitions: cancer-related depressed mood state is defined as a group of depressive symptoms, rather than major depressive disorder. Thus, “cancer-related depression” or “depressed mood state” is introduced as standard terminology and associated with the Chinese medicine concept of “yu zheng” (depression syndrome). 2) Pathogenesis: factors including psychological stress, cancer pain, cancer fatigue, sleep disorders, surgery trauma, che...

  10. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colon & rectal cancer multidisciplinary management: the radiology experts review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudyka, V; Blomqvist, L; Beets-Tan, R G H; Boelens, P G; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J; Dieguez, A; Brown, G

    2014-04-01

    Some interesting shifts have taken place in the diagnostic approach for detection of colorectal lesions over the past decade. This article accompanies the recent EURECCA consensus group reccomendations for optimal management of colon and rectal cancers. In summary, imaging has a crucial role to play in the diagnosis, staging assessment and follow up of patients with colon and rectal cancer. Recent advances include the use of CT colonography instead of Barium Enema in the diagnosis of colonoic cancer and as an alternative to colonoscopy. Modern mutlidetector CT scanning techniques have also shown improvements in prognostic stratification of patients with colonic cancer and clinical trials are underway testing the selective use of neoadjuvant therapy for imaging identified high risk colon cancers. In rectal cancer, high resolution MRI with a voxel size less or equal to 3 × 1 × 1 mm3 on T2-weighted images has a proven ability to accurately stage patients with rectal cancer. Moreover, preoperative identification of prognostic features allows stratification of patients into different prognostic groups based on assessment of depth of extramural spread, relationship of the tumour edge to the mesorectal fascia (MRF) and extramural venous invasion (EMVI). These poor prognostic features predict an increased risk of local recurrence and/or metastatic disease and should form the basis for preoperative local staging and multidisciplinary preoperative discussion of patient treatment options.

  11. Expert consensus contouring guidelines for IMRT in esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional two-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and do not provide sufficient anatomical detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials Eight expert academically-based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform CT simulation datasets and an accompanying diagnostic PET-CT were distributed to each expert, and he/she was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results Kappa statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the three test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the three test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets utilizing these guidelines may require modification in the future. PMID:26104943

  12. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence R. [Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  13. Biomarker Identification and Pathway Analysis by Serum Metabolomics of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingrong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death, for which no validated tumor biomarker is sufficiently accurate to be useful for diagnosis. Additionally, the metabolic alterations associated with the disease are unclear. In this study, we investigated the construction, interaction, and pathways of potential lung cancer biomarkers using metabolomics pathway analysis based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database and the Human Metabolome Database to identify the top altered pathways for analysis and visualization. We constructed a diagnostic model using potential serum biomarkers from patients with lung cancer. We assessed their specificity and sensitivity according to the area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves, which could be used to distinguish patients with lung cancer from normal subjects. The pathway analysis indicated that sphingolipid metabolism was the top altered pathway in lung cancer. ROC curve analysis indicated that glycerophospho-N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (GpAEA and sphingosine were potential sensitive and specific biomarkers for lung cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Compared with the traditional lung cancer diagnostic biomarkers carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratin 19 fragment, GpAEA and sphingosine were as good or more appropriate for detecting lung cancer. We report our identification of potential metabolic diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of lung cancer and clarify the metabolic alterations in lung cancer.

  14. Consensus Recommendations for Advancing Breast Cancer: Risk Identification and Screening in Ethnically Diverse Younger Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Stojadinovic, Thomas A Summers, John Eberhardt, Albert Cerussi, Warren Grundfest, Charles M. Peterson, Michael Brazaitis, Elizabeth Krupinski, Harold Freeman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A need exists for a breast cancer risk identification paradigm that utilizes relevant demographic, clinical, and other readily obtainable patient-specific data in order to provide individualized cancer risk assessment, direct screening efforts, and detect breast cancer at an early disease stage in historically underserved populations, such as younger women (under age 40 and minority populations, who represent a disproportionate number of military beneficiaries. Recognizing this unique need for military beneficiaries, a consensus panel was convened by the USA TATRC to review available evidence for individualized breast cancer risk assessment and screening in young (< 40, ethnically diverse women with an overall goal of improving care for military beneficiaries. In the process of review and discussion, it was determined to publish our findings as the panel believes that our recommendations have the potential to reduce health disparities in risk assessment, health promotion, disease prevention, and early cancer detection within and in other underserved populations outside of the military. This paper aims to provide clinicians with an overview of the clinical factors, evidence and recommendations that are being used to advance risk assessment and screening for breast cancer in the military.

  15. Long Non-Coding RNA as Potential Biomarker for Prostate Cancer: Is It Making a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Junli; Tang, Jie; Wang, Guo; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Whole genome transcriptomic analyses have identified numerous long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts that are increasingly implicated in cancer biology. LncRNAs are found to promote essential cancer cell functions such as proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, with the potential to serve as novel biomarkers of various cancers and to further reveal uncharacterized aspects of tumor biology. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms as well as the clinical applications of lncRNAs in diverse diseases are not completely understood, and remain to be fully explored. LncRNAs may be critical players and regulators in prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression, and could serve as potential biomarkers for prostate cancer. This review focuses on lncRNA biomarkers that are already available for clinical use and provides an overview of lncRNA biomarkers that are under investigation for clinical development in prostate cancer. PMID:28272371

  16. Advances in Gas Chromatographic Methods for the Identification of Biomarkers in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos A. Kouremenos, Mikael Johansson, Philip J. Marriott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening complex biological specimens such as exhaled air, tissue, blood and urine to identify biomarkers in different forms of cancer has become increasingly popular over the last decade, mainly due to new instruments and improved bioinformatics. However, despite some progress, the identification of biomarkers has shown to be a difficult task with few new biomarkers (excluding recent genetic markers being considered for introduction to clinical analysis. This review describes recent advances in gas chromatographic methods for the identification of biomarkers in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. It presents a general overview of cancer metabolism, the current biomarkers used for cancer diagnosis and treatment, a background to metabolic changes in tumors, an overview of current GC methods, and collectively presents the scope and outlook of GC methods in oncology.

  17. Excerpts from the 1st international NTNU symposium on current and future clinical biomarkers of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robles, Ana I; Olsen, Karina Standahl; Tsui, Dana W T;

    2016-01-01

    The goal of biomarker research is to identify clinically valid markers. Despite decades of research there has been disappointingly few molecules or techniques that are in use today. The "1st International NTNU Symposium on Current and Future Clinical Biomarkers of Cancer: Innovation and Implement......The goal of biomarker research is to identify clinically valid markers. Despite decades of research there has been disappointingly few molecules or techniques that are in use today. The "1st International NTNU Symposium on Current and Future Clinical Biomarkers of Cancer: Innovation...

  18. (Very) Early technology assessment and translation of predictive biomarkers in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel-Cases, Anna; Schouten, Philip C; Steuten, Lotte M G; Retèl, Valesca P; Linn, Sabine C; van Harten, Wim H

    2017-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers can guide treatment decisions in breast cancer. Many studies are undertaken to discover and translate these biomarkers, yet few biomarkers make it to practice. Before use in clinical decision making, predictive biomarkers need to demonstrate analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility. While attaining analytical and clinical validity is relatively straightforward, by following methodological recommendations, the achievement of clinical utility is extremely challenging. It requires demonstrating three associations: the biomarker with the outcome (prognostic association), the effect of treatment independent of the biomarker, and the differential treatment effect between the prognostic and the predictive biomarker (predictive association). In addition, economical, ethical, regulatory, organizational and patient/doctor-related aspects are hampering the translational process. Traditionally, these aspects do not receive much attention until formal approval or reimbursement of a biomarker test (informed by Health Technology Assessment (HTA)) is at stake, at which point the clinical utility and sometimes price of the test can hardly be influenced anymore. When HTA analyses are performed earlier, during biomarker research and development, they may prevent further development of those biomarkers unlikely to ever provide sufficient added value to society, and rather facilitate translation of the promising ones. Early HTA is particularly relevant for the predictive biomarker field, as expensive medicines are under pressure and the need for biomarkers to guide their appropriate use is huge. Closer interaction between clinical researchers and HTA experts throughout the translational research process will ensure that available data and methodologies will be used most efficiently to facilitate biomarker translation.

  19. Identification of urine protein biomarkers with the potential for early detection of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hongjuan Zhang; Jing Cao; Lin Li; Yanbin Liu; Hong Zhao; Nan Li; Bo Li; Aiqun Zhang; Huanwei Huang; She Chen; Mengqiu Dong; Lei Yu; Jian Zhang; Liang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and has an overall 5-year survival rate lower than 15%. Large-scale clinical trials have demonstrated a significant relative reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals with low-dose computed tomography screening. However, biomarkers capable of identifying the most at-risk population and detecting lung cancer before it becomes clinically apparent are urgently needed in the clinic. Here, we report the identification of urine biomark...

  20. Biomarker Identification and Pathway Analysis by Serum Metabolomics of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yingrong Chen; Zhihong Ma; Lishan Min; Hongwei Li; Bin Wang; Jing Zhong; Licheng Dai

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death, for which no validated tumor biomarker is sufficiently accurate to be useful for diagnosis. Additionally, the metabolic alterations associated with the disease are unclear. In this study, we investigated the construction, interaction, and pathways of potential lung cancer biomarkers using metabolomics pathway analysis based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database and the Human Metabolome Database to identify the top...

  1. Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: update on the Brazilian consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosário, Pedro Weslley; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa Maria Z; Maia, Ana Luiza; Vaisman, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Thyroid nodules are frequent findings, especially when sensitive imaging methods are used. Although thyroid cancer is relatively rare, its incidence is increasing, particularly in terms of small tumors, which have an uncertain clinical relevance. Most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer exhibit satisfactory clinical outcomes when treatment is appropriate, and their mortality rate is similar to that of the overall population. However, relapse occurs in a considerable fraction of these patients, and some patients stop responding to conventional treatment and eventually die from their disease. Therefore, the challenge is how to identify the individuals who require more aggressive disease management while sparing the majority of patients from unnecessary treatments and procedures. We have updated the Brazilian Consensus that was published in 2007, emphasizing the diagnostic and therapeutic advances that the participants, representing several Brazilian university centers, consider most relevant in clinical practice. The formulation of the present guidelines was based on the participants' experience and a review of the relevant literature.

  2. Breast cancer biomarkers predict weight loss after gastric bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauter Edward R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has long been associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk and more recently with premenopausal breast cancer risk. We previously observed that nipple aspirate fluid (n levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA were associated with obesity. Serum (s levels of adiponectin are lower in women with higher body mass index (BMI and with breast cancer. We conducted a prospective study of obese women who underwent gastric bypass surgery to determine: 1 change in n- and s-adiponectin and nPSA after surgery and 2 if biomarker change is related to change in BMI. Samples (30-s, 28-n and BMI were obtained from women 0, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Findings There was a significant increase after surgery in pre- but not postmenopausal women at all time points in s-adiponectin and at 3 and 6 months in n-adiponectin. Low n-PSA and high s-adiponectin values were highly correlated with decrease in BMI from baseline. Conclusions Adiponectin increases locally in the breast and systemically in premenopausal women after gastric bypass. s-adiponectin in pre- and nPSA in postmenopausal women correlated with greater weight loss. This study provides preliminary evidence for biologic markers to predict weight loss after gastric bypass surgery.

  3. TAGCNA: a method to identify significant consensus events of copy number alterations in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiguo Yuan

    Full Text Available Somatic copy number alteration (CNA is a common phenomenon in cancer genome. Distinguishing significant consensus events (SCEs from random background CNAs in a set of subjects has been proven to be a valuable tool to study cancer. In order to identify SCEs with an acceptable type I error rate, better computational approaches should be developed based on reasonable statistics and null distributions. In this article, we propose a new approach named TAGCNA for identifying SCEs in somatic CNAs that may encompass cancer driver genes. TAGCNA employs a peel-off permutation scheme to generate a reasonable null distribution based on a prior step of selecting tag CNA markers from the genome being considered. We demonstrate the statistical power of TAGCNA on simulated ground truth data, and validate its applicability using two publicly available cancer datasets: lung and prostate adenocarcinoma. TAGCNA identifies SCEs that are known to be involved with proto-oncogenes (e.g. EGFR, CDK4 and tumor suppressor genes (e.g. CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and provides many additional SCEs with potential biological relevance in these data. TAGCNA can be used to analyze the significance of CNAs in various cancers. It is implemented in R and is freely available at http://tagcna.sourceforge.net/.

  4. [Consensus: Rational approach towards the patient with cancer, fever and neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaya, María Elena; Rabagliati, Ricardo; Bidart, Teresa; Payá, Ernesto; Guzmán, Ana M; Morales, Ricardo; Braun, Stephanie; Bronfman, Lucía; Ferrés, Marcela; Flores, Claudio; García, Patricia; Letelier, Luz M; Puga, Bárbara; Salgado, Carmen; Thompson, Luis; Tordecilla, Juan; Zubieta, Marcela

    2005-01-01

    The severity and duration of post chemotherapy neutropenia were recognized during the 1960s as main predisposing factors for infections in cancer patients. At the beginning of the 70's a standard management approach for all febrile neutropenia (FN) episodes was proposed, based on hospitalization and intravenous empirical broad spectrum antibiotic therapy. Widespread use of this approach resulted in a significant reduction in mortality attributable to bacterial infections. During the last 10 to 15 years, reappraisal of this standard approach has been done by several research groups who question the benefit of treating all FN patients similarly without taking in to consideration differences in severity of the FN episodes. This reappraisal has led during the 1990s to the development of the concept of high and low risk FN episodes that has been the base for the adoption of selective therapies based on the risk categorization of the individual patient. The Chilean Infectious Diseases Society called upon two government National Programs responsible for the appropriate distribution of chemotherapeutic drugs to all pediatric and adults cancer patients within the public health system, and upon the Chilean Hematology Society for the development of a Consensus on Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention of Infections during FN Episodes in Cancer patients. The need for this Consensus is based on two main aspects: the new approaches proposed during the past year for management of these episodes, and the increasing population of cancer patients receiving improved chemotherapeutic agents that has increased there survival possibilities as well as there possibility to suffer a FN episode. The topics discussed in this document are based on an updated systematic and analytic review of the medical literature including epidemiology, laboratory diagnostics, risk categorization, treatment and prophylaxis. National data was included when available in order to provide the healthcare personnel

  5. Putative Biomarkers and Targets of Estrogen Receptor Negative Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Byers

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a progressive and potentially fatal disease that affects women of all ages. Like all progressive diseases, early and reliable diagnosis is the key for successful treatment and annihilation. Biomarkers serve as indicators of pathological, physiological, or pharmacological processes. Her2/neu, CA15.3, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and cytokeratins are biomarkers that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. The structural and functional complexity of protein biomarkers and the heterogeneity of the breast cancer pathology present challenges to the scientific community. Here we review estrogen receptor-related putative breast cancer biomarkers, including those of putative breast cancer stem cells, a minor population of estrogen receptor negative tumor cells that retain the stem cell property of self renewal. We also review a few promising cytoskeleton targets for ER alpha negative breast cancer.

  6. Proteomic approaches to biomarker discovery in lung cancers by SELDI technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖雪媛; 卫秀平; 何大澄

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is to identify protein profiles that could be used to discover specific biomarkers in serum and discriminate lung cancer. Thirty serum samples from patients with lung cancer (15 cases of primary brochogenic carcinoma, 9 cases of metastasis lung cancer and 6 cases of lung cancer after chemotherapy) and twelve from healthy individuals were analyzed by SELDI (Surfaced Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization) technology. Anion-exchange columns were used to fractionate the sera with 6 designated pH washing solutions. Two types of protein chip arrays, IMAC-Cu and WCX2, were employed. Protein chips were examined in PBSII ProteinChip Reader (Ciphergen Biosystems Inc.) and the resulting profiles between cancer and normal were analyzed with Biomarker Wizard System. In total, 15 potential lung cancer biomarkers, of which 6 were up-regulated and 9 were down-regulated, were discovered in the serum samples from patients with lung cancer. 5 of 15 these biomarkers were able to be detected on both WCX2 and IMAC-Cu protein chips. The sensitivities provided by the individual markers range from 44.8% to 93.1% and the specificities were 85.0%-94.4%. Our results suggest that serum is a capable resource for detection of lung cancer with specific biomarkers. Moreover, protein chip array system was shown to be a useful tool for identification, as well as detection of disease biomarkers in sera.

  7. Discovery and development of DNA methylation-based biomarkers for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Kimberly; Holcomb, Thomas; Januario, Tom; Yauch, Robert L; Du, Pan; Bourgon, Richard; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Amler, Lukas C; Hampton, Garret M; S Shames, David

    2014-02-01

    Lung cancer remains the primary cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Improved tools for early detection and therapeutic stratification would be expected to increase the survival rate for this disease. Alterations in the molecular pathways that drive lung cancer, which include epigenetic modifications, may provide biomarkers to help address this major unmet clinical need. Epigenetic changes, which are defined as heritable changes in gene expression that do not alter the primary DNA sequence, are one of the hallmarks of cancer, and prevalent in all types of cancer. These modifications represent a rich source of biomarkers that have the potential to be implemented in clinical practice. This perspective describes recent advances in the discovery of epigenetic biomarkers in lung cancer, specifically those that result in the methylation of DNA at CpG sites. We discuss one approach for methylation-based biomarker assay development that describes the discovery at a genome-scale level, which addresses some of the practical considerations for design of assays that can be implemented in the clinic. We emphasize that an integrated technological approach will enable the development of clinically useful DNA methylation-based biomarker assays. While this article focuses on current literature and primary research findings in lung cancer, the principles we describe here apply to the discovery and development of epigenetic biomarkers for other types of cancer.

  8. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  9. Current advances in biomarkers for targeted therapy in triple-negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleisher B

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brett Fleisher,1 Charlotte Clarke,2 Sihem Ait-Oudhia1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Center for Pharmacometrics and Systems Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Orlando, FL, 2Department of Translational Research, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a complex heterogeneous disease characterized by the absence of three hallmark receptors: human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor. Compared to other breast cancer subtypes, TNBC is more aggressive, has a higher prevalence in African-Americans, and more frequently affects younger patients. Currently, TNBC lacks clinically accepted targets for tailored therapy, warranting the need for candidate biomarkers. BiomarkerBase, an online platform used to find biomarkers reported in clinical trials, was utilized to screen all potential biomarkers for TNBC and select only the ones registered in completed TNBC trials through clinicaltrials.gov. The selected candidate biomarkers were classified as surrogate, prognostic, predictive, or pharmacodynamic (PD and organized by location in the blood, on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, or in the nucleus. Blood biomarkers include vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and interleukin-8 (IL-­8; cell surface biomarkers include EGFR, insulin-like growth factor binding protein, c-Kit, c-Met, and PD-L1; cytoplasm biomarkers include PIK3CA, pAKT/S6/p4E-BP1, PTEN, ALDH1, and the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR-related metabolites; and nucleus biomarkers include BRCA1, the glucocorticoid receptor, TP53, and Ki67. Candidate biomarkers were further organized into a “cellular protein network” that demonstrates potential connectivity. This review provides an inventory and reference point for promising biomarkers for breakthrough targeted therapies in TNBC. Keywords: anti-cancer directed pharmacotherapy, difficult

  10. Urinary APE1/Ref-1: A Potential Bladder Cancer Biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunga; Shin, Ju Hyun; Lee, Yu Ran; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Song, Ki Hak; Na, Yong Gil; Chang, Seok Jong; Lim, Jae Sung; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is one of the most common urothelial cancers with still noticeable incidence rate. Early detection of BCa is highly correlated with successful therapeutic outcomes. We previously showed that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) was expressed at an increased level in the serum of BCa patients when compared to the level in healthy controls. In this study, we investigated whether urinary APE1/Ref-1 was also elevated in patients with BCa. In this case-control study, voided urine was collected from 277 subjects including 169 BCa patients and 108 non-BCa controls. Urinary APE1/Ref-1 level was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). APE1/Ref-1 levels were significantly elevated in BCa patients relative to levels in non-BCa controls and were correlated with tumor grade and stage. Urinary APE1/Ref-1 levels were also higher in patients with recurrence history of BCa. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of APE1/Ref-1 showed an area under the curve of 0.83, indicating the reliability and validity of this biomarker. The optimal combination of sensitivity and specificity was determined to be 82% and 80% at a cut-off value of 0.376 ng/100 μL for detection of APE1/Ref-1 in urine. In conclusion, urinary APE1/Ref-1 levels measured from noninvasively obtained body fluids would be clinically applicable for diagnosis of BCa.

  11. Building the Evidence Base of Blood-Based Biomarkers for Early Detection of Cancer: A Rapid Systematic Mapping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Uttley

    2016-08-01

    Interpretation: This study is the first to systematically and comprehensively map blood biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Use of this rapid systematic mapping approach found a broad range of relevant biomarkers allowing an evidence-based approach to identification of promising biomarkers for development of a blood-based cancer screening test in the general population.

  12. Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Adjuvant Systemic Therapy for Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lyndsay N.; McShane, Lisa M.; Andre, Fabrice; Collyar, Deborah E.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Kuderer, Nicole M.; Liu, Minetta C.; Mennel, Robert G.; Van Poznak, Catherine; Bast, Robert C.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on appropriate use of breast tumor biomarker assay results to guide decisions on adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. Methods A literature search and prospectively defined study selection sought systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, prospective-retrospective studies, and prospective comparative observational studies published from 2006 through 2014. Outcomes of interest included overall survival and disease-free or recurrence-free survival. Expert panel members used informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. Results The literature search identified 50 relevant studies. One randomized clinical trial and 18 prospective-retrospective studies were found to have evaluated the clinical utility, as defined by the guideline, of specific biomarkers for guiding decisions on the need for adjuvant systemic therapy. No studies that met guideline criteria for clinical utility were found to guide choice of specific treatments or regimens. Recommendations In addition to estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, the panel found sufficient evidence of clinical utility for the biomarker assays Oncotype DX, EndoPredict, PAM50, Breast Cancer Index, and urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in specific subgroups of breast cancer. No biomarker except for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 was found to guide choices of specific treatment regimens. Treatment decisions should also consider disease stage, comorbidities, and patient preferences. PMID:26858339

  13. Exosomal proteins as prognostic biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Birgitte Sandfeld; Aggerholm-Pedersen, N; Bæk, R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of exosomes as biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an intriguing approach in the liquid-biopsy era. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles with membrane-bound proteins that reflect their originating cell. Prognostic biomarkers are needed to improve patient selection...

  14. Proteomic profiling of exosomes leads to the identification of novel biomarkers for prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Duijvesz (Diederick); K.E. Burnum-Johnson (Kristin); M.A. Gritsenko (Marina); A.M. Hoogland (Marije); M.S. Vredenbregt-van den Berg (Mirella); R. Willemsen (Rob); T.M. Luider (Theo); L. Paša-Tolić (Ljiljana); G.W. Jenster (Guido)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, the complexity of body fluids often hampers biomarker discovery. An attractive alternative approach is the isolation of small vesicles, i.e. exosomes, ∼10

  15. Molecular Biomarkers of Colorectal Cancer: A Review of Published Articles From Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geramizadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Context Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide (the third most common cancer in the world and is especially more common in Western countries; however, its incidence has been increased significantly during the last few years in Eastern countries such as Iran and considered as one of the five common cancers in this country. According to molecular pathways, numerous biomarkers have been identified for colorectal cancers which help patients’ management. Evidence aquisition In this study, we tried to review published articles about the molecular biomarkers of colorectal cancer from Iran. We searched medical databases such as google scholar, Scopus, PubMed, Magiran, SID and Iran Medex for keywords of “colon cancer, KRAS, BRAF, mismatch repair gene, Microsatellite instability, molecular genetics, molecular pathogenesis, biomarker and Iran” to find studies published about colorectal cancers from Iran regarding molecular biomarkers. Conclusion This study showed that molecular biomarkers in colorectal cancer of Iranian patients are not so different from Western population.

  16. HER2: An emerging biomarker in non-breast and non-gastric cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhayati Omar

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Moving forward, the rigorous evaluation of HER2 (protein and genomic status as a predictive biomarker will be necessary to bring anti-HER2 therapeutics for non-breast and non-gastric cancers to the clinic.

  17. [Circulating biomarkers association in the follow-up of patients with oral cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, G; Cozzolino, A; Santagata, M; Vicidomini, A; Itro, A

    2001-05-01

    The goal of this study is to analyze the importance of circulating biomarkers association in the management of patients affected by oral cancer. In this study a survey is made of the international experience from 1980 to 1990 based on the presence of CEA, LASA, SCC Ag, TPA, ferritina, CA-50 and others in patients affected by oral cancer and the sensitivity and specificity of these circulating biomarkers association are assessed. In patients with active disease, the results obtained at the time of diagnosis of oral cancer are not satisfactory due to poor specificity of these circulating biomarkers association. The conclusions is drawn that the circulating biomarkers association (especially CEA, SCC Ag, LASA, ferritin, TPA and CA-50) appears to be useful in the prognosis and staging of oral cancer, while their presence is not significative for the diagnosis.

  18. Guidelines for biomarker testing in metastatic melanoma: a National Consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Algarra, S; Fernández-Figueras, M T; López-Martín, J A; Santos-Briz, A; Arance, A; Lozano, M D; Berrocal, A; Ríos-Martín, J J; Espinosa, E; Rodríguez-Peralto, J L

    2014-04-01

    This consensus statement, conceived as a joint initiative of the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM), makes diagnostic and treatment recommendations for the management of patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma based on the current scientific evidence on biomarker use. This document thus provides an opportunity to improve healthcare efficiency and resource use, which will benefit these patients. Based on the data available so far, this expert group recommends routinely testing patients with metastatic melanoma for BRAF mutation status, as the result affects the subsequent therapeutic management of these patients. The analysis of genetic alterations in KIT may be reasonable in patients with primary tumours in acral or mucosal sites or on chronically sun-exposed skin, in an advanced condition, but not in patients with other types of melanomas. This panel believes that testing for other genetic alterations, such as NRAS mutation status in patients not carrying BRAF mutations, GNAQ/GNA11 mutational analysis or genetic alterations in PTEN, is not currently indicated as routine clinical practice, because the results do not influence treatment planning in these patients at the present time. Other important issues addressed in this document are the organisational requirements and quality controls needed for proper testing of these biomarkers, and the legal implications to be borne in mind.

  19. Potential utility of cancer-specific biomarkers for assessing response to hormonal treatments in metastatic prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalken, J.; Dijkstra, S.; Baskin-Bey, E.; Oort, I. van

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men and there is an urgent clinical need to improve its detection and treatment. The introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a biomarker for prostate cancer several decades ago represented an important step forward in our abil

  20. Identification of plasma lipid biomarkers for prostate cancer by lipidomics and bioinformatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinchun Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipids have critical functions in cellular energy storage, structure and signaling. Many individual lipid molecules have been associated with the evolution of prostate cancer; however, none of them has been approved to be used as a biomarker. The aim of this study is to identify lipid molecules from hundreds plasma apparent lipid species as biomarkers for diagnosis of prostate cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using lipidomics, lipid profiling of 390 individual apparent lipid species was performed on 141 plasma samples from 105 patients with prostate cancer and 36 male controls. High throughput data generated from lipidomics were analyzed using bioinformatic and statistical methods. From 390 apparent lipid species, 35 species were demonstrated to have potential in differentiation of prostate cancer. Within the 35 species, 12 were identified as individual plasma lipid biomarkers for diagnosis of prostate cancer with a sensitivity above 80%, specificity above 50% and accuracy above 80%. Using top 15 of 35 potential biomarkers together increased predictive power dramatically in diagnosis of prostate cancer with a sensitivity of 93.6%, specificity of 90.1% and accuracy of 97.3%. Principal component analysis (PCA and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA demonstrated that patient and control populations were visually separated by identified lipid biomarkers. RandomForest and 10-fold cross validation analyses demonstrated that the identified lipid biomarkers were able to predict unknown populations accurately, and this was not influenced by patient's age and race. Three out of 13 lipid classes, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, ether-linked phosphatidylethanolamine (ePE and ether-linked phosphatidylcholine (ePC could be considered as biomarkers in diagnosis of prostate cancer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using lipidomics and bioinformatic and statistical methods, we have identified a few out of hundreds plasma apparent lipid molecular

  1. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers and Mediators of Cell–Cell Communication in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Molly A.

    2015-01-01

    The realization of personalized medicine for cancer will rely not only on the development of new therapies, but on biomarkers that direct these therapies to the right patient. MicroRNA expression profiles in the primary tumor have been shown to differ between cancer patients and healthy individuals, suggesting they might make useful biomarkers. However, examination of microRNA expression in the primary tumor requires an invasive biopsy procedure. More recently, microRNAs have been shown to be...

  2. Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor-Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    cDNA. Lobular carcinoma - 2 A polyclonal pan-TM antibody that recognizes multiple TM Phyllodes tumor - 1 Not determined from the initial pathology...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8162 TITLE: Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Tropomyosin-l, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker DAMD17-98-1-8162 of Human Breast Cancer 6. A UTHOR

  3. Applying tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers in product regulation and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Stephen S; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2010-06-21

    Tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers are metabolites or protein or DNA adducts of specific compounds in tobacco products. Highly reliable analytical methods, based mainly on mass spectrometry, have been developed and applied in large studies of many of these biomarkers. A panel of tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers is suggested here, and typical values for smokers and nonsmokers are summarized. This panel of biomarkers has potential applications in the new and challenging area of tobacco product regulation and in the development of rational approaches to cancer prevention by establishing carcinogen and toxicant uptake and excretion in people exposed to tobacco products.

  4. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence.

  5. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K D′Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India. Early diagnosis is imperative in improving outcomes and preserving quality of life. High index of suspicion is to be maintained for leukoplakia (high risk site. Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed tongue cancer should include essential tests: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is investigative modality of choice when indicated. Computed tomography (CT scan is an option when MRI is unavailable. In early lesions when imaging is not warranted ultrasound may help guide management of the neck. Early stage cancers (stage I & II require single modality treatment - either surgery or radiotherapy. Surgery is preferred. Adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated for T3/T4 cancers, presence of high risk features [lymphovascular emboli (LVE, perineural invasion (PNI, poorly differentiated, node +,close margins. Adjuvant chemoradiation (CTRT is indicated for positive margins and extranodal disease. Locally advanced operable cancers (stage III & IVA require combined multimodality treatment - surgery + adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant treatment is indicated in all and in the presence of high risk features as described above. Locally advanced inoperable cancers (stage IVB are treated with palliative chemo-radiotherapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or symptomatic treatment depending upon the performance status. Select cases may be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical salvage. Metastatic disease (stage IVC should be treated with a goal for palliation. Chemotherapy may be offered to patients with good performance status. Local treatment in the form of radiotherapy may be added for palliation of symptoms. Intense follow-up every 3 months is required for initial 2 years as most recurrences occur in the first 24 months. After 2 nd year follow up is done at 4-6 months interval. At each follow up screening

  6. Identification of serum biomarkers for lung cancer using magnetic bead-based SELDI-TOF-MS

    OpenAIRE

    SONG, QI-BIN; Hu, Wei-Guo; Wang, Peng; Yao, Yi; Zeng, Hua-zong

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To identify novel serum biomarkers for lung cancer diagnosis using magnetic bead-based surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrum (SELDI-TOF-MS). Methods: The protein fractions of 121 serum specimens from 30 lung cancer patients, 30 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 33 healthy controls were enriched using WCX magnetic beads and subjected to SELDI-TOF-MS. The spectra were analyzed using Bio-marker Wizard version 3.1.0 and Biomarker Patterns Software versio...

  7. Potential Biomarkers of Fat Loss as a Feature of Cancer Cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ebadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fat loss is associated with shorter survival and reduced quality of life in cancer patients. Effective intervention for fat loss in cachexia requires identification of the condition using prognostic biomarkers for early detection and prevention of further depletion. No biomarkers of fat mass alterations have been defined for application to the neoplastic state. Several inflammatory cytokines have been implicated in mediating fat loss associated with cachexia; however, plasma levels may not relate to adipose atrophy. Zinc-α2-glycoprotein may be a local catabolic mediator within adipose tissue rather than serving as a plasma biomarker of fat loss. Plasma glycerol and leptin associate with adipose tissue atrophy and mass, respectively; however, no study has evaluated their potential as a prognostic biomarker of cachexia-associated fat loss. This review confirms the need for further studies to identify valid prognostic biomarkers to identify loss of fat based on changes in plasma levels of biomarkers.

  8. Urinary tobacco smoke-constituent biomarkers for assessing risk of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-Min; Butler, Lesley M; Stepanov, Irina; Hecht, Stephen S

    2014-01-15

    Tobacco-constituent biomarkers are metabolites of specific compounds present in tobacco or tobacco smoke. Highly reliable analytic methods, based mainly on mass spectrometry, have been developed for quantitation of these biomarkers in both urine and blood specimens. There is substantial interindividual variation in smoking-related lung cancer risk that is determined in part by individual variability in the uptake and metabolism of tobacco smoke carcinogens. Thus, by incorporating these biomarkers in epidemiologic studies, we can potentially obtain a more valid and precise measure of in vivo carcinogen dose than by using self-reported smoking history, ultimately improving the estimation of smoking-related lung cancer risk. Indeed, we have demonstrated this by using a prospective study design comparing biomarker levels in urine samples collected from smokers many years before their development of cancer versus those in their smoking counterparts without a cancer diagnosis. The following urinary metabolites were associated with lung cancer risk, independent of smoking intensity and duration: cotinine plus its glucuronide, a biomarker of nicotine uptake; 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL), a biomarker of the tobacco carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK); and r-1-,t-2,3,c-4-tetrahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrene (PheT), a biomarker of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These results provide several possible new directions for using tobacco smoke-constituent biomarkers in lung cancer prevention, including improved lung cancer risk assessment, intermediate outcome determination in prevention trials, and regulation of tobacco products.

  9. Multiplexed cancer biomarker detection using chip-integrated silicon photonic sensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Adam L; Shia, Winnie W; Lenkeit, Kimberly A; Lee, So-Hyun; Bailey, Ryan C

    2016-09-21

    The analysis of disease-specific biomarker panels holds promise for the early detection of a range of diseases, including cancer. Blood-based biomarkers, in particular, are attractive targets for minimally-invasive disease diagnosis. Specifically, a panel of organ-specific biomarkers could find utility as a general disease surveillance tool enabling earlier detection or prognostic monitoring. Using arrays of chip-integrated silicon photonic sensors, we describe the simultaneous detection of eight cancer biomarkers in serum in a relatively rapid (1 hour) and fully automated antibody-based sandwich assay. Biomarkers were chosen for their applicability to a range of organ-specific cancers, including disease of the pancreas, liver, ovary, breast, lung, colorectum, and prostate. Importantly, we demonstrate that selected patient samples reveal biomarker "fingerprints" that may be useful for a personalized cancer diagnosis. More generally, we show that the silicon photonic technology is capable of measuring multiplexed panels of protein biomarkers that may have broad utility in clinical diagnostics.

  10. Biomarker Validation for Aging: Lessons from mtDNA Heteroplasmy Analyses in Early Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Barker

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The anticipated biological and clinical utility of biomarkers has attracted significant interest recently. Aging and early cancer detection represent areas active in the search for predictive and prognostic biomarkers. While applications differ, overlapping biological features, analytical technologies and specific biomarker analytes bear comparison. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA as a biomarker in both biological models has been evaluated. However, it remains unclear whether mtDNA changes in aging and cancer represent biological relationships that are causal, incidental, or a combination of both. This article focuses on evaluation of mtDNA-based biomarkers, emerging strategies for quantitating mtDNA admixtures, and how current understanding of mtDNA in aging and cancer evolves with introduction of new technologies. Whether for cancer or aging, lessons from mtDNA based biomarker evaluations are several. Biological systems are inherently dynamic and heterogeneous. Detection limits for mtDNA sequencing technologies differ among methods for low-level DNA sequence admixtures in healthy and diseased states. Performance metrics of analytical mtDNA technology should be validated prior to application in heterogeneous biologically-based systems. Critical in evaluating biomarker performance is the ability to distinguish measurement system variance from inherent biological variance, because it is within the latter that background healthy variability as well as high-value, disease-specific information reside.

  11. Cancer biomarkers defined by autoantibody signatures to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Blixt, Ola; Tarp, Mads A;

    2010-01-01

    -glycopeptide microarray was developed that detected IgG antibodies to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes in patients vaccinated with a keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated truncated MUC1 peptide. We detected cancer-associated IgG autoantibodies in sera from breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer patients against different......Autoantibodies to cancer antigens hold promise as biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Proteins that are aberrantly processed in cancer cells are likely to present autoantibody targets. The extracellular mucin MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many cancers; thus, we...... evaluated whether autoantibodies generated to aberrant O-glycoforms of MUC1 might serve as sensitive diagnostic biomarkers for cancer. Using an antibody-based glycoprofiling ELISA assay, we documented that aberrant truncated glycoforms were not detected in sera of cancer patients. An O...

  12. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, Florence, E-mail: florence.huguet@tnn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital, APHP, University Paris VI, Paris (France); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, CRLC Val d' Aurelle-Paul Lamarque, Montpellier (France); Racadot, Severine [Department of Radiation Oncology, CRLC Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  13. Radiotherapy technical considerations in the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer: American-French consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose intensity

  14. Blood and tissue biomarkers in prostate cancer: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Capizzi, Elisa; Loda, Massimo

    2010-02-01

    The prevalence of prostate cancer (PCa) is high and increases with age. PCa is the most common cutaneous cancer in American men. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening has impacted the detection of PCa and is directly responsible for a dramatic decrease in stage at diagnosis. Gleason score and stage at the time of diagnosis remain the mainstay to predict prognosis, in the absence of more accurate and reliable tissue or blood biomarkers. Despite extensive research efforts, very few biomarkers of PCa have been introduced to date in clinical practice. Even screening with PSA has recently been questioned. A thorough analysis of all tissue and serum biomarkers in prostate cancer research cannot be easily synthesized, and goes beyond the scope of the present article. Therefore the authors focus here on the most recently reported tissue and circulating biomarkers for PCa whose application in clinical practice is either current or expected in the near future.

  15. Current status of predictive biomarkers for neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norihisa; Uemura; Tadashi; Kondo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy has been proven to be extremely valuable and is widely used for advanced esophageal cancer. However, a significant proportion of treated patients(60%-70%) does not respond well to neoadjuvant treatments and develop severe adverse effects. Therefore, predictive markers for individualization of multimodality treatments are urgently needed in esophageal cancer. Recently, molecular biomarkers that predict the response to neoadjuvant therapy have been explored in multimodal approaches in esophageal cancer and successful examples of biomarker identification have been reported. In this review, promising candidates for predictive molecular biomarkers developed by using multiple molecular approaches are reviewed. Moreover, treatment strategies based on the status of predicted biomarkers are discussed, while considering the international differences in the clinical background. However, in the absence of adequate treatment options related to the results of the biomarker test, the usefulness of these diagnostic tools is limited and new effective therapies for biomarker-identified nonresponders to cancer treatment should be concurrent with the progress of predictive technologies. Further improvement in the prognosis of esophageal cancer patients can be achieved through the introduction of novel therapeutic approaches in clinical practice.

  16. Serum Helicobacter pylori NapA antibody as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jingjing Liu; Huimin Liu; Tingting Zhang; Xiyun Ren; Christina Nadolny; Xiaoqun Dong; Lina Huang; Kexin Yuan; Wenjing Tian; Yunhe Jia

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is strongly associated with gastric cancer. However, only a minority of infected individuals ever develop gastric cancer. This risk stratification may be in part due to differences among strains. The relationship between neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) and gastric cancer is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of NapA as a biomarker in gastric cancer. We used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the...

  17. Aberrant Crypt Foci: The Case for Inclusion as a Biomarker for Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Morris; Michael J. Wargovich; Brown, Vondina R.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF) are one of the earliest histopathological manifestations of colon cancer. In this review, we critically present the molecular, cellular, histopathological, and chemopreventive evidence that ACF are relevant biomarkers for colon cancer. The laboratory and clinical evidence are highly suggestive that ACF are in the pathway leading to colon cancer, but not all ACF will do so. The possible fate and outcome of ACF in the progression toward colon cancer may be dependent on...

  18. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P;

    2011-01-01

    the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer to be addressed through discussion......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before...

  19. Detection of cancer biomarkers in serum using a hybrid mechanical and optoplasmonic nanosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, P. M.; Pini, V.; Ruz, J. J.; da Silva, R. A.; González, M. U.; Ramos, D.; Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.

    2014-12-01

    Blood contains a range of protein biomarkers that could be used in the early detection of disease. To achieve this, however, requires sensors capable of detecting (with high reproducibility) biomarkers at concentrations one million times lower than the concentration of the other blood proteins. Here, we show that a sandwich assay that combines mechanical and optoplasmonic transduction can detect cancer biomarkers in serum at ultralow concentrations. A biomarker is first recognized by a surface-anchored antibody and then by an antibody in solution that identifies a free region of the captured biomarker. This second antibody is tethered to a gold nanoparticle that acts as a mass and plasmonic label; the two signatures are detected by means of a silicon cantilever that serves as a mechanical resonator for ‘weighing’ the mass of the captured nanoparticles and as an optical cavity that boosts the plasmonic signal from the nanoparticles. The capabilities of the approach are illustrated with two cancer biomarkers: the carcinoembryonic antigen and the prostate specific antigen, which are currently in clinical use for the diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of colon and prostate cancer, respectively. A detection limit of 1 × 10-16 g ml-1 in serum is achieved with both biomarkers, which is at least seven orders of magnitude lower than that achieved in routine clinical practice. Moreover, the rate of false positives and false negatives at this concentration is extremely low, ˜10-4.

