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Sample records for cancer biomarker consensus

  1. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Cancer Biomarker: Consensus and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar R. Padhani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available On May 3, 2008, a National Cancer Institute (NCI-sponsored open consensus conference was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, during the 2008 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Meeting. Approximately 100 experts and stakeholders summarized the current understanding of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI and reached consensus on the use of DW-MRI as a cancer imaging biomarker. DW-MRI should be tested as an imaging biomarker in the context of well-defined clinical trials, by adding DW-MRI to existing NCI-sponsored trials, particularly those with tissue sampling or survival indicators. Where possible, DW-MRI measurements should be compared with histologic indices including cellularity and tissue response. There is a need for tissue equivalent diffusivity phantoms; meanwhile, simple fluid-filled phantoms should be used. Monoexponential assessments of apparent diffusion coefficient values should use two b values (> 100 and between 500 and 1000 mm2/sec depending on the application. Free breathing with multiple acquisitions is superior to complex gating techniques. Baseline patient reproducibility studies should be part of study designs. Both region of interest and histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient measurements should be obtained. Standards for measurement, analysis, and display are needed. Annotated data from validation studies (along with outcome measures should be made publicly available. Magnetic resonance imaging vendors should be engaged in this process. The NCI should establish a task force of experts (physicists, radiologists, and oncologists to plan, organize technical aspects, and conduct pilot trials. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network infrastructure may be suitable for these purposes. There is an extraordinary opportunity for DW-MRI to evolve into a clinically valuable imaging tool, potentially important for drug development.

  2. Validation of New Cancer Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, Michael J; Sturgeon, Catherine M; Söletormos, Georg; Barak, Vivian; Molina, Rafael; Hayes, Daniel F; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Bossuyt, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers are playing increasingly important roles in the detection and management of patients with cancer. Despite an enormous number of publications on cancer biomarkers, few of these biomarkers are in widespread clinical use. CONTENT: In this review, we discuss the key steps in...... advancing a newly discovered cancer candidate biomarker from pilot studies to clinical application. Four main steps are necessary for a biomarker to reach the clinic: analytical validation of the biomarker assay, clinical validation of the biomarker test, demonstration of clinical value from performance of...... the biomarker test, and regulatory approval. In addition to these 4 steps, all biomarker studies should be reported in a detailed and transparent manner, using previously published checklists and guidelines. Finally, all biomarker studies relating to demonstration of clinical value should be...

  3. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

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    Mudit Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person’s genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed.

  4. Rectal cancer radiotherapy: Towards European consensus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose. During the first decade of the 21st century several important European randomized studies in rectal cancer have been published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized. This article summarizes the consensus about imaging and radiotherapy of rectal cancer and gives an update until May 2010. Methods. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each committee member commented and voted, sentence by sentence three times. Sentences which did not reach agreement after voting round no 2 were openly debated during the Conference in Perugia (Italy) December 2008. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', 'minimum consensus'. Results. The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only three (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Considerable progress has been made in staging and treatment, including radiation treatment of rectal cancer. Conclusions. This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe. In spite of substantial progress, many research challenges remain

  5. Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer

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    Rikako Ishigamori

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common epithelial malignancy in the world. Since CRC develops slowly from removable precancerous lesions, detection of the lesion at an early stage by regular health examinations can reduce the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. Colonoscopy significantly improves the detection rate of CRC, but the examination is expensive and inconvenient. Therefore, we need novel biomarkers that are non-invasive to enable us to detect CRC quite early. A number of validation studies have been conducted to evaluate genetic, epigenetic or protein markers for identification in the stool and/or serum. Currently, the fecal occult blood test is the most widely used method of screening for CRC. However, advances in genomics and proteomics will lead to the discovery of novel non-invasive biomarkers.

  6. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field.

  7. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field. PMID:27625573

  8. A review of molecular biomarkers for bladder cancer

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    Miakhil I

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous molecular markers for bladder cancer have been identified and investigated with various laboratory techniques. Molecular markers are isolated from tissue, serum and urine. They fall into proteomic, genetic and epigenetic categories. Some of molecular markers show promising results in terms of facilitating early diagnosis and guiding treatment. Molecular markers or the so- called biomarkers can provide additional information alongside staging, grading and lymphovascular invasion, for better prognostication.Aim:This studyprovides an up-to-date review of the frequently studied and most important biomarkers that have shown consistent relevance in relation to bladder cancer. Methods: The key words were searched on the PubMed, Google scholar and NHS library search engines. Results: More than twenty biomarkers as per our methodology were identified but only half of them have shown consistence relevance in bladder cancer. Conclusion: It is envisaged that a combination of a few biomarkers, which are investigated frequently and have shown clinical relevance, could possibly provide useful information in predicting recurrence and provide useful prognostic information. So far none of the biomarkers for bladder cancer are adopted in the UK standard practice. Despite that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA had approved some of these biomarkers, none of the urology associations incorporated them in to their guidelines as yet. However, it won’t be long before a final consensus is reached to integrate molecular staging in to the current TNM staging system.

  9. Biomarkers of HIV-associated Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Thabile Flepisi; Patrick Bouic; Gerhard Sissolak; Bernd Rosenkranz

    2014-01-01

    Cancer biomarkers have provided great opportunities for improving the management of cancer patients by enhancing the efficiency of early detection, diagnosis, and efficacy of treatment. Every cell type has a unique molecular signature, referred to as biomarkers, which are identifiable characteristics such as levels or activities of a myriad of genes, proteins, or other molecular features. Biomarkers can facilitate the molecular definition of cancer, provide information about the course of can...

  10. Epigenetic biomarkers in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaz, Andrew M; Grady, William M

    2014-01-28

    The aberrant DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes is well documented in esophageal cancer, including adenocarcinoma (EAC) and squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) as well as in Barrett's esophagus (BE), a pre-malignant condition that is associated with chronic acid reflux. BE is a well-recognized risk factor for the development of EAC, and consequently the standard of care is for individuals with BE to be placed in endoscopic surveillance programs aimed at detecting early histologic changes that associate with an increased risk of developing EAC. Yet because the absolute risk of EAC in individuals with BE is minimal, a clinical need in the management of BE is the identification of additional risk markers that will indicate individuals who are at a significant absolute risk of EAC so that they may be subjected to more intensive surveillance. The best currently available risk marker is the degree of dysplasia in endoscopic biopsies from the esophagus; however, this marker is suboptimal for a variety of reasons. To date, there are no molecular biomarkers that have been translated to widespread clinical practice. The search for biomarkers, including hypermethylated genes, for either the diagnosis of BE, EAC, or ESCC or for risk stratification for the development of EAC in those with BE is currently an area of active research. In this review, we summarize the status of identified candidate epigenetic biomarkers for BE, EAC, and ESCC. Most of these aberrantly methylated genes have been described in the context of early detection or diagnostic markers; others might prove useful for estimating prognosis or predicting response to treatment. Finally, special attention will be paid to some of the challenges that must be overcome in order to develop clinically useful esophageal cancer biomarkers. PMID:22406828

  11. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

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    Chikezie O. Madu, Yi Lu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form.A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues.Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of

  12. Biomarkers in precision therapy in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Reimers, Marlies S.; Zeestraten, Eliane C.M.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Europe. Because CRC is also a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, a lot of research has been focused on the discovery and development of biomarkers to improve the diagnostic process and to predict treatment outcomes. Up till now only a few biomarkers are recommended by expert panels. Current TNM criteria, however, cause substantial under- and overtreatment of CRC patients. Consequently, there is a growing need for ne...

  13. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic;

    2015-01-01

    panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent......The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary...... disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence...

  14. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Austin Miller; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Willie Underwood

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods: Concurrent meas...

  15. Consensus Guidelines for CSF and Blood Biobanking for CNS Biomarker Studies

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    Charlotte E. Teunissen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are being used in clinical practice. Anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies in serum are currently useful for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, but we could expect novel CSF biomarkers that help define prognosis and response to treatment for this disease. One of the most critical factors in biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies performed by single centers. Collaboration between investigators is needed to establish large biobanks of well-defined samples. A key issue in collaboration is to establish standardized protocols for biobanking to ensure that the statistical power gained by increasing the numbers of CSF samples is not compromised by pre-analytical factors. Here, consensus guidelines for CSF collection and biobanking are presented, based on the guidelines that have been published by the BioMS-eu network for CSF biomarker research. We focussed on CSF collection procedures, pre-analytical factors and high quality clinical and paraclinical information. Importantly, the biobanking protocols are applicable for CSF biobanks for research targeting any neurological disease.

  16. Barcelona Consensus on Biomarker-Based Immunosuppressive Drugs Management in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Mercè; Shipkova, Maria; van Gelder, Teun; Wieland, Eberhard; Sommerer, Claudia; Budde, Klemens; Haufroid, Vincent; Christians, Uwe; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Barten, Markus J; Bergan, Stein; Picard, Nicolas; Millán López, Olga; Marquet, Pierre; Hesselink, Dennis A; Noceti, Ofelia; Pawinski, Tomasz; Wallemacq, Pierre; Oellerich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    With current treatment regimens, a relatively high proportion of transplant recipients experience underimmunosuppression or overimmunosuppression. Recently, several promising biomarkers have been identified for determining patient alloreactivity, which help in assessing the risk of rejection and personal response to the drug; others correlate with graft dysfunction and clinical outcome, offering a realistic opportunity for personalized immunosuppression. This consensus document aims to help tailor immunosuppression to the needs of the individual patient. It examines current knowledge on biomarkers associated with patient risk stratification and immunosuppression requirements that have been generally accepted as promising. It is based on a comprehensive review of the literature and the expert opinion of the Biomarker Working Group of the International Association of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology. The quality of evidence was systematically weighted, and the strength of recommendations was rated according to the GRADE system. Three types of biomarkers are discussed: (1) those associated with the risk of rejection (alloreactivity/tolerance), (2) those reflecting individual response to immunosuppressants, and (3) those associated with graft dysfunction. Analytical aspects of biomarker measurement and novel pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models accessible to the transplant community are also addressed. Conventional pharmacokinetic biomarkers may be used in combination with those discussed in this article to achieve better outcomes and improve long-term graft survival. Our group of experts has made recommendations for the most appropriate analysis of a proposed panel of preliminary biomarkers, most of which are currently under clinical evaluation in ongoing multicentre clinical trials. A section of Next Steps was also included, in which the Expert Committee is committed to sharing this knowledge with the Transplant Community in the form of triennial

  17. Nanomaterials based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Bansi D.; Kumar, Saurabh; Mouli Pandey, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors have enormous potential to contribute to the evolution of new molecular diagnostic techniques for patients suffering with cancerous diseases. A major obstacle preventing faster development of biosensors pertains to the fact that cancer is a highly complex set of diseases. The oncologists currently rely on a few biomarkers and histological characterization of tumors. Some of the signatures include epigenetic and genetic markers, protein profiles, changes in gene expression, and post-translational modifications of proteins. These molecular signatures offer new opportunities for development of biosensors for cancer detection. In this context, conducting paper has recently been found to play an important role towards the fabrication of a biosensor for cancer biomarker detection. In this paper we will focus on results of some of the recent studies obtained in our laboratories relating to fabrication and application of nanomaterial modified paper based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection.

  18. DNA Methylation Biomarkers: Cancer and Beyond

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    Thomas Mikeska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are naturally-occurring characteristics by which a particular pathological process or disease can be identified or monitored. They can reflect past environmental exposures, predict disease onset or course, or determine a patient’s response to therapy. Epigenetic changes are such characteristics, with most epigenetic biomarkers discovered to date based on the epigenetic mark of DNA methylation. Many tissue types are suitable for the discovery of DNA methylation biomarkers including cell-based samples such as blood and tumor material and cell-free DNA samples such as plasma. DNA methylation biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic and predictive power are already in clinical trials or in a clinical setting for cancer. Outside cancer, strong evidence that complex disease originates in early life is opening up exciting new avenues for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers for adverse early life environment and for estimation of future disease risk. However, there are a number of limitations to overcome before such biomarkers reach the clinic. Nevertheless, DNA methylation biomarkers have great potential to contribute to personalized medicine throughout life. We review the current state of play for DNA methylation biomarkers, discuss the barriers that must be crossed on the way to implementation in a clinical setting, and predict their future use for human disease.

  19. Genomic Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael F; Nathanson, Katherine L; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Clinical risk assessment for cancer predisposition includes a three-generation pedigree and physical examination to identify inherited syndromes. Additionally genetic and genomic biomarkers may identify individuals with a constitutional basis for their disease that may not be evident clinically. Genomic biomarker testing may detect molecular variations in single genes, panels of genes, or entire genomes. The strength of evidence for the association of a genomic biomarker with disease risk may be weak or strong. The factors contributing to clinical validity and utility of genomic biomarkers include functional laboratory analyses and genetic epidemiologic evidence. Genomic biomarkers may be further classified as low, moderate or highly penetrant based on the likelihood of disease. Genomic biomarkers for breast cancer are comprised of rare highly penetrant mutations of genes such as BRCA1 or BRCA2, moderately penetrant mutations of genes such as CHEK2, as well as more common genomic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms, associated with modest effect sizes. When applied in the context of appropriate counseling and interpretation, identification of genomic biomarkers of inherited risk for breast cancer may decrease morbidity and mortality, allow for definitive prevention through assisted reproduction, and serve as a guide to targeted therapy . PMID:26987529

  20. Proteomic Approaches for Biomarker Panels in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic technologies remain the main backbone of biomarkers discovery in cancer. The continuous development of proteomic technologies also enlarges the bioinformatics domain, thus founding the main pillars of cancer therapy. The main source for diagnostic/prognostic/therapy monitoring biomarker panels are molecules that have a dual role, being both indicators of disease development and therapy targets. Proteomic technologies, such as mass-spectrometry approaches and protein array technologies, represent the main technologies that can depict these biomarkers. Herein, we will illustrate some of the most recent strategies for biomarker discovery in cancer, including the development of immune-markers and the use of cancer stem cells as target therapy. The challenges of proteomic biomarker discovery need new forms of cross-disciplinary conglomerates that will result in increased and tailored access to treatments for patients; diagnostic companies would benefit from the enhanced co-development of companion diagnostics and pharmaceutical companies. In the technology optimization in biomarkers, immune assays are the leaders of discovery machinery. PMID:26565430

  1. DETECTION OF CANCER BIOMARKERS WITH NANOTECHNOLOGY

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    Lei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer biomarkers with high precision is critically important for cancer therapy. A variety of sensors based on different nanostructured materials have attracted intensive research interest due to their potential for highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer biomarkers. This review covers the use of a variety of nanostructured materials, including carbon nanotubes, silicon nanowires, gold nanoparticles and quantum dots, in the fabrication of sensors. Emphases are placed on how the detection systems work and what detection limits can be achieved. Some assays described in this review outperform established methods for cancer biomarker detection. It is highly promising that these sensors would soon move into commercial-scale production and find routine use in hospitals.

  2. The proteomics in prostate cancer biomarker discovery

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    V. E. Shevchenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC represents the second most frequent type of tumor in men worldwide. Proteomics represents a promising approach for the discovery of new biomarkers able to improve the management of PC patients. Markers more specific and sensitive than prostate-specific antigen are needed for PC diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. Moreover, proteomics could represent an important tool to identify new molecular targets for PC tailored therapy. Now several possible PC biomarkers sources, each with advantages and limitations, are under investigation, including tissues, urine, serum, plasma and prostatic fluids. Innovative high-throughput proteomic platforms are now identifying and quantifying new specific and sensitive biomarkers for PC detection, stratification and treatment. Nevertheless, many putative biomarkers are still far from being applied in clinical practice.This review aims to discuss the recent advances in PC proteomics, emphasizing biomarker discovery and their application to clinical utility for diagnosis and patient stratification.

  3. Challenges in Using Circulating miRNAs as Cancer Biomarkers

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    Paola Tiberio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, circulating miRNAs have emerged as a new class of promising cancer biomarkers. Independent studies have shown the feasibility of using these small RNAs as tools for the diagnosis and prognosis of different types of malignancies as well as for predicting and possibly monitoring treatment response. However, despite an initial enthusiasm for their possible clinical application, widespread inconsistencies have been observed among the studies, and miRNA-based tools still represent the object of research within clinical diagnostic or treatment protocols. The poor overlap of results could be explained, at least in part, by preanalytical and analytical variables and donor-related factors that could generate artefacts, impairing an accurate quantification of circulating miRNAs. In fact, critical issues are represented by nonuniform sample choice, handling, and processing, as well as by blood cell contamination in sample preparation and lack of consensus for data normalization. In this review, we address the potential technical biases and individual-related parameters that can influence circulating miRNA studies’ outcome. The exciting potential of circulating miRNAs as cancer biomarkers could confer an important advance in the disease management, but their clinical significance might not be proven without a global consensus of procedures and standardized protocols for their accurate detection.

  4. Molecular Imaging of Biomarkers in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Riedl, Chris C.; Dickler, Maura N.; Jhaveri, Komal; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The success of breast cancer therapy is ultimately defined by clinical endpoints such as survival. It is valuable to have biomarkers that can predict the most efficacious therapies or measure response to therapy early in the course of treatment. Molecular imaging has a promising role in complementing and overcoming some of the limitations of traditional biomarkers by providing the ability to perform noninvasive, repeatable whole-body assessments. The potential advantages of imaging biomarkers are obvious and initial clinical studies have been promising, but proof of clinical utility still requires prospective multicenter clinical trials. PMID:26834103

  5. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene methylation need to be standardised, simplified and evaluated in external quality assurance programmes. It is concluded that methylated genes have the potential to provide a new generation of cancer biomarkers.

  6. National Cancer Centre Singapore Consensus Guidelines for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Pierce K H; Choo, Su Pin; Ng, David C E; Lo, Richard H G; Wang, Michael L C; Toh, Han Chong; Tai, David W M; Goh, Brian K P; Wong, Jen San; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Goh, Anthony S W; Yan, Sean X; Loke, Kelvin S H; Thang, Sue Ping; Gogna, Apoorva; Too, Chow Wei; Irani, Farah Gillian; Leong, Sum; Lim, Kiat Hon; Thng, Choon Hua

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer in the world, but the second most common cause of cancer death. There is no universally accepted consensus practice guidelines for HCC owing to rapid developments in new treatment modalities, the heterogeneous epidemiology and clinical presentation of HCC worldwide. However, a number of regional and national guidelines currently exist which reflect practice relevant to the epidemiology and collective experience of the consensus group. In 2014, clinicians at the multidisciplinary Comprehensive Liver Cancer Clinic (CLCC) at the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) reviewed the latest published scientific data and existing international and regional practice guidelines, such as those of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver, and modified them to reflect local practice. These would serve as a template by which treatment outcomes can be collated and benchmarked against international data. The NCCS Consensus Guidelines for HCC have been successfully implemented in the CLCC since their publication online on 26(th) September 2014, and the guidelines allow outcomes of treatment to be compared to international data. These guidelines will be reviewed periodically to incorporate new data. PMID:27386428

  7. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Surgery Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue in the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 2nd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations. PMID:27579720

  8. Using Aptamers for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

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    Yun Min Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded synthetic DNA- or RNA-based oligonucleotides that fold into various shapes to bind to a specific target, which includes proteins, metals, and molecules. Aptamers have high affinity and high specificity that are comparable to that of antibodies. They are obtained using iterative method, called (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment SELEX and cell-based SELEX (cell-SELEX. Aptamers can be paired with recent advances in nanotechnology, microarray, microfluidics, and other technologies for applications in clinical medicine. One particular area that aptamers can shed a light on is biomarker discovery. Biomarkers are important in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In this paper, we will describe ways in which aptamers can be used to discover biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  9. Hypermethylated DNA, a Biomarker for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Ladefoged; Krarup, Henrik Bygum; Sunesen, Kåre Gotschalck;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: In colorectal cancer (CRC), improved methods for early detection are essential for increasing survival. Hypermethylated DNA in blood or stool has been proposed as a biomarker for CRC. In recent years, biochemical methods have improved, and several hypermethylated genes that are sensitive and...

  10. Identification of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

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    Anna Meiliana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (PCa was the second most common type of cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. The great challenge for physicians is being able to accurately predict PCa prognosis and treatment response in order to reduce PCa-speciic mortality while avoiding overtreatment by identifying of when to intervene, and in which patients. CONTENT: Currently, PCa prognosis and treatment decision of PCa involved digital rectal examination, Prostate-Speciic Antigens (PSA, and subsequent biopsies for histopathological staging, known as Gleason score. However, each procedure has its shortcomings. Efforts to find a better clinically meaningful and non-invasive biomarkers still developed involving proteins, circulating tumor cells, nucleic acids, and the ‘omics' approaches. SUMMARY: Biomarkers for PCa will most likely be an assay employing multiple biomarkers in combination using protein and gene microarrays, containing markers that are differentially expressed in PCa. KEYWORDS: prostate cancer, PSA, biomarkers, nomograms, miRNA, proteomic, genomic, metabolomic.

  11. Ovarian cancer biomarkers as diagnostic triage tests

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    Jordan SM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sara M Jordan, Robert E BristowDivision of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA, USAAbstract: Ovarian cancer survival improves with accurate surgical staging, maximal tumor removal, and appropriate adjuvant chemotherapy. Therefore, survival is higher among patients managed by a gynecologic oncologist trained in these surgical techniques. Unfortunately, identifying patients preoperatively for referral to a gynecologic oncologist is often challenging, given that there are no definitive noninvasive diagnostic tests to triage patients with an adnexal mass to a surgical subspecialist. Inaccurate preoperative diagnosis of an adnexal mass frequently results in either unnecessary surgery for a benign mass or inadequate surgical staging for a malignant mass, with a subsequent negative effect on overall survival. Several recent tests have been investigated to improve the preoperative diagnosis of women presenting with adnexal masses. Cancer antigen 125 is the most commonly used serum marker for screening and monitoring of ovarian cancer, but is elevated in many benign conditions and falsely normal in 50% of early-stage epithelial ovarian cancers. The relatively low sensitivity and specificity of CA125 has driven researchers to identify new biomarkers and algorithms to assist with triaging adnexal masses. A promising new biomarker, human epididymis protein 4, has been developed to monitor for recurrence of ovarian cancer. Three algorithms have also been developed, ie, risk of malignancy index, risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm, and OVA-1, which is the first diagnostic algorithm that combines multiple biomarkers for the purpose of triaging adnexal masses to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.Keywords: ovarian cancer, biomarkers, CA125, RMI, ROMA, HE4, OVA-1

  12. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Nils; Duffy, M.J; Napieralski, R.;

    2009-01-01

    measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for...... predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene...

  13. Biomarkers for predicting complete debulking in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten Lindberg; Ottesen, Bent; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Nedergaard, Lotte; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Antonsen, Sofie Leisby; Lydolph, Magnus; Høgdall, Claus

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We aimed to construct and validate a model based on biomarkers to predict complete primary debulking surgery for ovarian cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study consisted of three parts: Part I: Biomarker data obtained from mass spectrometry, baseline data and, surgical outcome were.......64. CONCLUSION: Our validated model based on biomarkers was unable to predict surgical outcome for patients with ovarian cancer....

  14. Cancer Hallmarks, Biomarkers and Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Liangjian; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease encompassing multiple tumor entities, each characterized by distinct morphology, behavior and clinical implications. Besides estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, novel biomarkers have shown their prognostic and predictive values, complicating our understanding towards to the heterogeneity of such cancers. Ten cancer hallmarks have been proposed by Weinberg to characterize cancer and its carcinogenesis. By reviewing biomarkers and breast cancer molecular subtypes, we propose that the divergent outcome observed from patients stratified by hormone status are driven by different cancer hallmarks. 'Sustaining proliferative signaling' further differentiates cancers with positive hormone receptors. 'Activating invasion and metastasis' and 'evading immune destruction' drive the differentiation of triple negative breast cancers. 'Resisting cell death', 'genome instability and mutation' and 'deregulating cellular energetics' refine breast cancer classification with their predictive values. 'Evading growth suppressors', 'enabling replicative immortality', 'inducing angiogenesis' and 'tumor-promoting inflammation' have not been involved in breast cancer classification which need more focus in the future biomarker-related research. This review novels in its global view on breast cancer heterogeneity, which clarifies many confusions in this field and contributes to precision medicine. PMID:27390604

  15. Research status and funding trends of lung cancer biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Cui; Hong, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of malignant tumors with the highest morbidity and mortality in the world. At present, research of early diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and metastasis associated biomarkers is most active. This article reviewed the research status of lung cancer biomarkers and analyzed the funding situation in the field of lung cancer markers in recent 10 years in China and abroad, to provide a reference for the future basic and clinical translational research of lung cancer biomarkers.

  16. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Ji-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke is common among cancer patients. However, risk factors and biomarkers of stroke in cancer patients are not well established. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and biomarkers as well as etiology of ischemic stroke in cancer patients. Methods A retrospective review was conducted in cancer patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted to a general hospital in Busan, Korea, between January 2003 and December 2012. The risk factors and biomarkers for strok...

  17. Mitochondrial DNA as a Cancer Biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    Jakupciak, John P.; Wang, Wendy; Markowitz, Maura E; Ally, Delphine; Coble, Michael; Srivastava, Sudhir; Maitra, Anirban; Barker, Peter E.; Sidransky, David; O’Connell, Catherine D.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a national effort to identify biomarkers for the early detection of cancer, we developed a rapid and high-throughput sequencing protocol for the detection of sequence variants in mitochondrial DNA. Here, we describe the development and implementation of this protocol for clinical samples. Heteroplasmic and homoplasmic sequence variants occur in the mitochondrial genome in patient tumors. We identified these changes by sequencing mitochondrial DNA obtained from tumors and blood from...

  18. Biomarkers and Pharmacogenetics in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunhai Xu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate identification and validation of biomarkers as well as pharmacogenetics are important in formulating patient-oriented, individualized chemotherapy or biological therapy in cancer patients. These markers can be especially valuable in pancreatic cancer, where high mortality and complex disease biology are frequently encountered. Recently, several advances have been made to further our knowledge in this specific area of pancreatic cancer. In the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting, researchers have presented several interesting results in biomarkers development: the identifications of 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that is associated with positive efficacy of gemcitabine (Abstract #4022; the introduction of circulating tumor cells as a prognostic markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Abstract #e14657; the re-affirmation of plasma cytidine deaminase (CDA as a positive predictive markers for gemcitabine efficacy, as well as the postulations that CDA*3 as a potential genotype marker to predict gemcitabine responses (Abstract #e14645; and finally the retrospective tumor tissues analysis in the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (AIO trial in an attempt for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway biomarker identifications (Abstract #4047

  19. The Progress and Prospects of Putative Biomarkers for Liver Cancer Stem Cells in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yan; Yang, Ting; Pang, Bing-Yao; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Yong-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is organized by liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs), which are a subset of cells with "stem-like" characteristics. Identification of the LCSCs is a fundamental and important problem in HCC research. LCSCs have been investigated by various stem cell biomarkers. There is still lack of consensus regarding the existence of a "global" marker for LCSCs in HCC. In this review article, we summarize the progress and prospects of putative biomarkers for LCSCs in the past decades, which is essential to develop future therapies targeting CSCs and to predict prognosis and curative effect of these therapies. PMID:27610139

  20. [Curative treatment for esophageal cancer: results of a multidisciplinary consensus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemann, Pierre; Mantziari, Styliani; Wagner, Dorothea; Digklia, Antonia; Ozsahin, Esat; De Bari, Berardino; Dorta, Gian; Godat, Sébastien; Montserrat, Fraga; Sempoux, Christine; Brunel, Christophe; Demartines, Nicolas; Schäfer, Markus

    2016-06-15

    The management of patients with resectable cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction is currently not standardized. A multi- disciplinary regional consensus has been developed and is presented in this article. The standard workup includes an upper endoscopy, ultrasonography and a CT-scan. For locally advanced tumors, surgery should be associated with either preoperative radiochemotherapy orperioperative chemotherapy after discussion in multidisciplinary tumor board. Before the operation, smoking and alcohol cessation is imperative and nutritional status should be optimized. Nowadays, surgery is well standardized and generally performed minimally invasive accesses. After surgery, clinical and oncological follow-up is necessary. PMID:27487620

  1. Core Outcomes for Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Consensus Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whistance, Robert N.; Forsythe, Rachael O.; Macefield, Rhiannon; Pullyblank, Anne M.; Avery, Kerry N. L.; Brookes, Sara T.; Thomas, Michael G.; Sylvester, Paul A.; Russell, Ann; Oliver, Alfred; Morton, Dion; Kennedy, Robin; Jayne, David G.; Huxtable, Richard; Hackett, Roland; Card, Mia; Brown, Julia; Blazeby, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is common, and there is a great need to improve the delivery of such care. The gold standard for evaluating surgery is within well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, the impact of RCTs is diminished by a lack of coordinated outcome measurement and reporting. A solution to these issues is to develop an agreed standard “core” set of outcomes to be measured in all trials to facilitate cross-study comparisons, meta-analysis, and minimize outcome reporting bias. This study defines a core outcome set for CRC surgery. Methods and Findings The scope of this COS includes clinical effectiveness trials of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer. Excluded were nonsurgical oncological interventions. Potential outcomes of importance to patients and professionals were identified through systematic literature reviews and patient interviews. All outcomes were transcribed verbatim and categorized into domains by two independent researchers. This informed a questionnaire survey that asked stakeholders (patients and professionals) from United Kingdom CRC centers to rate the importance of each domain. Respondents were resurveyed following group feedback (Delphi methods). Outcomes rated as less important were discarded after each survey round according to predefined criteria, and remaining outcomes were considered at three consensus meetings; two involving international professionals and a separate one with patients. A modified nominal group technique was used to gain the final consensus. Data sources identified 1,216 outcomes of CRC surgery that informed a 91 domain questionnaire. First round questionnaires were returned from 63 out of 81 (78%) centers, including 90 professionals, and 97 out of 267 (35%) patients. Second round response rates were high for all stakeholders (>80%). Analysis of responses lead to 45 and 23 outcome domains being retained

  2. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  3. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C Chadha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP. However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods: Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8, Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1 were obtained from four groups of men: (1 Controls (2 with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx (3 with clinically localized CaP and (4 with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results: TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93 and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97 were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP. The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997. The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992 and PSA (AUC = 0.963 levels. Conclusions: The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted.