  20. Comprehensive serum profiling for the discovery of epithelial ovarian cancer biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yip

    Full Text Available FDA-cleared ovarian cancer biomarkers are limited to CA-125 and HE4 for monitoring and recurrence and OVA1, a multivariate panel consisting of CA-125 and four additional biomarkers, for referring patients to a specialist. Due to relatively poor performance of these tests, more accurate and broadly applicable biomarkers are needed. We evaluated the dysregulation of 259 candidate cancer markers in serum samples from 499 patients. Sera were collected prospectively at 11 monitored sites under a single well-defined protocol. All stages of ovarian cancer and common benign gynecological conditions were represented. To ensure consistency and comparability of biomarker comparisons, all measurements were performed on a single platform, at a single site, using a panel of rigorously calibrated, qualified, high-throughput, multiplexed immunoassays and all analyses were conducted using the same software. Each marker was evaluated independently for its ability to differentiate ovarian cancer from benign conditions. A total of 175 markers were dysregulated in the cancer samples. HE4 (AUC=0.933 and CA-125 (AUC=0.907 were the most informative biomarkers, followed by IL-2 receptor α, α1-antitrypsin, C-reactive protein, YKL-40, cellular fibronectin, CA-72-4 and prostasin (AUC>0.800. To improve the discrimination between cancer and benign conditions, a simple multivariate combination of markers was explored using logistic regression. When combined into a single panel, the nine most informative individual biomarkers yielded an AUC value of 0.950, significantly higher than obtained when combining the markers in the OVA1 panel (AUC 0.912. Additionally, at a threshold sensitivity of 90%, the combination of the top 9 markers gave 88.9% specificity compared to 63.4% specificity for the OVA1 markers. Although a blinded validation study has not yet been performed, these results indicate that alternative biomarker combinations might lead to significant improvements in the

  1. MicroRNA biomarkers in whole blood for detection of pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Dehlendorff, Christian; Jensen, Benny V

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Biomarkers for the early diagnosis of patients with pancreatic cancer are needed to improve prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To describe differences in microRNA expression in whole blood between patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and healthy participants and to identify panels...... of microRNAs for use in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer compared with the cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A case-control study that included 409 patients with pancreatic cancer and 25 with chronic pancreatitis who had been included prospectively in the Danish BIOPAC...... (Biomarkers in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer) study (July 2008-October 2012) plus 312 blood donors as healthy participants. The microRNA expressions in pretreatment whole blood RNA samples were collected and analyzed in 3 randomly determined subcohorts: discovery cohort (143 patients with pancreatic cancer...

  2. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC to Determine Cut-Off Points of Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi L. Weiss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of biomarkers in disease prognosis continues to be an important investigation in many cancer studies. In order for these biomarkers to have practical application in clinical decision making regarding patient treatment and follow-up, it is common to dichotomize patients into those with low vs. high expression levels. In this study, receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves, area under the curve (AUC of the ROC, sensitivity, specificity, as well as likelihood ratios were calculated to determine levels of growth factor biomarkers that best differentiate lung cancer cases versus control subjects. Selected cut-off points for p185erbB-2 and EGFR membrane appear to have good discriminating power to differentiate control tissues versus uninvolved tissues from patients with lung cancer (AUC = 89% and 90%, respectively; while AUC increased to at least 90% for selected cut-off points for p185erbB-2 membrane, EGFR membrane, and FASE when comparing between control versus carcinoma tissues from lung cancer cases. Using data from control subjects compared to patients with lung cancer, we presented a simple and intuitive approach to determine dichotomized levels of biomarkers and validated the value of these biomarkers as surrogate endpoints for cancer outcome.

  3. Cancer screening: a mathematical model relating secreted blood biomarker levels to tumor sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie M Lutz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing efforts and financial resources are being invested in early cancer detection research. Blood assays detecting tumor biomarkers promise noninvasive and financially reasonable screening for early cancer with high potential of positive impact on patients' survival and quality of life. For novel tumor biomarkers, the actual tumor detection limits are usually unknown and there have been no studies exploring the tumor burden detection limits of blood tumor biomarkers using mathematical models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a mathematical model relating blood biomarker levels to tumor burden. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a linear one-compartment model, the steady state between tumor biomarker secretion into and removal out of the intravascular space was calculated. Two conditions were assumed: (1 the compartment (plasma is well-mixed and kinetically homogenous; (2 the tumor biomarker consists of a protein that is secreted by tumor cells into the extracellular fluid compartment, and a certain percentage of the secreted protein enters the intravascular space at a continuous rate. The model was applied to two pathophysiologic conditions: tumor biomarker is secreted (1 exclusively by the tumor cells or (2 by both tumor cells and healthy normal cells. To test the model, a sensitivity analysis was performed assuming variable conditions of the model parameters. The model parameters were primed on the basis of literature data for two established and well-studied tumor biomarkers (CA125 and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]. Assuming biomarker secretion by tumor cells only and 10% of the secreted tumor biomarker reaching the plasma, the calculated minimally detectable tumor sizes ranged between 0.11 mm(3 and 3,610.14 mm(3 for CA125 and between 0.21 mm(3 and 131.51 mm(3 for PSA. When biomarker secretion by healthy cells and tumor cells was assumed, the calculated tumor sizes leading to positive test results ranged

  4. Validated biomarkers: The key to precision treatment in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michael J; O'Donovan, Norma; McDermott, Enda; Crown, John

    2016-10-01

    Recent DNA sequencing and gene expression studies have shown that at a molecular level, almost every case of breast cancer is unique and different from other breast cancers. For optimum management therefore, every patient should receive treatment that is guided by the molecular composition of their tumor, i.e., precision treatment. While such a scenario is still some distance into the future, biomarkers are beginning to play an important role in preparing the way for precision treatment. In particular, biomarkers are increasingly being used for predicting patient outcome and informing as to the most appropriate type of systemic therapy to be administered. Mandatory biomarkers for every newly diagnosed case of breast cancer are estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors in selecting patients for endocrine treatment and HER2 for identifying patients likely to benefit from anti-HER2 therapy. Amongst the best validated prognostic biomarker tests are uPA/PAI-1, MammaPrint and Oncotype DX. Although currently, there are no biomarkers available for predicting response to specific forms of chemotherapy, uPA/PAI-1 and Oncotype DX can aid the identification of lymph node-negative patients that are most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, in general. In order to accelerate progress towards precision treatment for women with breast cancer, we need additional predictive biomarkers, especially for enhancing the positive predictive value for endocrine and anti-HER2 therapies, as well as biomarkers for predicting response to specific forms of chemotherapy. The ultimate biomarker test for achieving the goal of precision treatment for patients with breast cancer will likely require a combination of gene sequencing and transcriptomic analysis of every patient's tumor.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging for the clinical management of rectal cancer patients: recommendations from the 2012 European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) consensus meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Centre+, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barbaro, Brunella [Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Curvo-Semedo, Luis [Coimbra University Hospitals, Coimbra (Portugal); Fenlon, Helen M. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Gourtsoyianni, Sofia [University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS FT, London (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Hoeffel, Christine [Reims University Hospital, Reims (France); Kim, Seung Ho [Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Laghi, Andrea [Sapienza - University of Rome, Rome (Italy); Maier, Andrea [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Rafaelsen, Soeren R. [Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); Torkzad, Michael R. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Blomqvist, Lennart [Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    To develop guidelines describing a standardised approach regarding the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. A consensus meeting of 14 abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) was conducted following the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Two independent (non-voting) chairs facilitated the meeting. Two hundred and thirty-six items were scored by participants for appropriateness and classified subsequently as appropriate or inappropriate (defined by {>=} 80 % consensus) or uncertain (defined by < 80 % consensus). Items not reaching 80 % consensus were noted. Consensus was reached for 88 % of items: recommendations regarding hardware, patient preparation, imaging sequences, angulation, criteria for MRI assessment and MRI reporting were constructed from these. These expert consensus recommendations can be used as clinical guidelines for primary staging and restaging of rectal cancer using MRI. (orig.)

  6. AGR3 in breast cancer: prognostic impact and suitable serum-based biomarker for early cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garczyk, Stefan; von Stillfried, Saskia; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Hartmann, Arndt; Schrauder, Michael G; Fasching, Peter A; Anzeneder, Tobias; Tannapfel, Andrea; Ergönenc, Yavuz; Knüchel, Ruth; Rose, Michael; Dahl, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Blood-based early detection of breast cancer has recently gained novel momentum, as liquid biopsy diagnostics is a fast emerging field. In this study, we aimed to identify secreted proteins which are up-regulated both in tumour tissue and serum samples of breast cancer patients compared to normal tissue and sera. Based on two independent tissue cohorts (n = 75 and n = 229) and one serum cohort (n = 80) of human breast cancer and healthy serum samples, we characterised AGR3 as a novel potential biomarker both for breast cancer prognosis and early breast cancer detection from blood. AGR3 expression in breast tumours is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor α (Pbreast tumours (multivariate hazard ratio: 2.186, 95% CI: 1.008-4.740, Pbreast cancer patients (n = 40, mainly low stage tumours) compared to healthy controls (n = 40). To develop a suitable biomarker panel for early breast cancer detection, we measured AGR2 protein in human serum samples in parallel. The combined AGR3/AGR2 biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 89.5% as shown by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve statistics. Thus our data clearly show the potential usability of AGR3 and AGR2 as biomarkers for blood-based early detection of human breast cancer.

  7. Adiposity, mediating biomarkers and risk of colon cancer in the european prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrova, K.; Drogan, D.; Boeing, H.; Jenab, M.; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Adiposity is a risk factor for colon cancer, but underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We evaluated the extent to which 11 biomarkers with inflammatory and metabolic actions mediate the association of adiposity measures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI), with colon cancer

  8. Candidate serological biomarkers for cancer identified from the secretomes of 23 cancer cell lines and the human protein atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Ching; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chen, Chi-De; Yu, Chia-Jung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Tai, Dar-In; Liu, Hao-Ping; Su, Wen-Hui; Chang, Yu-Sun; Yu, Jau-Song

    2010-06-01

    Although cancer cell secretome profiling is a promising strategy used to identify potential body fluid-accessible cancer biomarkers, questions remain regarding the depth to which the cancer cell secretome can be mined and the efficiency with which researchers can select useful candidates from the growing list of identified proteins. Therefore, we analyzed the secretomes of 23 human cancer cell lines derived from 11 cancer types using one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and nano-LC-MS/MS performed on an LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer to generate a more comprehensive cancer cell secretome. A total of 31,180 proteins was detected, accounting for 4,584 non-redundant proteins, with an average of 1,300 proteins identified per cell line. Using protein secretion-predictive algorithms, 55.8% of the proteins appeared to be released or shed from cells. The identified proteins were selected as potential marker candidates according to three strategies: (i) proteins apparently secreted by one cancer type but not by others (cancer type-specific marker candidates), (ii) proteins released by most cancer cell lines (pan-cancer marker candidates), and (iii) proteins putatively linked to cancer-relevant pathways. We then examined protein expression profiles in the Human Protein Atlas to identify biomarker candidates that were simultaneously detected in the secretomes and highly expressed in cancer tissues. This analysis yielded 6-137 marker candidates selective for each tumor type and 94 potential pan-cancer markers. Among these, we selectively validated monocyte differentiation antigen CD14 (for liver cancer), stromal cell-derived factor 1 (for lung cancer), and cathepsin L1 and interferon-induced 17-kDa protein (for nasopharyngeal carcinoma) as potential serological cancer markers. In summary, the proteins identified from the secretomes of 23 cancer cell lines and the Human Protein Atlas represent a focused reservoir of potential cancer biomarkers.

  9. Integrated proteomic analysis of human cancer cells and plasma from tumor bearing mice for ovarian cancer biomarker discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon J Pitteri

    Full Text Available The complexity of the human plasma proteome represents a substantial challenge for biomarker discovery. Proteomic analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and isolated cancer cells and cell lines provide alternative methods for identification of potential cancer markers that would be detectable in human blood using sensitive assays. The goal of this work is to evaluate the utility of an integrative strategy using these two approaches for biomarker discovery.We investigated a strategy that combined quantitative plasma proteomics of an ovarian cancer mouse model with analysis of proteins secreted or shed by human ovarian cancer cells. Of 106 plasma proteins identified with increased levels in tumor bearing mice, 58 were also secreted or shed from ovarian cancer cells. The remainder consisted primarily of host-response proteins. Of 25 proteins identified in the study that were assayed, 8 mostly secreted proteins common to mouse plasma and human cancer cells were significantly upregulated in a set of plasmas from ovarian cancer patients. Five of the eight proteins were confirmed to be upregulated in a second independent set of ovarian cancer plasmas, including in early stage disease.Integrated proteomic analysis of cancer mouse models and human cancer cell populations provides an effective approach to identify potential circulating protein biomarkers.

  10. Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical management of colon cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic and Cypriot Colorectal Cancer Study Group by the HeSMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xynos, Evaghelos; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tekkis, Paris; Vini, Louiza; Tzardi, Maria; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Vassiliou, Vassilios; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Karachaliou, Niki; Zoras, Odysseas; Agalianos, Christos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable improvement in the management of colon cancer, there is a great deal of variation in the outcomes among European countries, and in particular among different hospital centers in Greece and Cyprus. Discrepancy in the approach strategies and lack of adherence to guidelines for the management of colon cancer may explain the situation. The aim was to elaborate a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of colon cancer, based on European guidelines (ESMO and EURECCA), and also taking into account local special characteristics of our healthcare system. Following discussion and online communication among members of an executive team, a consensus was developed. Statements entered the Delphi voting system on two rounds to achieve consensus by multidisciplinary international experts. Statements with an agreement rate of ≥80% achieved a large consensus, while those with an agreement rate of 60-80% a moderate consensus. Statements achieving an agreement of Guidelines are proposed along with algorithms of diagnosis and treatment. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, and adherence to guidelines is emphasized.

  11. Application of Glycoproteomics in the Discovery of Biomarkers for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing Kay; Gabrielson, Edward; Zhang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Approximately 40–60% of lung cancer patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. In order to improve the survival rate of lung cancer patients, the discovery of early diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is urgently needed. Lung cancer development and progression are a multistep process which is characterized by abnormal gene and protein expressions ultimately leading to phenotypic change. In lung cancer, the expression of cellular glycoproteins directly reflects the physiological and/or pathological status of the lung parenchyma. Glycoproteins have long been recognized to play fundamental roles in many physiological and pathological processes, particularly in cancer genesis and progression. Although numerous papers have already acknowledged the importance of the discovery of cancer biomarkers, the systemic study of glycoproteins in lung cancer using glycoproteomic approaches is still suboptimal. Herein, we review the recent technological development of glycoproteomics in highlighting their utility and limitations for the discovery of glycoprotein biomarkers in lung cancer. PMID:22641610

  12. De-Risking Immunotherapy: Report of a Consensus Workshop of the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellman, Ira; Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J; Kalos, Michael D; Chen, Daniel S; Allison, James P; Drake, Charles G; Levitsky, Hy; Lonberg, Nils; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Fearon, Douglas T; Wherry, E John; Lowy, Israel; Vonderheide, Robert H; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    With the recent FDA approvals of pembrolizumab and nivolumab, and a host of additional immunomodulatory agents entering clinical development each year, the field of cancer immunotherapy is changing rapidly. Strategies that can assist researchers in choosing the most promising drugs and drug combinations to move forward through clinical development are badly needed in order to reduce the likelihood of late-stage clinical trial failures. On October 5, 2014, the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute, a collaborative think tank composed of stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and patient interest groups, met to discuss strategies for de-risking immunotherapy development, with a focus on integrating preclinical and clinical studies, and conducting smarter early-phase trials, particularly for combination therapies. Several recommendations were made, including making better use of clinical data to inform preclinical research, obtaining adequate tissues for biomarker studies, and choosing appropriate clinical trial endpoints to identify promising drug candidates and combinations in nonrandomized early-phase trials.

  13. Cell-specific biomarkers and targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Li, Zhiyang; Yang, Jingjing; Jiang, Yanyun; Chen, Zhongsi; Ali, Zeeshan; He, Nongyue; Wang, Zhifei

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women, and its related treatment has been attracting significant attention over the past decades. Among the various treatments, targeted therapy has shown great promise as a precision treatment, by binding to cancer cell-specific biomarkers. So far, great achievements have been made in targeted therapy of breast cancer. In this review, we first discuss cell-specific biomarkers, which are not only useful for classification of breast cancer subtyping but also can be utilized as goals for targeted therapy. Then, the innovative and generic-targeted biopharmaceuticals for breast cancer, including monoclonal antibodies, non-antibody proteins and small molecule drugs, are reviewed. Finally, we provide our outlook on future developments of biopharmaceuticals, and provide solutions to problems in this field.

  14. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0582 TITLE: ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...ETS gene fusion status associated with clinical outcomes following radiation therapy , by analyzing both the collected biomarker and clinical data...denotes absence of an ERG fusion). ETS gene fusions status did not predict outcomes following radiation therapy , as demonstrated by Kaplan Meier

  15. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  16. Identifying gaps in the locoregional management of early breast cancer: highlights from the Kyoto Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Masakazu; Winer, Eric P; Inamoto, Takashi; Benson, John R; Forbes, John F; Mitsumori, Michihide; Robertson, John F R; Sasano, Hironobu; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Yamauchi, Akira; Klimberg, V Suzanne

    2011-10-01

    A consensus conference was held to investigate issues related to the local management of early breast cancer. Here, we highlight the major topics discussed at the conference and propose ideas for future studies. Regarding axillary management, we examined three major issues. First, we discussed whether the use of axillary reverse mapping could clarify the lymphatic system of breast and whether the ipsilateral arm might help avoid lymphedema. Second, the use of an indocyanine green fluorescent navigation system was discussed for intraoperative lymphatic mapping. These new issues should be examined further in practice. Finally, some agreement was reached on the importance of "four-node diagnosis" to aid in the diagnostic accuracy of sentinel nodes. Regarding breast treatment, there was general agreement that the clinical value of surgical margins in predicting local failure was dependent on the tumor's intrinsic biology and subtypes. For patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy, less extensive excision may be feasible in those who respond to systemic therapy in an acceptable manner. Most trials of preoperative chemotherapy lack outcome data on local recurrence. Therefore, there is a need for such data for overview analysis. We also agreed that radiation after mastectomy may be beneficial in node-positive cases where more than four nodes are involved. Throughout the discussions for both invasive and noninvasive disease, the investigation of nomograms was justified for major issues in the decision-making process, such as the presence or absence of microinvasion and the involvement of nonsentinel nodes in sentinel node-positive patients.

  17. Advancing Treatment for Metastatic Bone Cancer: Consensus Recommendations from the Second Cambridge Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Robert E.; Guise, Theresa A.; Lipton, Allan; Roodman, G. David; Berenson, James R.; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boyce, Brendan F.; Calvi, Laura M.; Hadji, Peyman; McCloskey, Eugene V.; Saad, Fred; Smith, Matthew R.; Suva, Larry J.; Taichman, Russell S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Summarize current knowledge, critical gaps in knowledge, and recommendations to advance the field of metastatic bone cancer. Experimental Design A multidisciplinary consensus conference was convened to review recent progress in basic and clinical research, assess critical gaps in current knowledge, and prioritize recommendations to advance research in the next 5 years. The program addressed three principal topics: biology of metastasis, preserving normal bone health, and optimizing bone-targeted therapies. Results A variety of specific recommendations were identified as important to advance research and clinical care over the next 5 years. Conclusions Priorities for research in bone biology include characterizing components of the stem cell niche in bone, developing oncogenic immunocompetent animal models of bone metastasis, and investigating the unique contribution of the bone microenvironment to tumor growth and dormancy. Priorities for research in preserving normal bone health include developing methods to measure and characterize disseminating tumor cells, assessing outcomes from the major prevention trials currently in progress, and improving methodologies to assess risks and benefits of treatment. Priorities for optimizing bone-targeted therapies include advancing studies of serum proteomics and genomics to reliably identify patients who will develop bone metastases, enhancing imaging for early detection of bone metastases and early response evaluation, and developing new tests to evaluate response to bone-directed treatments. PMID:18927277

  18. CCNA2 Is a Prognostic Biomarker for ER+ Breast Cancer and Tamoxifen Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Tian Gao; Yong Han; Ling Yu; Sheng Ao; Ziyu Li; Jiafu Ji

    2014-01-01

    Identification of effective prognostic biomarkers and targets are of crucial importance to the management of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. CCNA2 (also known as CyclinA2) belongs to the highly conserved cyclin family and is significantly overexpressed in various cancer types. In this study, we demonstrated that CCNA2 had significant predictive power in distant metastasis free survival, disease free survival, recurrence free survival and overall survival of ER+ breast cancer p...

  19. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012 : Science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, C. J. H.; Boelens, P. G.; Tanis, P. J.; Espin, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Naredi, P.; Pahlman, L.; Ortiz, H.; Rutten, H. J.; Breugom, A. J.; Smith, J. J.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Valentini, V.

    2014-01-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the c

  20. Biomarker discovery by proteomics-based approaches for early detection and personalized medicine in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Claudia; Cevenini, Armando; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-12-26

    About one million people per year develop colorectal cancer (CRC) and approximately half of them die. The extent of the disease (i.e. local invasion at the time of diagnosis) is a key prognostic factor. The 5-year survival rate is almost 90% in the case of delimited CRC and 10% in the case of metastasized CRC. Hence, one of the great challenges in the battle against CRC is to improve early diagnosis strategies. Large-scale proteomic approaches are widely used in cancer research to search for novel biomarkers. Such biomarkers can help in improving the accuracy of the diagnosis and in the optimization of personalized therapy. Herein, we provide an overview of studies published in the last 5 years on CRC that led to the identification of protein biomarkers suitable for clinical application by using proteomic approaches. We discussed these findings according to biomarker application, including also the role of protein phosphorylation and cancer stem cells in biomarker discovery. Our review provides a cross section of scientific approaches and can furnish suggestions for future experimental strategies to be used as reference by scientists, clinicians and researchers interested in proteomics for biomarker discovery.

  1. Single-band upconversion nanoprobes for multiplexed simultaneous in situ molecular mapping of cancer biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Wang, Rui; Yao, Chi; Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Chengli; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Congjian; Zeng, Aijun; Zhao, Dongyuan; Zhang, Fan

    2015-04-01

    The identification of potential diagnostic markers and target molecules among the plethora of tumour oncoproteins for cancer diagnosis requires facile technology that is capable of quantitatively analysing multiple biomarkers in tumour cells and tissues. Diagnostic and prognostic classifications of human tumours are currently based on the western blotting and single-colour immunohistochemical methods that are not suitable for multiplexed detection. Herein, we report a general and novel method to prepare single-band upconversion nanoparticles with different colours. The expression levels of three biomarkers in breast cancer cells were determined using single-band upconversion nanoparticles, western blotting and immunohistochemical technologies with excellent correlation. Significantly, the application of antibody-conjugated single-band upconversion nanoparticle molecular profiling technology can achieve the multiplexed simultaneous in situ biodetection of biomarkers in breast cancer cells and tissue specimens and produce more accurate results for the simultaneous quantification of proteins present at low levels compared with classical immunohistochemical technology.

  2. Detecting Blood-Based Biomarkers in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review of Their Current Status and Clinical Utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuis, A. M. Sofie; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Prakash, Jai; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2017-01-01

    Reviews on circulating biomarkers in breast cancer usually focus on one single biomarker or a selective group of biomarkers. An overview summarizing the discovery and evaluation of all blood-based biomarkers in metastatic breast cancer is lacking. This systematic review aims to identify the available evidence of known blood-based biomarkers in metastatic breast cancer, regarding their clinical utility and state-of-the-art position in the validation process. The initial search yielded 1078 original studies, of which 420 were assessed for eligibility. A total of 320 studies were included in the final synthesis. A Development, Evaluation and Application Chart (DEAC) of all biomarkers was developed. Most studies focus on identifying new biomarkers and search for relations between these biomarkers and traditional molecular characteristics. Biomarkers are usually investigated in only one study (68.8%). Only 9.8% of all biomarkers was investigated in more than five studies. Circulating tumor cells, gene expression within tumor cells and the concentration of secreted proteins are the most frequently investigated biomarkers in liquid biopsies. However, there is a lack of studies focusing on identifying the clinical utility of these biomarkers, by which the additional value still seems to be limited according to the investigated evidence. PMID:28208771

  3. New Concepts in Cancer Biomarkers: Circulating miRNAs in Liquid Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Larrea

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effective and efficient management of cancer patients relies upon early diagnosis and/or the monitoring of treatment, something that is often difficult to achieve using standard tissue biopsy techniques. Biological fluids such as blood hold great possibilities as a source of non-invasive cancer biomarkers that can act as surrogate markers to biopsy-based sampling. The non-invasive nature of these “liquid biopsies” ultimately means that cancer detection may be earlier and that the ability to monitor disease progression and/or treatment response represents a paradigm shift in the treatment of cancer patients. Below, we review one of the most promising classes of circulating cancer biomarkers: microRNAs (miRNAs. In particular, we will consider their history, the controversy surrounding their origin and biology, and, most importantly, the hurdles that remain to be overcome if they are really to become part of future clinical practice.

  4. Early detection of recurrence after curative resection for colorectal cancer - obstacles when using soluble biomarkers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Jess, Per; Aldulaymi, Bahir Hadi Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Results from monitoring studies using biomarkers in blood samples aiming at early detection of recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC) are presently evaluated. However, some serological biomarker levels are influenced by the surgical trauma, which may complicate translation...... were recorded at each visit to the outpatient clinic. Results. Among the 165 patients, 49 developed recurrence (R+), 107 did not (R-) and 11 developed a new primary cancer, including 2 in the R+ group. Within the 3 years of observation, 78 (47.3%) of the 165 patients underwent 117 (range 1...

  5. The Transcription Factor ZNF217 Is a Prognostic Biomarker and Therapeutic Target during Breast Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlepage, Laurie E.; Adler, Adam S.; Kouros-Mehr, Hosein; Huang, Guiqing; Chou, Jonathan; Krig, Sheryl R.; Griffith, Obi L.; Korkola, James E.; Qu, Kun; Lawson, Devon A.; Xue, Qing; Sternlicht, Mark D.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Yaswen, Paul; Rugo, Hope S.; Sweeney, Colleen A.; Collins, Colin C.; Gray, Joe W.; Chang, Howard Y.; Werb, Zena

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor ZNF217 is a candidate oncogene in the amplicon on chromosome 20q13 that occurs in 20% to 30% of primary human breast cancers and that correlates with poor prognosis. We show that Znf217 overexpression drives aberrant differentiation and signaling events, promotes increased self-renewal capacity, mesenchymal marker expression, motility, and metastasis, and represses an adult tissue stem cell gene signature downregulated in cancers. By in silico screening, we identified candidate therapeutics that at low concentrations inhibit growth of cancer cells expressing high ZNF217. We show that the nucleoside analogue triciribine inhibits ZNF217-induced tumor growth and chemotherapy resistance and inhibits signaling events [e.g., phospho-AKT, phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)] in vivo. Our data suggest that ZNF217 is a biomarker of poor prognosis and a therapeutic target in patients with breast cancer and that triciribine may be part of a personalized treatment strategy in patients overexpressing ZNF217. Because ZNF217 is amplified in numerous cancers, these results have implications for other cancers. SIGNIFICANCE This study finds that ZNF217 is a poor prognostic indicator and therapeutic target in patients with breast cancer and may be a strong biomarker of triciribine treatment efficacy in patients. Because previous clinical trials for triciribine did not include biomarkers of treatment efficacy, this study provides a rationale for revisiting triciribine in the clinical setting as a therapy for patients with breast cancer who overexpress ZNF217. PMID:22728437

  6. Identification of an epigenetic biomarker panel with high sensitivity and specificity for colorectal cancer and adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lind Guro E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of cancer-specific DNA methylation patterns in epithelial colorectal cells in human feces provides the prospect of a simple, non-invasive screening test for colorectal cancer and its precursor, the adenoma. This study investigates a panel of epigenetic markers for the detection of colorectal cancer and adenomas. Methods Candidate biomarkers were subjected to quantitative methylation analysis in test sets of tissue samples from colorectal cancers, adenomas, and normal colonic mucosa. All findings were verified in independent clinical validation series. A total of 523 human samples were included in the study. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis was used to evaluate the performance of the biomarker panel. Results Promoter hypermethylation of the genes CNRIP1, FBN1, INA, MAL, SNCA, and SPG20 was frequent in both colorectal cancers (65-94% and adenomas (35-91%, whereas normal mucosa samples were rarely (0-5% methylated. The combined sensitivity of at least two positives among the six markers was 94% for colorectal cancers and 93% for adenoma samples, with a specificity of 98%. The resulting areas under the ROC curve were 0.984 for cancers and 0.968 for adenomas versus normal mucosa. Conclusions The novel epigenetic marker panel shows very high sensitivity and specificity for both colorectal cancers and adenomas. Our findings suggest this biomarker panel to be highly suitable for early tumor detection.

  7. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  8. Hierarchy of Gene Expression as a Biomarker for Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Man

    2013-03-01

    Cancer is a dedifferentiation of healthy cellular and genetic processes. At the same time, specific oncological pathways are activated in the cancer state. Cancer metastasis exposes cancer cells to a variety of microenvironments, in which physics of evolution suggests modularity is a relevant order parameter. We were thus motivated to examine the structure in gene and tissue networks of breast cancer patients. We studied the relation between metastasis and breast cancer network structure. We found that hierarchy of cancer networks distinguishes non-metastatic from metastatic patient populations. We also found that for cancer-associated genes, likelihood of metastasis is correlated with increased network hierarchy. Conversely for tissue networks using all gene data, reduced network structure is correlated with likelihood of metastasis. We suggest hierarchy of gene expression may be useful as a biomarker for breast cancer breast cancer metastasis and recurrence. For those patients with reduced structure, which is at least 5% of the patient population, this biomarker provides a strong signal for likelihood of cancer metastasis.

  9. [The level of evidence for the use of biomarkers in the early detection of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Gauchez, Anne-Sophie; Salomon, Laurent; Haugh, Margaret; Ceraline, Jocelyn; Fulla, Yvonne; Georges, Agnès; Larré, Stéphane; Loric, Sylvain; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Mazerolles, Catherine; Molinié, Vincent; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Piffret, Jacques; Thuillier, François; Perrin, Paul; Rebillard, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the evidence for the use of PSA and other biomarkers in the early detection of prostate cancer, we searched PubMed for clinical trials and studies assessing PSA and other biomarkers in the early detection of prostate cancer, published between 2000 and May 2013 that included >200 subjects. The level of evidence (LOE) for clinical utility was evaluated using the tumor marker utility grading system. A total of 84 publications, corresponding to 70 trials and studies were selected for inclusion in this review. We attributed a level of evidence (LoE) of IA to PSA for early PCa detection, but we do not recommend its use in mass screening. Emerging biomarkers were assessed in prospective case-control and cohort studies: PCA3 (n=3); kallikreins (n=3); [-2]proPSA (n=5); fusion oncogenes (n=2). These studies used biopsy results for prostate cancer to determine specificity and sensitivity, but they did not assess the effect on PCa mortality. The LoE attributed was III-C. PSA can be used for early prostate cancer detection but mass screening is not recommended. Studies on other biomarkers suggest that they could be used, individually or in combination, to improve the selection of patients with elevated PSA levels for biopsy, but RCTs assessing their impact on prostate cancer management and mortality are needed. A better use of available tests is possible for men at risk in order to maximize the risk-benefit ratio.

  10. Strategies to design clinical studies to identify predictive biomarkers in cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gracia, Jose Luis; Sanmamed, Miguel F; Bosch, Ana; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Schalper, Kurt A; Segura, Victor; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Tabernero, Josep; Sweeney, Christopher J; Choueiri, Toni K; Martín, Miguel; Fusco, Juan Pablo; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria Esperanza; Calvo, Alfonso; Prior, Celia; Paz-Ares, Luis; Pio, Ruben; Gonzalez-Billalabeitia, Enrique; Gonzalez Hernandez, Alvaro; Páez, David; Piulats, Jose María; Gurpide, Alfonso; Andueza, Mapi; de Velasco, Guillermo; Pazo, Roberto; Grande, Enrique; Nicolas, Pilar; Abad-Santos, Francisco; Garcia-Donas, Jesus; Castellano, Daniel; Pajares, María J; Suarez, Cristina; Colomer, Ramon; Montuenga, Luis M; Melero, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    The discovery of reliable biomarkers to predict efficacy and toxicity of anticancer drugs remains one of the key challenges in cancer research. Despite its relevance, no efficient study designs to identify promising candidate biomarkers have been established. This has led to the proliferation of a myriad of exploratory studies using dissimilar strategies, most of which fail to identify any promising targets and are seldom validated. The lack of a proper methodology also determines that many anti-cancer drugs are developed below their potential, due to failure to identify predictive biomarkers. While some drugs will be systematically administered to many patients who will not benefit from them, leading to unnecessary toxicities and costs, others will never reach registration due to our inability to identify the specific patient population in which they are active. Despite these drawbacks, a limited number of outstanding predictive biomarkers have been successfully identified and validated, and have changed the standard practice of oncology. In this manuscript, a multidisciplinary panel reviews how those key biomarkers were identified and, based on those experiences, proposes a methodological framework-the DESIGN guidelines-to standardize the clinical design of biomarker identification studies and to develop future research in this pivotal field.

  11. Blinded Validation of Breath Biomarkers of Lung Cancer, a Potential Ancillary to Chest CT Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Phillips

    Full Text Available Breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs have been reported as biomarkers of lung cancer, but it is not known if biomarkers identified in one group can identify disease in a separate independent cohort. Also, it is not known if combining breath biomarkers with chest CT has the potential to improve the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening.Model-building phase (unblinded: Breath VOCs were analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry in 82 asymptomatic smokers having screening chest CT, 84 symptomatic high-risk subjects with a tissue diagnosis, 100 without a tissue diagnosis, and 35 healthy subjects. Multiple Monte Carlo simulations identified breath VOC mass ions with greater than random diagnostic accuracy for lung cancer, and these were combined in a multivariate predictive algorithm. Model-testing phase (blinded validation: We analyzed breath VOCs in an independent cohort of similar subjects (n = 70, 51, 75 and 19 respectively. The algorithm predicted discriminant function (DF values in blinded replicate breath VOC samples analyzed independently at two laboratories (A and B. Outcome modeling: We modeled the expected effects of combining breath biomarkers with chest CT on the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening.Unblinded model-building phase. The algorithm identified lung cancer with sensitivity 74.0%, specificity 70.7% and C-statistic 0.78. Blinded model-testing phase: The algorithm identified lung cancer at Laboratory A with sensitivity 68.0%, specificity 68.4%, C-statistic 0.71; and at Laboratory B with sensitivity 70.1%, specificity 68.0%, C-statistic 0.70, with linear correlation between replicates (r = 0.88. In a projected outcome model, breath biomarkers increased the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest CT for lung cancer when the tests were combined in series or parallel.Breath VOC mass ion biomarkers identified lung cancer in a separate independent cohort

  12. LiverCancerMarkerRIF: a liver cancer biomarker interactive curation system combining text mining and expert annotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hong-Jie; Wu, Johnny Chi-Yang; Lin, Wei-San; Reyes, Aaron James F.; dela Rosa, Mira Anne C.; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers are biomolecules in the human body that can indicate disease states and abnormal biological processes. Biomarkers are often used during clinical trials to identify patients with cancers. Although biomedical research related to biomarkers has increased over the years and substantial effort has been expended to obtain results in these studies, the specific results obtained often contain ambiguities, and the results might contradict each other. Therefore, the information gathered from these studies must be appropriately integrated and organized to facilitate experimentation on biomarkers. In this study, we used liver cancer as the target and developed a text-mining–based curation system named LiverCancerMarkerRIF, which allows users to retrieve biomarker-related narrations and curators to curate supporting evidence on liver cancer biomarkers directly while browsing PubMed. In contrast to most of the other curation tools that require curators to navigate away from PubMed and accommodate distinct user interfaces or Web sites to complete the curation process, our system provides a user-friendly method for accessing text-mining–aided information and a concise interface to assist curators while they remain at the PubMed Web site. Biomedical text-mining techniques are applied to automatically recognize biomedical concepts such as genes, microRNA, diseases and investigative technologies, which can be used to evaluate the potential of a certain gene as a biomarker. Through the participation in the BioCreative IV user-interactive task, we examined the feasibility of using this novel type of augmented browsing-based curation method, and collaborated with curators to curate biomarker evidential sentences related to liver cancer. The positive feedback received from curators indicates that the proposed method can be effectively used for curation. A publicly available online database containing all the aforementioned information has been constructed at http

  13. Lung Cancer Signature Biomarkers: tissue specific semantic similarity based clustering of Digital Differential Display (DDD data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Mousami

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue-specific Unigene Sets derived from more than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs in the NCBI, GenBank database offers a platform for identifying significantly and differentially expressed tissue-specific genes by in-silico methods. Digital differential display (DDD rapidly creates transcription profiles based on EST comparisons and numerically calculates, as a fraction of the pool of ESTs, the relative sequence abundance of known and novel genes. However, the process of identifying the most likely tissue for a specific disease in which to search for candidate genes from the pool of differentially expressed genes remains difficult. Therefore, we have used ‘Gene Ontology semantic similarity score’ to measure the GO similarity between gene products of lung tissue-specific candidate genes from control (normal and disease (cancer sets. This semantic similarity score matrix based on hierarchical clustering represents in the form of a dendrogram. The dendrogram cluster stability was assessed by multiple bootstrapping. Multiple bootstrapping also computes a p-value for each cluster and corrects the bias of the bootstrap probability. Results Subsequent hierarchical clustering by the multiple bootstrapping method (α = 0.95 identified seven clusters. The comparative, as well as subtractive, approach revealed a set of 38 biomarkers comprising four distinct lung cancer signature biomarker clusters (panel 1–4. Further gene enrichment analysis of the four panels revealed that each panel represents a set of lung cancer linked metastasis diagnostic biomarkers (panel 1, chemotherapy/drug resistance biomarkers (panel 2, hypoxia regulated biomarkers (panel 3 and lung extra cellular matrix biomarkers (panel 4. Conclusions Expression analysis reveals that hypoxia induced lung cancer related biomarkers (panel 3, HIF and its modulating proteins (TGM2, CSNK1A1, CTNNA1, NAMPT/Visfatin, TNFRSF1A, ETS1, SRC-1, FN1, APLP2, DMBT1

  14. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Natalie [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Pestrin, Marta [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca [Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Malorni, Luca [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Di Leo, Angelo, E-mail: adileo@usl4.toscana.it [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy)

    2014-03-25

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  15. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Turner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  16. Review:Proteomic technology for biomarker profiling in cancer: an update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALAOUI-JAMALI Moulay A.; XU Ying-jie

    2006-01-01

    The progress in the understanding of cancer progression and early detection has been slow and frustrating due to the complex multifactorial nature and heterogeneity of the cancer syndrome. To date, no effective treatment is available for advanced cancers, which remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Clearly, there is urgent need to unravel novel biomarkers for early detection.Most of the functional information of the cancer-associated genes resides in the proteome. The later is an exceptionally complex biological system involving several proteins that function through posttranslational modifications and dynamic intermolecular collisions with partners. These protein complexes can be regulated by signals emanating from cancer cells, their surrounding tissue microenvironment, and/or from the host. Some proteins are secreted and/or cleaved into the extracellular milieu and may represent valuable serum biomarkers for diagnosis purpose. It is estimated that the cancer proteome may include over 1.5million proteins as a result of posttranslational processing and modifications. Such complexity clearly highlights the need for ultra-high resolution proteomic technology for robust quantitative protein measurements and data acquisition. This review is to update the current research efforts in high-resolution proteomic technology for discovery and monitoring cancer biomarkers.

  17. Current Challenges in Development of Differentially Expressed and Prognostic Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Predicting the aggressiveness of prostate cancer at biopsy is invaluable in making treatment decisions. In this paper we review the differential expression of genes and microRNAs identified through microarray analysis as potentially useful markers for prostate cancer prognosis and discuss some of the challenges associated with their development. Methods. A review of the literature was conducted through Medline. Articles were identified through searches of the following terms: “prostate cancer AND differential expression”, “prostate cancer prognosis”, and “prostate cancer AND microRNAs”. Results. Though numerous differentially expressed genes and microRNAs were identified as possible prognostic markers, the significance of several of these genes is either debated due to conflicting results or is not validated in other study populations. A few of the articles constructed predictive nomograms using a panel of biomarkers which require further validation. Challenges to the development of useful markers include different methodology, cancer heterogeneity, and sampling error. These can be overcome by categorizing prognostic factors into particular gene pathways or by supplementing biopsy information with blood or urine-based biomarkers. Conclusion. Though biomarkers based on differential expression offer the potential to improve decision making concerning prostate cancer, further validation of their utility and accuracy at the biopsy level is needed.

  18. Potential Biomarker of L type Amino Acid Transporter 1 in Breast Cancer Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Zhongxing; Cho, Heidi T.; Williams, Larry; Zhu, Aizhi; Liang, Ke; Huang, Ke; Wu, Hui; Jiang, Chunsu; Hong, Samuel; Crowe, Ronald; Goodman, Mark M.; Shim, Hyunsuk [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta (United States)

    2011-06-15

    L type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is essential for the transport of large neutral amino acids. However, its role in breast cancer growth remains largely unknown. The purpose of the study is to investigate whether LAT1 is a potential biomarker for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. LAT1 mRNA and protein levels in breast cancer cell lines and tissues were analyzed. In addition, the effects of targeting LAT1 for the inhibition of breast cancer cell tumorigenesis were assessed with soft agar assay. The imaging of xenograft with 1 amino 3 [{sup 18F}]fluorocyclo butane 1 carboxylic acid ([{sup 18F}]FACBC) PET was assessed for its diagnostic biomarker potential. Normal breast tissue or low malignant cell lines expressed low levels of LAT1 mRNA and protein, while highly malignant cancer cell lines and high grade breast cancer tissue expressed high levels of LAT1. In addition, higher expression levels of LAT1 in breast cancer tissues were consistent with advanced stage breast cancer. Furtermore, the blockade of LAT1 with its inhibitor, 2 amino bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane 2 carboxylic acid (BCH), or the knockdown of LAT1 with siRNA, inhibited proliferation and tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. A leucine analog, [{sup 18F}]FACBC, has been demonstrated to be an excellent PET tracer for the non invasive imaging og malignant breast cancer using an orthotopic animal model. The overexpression of LAT1 is required for the progression of breast cancer. LAT1 represents a potential biomarker for therapy and diagnosis of breast cancer. [{sup 18F}]FACBC that correlates with LAT1 function is a potential PET tracer for malignant breast tumor imaging.