  4. Testicular cancer: biology and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looijenga, Leendert H J; Stoop, Hans; Biermann, Katharina

    2014-03-01

    The term "human germ cell tumors" (GCTs) refers to a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, all with a defined histological appearance. They have specific epidemiological characteristics, clinical behavior, and pathogenesis. Histologically, GCTs contain various tissue elements, which are homologs of normal embryogenesis. We have proposed a subclassification of GCTs in five subtypes, three of which preferentially occur in the testis. These include teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants (type I), seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults (type II), and spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly (type III). Both spontaneous and induced animal models have been reported, of which the relevance for human GCTs is still to be clarified. Multidisciplinary studies have recently shed new light on the (earliest steps in the) pathogenesis of GCTs, mainly in regard of malignant type II GCTs (germ cell cancer (GCC)). This review discusses novel understanding of the pathogenesis of (mainly) GCC, focusing on identification of informative diagnostic markers suitable for application in a clinical setting. These include OCT3/4, SOX9/FOXL2, SOX17/SOX2, as well as embryonic microRNAs. These markers have been identified through studies on normal embryogenesis, specifically related to the gonads, including the germ cell lineage. Their strengths and limitations are discussed as well as the expected future approach to identify the group of individuals at highest risk for development of a GCC. The latter would allow screening of defined populations, early diagnosis, optimal follow-up, and potentially early treatment, preventing long-term side effects of systemic treatment. PMID:24487784

  5. Aberrant glycosylation associated with enzymes as cancer biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meany Danni L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the new roles for enzymes in personalized medicine builds on a rational approach to cancer biomarker discovery using enzyme-associated aberrant glycosylation. A hallmark of cancer, aberrant glycosylation is associated with differential expressions of enzymes such as glycosyltransferase and glycosidases. The aberrant expressions of the enzymes in turn cause cancer cells to produce glycoproteins with specific cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures. Content In this review we provide examples of cancer biomarker discovery using aberrant glycosylation in three areas. First, changes in glycosylation machinery such as glycosyltransferases/glycosidases could be used as cancer biomarkers. Second, most of the clinically useful cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins. Discovery of specific cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures of these existing biomarkers could improve their cancer specificity, such as the discovery of AFP-L3, fucosylated glycoforms of AFP. Third, cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures provide a compelling rationale for discovering new biomarkers using glycomic and glycoproteomic technologies. Summary As a hallmark of cancer, aberrant glycosylation allows for the rational design of biomarker discovery efforts. But more important, we need to translate these biomarkers from discovery to clinical diagnostics using good strategies, such as the lessons learned from translating the biomarkers discovered using proteomic technologies to OVA 1, the first FDA-cleared In Vitro Diagnostic Multivariate Index Assay (IVDMIA. These lessons, providing important guidance in current efforts in biomarker discovery and translation, are applicable to the discovery of aberrant glycosylation associated with enzymes as cancer biomarkers as well.

  6. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. de; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Ares, L.P.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the Amst

  7. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  8. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A...

  9. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  10. Sparse discriminant analysis for breast cancer biomarker identification and classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shi; Daoqing Dai; Chaochun Liu; Hong Yan

    2009-01-01

    Biomarker identification and cancer classification are two important procedures in microarray data analysis. We propose a novel uni-fied method to carry out both tasks. We first preselect biomarker candidates by eliminating unrelated genes through the BSS/WSS ratio filter to reduce computational cost, and then use a sparse discriminant analysis method for simultaneous biomarker identification and cancer classification. Moreover, we give a mathematical justification about automatic biomarker identification. Experimental results show that the proposed method can identify key genes that have been verified in biochemical or biomedical research and classify the breast cancer type correctly.

  11. Colorectal Cancer Biomarkers: Where Are We Now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gonzalez-Pons

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the Western world. Patient survival is highly dependent on the tumor stage at the time of diagnosis. Reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy is still a major obstacle in effective treatment of advanced disease. Due to the fact that colorectal cancer is mostly asymptomatic until it progresses to advanced stages, the implementation of screening programs aimed at early detection is essential to reduce incidence and mortality rates. Current screening and diagnostic methods range from semi-invasive procedures such as colonoscopy to noninvasive stool-based tests. The combination of the absence of symptoms, the semi-invasive nature of currently used methods, and the suboptimal accuracy of fecal blood tests results in colorectal cancer diagnosis at advanced stages in a significant number of individuals. Alterations in gene expression leading to colorectal carcinogenesis are reflected in dysregulated levels of nucleic acids and proteins, which can be used for the development of novel, minimally invasive molecular biomarkers. The purpose of this review is to discuss the commercially available colorectal cancer molecular diagnostic methods as well as to highlight some of the new candidate predictive and prognostic molecular markers for tumor, stool, and blood samples.

  12. Cancer Biomarker Discovery: Lectin-Based Strategies Targeting Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Clark

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker discovery can identify molecular markers in various cancers that can be used for detection, screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease progression. Lectin-affinity is a technique that can be used for the enrichment of glycoproteins from a complex sample, facilitating the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers associated with a disease state.

  13. Emerging Therapeutic Biomarkers in Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although clinical trials of molecular therapies targeting critical biomarkers (mTOR, epidermal growth factor receptor/epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and vascular endothelial growth factor in endometrial cancer show modest effects, there are still challenges that might remain regarding primary/acquired drug resistance and unexpected side effects on normal tissues. New studies that aim to target both genetic and epigenetic alterations (noncoding microRNA underlying malignant properties of tumor cells and to specifically attack tumor cells using cell surface markers overexpressed in tumor tissue are emerging. More importantly, strategies that disrupt the cancer stem cell/epithelial-mesenchymal transition-dependent signals and reactivate antitumor immune responses would bring new hope for complete elimination of all cell compartments in endometrial cancer. We briefly review the current status of molecular therapies tested in clinical trials and mainly discuss the potential therapeutic candidates that are possibly used to develop more effective and specific therapies against endometrial cancer progression and metastasis.

  14. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  15. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, Gil G. (Cheshire, CT); Ward, David C. (Las Vegas, NV); Bray-Ward, Patricia (Las Vegas, NV)

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  16. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the...

  17. Clinical Use of Cancer Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söletormos, Georg; Duffy, Michael J; Othman Abu Hassan, Suher; Verheijen, René H M; Tholander, Bengt; Bast, Robert C; Gaarenstroom, Katja N; Sturgeon, Catharine M; Bonfrer, Johannes M; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Troonen, Hugo; CarloTorre, Gian; Kanty Kulpa, Jan; Tuxen, Malgorzata K; Molina, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present an update of the European Group on Tumor Markers guidelines for serum markers in epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: Systematic literature survey from 2008 to 2013. The articles were evaluated by level of evidence and strength of recommendation. RESULTS: Because of its low...... sensitivity (50-62% for early stage epithelial ovarian cancer) and limited specificity (94-98.5%), cancer antigen (CA) 125 (CA125) is not recommended as a screening test in asymptomatic women. The Risk of Malignancy Index, which includes CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, and menopausal status, is recommended...... candidate for secondary cytoreductive surgery. CONCLUSIONS: At present, CA125 remains the most important biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer, excluding tumors of mucinous origin.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives...

  18. Trends in qualifying biomarkers in drug safety. Consensus of the 2011 meeting of the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A.G. eAgúndez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the consensus view on the use of qualifying biomarkers in drug safety, raised within the frame of the XXIV meeting of the Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology held in Málaga (Spain in October, 2011.The widespread use of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is a goal that scientists have long been pursuing. Thirty years ago, when molecular pharmacogenomics evolved, we anticipated that these genetic biomarkers would soon obviate the routine use of drug therapies in a way that patients should adapt to the therapy rather than the opposite. This expected revolution in routine clinical practice never took place as quickly nor with the intensity as initially expected.The concerted action of operating multicenter networks holds great promise for future studies to identify biomarkers related to drug toxicity and to provide better insight into the underlying pathogenesis. Today some pharmacogenomic advances are already widely accepted, but pharmacogenomics still needs further development to elaborate more precise algorithms and many barriers to implementing individualized medicine exist. We briefly discuss our view about these barriers and we provide suggestions and areas of focus to advance in the field.

  19. A New Serum Biomarker for Lung Cancer - Transthyretin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun LIU

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and very few specific biomarkers could be used in clinical diagnosis at present. The aim of this study is to find novel potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer using Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization (SELDI technique. Methods Serumsample of 227 cases including 146 lung cancer, 13 pneumonia, 28 tuberculous pleurisy and 40 normal individuals were analyzed by CM10 chips. The candidate biomarkers were identified by ESI/MS-MS and database searching, and further confirmed by immunoprecipitation. The same sets of serum sample from all groups were re-measured by ELISA assay. Results Three protein peaks with the molecular weight 13.78 kDa, 13.90 kDa and 14.07 kDa were found significantlydecreased in lung cancer serum compared to the other groups and were all automatically selected as specific biomarkers by Biomarker Wizard software. The candidate biomarkers obtained from 1-D SDS gel bands by matching the molecular weight with peaks on CM10 chips were identified by Mass spectrometry as the native transthyretin (nativeTTR, cysTTR and glutTTR, and the identity was further validated by immunoprecipitation using commercial TTR antibodies. Downregulated of TTR was found in both ELISA and SELDI analysis. Conclusion TTRs acted as the potentially useful biomarkers for lung cancer by SELDI technique.

  20. Inconvenient truth: cancer biomarker development by using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tadashi

    2014-05-01

    A biomarker is a crucial tool for measuring the progress of disease and the effects of treatment for better clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic biomarkers are required in various clinical settings. The proteome, a functional translation of the genome, is considered a rich source of biomarkers; therefore, sizable time and funding have been spent in proteomics to develop biomarkers. Although significant progress has been made in technologies toward comprehensive protein expression profiling, and many biomarker candidates published, none of the reported biomarkers have proven to be beneficial for cancer patients. The present deceleration in biomarker research can be attributed to technical limitations. Additional efforts are required to further technical progress; however, there are many examples demonstrating that problems in biomarker research are not so much with the technology but in the study design. In the study of biomarkers for early diagnosis, candidates are screened and validated by comparing cases and controls of similar sample size, and the low prevalence of disease is often ignored. Although it is reasonable to take advantage of multiple rather than single biomarkers when studying diverse disease mechanisms, the annotation of individual components of reported multiple biomarkers does not often explain the variety of molecular events underlying the clinical observations. In tissue biomarker studies, the heterogeneity of disease tissues and pathological observations are often not considered, and tissues are homogenized as a whole for protein extraction. In addition to the challenge of technical limitations, the fundamental aspects of biomarker development in a disease study need to be addressed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:23896458

  1. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the...... expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through...

  2. Towards Personalized Cancer Therapy : New Diagnostic Biomarkers and Radiosensitization Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegelberg, Diana

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the evaluation of biomarkers for radio-immunodiagnostics and radio-immunotherapy and on radiosensitization strategies after HSP90 inhibition, as a step towards more personalized cancer medicine. There is a need to develop new tracers that target cancer-specific biomarkers to improve diagnostic imaging, as well as to combine treatment strategies to potentiate synergistic effects. Special focus has been on the cell surface molecule CD44 and its oncogenic variants, which w...

  3. Immune responses to cancer: are they potential biomarkers of prognosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa L Whiteside

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent technical improvements in evaluations of immune cells in situ and immune monitoring of patients with cancer have provided a wealth of new data confirming that immune cells play a key role in human cancer progression. This, in turn, has revived the expectation that immune endpoints might serve as reliable biomarkers of outcome or response to therapy in cancer. The recent successes in linking the T-cell signature in human colorectal carcinoma (CRC with prognosis have provided a strong motive for searching for additional immune biomarkers that could serve as intermediate endpoints of response to therapy and outcome in human cancers. A number of potentially promising immune biomarkers have emerged, but most remain to be validated. Among them, the B-cell signature, as exemplified by expression of the immunoglobulin G kappa chain (IGKC in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL, has been validated as a biomarker of response to adjuvant therapy and better survival in patients with breast carcinoma and several other types of human solid tumors. Additional immune endpoints are being currently tested as potentially promising biomarkers in cancer. In view of currently growing use of immune cancer therapies, the search for immune biomarkers of prognosis are critically important for identifying patients who would benefit the most from adjuvant immunotherapy.

  4. MicroRNA signatures as clinical biomarkers in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markou A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Athina Markou, Martha Zavridou, Evi S Lianidou Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells, Lab of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Abstract: Even if early lung cancer detection has been recently significantly improved, the invasive nature of current diagnostic procedures, and a relatively high percentage of false positives, is limiting the application of modern detection tools. The discovery and clinical evaluation of novel specific and robust non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of lung cancer at an early stage, as well as for better prognosis and prediction of therapy response, is very challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs can play an important role in the diagnosis and management of lung cancer patients, as important and reliable biomarkers for cancer detection and prognostic prediction, and even as promising as novel targets for cancer therapy. miRNAs are important in cancer pathogenesis, and deregulation of their expression levels has been detected not only in lung cancer but in many other human tumor types. Numerous studies strongly support the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in non-small-cell lung cancer, and there is increasing evidence that altered miRNA expression is associated with tumor progression and survival. It is worth mentioning also that detection of miRNAs circulating in plasma or serum has enormous potential, because miRNAs serve as non-invasive biomarkers not only for the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease, but also as novel response and sensitivity predictors for cancer treatment. In this review, we summarize the current findings on the critical role of miRNAs in lung cancer tumorigenesis and highlight their potential as circulating biomarkers in lung cancer. Our review is based on papers that have been published after 2011, and includes the key words “miRNAs” and “lung cancer”. Keywords: non-small-cell lung carcinoma, miRNAs, tumor biomarkers, circulating miRNAs, liquid

  5. Metabolomics for Biomarker Discovery in Gastroenterological Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Nishiumi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of the omics cascade, which involves comprehensive investigations based on genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, etc., has developed rapidly and now plays an important role in life science research. Among such analyses, metabolome analysis, in which the concentrations of low molecular weight metabolites are comprehensively analyzed, has rapidly developed along with improvements in analytical technology, and hence, has been applied to a variety of research fields including the clinical, cell biology, and plant/food science fields. The metabolome represents the endpoint of the omics cascade and is also the closest point in the cascade to the phenotype. Moreover, it is affected by variations in not only the expression but also the enzymatic activity of several proteins. Therefore, metabolome analysis can be a useful approach for finding effective diagnostic markers and examining unknown pathological conditions. The number of studies involving metabolome analysis has recently been increasing year-on-year. Here, we describe the findings of studies that used metabolome analysis to attempt to discover biomarker candidates for gastroenterological cancer and discuss metabolome analysis-based disease diagnosis.

  6. Urinary PGE-M: a promising cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N

    2013-06-01

    Cancer prevention, early diagnosis, and targeted therapies are the keys to success in better cancer control and treatment. A big challenge remains to identify biomarkers for predicting who may have higher cancer risk and are able to respond to certain chemopreventive agents as well as for assessing a patient's response during treatment. Although a large body of evidence indicates that chronic inflammation is a risk factor for cancer, it is unclear whether inflammatory biomarkers can be used to predict cancer risk, progression, and death. Considering the importance of the proinflammatory COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in inflammation and cancer, Morris and colleagues found that urinary PGE-M is positively associated with obesity, smoking, and lung metastases in patients with breast cancer (4). Along the same lines, Kim and colleagues showed a potential association between urinary PGE-M and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women (beginning on page 511). In agreement with previous reports, their findings indicate that urinary PGE-M may serve as a promising biomarker for prognosticating cancer risk and disease progression. PMID:23636051

  7. Searching for a system: The quest for ovarian cancer biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodland, Karin D.; Maihle, Nita J.

    2011-11-01

    The stark difference in clinical outcome for patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed at early stages (95% at 5 years) versus late stages (27.6% at 5 years) has driven a decades-long quest for effective biomarkers that will enable earlier detection of ovarian cancer. Yet despite intense efforts, including the application of modern high throughput technologies such as transcriptomics and proteomics, there has been little improvement in performance compared to the gold standard of quantifying serum CA125 immunoreactivity paired with transvaginal ultrasound. This review describes the strategies that have been used for identification of ovarian cancer biomarkers, including the recent introduction of novel bioinformatic approaches. Results obtained using high throughput-based vs. biologically rational approaches for the discovery of diagnostic early detection biomarkers are compared and analyzed for functional enrichment.