  19. Prognostic and therapeutic value of mitochondrial serine hydroxyl-methyltransferase 2 as a breast cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lahong; Chen, Zhaojun; Xue, Dan; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Xiyong; Luh, Frank; Hong, Liquan; Zhang, Hang; Pan, Feng; Liu, Yuhua; Chu, Peiguo; Zheng, Shu; Lou, Guoqiang; Yen, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondrial serine hydroxylmethyltransferase 2 (SHMT2) is a key enzyme in the serine/glycine synthesis pathway. SHMT2 has been implicated as a critical component for tumor cell survival. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value and efficiency of SHMT2 as a biomarker in patients with breast cancer. Individual and pooled survival analyses were performed on five independent breast cancer microarray datasets. Gene signatures enriched by SHMT2 were also analyzed in these datasets. SHMT2 protein expression was detected using immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay in 128 breast cancer cases. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that SHMT2 was significantly associated with gene signatures of mitochondrial module, cancer invasion, metastasis and poor survival among breast cancer patients (prelevance of SHMT2 was validated on IHC data. The mitochondrial localization of SHMT2 protein was visualized on IHC staining. Independent and pooled analysis confirmed that SHMT2 expression was associated with breast cancer tumor aggressiveness (TNM staging and Elson grade) in a dose-dependent manner (pvalue for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer patients, compared to ER-positive patients. In cases involving stage IIb breast cancer, chemotherapy significantly extended survival time among patients with high SHMT2 expression. These results indicate that SHMT2 may be a valuable prognostic biomarker in ER-negative breast cancer cases. Furthermore, SHMT2 may be a potential target for breast cancer treatment and drug discovery.

  20. Identification of protein biomarkers for cervical cancer using human cervicovaginal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert A A Van Raemdonck

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cervicovaginal fluid (CVF can be considered as a potential source of biomarkers for diseases of the lower female reproductive tract. The fluid can easily be collected, thereby offering new opportunities such as the development of self tests. Our objective was to identify a CVF protein biomarker for cervical cancer or its precancerous state. METHODS: A differential proteomics study was set up using CVF samples from healthy and precancerous women. Label-free spectral counting was applied to quantify protein abundances. RESULTS: The proteome analysis revealed 16 candidate biomarkers of which alpha-actinin-4 (p = 0.001 and pyruvate kinase isozyme M1/M2 (p = 0.014 were most promising. Verification of alpha-actinin-4 by ELISA (n = 28 showed that this candidate biomarker discriminated between samples from healthy and both low-risk and high-risk HPV-infected women (p = 0.009. Additional analysis of longitudinal samples (n = 29 showed that alpha-actinin-4 levels correlated with virus persistence and clearing, with a discrimination of approximately 18 pg/ml. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that CVF is an excellent source of protein biomarkers for detection of lower female genital tract pathologies and that alpha-actinin-4 derived from CVF is a promising candidate biomarker for the precancerous state of cervical cancer. Further studies regarding sensitivity and specificity of this biomarker will demonstrate its utility for improving current screening programs and/or its use for a cervical cancer self-diagnosis test.

  1. Mechanism-driven biomarkers to guide immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalian, Suzanne L.; Taube, Janis M.; Anders, Robert A.; Pardoll, Drew M.

    2017-01-01

    With recent approvals for multiple therapeutic antibodies that block cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) in melanoma, non-small-cell lung cancer and kidney cancer, and additional immune checkpoints being targeted clinically, many questions still remain regarding the optimal use of drugs that block these checkpoint pathways. Defining biomarkers that predict therapeutic effects and adverse events is a crucial mandate, highlighted by recent approvals for two PDL1 diagnostic tests. Here, we discuss biomarkers for anti-PD1 therapy based on immunological, genetic and virological criteria. The unique biology of the CTLA4 immune checkpoint, compared with PD1, requires a different approach to biomarker development. Mechanism-based insights from such studies may guide the design of synergistic treatment combinations based on immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:27079802

  2. The Clinical Impact of Recent Advances in LC-MS for Cancer Biomarker Discovery and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Camp, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has become an indispensable tool in biomedical research with broad applications ranging from fundamental biology, systems biology, and biomarker discovery. Recent advances in LC-MS have made it become a major technology in clinical applications, especially in cancer biomarker discovery and verification. To overcome the challenges associated with the analysis of clinical samples, such as extremely wide dynamic range of protein concentrations in biofluids and the need to perform high throughput and accurate quantification, significant efforts have been devoted to improve the overall performance of LC-MS bases clinical proteomics. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in LC-MS in the aspect of cancer biomarker discovery and quantification, and discuss its potentials, limitations, and future perspectives.

  3. Molecular biomarker set for early detection of ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-06-16

    Embodiments of the present invention concern methods and compositions related to detection of ovarian cancer, including detection of the stage of ovarian cancer, in some cases. In particular, the invention encompasses use of expression of TFAP2A and in some embodiments CA125 and/or E2F5 to identify ovarian cancer, including detecting mRNA and/or protein levels of the respective gene products. Kits for detection of ovarian cancer are also described.

  4. Exercise, weight loss and biomarkers for breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, W.A.M. van

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postmenopausal breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in Western women. There are several known risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer of which few are lifestyle-related and, thereby, modifiable. These risk factors provide an opportunity for primary prevention. In this thesis,

  5. A Novel Electrochemical Microfluidic Chip Combined with Multiple Biomarkers for Early Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yao; Zhi, Xiao; Su, Haichuan; Wang, Kan; Yan, Zhen; He, Nongyue; Zhang, Jingpu; Chen, Di; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-12-01

    Early diagnosis is very important to improve the survival rate of patients with gastric cancer and to understand the biology of cancer. In order to meet the clinical demands for early diagnosis of gastric cancer, we developed a disposable easy-to-use electrochemical microfluidic chip combined with multiple antibodies against six kinds of biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), Helicobacter pylori CagA protein (H.P.), P53oncoprotein (P53), pepsinogen I (PG I), and PG-II). The six kinds of biomarkers related to gastric cancer can be detected sensitively and synchronously in a short time. The specially designed three electrodes system enables cross-contamination to be avoided effectively. The linear ranges of detection of the electrochemical microfluidic chip were as follows: 0.37-90 ng mL-1 for CEA, 10.75-172 U mL-1 for CA19-9, 10-160 U L-1 for H.P., 35-560 ng mL-1 for P53, 37.5-600 ng mL-1 for PG I, and 2.5-80 ng mL-1for PG II. This method owns better sensitivity compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results of 394 specimens of gastric cancer sera. Furthermore, we established a multi-index prediction model based on the six kinds of biomarkers for predicting risk of gastric cancer. In conclusion, the electrochemical microfluidic chip for detecting multiple biomarkers has great potential in applications such as early screening of gastric cancer patients, and therapeutic evaluation, and real-time dynamic monitoring the progress of gastric cancer in near future.

  6. Prostate Cancer in African-American Men: Serum Biomarkers for Early Detection Using Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    sali S. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of IL-10, a Lung Cancer Biomarker, in Serum using SiO2 Nanowires Template. Sensors Lett 2007; 5:1-4. 15...chromatography cortisol and cortisone analyses before and at the end of a race in elite cyclists. Chromatography B 2005: 824, 51–6. 26. Jerkunica I...quantity of these molecules. The attempts were made to employ this effect for diagnosis of various dis- eases, including ovarian, lung , and prostate cancers

  7. Circulating microRNAs as specific biomarkers for breast cancer detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders K O Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed microRNAs (miRNAs in plasma are potential biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection. Here, we aimed to develop specific blood-based miRNA assay for breast cancer detection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TaqMan-based miRNA profiling was performed in tumor, adjacent non-tumor, corresponding plasma from breast cancer patients, and plasma from matched healthy controls. All putative markers identified were verified in a training set of breast cancer patients. Selected markers were validated in a case-control cohort of 170 breast cancer patients, 100 controls, and 95 other types of cancers and then blindly validated in an independent set of 70 breast cancer patients and 50 healthy controls. Profiling results showed 8 miRNAs were concordantly up-regulated and 1 miRNA was concordantly down-regulated in both plasma and tumor tissue of breast cancer patients. Of the 8 up-regulated miRNAs, only 3 were significantly elevated (p<0.0001 before surgery and reduced after surgery in the training set. Results from the validation cohort showed that a combination of miR-145 and miR-451 was the best biomarker (p<0.0001 in discriminating breast cancer from healthy controls and all other types of cancers. In the blind validation, these plasma markers yielded Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve area of 0.931. The positive predictive value was 88% and the negative predictive value was 92%. Altered levels of these miRNAs in plasma have been detected not only in advanced stages but also early stages of tumors. The positive predictive value for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS cases was 96%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggested that these circulating miRNAs could be a potential specific biomarker for breast cancer screening.

  8. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  9. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) as a biomarker in gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Mie; Mau-Sørensen, Morten; Brünner, Nils

    2013-01-01

    The value of Tissue Inhibitor of MetalloProteinase-1 (TIMP-1) as a biomarker in patients with gastric cancer (GC) is widely debated. The aim of this review is to evaluate available literature describing the association between levels of TIMP-1 in tumor tissue and/or blood and the prognosis...

  10. Plasma alkylresorcinols, biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye intake, and incidence of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrø, Cecilie; Olsen, Anja; Landberg, Rikard;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated the association between whole-grain intake and colorectal cancer. Because whole-grain intake estimation might be prone to measurement errors, more objective measures (eg, biomarkers) could assist in investigating such associations. METHODS: The associatio...

  11. Biomarkers in tissue from patients with upper gastrointestinal cancers treated with erlotinib and bevacizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrberg, Kristoffer Staal; Pappot, Helle; Lassen, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    not be recommended in an unselected population of patients with chemo-refractory UGI cancer. However, a subpopulation of patients did benefit from the therapy. In this prospectively planned biomarker study we investigated vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) and epidermal growth...

  12. Expert consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of cancer-related depressed mood state based on Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaodan Tian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This consensus statement is organized into six parts: 1 Definitions: cancer-related depressed mood state is defined as a group of depressive symptoms, rather than major depressive disorder. Thus, “cancer-related depression” or “depressed mood state” is introduced as standard terminology and associated with the Chinese medicine concept of “yu zheng” (depression syndrome. 2 Pathogenesis: factors including psychological stress, cancer pain, cancer fatigue, sleep disorders, surgery trauma, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are strongly associated with cancer-related depressed mood state. Crucial elements of pathogenesis are cancer caused by depression, depression caused by cancer, and the concurrence of phlegm, dampness, and stasis from constrained liver-qi and spleen deficiency. 3 Symptoms: these include core symptoms, psychological symptoms, and somatic symptoms. Depressed mood and loss of interest are the main criteria for diagnosis. 4 Clinical evaluation: based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and a numeric rating scale, and taking mood changes during cancer diagnosis and treatment into consideration, a questionnaire can be drafted to distinguish between major depressive disorder and cancer-related depression. The aim is to assist oncology clinicians to identify, treat, and refer patients with cancer-related depression. 5 Diagnosis: diagnosis should be based on the Chinese Classification for Mental Disorders (CCMD-3, taking patients' mood changes during diagnosis and treatment into consideration. 6 Treatment: treatments for cancer-related depression must be performed concurrently with cancer treatment. For mild depression, non-pharmacologic comprehensive therapies, including psychological intervention, music therapy, patient education, physical activity, and acupuncture, are recommended; for moderate depression, classical Chinese herbal formulas based on syndrome pattern differentiation combined with

  13. Lung cancer screening beyond low-dose computed tomography: the role of novel biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Naveed; Kumar, Rohit; Kavuru, Mani S

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common and lethal malignancy in the world. The landmark National lung screening trial (NLST) showed a 20% relative reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals with screening low-dose computed tomography. However, the poor specificity and low prevalence of lung cancer in the NLST provide major limitations to its widespread use. Furthermore, a lung nodule on CT scan requires a nuanced and individualized approach towards management. In this regard, advances in high through-put technology (molecular diagnostics, multi-gene chips, proteomics, and bronchoscopic techniques) have led to discovery of lung cancer biomarkers that have shown potential to complement the current screening standards. Early detection of lung cancer can be achieved by analysis of biomarkers from tissue samples within the respiratory tract such as sputum, saliva, nasal/bronchial airway epithelial cells and exhaled breath condensate or through peripheral biofluids such as blood, serum and urine. Autofluorescence bronchoscopy has been employed in research setting to identify pre-invasive lesions not identified on CT scan. Although these modalities are not yet commercially available in clinic setting, they will be available in the near future and clinicians who care for patients with lung cancer should be aware. In this review, we present up-to-date state of biomarker development, discuss their clinical relevance and predict their future role in lung cancer management.

  14. Current Challenges in Volatile Organic Compounds Analysis as Potential Biomarkers of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial in reducing mortality among people suffering from cancer. There is a lack of characteristic early clinical symptoms in most forms of cancer, which highlights the importance of investigating new methods for its early detection. One of the most promising methods is the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. VOCs are a diverse group of carbon-based chemicals that are present in exhaled breath and biofluids and may be collected from the headspace of these matrices. Different patterns of VOCs have been correlated with various diseases, cancer among them. Studies have also shown that cancer cells in vitro produce or consume specific VOCs that can serve as potential biomarkers that differentiate them from noncancerous cells. This review identifies the current challenges in the investigation of VOCs as potential cancer biomarkers, by the critical evaluation of available matrices for the in vivo and in vitro approaches in this field and by comparison of the main extraction and detection techniques that have been applied to date in this area of study. It also summarises complementary in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies conducted to date in order to try to identify volatile biomarkers of cancer.

  15. Serum Helicobacter pylori NapA antibody as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Huimin; Zhang, Tingting; Ren, Xiyun; Nadolny, Christina; Dong, Xiaoqun; Huang, Lina; Yuan, Kexin; Tian, Wenjing; Jia, Yunhe

    2014-02-20

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is strongly associated with gastric cancer. However, only a minority of infected individuals ever develop gastric cancer. This risk stratification may be in part due to differences among strains. The relationship between neutrophil-activating protein (NapA) and gastric cancer is unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of NapA as a biomarker in gastric cancer. We used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the status of H. pylori infection. Indirect ELISA method was used for detection of NapA antibody titer in the serum of H. pylori infected individuals. Unconditional logistic regressions were adopted to analyze the variables and determine the association of NapA and gastric cancer. The results of study indicated serum H. pylori NapA antibody level were associated with a reduced risk for development of gastric cancer. It may be used in conjugation with other indicators for gastric cancer detection.

  16. Prognostic and therapeutic value of mitochondrial serine hydroxyl-methyltransferase 2 as a breast cancer biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lahong; Chen, Zhaojun; Xue, Dan; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Xiyong; Luh, Frank; Hong, Liquan; Zhang, Hang; Pan, Feng; Liu, Yuhua; Chu, Peiguo; Zheng, Shu; Lou, Guoqiang; Yen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial serine hydroxylmethyltransferase 2 (SHMT2) is a key enzyme in the serine/glycine synthesis pathway. SHMT2 has been implicated as a critical component for tumor cell survival. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value and efficiency of SHMT2 as a biomarker in patients with breast cancer. Individual and pooled survival analyses were performed on five independent breast cancer microarray datasets. Gene signatures enriched by SHMT2 were also analyzed in these datasets. SHMT2 protein expression was detected using immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay in 128 breast cancer cases. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that SHMT2 was significantly associated with gene signatures of mitochondrial module, cancer invasion, metastasis and poor survival among breast cancer patients (paggressiveness (TNM staging and Elson grade) in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05). The prognostic performance of SHMT2 mRNA was comparable to other gene signatures and proved superior to TNM staging. Further analysis results indicated that SHMT2 had better prognostic value for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer patients, compared to ER-positive patients. In cases involving stage IIb breast cancer, chemotherapy significantly extended survival time among patients with high SHMT2 expression. These results indicate that SHMT2 may be a valuable prognostic biomarker in ER-negative breast cancer cases. Furthermore, SHMT2 may be a potential target for breast cancer treatment and drug discovery. PMID:27666119

  17. Integrative Genomic Data Mining for Discovery of Potential Blood-Borne Biomarkers for Early Diagnosis of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yongliang Yang; Pavel Pospisil; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; S. James Adelstein; Amin I. Kassis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With the arrival of the postgenomic era, there is increasing interest in the discovery of biomarkers for the accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and early detection of cancer. Blood-borne cancer markers are favored by clinicians, because blood samples can be obtained and analyzed with relative ease. We have used a combined mining strategy based on an integrated cancer microarray platform, Oncomine, and the biomarker module of the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) program to identify po...

  18. Mechanisms of CTC Biomarkers in Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    obtained at the middle of vein puncture after the first 5 ml of blood was discarded to avoid contamination by normal epithelial cells . All samples (25...Supplementary Fig. 1) in which the endomembrane furrow separates the daughter and mother cell during cell -division events18. Biomarker profiling of...gating parameters to select for DAPI− (4′ , 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole)/ EpCAM−/CD45−/CD44+/CD24− cells . Cells were then subsequently sorted to obtain

  19. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery?

  20. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J; Albers, P; Altena, R; Aparicio, J; Bokemeyer, C; Busch, J; Cathomas, R; Cavallin-Stahl, E; Clarke, N W; Claßen, J; Cohn-Cedermark, G; Dahl, A A; Daugaard, G; De Giorgi, U; De Santis, M; De Wit, M; De Wit, R; Dieckmann, K P; Fenner, M; Fizazi, K; Flechon, A; Fossa, S D; Germá Lluch, J R; Gietema, J A; Gillessen, S; Giwercman, A; Hartmann, J T; Heidenreich, A; Hentrich, M; Honecker, F; Horwich, A; Huddart, R A; Kliesch, S; Kollmannsberger, C; Krege, S; Laguna, M P; Looijenga, L H J; Lorch, A; Lotz, J P; Mayer, F; Necchi, A; Nicolai, N; Nuver, J; Oechsle, K; Oldenburg, J; Oosterhuis, J W; Powles, T; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Rick, O; Rosti, G; Salvioni, R; Schrader, M; Schweyer, S; Sedlmayer, F; Sohaib, A; Souchon, R; Tandstad, T; Winter, C; Wittekind, C

    2013-04-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377-1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478-496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497-513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements.

  1. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris;

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs, and honing regimens of existing anti......-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill...... are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process...

  2. In Silico discovery of transcription factors as potential diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2011-09-19

    Background: Our study focuses on identifying potential biomarkers for diagnosis and early detection of ovarian cancer (OC) through the study of transcription regulation of genes affected by estrogen hormone.Results: The results are based on a set of 323 experimentally validated OC-associated genes compiled from several databases, and their subset controlled by estrogen. For these two gene sets we computationally determined transcription factors (TFs) that putatively regulate transcription initiation. We ranked these TFs based on the number of genes they are likely to control. In this way, we selected 17 top-ranked TFs as potential key regulators and thus possible biomarkers for a set of 323 OC-associated genes. For 77 estrogen controlled genes from this set we identified three unique TFs as potential biomarkers.Conclusions: We introduced a new methodology to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers for OC. This report is the first bioinformatics study that explores multiple transcriptional regulators of OC-associated genes as potential diagnostic biomarkers in connection with estrogen responsiveness. We show that 64% of TF biomarkers identified in our study are validated based on real-time data from microarray expression studies. As an illustration, our method could identify CP2 that in combination with CA125 has been reported to be sensitive in diagnosing ovarian tumors. 2011 Kaur et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  3. In Silico discovery of transcription factors as potential diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choolani Mahesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our study focuses on identifying potential biomarkers for diagnosis and early detection of ovarian cancer (OC through the study of transcription regulation of genes affected by estrogen hormone. Results The results are based on a set of 323 experimentally validated OC-associated genes compiled from several databases, and their subset controlled by estrogen. For these two gene sets we computationally determined transcription factors (TFs that putatively regulate transcription initiation. We ranked these TFs based on the number of genes they are likely to control. In this way, we selected 17 top-ranked TFs as potential key regulators and thus possible biomarkers for a set of 323 OC-associated genes. For 77 estrogen controlled genes from this set we identified three unique TFs as potential biomarkers. Conclusions We introduced a new methodology to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers for OC. This report is the first bioinformatics study that explores multiple transcriptional regulators of OC-associated genes as potential diagnostic biomarkers in connection with estrogen responsiveness. We show that 64% of TF biomarkers identified in our study are validated based on real-time data from microarray expression studies. As an illustration, our method could identify CP2 that in combination with CA125 has been reported to be sensitive in diagnosing ovarian tumors.

  4. Chromosomal aberrations and SCEs as biomarkers of cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norppa, H; Bonassi, S; Hansteen, I-L

    2006-01-01

    between CA analysis and cancer detection, i.e., is obviously not explained by undetected cancer. The present evidence indicates that both chromatid-type and chromosome-type CAs predict cancer, even though some data suggest that chromosome-type CAs may have a more pronounced predictive value than chromatid...... species. Although the association between CA level and cancer is seen at the group level, an association probably also exists for the individual, although it is not known if an individual approach could be feasible. However, group level evidence should be enough to support the use of CA analysis as a tool...

  5. Tests detecting biomarkers for screening of colorectal cancer: What is on the horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phalguni, Angaja

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To identify new and emerging screening tests for colorectal cancer (CRC that involves detection of various biomarkers like blood, DNA and RNA in samples of faeces, tissue or blood. Current practice: Screening for CRC can be done by bowel visualisation techniques and tests that measure biomarkers. The Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP in England uses a guaiac faecal occult blood test. Methods: The strategy was to search available literature, identify developers and contact them for relevant information. Advice from experts was sought on potential utility and likely impact of identified technologies on the BCSP.Results: Ninety-three companies and five research groups were contacted. Sixty-nine relevant tests were identified. Detailed information was available for 48 tests, of these 73% were CE marked and the remainder were considered as emerging. Forty-nine tests use immunochemical methods to detect occult blood in faeces. Eight, four and two tests detect biomarkers in a sample of blood, or exfoliated cells either shed in faeces or collected from rectal mucosa respectively. Six tests were grouped as ‘other tests’. Most of the identified tests are performed manually and give qualitative detection of biomarkers. Conclusion: Variation in test performance and characteristics was observed amongst the 69 identified tests. Automated, quantitative FIT with a variable cut off are the preferred approach in the BSCP. However the units used to report FITs results do not enable comparison across products. Tests detecting biomarkers other than occult blood are more specific to neoplasms but have limited sensitivity due to the heterogeneity of cancer. Research is ongoing to identify an optimal panel of biomarkers, simplifying and automating the test, and reducing the cost.

  6. Application of biomarkers in cancer risk management: evaluation from stochastic clonal evolutionary and dynamic system optimization points of view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aside from primary prevention, early detection remains the most effective way to decrease mortality associated with the majority of solid cancers. Previous cancer screening models are largely based on classification of at-risk populations into three conceptually defined groups (normal, cancer without symptoms, and cancer with symptoms. Unfortunately, this approach has achieved limited successes in reducing cancer mortality. With advances in molecular biology and genomic technologies, many candidate somatic genetic and epigenetic "biomarkers" have been identified as potential predictors of cancer risk. However, none have yet been validated as robust predictors of progression to cancer or shown to reduce cancer mortality. In this Perspective, we first define the necessary and sufficient conditions for precise prediction of future cancer development and early cancer detection within a simple physical model framework. We then evaluate cancer risk prediction and early detection from a dynamic clonal evolution point of view, examining the implications of dynamic clonal evolution of biomarkers and the application of clonal evolution for cancer risk management in clinical practice. Finally, we propose a framework to guide future collaborative research between mathematical modelers and biomarker researchers to design studies to investigate and model dynamic clonal evolution. This approach will allow optimization of available resources for cancer control and intervention timing based on molecular biomarkers in predicting cancer among various risk subsets that dynamically evolve over time.

  7. Tissue microarrays for testing basal biomarkers in familial breast cancer cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozany Mucha Dufloth

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The proteins p63, p-cadherin and CK5 are consistently expressed by the basal and myoepithelial cells of the breast, although their expression in sporadic and familial breast cancer cases has yet to be fully defined. The aim here was to study the basal immunopro-file of a breast cancer case series using tissue microarray technology. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a cross-sectional study at Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Brazil, and the Institute of Pathology and Mo-lecular Immunology, Porto, Portugal. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry using the antibodies p63, CK5 and p-cadherin, and also estrogen receptor (ER and Human Epidermal Receptor Growth Factor 2 (HER2, was per-formed on 168 samples from a breast cancer case series. The criteria for identifying women at high risk were based on those of the Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium. RESULTS: Familial tumors were more frequently positive for the p-cadherin (p = 0.0004, p63 (p < 0.0001 and CK5 (p < 0.0001 than was sporadic cancer. Moreover, familial tumors had coexpression of the basal biomarkers CK5+/ p63+, grouped two by two (OR = 34.34, while absence of coexpression (OR = 0.13 was associ-ated with the sporadic cancer phenotype. CONCLUSION: Familial breast cancer was found to be associated with basal biomarkers, using tissue microarray technology. Therefore, characterization of the familial breast cancer phenotype will improve the understanding of breast carcinogenesis.

  8. Serial Patterns of Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers in a Prediagnosis Longitudinal Dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Blyuss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of ovarian cancer through screening may have impact on mortality from the disease. Approaches based on CA125 cut-off have not been effective. Longitudinal algorithms such as the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA to interpret CA125 have been shown to have higher sensitivity and specificity than a single cut-off. The aim of this study was to investigate whether other ovarian cancer-related biomarkers, Human Epididymis 4 (HE4, glycodelin, mesothelin, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7, and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1, could improve the performance of CA125 in detecting ovarian cancer earlier. Serum samples (single and serial predating diagnosis from 47 women taking part in the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS who went on to develop primary invasive ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer (index cancer (170 samples and 179 matched controls (893 samples were included in the study. A multiplex immunobased assay platform (Becton Dickinson allowing simultaneous measurement of the six serum markers was used. The area under the ROC curve for the panel of three biomarkers (CA125, HE4, and glycodelin was higher than for CA125 alone for all analysed time groups, indicating that these markers can improve on sensitivity of CA125 alone for ovarian cancer detection.

  9. A meta analysis of pancreatic microarray datasets yields new targets as cancer genes and biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin C W Goonesekere

    Full Text Available The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC, which has a five year survival rate of less than 5%. Improved screening for earlier diagnosis, through the detection of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers provides the best hope of increasing the rate of curatively resectable carcinomas. Though many serum markers have been reported to be elevated in patients with PC, so far, most of these markers have not been implemented into clinical routine due to low sensitivity or specificity. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly upregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We demonstrate that the biological functions ascribed to these genes are clearly associated with PC and metastasis, and that that these genes exhibit a strong link to pathways involved with inflammation and the immune response. This investigation has yielded new targets for cancer genes, and potential biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. The candidate list of cancer genes includes protein kinase genes, new members of gene families currently associated with PC, as well as genes not previously linked to PC. In this study, we are also able to move towards developing a signature for hypomethylated genes, which could be useful for early detection of PC. We also show that the significantly upregulated 800+ genes in our analysis can serve as an enriched pool for tissue and serum protein biomarkers in pancreatic cancer.

  10. Serological proteome analysis of dogs with breast cancer unveils common serum biomarkers with human counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Rahbarghazi, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Canine mammary tumor is being touted as a model for investigating the human breast cancer. Breast cancer of the both species has similar biological behavior, histopathologic characteristics, and metastatic pattern. In this study, we used the serological proteome analysis to detect autoantigens that elicit a humoral response in dogs with mammary tumor in order to identify serum biomarkers with potential usefulness as diagnostic markers and to better understand molecular mechanisms underlying canine breast cancer development. Protein extract from a cell line was subject to 2DE followed by Western blotting using sera from 15 dogs with mammary tumor and sera from 15 healthy control dogs. Immunoreactive autoantigens were subsequently identified by the MALDI-TOF MS. Four autoantigens, including manganese-superoxide dismutase, triose phosphate isomerase, alpha-enolase, and phosphoglycerate mutase1, with significantly higher immunoreactivity in the tumor samples than in the normal samples were identified as biomarker candidates. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting revealed higher expression of these biomarkers in the malignant tumors than in the normal or benign tumors. The autoantigens found in this study have been reported to elicit autoantibody response in the human breast cancer, indicating the similarity of breast cancer proteome profile in dogs with that in human beings.

  11. Xenograft assessment of predictive biomarkers for standard head and neck cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Andrew P; Swick, Adam D; Smith, Molly A; Blitzer, Grace C; Yang, Robert Z; Saha, Sandeep; Harari, Paul M; Lambert, Paul F; Liu, Cheng Z; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a challenging cancer to treat with overall 5-year survival on the order of 50-60%. Therefore, predictive biomarkers for this disease would be valuable to provide more effective and individualized therapeutic approaches for these patients. While prognostic biomarkers such as p16 expression correlate with outcome; to date, no predictive biomarkers have been clinically validated for HNSCC. We generated xenografts in immunocompromised mice from six established HNSCC cell lines and evaluated response to cisplatin, cetuximab, and radiation. Tissue microarrays were constructed from pre- and posttreatment tumor samples derived from each xenograft experiment. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a semiautomated imaging and analysis platform to determine the relative expression of five potential predictive biomarkers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phospho-EGFR, phospho-Akt, phospho-ERK, and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1). Biomarker levels were compared between xenografts that were sensitive versus resistant to a specific therapy utilizing a two-sample t-test with equal standard deviations. Indeed the xenografts displayed heterogeneous responses to each treatment, and we linked a number of baseline biomarker levels to response. This included low ERCC1 being associated with cisplatin sensitivity, low phospho-Akt correlated with cetuximab sensitivity, and high total EGFR was related to radiation resistance. Overall, we developed a systematic approach to identifying predictive biomarkers and demonstrated several connections between biomarker levels and treatment response. Despite these promising initial results, this work requires additional preclinical validation, likely involving the use of patient-derived xenografts, prior to moving into the clinical realm for confirmation among patients with HNSCC.

  12. Collections of simultaneously altered genes as biomarkers of cancer cell drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-03-15

    Computational analysis of cancer pharmacogenomics data has resulted in biomarkers predictive of drug response, but the majority of response is not captured by current methods. Methods typically select single biomarkers or groups of related biomarkers but do not account for response that is strictly dependent on many simultaneous genetic alterations. This shortcoming reflects the combinatorics and multiple-testing problem associated with many-body biologic interactions. We developed a novel approach, Multivariate Organization of Combinatorial Alterations (MOCA), to partially address these challenges. Extending on previous work that accounts for pairwise interactions, the approach rapidly combines many genomic alterations into biomarkers of drug response, using Boolean set operations coupled with optimization; in this framework, the union, intersection, and difference Boolean set operations are proxies of molecular redundancy, synergy, and resistance, respectively. The algorithm is fast, broadly applicable to cancer genomics data, is of immediate use for prioritizing cancer pharmacogenomics experiments, and recovers known clinical findings without bias. Furthermore, the results presented here connect many important, previously isolated observations.

  13. Clinical librarian support for rapid review of clinical utility of cancer molecular biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yimin; Fowler, Clara S; Fulton, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The clinical librarian used a restricted literature searching and quality-filtering approach to provide relevant clinical evidence for the use of cancer molecular biomarkers by institutional policy makers and clinicians in the rapid review process. The librarian-provided evidence was compared with the cited references in the institutional molecular biomarker algorithm. The overall incorporation rate of the librarian-provided references into the algorithm was above 80%. This study suggests the usefulness of clinical librarian expertise for clinical practice. The searching and filtering methods for high-level evidence can be adopted by information professionals who are involved in the rapid literature review.

  14. DNA methylome and the complexity of discovering prostate cancer biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahriar Koochekpour

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer (PCa) remains the most common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men.Molecular discrimination at an early stage between indolent and aggressive primary tumors in pathologically confirmed PCa is required to develop personalized therapeutic interventions.

  15. Personalization of prostate cancer prevention and therapy: are clinically qualified biomarkers in the horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yap Timothy A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer remains the most common malignancy among men and the second leading cause of male cancer-related mortality. Death from this disease is invariably due to resistance to androgen deprivation therapy. Our improved understanding of the biology of prostate cancer has heralded a new era in molecular anticancer drug development, with multiple novel anticancer drugs for castration resistant prostate cancer now entering the clinic. These include the taxane cabazitaxel, the vaccine sipuleucel-T, the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone, the novel androgen receptor antagonist MDV-3100 and the radionuclide alpharadin. The management and therapeutic landscape of prostate cancer has now been transformed with this growing armamentarium of effective antitumor agents. This review discusses strategies for the prevention and personalization of prostate cancer therapy, with a focus on the development of predictive and intermediate endpoint biomarkers, as well as novel clinical trial designs that will be crucial for the optimal development of such anticancer therapeutics.

  16. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pereira

    Full Text Available High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools.Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival.Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic dilemma and a potential

  17. Circulating microRNAs: Novel biomarkers for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process, involving a variety of changes in gene expression and physiological structure change. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules. Recent innovation in miRNAs profiling technology have shed new light on the pathology of esophageal carcinoma (EC), and also heralded great potential for exploring novel biomarkers for both EC diagnosis and treatment. Frequent dysregulation of miRNA in malignancy highlights the study of molecular...

  18. A survey of immunohistochemical biomarkers for basal-like breast cancer against a gene expression profile gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jennifer R; Gao, Dongxia; Chow, Christine; Cheng, Jinjin; Lau, Sherman Y H; Ellis, Matthew J; Perou, Charles M; Bernard, Philip S; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2013-11-01

    Gene expression profiling of breast cancer delineates a particularly aggressive subtype referred to as 'basal-like', which comprises ∼15% of all breast cancers, afflicts younger women and is refractory to endocrine and anti-HER2 therapies. Immunohistochemical surrogate definitions for basal-like breast cancer, such as the clinical ER/PR/HER2 triple-negative phenotype and models incorporating positive expression for CK5 (CK5/6) and/or EGFR are heavily cited. However, many additional biomarkers for basal-like breast cancer have been described in the literature. A parallel comparison of 46 proposed immunohistochemical biomarkers of basal-like breast cancer was performed against a gene expression profile gold standard on a tissue microarray containing 42 basal-like and 80 non-basal-like breast cancer cases. Ki67 and PPH3 were the most sensitive biomarkers (both 92%) positively expressed in the basal-like subtype, whereas CK14, IMP3 and NGFR were the most specific (100%). Among biomarkers surveyed, loss of INPP4B (a negative regulator of phosphatidylinositol signaling) was 61% sensitive and 99% specific with the highest odds ratio (OR) at 108, indicating the strongest association with basal-like breast cancer. Expression of nestin, a common marker of neural progenitor cells that is also associated with the triple-negative/basal-like phenotype and poor breast cancer prognosis, possessed the second highest OR at 29 among the 46 biomarkers surveyed, as well as 54% sensitivity and 96% specificity. As a positively expressed biomarker, nestin possesses technical advantages over INPP4B that make it a more ideal biomarker for identification of basal-like breast cancer. The comprehensive immunohistochemical biomarker survey presented in this study is a necessary step for determining an optimized surrogate immunopanel that best defines basal-like breast cancer in a practical and clinically accessible way.

  19. Potentials of plasma NGAL and MIC-1 as biomarker(s in the diagnosis of lethal pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhwinder Kaur

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC is lethal malignancy with very high mortality rate. Absence of sensitive and specific marker(s is one of the major factors for poor prognosis of PC patients. In pilot studies using small set of patients, secreted acute phase proteins neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL and TGF-β family member macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1 are proposed as most potential biomarkers specifically elevated in the blood of PC patients. However, their performance as diagnostic markers for PC, particularly in pre-treatment patients, remains unknown. In order to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of NGAL and MIC-1, their levels were measured in plasma samples from patients with pre-treatment PC patients (n = 91 and compared it with those in healthy control (HC individuals (n = 24 and patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP, n = 23. The diagnostic performance of these two proteins was further compared with that of CA19-9, a tumor marker commonly used to follow PC progression. The levels of all three biomarkers were significantly higher in PC compared to HCs. The mean (± standard deviation, SD plasma NGAL, CA19-9 and MIC-1 levels in PC patients was 111.1 ng/mL (2.2, 219.2 U/mL (7.8 and 4.5 ng/mL (4.1, respectively. In comparing resectable PC to healthy patients, all three biomarkers were found to have comparable sensitivities (between 64%-81% but CA19-9 and NGAL had a higher specificity (92% and 88%, respectively. For distinguishing resectable PC from CP patients, CA19-9 and MIC-1 were most specific (74% and 78% respectively. CA19-9 at an optimal cut-off of 54.1 U/ml is highly specific in differentiating resectable (stage 1/2 pancreatic cancer patients from controls in comparison to its clinical cut-off (37.1 U/ml. Notably, the addition of MIC-1 to CA19-9 significantly improved the ability to distinguish resectable PC cases from CP (p = 0.029. Overall, MIC-1 in combination with CA19-9 improved the diagnostic

  20. The Role of Epigenomics in the Study of Cancer Biomarkers and in the Development of Diagnostic Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetics plays a key role in cancer development. Genetics alone cannot explain sporadic cancer and cancer development in individuals with no family history or a weak family history of cancer. Epigenetics provides a mechanism to explain the development of cancer in such situations. Alterations in epigenetic profiling may provide important insights into the etiology and natural history of cancer. Because several epigenetic changes occur before histopathological changes, they can serve as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and risk assessment. Many cancers may remain asymptomatic until relatively late stages; in managing the disease, efforts should be focused on early detection, accurate prediction of disease progression, and frequent monitoring. This chapter describes epigenetic biomarkers as they are expressed during cancer development and their potential use in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Based on epigenomic information, biomarkers have been identified that may serve as diagnostic tools; some such biomarkers also may be useful in identifying individuals who will respond to therapy and survive longer. The importance of analytical and clinical validation of biomarkers is discussed, along with challenges and opportunities in this field.

  1. Direct cancer tissue proteomics: a method to identify candidate cancer biomarkers from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S-I; Thumar, J; Lundgren, D H; Rezaul, K; Mayya, V; Wu, L; Eng, J; Wright, M E; Han, D K

    2007-01-01

    Successful treatment of multiple cancer types requires early detection and identification of reliable biomarkers present in specific cancer tissues. To test the feasibility of identifying proteins from archival cancer tissues, we have developed a methodology, termed direct tissue proteomics (DTP), which can be used to identify proteins directly from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded prostate cancer tissue samples. Using minute prostate biopsy sections, we demonstrate the identification of 428 prostate-expressed proteins using the shotgun method. Because the DTP method is not quantitative, we employed the absolute quantification method and demonstrate picogram level quantification of prostate-specific antigen. In depth bioinformatics analysis of these expressed proteins affords the categorization of metabolic pathways that may be important for distinct stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we validate Wnt-3 as an upregulated protein in cancerous prostate cells by immunohistochemistry. We propose that this general strategy provides a roadmap for successful identification of critical molecular targets of multiple cancer types.

  2. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoll, H J; Souchon, R; Krege, S; Albers, P; Beyer, J; Kollmannsberger, C; Fossa, S D; Skakkebaek, N E; de Wit, R; Fizazi, K; Droz, J P; Pizzocaro, G; Daugaard, G; de Mulder, P H M; Horwich, A; Oliver, T; Huddart, R; Rosti, G; Paz Ares, L; Pont, O; Hartmann, J T; Aass, N; Algaba, F; Bamberg, M; Bodrogi, I; Bokemeyer, C; Classen, J; Clemm, S; Culine, S; de Wit, M; Derigs, H G; Dieckmann, K P; Flasshove, M; Garcia del Muro, X; Gerl, A; Germa-Lluch, J R; Hartmann, M; Heidenreich, A; Hoeltl, W; Joffe, J; Jones, W; Kaiser, G; Klepp, O; Kliesch, S; Kisbenedek, L; Koehrmann, K U; Kuczyk, M; Laguna, M P; Leiva, O; Loy, V; Mason, M D; Mead, G M; Mueller, R P; Nicolai, N; Oosterhof, G O N; Pottek, T; Rick, O; Schmidberger, H; Sedlmayer, F; Siegert, W; Studer, U; Tjulandin, S; von der Maase, H; Walz, P; Weinknecht, S; Weissbach, L; Winter, E; Wittekind, C

    2004-09-01

    Germ cell tumour is the most frequent malignant tumour type in young men with a 100% rise in the incidence every 20 years. Despite this, the high sensitivity of germ cell tumours to platinum-based chemotherapy, together with radiation and surgical measures, leads to the high cure rate of > or = 99% in early stages and 90%, 75-80% and 50% in advanced disease with 'good', 'intermediate' and 'poor' prognostic criteria (IGCCCG classification), respectively. The high cure rate in patients with limited metastatic disease allows the reduction of overall treatment load, and therefore less acute and long-term toxicity, e.g. organ sparing surgery for specific cases, reduced dose and treatment volume of irradiation or substitution of node dissection by surveillance or adjuvant chemotherapy according to the presence or absence of vascular invasion. Thus, different treatment options according to prognostic factors including histology, stage and patient factors and possibilities of the treating centre as well may be used to define the treatment strategy which is definitively chosen for an individual patient. However, this strategy of reduction of treatment load as well as the treatment itself require very high expertise of the treating physician with careful management and follow-up and thorough cooperation by the patient as well to maintain the high rate for cure. Treatment decisions must be based on the available evidence which has been the basis for this consensus guideline delivering a clear proposal for diagnostic and treatment measures in each stage of gonadal and extragonadal germ cell tumour and individual clinical situations. Since this guideline is based on the highest evidence level available today, a deviation from these proposals should be a rare and justified exception.

  3. Nestin servers as a promising prognostic biomarker in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yuan; Lu, Ming; Wang, Cong; Li, Qingbao; Gao, Yongsheng; Mu, Dianbin; Cao, Yan; Li, Miaomiao; Meng, Xiangjiao

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide and it is important to identify the predictive and/or prognostic markers for the cancer. Nestin, a proliferative and multipotent biomarker has been reported to be associated with prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a few studies. In the present study, we retrospectively recruited 153 patients with NSCLC. Nestin protein expression in tumor samples was determined by immunohistochemistry staining. Nestin expression was related with tumor differentiation (P=0.036), lymphatic metastasis (N stage, P=0.011), and p-TNM stage (P=0.013), while there was no significant association between Nestin expression level and age, smoking habits, gender, histologic type, and T stage. Nestin was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in NSCLC with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.701 (95% CI, 1.616-4.513, PCRISPR/Cas9 mediated genome editing. It was observed that knockout of Nestin caused enhancement of cancer cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation, and invasion in A549 and H1299 cell lines. Furthermore, we examined the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) related biomarkers such as E-cadherin and Vimentin in Nestin-depleted lung cancer cells and knockout of Nestin was found to inhibit EMT, suggesting the involvement of Nestin mediated EMT signaling in lung cancer. The finding above demonstrated that Nestin might serve as a prognostic factor and therapeutic target in NSCLCs.

  4. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Saletta

    2014-06-01

    General significance: The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations.

  5. Discovery and validation of DNA hypomethylation biomarkers for liver cancer using HRM-specific probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Stefanska

    Full Text Available Poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC associated with late diagnosis necessitates the development of early diagnostic biomarkers. We have previously delineated the landscape of DNA methylation in HCC patients unraveling the importance of promoter hypomethylation in activation of cancer- and metastasis-driving genes. The purpose of the present study was to test the feasibility that genes that are hypomethylated in HCC could serve as candidate diagnostic markers. We use high resolution melting analysis (HRM as a simple translatable PCR-based method to define methylation states in clinical samples. We tested seven regions selected from the shortlist of genes hypomethylated in HCC and showed that HRM analysis of several of them distinguishes methylation states in liver cancer specimens from normal adjacent liver and chronic hepatitis in the Shanghai area. Such regions were identified within promoters of neuronal membrane glycoprotein M6-B (GPM6B and melanoma antigen family A12 (MAGEA12 genes. Differences in HRM in the immunoglobulin superfamily Fc receptor (FCRL1 separated invasive tumors from less invasive HCC. The identified biomarkers differentiated HCC from chronic hepatitis in another set of samples from Dhaka. Although the main thrust in DNA methylation diagnostics in cancer is on hypermethylated genes, our study for the first time illustrates the potential use of hypomethylated genes as markers for solid tumors. After further validation in a larger cohort, the identified DNA hypomethylated regions can become important candidate biomarkers for liver cancer diagnosis and prognosis, especially in populations with high risk for HCC development.

  6. A new device for liver cancer biomarker detection with high accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaipeng Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel cantilever array-based bio-sensor was batch-fabricated with IC compatible MEMS technology for precise liver cancer bio-marker detection. A micro-cavity was designed in the free end of the cantilever for local antibody-immobilization, thus adsorption of the cancer biomarker is localized in the micro-cavity, and the adsorption-induced k variation can be dramatically reduced with comparison to that caused by adsorption of the whole lever. The cantilever is pizeoelectrically driven into vibration which is pizeoresistively sensed by Wheatstone bridge. These structural features offer several advantages: high sensitivity, high throughput, high mass detection accuracy, and small volume. In addition, an analytical model has been established to eliminate the effect of adsorption-induced lever stiffness change and has been applied to precise mass detection of cancer biomarker AFP, the detected AFP antigen mass (7.6 pg/ml is quite close to the calculated one (5.5 pg/ml, two orders of magnitude better than the value by the fully antibody-immobilized cantilever sensor. These approaches will promote real application of the cantilever sensors in early diagnosis of cancer.

  7. TFF3 is a valuable predictive biomarker of endocrine response in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Felicity E B; Westley, Bruce R

    2015-06-01

    The stratification of breast cancer patients for endocrine therapies by oestrogen or progesterone receptor expression is effective but imperfect. The present study aims were to validate microarray studies that demonstrate TFF3 regulation by oestrogen and its association with oestrogen receptors in breast cancer, to evaluate TFF3 as a biomarker of endocrine response, and to investigate TFF3 function. Microarray data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and northern and western transfer analyses. TFF3 was induced by oestrogen, and its induction was inhibited by antioestrogens, tamoxifen, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and fulvestrant in oestrogen-responsive breast cancer cells. The expression of TFF3 mRNA was associated with oestrogen receptor mRNA in breast tumours (Pearson's coefficient=0.762, P=0.000). Monoclonal antibodies raised against the TFF3 protein detected TFF3 by immunohistochemistry in oesophageal submucosal glands, intestinal goblet and neuroendocrine cells, Barrett's metaplasia and intestinal metaplasia. TFF3 protein expression was associated with oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and TFF1 expression in malignant breast cells. TFF3 is a specific and sensitive predictive biomarker of response to endocrine therapy, degree of response and duration of response in unstratified metastatic breast cancer patients (P=0.000, P=0.002 and P=0.002 respectively). Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated that TFF3 is an independent biomarker of endocrine response and degree of response, and this was confirmed in a validation cohort. TFF3 stimulated migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. In conclusion, TFF3 expression is associated with response to endocrine therapy, and outperforms oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and TFF1 as an independent biomarker, possibly because it mediates the malign effects of oestrogen on invasion and metastasis.

  8. Blood-based protein biomarker panel for the detection of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Y C Fung

    Full Text Available The majority of colorectal cancer (CRC cases are preventable by early detection and removal of precancerous polyps. Even though CRC is the second most common internal cancer in Australia, only 30 per cent of the population considered to have risk factors participate in stool-based test screening programs. Evidence indicates a robust, blood-based, diagnostic assay would increase screening compliance. A number of potential diagnostic blood-based protein biomarkers for CRC have been reported, but all lack sensitivity or specificity for use as a stand-alone diagnostic. The aim of this study was to identify and validate a panel of protein-based biomarkers in independent cohorts that could be translated to a reliable, non-invasive blood-based screening test.In two independent cohorts (n = 145 and n = 197, we evaluated seven single biomarkers in serum of CRC patients and age/gender matched controls that showed a significant difference between controls and CRC, but individually lack the sensitivity for diagnostic application. Using logistic regression strategies, we identified a panel of three biomarkers that discriminated between controls and CRC with 73% sensitivity at 95% specificity, when applied to either of the two cohorts. This panel comprised of Insulin like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2, Dickkopf-3 (DKK3, and Pyruvate kinase M2(PKM2.Due to the heterogeneous nature of CRC, a single biomarker is unlikely to have sufficient sensitivity or specificity for use as a stand-alone diagnostic screening test and a panel of markers may be more effective. We have identified a 3 biomarker panel that has higher sensitivity and specificity for early stage (Stage I and -II disease than the faecal occult blood test, raising the possibility for its use as a non-invasive blood diagnostic or screening test.

  9. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  10. Essential Items for Structured Reporting of Rectal Cancer MRI: 2016 Consensus Recommendation from the Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution rectal MRI plays a crucial role in evaluating rectal cancer by providing multiple prognostic findings and imaging features that guide proper patient management. Quality reporting is critical for accurate effective communication of the information among multiple disciplines, for which a systematic structured approach is beneficial. Existing guides on reporting of rectal MRI are divergent on some issues, largely reflecting the differences in overall management of rectal cancer patients between the United States and Europe. The Korean Society of Abdominal Radiology (KSAR) study group for rectal cancer has developed an expert consensus recommendation regarding essential items for structured reporting of rectal cancer MRI using a modified Delphi method. This recommendation aims at presenting an up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, structured reporting template that can be readily adopted in daily clinical practice. In addition, a thorough explanation of the clinical and scientific rationale underlying the reporting items and their formats is provided. This KSAR recommendation may serve as a useful tool to help achieve more standardized optimal care for rectal cancer patients using rectal MRI.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of a HAp-based biomarker with controlled drug release for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Maykel [Dept. of Molecular Engineering of Materials, Center of Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (CFATA-UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Merino, Ulises [Dept. of Molecular Engineering of Materials, Center of Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (CFATA-UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); University of the Valley of Mexico (UVM), Boulevard Villas del Mesón 1000, Juriquilla, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76320 (Mexico); Vargas, Susana [Dept. of Molecular Engineering of Materials, Center of Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (CFATA-UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico); Quintanilla, Francisco [University of the Valley of Mexico (UVM), Boulevard Villas del Mesón 1000, Juriquilla, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76320 (Mexico); Rodríguez, Rogelio, E-mail: rogelior@unam.mx [Dept. of Molecular Engineering of Materials, Center of Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (CFATA-UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2016-04-01

    A biocompatible hybrid porous polymer–ceramic material was synthesized to be used as a biomarker in the treatment of breast cancer. This device was equipped with the capacity to release medicaments locally in a controlled manner. The biomaterial was Hydroxyapatite(HAp)-based and had a controlled pore size and pore volume fraction. It was implemented externally using a sharp end and a pair of barbed rings placed opposite each other to prevent relative movement once implanted. The biomarker was impregnated with cis-diamine dichloride platinum (II) [Cl{sub 2}-Pt-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]; the rate of release was obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and release occurred over the course of three months. Different release profiles were obtained as a function of the pore volume fraction. The biomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. - Highlights: • A novel biocompatible hybrid porous polymer–ceramic material was synthesized. • The polymer–ceramic (HAp-based) material was used to prepare a biomarker. • The biomarker was impregnated with cis-diamine dichloride platinum (II). • The rate of cisplatin release was determined using inductively coupled plasma. • The kinetics of the cisplatin release was studied varying the biomarker porosity.

  12. Probing the O-glycoproteome of Gastric Cancer Cell Lines for Biomarker Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira Campos, Diana Alexandra; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Joana

    2015-01-01

    biomarker assays. However, the current knowledge of secreted and circulating O-glycoproteins is limited. Here, we used the COSMC KO "SimpleCell" (SC) strategy to characterize the O-glycoproteome of two gastric cancer SC lines (AGS, MKN45) as well as a gastric cell line (KATO III) which naturally expresses...... at least partially truncated O-glycans. Overall we identified 499 O-glycoproteins and 1,236 O-glycosites in gastric cancer SCs, and a total 47 O-glycoproteins and 73 O-glycosites in the KATO III cell line. We next modified the glycoproteomic strategy to apply it to pools of sera from gastric cancer...... with the STn glycoform were further validated as being expressed in gastric cancer tissue. A proximity ligation assay was used to demonstrate that CD44 was expressed with the STn glycoform in gastric cancer tissues. The study provides a discovery strategy for aberrantly glycosylated O-glycoproteins and a set...

  13. The use of MYBL2 as a novel candidate biomarker of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cara M; Astbury, Katharine; Kehoe, Louise; O'Crowley, Jacqueline Barry; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer affecting women worldwide. It is characterized by chromosomal aberrations and alteration in the expression levels of many cell cycle regulatory proteins, driven primarily by transforming human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. MYBL2 is a member of the MYB proto-oncogene family that encodes DNA binding proteins. These proteins are involved in cell proliferation and control of cellular differentiation. We have previously demonstrated the utility of MYBL2 as a putative biomarker for cervical pre-cancer and cancer. In this chapter we describe the methodological approach for testing MYBL2 protein expression in tissue biopsies from cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer, using immunohistochemistry techniques on the automated immunostaining platform, the Ventana BenchMark LT. The protocol outlines the various steps in the procedure from cutting tissue sections, antibody optimization, antigen retrieval, immunostaining, and histological review.

  14. Consensus for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer: results from a European workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirker, Robert; Herth, Felix J F; Kerr, Keith M;

    2010-01-01

    Activating somatic mutations of the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have recently been characterized in a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients harboring these mutations in their tumors show excellent response to EGFR...... tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). The EGFR-TKI gefitinib has been approved in Europe for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC with activating mutations of the EGFR TK. Because EGFR mutation testing is not yet well established across Europe, biomarker......-directed therapy only slowly emerges for the subset of NSCLC patients most likely to benefit: those with EGFR mutations....

  15. [The Functional Role of Exosomes in Cancer Biology and Their Potential as Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets of Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yutaka; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    Intercellular communication plays an important role in the regulation of various cellular events. In particular, cancer cells and the surrounding cells communicate with each other, and this intercellular communication triggers cancer initiation and progression through the secretion of molecules, including growth factors and cytokines. Recent advances in cancer biology have indicated that small membrane vesicles, termed exosomes, also serve as regulatory agents in intercellular communications. Exosomes contain functional cellular components, including proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs), and they transfer these components to recipient cells. This exosome-mediated intercellular communication leads to increased growth, invasion, and metastasis of cancer. Thus, researchers regard exosomes as important cues to understanding the molecular mechanisms of cancer biology. Indeed, several lines of evidence have demonstrated that exosomes can explain multiple aspects of cancer biology. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that exosomes and their specific molecules are also attractive for use as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in cancer. Recent reports showed the efficacy of a novel diagnosis by detecting component molecules of cancer-derived exosomes, including miRNAs and membrane proteins. Furthermore, clinical trials that test the application of exosomes for cancer therapy have already been reported. From these points of view, we will summarize experimental data that support the role of exosomes in cancer progression and the potential of exosomes for use in novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for cancer.

  16. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  17. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Alex C [ORNL; Hitt, Austin N [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  18. Serum Circulating microRNA Profiling for Identification of Potential Breast Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermín Mar-Aguilar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small, non-coding RNA molecules that can regulate gene expression, thereby affecting crucial processes in cancer development. miRNAs offer great potential as biomarkers for cancer detection because of their remarkable stability in blood and their characteristic expression in different diseases. We investigated whether quantitative RT-PCR miRNA profiling on serum could discriminate between breast cancer patients and healthy controls. We performed miRNA profiling on serum from breast cancer patients, followed by construction of ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. We found that seven miRNAs (miR-10b, miR-21, miR-125b, miR-145, miR-155 miR-191 and miR-382 had different expression patterns in serum of breast cancer patients compared to healthy controls. ROC curve analyses revealed that three serum miRNAs could be valuable biomarkers for distinguishing BC from normal controls. Additionally, a combination of ROC curve analyses of miR-145, miR-155 and miR-382 showed better sensitivity and specificity of our assay. miRNA profiling in serum has potential as a novel method for breast cancer detection in the Mexican population.

  19. Metastin has potential as a suitable biomarker and novel effective therapy for cancer metastasis (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Sunao; Tang, Xian Yang; Sato, Haruhiro; Usui, Yukio; Uchida, Toyoaki; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-09-01

    Cancer metastasis is a leading cause of death in cancer patients and is a multistep process involving complex interactions between tumor and host cells. To metastasize, tumor cells must invade or migrate from the primary tumor and be transported to close or distant secondary sites. A tumor cell should successfully accomplish each step of the pathway or metastasis may not develop. KiSS-1 is a human metastasis suppressor gene that inhibits metastasis of human melanomas and breast carcinomas without affecting tumorigenicity. KiSS-1 encodes a carboxy-terminally amidated peptide with 54 amino-acid residues. The peptide was isolated from human placenta as the endogenous ligand of an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor and termed 'metastin'. The literature reports metastin related to human carcinoma, such as melanoma, thyroid cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic carcinoma, as well as breast, ovarian, bladder and kidney cancer. These malignancies are difficult to treat and, even in early-stage cancer, a number of patients develop metastasis shortly after surgery. Studies have suggested that metastin inhibits tumor invasion or migration through focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, MAP kinase or Rho A. Additionally, metastin may be a biomarker in ESCC, pancreatic carcinoma and bladder cancer. Metastin has potential as a suitable biomarker in the identification of tumors with high metastatic potential and as a novel effective treatment modality for patients with metastasis.

  20. The Relevance of Epigenetic Biomarkers for Breast Cancer and Obesity for Personalised Treatment in Public Healthcare: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Goettler; Haslberger, Alexander G.; Elena Ambrosino

    2016-01-01

    Background: Personalised medicine has gained attention as a result of the advances of genomic research in the last decade. This includes the rise in epigenetic research, which focuses on the environmental influences on the genome and examines biomarkers that might be useful for cancer therapy. This study investigates the epigenetic biomarkers for breast cancer and its risk factor, obesity, and evaluates their relevance for global public health. Methods: A systematic search of articles pub...

  1. What are the reasons for low use of graphene quantum dots in immunosensing of cancer biomarkers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2017-02-01

    Graphene quantum dots-based immunosensors have recently gained importance for detecting antigens and biomarkers responsible for cancer diagnosis. This paper reports a literature survey of the applications of graphene quantum dots for sensing cancer biomarkers. The survey sought to explore three questions: (1) Do graphene quantum dots improve immunosensing technology? (2) If so, can graphene quantum dots have a critical, positive impact on construction of immuno-devices? And (3) What is the reason for some troubles in the application of this technology? The number of published papers in the field seems positively answer the first two questions. However additional efforts must be made to move from the bench to the real diagnosis. Some approaches to improve the analytical performance of graphene quantum dots-based immunosensors through their figures of merit have been also discussed.

  2. Circulating free DNA as biomarker and source for mutation detection in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma has shown potential as biomarker in various cancers and could become an importance source for tumour mutation detection. The objectives of our study were to establish a normal range of cfDNA in a cohort of healthy individuals and to compare...... this with four cohorts of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. We also investigated the prognostic value of cfDNA and analysed the tumour-specific KRAS mutations in the plasma. METHODS: The study was a prospective biomarker evaluation in four consecutive Phase II trials, including 229 patients...... the prognostic value of cfDNA measurement in plasma and utility for mutation detection with the method presented....

  3. Current state of the art, multimodality research and future visions for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer: consensus results from "Challenges and Chances in Prostate Cancer Research Meeting 2013".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Debus, Jürgen; Feick, Günter; Hadaschik, Boris; Hohenfellner, Markus; Schüle, Roland; Zacharias, Jens-Peter; Schwardt, Malte

    2014-11-04

    A brainstorming and consensus meeting organized by the German Cancer Aid focused on modern treatment of prostate cancer and promising innovative techniques and research areas. Besides optimization of screening algorithms, molecular-based stratification and individually tailored treatment regimens will be the future of multimodal prostate cancer management. Effective interdisciplinary structures, including biobanking and data collection mechanisms are the basis for such developments.

  4. Composite Biomarkers For Non-invasive Screening, Diagnosis And Prognosis Of Colorectal Cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-09-11

    The present invention concerns particular biomarkers for diagnosing and/or prognosticating colorectal cancer, in particular in a non-invasive manner. The methods and compositions concern analysis of methylation patterns of one or more genes from a set of 29 genes identified as described herein. In certain embodiments, the gene set includes at least P15.INK4b, SST, GAS7, CNRIP1, and PIK3CG.

  5. Blood-Based Biomarkers for Lung Cancer Early Detection and Evaluation of CT-Based Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    normal bronchial epithelia from patients with NSCLC as well as in one high-risk patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (Figure 3c...high-risk chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient is indicated (*), and positive (H1395) and negative (HCC-2935) controls are shown. EYA4...Cancer, Early Detection, MicroRNA , Gene expression, Genomics, Blood test, Biomarkers 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  6. A novel proteomic biomarker panel as a diagnostic tool for patients with ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgdall, Claus; Fung, Eric T; Christensen, Ib J;

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that the proteomic markers apolipoprotein A1, hepcidin, transferrin, inter-alpha trypsin IV internal fragment, transthyretin, connective-tissue activating protein 3 and beta-2 microglobulin may discriminate between a benign pelvic mass and ovarian cancer (OC). The aim...... was to determine if these serum proteomic biomarkers alone as well as in combination with age and serum CA125, could be helpful in triage of women with a pelvic mass....

  7. Identification of Novel Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers by Cross-laboratory Microarray Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋学锋; 朱涛; 杨洁; 李双; 叶双梅; 廖书杰; 孟力; 卢运萍; 马丁

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to pool information in epithelial ovarian cancer by combining studies using Affymetrix expression microarray datasets made at different laboratories to identify novel biomarkers.Epithelial microarray expression information across laboratories was screened and combined after preprocessing raw microarray data,then ANOVA and unpaired T test statistical analysis was performed for identifying differentially expressed genes(DEGs),followed by clustering and pathway analysis for these ...

  8. IGFBP3 methylation is a novel diagnostic and predictive biomarker in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Perez-Carbonell

    Full Text Available Aberrant hypermethylation of cancer-related genes has emerged as a promising strategy for the development of diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers in human cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic and comprehensive analysis of a panel of CRC-specific genes as potential diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers in a large, population-based CRC cohort.Methylation status of the SEPT9, TWIST1, IGFBP3, GAS7, ALX4 and miR137 genes was studied by quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing in a population-based cohort of 425 CRC patients.Methylation levels of all genes analyzed were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to normal mucosa (p<0.0001; however, cancer-associated hypermethylation was most frequently observed for miR137 (86.7% and IGFBP3 (83% in CRC patients. Methylation analysis using the combination of these two genes demonstrated greatest accuracy for the identification of colonic tumors (sensitivity 95.5%; specificity 90.5%. Low levels of IGFBP3 promoter methylation emerged as an independent risk factor for predicting poor disease free survival in stage II and III CRC patients (HR = 0.49, 95% CI: 0.28-0.85, p = 0.01. Our results also suggest that stage II & III CRC patients with high levels of IGFBP3 methylation do not benefit from adjuvant 5FU-based chemotherapy.By analyzing a large, population-based CRC cohort, we demonstrate the potential clinical significance of miR137 and IGFBP3 hypermethylation as promising diagnostic biomarkers in CRC. Our data also revealed that IGFBP3 hypermethylation may serve as an independent prognostic and predictive biomarker in stage II and III CRC patients.

  9. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    biomarkers to determine the presence of or progression to aggressive disease. ( Lead site: FHCRC) Milestone 2. Execute collaboration agreement with...panel of four-kallikrein plasma-based markers to determine the presence of or progression to clinically relevant prostate cancer. ( Lead site: FHCRC... Lead site: FHCRC) Milestone 10. Urine specimens identified for analysis. Due 12/30/2014 COMPLETED Milestone 11. PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG validation

  10. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colorectal cancer clinical management: the pathologists expert review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirke, P.; West, N.P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.

    2014-01-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20 years; however, a considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore,

  11. Annexin A9 (ANXA9) biomarker and therapeutic target in epithelial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi [El Cerrito, CA; Kuo, Wen-Lin [San Ramon, CA; Neve, Richard M [San Mateo, CA; Gray, Joe W [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-12

    Amplification of the ANXA9 gene in human chromosomal region 1q21 in epithelial cancers indicates a likelihood of both in vivo drug resistance and metastasis, and serves as a biomarker indicating these aspects of the disease. ANXA9 can also serve as a therapeutic target. Interfering RNAs (iRNAs) (such as siRNA and miRNA) and shRNA adapted to inhibit ANXA9 expression, when formulated in a therapeutic composition, and delivered to cells of the tumor, function to treat the epithelial cancer.

  12. Exosomes: Emerging biomarkers and targets for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Maggie K S; Wong, Alice S T

    2015-10-10

    The limitations of current chemotherapies have motivated research in developing new treatments. Growing evidence shows that interaction between tumors and their microenvironment, but not tumor cells per se, is the key factor in tumor progression and therefore of obvious scientific interest and therapeutic value. Exosomes are small (30-100 nm) extracellular vesicles which have emerged as key mediators of intercellular communication between tumor cells and major cell types in the tumor microenvironment such as fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells as well as noncellular extracellular matrices through paracrine mechanisms. This review is to highlight the emerging role of exosomes in particular types of cancer, such as ovarian cancer, owing to its unique route of metastasis, which is capable of rapidly translating exosome research for clinical applications in diagnosis, prognosis, and potential treatment.

  13. Biomarkers in the Detection of Prostate Cancer in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    hypermethylation with silencing of specific genes. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, molecular markers, racial differences, active surveillance 16...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c...the biology of PrCa in AAs and this lack of knowledge can limit therapeutic options for AAs with PrCa, especially the choice of active surveillance

  14. Impact of biospecimens handling on biomarker research in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callari Maurizio

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling is moving from the research setting to the practical clinical use. Gene signatures able to correctly identify high risk breast cancer patients as well as to predict response to treatment are currently under intense investigation. While technical issues dealing with RNA preparation, choice of array platforms, statistical analytical tools are taken into account, the tissue collection process is seldom considered. The time elapsed between surgical tissue removal and freezing of samples for biological characterizations is rarely well defined and/or recorded even for recently stored samples, despite the publications of standard operating procedures for biological sample collection for tissue banks. Methods Breast cancer samples from 11 patients were collected immediately after surgical removal and subdivided into aliquots. One was immediately frozen and the others were maintained at room temperature for respectively 2, 6 and 24 hrs. RNA was extracted and gene expression profile was determined using cDNA arrays. Phosphoprotein profiles were studied in parallel. Results Delayed freezing affected the RNA quality only in 3 samples, which were not subjected to gene profiling. In the 8 breast cancer cases with apparently intact RNA also in sample aliquots frozen at delayed times, 461 genes were modulated simply as a function of freezing timing. Some of these genes were included in gene signatures biologically and clinically relevant for breast cancer. Delayed freezing also affected detection of phosphoproteins, whose pattern may be crucial for clinical decision on target-directed drugs. Conclusion Time elapsed between surgery and freezing of samples appears to have a strong impact and should be considered as a mandatory variable to control for clinical implications of inadequate tissue handling.

  15. MicroRNAs as biomarkers for early breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapy prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Farah J; Nasr, Rihab; Talhouk, Rabih

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem that affects one in eight women worldwide. As such, detecting breast cancer at an early stage anticipates better disease outcome and prolonged patient survival. Extensive research has shown that microRNA (miRNA) are dysregulated at all stages of breast cancer. miRNA are a class of small noncoding RNA molecules that can modulate gene expression and are easily accessible and quantifiable. This review highlights miRNA as diagnostic, prognostic and therapy predictive biomarkers for early breast cancer with an emphasis on the latter. It also examines the challenges that lie ahead in their use as biomarkers. Noteworthy, this review addresses miRNAs reported in patients with early breast cancer prior to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgical procedures or distant metastasis (unless indicated otherwise). In this context, miRNA that are mentioned in this review were significantly modulated using more than one statistical test and/or validated by at least two studies. A standardized protocol for miRNA assessment is proposed starting from sample collection to data analysis that ensures comparative analysis of data and reproducibility of results.

  16. Glypican-1 as a Biomarker for Prostate Cancer: Isolation and Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quach; Justiniano, Irene O; Nocon, Aline L; Soon, Julie T; Wissmueller, Sandra; Campbell, Douglas H; Walsh, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed male visceral cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Standard tests such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement have poor specificity (33%) resulting in a high number of false positive reports. Consequently there is a need for new biomarkers to address this problem. The MIL-38 antibody was first described nearly thirty years ago, however, until now, the identification of the target antigen remained elusive. By a series of molecular techniques and mass spectrometry, the MIL-38 antigen was identified to be the highly glycosylated proteoglycan Glypican-1 (GPC-1). This protein is present in two forms; a membrane bound core protein of 55-60 kDa and secreted soluble forms of 40 kDa and 52 kDa. GPC-1 identification was confirmed by immuno-precipitation, western blots and ELISA. An ELISA platform is currently being developed to assess the levels of GPC-1 in normal, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer patients to determine whether secreted GPC-1 may represent a clinically relevant biomarker for prostate cancer diagnosis.

  17. Glioblastoma cancer stem cells: Biomarker and therapeutic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Kelli B; Clark, Paul A; Zorniak, Michael; Alrfaei, Bahauddeen M; Kuo, John S

    2014-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in humans. It accounts for fifty-two percent of primary brain malignancies in the United States and twenty percent of all primary intracranial tumors. Despite the current standard therapies of maximal safe surgical resection followed by temozolomide and radiotherapy, the median patient survival is still less than 2 years due to inevitable tumor recurrence. Glioblastoma cancer stem cells (GSCs) are a subgroup of tumor cells that are radiation and chemotherapy resistant and likely contribute to rapid tumor recurrence. In order to gain a better understanding of the many GBM-associated mutations, analysis of the GBM cancer genome is on-going; however, innovative strategies to target GSCs and overcome tumor resistance are needed to improve patient survival. Cancer stem cell biology studies reveal basic understandings of GSC resistance patterns and therapeutic responses. Membrane proteomics using phage and yeast display libraries provides a method to identify novel antibodies and surface antigens to better recognize, isolate, and target GSCs. Altogether, basic GBM and GSC genetics and proteomics studies combined with strategies to discover GSC-targeting agents could lead to novel treatments that significantly improve patient survival and quality of life.

  18. Blood biomarker levels to aid discovery of cancer-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms: kallikreins and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Robert J; Halldén, Christer; Cronin, Angel M; Ploner, Alexander; Wiklund, Fredrik; Bjartell, Anders S; Stattin, Pär; Xu, Jianfeng; Scardino, Peter T; Offit, Kenneth; Vickers, Andrew J; Grönberg, Henrik; Lilja, Hans

    2010-05-01

    Polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer include those in three genes encoding major secretory products of the prostate: KLK2 (encoding kallikrein-related peptidase 2; hK2), KLK3 (encoding prostate-specific antigen; PSA), and MSMB (encoding beta-microseminoprotein). PSA and hK2, members of the kallikrein family, are elevated in sera of men with prostate cancer. In a comprehensive analysis that included sequencing of all coding, flanking, and 2 kb of putative promoter regions of all 15 kallikrein (KLK) genes spanning approximately 280 kb on chromosome 19q, we identified novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and genotyped 104 SNPs in 1,419 cancer cases and 736 controls in Cancer Prostate in Sweden 1, with independent replication in 1,267 cases and 901 controls in Cancer Prostate in Sweden 2. This verified prior associations of SNPs in KLK2 and in MSMB (but not in KLK3) with prostate cancer. Twelve SNPs in KLK2 and KLK3 were associated with levels of PSA forms or hK2 in plasma of control subjects. Based on our comprehensive approach, this is likely to represent all common KLK variants associated with these phenotypes. A T allele at rs198977 in KLK2 was associated with increased cancer risk and a striking decrease of hK2 levels in blood. We also found a strong interaction between rs198977 genotype and hK2 levels in blood in predicting cancer risk. Based on this strong association, we developed a model for predicting prostate cancer risk from standard biomarkers, rs198977 genotype, and rs198977 x hK2 interaction; this model had greater accuracy than did biomarkers alone (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.874 versus 0.866), providing proof in principle to clinical application for our findings.

  19. Sensitive multiplex detection of serological liver cancer biomarkers using SERS-active photonic crystal fiber probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinish, U S; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Chang, Young Tae; Olivo, Malini

    2014-11-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy possesses the most promising advantage of multiplex detection for biosensing applications, which is achieved due to the narrow 'fingerprint' Raman spectra from the analyte molecules. We developed an ultrasensitive platform for the multiplex detection of cancer biomarkers by combining the SERS technique with a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF). Axially aligned air channels inside the HCPCF provide an excellent platform for optical sensing using SERS. In addition to the flexibility of optical fibers, HCPCF provides better light confinement and a larger interaction length for the guided light and the analyte, resulting in an improvement in sensitivity to detect low concentrations of bioanalytes in extremely low sample volumes. Herein, for the first time, we demonstrate the sensitive multiplex detection of biomarkers immobilized inside the HCPCF using antibody-conjugated SERS-active nanoparticles (SERS nanotags). As a proof-of-concept for targeted multiplex detection, initially we carried out the sensing of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarker in oral squamous carcinoma cell lysate using three different SERS nanotags. Subsequently, we also achieved simultaneous detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) biomarkers-alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) secreted in the supernatant from Hep3b cancer cell line. Using a SERS-HCPCF sensing platform, we could successfully demonstrate the multiplex detection in an extremely low sample volume of ∼20 nL. In future, this study may lead to sensitive biosensing platform for the low concentration detection of biomarkers in an extremely low sample volume of body fluids to achieve early diagnosis of multiple diseases. (© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  20. Proteomic profiling of exosomes leads to the identification of novel biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diederick Duijvesz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, the complexity of body fluids often hampers biomarker discovery. An attractive alternative approach is the isolation of small vesicles, i.e. exosomes, ∼100 nm, which contain proteins that are specific to the tissue from which they are derived and therefore can be considered as treasure chests for disease-specific biomarker discovery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Exosomes were isolated from 2 immortalized primary prostate epithelial cells (PNT2C2 and RWPE-1 and 2 PCa cell lines (PC346C and VCaP by ultracentrifugation. After tryptic digestion, proteomic analyses utilized a nanoLC coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap operated in tandem MS (MS/MS mode. Accurate Mass and Time (AMT tag approach was employed for peptide identification and quantitation. Candidate biomarkers were validated by Western blotting and Immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Proteomic characterization resulted in the identification of 248, 233, 169, and 216 proteins by at least 2 peptides in exosomes from PNT2C2, RWPE-1, PC346C, and VCaP, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed 52 proteins differently abundant between PCa and control cells, 9 of which were more abundant in PCa. Validation by Western blotting confirmed a higher abundance of FASN, XPO1 and PDCD6IP (ALIX in PCa exosomes. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of exosomal proteins using high performance LC-FTMS resulted in the discovery of PDCD6IP, FASN, XPO1 and ENO1 as new candidate biomarkers for prostate cancer.

  1. Metallothionein - immunohistochemical cancer biomarker: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromir Gumulec

    Full Text Available Metallothionein (MT has been extensively investigated as a molecular marker of various types of cancer. In spite of the fact that numerous reviews have been published in this field, no meta-analytical approach has been performed. Therefore, results of to-date immunohistochemistry-based studies were summarized using meta-analysis in this review. Web of science, PubMed, Embase and CENTRAL databases were searched (up to April 30, 2013 and the eligibility of individual studies and heterogeneity among the studies was assessed. Random and fixed effects model meta-analysis was employed depending on the heterogeneity, and publication bias was evaluated using funnel plots and Egger's tests. A total of 77 studies were included with 8,015 tissue samples (4,631 cases and 3,384 controls. A significantly positive association between MT staining and tumors (vs. healthy tissues was observed in head and neck (odds ratio, OR 9.95; 95% CI 5.82-17.03 and ovarian tumors (OR 7.83; 1.09-56.29, and a negative association was ascertained in liver tumors (OR 0.10; 0.03-0.30. No significant associations were identified in breast, colorectal, prostate, thyroid, stomach, bladder, kidney, gallbladder, and uterine cancers and in melanoma. While no associations were identified between MT and tumor staging, a positive association was identified with the tumor grade (OR 1.58; 1.08-2.30. In particular, strong associations were observed in breast, ovarian, uterine and prostate cancers. Borderline significant association of metastatic status and MT staining were determined (OR 1.59; 1.03-2.46, particularly in esophageal cancer. Additionally, a significant association between the patient prognosis and MT staining was also demonstrated (hazard ratio 2.04; 1.47-2.81. However, a high degree of inconsistence was observed in several tumor types, including colorectal, kidney and prostate cancer. Despite the ambiguity in some tumor types, conclusive results are provided in the tumors of

  2. Quantitative optical biomarkers of lung cancer based intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwen; Zhan, Zhenlin; Lin, Hongxin; Zuo, Ning; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xie, Shusen; Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu

    2016-10-01

    Alterations in the elastic fibers have been implicated in lung cancer. However, the label-free, microscopic imaging of elastic fibers in situ remains a major challenge. Here, we present the use of intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal as a novel means for quantification of the elastic fibers in intact fresh human lung tissues. We obtained the TPEF images of elastic fibers from ex vivo the human lung tissues. We found that three features, including the elastic fibers area, the elastic fibers orientation, the elastic fibers structure, provide the quantitative identification of lung cancer and the direct visual cues for cancer versus non-cancer areas. These results suggest that the TPEF signal can be used as the label-free optical biomarkers for rapid clinical lung diagnosis and instant image-guided surgery.

  3. Circulating Cancer Biomarkers: The Macro-revolution of the Micro-RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montani, Francesca; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that act as master regulators of many cellular processes. The expression of miRNAs is often deregulated in human tumors, causing the alteration of molecular mechanisms relevant for cancer progression. Importantly, miRNAs are detectable in the blood and their quantity fluctuations are the hallmark of pathogenic conditions, including cancer. Several groups reported the identification of circulating cell-free miRNAs (cf-miRNAs) in the human serum and plasma and demonstrated their diagnostic and prognostic utility. Other studies also shown that it may be feasible to apply such cf-miRNA signatures within screening programs in order to improve cancer early detection. Circulating cf-miRNAs therefore appear to be excellent candidates for blood-borne cancer biomarkers.

  4. SurvExpress: an online biomarker validation tool and database for cancer gene expression data using survival analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Aguirre-Gamboa

    Full Text Available Validation of multi-gene biomarkers for clinical outcomes is one of the most important issues for cancer prognosis. An important source of information for virtual validation is the high number of available cancer datasets. Nevertheless, assessing the prognostic performance of a gene expression signature along datasets is a difficult task for Biologists and Physicians and also time-consuming for Statisticians and Bioinformaticians. Therefore, to facilitate performance comparisons and validations of survival biomarkers for cancer outcomes, we developed SurvExpress, a cancer-wide gene expression database with clinical outcomes and a web-based tool that provides survival analysis and risk assessment of cancer datasets. The main input of SurvExpress is only the biomarker gene list. We generated a cancer database collecting more than 20,000 samples and 130 datasets with censored clinical information covering tumors over 20 tissues. We implemented a web interface to perform biomarker validation and comparisons in this database, where a multivariate survival analysis can be accomplished in about one minute. We show the utility and simplicity of SurvExpress in two biomarker applications for breast and lung cancer. Compared to other tools, SurvExpress is the largest, most versatile, and quickest free tool available. SurvExpress web can be accessed in http://bioinformatica.mty.itesm.mx/SurvExpress (a tutorial is included. The website was implemented in JSP, JavaScript, MySQL, and R.

  5. An integrated approach to blood-based cancer diagnosis and biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Martin Renqiang; Chowdhury, Salim; Qi, Yanjun; Stewart, Alex; Ostroff, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Disrupted or abnormal biological processes responsible for cancers often quantitatively manifest as disrupted additive and multiplicative interactions of gene/protein expressions correlating with cancer progression. However, the examination of all possible combinatorial interactions between gene features in most case-control studies with limited training data is computationally infeasible. In this paper, we propose a practically feasible data integration approach, QUIRE (QUadratic Interactions among infoRmative fEatures), to identify discriminative complex interactions among informative gene features for cancer diagnosis and biomarker discovery directly based on patient blood samples. QUIRE works in two stages, where it first identifies functionally relevant gene groups for the disease with the help of gene functional annotations and available physical protein interactions, then it explores the combinatorial relationships among the genes from the selected informative groups. Based on our private experimentally generated data from patient blood samples using a novel SOMAmer (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer) technology, we apply QUIRE to cancer diagnosis and biomarker discovery for Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and Ovarian Cancer (OVC). To further demonstrate the general applicability of our approach, we also apply QUIRE to a publicly available Colorectal Cancer (CRC) dataset that can be used to prioritize our SOMAmer design. Our experimental results show that QUIRE identifies gene-gene interactions that can better identify the different cancer stages of samples, as compared to other state-of-the-art feature selection methods. A literature survey shows that many of the interactions identified by QUIRE play important roles in the development of cancer.

  6. Warehousing re-annotated cancer genes for biomarker meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, M; Travaglione, A; Capobianco, E

    2013-07-01

    Translational research in cancer genomics assigns a fundamental role to bioinformatics in support of candidate gene prioritization with regard to both biomarker discovery and target identification for drug development. Efforts in both such directions rely on the existence and constant update of large repositories of gene expression data and omics records obtained from a variety of experiments. Users who interactively interrogate such repositories may have problems in retrieving sample fields that present limited associated information, due for instance to incomplete entries or sometimes unusable files. Cancer-specific data sources present similar problems. Given that source integration usually improves data quality, one of the objectives is keeping the computational complexity sufficiently low to allow an optimal assimilation and mining of all the information. In particular, the scope of integrating intraomics data can be to improve the exploration of gene co-expression landscapes, while the scope of integrating interomics sources can be that of establishing genotype-phenotype associations. Both integrations are relevant to cancer biomarker meta-analysis, as the proposed study demonstrates. Our approach is based on re-annotating cancer-specific data available at the EBI's ArrayExpress repository and building a data warehouse aimed to biomarker discovery and validation studies. Cancer genes are organized by tissue with biomedical and clinical evidences combined to increase reproducibility and consistency of results. For better comparative evaluation, multiple queries have been designed to efficiently address all types of experiments and platforms, and allow for retrieval of sample-related information, such as cell line, disease state and clinical aspects.

  7. The role of quantitative mass spectrometry in the discovery of pancreatic cancer biomarkers for translational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Aronsson, Linus; Sasor, Agata; Welinder, Charlotte; Rezeli, Melinda; Marko-Varga, György; Andersson, Roland

    2014-04-05

    In the post-genomic era, it has become evident that genetic changes alone are not sufficient to understand most disease processes including pancreatic cancer. Genome sequencing has revealed a complex set of genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer such as point mutations, chromosomal losses, gene amplifications and telomere shortening that drive cancerous growth through specific signaling pathways. Proteome-based approaches are important complements to genomic data and provide crucial information of the target driver molecules and their post-translational modifications. By applying quantitative mass spectrometry, this is an alternative way to identify biomarkers for early diagnosis and personalized medicine. We review the current quantitative mass spectrometric technologies and analyses that have been developed and applied in the last decade in the context of pancreatic cancer. Examples of candidate biomarkers that have been identified from these pancreas studies include among others, asporin, CD9, CXC chemokine ligand 7, fibronectin 1, galectin-1, gelsolin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2, metalloproteinase inhibitor 1, stromal cell derived factor 4, and transforming growth factor beta-induced protein. Many of these proteins are involved in various steps in pancreatic tumor progression including cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion, metastasis, immune response and angiogenesis. These new protein candidates may provide essential information for the development of protein diagnostics and targeted therapies. We further argue that new strategies must be advanced and established for the integration of proteomic, transcriptomic and genomic data, in order to enhance biomarker translation. Large scale studies with meta data processing will pave the way for novel and unexpected correlations within pancreatic cancer, that will benefit the patient, with targeted treatment.