  8. Biomarkers, Bundled Payments, and Colorectal Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, William; Lynch, Patrick; Raju, Gottumukkala; Rodriguez, Alma; Burke, Thomas; Hafemeister, Lisa; Hawk, Ernest; Wu, Xifeng; Raymond N. DuBois; MISHRA, LOPA

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the management of cancers such as colorectal cancer (CRC) are urgently needed, as such cancers continue to be one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers; CRC accounts for 21% of all cancers and is responsible for mortalities second only to lung cancer in the United States. A comprehensive science-driven approach towards markedly improved early detection/screening to efficacious targeted therapeutics with clear diagnostic and prognostic markers is essential. In addition, further cha...

  9. Guidelines for lung cancer in 2015: Consensus and controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Shun; Yong-feng YU; Wen-xiang JI

    2016-01-01

    The standardization of diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer has important significance for improving the prognosis of patients with lung cancer. A thorough and accurate interpretation of the guidelines of lung cancer is conducive to enhance a deeper understanding of the standardized diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. The authors of this article intend to give a brief summary and comment for the latest information about diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer at home and abroad, focusing...

  10. Report from the 13th Annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference; Calgary, Alberta; September 8–10, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, M.M.; Pasieka, J; Dixon, E; McEwan, S.; McKay, A; Renouf, D.; Schellenberg, D; Ruether, D.

    2012-01-01

    The 13th annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Calgary, Alberta, September 8–10, 2011. Health care professionals involved in the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purposes of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses current issues in the management neuroendocrine tumours and locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  11. Exosomal miRNAs as biomarkers for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Pettersen Hessvik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that finely regulate gene expression in cells. Alterations in miRNA expression have been associated with development of cancer, and miRNAs are now being investigated as biomarkers for cancer as well as other diseases. Recently, miRNAs have been found outside cells in body fluids. Extracellular miRNAs exist in different forms - associated with Ago2 proteins, loaded into extracellular vesicles (exosomes, microvesicles or apoptotic bodies or into high density lipoprotein particles. These extracellular miRNAs are probably products of distinct cellular processes, and might therefore play different roles. However, their functions in vivo are currently unknown. In spite of this, they are considered as promising, noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic tools. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the Western world, but the currently used biomarker (prostate specific antigen has low specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are highly needed. In this review we will discuss possible biological functions of extracellular miRNAs, as well as the potential use of miRNAs from extracellular vesicles as biomarkers for prostate cancer.

  12. Cancer biomarker discovery in saliva by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran S. Ambatipudi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The quest for biomarkers has been much pursued to aid in the early diagnosis, monitor post-treatment progress and development of targeted therapies. Nevertheless, the translation of biomarker discovery to clinical use has been limited due to multiple reasons such as the long path from discovery to clinical assays, limitation of samples and incoherent pipeline for biomarker development. To date, diagnosis of cancer has been based on biopsies and histological examinations and often becomes difficult to get repeated sampling from patients for confirmation. Consequently, it is important for clinical researchers to look at multiple body fluids and different molecular techniques to identify biomarkers. One such bodyfluid is saliva, which is easily and non-invasively collected and contains thousands of potential protein biomarkers. Moreover, recent advances in the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry based proteomics hold great promise to identify potential biomarkers. This review presents an overview of the potential use of saliva and mass spectrometry for global discovery and validation of biomarkers.

  13. [NCCN Asian consensus statement - can Asian patients with cancer accept treatment modalities from NCCN guidelines ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Seiichiro; Hinotsu, Shiro; Namiki, Mikio; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-06-01

    To spread the National Comprehensive Cancer Network(NCCN)guidelines widely in Asia, committee members from Asian countries have been preparing an Asia Consensus Statement(ACS)along the NCCN guidelines. The ACS for Kidney Cancer guidelines and Prostate Cancer guidelines were issued in 2009 and in 2011, respectively. In addition, second versions of both these guidelines were issued in 2011 and 2013, respectively. In this review, the process and contents of NCCN ACS have been described. PMID:25129079

  14. Computational and Experimental Approaches to Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzystanek, Marcin

    Effective cancer treatment requires good biomarkers: measurable indicators of some biological state or condition that constitute the cornerstone of personalized medicine. Prognostic biomarkers provide information about the likely course of the disease, while predictive biomarkers enable prediction...... of a patient’s response to a particular treatment, thus helping to avoid unnecessary treatment and unwanted side effects in non-responding individuals.Currently biomarker discovery is facilitated by recent advances in high-throughput technologies when association between a given biological phenotype...... levels show random distribution in a given cohort. However, gene expression levels may also be affected by technical bias when the actual measurement technology or sample handling may introduce a systematic error. If the distribution of systematic errors correlates with the biological phenotype then the...

  15. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. Material and methods: During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. Results: Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5 mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. Conclusion: The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency

  16. Resolving breast cancer heterogeneity by searching reliable protein cancer biomarkers in the breast fluid secretome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major goals in cancer research is to find and evaluate the early presence of biomarkers in human fluids and tissues. To resolve the complex cell heterogeneity of a tumor mass, it will be useful to characterize the intricate biomolecular composition of tumor microenvironment (the so called cancer secretome), validating secreted proteins as early biomarkers of cancer initiation and progression. This approach is not broadly applicable because of the paucity of well validated and FDA-approved biomarkers and because most of the candidate biomarkers are mainly organ-specific rather than tumor-specific. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to identify and validate a panel of biomarker combinations for early detection of human tumors. This is especially important for breast cancer, the cancer spread most worldwide among women. It is well known that patients with early diagnosed breast cancer live longer, require less extensive treatment and fare better than patients with more aggressive and/or advanced disease. In the frame of searching breast cancer biomarkers (especially using nipple aspirate fluid mirroring breast microenvironment), studies have highlighted an optimal combination of well-known biomarkers: uPA + PAI-1 + TF. When individually investigated they did not show perfect accuracy in predicting the presence of breast cancer, whereas the triple combination has been demonstrated to be highly predictive of pre-cancer and/or cancerous conditions, approaching 97-100% accuracy. Despite the heterogeneous composition of breast cancer and the difficulties to find specific breast cancer biomolecules, the noninvasive analysis of the nipple aspirate fluid secretome may significantly improve the discovery of promising biomarkers, helping also the differentiation among benign and invasive breast diseases, opening new frontiers in early oncoproteomics

  17. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Bicheng; Doll, Donald; Shen, Kui; Kloecker, Goetz; Freter, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential ...

  18. Risk factors and novel biomarkers in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fourkala, E.-O.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts continue to identify and validate novel risk factors / biomarkers for breast cancer and improve current risk prediction models in the general population due to ongoing issues with sensitivity and specificity. The overall goal of this PhD study is to add to this effort. Specific aims are to (1) examine which is the best source of getting notified for breast cancer diagnosis in the general population since accurate data is crucial for risk assessment studies (2) investigate the assoc...

  19. Prostate cancer biomarker profiles in urinary sediments and exosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, S.; Birker, I.L.; Smit, F.P.; Leyten, G.H.J.M.; Reijke, T.M. de; Oort, I.M. van; Mulders, P.F.A.; Jannink, S.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Urinary biomarker tests for diagnosing prostate cancer have gained considerable interest. Urine is a complex mixture that can be subfractionated. We evaluated 2 urinary fractions that contain nucleic acids, ie cell pellets and exosomes. The influence of digital rectal examination before uri

  20. Identification of candidate epigenetic biomarkers for ovarian cancer detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Jansen, Rachel A.; Fabbri, Enrica; Potter, Dustin; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Chan, Michael W. Y.; Liu, Joseph C.; Crijns, Anne P. G.; Brown, Robert; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Van Der Zee, Ate G. J.; Cohn, David E.; Yan, Pearlly S.; Huang, Tim H. -M.; Lin, Huey-Jen L.

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer ranks the most lethal among gynecologic neoplasms in women. To develop potential biomarkers for diagnosis, we have identified five novel genes (CYP39A1, GTF2A1, FOXD4L4, EBP, and HAAO) that are hypermethylated in ovarian tumors, compared with the non-malignant normal ovarian surface e

  1. Effects of synbiotics on cancer risk biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Clune, Yvonne E.

    2005-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in the world and second most common (behind lung cancer) in developed countries. In recent years there has been much interest in the potential use of prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics in the prevention and treatment of CRC. We have previously shown that synbiotic consumption in Azoxymethane treated rats modulates the immune system, influences the genotoxic potential of caecal contents and reduces the number of co...

  2. Biomarkers of Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Luay Mousa; Salem, Mohamed E.; Sameh Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide and accounts for 10% of all new cancer diagnoses. Angiogenesis is a tightly regulated process that is mediated by a group of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors. Given the widespread use of antiangiogenic agents in CRC, there has been considerable interest in the development of methods to identify novel markers that can predict outcome in the treatment of this disease with angiogenesi...

  3. Evaluating biomarkers to model cancer risk post cosmic ray exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Deepa M.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Blattnig, Steve R.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Doetsch, Paul W.; Dynan, William S.; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Kidane, Yared; Kronenberg, Amy; Naidu, Mamta D.; Peterson, Leif E.; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Saha, Janapriya; Snijders, Antoine M.; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Tang, Jonathan; Werner, Erica; Pluth, Janice M.

    2016-06-01

    Robust predictive models are essential to manage the risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Chronic exposure to cosmic rays in the context of the complex deep space environment may place astronauts at high cancer risk. To estimate this risk, it is critical to understand how radiation-induced cellular stress impacts cell fate decisions and how this in turn alters the risk of carcinogenesis. Exposure to the heavy ion component of cosmic rays triggers a multitude of cellular changes, depending on the rate of exposure, the type of damage incurred and individual susceptibility. Heterogeneity in dose, dose rate, radiation quality, energy and particle flux contribute to the complexity of risk assessment. To unravel the impact of each of these factors, it is critical to identify sensitive biomarkers that can serve as inputs for robust modeling of individual risk of cancer or other long-term health consequences of exposure. Limitations in sensitivity of biomarkers to dose and dose rate, and the complexity of longitudinal monitoring, are some of the factors that increase uncertainties in the output from risk prediction models. Here, we critically evaluate candidate early and late biomarkers of radiation exposure and discuss their usefulness in predicting cell fate decisions. Some of the biomarkers we have reviewed include complex clustered DNA damage, persistent DNA repair foci, reactive oxygen species, chromosome aberrations and inflammation. Other biomarkers discussed, often assayed for at longer points post exposure, include mutations, chromosome aberrations, reactive oxygen species and telomere length changes. We discuss the relationship of biomarkers to different potential cell fates, including proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and loss of stemness, which can propagate genomic instability and alter tissue composition and the underlying mRNA signatures that contribute to cell fate decisions. Our goal is to highlight factors that are important in choosing

  4. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Kümler, Iben; Nygård, Sune Boris;

    2013-01-01

    process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non...... any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of......Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs, and honing regimens of existing anti...

  5. Consensus nomenclature for CD8+ T cell phenotypes in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetoh, Lionel; Smyth, Mark J.; Drake, Charles G.; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Apte, Ron N.; Ayyoub, Maha; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bonneville, Marc; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Esteban; Chen, Lieping; Colombo, Mario P.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Coukos, Georges; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dranoff, Glenn; Frazer, Ian H.; Fridman, Wolf-Hervé; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L.; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John; Knuth, Alexander; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Marincola, Francesco; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Odun, Kunle; Overwijk, Willem W.; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ribas, Antoni; Romero, Pedro; Schreiber, Robert D.; Schuler, Gerold; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Tartour, Eric; Valmori, Danila; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Wang, Ena; Zou, Weiping; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas preclinical investigations and clinical studies have established that CD8+ T cells can profoundly affect cancer progression, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Challenging the prevalent view that the beneficial effect of CD8+ T cells in cancer is solely attributable to their cytotoxic activity, several reports have indicated that the ability of CD8+ T cells to promote tumor regression is dependent on their cytokine secretion profile and their ability to self-renew. Evidence has also shown that the tumor microenvironment can disarm CD8+ T cell immunity, leading to the emergence of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. The existence of different types of CD8+ T cells in cancer calls for a more precise definition of the CD8+ T cell immune phenotypes in cancer and the abandonment of the generic terms “pro-tumor” and “antitumor.” Based on recent studies investigating the functions of CD8+ T cells in cancer, we here propose some guidelines to precisely define the functional states of CD8+ T cells in cancer. PMID:26137416

  6. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Hua Tao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  7. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qiu-Li; Xu, Wang-Hong, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Tao, Meng-Hua, E-mail: mtao@buffalo.edu [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-04-28

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer.

  8. Biomarkers of the Metabolic Syndrome and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of its public health importance, our understanding of the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis and progress is still evolving. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a constellation of biochemical abnormalities including visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia and high blood pressure. The components of the MS have all been related to late-stage disease and even to a poor prognosis of breast cancer through multiple interacting mechanisms. In this review, we aim to present a summary of recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of the MS to breast cancer with the emphasis on the role of biomarkers of the MS in the prognosis of breast cancer

  9. Epigenetic biomarkers in prostate cancer: Current and future uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Karen; Ricciardelli, Carmela; Bianco-Miotto, Tina

    2014-01-28

    Epigenome alterations are characteristic of nearly all human malignancies and include changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs (miRNAs). However, what induces these epigenetic alterations in cancer is largely unknown and their mechanistic role in prostate tumorigenesis is just beginning to be evaluated. Identification of the epigenetic modifications involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer will not only identify novel therapeutic targets but also prognostic and diagnostic markers. This review will focus on the use of epigenetic modifications as biomarkers for prostate cancer. PMID:22391123

  10. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    OpenAIRE

    Arron Thind; Clive Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analy...

  11. Chromosomal aberrations and SCEs as biomarkers of cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norppa, H; Bonassi, S; Hansteen, I-L; Hagmar, L; Strömberg, U; Rössner, P; Boffetta, P; Lindholm, C; Gundy, S; Lazutka, J; Cebulska-Wasilewska, A; Fabiánová, E; Srám, R J; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Barale, R; Fucic, A

    Previous studies have suggested that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations (CAs), but not of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), predicts cancer risk. We have further examined this relationship in European cohorts comprising altogether almost 22,000 subjects, in the framework of a European...... collaborative project (CancerRiskBiomarkers). The present paper gives an overview of some of the results of the project, especially as regards CAs and SCEs. The results confirm that a high level of CAs is associated with an increased risk of cancer and indicate that this association does not depend on the time...... between CA analysis and cancer detection, i.e., is obviously not explained by undetected cancer. The present evidence indicates that both chromatid-type and chromosome-type CAs predict cancer, even though some data suggest that chromosome-type CAs may have a more pronounced predictive value than chromatid...

  12. Aberrantly methylated DNA as a biomarker in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Guldberg, Per;

    2013-01-01

    hypermethylation events, their use as tumor biomarkers is usually not hampered by analytical signals from normal cells, which is a general problem for existing protein tumor markers used for clinical assessment of breast cancer. There is accumulating evidence that DNA-methylation changes in breast cancer patients......Aberrant DNA hypermethylation at gene promoters is a frequent event in human breast cancer. Recent genome-wide studies have identified hundreds of genes that exhibit differential methylation between breast cancer cells and normal breast tissue. Due to the tumor-specific nature of DNA...... occur early during tumorigenesis. This may open up for effective screening, and analysis of blood or nipple aspirate may later help in diagnosing breast cancer. As a more detailed molecular characterization of different types of breast cancer becomes available, the ability to divide patients into...