  8. Unlocking biomarker discovery: large scale application of aptamer proteomic technology for early detection of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M Ostroff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. New diagnostics are needed to detect early stage lung cancer because it may be cured with surgery. However, most cases are diagnosed too late for curative surgery. Here we present a comprehensive clinical biomarker study of lung cancer and the first large-scale clinical application of a new aptamer-based proteomic technology to discover blood protein biomarkers in disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a multi-center case-control study in archived serum samples from 1,326 subjects from four independent studies of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in long-term tobacco-exposed populations. Sera were collected and processed under uniform protocols. Case sera were collected from 291 patients within 8 weeks of the first biopsy-proven lung cancer and prior to tumor removal by surgery. Control sera were collected from 1,035 asymptomatic study participants with ≥ 10 pack-years of cigarette smoking. We measured 813 proteins in each sample with a new aptamer-based proteomic technology, identified 44 candidate biomarkers, and developed a 12-protein panel (cadherin-1, CD30 ligand, endostatin, HSP90α, LRIG3, MIP-4, pleiotrophin, PRKCI, RGM-C, SCF-sR, sL-selectin, and YES that discriminates NSCLC from controls with 91% sensitivity and 84% specificity in cross-validated training and 89% sensitivity and 83% specificity in a separate verification set, with similar performance for early and late stage NSCLC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is a significant advance in clinical proteomics in an area of high unmet clinical need. Our analysis exceeds the breadth and dynamic range of proteome interrogated of previously published clinical studies of broad serum proteome profiling platforms including mass spectrometry, antibody arrays, and autoantibody arrays. The sensitivity and specificity of our 12-biomarker panel improves upon published protein and gene expression panels

  9. Aberrant p16 promoter hypermethylation in bronchial mucosae as a biomarker for the early detection of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guang-shun; HOU Ai-rong; LI Long-yun; GAO Yan-ning; CHENG Shu-jun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death in the world and its mortality could be greatly reduced by diagnosis and treatment in its early stages. Effective tools for the early detection of lung cancer and its high risk factors remain a major challenge. Biomarkers that detect lung cancer in its early stages or identify its pretumour lesions,enabling early therapeutic intervention, would be invaluable to improve its dismal prognosis.

  10. IL-8 as a urinary biomarker for the detection of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urquidi Virginia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current urine-based assays for bladder cancer (BCa diagnosis lack accuracy, so the search for improved biomarkers continues. Through genomic and proteomic profiling of urine, we have identified a panel of biomarkers associated with the presence of BCa. In this study, we evaluated the utility of three of these biomarkers, interleukin 8 (IL-8, Matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9 and Syndecan in the diagnosis of BCa through urinalysis. Methods Voided urines from 127 subjects, cancer subjects (n = 64, non-cancer subjects (n = 63 were analyzed. The protein concentrations of IL-8, MMP-9, and Syndecan were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Data were also compared to a commercial ELISA-based BCa detection assay (BTA-Trak© and urinary cytology. We used the area under the curve of a receiver operating characteristic (AUROC to compare the performance of each biomarker. Results Urinary protein concentrations of IL-8, MMP-9 and BTA were significantly elevated in BCa subjects. Of the experimental markers compared to BTA-Trak©, IL-8 was the most prominent marker (AUC; 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.86. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that only IL-8 (OR; 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16-1.97, p = 0.002 was an independent factor for the detection of BCa. Conclusions These results suggest that the measurement of IL-8 in voided urinary samples may have utility for urine-based detection of BCa. These findings need to be confirmed in a larger, prospective cohort.

  11. Correlations between diffusion-weighted imaging and breast cancer biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martincich, Laura; Deantoni, Veronica; Bertotto, Ilaria; Liotti, Michele; Regge, Daniele [Unit of Radiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Redana, Stefania; Rossi, Valentina; Aglietta, Massimo; Montemurro, Filippo [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Division of Medical Oncology, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Kubatzki, Franziska; Ponzone, Riccardo [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Division of Gynecological Oncology, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Sarotto, Ivana [Unit of Pathology, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Candiolo, Turin (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    We evaluated whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) provided by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) varies according to biological features in breast cancer. DWI was performed in 190 patients undergoing dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for local staging. For each of the 192 index cancers we studied the correlation between ADC and classical histopathological and immunohistochemical breast tumour features (size, histological type, grade, oestrogen receptor [ER] and Ki-67 expression, HER2 status). ADC was compared with immunohistochemical surrogates of the intrinsic subtypes (Luminal A; Luminal B; HER2-enriched; triple-negative). Correlations were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests. A weak, statistically significant correlation was observed between ADC values and the percentage of ER-positive cells (-0.168, P = 0.020). Median ADC values were significantly higher in ER-negative than in ER-positive tumours (1.110 vs 1.050 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, P = 0.015). HER2-enriched tumours had the highest median ADC value (1.190 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, range 0.950-2.090). Multiple comparisons showed that this value was significantly higher than that of Luminal A (1.025 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s [0.700-1.340], P = 0.004) and Luminal B/HER2-negative (1.060 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s [0.470-2.420], P = 0.008) tumours. A trend towards statistical significance (P = 0.018) was seen with Luminal B/HER2-positive tumours. ADC values vary significantly according to biological tumour features, suggesting that cancer heterogeneity influences imaging parameters. (orig.)

  12. Biomolecular characterization of exosomes released from cancer stem cells: Possible implications for biomarker and treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhruv; Gupta, Dwijendra; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K

    2015-02-20

    Cancer recognized as one of the leading irrepressible health issues is contributing to increasing mortality-rate day-by-day. The tumor microenvironment is an important field of cancer to understand the detection, treatment and prevention of cancer. Recently, cancer stem cell (CSC) research has shown promising results aiming towards cancer diagnostics and treatment. Here, we found that prostate and breast cancer stem cells secreted vesicles of endosomal origin, called exosomes showed strong connection between autophagy and exosomes released from CSCs. Exosomes may serve as vesicles to communicate with neoplastic cells (autocrine and paracrine manner) and normal cells (paracrine and endocrine manner) and thereby suppress immune systems and regulate neoplastic growth, and metastasis. They can also be used as biomarkers for various cancers. We detected tetraspanin proteins (CD9, CD63, CD81), Alix and tumor susceptibility gene-101 (TSG101) of exosomal markers from rotenone treated CSCs. We have also detected the induction of autophagy genes, Atg7 and conversion of autophagy marker (LC3-I to LC3-II), and tetraspanin proteins (CD9, CD63, CD81) in rotenone treated CSCs by western blotting. The mRNA expression of CD9, CD63, CD81 and TSG101 analyzed by qRT-PCR showed that the rotenone induced the expression of CD9, CD63, CD81 and TSG101 in CSCs. Electron microscopy of rotenone treated CSCs showed the mitochondrial damage of CSCs as confirmed by the release of exosomes from CSCs. The constituents of exosomes may be useful to understand the mechanism of exosomes formation, release and function, and also serve as a useful biomarker and provide novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  13. The ADAMs family of proteases: new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for cancer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2011-06-09

    Abstract The ADAMs are transmembrane proteins implicated in proteolysis and cell adhesion. Forty gene members of the family have been identified, of which 21 are believed to be functional in humans. As proteases, their main substrates are the ectodomains of other transmembrane proteins. These substrates include precursor forms of growth factors, cytokines, growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors and several different types of adhesion molecules. Although altered expression of specific ADAMs has been implicated in different diseases, their best-documented role is in cancer formation and progression. ADAMs shown to play a role in cancer include ADAM9, ADAM10, ADAM12, ADAM15 and ADAM17. Two of the ADAMs, i.e., ADAM10 and 17 appear to promote cancer progression by releasing HER\\/EGFR ligands. The released ligands activate HER\\/EGFR signalling that culminates in increased cell proliferation, migration and survival. Consistent with a causative role in cancer, several ADAMs are emerging as potential cancer biomarkers for aiding cancer diagnosis and predicting patient outcome. Furthermore, a number of selective ADAM inhibitors, especially against ADAM10 and ADAM17, have been shown to have anti-cancer effects. At least one of these inhibitors is now undergoing clinical trials in patients with breast cancer.

  14. Emerging treatments in management of prostate cancer: biomarker validation and endpoints for immunotherapy clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slovin SF

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan F SlovinGenitourinary Oncology Service, Sidney Kimmel Center for Prostate and Urologic Cancers, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: The rapidly emerging field of immunotherapy and the development of novel immunologic agents that have been approved in melanoma and successfully studied in lung cancer, kidney cancer, and prostate cancer have mandated that there be uniformity in clinical trial analysis beyond conventional survival endpoints and imaging. This includes some measure of determining whether the immunologic target is hit and how the treatment has impacted on the immune system in toto. While melanoma is leading the field towards these ends, there is some doubt that not all of the recent successes with immune therapies, for example, checkpoint inhibitors, will be effective for every cancer, and that the toxicities may also be different depending on the malignancy. This review serves to elucidate the current issues facing clinical investigators who perform immunologic trials targeted at patients with prostate cancer and discusses the challenges in assessing the right immunologic endpoints to demonstrate biologic/immunologic targeting leading to clinical benefit.Keywords: sipuleucel-T, prostate-specific antigen, prostate cancer, biomarkers, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, cellular therapy

  15. Multiplexed cancer biomarker detection using quartz-based photonic crystal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Sheng; Chaudhery, Vikram; Pokhriyal, Anusha; George, Sherine; Polans, James; Lu, Meng; Tan, Ruimin; Zangar, Richard C; Cunningham, Brian T

    2012-01-17

    A photonic crystal (PC) surface is demonstrated as a high-sensitivity platform for detection of a panel of 21 cancer biomarker antigens using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray format. A quartz-based PC structure fabricated by nanoimprint lithography, selected for its low autofluorescence, supports two independent optical resonances that simultaneously enable enhancement of fluorescence detection of biomarkers and label-free quantification of the density of antibody capture spots. A detection instrument is demonstrated that supports fluorescence and label-free imaging modalities, with the ability to optimize the fluorescence enhancement factor on a pixel-by-pixel basis throughout the microarray using an angle-scanning approach for the excitation laser that automatically compensates for variability in surface chemistry density and capture spot density. Measurements show that the angle-scanning illumination approach reduces the coefficient of variation of replicate assays by 20-99% compared to ordinary fluorescence microscopy, thus supporting reduction in limits of detectable biomarker concentration. Using the PC resonance, biomarkers in mixed samples were detectable at the lowest concentrations tested (2.1-41 pg/mL), resulting in a three-log range of quantitative detection.

  16. Angiopoietin-like protein 2 as a potential biomarker for colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YOSHINAGA, TAKUMA; SHIGEMITSU, TAKAMASA; NISHIMATA, HIROTO; KITAZONO, MASAKI; HORI, EMIKO; TOMIYOSHI, AYAKO; TAKEI, TAKAYUKI; YOSHIDA, MASAHIRO

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy worldwide. Disease progression leads to its spread to other organs, such as the liver, and is associated with higher mortality rates. Early CRC detection is therefore crucial for maximizing the chances of complete cure. The measurement of serum-based tumor biomarkers has shown great potential for the detection of CRC. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of using angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) as a candidate biomarker for CRC. We first investigated ANGPTL2 expression in 7 CRC cell lines, among which Colo320, NCC-CoCK-115P, Caco-2 and Colo205 exhibited comparatively high ANGPTL2 expression. The serum levels of ANGPTL2 in CRC patients (3.45±1.30 ng/ml) were higher compared with those in healthy controls (2.74±0.64 ng/ml) (P<0.05). A receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the diagnostic performance of ANGPTL2 was marginally lower compared with that of the established biomarker C-reactive protein, but higher compared with that of carbohydrate antigen 19-9. These results suggested that the simultaneous measurement of ANGPTL2, along with previously established serum biomarkers, may increase the likelihood of early detection of CRC. PMID:26623054

  17. A targeted proteomic strategy for the measurement of oral cancer candidate biomarkers in human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Rebeca; Bollinger, James G; Rivera, César; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Paes Leme, Adriana F; MacCoss, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), are the sixth most common malignancy in the world and are characterized by poor prognosis and a low survival rate. Saliva is oral fluid with intimate contact with OSCC. Besides non-invasive, simple, and rapid to collect, saliva is a potential source of biomarkers. In this study, we build an SRM assay that targets fourteen OSCC candidate biomarker proteins, which were evaluated in a set of clinically-derived saliva samples. Using Skyline software package, we demonstrated a statistically significant higher abundance of the C1R, LCN2, SLPI, FAM49B, TAGLN2, CFB, C3, C4B, LRG1, SERPINA1 candidate biomarkers in the saliva of OSCC patients. Furthermore, our study also demonstrated that CFB, C3, C4B, SERPINA1 and LRG1 are associated with the risk of developing OSCC. Overall, this study successfully used targeted proteomics to measure in saliva a panel of biomarker candidates for OSCC.

  18. Biomarker and animal models for assessment of retinoid efficacy in cancer chemoprevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M NILES

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential for normal growth and development. Epidemiology and laboratory studies suggest that decreased vitamin A levels and defective metabo-lisrn/action may contribute to the genesis of certain cancers. Based on this information, natural and synthetic derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) have been used for chemoprevention of cancer. Retinoids have had some success in the chemoprevention of leukoplakia and in the decreased incidence of second prima-ties in head and neck cancer. There is little information on biomarkers that can be used to assess the efficacy of the chemopreventive activity of retinoids. The ability of retinoids to induce RARb has been consistently shown to correlate with the response of cells and tissues to retinoic acid, but few other biomarkers have been certified as indicators of retinoid activity. In light of the failure of the ATBC and CARET clinical intervention trials for chemoprevention of lung cancer, greater use of animal models for chemoprevention studies is necessary. The potential combination of phytochemicals that inhibit DNA methyltransferase activity with retinoids holds promise for more effective chemoprevention of retinoid-unrespon-sive premalignant lesions.

  19. In vitro cultured lung cancer cells are not suitable for animal-based breath biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallschmidt, Kristin; Becker, Roland; Zwaka, Hanna; Menzel, Randolf; Johnen, Dorothea; Fischer-Tenhagen, Carola; Rolff, Jana; Nehls, Irene

    2015-02-10

    In vitro cultured lung cancer cell lines were investigated regarding the possible identification of volatile organic compounds as potential biomarkers. Gas samples from the headspace of pure culture medium and from the cultures of human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549 and Lu7466 were exposed to polypropylene fleece in order to absorb odour components. Sniffer dogs were trained with loaded fleeces of both cell lines, and honey bees were trained with fleeces exposed to A549. Afterwards, their ability to distinguish between cell-free culture medium odour and lung cancer cell odour was tested. Neither bees nor dogs were able to discriminate between odours from the cancer cell cultures and the pure culture medium. Solid phase micro extraction followed by gas chromatography with mass selective detection produced profiles of volatiles from the headspace offered to the animals. The profiles from the cell lines were largely similar; distinct differences were based on the decrease of volatile culture medium components due to the cells' metabolic activity. In summary, cultured lung cancer cell lines do not produce any biomarkers recognizable by animals or gas chromatographic analysis.

  20. Noncoding Genomics in Gastric Cancer and the Gastric Precancerous Cascade: Pathogenesis and Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Sandoval-Bórquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death, whose patterns vary among geographical regions and ethnicities. It is a multifactorial disease, and its development depends on infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, host genetic factors, and environmental factors. The heterogeneity of the disease has begun to be unraveled by a comprehensive mutational evaluation of primary tumors. The low-abundance of mutations suggests that other mechanisms participate in the evolution of the disease, such as those found through analyses of noncoding genomics. Noncoding genomics includes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation of promoter sites, miRNAs, other noncoding RNAs in regulatory regions, and other topics. These processes and molecules ultimately control gene expression. Potential biomarkers are appearing from analyses of noncoding genomics. This review focuses on noncoding genomics and potential biomarkers in the context of gastric cancer and the gastric precancerous cascade.

  1. A pilot study to explore circulating tumour cells in pancreatic cancer as a novel biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, L; Backen, A; Sloane, R; Menasce, L; Ryder, D; Krebs, M; Board, R; Clack, G; Hughes, A; Blackhall, F; Valle, J W; Dive, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obtaining tissue for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis and biomarker assessment to aid drug development is challenging. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) may represent a potential biomarker to address these unmet needs. We compared prospectively the utility of two platforms for CTC enumeration and characterisation in pancreatic cancer patients in a pilot exploratory study. Patients and methods: Blood samples were obtained prospectively from 54 consenting patients and analysed by CellSearch and isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET). CellSearch exploits immunomagnetic capture of CTCs-expressing epithelial markers, whereas ISET is a marker independent, blood filtration device. Circulating tumour cell expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was assessed to explore any discrepancy in CTC number between the two platforms. Results: ISET detected CTCs in more patients than CellSearch (93% vs 40%) and in higher numbers (median CTCs/7.5 ml, 9 (range 0–240) vs 0 (range 0–144)). Heterogeneity observed for epithelial cell adhesion molecule, pan-cytokeratin (CK), E-Cadherin, Vimentin and CK 7 expression in CTCs may account for discrepancy in CTC number between platforms. Conclusion: ISET detects more CTCs than CellSearch and offers flexible CTC characterisation with potential to investigate CTC biology and develop biomarkers for pancreatic cancer patient management. PMID:22187035

  2. Embracing an integromic approach to tissue biomarker research in cancer: Perspectives and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gerald; Bankhead, Peter; Dunne, Philip D; O'Reilly, Paul G; James, Jacqueline A; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Hamilton, Peter W; McArt, Darragh G

    2016-06-02

    Modern approaches to biomedical research and diagnostics targeted towards precision medicine are generating 'big data' across a range of high-throughput experimental and analytical platforms. Integrative analysis of this rich clinical, pathological, molecular and imaging data represents one of the greatest bottlenecks in biomarker discovery research in cancer and other diseases. Following on from the publication of our successful framework for multimodal data amalgamation and integrative analysis, Pathology Integromics in Cancer (PICan), this article will explore the essential elements of assembling an integromics framework from a more detailed perspective. PICan, built around a relational database storing curated multimodal data, is the research tool sitting at the heart of our interdisciplinary efforts to streamline biomarker discovery and validation. While recognizing that every institution has a unique set of priorities and challenges, we will use our experiences with PICan as a case study and starting point, rationalizing the design choices we made within the context of our local infrastructure and specific needs, but also highlighting alternative approaches that may better suit other programmes of research and discovery. Along the way, we stress that integromics is not just a set of tools, but rather a cohesive paradigm for how modern bioinformatics can be enhanced. Successful implementation of an integromics framework is a collaborative team effort that is built with an eye to the future and greatly accelerates the processes of biomarker discovery, validation and translation into clinical practice.

  3. Lectin chromatography/mass spectrometry discovery workflow identifies putative biomarkers of aggressive breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Penelope M; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K; Prakobphol, Akraporn; Li, Bensheng; Jung, Kwanyoung; Cho, Wonryeon; Braten, Miles; Inerowicz, Halina D; Williams, Katherine; Albertolle, Matthew; Held, Jason M; Iacovides, Demetris; Sorensen, Dylan J; Griffith, Obi L; Johansen, Eric; Zawadzka, Anna M; Cusack, Michael P; Allen, Simon; Gormley, Matthew; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Gray, Joe W; Regnier, Fred; Gibson, Bradford W; Fisher, Susan J

    2012-04-06

    We used a lectin chromatography/MS-based approach to screen conditioned medium from a panel of luminal (less aggressive) and triple negative (more aggressive) breast cancer cell lines (n=5/subtype). The samples were fractionated using the lectins Aleuria aurantia (AAL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), which recognize fucose and sialic acid, respectively. The bound fractions were enzymatically N-deglycosylated and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. In total, we identified 533 glycoproteins, ∼90% of which were components of the cell surface or extracellular matrix. We observed 1011 glycosites, 100 of which were solely detected in ≥3 triple negative lines. Statistical analyses suggested that a number of these glycosites were triple negative-specific and thus potential biomarkers for this tumor subtype. An analysis of RNaseq data revealed that approximately half of the mRNAs encoding the protein scaffolds that carried potential biomarker glycosites were up-regulated in triple negative vs luminal cell lines, and that a number of genes encoding fucosyl- or sialyltransferases were differentially expressed between the two subtypes, suggesting that alterations in glycosylation may also drive candidate identification. Notably, the glycoproteins from which these putative biomarker candidates were derived are involved in cancer-related processes. Thus, they may represent novel therapeutic targets for this aggressive tumor subtype.

  4. Detection of label-free cancer biomarkers using nickel nanoislands and quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rivas, Adrián; Chinestra, Patrick; Favre, Gilles; Pinaud, Sébastien; Séverac, Childérick; Faye, Jean-Charles; Vieu, Christophe

    2010-09-07

    We present a technique for the label-free detection and recognition of cancer biomarkers using metal nanoislands intended to be integrated in a novel type of nanobiosensor. His-tagged (scFv)-F7N1N2 is the antibody fragment which is directly immobilized, by coordinative bonds, onto ~5 nm nickel islands, then deposited on the surface of a quartz crystal of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to validate the technique. Biomarker GTPase RhoA was investigated because it has been found to be overexpressed in various tumors and because we have recently isolated and characterized a new conformational scFv which selectively recognizes the active form of RhoA. We implemented a surface chemistry involving an antibiofouling coating of polyethylene glycol silane (PEG-silane) (<2 nm thick) and Ni nanoislands to reach a label-free detection of the active antigen conformation of RhoA, at various concentrations. The methodology proposed here proves the viability of the concept by using Ni nanoislands as an anchoring surface layer enabling the detection of a specific conformation of a protein, identified as a potential cancer biomarker. Hence, this novel methodology can be transferred to a nanobiosensor to detect, at lower time consumption and with high sensitivity, specific biomolecules.

  5. Identification of biomarkers for cervical cancer in peripheral blood lymphocytes using oligonucleotide microarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Jie; ZHANG Wei-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Oligonucleotide microarrays are increasingly being used to identify gene expression profiles that associated with complex genetic diseases. Peripheral lymphocytes communicate with cells and extracellular matrixes in almost all tissues and organs in human body, suggesting that the gene expression profiles in peripheral lymphocytes may reflect the presence of disease in the body. This study aimed to identify molecular biomarkers for cervical cancer in peripheral blood lymphocytes by using oligonucleotide microarrays.Methods Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of 24 early stage cervical cancer patients and 18 healthy controls. We used 22K Human Genome microarrays to profile peripheral blood lymphocytes from 4 early stage cervical cancer patients and compared their gene expression profiles with those from 3 healthy controls. Differentially expressed genes would be identified if they had adjusted P values of less than 0.05 and a groupwise average fold change greater than 1.5 or less than 0.67. Then the selected 5 genes were validated in the remaining 20 early stage cervical cancer patients and the 15 healthy controls by using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results Genes identified by the gene selection program expressed differently between the blood samples of the early stage cervical cancer patients and those of the healthy controls. To validate the gene expression data, 5 genes were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. In three of the 5 identified genes, tenasin-c (TNC), nuceolin (NCL), and enolase 2 (ENO2) showed a significant up-regulation in the blood samples of the early stage cervical cancer patients versus that of the healthy controls.Conclusions The up-regulation of TNC, NCL, and ENO2 in peripheral blood may be used to identify novel blood biomarkers for detecting cervical cancer in a clinically accessible surrogate tissue, and thus to provide a possibility to develop a noninvasive and predictive

  6. Nestin servers as a promising prognostic biomarker in non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yuan; Lu, Ming; Wang, Cong; Li, Qingbao; Gao, Yongsheng; Mu, Dianbin; Cao, Yan; Li, Miaomiao; Meng, Xiangjiao

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide and it is important to identify the predictive and/or prognostic markers for the cancer. Nestin, a proliferative and multipotent biomarker has been reported to be associated with prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a few studies. In the present study, we retrospectively recruited 153 patients with NSCLC. Nestin protein expression in tumor samples was determined by immunohistochemistry staining. Nestin expression was related with tumor differentiation (P=0.036), lymphatic metastasis (N stage, P=0.011), and p-TNM stage (P=0.013), while there was no significant association between Nestin expression level and age, smoking habits, gender, histologic type, and T stage. Nestin was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in NSCLC with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.701 (95% CI, 1.616-4.513, Pcell proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and apoptosis by knockout of Nestin with a new developed method, CRISPR/Cas9 mediated genome editing. It was observed that knockout of Nestin caused enhancement of cancer cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation, and invasion in A549 and H1299 cell lines. Furthermore, we examined the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) related biomarkers such as E-cadherin and Vimentin in Nestin-depleted lung cancer cells and knockout of Nestin was found to inhibit EMT, suggesting the involvement of Nestin mediated EMT signaling in lung cancer. The finding above demonstrated that Nestin might serve as a prognostic factor and therapeutic target in NSCLCs.

  7. Application of artificial neural network model combined with four biomarkers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoran; Yang, Yongli; Tan, Shanjuan; Wang, Sihua; Feng, Xiaolei; Cui, Liuxin; Feng, Feifei; Yu, Songcheng; Wang, Wei; Wu, Yongjun

    2016-10-20

    The purpose of the study was to explore the application of artificial neural network model in the auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer and compare the effects of back-propagation (BP) neural network with Fisher discrimination model for lung cancer screening by the combined detections of four biomarkers of p16, RASSF1A and FHIT gene promoter methylation levels and the relative telomere length. Real-time quantitative methylation-specific PCR was used to detect the levels of three-gene promoter methylation, and real-time PCR method was applied to determine the relative telomere length. BP neural network and Fisher discrimination analysis were used to establish the discrimination diagnosis model. The levels of three-gene promoter methylation in patients with lung cancer were significantly higher than those of the normal controls. The values of Z(P) in two groups were 2.641 (0.008), 2.075 (0.038) and 3.044 (0.002), respectively. The relative telomere lengths of patients with lung cancer (0.93 ± 0.32) were significantly lower than those of the normal controls (1.16 ± 0.57), t = 4.072, P neural network were 0.670 (0.569-0.761) and 0.760 (0.664-0.840). The AUC of BP neural network was higher than that of Fisher discrimination analysis, and Z(P) was 0.76. Four biomarkers are associated with lung cancer. BP neural network model for the prediction of lung cancer is better than Fisher discrimination analysis, and it can provide an excellent and intelligent diagnosis tool for lung cancer.

  8. Exosomes are fingerprints of originating cells: potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Miharu Kobayashi, Gregory E Rice, Jorge Tapia, Murray D Mitchell, Carlos Salomon Exosome Biology Laboratory, Centre for Clinical Diagnostics, University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Abstract: The past decade has seen an extraordinary explosion of research in the field of extracellular vesicles, especially in a specific type of extracellular vesicles originating from endosomal compartments, called exosomes. Exosomes are a specific subtype of secreted vesicles that are defined as small (~30–120 nm but very stable membrane vesicles that are released from a wide range of cells, including normal and cancer cells. As the content of exosomes is cell type specific, it is believed that they are a "fingerprint" of the releasing cell and its metabolic status. We hypothesized that the exosomes and their specific exosomal content (eg, microribonucleic acid represent a precious biomedical tool and may be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of malignant tumors. In addition, exosomes may modify the phenotype of the parent and/or target cell by transferring pro-oncogenic molecules to induce cancerous phenotype of recipient cells and contribute to the formation of the premetastatic niche. The mechanism involved in these phenomena remains unclear; however, inclusion of signaling mediators into exosomes or exosome release may reduce their intracellular bioavailability in the parent cell, thereby altering cell phenotype and their metastatic potential. The aim of this review therefore is to analyze the biogenesis and role of exosomes from tumor cells, focusing primarily on ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer, and an effective early diagnosis has the potential to improve patient survival. Ovarian cancer currently lacks a reliable method for early detection, however, exosomes have received great attention as potential biomarkers and mediators

  9. Mitochondrial DNA mutations—candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gazi Nurun Nahar Sultana; Atiqur Rahman; Abu Din Ahmed Shahinuzzaman; Rowshan Ara Begum; Chowdhury Faiz Hossain

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem that affects more than 24% of women in Bangladesh.Furthermore,among low-income countries including Bangladesh,individuals have a high risk for developing breast cancer.This study aimed to identify candidate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women to be used as a preventive approach.We screened the blood samples from 24 breast cancer patients and 20 healthy controls to detect polymorphisms in the D-loop and the ND3- and ND4-coding regions of mtDNA by direct sequencing.Among 14 distinct mutations,10 polymorphisms were found in the D-loop,3 were found in the ND3-coding region,and 1 was found in the ND4-coding region.The frequency of two novel polymorphisms in the D-loop,one at position 16290 (T-ins) and the other at position 16293 (A-del),was higher in breast cancer patients than in control subjects (position 16290:odds ratio =6.011,95% confidence interval =1.2482 to 28.8411,P =0.002; position 16293:odds ratio =5.6028,95% confidence interval =1.4357 to 21.8925,P =0.010).We also observed one novel mutation in the ND3-coding region at position 10316 (A > G) in 69% of breast cancer patients but not in control subjects.The study suggests that two novel polymorphisms in the D-loop may be candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women.

  10. Integrative genomic data mining for discovery of potential blood-borne biomarkers for early diagnosis of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the arrival of the postgenomic era, there is increasing interest in the discovery of biomarkers for the accurate diagnosis, prognosis, and early detection of cancer. Blood-borne cancer markers are favored by clinicians, because blood samples can be obtained and analyzed with relative ease. We have used a combined mining strategy based on an integrated cancer microarray platform, Oncomine, and the biomarker module of the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA program to identify potential blood-based markers for six common human cancer types. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the Oncomine platform, the genes overexpressed in cancer tissues relative to their corresponding normal tissues were filtered by Gene Ontology keywords, with the extracellular environment stipulated and a corrected Q value (false discovery rate cut-off implemented. The identified genes were imported to the IPA biomarker module to separate out those genes encoding putative secreted or cell-surface proteins as blood-borne (blood/serum/plasma cancer markers. The filtered potential indicators were ranked and prioritized according to normalized absolute Student t values. The retrieval of numerous marker genes that are already clinically useful or under active investigation confirmed the effectiveness of our mining strategy. To identify the biomarkers that are unique for each cancer type, the upregulated marker genes that are in common between each two tumor types across the six human tumors were also analyzed by the IPA biomarker comparison function. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The upregulated marker genes shared among the six cancer types may serve as a molecular tool to complement histopathologic examination, and the combination of the commonly upregulated and unique biomarkers may serve as differentiating markers for a specific cancer. This approach will be increasingly useful to discover diagnostic signatures as the mass of microarray data continues to grow in the

  11. Biomarkers for cervical cancer screening: the role of p16(INK4a) to highlight transforming HPV infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Schmidt, Dietmar; Bergeron, Christine

    2012-04-01

    Biomarkers indicating the initiation of neoplastic transformation processes in human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected epithelial cells are moving into the focus of cancer prevention research, particularly for anogenital cancer, including cancer of the uterine cervix. Based on the in-depth understanding of the molecular events leading to neoplastic transformation of HPV-infected human cells, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a) turned out to be substantially overexpressed in virtually all HPV-transformed cells. This finding opened novel avenues in diagnostic histopathology to substantially improve the diagnostic accuracy of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions. Furthermore, it provides a novel technical platform to substantially improve the accuracy of cytology-based cancer early-detection programs. Here, we review the molecular background and the current evidence for the clinical utility of the p16(INK4a) biomarker for HPV-related cancers, and cervical cancer prevention in particular.

  12. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, T.H. van der; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.; Delahunt, B.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporti

  13. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship : highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Classen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germa Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J.T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  14. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: Highlights from the third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Beyer (Jörg); P. Albers (Peter); R. Altena (Renske); J. Aparicio (Jorge); C. Bokemeyer; J. Busch (Jamie); R. Cathomas (Richard); E. Cavallin-Stahl (Eva); N.W. Clarke (Noel); J. Claßen (Johannes); G. Cohn-Cedermark (Gabriella); A.A. Dahl; G. Daugaard (Gedske); U. de Giorgi (Ugo); M. de Santis (Maria); M. De Wit (Meike); R. de Wit (Ronald); K.P. Dieckmann; M. Fenner (Martin); K. Fizazi (Karim); A. Flechon (Aude); S.D. Fossa (Sophie); J.R. Germá Lluch (José Ramón); J.A. Gietema (Jourik); S. Gillessen (Silke); A. Giwercman (Aleksander); J.T. Hartmann; A. Heidenreich (Axel); M. Hentrich (Marcus); F.U. Honecker (Friedemann); A. Horwich; R.A. Huddart (Robbert); S. Kliesch (Sabine); C. Kollmannsberger (Christian); S. Krege (Susanne); M.P. Laguna (Maria Pilar); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); A. Lorch (Anja); J.P. Lotz (Jean Pierre); F. Mayer; A. Necchi (Andrea); N. Nicolai (Nicola); J. Nuver (Janine); K. Oechsle (Karin); J. Oldenburg (Jan); J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); T. Powles (Tom); E. Rajpert-De Meyts (Ewa); O. Rick (Oliver); G. Rosti (Giovanni); R. Salvioni (Roberto); C. Winter (Christopher); C. Wittekind (Christian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et a

  15. Potentiometric Sensors Based on Surface Molecular Imprinting: Detection of Cancer Biomarkers and Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z; Jain, V; Yi, J; Mueller, S; Sokolov, J; Liu, Z; Levon, K; Rigas, B; Rafailovich, M

    2010-01-01

    The continuing discovery of cancer biomarkers necessitates improved methods for their detection. Molecular imprinting using artificial materials provides an alternative to the detection of a wide range of substances. We applied surface molecular imprinting using self-assembled monolayers to design sensing elements for the detection of cancer biomarkers and other proteins. These elements consist of a gold-coated silicon chip onto which hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiol molecules and template biomolecule are co-adsorbed, where the thiol molecules are chemically bound to the metal substrate and self-assembled into highly ordered monolayers, the biomolecules can be removed, creating the foot-print cavities in the monolayer matrix for this kind of template molecules. Re-adsorption of the biomolecules to the sensing chip changes its potential, which can be measured potentiometrically. We applied this method to the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both solutions of purified CEA and in the culture medium of a CEA-producing human colon cancer cell line. The CEA assay, validated also against a standard immunoassay, was both sensitive (detection range 2.5-250 ng/mL) and specific (no cross-reactivity with hemoglobin; no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Similar results were obtained for human amylase. In addition, we detected virions of poliovirus in a specific manner (no cross-reactivity to adenovirus, no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Our findings demonstrate the application of the principles of molecular imprinting to the development of a new method for the detection of protein cancer biomarkers and to protein-based macromolecular structures such as the capsid of a virion. This approach has the potential of generating a general assay methodology that could be highly sensitive, specific, simple and likely inexpensive.

  16. Validation of methylation biomarkers that distinguish normal colon mucosa of cancer patients from normal colon mucosa of patients without cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, Matteo; Powell, Jasmine; Sapienza, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    We have validated differences in DNA methylation levels of candidate genes previously reported to discriminate between normal colon mucosa of patients with colon cancer and normal colon mucosa of individuals without cancer. Here, we report that CpG sites in 16 of the 30 candidate genes selected show significant differences in mean methylation level in normal colon mucosa of 24 patients with cancer and 24 controls. A support vector machine trained on these data and data for an additional 66 CpGs yielded an 18-gene signature, composed of ten of the validated candidate genes plus eight additional candidates. This model exhibited 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity in a 40-sample training set and classified all eight samples in the test set correctly. Moreover, we found a moderate-strong correlation (Pearson coefficients r = 0.253-0.722) between methylation levels in colon mucosa and methylation levels in peripheral blood for seven of the 18 genes in the support vector model. These seven genes, alone, classified 44 of the 48 patients in the validation set correctly and five CpGs selected from only two of the seven genes classified 41 of the 48 patients in the discovery set correctly. These results suggest that methylation biomarkers may be developed that will, at minimum, serve as useful objective and quantitative diagnostic complements to colonoscopy as a cancer-screening tool. These data also suggest that it may be possible to monitor biomarker methylation levels in tissues collected much less invasively than by colonoscopy.

  17. Absolute Quantification of Choline-Related Biomarkers in Breast Cancer Biopsies by Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Mimmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been repeatedly demonstrated that choline metabolism is altered in a wide variety of cancers. In breast tumours, the choline metabolite profile is characterized by an elevation of phosphocholine and total choline-compounds. This pattern is increasingly being exploited as biomarker in cancer diagnosis.

  18. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Claßen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germá Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J. T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Winter, C.; Wittekind, C.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377–1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478–496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497–513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements. PMID:23152360

  19. Plasma and EBC microRNAs as early biomarkers of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzoni, Paola; Banda, Iris; Goldoni, Matteo; Corradi, Massimo; Tiseo, Marcello; Acampa, Olga; Balestra, Valeria; Ampollini, Luca; Casalini, Angelo; Carbognani, Paolo; Mutti, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Lung cancer is a major cause of death in Western countries. Current screening methods are invasive and still lead to a high percentage of false positives. There is, therefore, a need to find biomarkers that increase the probability of detecting lung cancer early. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are stable molecules in blood plasma and exhaled breath condensate (EBC). We quantified miRNA-21 and miRNA-486 expression from plasma and EBC samples from patients with a diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and controls. miRNA-21 was significantly higher in plasma and in EBC of the NSCLC patients and miRNA-486 was significantly lower. This difference indicates a significantly improved diagnostic value, and suggests that these miRNAs could be clinically used as a first-line screening test in high-risk subjects.

  20. Reproducible cancer biomarker discovery in SELDI-TOF MS using different pre-processing algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been much interest in differentiating diseased and normal samples using biomarkers derived from mass spectrometry (MS studies. However, biomarker identification for specific diseases has been hindered by irreproducibility. Specifically, a peak profile extracted from a dataset for biomarker identification depends on a data pre-processing algorithm. Until now, no widely accepted agreement has been reached. RESULTS: In this paper, we investigated the consistency of biomarker identification using differentially expressed (DE peaks from peak profiles produced by three widely used average spectrum-dependent pre-processing algorithms based on SELDI-TOF MS data for prostate and breast cancers. Our results revealed two important factors that affect the consistency of DE peak identification using different algorithms. One factor is that some DE peaks selected from one peak profile were not detected as peaks in other profiles, and the second factor is that the statistical power of identifying DE peaks in large peak profiles with many peaks may be low due to the large scale of the tests and small number of samples. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the DE peak detection power in large profiles could be improved by the stratified false discovery rate (FDR control approach and that the reproducibility of DE peak detection could thereby be increased. CONCLUSIONS: Comparing and evaluating pre-processing algorithms in terms of reproducibility can elucidate the relationship among different algorithms and also help in selecting a pre-processing algorithm. The DE peaks selected from small peak profiles with few peaks for a dataset tend to be reproducibly detected in large peak profiles, which suggests that a suitable pre-processing algorithm should be able to produce peaks sufficient for identifying useful and reproducible biomarkers.

  1. Mining novel biomarkers for prognosis of gastric cancer with serum proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sui Mei-Hua

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although gastric caner (GC remains the second cause of cancer-related death, useful biomarkers for prognosis are still unavailable. We present here the attempt of mining novel biomarkers for GC prognosis by using serum proteomics. Methods Sera from 43 GC patients and 41 controls with gastritis as Group 1 and 11 GC patients as Group 2 was successively detected by Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS with Q10 chip. Peaks were acquired by Ciphergen ProteinChip Software 3.2.0 and analyzed by Zhejiang University-ProteinChip Data Analysis System (ZJU-PDAS. CEA level were evaluated by chemiluminescence immunoassay. Results After median follow-up periods of 33 months, Group 1 with 4 GC patients lost was divided into 20 good-prognosis GC patients (overall survival more than 24 months and 19 poor-prognosis GC patients (no more than 24 months. The established prognosis pattern consisted of 5 novel prognosis biomarkers with 84.2% sensitivity and 85.0% specificity, which were significantly higher than those of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA and TNM stage. We also tested prognosis pattern blindly in Group 2 with 66.7% sensitivity and 80.0% specificity. Moreover, we found that 4474-Da peak elevated significantly in GC and was associated with advanced stage (III+IV and short survival (p Conclusion We have identified a number of novel biomarkers for prognosis prediction of GC by using SELDI-TOF-MS combined with sophisticated bioinformatics. Particularly, elevated expression of 4474-Da peak showed very promising to be developed into a novel biomarker associated with biologically aggressive features of GC.

  2. Prediction of lung cancer based on serum biomarkers by gene expression programming methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhuang; Chen, Xiao-Zheng; Cui, Lian-Hua; Si, Hong-Zong; Lu, Hai-Jiao; Liu, Shi-Hai

    2014-01-01

    In diagnosis of lung cancer, rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors is very important. Serum markers, including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), neurone specific enolase (NSE) and Cyfra21-1, are reported to reflect lung cancer characteristics. In this study classification of lung tumors was made based on biomarkers (measured in 120 NSCLC and 60 SCLC patients) by setting up optimal biomarker joint models with a powerful computerized tool - gene expression programming (GEP). GEP is a learning algorithm that combines the advantages of genetic programming (GP) and genetic algorithms (GA). It specifically focuses on relationships between variables in sets of data and then builds models to explain these relationships, and has been successfully used in formula finding and function mining. As a basis for defining a GEP environment for SCLC and NSCLC prediction, three explicit predictive models were constructed. CEA and NSE are frequently- used lung cancer markers in clinical trials, CRP, LDH and Cyfra21-1 have significant meaning in lung cancer, basis on CEA and NSE we set up three GEP models-GEP 1(CEA, NSE, Cyfra21-1), GEP2 (CEA, NSE, LDH), GEP3 (CEA, NSE, CRP). The best classification result of GEP gained when CEA, NSE and Cyfra21-1 were combined: 128 of 135 subjects in the training set and 40 of 45 subjects in the test set were classified correctly, the accuracy rate is 94.8% in training set; on collection of samples for testing, the accuracy rate is 88.9%. With GEP2, the accuracy was significantly decreased by 1.5% and 6.6% in training set and test set, in GEP3 was 0.82% and 4.45% respectively. Serum Cyfra21-1 is a useful and sensitive serum biomarker in discriminating between NSCLC and SCLC. GEP modeling is a promising and excellent tool in diagnosis of lung cancer.

  3. Long noncoding RNAs as auxiliary biomarkers for gastric cancer screening: A pooled analysis of individual studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhaolei; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Zhenzhou; Hu, Minhua; Lin, Yingying; Chen, Yansong; Zheng, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    Background Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are highlighted as novel cancer biomarkers with great promise. Herein, we focused on summarizing the overall diagnostic performance of lncRNAs for gastric cancer (GC). Methods Publications fulfilling the search criteria were selected from the online databases. Study quality was assessed according to the Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy (QUADAS) checklist. The summary receiver operator characteristic (SROC) curve was plotted using a bivariate meta-analysis model. Statistical analysis was performed based on the platforms of STATA 12.0 and Meta-Disc 1.4 software. Results Fifteen studies with 1252 patients and 1283 matched controls were included. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for lncRNA expression profile in differentiating GC patients from cancer-free individuals were 0.68 (95%CI: 0.61-0.74) and 0.79 (95%CI: 0.72-0.84), respectively, corresponding to an area under curve (AUC) of 0.80. Moreover, the stratified analyses demonstrated that plasma-based lncRNA profiling harbored higher accuracy than that tissue-based assay (specificity: 0.80 versus 0.75; AUC: 0.84 versus 0.77). Conclusions LncRNA profiling hallmarks a moderate diagnostic value in the management of GC and that lncRNA expression patterns may potentially be utilized as auxiliary biomarkers in confirming GC. PMID:27015554

  4. Translating discovery in zebrafish pancreatic development to human pancreatic cancer: biomarkers, targets, pathogenesis, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Nelson S; Kazi, Abid A; Yee, Rosemary K

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

  5. Molecular biomarkers in extrahepatic bile duct cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for gross residual disease after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyeon Kang; Kim, Kyu Bo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hae Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To analyze the outcomes of chemoradiotherapy for extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer patients who underwent R2 resection or bypass surgery and to identify prognostic factors affecting clinical outcomes, especially in terms of molecular biomarkers. Medical records of 21 patients with EHBD cancer who underwent R2 resection or bypass surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy from May 2001 to June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All surgical specimens were re-evaluated by immunohistochemical staining using phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAKT), CD24, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), survivin, and {beta}-catenin antibodies. The relationship between clinical outcomes and immunohistochemical results was investigated. At a median follow-up of 20 months, the actuarial 2-year locoregional progression-free, distant metastasis-free and overall survival were 37%, 56%, and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis using clinicopathologic factors, there was no significant prognostic factor. In the immunohistochemical staining, cytoplasmic staining, and nuclear staining of pAKT was positive in 10 and 6 patients, respectively. There were positive CD24 in 7 patients, MMP9 in 16 patients, survivin in 8 patients, and {beta}-catenin in 3 patients. On univariate analysis, there was no significant value of immunohistochemical results for clinical outcomes. There was no significant association between clinical outcomes of patients with EHBD cancer who received chemoradiotherapy after R2 resection or bypass surgery and pAKT, CD24, MMP9, survivin, and {beta}-catenin. Future research is needed on a larger data set or with other molecular biomarkers.

  6. Molecular Biomarkers in Bladder Cancer: Novel Potential Indicators of Prognosis and Treatment Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Nagata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many clinical and molecular markers for predicting outcomes in bladder cancer (BC have been reported, their application in clinical practice remains unclear. Bladder carcinogenesis has two distinct molecular pathways that direct the development of BC. FGFR3 mutations are common in low-grade BC, while TP53 mutation or loss of RB1 is associated with muscle-invasive BC. However, no tissue-based gene markers confirmed by prospective large-scale trials in BC have been used in clinical practice. Micro-RNA analyses of BC tissue revealed that miR-145 and miR-29c⁎ function as tumor suppressors, whereas miR-183 and miR-17-5p function as oncogenic miRNAs. In liquid biopsy, circulating tumor cells (CTC, exosomes, or cell-free RNA is extracted from the peripheral blood samples of cancer patients to analyze cancer prognosis. It was reported that detection of CTC was associated with poor prognostic factors. However, application of liquid biopsy in BC treatment is yet to be explored. Although several cell-free RNAs, such as miR-497 in plasma or miR-214 in urine, could be promising novel circulating biomarkers, they are used only for diagnosing BC as the case that now stands. Here, we discuss the application of novel biomarkers in evaluating and measuring BC outcomes.

  7. Long Non-Coding RNAs As Potential Novel Prognostic Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saus, Ester; Brunet-Vega, Anna; Iraola-Guzmán, Susana; Pegueroles, Cinta; Gabaldón, Toni; Pericay, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of death worldwide. Surgery is usually the first line of treatment for patients with CRC but many tumors with similar histopathological features show significantly different clinical outcomes. The discovery of robust prognostic biomarkers in patients with CRC is imperative to achieve more effective treatment strategies and improve patient's care. Recent progress in next generation sequencing methods and transcriptome analysis has revealed that a much larger part of the genome is transcribed into RNA than previously assumed. Collectively referred to as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), some of these RNA molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to be altered and to play critical roles in tumor biology. This discovery leads to exciting possibilities for personalized cancer diagnosis, and therapy. Many lncRNAs are tissue and cancer-type specific and have already revealed to be useful as prognostic markers. In this review, we focus on recent findings concerning aberrant expression of lncRNAs in CRC tumors and emphasize their prognostic potential in CRC. Further studies focused on the mechanisms of action of lncRNAs will contribute to the development of novel biomarkers for diagnosis and disease progression.

  8. Evolving Paradigm of Radiotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Current Consensus and Continuing Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Juloori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-risk prostate cancer is an aggressive form of the disease with an increased risk of distant metastasis and subsequent mortality. Multiple randomized trials have established that the combination of radiation therapy and long-term androgen deprivation therapy improves overall survival compared to either treatment alone. Standard of care for men with high-risk prostate cancer in the modern setting is dose-escalated radiotherapy along with 2-3 years of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. There are research efforts directed towards assessing the efficacy of shorter ADT duration. Current research has been focused on assessing hypofractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT techniques. Ongoing randomized trials will help assess the utility of pelvic lymph node irradiation. Research is also focused on multimodality therapy with addition of a brachytherapy boost to external beam radiation to help improve outcomes in men with high-risk prostate cancer.

  9. Hepatocellular carcinoma: consensus recommendations of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melanie B; Jaffe, Deborah; Choti, Michael M; Belghiti, Jacques; Curley, Steven; Fong, Yuman; Gores, Gregory; Kerlan, Robert; Merle, Phillipe; O'Neil, Bert; Poon, Ronnie; Schwartz, Lawrence; Tepper, Joel; Yao, Francis; Haller, Daniel; Mooney, Margaret; Venook, Alan

    2010-09-01

    Hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults and the third most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The incidence of HCC in the United States is rising steadily because of the prevalence of hepatitis C viral infection and other causes of hepatic cirrhosis. The majority of patients have underlying hepatic dysfunction, which complicates patient management and the search for safe and effective therapies. The Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) in HCC was convened by the National Cancer Institute's Gastrointestinal Cancer Steering Committee to identify the key knowledge gaps in HCC and define clinical research priorities. The CTPM structured its review according to current evidence-based treatment modalities in HCC and prioritized the recommendations on the basis of the patient populations representing the greatest unmet medical need.

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotube based transparent immunosensor for detection of a prostate cancer biomarker osteopontin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Abhinav; Hong, Seongkyeol; Singh, Renu [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaesung, E-mail: jjang@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • A transparent CNT immunosensor is presented for detection of a prostate cancer biomarker osteopontin. • This immunosensor showed a highly linear and reproducible behavior from 1 pg mL{sup −1} to 1 μg mL{sup −1}. • The limit of detection of the immunosensor was 0.3 pg mL{sup −1}. • This immunosensor demonstrated high selectivity against bovine serum albumin and human serum. - Abstract: Osteopontin (OPN) is involved in almost all steps of cancer development, and it is being investigated as a potential biomarker for a diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. Here, we report a label-free, highly sensitive and transparent immunosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for detection of OPN. A high density of −COOH functionalized SWCNTs was deposited between two gold/indium tin oxide electrodes on a glass substrate by dielectrophoresis. Monoclonal antibodies specific to OPN were covalently immobilized on the SWCNTs. Relative resistance change of the immunosensors was measured as the concentration of OPN in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and human serum was varied from 1 pg mL{sup −1} to 1 μg mL{sup −1} for different channel lengths of 2, 5, and 10 μm, showing a highly linear and reproducible behavior (R{sup 2} > 97%). These immunosensors were also specific to OPN against another test protein, bovine serum albumin, PBS and human serum, showing that a limit of detection for OPN was 0.3 pg mL{sup −1}. This highly sensitive and transparent immunosensor has a great potential as a simple point-of-care test kit for various protein biomarkers.

  11. Biomarkers of evasive resistance predict disease progression in cancer patients treated with antiangiogenic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, Andreas; Jöhrer, Karin; Kocher, Florian; Steiner, Normann; Graziadei, Ivo; Heidegger, Isabel; Pichler, Renate; Leonhartsberger, Nicolai; Kremser, Christian; Kern, Johann; Untergasser, Gerold; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Hilbe, Wolfgang

    2016-04-12

    Numerous antiangiogenic agents are approved for the treatment of oncological diseases. However, almost all patients develop evasive resistance mechanisms against antiangiogenic therapies. Currently no predictive biomarker for therapy resistance or response has been established. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify biomarkers predicting the development of therapy resistance in patients with hepatocellular cancer (n = 11), renal cell cancer (n = 7) and non-small cell lung cancer (n = 2). Thereby we measured levels of angiogenic growth factors, tumor perfusion, circulating endothelial cells (CEC), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) and tumor endothelial markers (TEM) in patients during the course of therapy with antiangiogenic agents, and correlated them with the time to antiangiogenic progression (aTTP). Importantly, at disease progression, we observed an increase of proangiogenic factors, upregulation of CEC/CEP levels and downregulation of TEMs, such as Robo4 and endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR), reflecting the formation of torturous tumor vessels. Increased TEM expression levels tended to correlate with prolonged aTTP (ECSCR high = 275 days vs. ECSCR low = 92.5 days; p = 0.07 and for Robo4 high = 387 days vs. Robo4 low = 90.0 days; p = 0.08). This indicates that loss of vascular stabilization factors aggravates the development of antiangiogenic resistance. Thus, our observations confirm that CEP/CEC populations, proangiogenic cytokines and TEMs contribute to evasive resistance in antiangiogenic treated patients. Higher TEM expression during disease progression may have clinical and pathophysiological implications, however, validation of our results is warranted for further biomarker development.

  12. FIRST LINE 5-FU-BASED CHEMOTHERAPY WITH/WITHOUT BEVACIZUMAB FOR METASTATIC COLORECTAL CANCER: TISSUE BIOMARKER CANDIDATES

    OpenAIRE

    Assia Konsoulova; Ivan Donev; Nikolay Conev; Sonya Draganova; Nadezhda Petrova; Eleonora Dimitrova; Hristo Popov; Kameliya Bratoeva; Petar Ghenev

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the USA. According to Bulgarian National Statistics Institute, 2370 colon and 1664 rectal cancer cases were diagnosed in 2012 with total number of patients 29995. Adding bevacizumab to chemotherapy in patients with metastatic disease improves progression-free survival (PFS) but no predictive markers have been proven in the clinical practice. In our study we examined two tissue biomarkers that may correlate with resp...

  13. Data Mining Approaches for Genomic Biomarker Development: Applications Using Drug Screening Data from the Cancer Genome Project and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, David G

    2015-01-01

    Developing reliable biomarkers of tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance can guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and influence pre-therapy clinical decisions. A popular strategy for developing biomarkers uses characterizations of human tumor samples against a range of cancer drug responses that correlate with genomic change; developed largely from the efforts of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and Sanger Cancer Genome Project (CGP). The purpose of this study is to provide an independent analysis of this data that aims to vet existing and add novel perspectives to biomarker discoveries and applications. Existing and alternative data mining and statistical methods will be used to a) evaluate drug responses of compounds with similar mechanism of action (MOA), b) examine measures of gene expression (GE), copy number (CN) and mutation status (MUT) biomarkers, combined with gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA), for hypothesizing biological processes important for drug response, c) conduct global comparisons of GE, CN and MUT as biomarkers across all drugs screened in the CGP dataset, and d) assess the positive predictive power of CGP-derived GE biomarkers as predictors of drug response in CCLE tumor cells. The perspectives derived from individual and global examinations of GEs, MUTs and CNs confirm existing and reveal unique and shared roles for these biomarkers in tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance. Applications of CGP-derived genomic biomarkers to predict the drug response of CCLE tumor cells finds a highly significant ROC, with a positive predictive power of 0.78. The results of this study expand the available data mining and analysis methods for genomic biomarker development and provide additional support for using biomarkers to guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and pre-therapy clinical decisions.

  14. Data Mining Approaches for Genomic Biomarker Development: Applications Using Drug Screening Data from the Cancer Genome Project and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G Covell

    Full Text Available Developing reliable biomarkers of tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance can guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and influence pre-therapy clinical decisions. A popular strategy for developing biomarkers uses characterizations of human tumor samples against a range of cancer drug responses that correlate with genomic change; developed largely from the efforts of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE and Sanger Cancer Genome Project (CGP. The purpose of this study is to provide an independent analysis of this data that aims to vet existing and add novel perspectives to biomarker discoveries and applications. Existing and alternative data mining and statistical methods will be used to a evaluate drug responses of compounds with similar mechanism of action (MOA, b examine measures of gene expression (GE, copy number (CN and mutation status (MUT biomarkers, combined with gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA, for hypothesizing biological processes important for drug response, c conduct global comparisons of GE, CN and MUT as biomarkers across all drugs screened in the CGP dataset, and d assess the positive predictive power of CGP-derived GE biomarkers as predictors of drug response in CCLE tumor cells. The perspectives derived from individual and global examinations of GEs, MUTs and CNs confirm existing and reveal unique and shared roles for these biomarkers in tumor cell drug sensitivity and resistance. Applications of CGP-derived genomic biomarkers to predict the drug response of CCLE tumor cells finds a highly significant ROC, with a positive predictive power of 0.78. The results of this study expand the available data mining and analysis methods for genomic biomarker development and provide additional support for using biomarkers to guide hypothesis-driven basic science research and pre-therapy clinical decisions.

  15. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L. Tonry

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate Cancer (PCa is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease; (ii would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making.

  16. Spermine and citrate as metabolic biomarkers for assessing prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guro F Giskeødegård

    Full Text Available Separating indolent from aggressive prostate cancer is an important clinical challenge for identifying patients eligible for active surveillance, thereby reducing the risk of overtreatment. The purpose of this study was to assess prostate cancer aggressiveness by metabolic profiling of prostatectomy tissue and to identify specific metabolites as biomarkers for aggressiveness. Prostate tissue samples (n = 158, 48 patients with a high cancer content (mean: 61.8% were obtained using a new harvesting method, and metabolic profiles of samples representing different Gleason scores (GS were acquired by high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS. Multivariate analysis (PLS, PLS-DA and absolute quantification (LCModel were used to examine the ability to predict cancer aggressiveness by comparing low grade (GS = 6, n = 30 and high grade (GS≥7, n = 81 cancer with normal adjacent tissue (n = 47. High grade cancer tissue was distinguished from low grade cancer tissue by decreased concentrations of spermine (p = 0.0044 and citrate (p = 7.73·10(-4, and an increase in the clinically applied (total choline+creatine+polyamines/citrate (CCP/C ratio (p = 2.17·10(-4. The metabolic profiles were significantly correlated to the GS obtained from each tissue sample (r = 0.71, and cancer tissue could be distinguished from normal tissue with sensitivity 86.9% and specificity 85.2%. Overall, our findings show that metabolic profiling can separate aggressive from indolent prostate cancer. This holds promise for the benefit of applying in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS within clinical MR imaging investigations, and HR-MAS analysis of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies has a potential as an additional diagnostic tool.

  17. A Comprehensive Review on miR-200c, A Promising Cancer Biomarker with Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Nag, Alo; Mandal, Chandi C

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small single stranded non coding RNA molecules (~22 nucleotides) which impede protein production by directly interacting with 3'untranslated regions of the target mRNAs. Interestingly, miR-200c is often dysregulated in various cancers that normally exhibits tumor suppressive behavior by blocking epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells. However, elevation of miR-200c in various cancer tissues contradicts the tumor suppressive role of this microRNA. This review addresses the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of the endogenous level of miR-200c in various cancers such as breast, ovarian, prostate, endometrial, lungs, colon, pancreatic, etc. and its differential role in regulation of proliferation and EMT phenotype of cancer cells. Further, this review discusses whether abnormal level of miR-200c in cancer tissues or in blood circulation can be used as a biomarker. Importantly, how the level of miR-200c can be used to predict the effectiveness of the cancer therapy is also discussed. Accumulating evidences suggest that use of miR-200c alone may not be sufficient for treatment of cancer patients, but the combination of miR-200c with an anti-proliferating drug could be a better choice to prevent invasiveness of cancers as well as tumor growth both in primary and in metastatic sites. This article also proposes that the tumor microenvironment may have a role in influencing epigenetic silencing of miR-200c expression.

  18. Histone Methylation Marks on Circulating Nucleosomes as Novel Blood-Based Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Gezer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Circulating nucleic acids (CNAs are under investigation as a liquid biopsy in cancer as potential non-invasive biomarkers, as stable structure in circulation nucleosomes could be valuable sources for detection of cancer-specific alterations in histone modifications. Our interest is in histone methylation marks with a focus on colorectal cancer, one of the leading cancers respective the incidence and mortality. Our previous work included the analysis of trimethylations of lysine 9 on histone 3 (H3K9me3 and of lysine 20 on histone 4 (H4K20me3 by chromatin immuno- precipitation-related PCR in circulating nucleosomes. Here we asked whether global immunologic measurement of histone marks in circulation could be a suitable approach to show their potential as biomarkers. In addition to H3K9me3 and H4K20me3 we also measured H3K27me3 in plasma samples from CRC patients (n = 63 and cancer free individuals (n = 40 by ELISA-based methylation assays. Our results show that of three marks, the amounts of H3K27me3 (p = 0.04 and H4K20me3 (p < 0.001 were significantly lower in CRC patients than in healthy controls. For H3K9me3 similar amounts were measured in both groups. Areas under the curve (AUC in receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves indicating the power of CRC detection were 0.620 for H3K27me3, 0.715 for H4K20me3 and 0.769 for the combination of both markers. In conclusion, findings of this preliminary study reveal the potential of blood-based detection of CRC by quantification of histone methylation marks and the additive effect of the marker combination.

  19. Extracellular vesicles – biomarkers and effectors of the cellular interactome in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz eRak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In multicellular organisms both health and disease are defined by patterns of communications between the constituent cells. In addition to networks of soluble mediators, cells are also programmed to exchange complex messages pre-assembled as multimolecular cargo of membraneous structures known extracellular vesicles (EV. Several biogenetic pathways produce EVs with different properties and known as exosomes, ectosomes and apoptotic bodies. In cancer, EVs carry molecular signatures and effectors of the disease, such as mutant oncoproteins, oncogenic transcripts, microRNA and DNA sequences. Intercellular trafficking of such EVs (oncosomes may contribute to horizontal cellular transformation, phenotypic reprogramming and functional re-education of recipient cells, both locally and systemically. The EV-mediated, reciprocal molecular exchange also includes tumor suppressors, phosphoproteins, proteases, growth factors and bioactive lipids, all of which participate in the functional integration of multiple cells and their collective involved in tumor angiogenesis, inflammation, immunity, coagulopathy, mobilization of bone marrow derived effectors, metastasis, drug resistance or cellular stemness. In cases where the EV involvement is rate limiting their production and uptake may represent and unexplored anticancer therapy target. Moreover, oncosomes circulating in biofluids of cancer patients offer an unprecedented, remote and non-invasive access to crucial molecular information about cancer cells, including their driver mutations, classifiers, molecular subtypes, therapeutic targets and biomarkers of drug resistance. New nanotechnologies are being developed to exploit this unique biomarker platform. Indeed, embracing the notion that human cancers are defined not only by processes occurring within cancer cells, but also between them, and amidst the altered tumor and systemic microenvironment may open new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities.

  20. Identification of Tetranectin as a Potential Biomarker for Metastatic Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Hu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Lymph node involvement is the most important predictor of survival rates in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. A biomarker that can indicate lymph node metastasis would be valuable to classify patients with OSCC for optimal treatment. In this study, we have performed a serum proteomic analysis of OSCC using 2-D gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. One of the down-regulated proteins in OSCC was identified as tetranectin, which is a protein encoded by the CLEC3B gene (C-type lectin domain family 3, member B. We further tested the protein level in serum and saliva from patients with lymph-node metastatic and primary OSCC. Tetranectin was found significantly under-expressed in both serum and saliva of metastatic OSCC compared to primary OSCC. Our results suggest that serum or saliva tetranectin may serve as a potential biomarker for metastatic OSCC. Other candidate serum biomarkers for OSCC included superoxide dismutase, ficolin 2, CD-5 antigen-like protein, RalA binding protein 1, plasma retinol-binding protein and transthyretin. Their clinical utility for OSCC detection remains to be further tested in cancer patients.

  1. Rare Cancers Europe (RCE) methodological recommendations for clinical studies in rare cancers: A European consensus position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.G. Casali (Paolo); P. Bruzzi (P.); J. Bogaerts (Jan); J-Y. Blay (Jean Yves); M. Aapro (Matti); A. Adamous; A. Berruti (Alfredo); J. Bressington; B. Bruzzi; R. Capocaccia (Riccardo); F. Cardoso (Fatima); J.E. Celis; A. Cervantes (Andres); F. Ciardiello; C. Claussen; M. Coleman; S. Comis; S. Craine; D. De Boltz; F. De Lorenzo; A.P. Dei Tos (Angelo); G. Gatta (Gemma); J. Geissler (Jan); R. Giuliani; E. Grande (Enrico); A. Gronchi (Alessandro); S. Jezdic; B. Jonsson; L. Jost; H. Keulen; D. Lacombe (Denis); G. Lamory; Y. Le Cam; S. Leto di Priolo; L. Licitra; F. Macchia; A. Margulies; S. Marreaud (Sandrine); G. McVie; S. Narbutas; K. Oliver; N. Pavlidis; J. Pelouchova; G. Pentheroudakis; M.J. Piccart (Martine); M. Pierotti (Marco Alessandro); G. Pravettoni; K. Redmond; P.H.J. Riegman (Peter); M.P. Ruffilli; D. Ryner; S. Sandrucci; M. Seymour; V. Torri (Valter); A. Trama; S. van Belle (S.); G. Vassal; M. Wartenberg; C. Watts; A. Wilson; W. Yared

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWhile they account for one-fifth of new cancer cases, rare cancers are difficult to study. A higher than average degree of uncertainty should be accommodated for clinical as well as for population-based decision making. Rules of rational decision making in conditions of uncertainty shoul

  2. Identification and Validation of PCAT14 as Prognostic Biomarker in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhanshu Shukla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in the discovery of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have identified lineage- and cancer-specific biomarkers that may be relevant in the clinical management of prostate cancer (PCa. Here we assembled and analyzed a large RNA-seq dataset, from 585 patient samples, including benign prostate tissue and both localized and metastatic PCa to discover and validate differentially expressed genes associated with disease aggressiveness. We performed Sample Set Enrichment Analysis (SSEA and identified genes associated with low versus high Gleason score in the RNA-seq database. Comparing Gleason 6 versus 9+ PCa samples, we identified 99 differentially expressed genes with variable association to Gleason grade as well as robust expression in prostate cancer. The top-ranked novel lncRNA PCAT14, exhibits both cancer and lineage specificity. On multivariate analysis, low PCAT14 expression independently predicts for BPFS (P = .00126, PSS (P = .0385, and MFS (P = .000609, with trends for OS as well (P = .056. An RNA in-situ hybridization (ISH assay for PCAT14 distinguished benign vs malignant cases, as well as high vs low Gleason disease. PCAT14 is transcriptionally regulated by AR, and endogenous PCAT14 overexpression suppresses cell invasion. Thus, Using RNA-sequencing data we identify PCAT14, a novel prostate cancer and lineage-specific lncRNA. PCAT14 is highly expressed in low grade disease and loss of PCAT14 predicts for disease aggressiveness and recurrence.

  3. Exosomal Proteins as Diagnostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandfeld-Paulsen, Birgitte; Jakobsen, Kristine Raaby; Bæk, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Exosomes have been suggested as promising biomarkers in NSCLC because they contain proteins from their originating cells and are readily available in plasma. In this study, we explored the potential of exosome protein profiling in diagnosing lung cancers of all stages and various...... histological subtypes in patients. METHODS: Plasma was isolated from 581 patients (431 with lung cancer and 150 controls). The extracellular vesicle array was used to phenotype exosomes. The extracellular vesicle array contained 49 antibodies for capturing exosomes. Subsequently, a cocktail of biotin......-conjugated CD9, CD81, and CD63 antibodies was used to detect and visualize captured exosomes. Multimarker models were made by combining two or more markers. The optimal multimarker model was evaluated by area under the curve (AUC) and random forests analysis. RESULTS: The markers CD151, CD171, and tetraspanin 8...

  4. Biomarkers in the management of breast cancer: great expectations, hard times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Gianfilippo; Nelmes, Daniel J; Al-Allak, Asmaa

    2013-12-01

    Progress in biomarkers research has resulted in increasing awareness of the heterogeneity of breast cancer. The identification of subtypes with different clinical behavior and the possibility of using targeted therapy in specific subgroup of patients (eg, those with tumors overexpressing HER2) raise expectations for increasing personalization of treatment. However, there is a widening gap between scientific discoveries and practical application in everyday practice: too many patients are still being managed based only on traditional clinical and pathologic parameters, because of lack of access to up to date technology-such as gene profiling, or cell proliferation assays-in many cancer centers in the United Kingdom. In this article, we provide some examples of this contrast, drawn from the literature and from our own clinical experience in South West Wales, and discuss possible solutions.

  5. Retracted: Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Pancreatic Cancer Using Integrated Transcriptomics With Functional Pathways Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Tong, Pan; Chen, Jinyun; Pei, Zenglin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Weiping; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Jin

    2016-02-22

    Retraction: 'Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Pancreatic Cancer Using Integrated Transcriptomics With Functional Pathways Analysis' by Zhang, X., Tong, P., Chen, J., Pei, Z., Zhang, X., Chen, W., Xu, J. and Wang, J. The above article from the Journal of Cellular Physiology, published online on 10 March 2016 in Wiley Online Library as Early View (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1002/jcp.25353/), has been retracted by agreement between Gary Stein, the journal's Editor-in-Chief, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, which confirmed that the article was submitted and approved for publication by Dr. Jin Wang without acknowledgement of NIH funding received or the consent and authorship of Dr. Ann Killary and Dr. Subrata Sen, with whom the manuscript was originally drafted.

  6. Serum microRNA biomarkers for detection of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T Hennessey

    Full Text Available Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality world-wide and the majority of cases are diagnosed at late stages of disease. There is currently no cost-effective screening test for NSCLC, and the development of such a test is a public health imperative. Recent studies have suggested that chest computed tomography screening of patients at high risk of lung cancer can increase survival from disease, however, the cost effectiveness of such screening has not been established. In this Phase I/II biomarker study we examined the feasibility of using serum miRNA as biomarkers of NSCLC using RT-qPCR to examine the expression of 180 miRNAs in sera from 30 treatment naive NSCLC patients and 20 healthy controls. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC and area under the curve were used to identify differentially expressed miRNA pairs that could distinguish NSCLC from healthy controls. Selected miRNA candidates were further validated in sera from an additional 55 NSCLC patients and 75 healthy controls. Examination of miRNA expression levels in serum from a multi-institutional cohort of 50 subjects (30 NSCLC patients and 20 healthy controls identified differentially expressed miRNAs. A combination of two differentially expressed miRNAs miR-15b and miR-27b, was able to discriminate NSCLC from healthy controls with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of 100% in the training set. Upon further testing on additional 130 subjects (55 NSCLC and 75 healthy controls, this miRNA pair predicted NSCLC with a specificity of 84% (95% CI 0.73-0.91, sensitivity of 100% (95% CI; 0.93-1.0, NPV of 100%, and PPV of 82%. These data provide evidence that serum miRNAs have the potential to be sensitive, cost-effective biomarkers for the early detection of NSCLC. Further testing in a Phase III biomarker study in is necessary for validation of these results.

  7. Detection of label-free cancer biomarkers using nickel nanoislands and quartz crystal microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Martínez-Rivas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrián Martínez-Rivas1,2, Patrick Chinestra3,4, Gilles Favre3,4, Sébastien Pinaud1, Childérick Séverac1,2, Jean-Charles Faye3,4, Christophe Vieu1,21LAAS-CNRS; Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France; 2Université de Toulouse, UPS, INSA, INP, ISAE; LAAS; Toulouse, France; 3INSERM U563, Université de Toulouse, CPTP, “Signalisation Cellulaire, GTPase Rho et cancers”, Toulouse, France; 4Institut Claudius Regaud, Biology Department, Toulouse, FranceAbstract: We present a technique for the label-free detection and recognition of cancer biomarkers using metal nanoislands intended to be integrated in a novel type of nanobiosensor. His-tagged (scFv-F7N1N2 is the antibody fragment which is directly immobilized, by coordinative bonds, onto ~5 nm nickel islands, then deposited on the surface of a quartz crystal of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM to validate the technique. Biomarker GTPase RhoA was investigated because it has been found to be overexpressed in various tumors and because we have recently isolated and characterized a new conformational scFv which selectively recognizes the active form of RhoA. We implemented a surface chemistry involving an antibiofouling coating of polyethylene glycol silane (PEG-silane (<2 nm thick and Ni nanoislands to reach a label-free detection of the active antigen conformation of RhoA, at various concentrations. The methodology proposed here proves the viability of the concept by using Ni nanoislands as an anchoring surface layer enabling the detection of a specific conformation of a protein, identified as a potential cancer biomarker. Hence, this novel methodology can be transferred to a nanobiosensor to detect, at lower time consumption and with high sensitivity, specific biomolecules.Keywords: nickel nanoislands, cancer biomarkers, quartz crystal microbalance, PEG-silane, RhoA protein, nanobiosensor

  8. YKL-40—A Protein in the Field of Translational Medicine: A Role as a Biomarker in Cancer Patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Nicolai A. [Departments of Surgical Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Johansen, Julia S., E-mail: julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk [Departments of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Departments of Medicine, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark)

    2010-07-12

    YKL-40 is a 40 kDa glycoprotein produced by cancer cells, inflammatory cells and stem cells. It probably has a role in cell proliferation and differentiation, inflammation, protection against apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of extracellular tissue remodelling. Plasma levels of YKL-40 are often elevated in patients with localized or advanced cancer compared to age-matched healthy subjects. Several studies have demonstrated that high plasma YKL-40 is an independent prognostic biomarker of short survival in patients with different types of cancer. However, there is not yet sufficient data to support determination of plasma YKL-40 outside research projects as a biomarker for screening of gastrointestinal cancer and determination of treatment response and poor prognosis before or during treatment and follow-up. Plasma YKL-40 is also elevated in patients with other diseases than cancer, e.g., severe infections, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive lung disease, asthma, liver fibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Co-morbidity should therefore always be considered in patients with cancer, since other sources than cancer cells can increase plasma YKL-40 levels. Future focused translational research projects combining basic and clinical research are needed in a joint effort to answer questions of the complex function and regulation of YKL-40 and the question if plasma YKL-40 is a clinical useful biomarker in patients with cancer.

  9. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-14 as a potential biomarker for breast cancer by immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Sisi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The post-translational modification of proteins, including glycosylation, differs between normal and tumor cells. The UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Tases family of enzymes regulates the initial steps of mucin O-glycosylation and is responsible for the altered glycosylation state observed in cancer cells. Recently it was found that GalNAc-T14 mRNA is heterogeneously expressed in breast carcinomas compared to normal tissue, however the expression profile of GalNAc-T14 protein in breast carcinomas compared to normal tissue is still unknown. In this study, we assessed the expression profile of GalNAc-T14 protein in malignant and non-malignant breast tissues by immunohistochemistry to evaluate whether GalNAc-T14 might be a potential biomarker for breast cancer. Methods In formalin-fixed tissues, the expression level of GalNAc-T14 protein was evaluated by immunohistochemistry assay in breast tissues. Expression profiles were assessed in normal tissues, benign fibroadenomas and several types of carcinomas. Results Our results showed that GalNAc-T14 was heterogeneously expressed in breast carcinomas compared to non-malignant tissue. GalNAc-T14 expression was observed in 47/56 (83.9% carcinoma samples, 7/48 (14.6% non-malignant breast tissue samples. GalNAc-T14 expression level was associated with histological grade. For this enzyme a significant association with invasive ductal type, mucinous adenocarcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS type was found. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that GalNAc-T14 may be a potential biomarker for breast cancer by immunohistochemistry. GalNAc-T14 expression level was associated with histological grade. GalNAc-T14 expression can provide new insights about breast cancer glycobiology.

  10. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervenis, Christos; Xynos, Evaghelos; Sotiropoulos, George; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Chrysou, Evangelia; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Karachaliou, Niki; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Kyriazanos, Ioannis; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Tekkis, Paris; Triantopoulou, Charina; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Vini, Louiza; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Ziras, Nikolaos; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    There is discrepancy and failure to adhere to current international guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) in hospitals in Greece and Cyprus. The aim of the present document is to provide a consensus on the multidisciplinary management of metastastic CRC, considering both special characteristics of our Healthcare System and international guidelines. Following discussion and online communication among the members of an executive team chosen by the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncology (HeSMO), a consensus for metastastic CRC disease was developed. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology on two voting rounds by invited multidisciplinary international experts on CRC. Statements reaching level of agreement by ≥80% were considered as having achieved large consensus, whereas statements reaching 60-80% moderate consensus. One hundred and nine statements were developed. Ninety experts voted for those statements. The median rate of abstain per statement was 18.5% (range: 0-54%). In the end of the process, all statements achieved a large consensus. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized. R0 resection is the only intervention that may offer substantial improvement in the oncological outcomes.

  11. Tumor budding as a potential histopathological biomarker in colorectal cancer: Hype or hope?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Grizzi; Giuseppe Celesti; Gianluca Basso; Luigi Laghi

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC),the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in men and women worldwide is recognized as a complex multi-pathway disease,an observation sustained by the fact that histologically identical tumors may have different outcome,including various response to therapy.Therefore,particularly in early and intermediate stage (stages Ⅱ and Ⅲ,respectively) CRC,there is a compelling need for biomarkers helpful of selecting patients with aggressive disease that might benefit from adjuvant and targeted therapy.Histopathological examination shows that likely other solid tumors the development and progression of human CRC is not only determined by genetically abnormal cells,but also by intricate interactions between malignant cells and the surrounding microenvironment.This has led to reconsider the features of tumor microenvironment as potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers.Among the histopathological biomarkers,tumor budding (i.e.,the presence of individual cells and small clusters of tumor cells at the tumor invasive front)has received much recent attention,particularly in the setting of CRC.Although its acceptance as a reportable factor has been held back by a lack of uniformity with respect to qualitative and quantitative aspects,tumor budding is now considered as an independent adverse prognostic factor in CRC that may allow for stratification of patients into risk categories more meaningful than those defined by tumor-node-metastasis staging alone,and also potentially guide treatment decisions,especially in T2-T3 NO (stage Ⅱ) CRCs.

  12. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging monitors binding of specific probes to cancer biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Ardeshirpour

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the "image and treat" concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy.

  13. Identification of CEACAM5 as a Biomarker for Prewarning and Prognosis in Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinfeng; Fan, Xing; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Fenli; Dong, Jiaqiang; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-12-01

    MGd1, a monoclonal antibody raised against gastric cancer cells, possesses a high degree of specificity for gastric cancer (GC). Here we identified that the antigen of MGd1 is CEACAM5, and used MGd1 to investigate the expression of CEACAM5 in non-GC and GC tissues (N=643), as a biomarker for prewarning and prognosis. The expression of CEACAM5 was detected by immunohistochemistry in numerous tissues; its clinicopathological correlation was statistically analyzed. CEACAM5 expression was increased progressively from normal gastric mucosa to chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and finally to GC (pgastric precancerous lesions (intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia), CEACAM5-positive patients had a higher risk of developing GC as compared with CEACAM5-negative patients (OR = 12.68, pgastric adenocarcinoma (p<0.001). In survival analysis, CEACAM5 was demonstrated to be an independent prognostic predictor for patients with GC of clinical stage IIIA/IV (p=0.033). Our results demonstrate that CEACAM5 is a promising biomarker for GC prewarning and prognostic evaluation.

  14. Clinical practice guidelines for the surgical treatment of rectal cancer: a consensus statement of the Hellenic Society of Medical Oncologists (HeSMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xynos, Evaghelos; Tekkis, Paris; Gouvas, Nikolaos; Vini, Louiza; Chrysou, Evangelia; Tzardi, Maria; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Boukovinas, Ioannis; Agalianos, Christos; Androulakis, Nikolaos; Athanasiadis, Athanasios; Christodoulou, Christos; Dervenis, Christos; Emmanouilidis, Christos; Georgiou, Panagiotis; Katopodi, Ourania; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Makatsoris, Thomas; Papakostas, Pavlos; Papamichael, Demetris; Pechlivanides, George; Pentheroudakis, Georgios; Pilpilidis, Ioannis; Sgouros, Joseph; Triantopoulou, Charina; Xynogalos, Spyridon; Karachaliou, Niki; Ziras, Nikolaos; Zoras, Odysseas; Souglakos, John

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer management, accurate staging by magnetic resonance imaging, neo-adjuvant treatment with the use of radiotherapy, and total mesorectal excision have resulted in remarkable improvement in the oncological outcomes. However, there is substantial discrepancy in the therapeutic approach and failure to adhere to international guidelines among different Greek-Cypriot hospitals. The present guidelines aim to aid the multidisciplinary management of rectal cancer, considering both the local special characteristics of our healthcare system and the international relevant agreements (ESMO, EURECCA). Following background discussion and online communication sessions for feedback among the members of an executive team, a consensus rectal cancer management was obtained. Statements were subjected to the Delphi methodology voting system on two rounds to achieve further consensus by invited multidisciplinary international experts on colorectal cancer. Statements were considered of high, moderate or low consensus if they were voted by ≥80%, 60-80%, or Guidelines and algorithms of diagnosis and treatment were proposed. The importance of centralization, care by a multidisciplinary team, adherence to guidelines, and personalization is emphasized.

  15. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kwast, Theo H; Amin, Mahul B; Billis, Athanase; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David; Humphrey, Peter A; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars; Delahunt, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporting of tumor size/volume and zonal location of prostate cancers were coordinated by working group 2. A survey circulated before the consensus conference demonstrated that 74% of the 157 participants considered pT2 substaging of prostate cancer to be of clinical and/or academic relevance. The survey also revealed a considerable variation in the frequency of reporting of pT2b substage prostate cancer, which was likely a consequence of the variable methodologies used to distinguish pT2a from pT2b tumors. Overview of the literature indicates that current pT2 substaging criteria lack clinical relevance and the majority (65.5%) of conference attendees wished to discontinue pT2 substaging. Therefore, the consensus was that reporting of pT2 substages should, at present, be optional. Several studies have shown that prostate cancer volume is significantly correlated with other clinicopathological features, including Gleason score and extraprostatic extension of tumor; however, most studies fail to demonstrate this to have prognostic significance on multivariate analysis. Consensus was reached with regard to the reporting of some quantitative measure of the volume of tumor in a prostatectomy specimen, without prescribing a specific methodology. Incorporation of the zonal and/or anterior location of the dominant/index tumor in the pathology report was accepted by most participants, but a formal definition of the identifying features of the dominant/index tumor remained undecided.

  16. Clinical utility of certain biomarkers as predictors of breast cancer with or without metastasis among Egyptian females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Samia A; Hamed, Manal A; Omar, Omar S

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to explore and correlate the value of certain biomarkers in breast cancer (BC) females with and without metastasis after undergoing the surgical treatment protocol in the National Cancer Institute in Egypt. Thirty females (33-69 years), diagnosed as early breast cancer patients with or without metastasis, and 20 healthy individuals were selected for this study. The biomarkers under investigation were vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-8 (IL-8). The correlation between these markers and the tumor grade was also evaluated. The results revealed a significant increase (p IL-8 in breast cancer patients with or without metastasis as compared to the healthy group. Surgical treatment of metastatic BC females showed a significant reduction of those parameters by variable degrees, whereas BC females without metastasis recorded the most inhibition levels. Also, there was positive correlation (p IL-8 as well as CRP and IL-6. In conclusion, the selected biomarkers may be beneficial for the prognosis of breast cancer and seem to be a diagnostic tool to differentiate between BC with or without metastasis. The descried surgical treatment protocol succeeded to attenuate the elevated biomarker levels and improve patient survival which deserves more extensive studies.

  17. PAI-1 -675 4G/5G polymorphism as a prognostic biomarker in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Haixin; Hemminki, Kari; Johansson, Robert; Altieri, Andrea; Enquist, Kerstin; Henriksson, Roger; Lenner, Per; Försti, Asta

    2008-05-01

    Extracellular matrix degradation, mediated by the urokinase plasminogen activation (uPA) system, is a critical step in tumor invasion and metastasis. High tumor levels of uPA and its inhibitor PAI-1 have been correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. We examined whether genetic variation in the genes of the uPA system affect breast cancer susceptibility and prognosis. We genotyped eight potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes of the uPA system in 959 Swedish breast cancer patients with detailed clinical data and up to 15 years of follow-up together with 952 matched controls. We used the unconditional logistic regression models to evaluate the associations between genotypes and breast cancer risk and tumor characteristics. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the survival probabilities; the log-rank test was used to test differences between subgroups. None of the SNPs conferred an increased breast cancer risk, but correlation with some traditional prognostic factors was observed for several SNPs. Most importantly, we identified the -675 4G/5G SNP in the PAI-1 gene as a promising prognostic biomarker for breast cancer. Compared to the 4G/4G and 4G/5G genotypes 5G/5G homozygosity correlated significantly with worse survival (RR 2.04, 95% CI 1.45-2.86, P5G/5G homozygotes were also the group with worse survival among lymph node negative cases. Our finding suggests that genotyping PAI-1 -675 4G/5G may help in clinical prognosis of breast cancer.