  13. A consensus prognostic gene expression classifier for ER positive breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Naderi, Ali; Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Pinder, Sarah E; Ellis, Ian O.; Aparicio, Sam; Brenton, James D.; Caldas, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Background A consensus prognostic gene expression classifier is still elusive in heterogeneous diseases such as breast cancer. Results Here we perform a combined analysis of three major breast cancer microarray data sets to hone in on a universally valid prognostic molecular classifier in estrogen receptor (ER) positive tumors. Using a recently developed robust measure of prognostic separation, we further validate the prognostic classifier in three external independent cohorts, confirming the...

  14. Refining the care of patients with pancreatic cancer: the AGITG Pancreatic Cancer Workshop consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Robert C; Barbour, Andrew P; Samra, Jaswinder; Nikfarjam, Mehrdad; Haghighi, Koroush; Kench, James G; Saxena, Payal; Goldstein, David

    2016-06-20

    A meeting of the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group (AGITG) was held to develop a consensus statement defining when a patient with pancreatic cancer has disease that is clearly operable, is borderline, or is locally advanced/inoperable. Key issues included the need for multidisciplinary team consensus for all patients considered for surgical resection. Staging investigations, to be completed within 4 weeks of presentation, should include pancreatic protocol computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound, and, when possible, biopsy. Given marked differences in outcomes, the operability of tumours should be clearly identified by categories: those clearly resectable by standard means (group 1a), those requiring vascular resection but which are clearly operable (group 1b), and those of borderline operability requiring vascular resection (groups 2a and 2b). Patients who may require vascular reconstruction should be referred, before exploration, to a specialist unit. All patients should have a structured pathology report with standardised reporting of all seven surgical margins, which identifies an R0 (no tumour cells within a defined distance of the margin) if all surgical margins are clear from 1 mm. Neo-adjuvant therapy is increasingly recommended for borderline operable disease, while chemotherapy is recommended as initial therapy for patients with unresectable loco-regional pancreatic cancer. The value of adding radiation after initial chemotherapy remains uncertain. A small number of patients may be downstaged by chemoradiation, and trimodality therapy should only be considered as part of a clinical trial. Instituting these recommendations nationally will be an integral part of the process of improving quality of care and reducing geographic variation between centres in outcomes for patients. PMID:27318402

  15. Cantilever with immobilized antibody for liver cancer biomarker detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel cantilever array-based bio-sensor was batch-fabricated with IC compatible MEMS technology for precise liver cancer bio-marker detection. A micro-cavity was designed in the free end of the cantilever for local antibody-immobilization, thus the adsorption of the cancer biomarker takes place only in the local region of the cantilever instead of the whole lever, and the effect of adsorption-induced k variation can be dramatically reduced. These structural features offer several advantages: high sensitivity, high throughput, high mass detection accuracy, and a portable system. In addition, an analytical model has been established to eliminate the effect of the adsorption-induced lever stiffness change and has been applied to the precise mass detection of the cancer biomarker AFP; the experimentally detected AFP antigen mass by the sensor (7.6 pg/mL) is quite close to the calculated one (5.5 pg/mL), two orders of magnitude better than those of the fully antibody-immobilized cantilever sensor. These approaches can promote real applications of the cantilever sensors in cancer diagnosis. (semiconductor devices)

  16. Cantilever with immobilized antibody for liver cancer biomarker detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaipeng, Wang; Jingjing, Wang; Yinfang, Zhu; Jinling, Yang; Fuhua, Yang

    2014-10-01

    A novel cantilever array-based bio-sensor was batch-fabricated with IC compatible MEMS technology for precise liver cancer bio-marker detection. A micro-cavity was designed in the free end of the cantilever for local antibody-immobilization, thus the adsorption of the cancer biomarker takes place only in the local region of the cantilever instead of the whole lever, and the effect of adsorption-induced k variation can be dramatically reduced. These structural features offer several advantages: high sensitivity, high throughput, high mass detection accuracy, and a portable system. In addition, an analytical model has been established to eliminate the effect of the adsorption-induced lever stiffness change and has been applied to the precise mass detection of the cancer biomarker AFP; the experimentally detected AFP antigen mass by the sensor (7.6 pg/mL) is quite close to the calculated one (5.5 pg/mL), two orders of magnitude better than those of the fully antibody-immobilized cantilever sensor. These approaches can promote real applications of the cantilever sensors in cancer diagnosis.

  17. Integrative analysis to select cancer candidate biomarkers to targeted validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Henry; Domingues, Romênia R.; Granato, Daniela C.; Yokoo, Sami; Canevarolo, Rafael R.; Winck, Flavia V.; Ribeiro, Ana Carolina P.; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Filgueiras, Paulo R.; Cruz, Karen S. P.; Barbuto, José Alexandre; Poppi, Ronei J.; Minghim, Rosane; Telles, Guilherme P.; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Fox, Jay W.; Santos-Silva, Alan R.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted proteomics has flourished as the method of choice for prospecting for and validating potential candidate biomarkers in many diseases. However, challenges still remain due to the lack of standardized routines that can prioritize a limited number of proteins to be further validated in human samples. To help researchers identify candidate biomarkers that best characterize their samples under study, a well-designed integrative analysis pipeline, comprising MS-based discovery, feature selection methods, clustering techniques, bioinformatic analyses and targeted approaches was performed using discovery-based proteomic data from the secretomes of three classes of human cell lines (carcinoma, melanoma and non-cancerous). Three feature selection algorithms, namely, Beta-binomial, Nearest Shrunken Centroids (NSC), and Support Vector Machine-Recursive Features Elimination (SVM-RFE), indicated a panel of 137 candidate biomarkers for carcinoma and 271 for melanoma, which were differentially abundant between the tumor classes. We further tested the strength of the pipeline in selecting candidate biomarkers by immunoblotting, human tissue microarrays, label-free targeted MS and functional experiments. In conclusion, the proposed integrative analysis was able to pre-qualify and prioritize candidate biomarkers from discovery-based proteomics to targeted MS. PMID:26540631

  18. Breast cancer subtype predictors revisited: from consensus to concordance?

    OpenAIRE

    MJ. Sontrop, Herman; JT. Reinders, Marcel; D. Moerland, Perry

    2016-01-01

    Background At the molecular level breast cancer comprises a heterogeneous set of subtypes associated with clear differences in gene expression and clinical outcomes. Single sample predictors (SSPs) are built via a two-stage approach consisting of clustering and subtype predictor construction based on the cluster labels of individual cases. SSPs have been criticized because their subtype assignments for the same samples were only moderately concordant (Cohen’s κ0.8). Interestingly, for a given...

  19. Chemoresistive Gas Sensors for the Detection of Colorectal Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Malagù

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous medical studies show that tumor growth is accompanied by protein changes that may lead to the peroxidation of the cell membrane with consequent emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs by breath or intestinal gases that should be seen as biomarkers for colorectal cancer (CRC. The analysis of VOCs represents a non-invasive and potentially inexpensive preliminary screening technique. An array of chemoresistive gas sensors based on screen-printed metal oxide semiconducting films has been selected to discriminate gases of oncological interest, e.g., 1-iodononane and benzene, widely assumed to be biomarkers of colorectal cancer, from those of interference in the gut, such as methane and nitric oxide.

  20. Clinical Utility of Biomarkers in Localized Prostate Cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Leapman, MS; Nguyen, HG; Cooperberg, MR

    2016-01-01

    A new generation of prostate cancer (PCa) biomarkers has emerged, including diagnostic serum and urine markers aimed at refining the identification high-grade tumors and tissue-based gene expression assays offering prognostic and predictive clinical information. Such tests seek to improve treatment-related decisions at multiple decision points, including initial diagnosis and following initial primary therapy. In this review, we aim to contextualize the body of evidence surrounding these emer...

  1. Characterisation of novel biomarkers for cancer therapy monitoring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabáková, Rita; Kollareddy, M.; Tylečková, Jiřina; Halada, Petr; Hajdúch, M.; Kovářová, Hana

    Brixen: Max-Planck-Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 2011. s. 1-1. [5th European Summer School „Proteomic basics“. 31.07.2011-06.08.2011, Brixen] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA MŠk MSM6198959216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : drug resistance * anti-cancer therapy * proteomics * biomarker Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. Plasma alkylresorcinols, biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye intake, and incidence of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrø, Cecilie; Olsen, Anja; Landberg, Rikard;

    2014-01-01

    between alkylresorcinols, biomarkers of whole-grain rye and wheat intake, and colorectal cancer incidence were investigated using prediagnostic plasma samples from colorectal cancer case patients and matched control subjects nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition...

  3. Proteomics and Mass Spectrometry for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field not only in the field of biology but also in translational cancer research. In recent years, mass spectrometry and associated technologies have been explored to identify proteins or a set of proteins specific to a given disease, for the purpose of disease detection and diagnosis. Such biomarkers are being investigated in samples including cells, tissues, serum/plasma, and other types of body fluids. When sufficiently refined, proteomic technologies may pave the way for early detection of cancer or individualized therapy for cancer. Mass spectrometry approaches coupled with bioinformatic tools are being developed for biomarker discovery and validation. Understanding basic concepts and application of such technology by investigators in the field may accelerate the clinical application of protein biomarkers in disease management.Abbreviations: 2DE: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis; ABPP: activity-based protein profiling; CEA: carcinoembryonic antigen; CI: confidence interval; ESI: electrospray ionization; FP: fluorophosphonate; HPLC: high performance liquid chromatography; ICAT: isotope coded affi nitytags; IEF: isoelectric focusing; iTRAQ: isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification; LCMS: combined liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry; LCMSMS: liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry; LOD: limit of detection; m/z: mass to charge ratio; MALDI: matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization; MS: mass spectrometry; MUDPIT: multidimensional protein identification technology; NAF: nipple aspirate fluid; PMF: peptide mass fingerprinting; PSA: prostate specifi c antigen; PTMs: post-translational modifications; RPMA: reverse phase protein microarray; SELDI: surface enhanced laser desorption ionization; TOF: time-of-flight.

  4. Candidate List of yoUr Biomarker (CLUB: A Web-based Platform to Aid Cancer Biomarker Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Leigh Anderson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CLUB (“Candidate List of yoUr Biomarkers” is a freely available, web-based resource designed to support Cancer biomarker research. It is targeted to provide a comprehensive list of candidate biomarkers for various cancers that have been reported by the research community. CLUB provides tools for comparison of marker candidates from different experimental platforms, with the ability to filter, search, query and explore, molecular interaction networks associated with cancer biomarkers from the published literature and from data uploaded by the community. This complex and ambitious project is implemented in phases. As a first step, we have compiled from the literature an initial set of differentially expressed human candidate cancer biomarkers. Each candidate is annotated with information from publicly available databases such as Gene Ontology, Swiss-Prot database, National Center for Biotechnology Information’s reference sequences, Biomolecular Interaction Network Database and IntAct interaction. The user has the option to maintain private lists of biomarker candidates or share and export these for use by the community. Furthermore, users may customize and combine commonly used sets of selection procedures and apply them as a stored workflow using selected candidate lists. To enable an assessment by the user before taking a candidate biomarker to the experimental validation stage, the platform contains the functionality to identify pathways associated with cancer risk, staging, prognosis, outcome in cancer and other clinically associated phenotypes. The system is available at http://club.bii.a-star.edu.sg.

  5. Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is currently treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although approximately 45% of patients respond to neoadjuvant therapy with T-level downstaging, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond. Molecular biomarkers have been investigated for their ability to predict outcome in LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A literature search using PubMed resulted in the initial assessment of 1,204 articles. Articles addressing the ability of a biomarker to predict outcome for LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation were included. Six biomarkers met the criteria for review: p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thymidylate synthase, Ki-67, p21, and bcl-2/bax. On the basis of composite data, p53 is unlikely to have utility as a predictor of response. Epidermal growth factor receptor has shown promise as a predictor when quantitatively evaluated in pretreatment biopsies or when EGFR polymorphisms are evaluated in germline DNA. Thymidylate synthase, when evaluated for polymorphisms in germline DNA, is promising as a predictive biomarker. Ki-67 and bcl-2 are not useful in predicting outcome. p21 needs to be further evaluated to determine its usefulness in predicting outcome. Bax requires more investigation to determine its usefulness. Epidermal growth factor receptor, thymidylate synthase, and p21 should be evaluated in larger prospective clinical trials for their ability to guide preoperative therapy choices in LARC.

  6. Probing the O-glycoproteome of Gastric Cancer Cell Lines for Biomarker Discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira Campos, Diana Alexandra; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Steentoft, Catharina; Gomes, Catarina; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Ferreira, José Alexandre; Afonso, Luis P; Santos, Lúcio L; de Sousa, João Pinto; Mandel, Ulla; Clausen, Henrik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Reis, Celso A

    2015-01-01

    Circulating O-glycoproteins shed from cancer cells represent important serum biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. We have recently shown that selective detection of cancer-associated aberrant glycoforms of circulating O-glycoprotein biomarkers can increase specificity of cancer biom...

  7. Identifying Cancer Biomarkers Via Node Classification within a Mapreduce Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysir Hassan A. Soliman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Big data are giving new research challenges in the life sciences domain because of their variety, volume, veracity, velocity, and value. Predicting gene biomarkers is one of the vital research issues in bioinformatics field, where microarray gene expression and network based methods can be used. These datasets suffer from the huge data voluminous, causing main memory problems. In this paper, a Random Committee Node Classifier algorithm (RCNC is proposed for identifying cancer biomarkers, which is based on microarray gene expression data and Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI data. Data are enriched from other public databases, such as IntACT1 and UniProt2 and Gene Ontology3 (GO. Cancer Biomarkers are identified when applied to different datasets with an accuracy rate an accuracy rate 99.16%, 99.96% precision, 99.24% recall, 99.16% F1-measure and 99.6 ROC. To speed up the performance, it is run within a MapReduce framework, where RCNC MapReduce algorithm is much faster than RCNC sequential algorithm when having large datasets.

  8. Midkine: A Novel Prognostic Biomarker for Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jono, Hirofumi, E-mail: hjono@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Ando, Yukio [Department of Diagnostic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto, 860-8556 (Japan)

    2010-04-20

    Since diagnosis at an early stage still remains a key issue for modern oncology and is crucial for successful cancer therapy, development of sensitive, specific, and non-invasive tumor markers, especially, in serum, is urgently needed. Midkine (MK), a plasma secreted protein, was initially identified in embryonal carcinoma cells at early stages of retinoic acid-induced differentiation. Multiple studies have reported that MK plays important roles in tumor progression, and is highly expressed in various malignant tumors. Because increased serum MK concentrations also have been reported in patients with various tumors, serum MK may have the potential to become a very useful tumor marker. Here, we review and discuss the possibility and usefulness of MK as a novel tumor marker.

  9. Biomarkers for diet and cancer prevention research: potentials and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cindy D DAVIS; John A MILNER

    2007-01-01

    As cancer incidence is projected to increase for decades there is a need for effec-tive preventive strategies. Fortunately, evidence continues to mount that altering dietary habits is an effective and cost-efficient approach for reducing cancer risk and for modifying the biological behavior of tumors. Predictive, validated and sensitive biomarkers, including those that reliably evaluate "intake" or exposure to a specific food or bioactive component, that assess one or more specific bio-logical "effects" that are linked to cancer, and that effectively predict individual "susceptibility" as a function of nutrient-nutrient interactions and genetics, are fundamental to evaluating who will benefit most from dietary interventions. These biomarkers must be readily accessible, easily and reliably assayed, and predictive of a key process(es) involved in cancer. The response to a food is determined not only by the effective concentration of the bioactive food component(s) reaching the target tissue, but also by the amount of the target requiring modification.Thus, this threshold response to foods and their components will vary from indi-vidual to individual. The key to understanding a personalized response is a greater knowledge of nutrigenomics, proteomics and metabolomics.