  18. Salivary microRNAs as promising biomarkers for detection of esophageal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijun Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tissue microRNAs (miRNAs can detect cancers and predict prognosis. Several recent studies reported that tissue, plasma, and saliva miRNAs share similar expression profiles. In this study, we investigated the discriminatory power of salivary miRNAs (including whole saliva and saliva supernatant for detection of esophageal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: By Agilent microarray, six deregulated miRNAs from whole saliva samples from seven patients with esophageal cancer and three healthy controls were selected. The six selected miRNAs were subjected to validation of their expression levels by RT-qPCR using both whole saliva and saliva supernatant samples from an independent set of 39 patients with esophageal cancer and 19 healthy controls. RESULTS: Six miRNAs (miR-10b*, miR-144, miR-21, miR-451, miR-486-5p, and miR-634 were identified as targets by Agilent microarray. After validation by RT-qPCR, miR-10b*, miR-144, and miR-451 in whole saliva and miR-10b*, miR-144, miR-21, and miR-451 in saliva supernatant were significantly upregulated in patients, with sensitivities of 89.7, 92.3, 84.6, 79.5, 43.6, 89.7, and 51.3% and specificities of 57.9, 47.4, 57.9%, 57.9, 89.5, 47.4, and 84.2%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found distinctive miRNAs for esophageal cancer in both whole saliva and saliva supernatant. These miRNAs possess discriminatory power for detection of esophageal cancer. Because saliva collection is noninvasive and convenient, salivary miRNAs show great promise as biomarkers for detection of esophageal cancer in areas at high risk.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of recurrently deregulated genes across multiple cancers identifies new pan-cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Tanaka, Yuji; Kawaji, Hideya;

    2016-01-01

    RNAs which are upregulated in cancer, defining promoters which overlap with repetitive elements (especially SINE/Alu and LTR/ERV1 elements) that are often upregulated in cancer. Lastly, we documented for the first time upregulation of multiple copies of the REP522 interspersed repeat in cancer. Overall...

  20. Circulating plasma MiR-141 is a novel biomarker for metastatic colon cancer and predicts poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyin Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC remains one of the major cancer types and cancer related death worldwide. Sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers that can facilitate disease detection, staging and prediction of therapeutic outcome are highly desirable to improve survival rate and help to determine optimized treatment for CRC. The small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, have recently been identified as critical regulators for various diseases including cancer and may represent a novel class of cancer biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate circulating microRNAs in human plasma for use as such biomarkers in colon cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we found that circulating miR-141 was significantly associated with stage IV colon cancer in a cohort of 102 plasma samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of candidate plasma microRNA markers. We observed that combination of miR-141 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, a widely used marker for CRC, further improved the accuracy of detection. These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 156 plasma samples collected at Tianjin, China. Furthermore, our analysis showed that high levels of plasma miR-141 predicted poor survival in both cohorts and that miR-141 was an independent prognostic factor for advanced colon cancer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that plasma miR-141 may represent a novel biomarker that complements CEA in detecting colon cancer with distant metastasis and that high levels of miR-141 in plasma were associated with poor prognosis.

  1. Circulating Plasma MiR-141 Is a Novel Biomarker for Metastatic Colon Cancer and Predicts Poor Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, David E.; Zheng, Hong; Schetter, Aaron J.; Nykter, Matti; Harris, Curtis C.; Chen, Kexin; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major cancer types and cancer related death worldwide. Sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers that can facilitate disease detection, staging and prediction of therapeutic outcome are highly desirable to improve survival rate and help to determine optimized treatment for CRC. The small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), have recently been identified as critical regulators for various diseases including cancer and may represent a novel class of cancer biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate circulating microRNAs in human plasma for use as such biomarkers in colon cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings By using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we found that circulating miR-141 was significantly associated with stage IV colon cancer in a cohort of 102 plasma samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of candidate plasma microRNA markers. We observed that combination of miR-141 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a widely used marker for CRC, further improved the accuracy of detection. These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 156 plasma samples collected at Tianjin, China. Furthermore, our analysis showed that high levels of plasma miR-141 predicted poor survival in both cohorts and that miR-141 was an independent prognostic factor for advanced colon cancer. Conclusions/Significance We propose that plasma miR-141 may represent a novel biomarker that complements CEA in detecting colon cancer with distant metastasis and that high levels of miR-141 in plasma were associated with poor prognosis. PMID:21445232

  2. Glycoproteomics using so-called ‘fluid-biopsy’ specimens in the discovery of lung cancer biomarkers. Promise and challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing Kay; Gabrielson, Ed; Askin, Frederic; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cancer in the US and worldwide. In spite of the rapid progression in personalized treatments, the overall survival rate of lung cancer patients is still suboptimal. Over the past decade, tremendous efforts have been focused on the discovery of protein biomarkers to facilitate the early detection and monitoring lung cancer progression during treatment. In addition to tumor tissues and cancer cell lines, a variety of biological material has been studied. Particularly in recent years, studies using fluid-based specimen or so-called “fluid-biopsy” specimen have progressed rapidly. Fluid specimens are relatively easier to collect than tumor tissue, and they can be repeatedly sampled during the disease progression. Glycoproteins have long been recognized to play fundamental roles in many physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus the discussion on recent advances of glycoproteomics, particularly in the identification of potential protein biomarkers using so-called fluid-based specimens in lung cancer. The purpose of this review is to summarize current strategies, achievements and perspectives in the field. This insight will highlight the discovery of tumor-associated glycoprotein biomarkers in lung cancer and their potential clinical applications. PMID:23112109

  3. PD-L1 biomarker testing for non-small cell lung cancer: truth or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Claud; Rizvi, Naiyer A

    2016-01-01

    Research in cancer immunology is currently accelerating following a series of cancer immunotherapy breakthroughs during the last 5 years. Various monoclonal antibodies which block the interaction between checkpoint molecules PD-1 on immune cells and PD-L1 on cancer cells have been used to successfully treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including some durable responses lasting years. Two drugs, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, are now FDA approved for use in certain patients who have failed or progressed on platinum-based or targeted therapies while agents targeting PD-L1, atezolizumab and durvalumab, are approaching the final stages of clinical testing. Despite impressive treatment outcomes in a subset of patients who receive these immune therapies, many patients with NSCLC fail to respond to anti-PD-1/PD-L1 and the identification of a biomarker to select these patients remains highly sought after. In this review, we discuss the recent clinical trial results of pembrolizumab, nivolumab, and atezolizumab for NSCLC, and the significance of companion diagnostic testing for tumor PD-L1 expression.

  4. Circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA as a novel cancer biomarker: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Man

    2012-10-01

    The unique characteristics of the mitochondrial genome, such as short length, simple molecular structure, and high copy number, have made monitoring aberrant changes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) quantity an interesting molecular tool for early tumor detection with many advantages over the nuclear genome-based methods. Recently, circulating cell-free (ccf) mtDNA in blood has emerged on the platform as a non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for many forms of solid tumors. Accumulating evidence demonstrate that plasma or serum ccf mtDNA levels are significantly different between cancer patients and healthy individuals. Furthermore, quantification of ccf mtDNA levels in circulation may assist in identifying patients from cancer-free healthy population. This minireview attempts to summarize our recent findings in this very promising field of cancer research. The potential technical challenges that we have encountered during the quantitative analysis of ccf mtDNA and mtDNA in general are also briefly discussed. Prospective studies with a larger cohort of patients in various cancer entities are beneficial to precisely define the clinical importance of assessing the ccf mtDNA amount for diagnosing and tracking malignant diseases and their progression.

  5. Testing breast cancer serum biomarkers for early detection and prognosis in pre-diagnosis samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Anna; Blyuss, Oleg; Metodieva, Gergana; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ryan, Andy; Kiseleva, Elena M; Prytomanova, Olga M; Jacobs, Ian J; Widschwendter, Martin; Menon, Usha; Timms, John F

    2017-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although mammography screening is available, there is an ongoing interest in improved early detection and prognosis. Herein, we have analysed a combination of serological biomarkers in a case–control cohort of sera taken before diagnosis. Methods: This nested case–control study within the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS) used serum samples from 239 women who subsequently developed breast cancer and 239 matched cancer-free controls. Sera were screened by ELISA for 9 candidate markers. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine associations with clinico-pathological features and between case controls in different time groups before diagnosis. Results: Significant associations with clinico-pathological features related to prognosis were found for several candidates (CA15-3, HSP90A and PAI-1). However, there were no consistent differences between cases and controls for any candidate in the lead up to diagnosis. Whilst combination models outperformed single markers, there was no increase in performance towards diagnosis. Conclusions: This study using unique pre-diagnosis samples shows that CA15-3, HSP90A and PAI-1 have potential as early prognostic markers and warrant further investigation. However, none of the candidates or combinations would be useful for screening. PMID:28081538

  6. Viral and Cellular Biomarkers in the Diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lina Tornesello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer arises from cells localized in the ectoendocervical squamocolumnar junction of the cervix persistently infected with one of about 13 human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes. The majority of HPV infections induces low grade squamous epithelial lesions that in more than 90% of cases spontaneously regress and in about 10% eventually progress to high grade lesions and even less frequently evolve to invasive cancer. Tumor progression is characterized by (1 increased expression of E6 and E7 genes of high risk HPVs, known to bind to and inactivate p53 and pRb oncosuppressors, respectively; (2 integration of viral DNA into host genome, with disruption of E2 viral genes and host chromosomal loci; and (3 molecular alterations of key regulators of cell cycle. Molecular markers with high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating viral infections associated with cellular abnormalities with high risk of progression are strongly needed for cervical cancer screening and triage. This review will focus on the analysis of clinical validated or candidate biomarkers, such as HPV DNA, HPV E6/E7 mRNA, HPV proteins, p16(INK4a and Ki67, TOP2A and MCM2 cellular factors, and DNA methylation profiles, which will likely improve the identification of premalignant lesions that have a high risk to evolve into invasive cervical cancer.

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Exosomes Leads to the Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijvesz, Diederick; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hoogland, Marije; Vredenbregt-van den Berg, Mirella S.; Willemsen, Rob; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Jenster, Guido

    2013-12-31

    Introduction: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, biomarker discovery from body fluids is often hampered by the high abundance of many proteins unrelated to disease. An attractive alternative biomarker discovery approach is the isolation of small vesicles (exosomes, ~100 nm). They contain proteins that are specific to the tissue from which they are derived and therefore can be considered as treasure chests for disease-specific marker discovery. Profiling prostate cancer-derived exosomes could reveal new markers for this malignancy. Materials and Methods: Exosomes were isolated from 2 immortalized primary prostate epithelial cells (PNT2C2 and RWPE-1) and 2 PCa cell lines (PC346C and VCaP) by ultracentrifugation. Proteomic analyses utilized a nanoLC coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap operated in tandem MS (MS/MS) mode, followed by the Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag approach. Exosomal proteins were validated by Western blotting. A Tissue Micro Array, containing 481 different PCa samples (radical prostatectomy), was used to correlate candidate markers with several clinical-pathological parameters such as PSA, Gleason score, biochemical recurrence, and (PCa-related) death. Results: Proteomic characterization resulted in the identification of 263 proteins by at least 2 peptides. Specifically analysis of exosomes from PNT2C2, RWPE-1, PC346C, and VCaP identified 248, 233, 169, and 216 proteins, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed 52 proteins differently expressed between PCa and control cells, 9 of which were more abundant in PCa. Validation by Western blotting confirmed a higher abundance of FASN, XPO1 and PDCD6IP (ALIX) in PCa exosomes. The Tissue Micro 4 Array showed strong correlation of higher Gleason scores and local recurrence with increased cytoplasmic XPO1 (P<0.001). Conclusions: Differentially abundant proteins of cell line-derived exosomes make a clear subdivision between

  8. Hypermethylation of BRCA1 gene: implication for prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target in sporadic primary triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X; Shan, L; Wang, F; Wang, J; Wang, F; Shen, G; Liu, X; Wang, B; Yuan, Y; Ying, J; Yang, H

    2015-04-01

    Paraffin sections from 239 cases of surgical resected mammary gland carcinomas were assessed to determine the role of BRCA1 gene methylation in sporadic triple-negative breast cancer and to evaluate the relationship between BRCA1 gene methylation and clinicopathologic features of triple-negative breast cancer in the National Cancer Center, China. Diagnostic tissues collected from patients received mastectomy in the National Cancer Center from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2008 were reviewed. Tissue microarrays were constructed using 239 triple-negative breast cancer cases and stained with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, cytokeratin 5/6, and epidermal growth factor receptor. Methylation status of the BRCA1 promoter was measured by methylation-specific PCR and analyzed against clinicopathologic characteristics, subtypes, and prognosis using standard statistical methods. Among the 239 triple-negative breast cancer cases, 137 (57.3 %) showed methylation of the BRCA1. According to the immunohistochemistry results, triple-negative breast cancer cases were classified into basal-like breast cancer (60.7 %) and non-basal-like breast cancer (39.3 %). The frequency of BRCA1 methylation was significantly higher in basal-like breast cancer subtype (71.7 %) than the non-basal subtype (35.1 %). Thus, BRCA1 methylation is statistically significantly correlated with basal-like breast cancer subtype (p triple-negative breast cancer. Here we demonstrated that epigenetic alteration of key tumor suppressor gene can be a promising biomarker for the prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer/basal-like breast cancer. Specifically our finding revealed that BRCA1 methylation is closely associated with a significant decrease in overall survival and disease-free survival, highlighting BRCA1 promoter methylation as promising and powerful biomarkers for effect and better prognosis of DNA damaging agents for triple-negative breast cancer

  9. Noncoding RNAs as potential biomarkers to predict the outcome in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaizhou Jin,1–3,* Guopei Luo,1–3,* Zhiwen Xiao,1–3 Zuqiang Liu,1–3 Chen Liu,1–3 Shunrong Ji,1–3 Jin Xu,1–3 Liang Liu,1–3 Jiang Long,1–3 Quanxing Ni,1–3 Xianjun Yu1–3 1Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 3Pancreatic Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC, a common digestive system cancer, is highly malignant and has a poor disease outcome. Currently, all available examination and detection methods cannot accurately predict the clinical outcome. Therefore, it is extremely important to identify novel molecular biomarkers for personalized medication and to significantly improve the overall outcome. The “noncoding RNAs” (ncRNAs are a group of RNAs that do not code for proteins, and they are categorized as structural RNAs and regulatory RNAs. It has been shown that microRNAs and long ncRNAs function as regulatory RNAs to affect the progression of various diseases. Many studies have confirmed a role for ncRNAs in the progression of PDAC during the last few years. Because of the significant role of ncRNAs in PDAC, ncRNA profiling may be used to predict PDAC outcome with high accuracy. This review comprehensively analyzes the value of ncRNAs as potential biomarkers to predict the outcome in PDAC and the possible mechanisms thereof. Keywords: pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, microRNA, long noncoding RNA, outcome prediction

  10. In vivo biomarker expression patterns are preserved in 3D cultures of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windus, Louisa C.E.; Kiss, Debra L.; Glover, Tristan [Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies, Discovery Biology, Griffith University, Nathan 4111, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Avery, Vicky M., E-mail: v.avery@griffith.edu.au [Eskitis Institute for Cell and Molecular Therapies, Discovery Biology, Griffith University, Nathan 4111, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-11-15

    Here we report that Prostate Cancer (PCa) cell-lines DU145, PC3, LNCaP and RWPE-1 grown in 3D matrices in contrast to conventional 2D monolayers, display distinct differences in cell morphology, proliferation and expression of important biomarker proteins associated with cancer progression. Consistent with in vivo growth rates, in 3D cultures, all PCa cell-lines were found to proliferate at significantly lower rates in comparison to their 2D counterparts. Moreover, when grown in a 3D matrix, metastatic PC3 cell-lines were found to mimic more precisely protein expression patterns of metastatic tumour formation as found in vivo. In comparison to the prostate epithelial cell-line RWPE-1, metastatic PC3 cell-lines exhibited a down-regulation of E-cadherin and {alpha}6 integrin expression and an up-regulation of N-cadherin, Vimentin and {beta}1 integrin expression and re-expressed non-transcriptionally active AR. In comparison to the non-invasive LNCaP cell-lines, PC3 cells were found to have an up-regulation of chemokine receptor CXCR4, consistent with a metastatic phenotype. In 2D cultures, there was little distinction in protein expression between metastatic, non-invasive and epithelial cells. These results suggest that 3D cultures are more representative of in vivo morphology and may serve as a more biologically relevant model in the drug discovery pipeline. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed and optimised 3D culturing techniques for Prostate Cancer cell-lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated biomarker expression in 2D versus 3D culture techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PC3 cells re-expressed non-transcriptionally active androgen receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metastatic PCa cell lines retain in vivo-like antigenic profiles in 3D cultures.

  11. Detection of cancer clones in human gastric adenoma by increased DNA-instability and other biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sun

    2009-06-01

    concept of “procancer” (as opposed to “precancer” as being a unique stage during the course of carcinogenesis and cancer progression. We designate the term to cancer clones at the very early stages of malignant progression that do not show distinguishable morphological atypia but do show positive DNA-instability testing and positive staining for various biomarkers such as Ki67, p53, DFF45, and bFGF. We also define the abnormal positive staining of these biomarkers, including the DNA-instability test as “functional atypia”, compared to the ordinary morphological atypia.

  12. Use of Aleuria alantia Lectin Affinity Chromatography to Enrich Candidate Biomarkers from the Urine of Patients with Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Ambrose

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing a urine test to detect bladder tumours with high sensitivity and specificity is a key goal in bladder cancer research. We hypothesised that bladder cancer-specific glycoproteins might fulfill this role. Lectin-ELISAs were used to study the binding of 25 lectins to 10 bladder cell lines and serum and urine from bladder cancer patients and non-cancer controls. Selected lectins were then used to enrich glycoproteins from the urine of bladder cancer patients and control subjects for analysis by shotgun proteomics. None of the lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cancer cell lines over normal urothlelial cell lines or for urinary glycans from bladder cancer patients over those from non-cancer controls. However, several lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cell line glycans over serum glycans and are potentially useful for enriching glycoproteins originating from the urothelium in urine. Aleuria alantia lectin affinity chromatography and shotgun proteomics identified mucin-1 and golgi apparatus protein 1 as proteins warranting further investigation as urinary biomarkers for low-grade bladder cancer. Glycosylation changes in bladder cancer are not reliably detected by measuring lectin binding to unfractionated proteomes, but it is possible that more specific reagents and/or a focus on individual proteins may produce clinically useful biomarkers.

  13. Biomarkers in Exhaled Breath Condensate and Serum of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Ying Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer are leading causes of deaths worldwide which are associated with chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Lung cancer, in particular, has a very high mortality rate due to the characteristically late diagnosis. As such, identification of novel biomarkers which allow for early diagnosis of these diseases could improve outcome and survival rate. Markers of oxidative stress in exhaled breath condensate (EBC are examples of potential diagnostic markers for both COPD and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. They may even be useful in monitoring treatment response. In the serum, S100A8, S100A9, and S100A12 of the S100 proteins are proinflammatory markers. They have been indicated in several inflammatory diseases and cancers including secondary metastasis into the lung. It is highly likely that they not only have the potential to be diagnostic biomarkers for NSCLC but also prognostic indicators and therapeutic targets.

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and sphingosine kinase 1: novel biomarkers for clinical prognosis in breast, prostate, and hematological cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan ePyne

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence for a role in cancer of the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, the enzyme sphingosine kinase 1 (that catalyses S1P formation and S1P-specific G protein coupled receptors. This perspective highlights recent findings demonstrating that sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P receptors are new important biomarkers for detection of early cancer and progression to aggressive cancer. The impact of the sub-cellular distribution of S1P metabolising enzymes and S1P receptors and their spatial functional interaction with oncogenes is considered with respect to prognostic outcome. These findings suggest that S1P, in addition to being a biomarker of clinical prognosis, might also be a new therapeutic target for intervention in cancer.

  15. Validation of proposed prostate cancer biomarkers with gene expression data: a long road to travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Adriana; Esposito, Alessia Isabella; Gallina, Anna; Nees, Matthias; Angelini, Giovanna; Albini, Adriana; Pfeffer, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    Biomarkers are important for early detection of cancer, prognosis, response prediction, and detection of residual or relapsing disease. Special attention has been given to diagnostic markers for prostate cancer since it is thought that early detection and surgery might reduce prostate cancer-specific mortality. The use of prostate-specific antigen, PSA (KLK3), has been debated on the base of cohort studies that show that its use in preventive screenings only marginally influences mortality from prostate cancer. Many groups have identified alternative or additional markers, among which PCA3, in order to detect early prostate cancer through screening, to distinguish potentially lethal from indolent prostate cancers, and to guide the treatment decision. The large number of markers proposed has led us to the present study in which we analyze these indicators for their diagnostic and prognostic potential using publicly available genomic data. We identified 380 markers from literature analysis on 20,000 articles on prostate cancer markers. The most interesting ones appeared to be claudin 3 (CLDN3) and alpha-methysacyl-CoA racemase highly expressed in prostate cancer and filamin C (FLNC) and keratin 5 with highest expression in normal prostate tissue. None of the markers proposed can compete with PSA for tissue specificity. The indicators proposed generally show a great variability of expression in normal and tumor tissue or are expressed at similar levels in other tissues. Those proposed as prognostic markers distinguish cases with marginally different risk of progression and appear to have a clinically limited use. We used data sets sampling 152 prostate tissues, data sets with 281 prostate cancers analyzed by microarray analysis and a study of integrated genomics on 218 cases to develop a multigene score. A multivariate model that combines several indicators increases the discrimination power but does not add impressively to the information obtained from Gleason

  16. RBBP6: a potential biomarker of apoptosis induction in human cervical cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moela P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pontsho Moela, Lesetja Raymond Motadi Department of Biochemistry, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa Abstract: Overexpression of RBBP6 in cancers of the colon, lung, and esophagus makes it a potential target in anticancer therapy. This is especially important because RBBP6 associates with the tumor suppressor gene p53, the inactivation of which has been linked to over 50% of all cancer types. However, the expression of RBBP6 in cancer and its interaction with p53 are yet to be understood in order to determine whether or not RBBP6 is cancer promoting and therefore a potential biomarker. In this study, we manipulated RBBP6 expression levels followed by treatment with either camptothecin or γ-aminobutyric acid in cervical cancer cells to induce apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. We began by staining human cervical cancer tissue sections with anti-RBBP6 monoclonal antibody to evaluate the extent of expression of RBBP6 in patients’ specimens. We followed on with silencing the overexpression of RBBP6 and treatment with anticancer agents to evaluate how the specimens respond to combinational therapy. Apoptosis induction was evaluated through confocal microscope, and flow cytometry using annexin V staining, and also by checking the mitochondrial and caspase-3/7 activity. Cell cycle arrest was evaluated using flow cytometry through staining with propidium iodide. RBBP6 was highly expressed in cervical cancer tissue sections that were in stage II or III of development. Silencing RBBP6 followed by treatment with γ-aminobutyric acid and camptothecin seems to sensitize cells to apoptosis induction rather than cell cycle arrest. Overexpression of RBBP6 seems to promote S-phase in cell cycle and cell proliferation. These results predict a proliferative role of RBBP6 in cancer progression rather than as a cancer-causing gene. Furthermore, sensitization of cells to camptothecin-induced apoptosis by RBBP6 targeting suggests a promising tool for

  17. Biomarkers of dietary intake of flavonoids and phenolic acids for studying diet-cancer relationship in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For many polyphenolic compounds found in plant-derived food, biological effects possibly relevant for cancer prevention have been shown. Since dietary intake estimates suffer from imprecision, the measurement of these compounds (or metabolites of) in biological specimens collected in epidemiological studies is expected to improve accuracy of exposure estimation. AIM OF THE STUDY: The current use of biomarkers in etiologic studies on polyphenolics and cancer risk is evaluated. In a...

  18. Global DNA hypomethylation in peripheral blood leukocytes as a biomarker for cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Dong Woo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Good biomarkers for early detection of cancer lead to better prognosis. However, harvesting tumor tissue is invasive and cannot be routinely performed. Global DNA methylation of peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was evaluated as a biomarker for cancer risk. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis to estimate overall cancer risk according to global DNA hypomethylation levels among studies with various cancer types and analytical methods used to measure DNA methylation. Studies were systemically searched via PubMed with no language limitation up to July 2011. Summary estimates were calculated using a fixed effects model. RESULTS: The subgroup analyses by experimental methods to determine DNA methylation level were performed due to heterogeneity within the selected studies (p<0.001, I(2: 80%. Heterogeneity was not found in the subgroup of %5-mC (p = 0.393, I(2: 0% and LINE-1 used same target sequence (p = 0.097, I(2: 49%, whereas considerable variance remained in LINE-1 (p<0.001, I(2: 80% and bladder cancer studies (p = 0.016, I(2: 76%. These results suggest that experimental methods used to quantify global DNA methylation levels are important factors in the association study between hypomethylation levels and cancer risk. Overall, cancer risks of the group with the lowest DNA methylation levels were significantly higher compared to the group with the highest methylation levels [OR (95% CI: 1.48 (1.28-1.70]. CONCLUSIONS: Global DNA hypomethylation in peripheral blood leukocytes may be a suitable biomarker for cancer risk. However, the association between global DNA methylation and cancer risk may be different based on experimental methods, and region of DNA targeted for measuring global hypomethylation levels as well as the cancer type. Therefore, it is important to select a precise and accurate surrogate marker for global DNA methylation levels in the association studies between global DNA methylation levels in peripheral

  19. Possible mechanisms behind the differential effects of soy protein and casein feedings on colon cancer biomarkers in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, E.H.; Geerse, G.J.; Klaassens, E.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Alink, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    In the present studies, several hypotheses were tested to explain previously reported differential effects of soy and casein on colon cancer biomarkers like cell proliferation, fecal fat, fecal bile acid, alkaline phosphatase, and magnesium excretion in rats. In Study 1, the effect of methionine, a

  20. Electroanalytical and surface plasmon resonance sensors for detection of breast cancer and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in cells and body fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghui; Yi, Xinyao; Wang, Jianxiu; Zhou, Feimeng

    2014-04-21

    Cancer and neurological disorders are two leading causes of human death. Their early diagnoses will either greatly improve the survival rate or facilitate effective treatments or modalities. Detection of biomarkers in body fluids and some tissues (e.g., blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluids) is relatively non-invasive and provides useful chemical and biological information that is complementary to tomographic imaging (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and X-ray computed tomography). Recent years have witnessed the contributions from and potential applications of bioanalytical methods for early detection of major diseases. In this review, we survey some recent developments of electroanalytical (as a representative label-based technique) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) (as a representative label-free technique) biosensors for detection of biomarkers relevant to etiologies of breast cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD). While breast cancer is representative of cancers of complexity (multiple biomarkers, false positives from tomographic scans, and a need for more effective early diagnostic methods), AD is the most prevalent neurological disorder that is also linked to multiple biomarkers. Both electroanalytical and SPR-based sensors have attractive features of sensitivity, portability, obviation of large sample volumes, and capability of multiplexed detection. Various sensing protocols developed in the past five years are reviewed, demonstrating the feasibility of both techniques for diagnostic purposes. Problems inherent in these two techniques that must be overcome before being clinically viable are also discussed.

  1. Peptide imprinted receptors for the determination of the small cell lung cancer associated biomarker progastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qader, A. A.; Urraca, J.; Torsetnes, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide imprinted polymers were developed for detection of progastrin releasing peptide (ProGRP); a low abundant blood based biomarker for small cell lung cancer. The polymers targeted the proteotypic nona-peptide sequence NLLGLIEAK and were used for selective enrichment of the proteotypic peptide...

  2. Optimizing Molecular-Targeted Therapies in Ovarian Cancer: The Renewed Surge of Interest in Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers and Cell Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donavon Hiss

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hallmarks of ovarian cancer encompass the development of resistance, disease recurrence and poor prognosis. Ovarian cancer cells express gene signatures which pose significant challenges for cancer drug development, therapeutics, prevention and management. Despite enhancements in contemporary tumor debulking surgery, tentative combination regimens and abdominal radiation which can achieve beneficial response rates, the majority of ovarian cancer patients not only experience adverse effects, but also eventually relapse. Therefore, additional therapeutic possibilities need to be explored to minimize adverse events and prolong progression-free and overall response rates in ovarian cancer patients. Currently, a revival in cancer drug discovery is devoted to identifying diagnostic and prognostic ovarian cancer biomarkers. However, the sensitivity and reliability of such biomarkers may be complicated by mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, diverse genetic risk factors, unidentified initiation and progression elements, molecular tumor heterogeneity and disease staging. There is thus a dire need to expand existing ovarian cancer therapies with broad-spectrum and individualized molecular targeted approaches. The aim of this review is to profile recent developments in our understanding of the interrelationships among selected ovarian tumor biomarkers, heterogeneous expression signatures and related molecular signal transduction pathways, and their translation into more efficacious targeted treatment rationales.

  3. Systematic enrichment analysis of gene expression profiling studies identifies consensus pathways implicated in colorectal cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Lascorz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of gene expression profiling (GEP studies on colorectal carcinogenesis have been performed but no reliable gene signature has been identified so far due to the lack of reproducibility in the reported genes. There is growing evidence that functionally related genes, rather than individual genes, contribute to the etiology of complex traits. We used, as a novel approach, pathway enrichment tools to define functionally related genes that are consistently up- or down-regulated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: We started the analysis with 242 unique annotated genes that had been reported by any of three recent meta-analyses covering GEP studies on genes differentially expressed in carcinoma vs normal mucosa. Most of these genes (218, 91.9% had been reported in at least three GEP studies. These 242 genes were submitted to bioinformatic analysis using a total of nine tools to detect enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO categories or Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. As a final consistency criterion the pathway categories had to be enriched by several tools to be taken into consideration. Results: Our pathway-based enrichment analysis identified the categories of ribosomal protein constituents, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, carbonic anhydrase isozymes, and a general category related to inflammation and cellular response as significantly and consistently overrepresented entities. Conclusions: We triaged the genes covered by the published GEP literature on colorectal carcinogenesis and subjected them to multiple enrichment tools in order to identify the consistently enriched gene categories. These turned out to have known functional relationships to cancer development and thus deserve further investigation.

  4. Single Gene Prognostic Biomarkers in Ovarian Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Scooter; Villalobos, Victor M.; Gevaert, Olivier; Abramovitz, Mark; Williams, Casey; Sikic, Branimir I.; Leyland-Jones, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To discover novel prognostic biomarkers in ovarian serous carcinomas. Methods A meta-analysis of all single genes probes in the TCGA and HAS ovarian cohorts was performed to identify possible biomarkers using Cox regression as a continuous variable for overall survival. Genes were ranked by p-value using Stouffer’s method and selected for statistical significance with a false discovery rate (FDR) <.05 using the Benjamini-Hochberg method. Results Twelve genes with high mRNA expression were prognostic of poor outcome with an FDR <.05 (AXL, APC, RAB11FIP5, C19orf2, CYBRD1, PINK1, LRRN3, AQP1, DES, XRCC4, BCHE, and ASAP3). Twenty genes with low mRNA expression were prognostic of poor outcome with an FDR <.05 (LRIG1, SLC33A1, NUCB2, POLD3, ESR2, GOLPH3, XBP1, PAXIP1, CYB561, POLA2, CDH1, GMNN, SLC37A4, FAM174B, AGR2, SDR39U1, MAGT1, GJB1, SDF2L1, and C9orf82). Conclusion A meta-analysis of all single genes identified thirty-two candidate biomarkers for their possible role in ovarian serous carcinoma. These genes can provide insight into the drivers or regulators of ovarian cancer and should be evaluated in future studies. Genes with high expression indicating poor outcome are possible therapeutic targets with known antagonists or inhibitors. Additionally, the genes could be combined into a prognostic multi-gene signature and tested in future ovarian cohorts. PMID:26886260

  5. Saliva collection methods for DNA biomarker analysis in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, April M; Kaur, Harpal; Dodd, Michael; D'Souza, Jacob; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Shaw, Richard J; Risk, Janet M

    2013-07-01

    Patients with head and neck cancers are predisposed to local recurrence and second primaries because of the phenomenon of field cancerisation, and clinical detection of recurrence remains challenging. DNA biomarkers in saliva may prove to be an adjunct to current diagnostic methods, but irradiation of the primary site often leads to xerostomia. We assessed 3 methods of collecting saliva for their ability to generate DNA of sufficient quantity and quality to use in biomarker assays. Paired saliva samples were collected from 2 groups of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In the first group saliva was collected in Oragene(®) vials and as saline mouthwash from non-irradiated patients (n=21) (4 had had radiotherapy before collection); in the second group it was collected using Oragene(®) sponge kits and as mouthwash from irradiated patients (n=24). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that Oragene(®) vials contained DNA in significantly greater amounts (median 122 μg, range 4-379) than mouthwash (median 17 μg, range 2-194) (p=0.0001) in the non-irradiated patients, while Oragene(®) sponge kits (median 4 μg, range 0.1-61) and mouthwash (median 5.5 μg, range 0.1-75) generated comparable concentrations of DNA from the irradiated group. All 90 samples contained DNA of sufficient quantity and quality for p16 promoter quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP). While Oragene(®) vials contained the most DNA, all 3 methods yielded enough to detect DNA biomarkers using qMSP. The method of collection should depend on the compliance of the patient and oral competency.

  6. Proteomic profiling of mammary carcinomas identifies C7orf24, a gamma-glutamyl cyclotransferase, as a potential cancer biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Friis, Esbern;

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women today and is the most common cancer (excluding skin cancers) among women in the Western world. Although cancers detected by screening mammography are significantly smaller than nonscreening ones, noninvasive biomarkers for detection...... of breast cancer as early as possible are an urgent need as the risk of recurrence and subsequent death is closely related to the stage of the disease at the time of primary surgery. A set of 123 primary breast tumors and matched normal tissue was analyzed by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis...... sample set (123 samples) and in an independent large TMA validation data set (2197 samples) of clinically annotated breast cancer specimens, respectively. Survival analysis showed that C7orf24 overexpression defines a subgroup of breast tumors with poor clinical outcome. Up-regulation of C7orf24 was also...

  7. Discovery of dachshund 2 protein as a novel biomarker of poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodin Björn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dachshund homolog 2 (DACH2 gene has been implicated in development of the female genital tract in mouse models and premature ovarian failure syndrome, but to date, its expression in human normal and cancerous tissue remains unexplored. Using the Human Protein Atlas as a tool for cancer biomarker discovery, DACH2 protein was found to be differentially expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Here, the expression and prognostic significance of DACH2 was further evaluated in ovarian cancer cell lines and human EOC samples. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of DACH2 was examined in tissue microarrays with 143 incident EOC cases from two prospective, population-based cohorts, including a subset of benign-appearing fallopian tubes (n = 32. A nuclear score (NS, i.e. multiplier of staining fraction and intensity, was calculated. For survival analyses, cases were dichotomized into low (NS 3 using classification and regression tree analysis. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the impact of DACH2 expression on survival. DACH2 expression was analysed in the cisplatin sensitive ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and its cisplatin resistant derivative A2780-Cp70. The specificity of the DACH2 antibody was tested using siRNA-mediated silencing of DACH2 in A2780-Cp70 cells. Results DACH2 expression was considerably higher in the cisplatin resistant A2780-Cp70 cells compared to the cisplatin-sensitive A2780 cells. While present in all sampled fallopian tubes, DACH2 expression ranged from negative to strong in EOC. In EOC, DACH2 expression correlated with several proteins involved in DNA integrity and repair, and proliferation. DACH2 expression was significantly higher in carcinoma of the serous subtype compared to non-serous carcinoma. In the full cohort, high DACH2 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in univariable analysis, and in carcinoma of the serous subtype

  8. Biomarker and Phenotypic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Lymphedema | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Lymphedema (LE) following treatment for breast cancer is the most common form of secondary LE in the industrialized world. It occurs in 20% to 87% of patients following treatment for breast cancer and results in significant disability. At the |

  9. Cell-free nucleic acids as noninvasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-08-27

    Cell-free nucleic acids (CFNA) have been reported by several authors in blood, stool, and urine of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). These genetic biomarkers can be an indication of neoplastic colorectal epithelial cells, and can thus potentially be used as noninvasive tests for the detection of the disease in CRC patients and monitor their staging, without the need to use heavier and invasive tools. In a number of test-trials, these genetic tests have shown the advantage of non-invasiveness, making them well accepted by most of the patients, without major side effects. They have also shown a promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of malignant and premalignant neoplasms. Moreover, costs for performing such tests are very low. Several studies reported and confirmed the proof of the principle for these genetic tests for screening, diagnosis, and prognosis; the main challenge of translating this approach from research to clinical laboratory is the validation from large and long-term randomized trials to prove sustainable high sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a review on the noninvasive genetics biomarkers for CRC detection described in the literature and the challenges that can be encountered for validation processes.

  10. Prognostic role of genetic biomarkers in clinical progression of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Cubero, Maria Jesus; Martinez-Gonzalez, Luis Javier; Saiz, Maria; Carmona-Saez, Pedro; Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Pascual-Geler, Manrique; Lorente, Jose Antonio; Cozar, Jose Manuel

    2015-08-07

    The aim of this study was to analyze the use of 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes ELAC2, RNASEL and MSR1 as biomarkers for prostate cancer (PCa) detection and progression, as well as perform a genetic classification of high-risk patients. A cohort of 451 men (235 patients and 216 controls) was studied. We calculated means of regression analysis using clinical values (stage, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score and progression) in patients and controls at the basal stage and after a follow-up of 72 months. Significantly different allele frequencies between patients and controls were observed for rs1904577 and rs918 (MSR1 gene) and for rs17552022 and rs5030739 (ELAC2). We found evidence of increased risk for PCa in rs486907 and rs2127565 in variants AA and CC, respectively. In addition, rs627928 (TT-GT), rs486907 (AG) and rs3747531 (CG-CC) were associated with low tumor aggressiveness. Some had a weak linkage, such as rs1904577 and rs2127565, rs4792311 and rs17552022, and rs1904577 and rs918. Our study provides the proof-of-principle that some of the genetic variants (such as rs486907, rs627928 and rs2127565) in genes RNASEL, MSR1 and ELAC2 can be used as predictors of aggressiveness and progression of PCa. In the future, clinical use of these biomarkers, in combination with current ones, could potentially reduce the rate of unnecessary biopsies and specific treatments.

  11. CDKN3 mRNA as a Biomarker for Survival and Therapeutic Target in Cervical Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eira Valeria Barrón

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3 gene, involved in mitosis, is upregulated in cervical cancer (CC. We investigated CDKN3 mRNA as a survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target for CC. CDKN3 mRNA was measured in 134 CC and 25 controls by quantitative PCR. A 5-year survival study was conducted in 121 of these CC patients. Furthermore, CDKN3-specific siRNAs were used to investigate whether CDKN3 is involved in proliferation, migration, and invasion in CC-derived cell lines (SiHa, CaSki, HeLa. CDKN3 mRNA was on average 6.4-fold higher in tumors than in controls (p = 8 x 10-6, Mann-Whitney. A total of 68.2% of CC patients over expressing CDKN3 gene (fold change ≥ 17 died within two years of diagnosis, independent of the clinical stage and HPV type (Hazard Ratio = 5.0, 95% CI: 2.5-10, p = 3.3 x 10-6, Cox proportional-hazards regression. In contrast, only 19.2% of the patients with lower CDKN3 expression died in the same period. In vitro inactivation of CDKN3 decreased cell proliferation on average 67%, although it had no effect on cell migration and invasion. CDKN3 mRNA may be a good survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target in CC.

  12. CDKN3 mRNA as a Biomarker for Survival and Therapeutic Target in Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrón, Eira Valeria; Roman-Bassaure, Edgar; Sánchez-Sandoval, Ana Laura; Espinosa, Ana María; Guardado-Estrada, Mariano; Medina, Ingrid; Juárez, Eligia; Alfaro, Ana; Bermúdez, Miriam; Zamora, Rubén; García-Ruiz, Carlos; Gomora, Juan Carlos; Kofman, Susana; Pérez-Armendariz, E Martha; Berumen, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) gene, involved in mitosis, is upregulated in cervical cancer (CC). We investigated CDKN3 mRNA as a survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target for CC. CDKN3 mRNA was measured in 134 CC and 25 controls by quantitative PCR. A 5-year survival study was conducted in 121 of these CC patients. Furthermore, CDKN3-specific siRNAs were used to investigate whether CDKN3 is involved in proliferation, migration, and invasion in CC-derived cell lines (SiHa, CaSki, HeLa). CDKN3 mRNA was on average 6.4-fold higher in tumors than in controls (p = 8 x 10-6, Mann-Whitney). A total of 68.2% of CC patients over expressing CDKN3 gene (fold change ≥ 17) died within two years of diagnosis, independent of the clinical stage and HPV type (Hazard Ratio = 5.0, 95% CI: 2.5-10, p = 3.3 x 10-6, Cox proportional-hazards regression). In contrast, only 19.2% of the patients with lower CDKN3 expression died in the same period. In vitro inactivation of CDKN3 decreased cell proliferation on average 67%, although it had no effect on cell migration and invasion. CDKN3 mRNA may be a good survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target in CC.

  13. MicroRNAs as biomarkers for CNS cancer and other disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smaele, Enrico; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Gulino, Alberto

    2010-06-18

    The use of miRNAs as biomarkers has gained growing interest in the last few years. Their role in regulating a great variety of targets and, as a consequence, multiple pathways, makes their use in diagnostics a powerful tool to be exploited for early detection of disease, risk assessment and prognosis and for the design of innovative therapeutic strategies. While still not fully validated, profiling of blood cells, exosomes or body fluid miRNAs would represent a tremendous and promising advance in non-invasive diagnostics of CNS disorders. A major challenge is represented by technological aspects of miRNA detection and discovery aiming to genome-wide high throughput, sensitive and accurate analysis. Although there is much to be learned in the field, this review will highlight the potential role of miRNA as a new class of biomarkers in several CNS disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer, Huntington and Parkinson diseases, schizophrenia and autism as well as different types of cancer (e.g. gliomas and medulloblastomas).

  14. A Magnetic Bead-Based Sensor for the Quantification of Multiple Prostate Cancer Biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse V Jokerst

    Full Text Available Novel biomarker assays and upgraded analytical tools are urgently needed to accurately discriminate benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH from prostate cancer (CaP. To address this unmet clinical need, we report a piezeoelectric/magnetic bead-based assay to quantitate prostate specific antigen (PSA; free and total, prostatic acid phosphatase, carbonic anhydrase 1 (CA1, osteonectin, IL-6 soluble receptor (IL-6sr, and spondin-2. We used the sensor to measure these seven proteins in serum samples from 120 benign prostate hypertrophy patients and 100 Gleason score 6 and 7 CaP using serum samples previously collected and banked. The results were analyzed with receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences between BPH and CaP patients in the PSA, CA1, and spondin-2 assays. The highest AUC discrimination was achieved with a spondin-2 OR free/total PSA operation--the area under the curve was 0.84 with a p value below 10(-6. Some of these data seem to contradict previous reports and highlight the importance of sample selection and proper assay building in the development of biomarker measurement schemes. This bead-based system offers important advantages in assay building including low cost, high throughput, and rapid identification of an optimal matched antibody pair.

  15. Tissue Microarrays in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Reliability of Immunohistochemically-Determined Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen Ege; Holst, René;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reliability of immunohistochemically-determined biomarkers using tissue microarrays (TMAs) of clinical specimens has long been open to question. Heterogeneity related to tumor biology might compromise determination of accurate biomarker expression in tumors, especially in small core...... samples. However, the optimal number of cores required for biomarkers with functional properties varied from 1 to > 4 cores. The results indicate that the optimal number of biopsies required to compensate for potential biomarker heterogeneity should be determined individually for each biomarker used...

  16. Proteomic analysis of urinary biomarker candidates for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Mårten; Lind, Sara Bergström; Mayrhofer, Corina; Segersten, Ulrika; Wester, Kenneth; Lyutvinskiy, Yaroslav; Zubarev, Roman; Malmström, Per-Uno; Pettersson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    Nonmuscle invasive tumors of the bladder often recur and thereby bladder cancer patients need regular re-examinations which are invasive, unpleasant, and expensive. A noninvasive and less expensive method, e.g. a urine dipstick test, for monitoring recurrence would thus be advantageous. In this study, the complementary techniques mass spectrometry (MS) and Western blotting (WB)/dot blot (DB) were used to screen the urine samples from bladder cancer patients. High resolving MS was used to analyze and quantify the urinary proteome and 29 proteins had a significantly higher abundance (pblot for four selected proteins; fibrinogen β chain precursor, apolipoprotein E, α-1-antitrypsin, and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein 1. Dot blot analysis of an independent urine sample set pointed out fibrinogen β chain and α-1-antitrypsin as most interesting biomarkers having sensitivity and specificity values in the range of 66-85%. Exploring the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) also revealed that bladder cancer tumors are the likely source of these proteins. They have the potential of being useful in diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and thus may improve the treatment of bladder tumors, especially nonmuscle invasive tumors.

  17. MicroRNA functional network in pancreatic cancer: From biology to biomarkers of disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jin Wang; Subrata Sen

    2011-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs), the 17- to 25-nucleotide-long non-coding RNAs, regulate expression of approximately 30% of the protein-coding genes at the post-transcriptional level and have emerged as critical components of the complex functional pathway networks controlling important cellular processes, such as proliferation, development, differentiation, stress response' and apoptosis. Abnormal expression levels of miRs, regulating critical cancerassociated pathways, have been implicated to play important roles in the oncogenic processes, functioning both as oncogenes and as tumour suppressor genes. Elucidation of the genetic networks regulated by the abnormally expressing miRs in cancer cells is proving to be extremely significant in understanding the role of these miRs in the induction of malignant-transformation-associated phenotypic changes. As a result, the miRs involved in the oncogenic transformation process are being investigated as novel biomarkers of disease detection and prognosis as well as potential therapeutic targets for human cancers. In this \\article, we review the existing literature in the field documenting the significance of aberrantly expressed miRs in human pancreatic cancer and discuss how the oncogenic miRs may be involved in the genetic networks regulating functional pathways deregulated in this malignancy.

  18. Trefoil factor family (TFF) proteins as potential serum biomarkers in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocka, M; Langer, D; Petrtyl, J; Vockova, P; Hanus, T; Kalousova, M; Zima, T; Petruzelka, L

    2015-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) is composed of three secretory proteins (TFF1, TFF2 and TFF3) that play an important role in mucosal protection of gastrointestinal tract. Their overexpression in colorectal tumors seems to be associated with more aggressive disease. We collected serum samples from 79 healthy controls and 97 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer at the time of diagnosis or at progression. Serum levels of TTF1-3, CEA and CA19-9 were measured by ELISA. Serum TFF1 and TFF3 levels were significantly higher in patients with colorectal cancer compared to healthy controls (p TFF3 correlated with extent of liver involvement in patient without pulmonary metastases and patients with higher TFF3 levels had significantly worse outcome (p TFF3 had higher sensitivity and the same specificity. Our results indicate that TFF3 is an effective biomarker in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with higher sensitivity than CEA a CA19-9. TFF3 levels strongly correlate with extension of liver disease and seem to have prognostic value.

  19. Deregulated Expression of Aurora Kinases Is Not a Prognostic Biomarker in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzi, Natalie; Sorrenti, Salvatore; Falvo, Laura; De Vito, Corrado; Catania, Antonio; Tartaglia, Francesco; Mocini, Renzo; Coccaro, Carmela; Alessandrini, Stefania; Barollo, Susi; Mian, Caterina; Antonelli, Alessandro; De Antoni, Enrico; D’Armiento, Massimino; Ulisse, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    A number of reports indicated that Aurora-A or Aurora-B overexpression represented a negative prognostic factor in several human malignancies. In thyroid cancer tissues a deregulated expression of Aurora kinases has been also demonstrated, butno information regarding its possible prognostic role in differentiated thyroid cancer is available. Here, weevaluated Aurora-A and Aurora-B mRNA expression and its prognostic relevance in a series of 87 papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), with a median follow-up of 63 months. The analysis of Aurora-A and Aurora-B mRNA levels in PTC tissues, compared to normal matched tissues, revealed that their expression was either up- or down-regulatedin the majority of cancer tissues. In particular, Aurora-A and Aurora-B mRNA levels were altered, respectively, in 55 (63.2%) and 79 (90.8%) out of the 87 PTC analyzed.A significant positive correlation between Aurora-A and Aurora-B mRNAswas observed (p=0.001). The expression of both Aurora genes was not affected by the BRAFV600E mutation. Univariate, multivariate and Kaplan-Mayer analyses documented the lack of association between Aurora-A or Aurora-B expression and clinicopathological parameterssuch as gender, age, tumor size, histology, TNM stage, lymph node metastasis and BRAF status as well asdisease recurrences or disease-free interval. Only Aurora-B mRNA was significantly higher in T(3-4) tissues, with respect to T(1-2) PTC tissues. The data reported here demonstrate that the expression of Aurora kinases is deregulated in the majority of PTC tissues, likely contributing to PTC progression. However, differently from other human solid cancers, detection of Aurora-A or Aurora-B mRNAs is not a prognostic biomarker inPTC patients. PMID:25807528

  20. Biomarker-driven trial in metastatic pancreas cancer: feasibility in a multicenter study of saracatinib, an oral Src inhibitor, in previously treated pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaroli, John; Quackenbush, Kevin; Dasari, Arvind; Powell, Rebecca; McManus, Martine; Tan, Aik-Choon; Foster, Nathan R; Picus, Joel; Wright, John; Nallapareddy, Sujatha; Erlichman, Charles; Hidalgo, Manuel; Messersmith, Wells A

    2012-10-01

    Src tyrosine kinases are overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, and the oral Src inhibitor saracatinib has shown antitumor activity in preclinical models of pancreas cancer. We performed a CTEP-sponsored Phase II clinical trial of saracatinib in previously treated pancreas cancer patients, with a primary endpoint of 6-month survival. A Simon MinMax two-stage phase II design was used. Saracatinib (175 mg/day) was administered orally continuously in 28-day cycles. In the unselected portion of the study, 18 patients were evaluable. Only two (11%) patients survived for at least 6 months, and three 6-month survivors were required to move to second stage of study as originally designed. The study was amended as a biomarker-driven trial (leucine rich repeat containing protein 19 [LRRC19] > insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 [IGFBP2] "top scoring pairs" polymerase chain reaction [PCR] assay, and PIK3CA mutant) based on preclinical data in a human pancreas tumor explant model. In the biomarker study, archival tumor tissue or fresh tumor biopsies were tested. Biomarker-positive patients were eligible for the study. Only one patient was PIK3CA mutant in a 3' untranslated region (UTR) portion of the gene. This patient was enrolled in the study and failed to meet the 6-month survival endpoint. As the frequency of biomarker-positive patients was very low (pancreatic cancer patients treated with a Src inhibitor based on a biomarker would improve 6-month survival, we demonstrate that testing pancreatic tumor samples for a biomarker-driven, multicenter study in metastatic pancreas cancer is feasible.

  1. Imaging biomarkers in prostate cancer: role of PET/CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picchio, M.; Mapelli, P.; Incerti, E.; Gianolli, L. [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Milan (Italy); Panebianco, V.; Barchetti, F. [Sapienza University, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Castellucci, P.; Nanni, C.; Fanti, S. [Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi - University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Bologna (Italy); Briganti, A.; Gandaglia, G.; Montorsi, F. [Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Kirienko, M. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently the most widely used biomarker of prostate cancer (PCa). PSA suggests the presence of primary tumour and disease relapse after treatment, but it is not able to provide a clear distinction between locoregional and distant disease. Molecular and functional imaging, that are able to provide a detailed and comprehensive overview of PCa extension, are more reliable tools for primary tumour detection and disease extension assessment both in staging and restaging. In the present review we evaluate the role of PET/CT and MRI in the diagnosis, staging and restaging of PCa, and the use of these imaging modalities in prognosis, treatment planning and response assessment. Innovative imaging strategies including new radiotracers and hybrid scanners such as PET/MRI are also discussed. (orig.)

  2. Serum Biomarkers for the Detection of Cardiac Toxicity after Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibo eTian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modality cancer treatments that include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted agents are highly effective therapies. Their use, especially in combination, is limited by the risk of significant cardiac toxicity. The current paradigm for minimizing cardiac morbidity, based on serial cardiac function monitoring, is suboptimal. An alternative approach based on biomarker testing, has emerged as a promising adjunct and a potential substitute to routine echocardiography. Biomarkers, most prominently cardiac troponins and natriuretic peptides, have been evaluated for their ability to describe the risk of potential cardiac dysfunction in clinically asymptomatic patients. Early rises in cardiac troponin concentrations have consistently predicted the risk and severity of significant cardiac events in patients treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Biomarkers represent a novel, efficient, and robust clinical decision tool for the management of cancer therapy-induced cardiotoxicity. This article aims to review the clinical evidence that supports the use of established biomarkers such as cardiac troponins and natriuretic peptides, as well as emerging data on proposed biomarkers.

  3. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    Our results point to significant national variation both in terms of the perceived aim of consensus conferences, expectations to conference outcomes, conceptions of the roles of lay people and experts, and in terms of the way in which the role of public deliberation is interpreted. Interestingly...

  4. Stratification of Prognosis of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Patients Using Combinatorial Biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yue

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is highly diverse group of cancers, and generally considered an aggressive disease associated with poor survival. Stratification of TNBC is highly desired for both prognosis and treatment decisions to identify patients who may benefit from less aggressive therapy.This study retrieved 192 consecutive non-metastasis TNBC patients who had undergone a resection of a primary tumor from 2008 to 2012. All samples were negative for ER, PR, and HER2/neu. Disease-free-survival (DFS and overall-survival (OS were evaluated for expression of immunohistochemical biomarkers (P53, Ki-67, CK5/6 and EGFR, as well as clinicopathological variables including age, tumor size, grade, lymph node status, pathologic tumor and nodal stages. The cutoff values of the basal biomarkers, EGFR and CK5/6, were estimated by time-dependent ROC curves. The prognostic values of combinatorial variables were identified by univariate and multivariate Cox analysis. Patients were stratified into different risk groups based on expression status of identified prognostic variables.Median age was 57 years (range, 28-92 years. Patients' tumor stage and nodal stage were significantly associated with OS and DFS. EGFR and CK5/6 were significant prognostic variables at cutoff points of 15% (p = 0.001, AUC = 0.723, and 50% (p = 0.006, AUC = 0.675, respectively. Multivariate Cox analysis identified five significant variables: EGFR (p = 0.016, CK5/6 (p = 0.018, Ki-67 (p = 0.048, tumor stage (p = 0.010, and nodal stage (p = 0.003. Patients were stratified into low basal (EGFR≤15% and CK5/6≤50% and high basal (EGFR>15% and/or CK5/6>50% expression groups. In the low basal expression group, patients with low expressions of Ki-67, low tumor and nodal stage had significantly better survival than those with high expressions/stages of three variables, log-rank p = 0.015 (100% vs 68% at 50 months. In the high basal expression group, patient with high basal expression

  5. CyNetSVM: A Cytoscape App for Cancer Biomarker Identification Using Network Constrained Support Vector Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xu; Banerjee, Sharmi; Chen, Li; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert; Xuan, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    One of the important tasks in cancer research is to identify biomarkers and build classification models for clinical outcome prediction. In this paper, we develop a CyNetSVM software package, implemented in Java and integrated with Cytoscape as an app, to identify network biomarkers using network-constrained support vector machines (NetSVM). The Cytoscape app of NetSVM is specifically designed to improve the usability of NetSVM with the following enhancements: (1) user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI), (2) computationally efficient core program and (3) convenient network visualization capability. The CyNetSVM app has been used to analyze breast cancer data to identify network genes associated with breast cancer recurrence. The biological function of these network genes is enriched in signaling pathways associated with breast cancer progression, showing the effectiveness of CyNetSVM for cancer biomarker identification. The CyNetSVM package is available at Cytoscape App Store and http://sourceforge.net/projects/netsvmjava; a sample data set is also provided at sourceforge.net.

  6. CyNetSVM: A Cytoscape App for Cancer Biomarker Identification Using Network Constrained Support Vector Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Xu; Banerjee, Sharmi; Chen, Li; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert; Xuan, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    One of the important tasks in cancer research is to identify biomarkers and build classification models for clinical outcome prediction. In this paper, we develop a CyNetSVM software package, implemented in Java and integrated with Cytoscape as an app, to identify network biomarkers using network-constrained support vector machines (NetSVM). The Cytoscape app of NetSVM is specifically designed to improve the usability of NetSVM with the following enhancements: (1) user-friendly graphical user...

  7. Attachment of a Genetically Engineered Antibody to a Carbon Nanotube Transistor for Detection of Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Mitchell; Dailey, Jennifer; Goldsmith, Brett; Robinson, Matthew; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a novel detection method for osteopontin (OPN) by attaching an engineered single chain variable fragment (scFv) protein with high binding affinity for OPN to a carbon nanotube transistor. Osteopontin is a potential new biomarker for prostate cancer; its presence in humans is already associated with several forms of cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis and stress. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men and as such represents a major public health issue. Detection of early-stage cancer often results in successful treatment, with long term disease-free survival in 60-90% of patients. Electronic transport measurements are used to detect the presence of OPN in solution at clinically relevant concentrations.

  8. DNA Damage and Repair Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: An Exploratory Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Vici

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer cells commonly harbour a defective G1/S checkpoint owing to the interaction of viral oncoproteins with p53 and retinoblastoma protein. The activation of the G2/M checkpoint may thus become essential for protecting cancer cells from genotoxic insults, such as chemotherapy. In 52 cervical cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, we investigated whether the levels of phosphorylated Wee1 (pWee1, a key G2/M checkpoint kinase, and γ-H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, discriminated between patients with a pathological complete response (pCR and those with residual disease. We also tested the association between pWee1 and phosphorylated Chk1 (pChk1, a kinase acting upstream Wee1 in the G2/M checkpoint pathway. pWee1, γ-H2AX and pChk1 were retrospectively assessed in diagnostic biopsies by immunohistochemistry. The degrees of pWee1 and pChk1 expression were defined using three different classification methods, i.e., staining intensity, Allred score, and a multiplicative score. γ-H2AX was analyzed both as continuous and categorical variable. Irrespective of the classification used, elevated levels of pWee1 and γ-H2AX were significantly associated with a lower rate of pCR. In univariate and multivariate analyses, pWee1 and γ-H2AX were both associated with reduced pCR. Internal validation conducted through a re-sampling without replacement procedure confirmed the robustness of the multivariate model. Finally, we found a significant association between pWee1 and pChk1. The message conveyed by the present analysis is that biomarkers of DNA damage and repair may predict the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in cervical cancer. Further studies are warranted to prospectively validate these encouraging findings.

  9. A tissue biomarker panel predicting systemic progression after PSA recurrence post-definitive prostate cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many men develop a rising PSA after initial therapy for prostate cancer. While some of these men will develop a local or metastatic recurrence that warrants further therapy, others will have no evidence of disease progression. We hypothesized that an expression biomarker panel can predict which men with a rising PSA would benefit from further therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case-control design was used to test the association of gene expression with outcome. Systemic (SYS progression cases were men post-prostatectomy who developed systemic progression within 5 years after PSA recurrence. PSA progression controls were matched men post-prostatectomy with PSA recurrence but no evidence of clinical progression within 5 years. Using expression arrays optimized for paraffin-embedded tissue RNA, 1021 cancer-related genes were evaluated-including 570 genes implicated in prostate cancer progression. Genes from 8 previously reported marker panels were included. A systemic progression model containing 17 genes was developed. This model generated an AUC of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.84-0.92. Similar AUCs were generated using 3 previously reported panels. In secondary analyses, the model predicted the endpoints of prostate cancer death (in SYS cases and systemic progression beyond 5 years (in PSA controls with hazard ratios 2.5 and 4.7, respectively (log-rank p-values of 0.0007 and 0.0005. Genes mapped to 8q24 were significantly enriched in the model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Specific gene expression patterns are significantly associated with systemic progression after PSA recurrence. The measurement of gene expression pattern may be useful for determining which men may benefit from additional therapy after PSA recurrence.

  10. Defining responses to therapy and study outcomes in clinical trials of invasive fungal diseases: Mycoses Study Group and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer consensus criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Brahm H; Herbrecht, Raoul; Stevens, David A; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Sobel, Jack; Viscoli, Claudio; Walsh, Thomas J; Maertens, Johan; Patterson, Thomas F; Perfect, John R; Dupont, Bertrand; Wingard, John R; Calandra, Thierry; Kauffman, Carol A; Graybill, John R; Baden, Lindsey R; Pappas, Peter G; Bennett, John E; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Cordonnier, Catherine; Viviani, Maria Anna; Bille, Jacques; Almyroudis, Nikolaos G; Wheat, L Joseph; Graninger, Wolfgang; Bow, Eric J; Holland, Steven M; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Dismukes, William E; De Pauw, Ben E

    2008-09-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) have become major causes of morbidity and mortality among highly immunocompromised patients. Authoritative consensus criteria to diagnose IFD have been useful in establishing eligibility criteria for antifungal trials. There is an important need for generation of consensus definitions of outcomes of IFD that will form a standard for evaluating treatment success and failure in clinical trials. Therefore, an expert international panel consisting of the Mycoses Study Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer was convened to propose guidelines for assessing treatment responses in clinical trials of IFDs and for defining study outcomes. Major fungal diseases that are discussed include invasive disease due to Candida species, Aspergillus species and other molds, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Coccidioides immitis. We also discuss potential pitfalls in assessing outcome, such as conflicting clinical, radiological, and/or mycological data and gaps in knowledge.

  11. [Consensus Meeting of the 9th International Conference on Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer (St. Gall, January 26-29, 2005)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thürlimann, B; Senn, H J

    2005-06-01

    More than 4,000 participants attended the congress and the consensus conference 2005, an increase of more than 1,000 participants. The conference had 2 highlights. (1) The presentation of the first results of the study BIG 1-98 -- letrozole as adjuvant, endocrine therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer -- showed a relative risk reduction in the disease-free survival of 19% when compared to tamoxifen. (2) The consensus conference adopted 2 new relevant developments: endocrine responsiveness as criterion for both chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. The newly introduced electronic voting system allowed the audience to observe the forming of the panelists' opinions on more than 100 predefined questions.

  12. Intake and Biomarkers of Folate and Risk of Cancer Morbidity in Older Adults, NHANES 1999-2002 with Medicare Linkage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    Full Text Available After the 1998 mandatory folic acid fortification of enriched cereal-grain products in the U.S., safety concerns were raised that excess consumption of folic acid and high blood folate biomarkers detected in adults may increase the risk of certain types of cancer.Baseline data from about 1400 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999-2002, aged ≥ 57 years were linked to Medicare and mortality files through December 31, 2007. Using cox proportional hazards regression models, we assessed associations between dietary folate equivalents, folate biomarkers, the presence of unmetabolized folic acid and, overall cancer incidence.With 8,114 person-years of follow-up (median follow-up, 6.3 years, about 125 cancer cases were identified. After adjusting for confounders, the hazard ratios of the highest quartile versus the second quartile of RBC folate and dietary folate equivalents were 0.54 (95% CI: 0.31-0.93 and 0.54 (95% CI: 0.30-0.95, respectively. Additionally, serum and RBC folate as continuous variables were inversely and significantly associated with cancer incidence (p<0.01. No significant associations were observed between the presence of unmetabolized folic acid, intake of naturally-occurring food folate or folic acid separately, and cancer incidence.High total folate intake and biomarkers in older adults appear to be protective against cancer in post-folic acid fortification years. This study does not show a negative impact of current level of folic acid fortification on cancer risk. As this is one of the few studies to examine the association between unmetabolized folic acid and cancer outcome, a study including a larger nationwide representative sample of the U.S. population is needed.

  13. Aurora Kinase A is a Biomarker for Bladder Cancer Detection and Contributes to its Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Aaron; Zhang, Shizhen; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Wang, Yan; Majewski, Tadeusz; Caraway, Nancy P.; Huang, Li; Shoshan, Einav; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Nitti, Giovanni; Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, June Goo; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Willis, Daniel; Zhang, Li; Guo, Charles C.; Yao, Hui; Baggerly, Keith; Lotan, Yair; Lerner, Seth P.; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    The effects of AURKA overexpression associated with poor clinical outcomes have been attributed to increased cell cycle progression and the development of genomic instability with aneuploidy. We used RNA interference to examine the effects of AURKA overexpression in human bladder cancer cells. Knockdown had minimal effects on cell proliferation but blocked tumor cell invasion. Whole genome mRNA expression profiling identified nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) as a downstream target that was repressed by AURKA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and NNMT promoter luciferase assays revealed that AURKA’s effects on NNMT were caused by PAX3-mediated transcriptional repression and overexpression of NNMT blocked tumor cell invasion in vitro. Overexpression of AURKA and activation of its downstream pathway was enriched in the basal subtype in primary human tumors and was associated with poor clinical outcomes. We also show that the FISH test for the AURKA gene copy number in urine yielded a specificity of 79.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 74.2% to 84.1%), and a sensitivity of 79.6% (95% CI = 74.2% to 84.1%) with an AUC of 0.901 (95% CI = 0.872 to 0.928; P < 0.001). These results implicate AURKA as an effective biomarker for bladder cancer detection as well as therapeutic target especially for its basal type. PMID:28102366

  14. Targeted proteomic approach in prostatic tissue: a panel of potential biomarkers for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Rosa; Damiano, Rocco; Savino, Rocco; Sindona, Giovanni; Napoli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the sixth highest causes of cancer-related deaths in men. The molecular events underlying its behavior and evolution are not completely understood. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the only approved Food and Drug Administration biomarker. A panel of ten stage-specific tumoral and adjacent non tumoral tissues from patients affected by PCa (Gleason score 6, 3+3; PSA 10 ÷19 ng/ml) was investigated by MS-based proteomics approach. The proposed method was based on identifying the base-soluble proteins from tissue, established an efficient study, which lead to a deeper molecular perspective understanding of the PCa. A total of 164 proteins were found and 132 of these were evaluated differentially expressed in tumoral tissues. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that among all dataset obtained, 105 molecules were involved in epithelial neoplasia with a p-value of 3.62E-05, whereas, only 11 molecules detected were ascribed to sentinel tissue and bodily fluids. PMID:27713912

  15. Ensemble of gene signatures identifies novel biomarkers in colorectal cancer activated through PPARγ and TNFα signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Maria Pagnotta

    Full Text Available We describe a novel bioinformatic and translational pathology approach, gene Signature Finder Algorithm (gSFA to identify biomarkers associated with Colorectal Cancer (CRC survival. Here a robust set of CRC markers is selected by an ensemble method. By using a dataset of 232 gene expression profiles, gSFA discovers 16 highly significant small gene signatures. Analysis of dichotomies generated by the signatures results in a set of 133 samples stably classified in good prognosis group and 56 samples in poor prognosis group, whereas 43 remain unreliably classified. AKAP12, DCBLD2, NT5E and SPON1 are particularly represented in the signatures and selected for validation in vivo on two independent patients cohorts comprising 140 tumor tissues and 60 matched normal tissues. Their expression and regulatory programs are investigated in vitro. We show that the coupled expression of NT5E and DCBLD2 robustly stratifies our patients in two groups (one of which with 100% survival at five years. We show that NT5E is a target of the TNF-α signaling in vitro; the tumor suppressor PPARγ acts as a novel NT5E antagonist that positively and concomitantly regulates DCBLD2 in a cancer cell context-dependent manner.

  16. Gene expression-based biomarkers for discriminating early and late stage of clear cell renal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Sherry; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Sehgal, Manika; Kaur, Harpreet; Sharma, Suresh; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to identify expression-based gene biomarkers that can discriminate early and late stage of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients. We have analyzed the gene expression of 523 samples to identify genes that are differentially expressed in the early and late stage of ccRCC. First, a threshold-based method has been developed, which attained a maximum accuracy of 71.12% with ROC 0.67 using single gene NR3C2. To improve the performance of threshold-based method, we combined two or more genes and achieved maximum accuracy of 70.19% with ROC of 0.74 using eight genes on the validation dataset. These eight genes include four underexpressed (NR3C2, ENAM, DNASE1L3, FRMPD2) and four overexpressed (PLEKHA9, MAP6D1, SMPD4, C11orf73) genes in the late stage of ccRCC. Second, models were developed using state-of-art techniques and achieved maximum accuracy of 72.64% and 0.81 ROC using 64 genes on validation dataset. Similar accuracy was obtained on 38 genes selected from subset of genes, involved in cancer hallmark biological processes. Our analysis further implied a need to develop gender-specific models for stage classification. A web server, CancerCSP, has been developed to predict stage of ccRCC using gene expression data derived from RNAseq experiments. PMID:28349958

  17. Androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) and drug efficacy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: Biomarker for treatment selection exclusion or inclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrand, Crystal R; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-05-01

    Currently there are no molecular biomarkers used to help guide treatment selection for those patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. A recent study published in JAMA Oncology (Antonarakis et al.) presents evidence supporting the potential use of androgen receptor splice variant 7 as a biomarker for optimal treatment selection in this population.

  18. Discovering biomarkers from gene expression data for predicting cancer subgroups using neural networks and relational fuzzy clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Animesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The four heterogeneous childhood cancers, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma present a similar histology of small round blue cell tumor (SRBCT and thus often leads to misdiagnosis. Identification of biomarkers for distinguishing these cancers is a well studied problem. Existing methods typically evaluate each gene separately and do not take into account the nonlinear interaction between genes and the tools that are used to design the diagnostic prediction system. Consequently, more genes are usually identified as necessary for prediction. We propose a general scheme for finding a small set of biomarkers to design a diagnostic system for accurate classification of the cancer subgroups. We use multilayer networks with online gene selection ability and relational fuzzy clustering to identify a small set of biomarkers for accurate classification of the training and blind test cases of a well studied data set. Results Our method discerned just seven biomarkers that precisely categorized the four subgroups of cancer both in training and blind samples. For the same problem, others suggested 19–94 genes. These seven biomarkers include three novel genes (NAB2, LSP1 and EHD1 – not identified by others with distinct class-specific signatures and important role in cancer biology, including cellular proliferation, transendothelial migration and trafficking of MHC class antigens. Interestingly, NAB2 is downregulated in other tumors including Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Neuroblastoma but we observed moderate to high upregulation in a few cases of Ewing sarcoma and Rabhdomyosarcoma, suggesting that NAB2 might be mutated in these tumors. These genes can discover the subgroups correctly with unsupervised learning, can differentiate non-SRBCT samples and they perform equally well with other machine learning tools including support vector machines. These biomarkers lead to four simple human interpretable

  19. Differential profiling of breast cancer plasma proteome by isotope-coded affinity tagging method reveals biotinidase as a breast cancer biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Myeong-Hee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of women's death worldwide. It is important to discover a reliable biomarker for the detection of breast cancer. Plasma is the most ideal source for cancer biomarker discovery since many cells cross-communicate through the secretion of soluble proteins into blood. Methods Plasma proteomes obtained from 6 breast cancer patients and 6 normal healthy women were analyzed by using the isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT labeling approach and tandem mass spectrometry. All the plasma samples used were depleted of highly abundant 6 plasma proteins by immune-affinity column chromatography before ICAT labeling. Several proteins showing differential abundance level were selected based on literature searches and their specificity to the commercially available antibodies, and then verified by immunoblot assays. Results A total of 155 proteins were identified and quantified by ICAT method. Among them, 33 proteins showed abundance changes by more than 1.5-fold between the plasmas of breast cancer patients and healthy women. We chose 5 proteins for the follow-up confirmation in the individual plasma samples using immunoblot assay. Four proteins, α1-acid glycoprotein 2, monocyte differentiation antigen CD14, biotinidase (BTD, and glutathione peroxidase 3, showed similar abundance ratio to ICAT result. Using a blind set of plasmas obtained from 21 breast cancer patients and 21 normal healthy controls, we confirmed that BTD was significantly down-regulated in breast cancer plasma (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p = 0.002. BTD levels were lowered in all cancer grades (I-IV except cancer grade zero. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of BTD was 0.78. Estrogen receptor status (p = 0.940 and progesterone receptor status (p = 0.440 were not associated with the plasma BTD levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that BTD is a potential serological biomarker for the detection of breast cancer.

  20. Why Consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Polletta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activists have long justified their egalitarian organizational forms in prefigurative terms. Making decisions by consensus, decentralizing organization, and rotating leadership serves to model the radically democratic society that activists hope to bring into being. Our comparison of consensus-based decision-making in three historical periods, however, shows that activists have understood the purposes of prefiguration in very different ways. Whereas radical pacifists in the 1940s saw their cooperative organizations as sustaining movement stalwarts in a period of political repression, new left activists in the 1960s imagined that their radically democratic practices would be adopted by ever-widening circles. Along with the political conditions in which they have operated, activists’ distinctive understandings of equality have also shaped the way they have made decisions. Our interviews with 30 leftist activists today reveal a view of decision-making as a place to work through inequalities that are informal, unacknowledged, and pervasive.

  1. MicroRNAs used as novel biomarkers for detecting cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunshan; Yu, Haixiang; Zhang, Lening; Li, Xiaoli; Feng, Yonggang; Xin, Hua

    2015-03-01

    The low survival rates of cancers are primarily due to late diagnosis and metastasis. Discriminating the metastasis is a crucial factor for prognosis and improving the survival rate of cancer patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate the expression of hundreds of downstream genes, which has a broad effect on the regulation of the whole cell cycle. Accumulating studies have found that the aberrant expression of miRNAs is associated with cancer genesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of miRNAs in detecting cancer metastasis. Medline, PubMed, Embase, and CNKI were searched for relevant articles. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio (PLR, NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), the summary receiver operator characteristic (SROC) curve and the calculated AUC (area under the SROC curve) were applied to explore the diagnostic accuracy of miRNAs in metastasis. Seven hundred seventy-one metastatic cancer patients and 552 non-metastatic cancer controls from 14 articles were involved in our meta-analysis. A sensitivity of 0.75 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-0.79) and a specificity of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.76-0.84) were observed from metastatic patients and non-metastatic controls in the combined analysis. And the AUC was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.79-0.86). In addition, results from subgroup analyses suggested that a higher diagnostic value for metastasis was acquired in tissue sample other than blood sample (sensitivity, 0.82 versus 0.73; specificity, 0.84 versus 0.79; PLR, 5.0 versus 3.5; NLR, 0.22 versus 0.34; DOR, 23 versus 10; AUC, 0.88 versus 0.80). In summary, this meta-analysis proved the relatively high diagnostic value of miRNA in metastasis, which might be applied as a novel screening tool to detect metastasis along with other biomarkers. We also illustrated that tissue-based miRNAs may have a better diagnostic accuracy than blood-based miRNAs.

  2. Biomarkers Associated with Cognitive Impairment in Treated Cancer Patients: Potential Predisposition and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Hélène; Denouel, Angeline; Lange, Marie; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Dubois, Martine; Joly, Florence

    2017-01-01

    circulating factors and genetic polymorphisms, can predispose to the development of cognitive disorders. However, many predictive factors remain unproven and discordant findings are frequently reported, warranting additional clinical and preclinical longitudinal cohort studies, with goals of better characterization of potential biomarkers and identification of patient populations at risk and/or particularly deleterious treatments. Research should focus on prevention and personalized cancer management, to improve the daily lives, autonomy, and return to work of patients.

  3. Are KRAS/BRAF mutations potent prognostic and/or predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Tomoya

    2012-02-01

    KRAS and BRAF mutations lead to the constitutive activation of EGFR signaling through the oncogenic Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk pathway. Currently, KRAS is the only potential biomarker for predicting the efficacy of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, a recent report suggested that the use of cetuximab was associated with survival benefit among patients with p.G13D-mutated tumors. Furthermore, although the presence of mutated BRAF is one of the most powerful prognostic factors for advanced and recurrent CRC, it remains unknown whether patients with BRAF-mutated tumors experience a survival benefit from treatment with anti-EGFR mAb. Thus, the prognostic or predictive relevance of the KRAS and BRAF genotype in CRC remains controversial despite several investigations. Routine KRAS/BRAF screening of pathological specimens is required to promote the appropriate clinical use of anti-EGFR mAb and to determine malignant phenotypes in CRC. The significance of KRAS/BRAF mutations as predictive or prognostic biomarkers should be taken into consideration when selecting a KRAS/BRAF screening assay. This article will review the spectrum of KRAS/BRAF genotype and the impact of KRAS/BRAF mutations on the clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with CRC, particularly when differentiating between the mutations at KRAS codons 12 and 13. Furthermore, the predictive role of KRAS/BRAF mutations in treatments with anti-EGFR mAb will be verified, focusing on KRAS p.G13D and BRAF mutations.

  4. Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers of Endocrine Responsiveness for Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cynthia X; Bose, Ron; Ellis, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen-dependent nature of breast cancer is the fundamental basis for endocrine therapy. The presence of estrogen receptor (ER), the therapeutic target of endocrine therapy, is a prerequisite for this therapeutic approach. However, estrogen-independent growth often exists de novo at diagnosis or develops during the course of endocrine therapy. Therefore ER alone is insufficient in predicting endocrine therapy efficacy. Several RNA-based multigene assays are now available in clinical practice to assess distant recurrence risk, with majority of these assays evaluated in patients treated with 5 years of adjuvant endocrine therapy. While MammaPrint and Oncotype Dx are most predictive of recurrence risk within the first 5 years of diagnosis, Prosigna, Breast Cancer Index (BCI), and EndoPredict Clin have also demonstrated utility in predicting late recurrence. In addition, PAM50, or Prosigna, provides further biological insights by classifying breast cancers into intrinsic molecular subtypes. Additional strategies are under investigation in prospective clinical trials to differentiate endocrine sensitive and resistant tumors and include on-treatment Ki-67 and Preoperative Endocrine Prognostic Index (PEPI) score in the setting of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. These biomarkers have become important tools in clinical practice for the identification of low risk patients for whom chemotherapy could be avoided. However, there is much work ahead toward the development of a molecular classification that informs the biology and novel therapeutic targets in high-risk disease as chemotherapy has only modest benefit in this population. The recognition of somatic mutations and their relationship to endocrine therapy responsiveness opens important opportunities toward this goal.

  5. Plasma-derived exosomal survivin, a plausible biomarker for early detection of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Khan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivin is expressed in prostate cancer (PCa, and its downregulation sensitizes PCa cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes, secreted from the endosomal membrane compartment, contain RNA and protein that they readily transport via exosome internalization into recipient cells. Recent progress has shown that tumor-derived exosomes play multiple roles in tumor growth and metastasis and may produce these functions via immune escape, tumor invasion and angiogenesis. Furthermore, exosome analysis may provide novel biomarkers to diagnose or monitor PCa treatment. METHODS: Exosomes were purified from the plasma and serum from 39 PCa patients, 20 BPH patients, 8 prostate cancer recurrent and 16 healthy controls using ultracentrifugation and their quantities and qualities were quantified and visualized from both the plasma and the purified exosomes using ELISA and Western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: Survivin was significantly increased in the tumor-derived samples, compared to those from BPH and controls with virtually no difference in the quantity of Survivin detected in exosomes collected from newly diagnosed patients exhibiting low (six or high (nine Gleason scores. Exosome Survivin levels were also higher in patients that had relapsed on chemotherapy compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that Survivin exists in plasma exosomes from both normal, BPH and PCa subjects. The relative amounts of exosomal Survivin in PCa plasma was significantly higher than in those with pre-inflammatory BPH and control plasma. This differential expression of exosomal Survivin was seen with both newly diagnosed and advanced PCa subjects with high or low-grade cancers. Analysis of plasma exosomal Survivin levels may offer a convenient tool for diagnosing or monitoring PCa and may, as it is elevated in low as well as high Gleason scored samples, be used for early detection.

  6. Evaluation of chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer treatment using quantitative CT image biomarkers: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; McMeekin, Scott; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and apply quantitative image biomarkers for early prediction of the tumor response to the chemotherapy among the ovarian cancer patients participated in the clinical trials of testing new drugs. In the experiment, we retrospectively selected 30 cases from the patients who participated in Phase I clinical trials of new drug or drug agents for ovarian cancer treatment. Each case is composed of two sets of CT images acquired pre- and post-treatment (4-6 weeks after starting treatment). A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was developed to extract and analyze the quantitative image features of the metastatic tumors previously tracked by the radiologists using the standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. The CAD scheme first segmented 3-D tumor volumes from the background using a hybrid tumor segmentation scheme. Then, for each segmented tumor, CAD computed three quantitative image features including the change of tumor volume, tumor CT number (density) and density variance. The feature changes were calculated between the matched tumors tracked on the CT images acquired pre- and post-treatments. Finally, CAD predicted patient's 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) using a decision-tree based classifier. The performance of the CAD scheme was compared with the RECIST category. The result shows that the CAD scheme achieved a prediction accuracy of 76.7% (23/30 cases) with a Kappa coefficient of 0.493, which is significantly higher than the performance of RECIST prediction with a prediction accuracy and Kappa coefficient of 60% (17/30) and 0.062, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing quantitative image features to improve the early predicting accuracy of the tumor response to the new testing drugs or therapeutic methods for the ovarian cancer patients.

  7. Integration of co-localized glandular morphometry and protein biomarker expression in immunofluorescent images for prostate cancer prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Richard; Khan, Faisal M.; Zeineh, Jack; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2015-03-01

    Immunofluorescent (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has proven to be extremely valuable and robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. There have been significant advances in the literature in quantitative biomarker expression as well as characterization of glandular architectures in discrete gland rings. However, while biomarker and glandular morphometric features have been combined as separate predictors in multivariate models, there is a lack of integrative features for biomarkers co-localized within specific morphological sub-types; for example the evaluation of androgen receptor (AR) expression within Gleason 3 glands only. In this work we propose a novel framework employing multiple techniques to generate integrated metrics of morphology and biomarker expression. We demonstrate the utility of the approaches in predicting clinical disease progression in images from 326 prostate biopsies and 373 prostatectomies. Our proposed integrative approaches yield significant improvements over existing IF image feature metrics. This work presents some of the first algorithms for generating innovative characteristics in tissue diagnostics that integrate co-localized morphometry and protein biomarker expression.

  8. DNA methylation-based biomarkers for early detection of non-small cell lung cancer: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laird-Offringa Ite A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the United States. This disease is clinically divided into two sub-types, small cell lung cancer, (10–15% of lung cancer cases, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; 85–90% of cases. Early detection of NSCLC, which is the more common and less aggressive of the two sub-types, has the highest potential for saving lives. As yet, no routine screening method that enables early detection exists, and this is a key factor in the high mortality rate of this disease. Imaging and cytology-based screening strategies have been employed for early detection, and while some are sensitive, none have been demonstrated to reduce lung cancer mortality. However, mortality might be reduced by developing specific molecular markers that can complement imaging techniques. DNA methylation has emerged as a highly promising biomarker and is being actively studied in multiple cancers. The analysis of DNA methylation-based biomarkers is rapidly advancing, and a large number of potential biomarkers have been identified. Here we present a detailed review of the literature, focusing on DNA methylation-based markers developed using primary NSCLC tissue. Viable markers for clinical diagnosis must be detectable in 'remote media' such as blood, sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, or even exhaled breath condensate. We discuss progress on their detection in such media and the sensitivity and specificity of the molecular marker panels identified to date. Lastly, we look to future advancements that will be made possible with the interrogation of the epigenome.

  9. Combining proteomics, serum biomarkers and bioinformatics to discriminate between esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and pre-cancerous lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-hui ZHAI; Jie-kai YU; Chen LIN; Li-dong WANG; Shu ZHENG

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Biomarker assay is a noninvasive method for the early detection of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).Searching for new biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity is very important for the early detection of ESCC.Serum surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) is a high throughput technology for identifying cancer biomarkers using drops of sera.Methods: In this study,185 serum samples were taken from ESCC patients in a high incidence area and screened by SELDI.A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was adopted to analyze the samples.Results: The SVM patterns successfully distinguished ESCC from pre-cancerous lesions (PCLs).Also,types of PCL,including dysplasia (DYS) and basal cell hyperplasia (BCH),and healthy controls (HC) were distinguished with an accuracy of 95.2% (DYS),96.6% (BCH),and 93.8% (HC),respectively.A marker of 25.1 kDa was identified in the ESCC patterns whose peak intensity was observed to increase significantly during the development of esophageal carcinogenesis,and to decrease obviously after surgery.Conclusions: We selected five ESCC biomarkers to form a diagnostic pattern which can discriminate among the different stages of esophageal carcinogenesis.This pattern can significantly improve the detection of ESCC.