  10. E-Cadherin as a diagnostic biomarker in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Singhai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: E-cadherin is expressed in most normal epithelial tissues. Selective loss of E-cadherin can cause dedifferentiation and invasiveness in human carcinomas, leading E-cadherin to be classified as a tumor suppressor. Loss of E-cadherin has been demonstrated in invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast, but the relationship between E-cadherin expression and breast cancer histopathology and prognosis is less clear. Aim: Our objective was to assess loss of E-cadherin as a diagnostic breast cancer biomarker and as an aid to the sub-classification of invasive breast cancer. We also correlated the loss of expression of E-cadherin with various clinical and pathologic prognostic factors. Material and Methods: Breast cancer specimens after modified radical mastectomy were obtained from women who underwent surgery at Grant Medical College and Sir J.J Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, India between May 2007 and October 2010. We stained 276 breast cancers specimens with monoclonal antibodies to E-cadherin. The breast cancers were classified by histopathological type. Results: A statistical correlation of E-cadherin loss with a positive diagnosis of invasive lobular carcinoma was found, but there was no correlation with any prognostic tumor variables. A negative E-cadherin stain was a sensitive and specific biomarker to confirm the diagnosis of invasive lobular carcinoma (specificity 97.7%; negative predictive value 96.8%; sensitivity 88.1%; and positive predictive value 91.2%. Positive E-cadherin expression was also associated with tubulolobular carcinomas. Conclusions: E-cadherin immunohistochemistry is helpful in classifying breast cancer cases with indeterminate histopathologic features. E-cadherin loss is uncommon in non-lobular carcinomas but shows no correlation to currently established prognostic variables.

  11. Adaptive Fuzzy Consensus Clustering Framework for Clustering Analysis of Cancer Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Chen, Hantao; You, Jane; Liu, Jiming; Wong, Hau-San; Han, Guoqiang; Li, Le

    2015-01-01

    Performing clustering analysis is one of the important research topics in cancer discovery using gene expression profiles, which is crucial in facilitating the successful diagnosis and treatment of cancer. While there are quite a number of research works which perform tumor clustering, few of them considers how to incorporate fuzzy theory together with an optimization process into a consensus clustering framework to improve the performance of clustering analysis. In this paper, we first propose a random double clustering based cluster ensemble framework (RDCCE) to perform tumor clustering based on gene expression data. Specifically, RDCCE generates a set of representative features using a randomly selected clustering algorithm in the ensemble, and then assigns samples to their corresponding clusters based on the grouping results. In addition, we also introduce the random double clustering based fuzzy cluster ensemble framework (RDCFCE), which is designed to improve the performance of RDCCE by integrating the newly proposed fuzzy extension model into the ensemble framework. RDCFCE adopts the normalized cut algorithm as the consensus function to summarize the fuzzy matrices generated by the fuzzy extension models, partition the consensus matrix, and obtain the final result. Finally, adaptive RDCFCE (A-RDCFCE) is proposed to optimize RDCFCE and improve the performance of RDCFCE further by adopting a self-evolutionary process (SEPP) for the parameter set. Experiments on real cancer gene expression profiles indicate that RDCFCE and A-RDCFCE works well on these data sets, and outperform most of the state-of-the-art tumor clustering algorithms. PMID:26357330

  12. Targeting cancer testis antigens for biomarkers and immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: Current status and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil; Suri; Nirmala; Jagadish; Shikha; Saini; Namita; Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer ranks third among the estimatedcancer cases and cancer related mortalities in United States in 2014. Early detection and efficient therapy remains a significant clinical challenge for this disease. Therefore, there is a need to identify novel tumor asso-ciated molecules to target for biomarker development and immunotherapy. In this regard, cancer testis antigens have emerged as a potential targets for developing novel clinical biomarkers and immunotherapy for various malignancies. These germ cell specific proteins exhibit aberrant expression in cancer cells and contribute in tumorigenesis. Owing to their unique expression profile and immunogenicity in cancer patients, cancer testis antigens are clinically referred as the most promising tumor associated antigens. Several cancer testis antigens have been studied in colorectal cancer but none of them could be used in clinical practice. This review is an attempt to address the promising cancer testis antigens in colorectal cancer and their possible clinical implications as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets with particular focus on challenges and future interventions.

  13. Exosomal Proteins as a Diagnostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandfeld-Paulsen, B; Jakobsen, K R; Bæk, R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exosomes have been suggested as promising biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), since they contain proteins from their originating cells and are readily available in plasma. In this study, we explore the potential of exosome protein profiling in diagnosing lung cancer...... patients of all stages and various histological subtypes. METHODS: Plasma was isolated from 581 patients (431 with lung cancer, 150 controls). The Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array was used to phenotype exosomes. The EV Array contained 49 antibodies for capturing exosomes. Subsequently, a cocktail of biotin......-conjugated CD9, CD81 and CD63 antibodies was used to detect and visualize captured exosomes. Multi-marker models were made combining two or more markers. The optimal multi-marker model was evaluated by Area under the curve (AUC) and Random Forests analysis. RESULTS: The markers CD151, CD171 and Tspan8 were...

  14. Circulating DNA as Potential Biomarker for Cancer Individualized Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shaorong; Liu Baorui; Lu Jianwei; Feng Jifeng

    2013-01-01

    Cancer individualized therapy often requires for gene mutation analysis of tumor tissue. However, tumor tissue is not always available in clinical practice, particularly from patients with refractory and recurrence disease. Even if patients have sufifcient tumor tissue for detection, as development of cancer, the gene status and drug sensitivity of tumor tissues could also change. Hence, screening mutations from primary tumor tissues becomes useless, it’s necessary to ifnd a surrogate tumor tissue for individualized gene screening. Circulating DNA is digested rapidly from blood, which could provide real-time information of the released fragment and make the real-time detection possible. Therefore, it’s expected that circulating DNA could be a potential tumor biomarker for cancer individualized therapy. This review focuses on the biology and clinical utility of circulating DNA mainly on gene mutation detection. Besides, its current status and possible direction in this research area is summarized and discussed objectively.

  15. Comparison of proteomic biomarker panels in urine and serum for ovarian cancer diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Anette Lykke; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Høgdall, Estrid; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Yip, Christine; Risum, Signe Normann; Pedersen, Anette Tønnes; Hartwell, Dorte; Fung, Eric T; Høgdall, Claus

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to confirm previously found candidate epithelial ovarian cancer biomarkers in urine and to compare a paired serum biomarker panel and a urine biomarker panel from the same study cohort with regard to the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the ...

  16. Toward consensus in the analysis of urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine as a noninvasive biomarker of oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Mark D; Olinski, Ryszard; Loft, Steffen;

    2010-01-01

    Of the DNA-derived biomarkers of oxidative stress, urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is the most frequently measured. However, there is significant discrepancy between chromatographic and immunoassay approaches, and intratechnique agreement among all available chromatography...... as mass spectrometric (MS), electrochemical detection (EC), or enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Overall, there was good within-technique agreement, with the majority of laboratories' results lying within 1 sd of their consensus mean. However, ELISA showed more within-technique variation than did...... of oxidative stress....

  17. Ki-67 biomarker in breast cancer of Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit V. Patil

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biological markers that reliably predict clinical or pathological response to primary systemic therapy early during a course of chemotherapy may have considerable clinical potential. Aims: Aims of study to evaluated changes in Ki-67 (MIB-1 labeling index and apoptotic index (AI before, during, and after neoadjuvant anthracycline chemotherapy in breast cancer in Indian women. Materials and Methods: Breast cancer tissues were collected from Grant Medical College and Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals, Mumbai, India. Twenty-seven patients receiving neoadjuvant FEC (5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy for operable breast cancer underwent repeat core biopsy after 21 days of treatment. Results: The objective clinical response rate was 56%. Eight patients (31% achieved a pathological response by histopathological criteria; two patients had a near-complete pathological response. Increased day-21 AI was a statistically significant predictor of pathological response (p = 0.049. A strong trend for predicting pathological response was seen with higher Ki-67 indices at day 21 and AI at surgery (p = 0.06 and 0.06, respectively. Conclusion: The clinical utility of early changes in biological marker expression during chemotherapy remains unclear. Until further prospectively validated evidence confirming the reliability of predictive biomarkers is available, clinical decision-making should not be based upon individual biological tumor biomarker profiles.

  18. Circulating exosomal microRNAs as biomarkers of colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Ogata-Kawata

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs have been attracting major interest as potential diagnostic biomarkers of cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the miRNA profiles of serum exosomes and to identify those that are altered in colorectal cancer (CRC. To evaluate their use as diagnostic biomarkers, the relationship between specific exosomal miRNA levels and pathological changes of patients, including disease stage and tumor resection, was examined. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Microarray analyses of miRNAs in exosome-enriched fractions of serum samples from 88 primary CRC patients and 11 healthy controls were performed. The expression levels of miRNAs in the culture medium of five colon cancer cell lines were also compared with those in the culture medium of a normal colon-derived cell line. The expression profiles of miRNAs that were differentially expressed between CRC and control sample sets were verified using 29 paired samples from post-tumor resection patients. The sensitivities of selected miRNAs as biomarkers of CRC were evaluated and compared with those of known tumor markers (CA19-9 and CEA using a receiver operating characteristic analysis. The expression levels of selected miRNAs were also validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses of an independent set of 13 CRC patients. RESULTS: The serum exosomal levels of seven miRNAs (let-7a, miR-1229, miR-1246, miR-150, miR-21, miR-223, and miR-23a were significantly higher in primary CRC patients, even those with early stage disease, than in healthy controls, and were significantly down-regulated after surgical resection of tumors. These miRNAs were also secreted at significantly higher levels by colon cancer cell lines than by a normal colon-derived cell line. The high sensitivities of the seven selected exosomal miRNAs were confirmed by a receiver operating characteristic analysis. CONCLUSION: Exosomal miRNA signatures appear to mirror pathological changes of CRC patients and

  19. Sputum-Based Molecular Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Lung Cancer: Limitations and Promise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, with an overall survival of 15% at five years. Biomarkers that can sensitively and specifically detect lung cancer at early stage are crucial for improving this poor survival rate. Sputum has been the target for the discovery of non-invasive biomarkers for lung cancer because it contains airway epithelial cells, and molecular alterations identified in sputum are most likely to reflect tumor-associated changes or field cancerization caused by smoking in the lung. Sputum-based molecular biomarkers include morphology, allelic imbalance, promoter hypermethylation, gene mutations and, recently, differential miRNA expression. To improve the sensitivity and reproducibility of sputum-based biomarkers, we recommend standardization of processing protocols, bronchial epithelial cell enrichment, and identification of field cancerization biomarkers

  20. Pathological examination of breast cancer biomarkers: current status in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shinobu

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews the current status of pathological evaluation for biomarkers in Japan. The introduced issues are the international trends for estimation of biomarkers considering diagnosis and treatment decision, and pathological issues under discussion, and how Japanese Breast Cancer Society (JBCS) members have addressed issues related to pathology and biomarkers evaluation. As topics of immunohistochemical study, (1) ASCO/CAP guidelines, (2) Ki67 and other markers, (3) quantification and image analysis, (4) application of cytologic samples, (5) pre-analytical process, and (6) Japan Pathology Quality Assurance System are introduced. Various phases of concepts, guidelines, and methodologies are co-existed in today's clinical practice. It is expected in near future that conventional methods and molecular procedures will be emerged, and Japanese Quality assurance/Quality control (QA/QC) system will work practically. What we have to do in the next generation are to validate novel procedures, to evaluate the relationship between traditional concepts and newly proposed ideas, to establish a well organized QA/QC system, and to standardize pre-analytical process that are the basis of all procedures using pathological tissues. PMID:25239167

  1. Translating colorectal cancer genetics into clinically useful biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley-Bunker, A; Walker, L C; Currie, M J; Pearson, J; Eglinton, T

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health problem worldwide accounting for over a million deaths annually. While many patients with Stage II and III CRC can be cured with combinations of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, this is morbid costly treatment and a significant proportion will suffer recurrence and eventually die of CRC. Increased understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC has the potential to identify high risk patients and target therapy more appropriately. Despite increased understanding of the molecular events underlying CRC development, established molecular techniques have only produced a limited number of biomarkers suitable for use in routine clinical practice to predict risk, prognosis and response to treatment. Recent rapid technological developments, however, have made genomic sequencing of CRC more economical and efficient, creating potential for the discovery of genetic biomarkers that have greater diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic capabilities for the management of CRC. This paper reviews the current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC, and summarizes molecular biomarkers that surgeons will encounter in current clinical use as well as those under development in clinical and preclinical trials. New molecular technologies are reviewed together with their potential impact on the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CRC and their potential clinical utility in classification, diagnosis, prognosis and targeting of therapy. PMID:26990814

  2. Circulating microRNAs as Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob Vasehus Schou; Julia Sidenius Johansen; Dorte Nielsen; Simona Rossi

    2016-01-01

    MiRNAs are suggested as promising cancer biomarkers. They are stable and extractable from a variety of clinical tissue specimens (fresh frozen or formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue) and a variety of body fluids (e.g., blood, urine, saliva). However, there are several challenges that need to be solved, considering their potential as biomarkers in cancer, such as lack of consistency between biomarker panels in independent studies due to lack of standardized sample handling and processing, ...

  3. Validation of Candidate Serum Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers for Early Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Su

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have previously analyzed protein profi les using Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectroscopy (SELDI-TOF-MS [Kozak et al. 2003, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 100:12343–8] and identified 3 differentially expressed serum proteins for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer (OC [Kozak et al. 2005, Proteomics, 5:4589–96], namely, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I, transthyretin (TTR and transferin (TF. The objective of the present study is to determine the efficacy of the three OC biomarkers for the detection of early stage (ES OC, in direct comparison to CA125.Methods: The levels of CA125, apoA-I, TTR and TF were measured in 392 serum samples [82 women with normal ovaries (N, 24 women with benign ovarian tumors (B, 85 women with ovarian tumors of low malignant potential (LMP, 126 women with early stage ovarian cancer (ESOC, and 75 women with late stage ovarian cancer (LSOC], obtained through the GOG and Cooperative Human Tissue Network. Following statistical analysis, multivariate regression models were built to evaluate the utility of the three OC markers in early detection.Results: Multiple logistic regression models (MLRM utilizing all biomarker values (CA125, TTR, TF and apoA-I from all histological subtypes (serous, mucinous, and endometrioid adenocarcinoma distinguished normal samples from LMP with 91% sensitivity (specifi city 92%, and normal samples from ESOC with a sensitivity of 89% (specifi city 92%. MLRM, utilizing values of all four markers from only the mucinous histological subtype showed that collectively, CA125, TTR, TF and apoA-I, were able to distinguish normal samples from mucinous LMP with 90% sensitivity, and further distinguished normal samples from early stage mucinous ovarian cancer with a sensitivity of 95%. In contrast, in serum samples from patients with mucinous tumors, CA125 alone was able to distinguish normal samples from LMP and early stage ovarian cancer with a sensitivity of

  4. The Janus serum bank and biomarkers of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Gislefoss

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Janus serum bank, established in 1973, contains sera stored at –25 degrees collected from 330,000 originally healthy individuals. The number of cancer cases have increased from zero in 1973 to more than 50,000 in 2005, including invasive and non-invasive cancers. Information on cases have been obtained by coupling the Janus file against the Norwegian Cancer Registry. The sera have been used in over 70 different cancers research projects, usually in case-control studies and in collaboration with national and international research groups. The type of biomarker analysed include antibodies against Chlamydia, CMV, Epstein Barr virus, HPV and Helicobacter pylori. Leptin, long chain fatty acids, androgens and other hormones, vitamins as well as environmental toxins such as organochlorines are other types of cancer biomarkers investigated. Mutation analyses (BRCA-1 etc have been possible using PCR and the trace amounts of DNA remaining in the sera.Janus serum bank ble etablert i 1973 og inneholder sera lagret ved –25 grader, innsamlet fra 330.000 opprinnelig friske personer. Antall krefttilfeller har steget fra null i 1973 til over 50.000 i år 2005, inkludert både invasiv og ikke-invasiv kreft. Informasjon om kasus er tilgjengelig ved å koble Janus-filene mot Kreftregisterets databaser. Serumprøvene er blitt benyttet i over 70 forskjellige kreftforskningsprosjekter, som oftest i kasus-kontroll studier og i samarbeide med en rekke nasjonale og internasjonale forskningsgrupper. Mange ulike biomarkører på kreft er blitt analysert, bl.a. antistoffer mot Chlamydia, CMV, Epstein Barr virus, HPV og Helicobacter pylori. Leptin, lange fettsyrer, androgener og andre hormoner, vitaminer såvel som miljøgifter av typen organiske klorforbindelser er eksempler på andre kreftbiomarkører som er undersøkt. Det har også vært mulig å gjøre mutasjonsanalyser (BRCA-1 etc ved å bruke PCR til å amplifisere opp den spormengden DNA som finnes i serum.

  5. Urinary metalloproteinases: noninvasive biomarkers for breast cancer risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pories, Susan E; Zurakowski, David; Roy, Roopali;

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and a disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM 12) can be detected in the urine of breast cancer patients and provide independent prediction of disease status. To evaluate the potential of urinary metalloproteinases as biomarkers to predict breast cancer risk status......, urine samples from women with known risk marker lesions, atypical hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), were analyzed. Urine samples were obtained from 148 women: 44 women with atypical hyperplasia, 24 women with LCIS, and 80 healthy controls. MMP analysis was done using gelatin zymography...... and ADAM 12 analysis was done via immunoblotting with monospecific antibodies and subsequent densitometric measurement. Positive urinary MMP-9 levels indicated a 5-fold risk of atypical hyperplasia and >13-fold risk of LCIS compared with normal controls. Urinary ADAM 12 levels were significantly...

  6. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  7. PBX3 is a putative biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Håkon; Grytli, Helene Hartvedt; Nygård, Ståle; Wang, Wanzhong; Ögren, Olov; Zhao, Sen; Løvf, Marthe; Katz, Betina; Skotheim, Rolf I; Bjartell, Anders; Eri, Lars Magne; Berge, Viktor; Svindland, Aud; Taskén, Kristin Austlid

    2016-10-15

    There is a great need to identify new and better prognostic and predictive biomarkers to stratify prostate cancer patients for optimal treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the expression profile of pre-B cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) transcription factors in prostate cancer with an emphasis on investigating whether PBX3 harbours any prognostic value. The expression profile of PBX3 and PBX1 in prostate tissue was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the expression of PBX3 transcript variants was analyzed by RT-PCR, NanoString Technologies®, and by analyzing RNA sequence data. The potential of PBX3 to predict prognosis, either at mRNA or protein level, was studied in four independent cohorts. PBX3 was mainly expressed in the nucleus of normal prostate basal cells, while it showed cytosolic expression in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer cells. We detected four PBX3 transcript variants in prostate tissue. Competing risk regression analysis revealed that high PBX3 expression was associated with slower progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (sub-hazard ratio (SHR) 0.18, 95% CI: 0.081-0.42, p values aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:27273830

  8. Circulating microRNAs: Novel biomarkers for esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Li Zhou, Li-Dong Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process, involving a variety of changes in gene expression and physiological structure change. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding endogenous RNA molecules. Recent innovation in miRNAs profiling technology have shed new light on the pathology of esophageal carcinoma (EC, and also heralded great potential for exploring novel biomarkers for both EC diagnosis and treatment. Frequent dysregulation of miRNA in malignancy highlights the study of molecular factors upstream of gene expression following the extensive investigation on elucidating the important role of miRNA in carcinogenesis. We herein present a thorough review of the role of miRNAs in EC, addressing miRNA functions, their putative role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors and their potential target genes. The recent progresses in discovering the quantifiable circulating cancer-associated miRNAs indicate the potential clinical use of miRNAs as novel minimally invasive biomarkers for EC and other cancers. We also discuss the potential role of miRNAs in detection, screening and surveillance of EC as miRNAs can be a potential target in personalized treatment of EC.

  9. A Preliminary Analysis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Biomarkers in Serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE-YUAN XIAO; YING TANG; XIU-PING WEI; DA-CHENG HE

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify potential serum biomarkers that could be used to discriminate lungcancers from normal. Methods Proteomic spectra of twenty-eight serum samples from patientswith non-small cell lung cancer and twelve from normal individuals were generated by SELDI(Surfaced Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization) Mass Spectrometry. Anion-exchange columns wereused to fractionate the sera into 6 designated pH groups. Two different types of protein chip arrays,IMAC-Cu and WCX2, were employed. Samples were examined in PBSII Protein Chip Reader(Ciphergen Biosystem Inc) and the discriminatory profiling between cancer and normal samples wasanalyzed with Biomarker Pattern software. Results Five distinct potential lung cancer biomarkerswith higher sensitivity and specificity were found, with four common biomarkers in both IMAC-Cuand WCX2 chip; the remaining biomarker occurred only in WCX2 chip. Two biomarkers wereup-regulated while three biomarkers were down-regulated in the serum samples from patients withnon-small cell lung cancer. The sensitivities provided by the individual biomarkers were 75%-96.43%and specificities were 75%-100%. Conclusions The preliminary results suggest that serum is acapable resource for detecting specific non-small cell lung cancer biomarkers. SELDI massspectrometry is a useful tool for the detection and identification of new potential biomarker ofnon-small cell lung cancer in serum.

  10. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future

  11. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence R. [Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  12. Expert consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of cancer-related depressed mood state based on Chinese medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Shaodan Tian; Mei Jia; Li Hou; Xinyi Chen; Dongyun Li; Tianwei Guo

    2015-01-01

    This consensus statement is organized into six parts: 1) Definitions: cancer-related depressed mood state is defined as a group of depressive symptoms, rather than major depressive disorder. Thus, “cancer-related depression” or “depressed mood state” is introduced as standard terminology and associated with the Chinese medicine concept of “yu zheng” (depression syndrome). 2) Pathogenesis: factors including psychological stress, cancer pain, cancer fatigue, sleep disorders, surgery trauma, che...

  13. Biomarkers for cancer-related fatigue and adverse reactions to chemotherapy in lung cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sha, Fei; ZHUANG, SHANSHAN; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Liqun; YANG, YUXIAN; ZHANG, SHENGQI; Jiang, Yi; QIU, GUODONG; Chen, Chen; ZHENG, JIETING; ZHANG, SHUYAO

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the biomarkers that appear to be correlated with cancer-related fatigue (CRF) and the adverse reactions (ADRs) to chemotherapy. A total of 100 lung cancer patients were selected and CRF prior to and following chemotherapy was evaluated. The plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1 and the level of 17-hydroxycorticosteroid (17-OHCS) in the urine were analyzed and correlated with CRF and the ADRs associated with chemotherapy. ...

  14. Biomarker Identification and Pathway Analysis by Serum Metabolomics of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingrong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death, for which no validated tumor biomarker is sufficiently accurate to be useful for diagnosis. Additionally, the metabolic alterations associated with the disease are unclear. In this study, we investigated the construction, interaction, and pathways of potential lung cancer biomarkers using metabolomics pathway analysis based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database and the Human Metabolome Database to identify the top altered pathways for analysis and visualization. We constructed a diagnostic model using potential serum biomarkers from patients with lung cancer. We assessed their specificity and sensitivity according to the area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves, which could be used to distinguish patients with lung cancer from normal subjects. The pathway analysis indicated that sphingolipid metabolism was the top altered pathway in lung cancer. ROC curve analysis indicated that glycerophospho-N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (GpAEA and sphingosine were potential sensitive and specific biomarkers for lung cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Compared with the traditional lung cancer diagnostic biomarkers carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratin 19 fragment, GpAEA and sphingosine were as good or more appropriate for detecting lung cancer. We report our identification of potential metabolic diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of lung cancer and clarify the metabolic alterations in lung cancer.

  15. Circular RNAs as potential biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengling; Nazarali, Adil J; Ji, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a naturally occurring type of universal and diverse endogenous noncoding RNAs which unlike linear RNAs, have covalently linked ends. They are usually stable, abundant, conserved RNA molecules and often exhibit tissue/developmental-stage specific expression. Functional circRNAs have been identified to act as microRNA sponges and RNA-binding protein (RBP) sequestering agents as well as transcriptional regulators. These multiple functional roles elicit a great potential for circRNAs in biological applications. Emerging evidence shows that circRNAs play important roles in several diseases, particularly in cancer where they act through regulating protein expression of the pivotal genes that are critical for carcinogenesis. The presence of abundant circRNAs in saliva, exosomes and clinical standard blood samples will make them potential diagnostic or predictive biomarkers for diseases, particularly for cancer development, progression and prognosis. Here, we review the current literature and provide evidence for the impact of circRNAs in cancers and their potential significance in cancer prognosis and clinical treatment. PMID:27429839

  16. Evidence and consensus of diagnosis of biliary tract and ampullary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explains the content and background of the recent guideline of the cancers in the title where, as the currently available evidence is mostly lower than level IV, experts' consensual recommendations are mainly described. For the biliary tract (BT) cancer, in cases of jaundice, right upper abdominal pain and abnormal biochemical findings, recommended is the examination by abdominal ultrasonography (US). There is no specific tumor marker for the cancer. Next diagnostic mean is the enhanced CT, especially multidetector-row CT, and MR-cholangio-pancreatic duct imaging. Direct BT imaging is necessary for diagnosis of the horizontal extension of the BT cancer. In the gallbladder cancer, no particular clinical symptoms are known and its differential diagnosis involving the stage decision is important from benign polyp, cholecystitis and gallstone by endoscopic US (EUS), CT and multi detector row CT (MDCT). Endoscopic direct biopsy is possible in the case of ampullary cancer and preoperative pathologic diagnosis is possible. For metastases and local extension, recommended are CT, MRI, EUS and intraductal-US. The guideline above is written standing on the low level evidences and on current experts' consensus, and further examination and evaluation are needed in those diagnoses. (R.T.)

  17. Consensus Recommendations for Advancing Breast Cancer: Risk Identification and Screening in Ethnically Diverse Younger Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Stojadinovic, Thomas A Summers, John Eberhardt, Albert Cerussi, Warren Grundfest, Charles M. Peterson, Michael Brazaitis, Elizabeth Krupinski, Harold Freeman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A need exists for a breast cancer risk identification paradigm that utilizes relevant demographic, clinical, and other readily obtainable patient-specific data in order to provide individualized cancer risk assessment, direct screening efforts, and detect breast cancer at an early disease stage in historically underserved populations, such as younger women (under age 40 and minority populations, who represent a disproportionate number of military beneficiaries. Recognizing this unique need for military beneficiaries, a consensus panel was convened by the USA TATRC to review available evidence for individualized breast cancer risk assessment and screening in young (< 40, ethnically diverse women with an overall goal of improving care for military beneficiaries. In the process of review and discussion, it was determined to publish our findings as the panel believes that our recommendations have the potential to reduce health disparities in risk assessment, health promotion, disease prevention, and early cancer detection within and in other underserved populations outside of the military. This paper aims to provide clinicians with an overview of the clinical factors, evidence and recommendations that are being used to advance risk assessment and screening for breast cancer in the military.

  18. Biomarker Identification and Pathway Analysis by Serum Metabolomics of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death, for which no validated tumor biomarker is sufficiently accurate to be useful for diagnosis. Additionally, the metabolic alterations associated with the disease are unclear. In this study, we investigated the construction, interaction, and pathways of potential lung cancer biomarkers using metabolomics pathway analysis based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database and the Human Metabolome Database to identify the top...

  19. TAGCNA: a method to identify significant consensus events of copy number alterations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiguo; Zhang, Junying; Yang, Liying; Zhang, Shengli; Chen, Baodi; Geng, Yaojun; Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Somatic copy number alteration (CNA) is a common phenomenon in cancer genome. Distinguishing significant consensus events (SCEs) from random background CNAs in a set of subjects has been proven to be a valuable tool to study cancer. In order to identify SCEs with an acceptable type I error rate, better computational approaches should be developed based on reasonable statistics and null distributions. In this article, we propose a new approach named TAGCNA for identifying SCEs in somatic CNAs that may encompass cancer driver genes. TAGCNA employs a peel-off permutation scheme to generate a reasonable null distribution based on a prior step of selecting tag CNA markers from the genome being considered. We demonstrate the statistical power of TAGCNA on simulated ground truth data, and validate its applicability using two publicly available cancer datasets: lung and prostate adenocarcinoma. TAGCNA identifies SCEs that are known to be involved with proto-oncogenes (e.g. EGFR, CDK4) and tumor suppressor genes (e.g. CDKN2A, CDKN2B), and provides many additional SCEs with potential biological relevance in these data. TAGCNA can be used to analyze the significance of CNAs in various cancers. It is implemented in R and is freely available at http://tagcna.sourceforge.net/. PMID:22815924

  20. Tumor interstitial fluid - a treasure trove of cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J; Timmermans-Wielenga, Vera; Talman, Mai-Lis; Serizawa, Reza R; Moreira, José M A

    2013-11-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical secretion, non-classical secretion, secretion via exosomes and membrane protein shedding. Consequently, the interstitial aqueous phase of solid tumors is a highly promising resource for the discovery of molecules associated with pathological changes in tissues. Firstly, it allows one to delve deeper into the regulatory mechanisms and functions of secretion-related processes in tumor development. Secondly, the anomalous secretion of molecules that is innate to tumors and the tumor microenvironment, being associated with cancer progression, offers a valuable source for biomarker discovery and possible targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we provide an overview of the features of tumor-associated interstitial fluids, based on recent and updated information obtained mainly from our studies of breast cancer. Data from the study of interstitial fluids recovered from several other types of cancer are also discussed. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled: The Updated Secretome. PMID:23416532

  1. Circulating MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Biliary Tract Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letelier, Pablo; Riquelme, Ismael; Hernández, Alfonso H.; Guzmán, Neftalí; Farías, Jorge G.; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a group of highly aggressive malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. The current diagnosis is based mainly on imaging and intraoperative exploration due to brush cytology havinga low sensitivity and the standard markers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate 19-9 (CA19-9), not having enough sensitivity nor specificity to be used in a differential diagnosis and early stage detection. Thus, better non-invasive methods that can distinguish between normal and pathological tissue are needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded non-coding RNA molecules of ~20–22 nucleotides that regulate relevant physiological mechanisms and can also be involved in carcinogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are detectable in multiple body fluids, showing great stability, either free or trapped in circulating microvesicles, such as exosomes. miRNAs are ideal biomarkers that may be used in screening and prognosis in biliary tract cancers, aiding also in the clinical decisions at different stages of cancer treatment. This review highlights the progress in the analysis of circulating miRNAs in serum, plasma and bile as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of BTCs. PMID:27223281

  2. Role of MGMT as biomarker in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inno, Alessandro; Fanetti, Giuseppe; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Gori, Stefania; Maggi, Claudia; Cirillo, Massimo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Nichetti, Federico; Martinetti, Antonia; de Braud, Filippo; Bossi, Ilaria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, occurring in about 30%-40% of metastatic colorectal cancer. Its prognostic role has not been defined yet, but loss of expression of MGMT, which is secondary to gene promoter methylation, results in an interesting high response to alkylating agents such as dacarbazine and temozolomide. In a phase 2 study on heavily pre-treated patients with MGMT methylated metastatic colorectal cancer, temozolomide achieved about 30% of disease control rate. Activating mutations of RAS or BRAF genes as well as mismatch repair deficiency may represent mechanisms of resistance to alkylating agents, but a dose-dense schedule of temozolomide may potentially restore sensitivity in RAS-mutant patients. Further development of temozolomide in MGMT methylated colorectal cancer includes investigation of synergic combinations with other agents such as fluoropyrimidines and research for additional biomarkers, in order to better define the role of temozolomide in the treatment of individual patients. PMID:25516857

  3. Digital image analysis outperforms manual biomarker assessment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålhammar, Gustav; Fuentes Martinez, Nelson; Lippert, Michael; Tobin, Nicholas P; Mølholm, Ida; Kis, Lorand; Rosin, Gustaf; Rantalainen, Mattias; Pedersen, Lars; Bergh, Jonas; Grunkin, Michael; Hartman, Johan

    2016-04-01

    In the spectrum of breast cancers, categorization according to the four gene expression-based subtypes 'Luminal A,' 'Luminal B,' 'HER2-enriched,' and 'Basal-like' is the method of choice for prognostic and predictive value. As gene expression assays are not yet universally available, routine immunohistochemical stains act as surrogate markers for these subtypes. Thus, congruence of surrogate markers and gene expression tests is of utmost importance. In this study, 3 cohorts of primary breast cancer specimens (total n=436) with up to 28 years of survival data were scored for Ki67, ER, PR, and HER2 status manually and by digital image analysis (DIA). The results were then compared for sensitivity and specificity for the Luminal B subtype, concordance to PAM50 assays in subtype classification and prognostic power. The DIA system used was the Visiopharm Integrator System. DIA outperformed manual scoring in terms of sensitivity and specificity for the Luminal B subtype, widely considered the most challenging distinction in surrogate subclassification, and produced slightly better concordance and Cohen's κ agreement with PAM50 gene expression assays. Manual biomarker scores and DIA essentially matched each other for Cox regression hazard ratios for all-cause mortality. When the Nottingham combined histologic grade (Elston-Ellis) was used as a prognostic surrogate, stronger Spearman's rank-order correlations were produced by DIA. Prognostic value of Ki67 scores in terms of likelihood ratio χ(2) (LR χ(2)) was higher for DIA that also added significantly more prognostic information to the manual scores (LR-Δχ(2)). In conclusion, the system for DIA evaluated here was in most aspects a superior alternative to manual biomarker scoring. It also has the potential to reduce time consumption for pathologists, as many of the steps in the workflow are either automatic or feasible to manage without pathological expertise. PMID:26916072

  4. Cell Line Modeling to Study Biomarker Panel in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    NickKholgh, Bita; Fang, Xiaolan; Winters, Shira M.; Raina, Anvi; Pandya, Komal S.; Gyabaah, Kenneth; Fino, Nora; Balaji, K.C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND African–American men with prostate cancer (PCa) present with higher-grade and -stage tumors compared to Caucasians. While the disparity may result from multiple factors, a biological basis is often strongly suspected. Currently, few well-characterized experimental model systems are available to study the biological basis of racial disparity in PCa. We report a validated in vitro cell line model system that could be used for the purpose. METHODS We assembled a PCa cell line model that included currently available African–American PCa cell lines and LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and C4-2 (castration-resistant) Caucasian PCa cells. The utility of the cell lines in studying the biological basis of variance in a malignant phenotype was explored using a multiplex biomarker panel consisting of proteins that have been proven to play a role in the progression of PCa. The panel expression was evaluated by Western blot and RT-PCR in cell lines and validated in human PCa tissues by RT-PCR. As proof-of-principle to demonstrate the utility of our model in functional studies, we performed MTS viability assays and molecular studies. RESULTS The dysregulation of the multiplex biomarker panel in primary African–American cell line (E006AA) was similar to metastatic Caucasian cell lines, which would suggest that the cell line model could be used to study an inherent aggressive phenotype in African–American men with PCa. We had previously demonstrated that Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is a novel kinase that is down regulated in advanced prostate cancer. We established the functional relevance by over expressing PKD1, which resulted in decreased proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in PCa cells. Moreover, we established the feasibility of studying the expression of the multiplex biomarker panel in archived human PCa tissue from African–Americans and Caucasians as a prelude to future translational studies. CONCLUSION We have characterized a novel in

  5. Putative Biomarkers and Targets of Estrogen Receptor Negative Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Byers

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a progressive and potentially fatal disease that affects women of all ages. Like all progressive diseases, early and reliable diagnosis is the key for successful treatment and annihilation. Biomarkers serve as indicators of pathological, physiological, or pharmacological processes. Her2/neu, CA15.3, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and cytokeratins are biomarkers that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. The structural and functional complexity of protein biomarkers and the heterogeneity of the breast cancer pathology present challenges to the scientific community. Here we review estrogen receptor-related putative breast cancer biomarkers, including those of putative breast cancer stem cells, a minor population of estrogen receptor negative tumor cells that retain the stem cell property of self renewal. We also review a few promising cytoskeleton targets for ER alpha negative breast cancer.

  6. Intratumour variation of biomarker expression by immunohistochemistry in resectable non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Ravn, Jesper;

    2013-01-01

    truly reflect the pattern of biomarker expression. It may also be an important factor in chemo resistance, as tumours with heterogeneous biomarker expression may potentially harbour chemo resistant tumour clones. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical evaluation of the expression of excision repair...... intratumour heterogeneity in 33-87% of tumours examined. This heterogeneity may influence results in studies investigating the therapeutic impact of predictive biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)....

  7. Investigating Multi-cancer Biomarkers and Their Cross-predictability in the Expression Profiles of Multiple Cancer Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George C. Tseng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technology has been widely applied to the analysis of many malignancies, however, integrative analyses across multiple studies are rarely investigated. In this study we performed a meta-analysis on the expression profiles of four published studies analyzing organ donor, benign tissues adjacent to tumor and tumor tissues from liver, prostate, lung and bladder samples. We identified 99 distinct multi-cancer biomarkers in the comparison of all three tissues in liver and prostate and 44 in the comparison of normal versus tumor in liver, prostate and lung. The bladder samples appeared to have a different list of biomarkers from the other three cancer types. The identified multi-cancer biomarkers achieved high accuracy similar to using whole genome in the within-cancer-type prediction. They also performed superior than the one using whole genome in inter-cancer-type prediction. To test the validity of the multi-cancer biomarkers, 23 independent prostate cancer samples were evaluated and 96% accuracy was achieved in inter-study prediction from the original prostate, liver and lung cancer data sets respectively. The result suggests that the compact lists of multi-cancer biomarkers are important in cancer development and represent the common signatures of malignancies of multiple cancer types. Pathway analysis revealed important tumorogenesis functional categories.

  8. Circulating microRNAs as Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Vasehus Schou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MiRNAs are suggested as promising cancer biomarkers. They are stable and extractable from a variety of clinical tissue specimens (fresh frozen or formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue and a variety of body fluids (e.g., blood, urine, saliva. However, there are several challenges that need to be solved, considering their potential as biomarkers in cancer, such as lack of consistency between biomarker panels in independent studies due to lack of standardized sample handling and processing, use of inconsistent normalization approaches, and differences in patients populations. Focusing on colorectal cancer (CRC, divergent results regarding circulating miRNAs as prognostic or predictive biomarkers are reported in the literature. In the present review, we summarize the current data on circulating miRNAs as prognostic/predictive biomarkers in patients with localized and metastatic CRC (mCRC.

  9. Consensus paper of the WFSBP Task Force on Biological Markers: Criteria for biomarkers and endophenotypes of schizophrenia part I: Neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaut, Florence; Boutros, Nash N; Jarema, Marek; Oranje, Bob; Hasan, Alkomiet; Daskalakis, Zafiris Jeffrey; Wichniak, Adam; Schmitt, Andrea; Riederer, Peter; Falkai, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The neurophysiological components that have been proposed as biomarkers or as endophenotypes for schizophrenia can be measured through electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), polysomnography (PSG), registration of event-related potentials (ERPs), assessment of smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM) and antisaccade paradigms. Most of them demonstrate deficits in schizophrenia, show at least moderate stability over time and do not depend on clinical status, which means that they fulfil the criteria as valid endophenotypes for genetic studies. Deficits in cortical inhibition and plasticity measured using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques seem promising markers of outcome and prognosis. However the utility of these markers as biomarkers for predicting conversion to psychosis, response to treatments, or for tracking disease progression needs to be further studied. PMID:26213111

  10. Biomarkers of ambient air pollution and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demetriou, Christiana A; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Loft, Steffen;

    2012-01-01

    these studies, causality assessment can benefit from biomarker research. In the present systematic review, we assess the contribution of intermediate biomarkers in epidemiological studies, to ascertain whether their measurement reinforces causal reasoning. We have reviewed 524 papers which described the...

  11. Proteomics in Cancer Biomarkers Discovery: Challenges and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem M. Sallam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of recent high-throughput technologies to various fields of science and medicine, it is becoming clear that obtaining large amounts of data is no longer a problem in modern research laboratories. However, coherent study designs, optimal conditions for obtaining high-quality data, and compelling interpretation, in accordance with the evidence-based systems biology, are critical factors in ensuring the emergence of good science out of these recent technologies. This review focuses on the proteomics field and its new perspectives on cancer research. Cornerstone publications that have tremendously helped scientists and clinicians to better understand cancer pathogenesis; to discover novel diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers; and to suggest novel therapeutic targets will be presented. The author of this review aims at presenting some of the relevant literature data that helped as a step forward in bridging the gap between bench work results and bedside potentials. Undeniably, this review cannot include all the work that is being produced by expert research groups all over the world.

  12. HNRNPC as a candidate biomarker for chemoresistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Han, Yong; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Jian; Feng, Junnan; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-03-01

    Chemoresistance is a major cause of treatment failure and high mortality in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Currently, the mechanism of chemoresistance remains unclear, and there is no biomarker to accurately predict the efficacy of chemotherapy. In the present study, we established human gastric cancer (GC) cell lines resistant to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), paclitaxel (TA), or cisplatin (DDP) by gradient drug treatment and generated a novel monoclonal antibody 5B2 targeting heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 (HNRNPC) overexpressed in chemoresistant GC cells. Overexpressing HNRNPC in GC cells promoted chemoresistance, and knockdown of HNRNPC by small interfering RNA (siRNA) reversed chemoresistance. By utilizing available datasets, we demonstrated that high level of HNRNPC transcript indicated poor overall survival (OS) and free of progression (FP). HNRNPC expression was negatively correlated with OS of GC patients treated with 5FU-based drugs and with time to progression (TTP) of GC patients treated with CF regimen. These data suggest the potential usefulness of HNRNPC as a prognostic and therapeutic marker of GC. PMID:26453116

  13. Proteomic profiling of exosomes leads to the identification of novel biomarkers for prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Duijvesz (Diederick); K.E. Burnum-Johnson (Kristin); M.A. Gritsenko (Marina); A.M. Hoogland (Marije); M.S. Vredenbregt-van den Berg (Mirella); R. Willemsen (Rob); T.M. Luider (Theo); L. Paša-Tolić (Ljiljana); G.W. Jenster (Guido)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, the complexity of body fluids often hampers biomarker discovery. An attractive alternative approach is the isolation of small vesicles, i.e. exosomes, ∼10

  14. Early detection of recurrence after curative resection for colorectal cancer - obstacles when using soluble biomarkers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Jess, Per; Aldulaymi, Bahir Hadi Mohammed;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Results from monitoring studies using biomarkers in blood samples aiming at early detection of recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC) are presently evaluated. However, some serological biomarker levels are influenced by the surgical trauma, which may complicate translation of the l...

  15. Environmental effects on molecular biomarkers expression in pancreatic and brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, Lawrence; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Massodi, Iqbal; Anbil, Sriram; Mai, Zhiming; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    A complete understanding of the biological mechanisms regulating devastating disease such as cancer remains elusive. Pancreatic and brain cancers are primary among the cancer types with poor prognosis. Molecular biomarkers have emerged as group of proteins that are preferentially overexpressed in cancers and with a key role in driving disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell proliferative biomarker is particularly highly expressed in most cancers including brain and pancreatic cancers. The ability of EGFR to sustain prolong cell proliferation is augmented by biomarkers such as Bax, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, proteins regulating the apoptotic process. To better understand the role and effect of the microenvironment on these biomarkers in pancreatic cancer (PaCa); we analysed two pancreatic tumor lines (AsPc-1 and MiaPaCa-2) in 2D, 3D in-vitro cultures and in orthotopic tumors at different growth stages. We also investigated in patient derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cultures, the ability to utilize the EGFR expression to specifically deliver photosensitizer to the cells for photodynamic therapy. Overall, our results suggest that (1) microenvironment changes affect biomarker expression; thereby it is critical to understand these effects prior to designing combination therapies and (2) EGFR expression in tumor cells indeed could serve as a reliable and a robust biomarker that could be used to design targeted and image-guided photodynamic therapy.

  16. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the...

  17. Nanomechanical sandwich assay for multiple cancer biomarkers in breast cancer cell-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etayash, H; McGee, A R; Kaur, K; Thundat, T

    2016-08-18

    The use of exosomes as cancer diagnostic biomarkers is technically limited by their size, heterogeneity and the need for extensive purification and labelling. We report the use of cantilever arrays for simultaneous detection of multiple exosomal surface-antigens with high sensitivity and selectivity. Exosomes from breast cancer were selectively identified by detecting over-expressed membrane-proteins CD24, CD63, and EGFR. Excellent selectivity however, was achieved when targeting the cell-surface proteoglycan, Glypican-1 at extraordinary limits (∼200 exosomes per mL, ∼0.1 pg mL(-1)). PMID:27492928

  18. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K D′Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India. Early diagnosis is imperative in improving outcomes and preserving quality of life. High index of suspicion is to be maintained for leukoplakia (high risk site. Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed tongue cancer should include essential tests: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is investigative modality of choice when indicated. Computed tomography (CT scan is an option when MRI is unavailable. In early lesions when imaging is not warranted ultrasound may help guide management of the neck. Early stage cancers (stage I & II require single modality treatment - either surgery or radiotherapy. Surgery is preferred. Adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated for T3/T4 cancers, presence of high risk features [lymphovascular emboli (LVE, perineural invasion (PNI, poorly differentiated, node +,close margins. Adjuvant chemoradiation (CTRT is indicated for positive margins and extranodal disease. Locally advanced operable cancers (stage III & IVA require combined multimodality treatment - surgery + adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant treatment is indicated in all and in the presence of high risk features as described above. Locally advanced inoperable cancers (stage IVB are treated with palliative chemo-radiotherapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or symptomatic treatment depending upon the performance status. Select cases may be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical salvage. Metastatic disease (stage IVC should be treated with a goal for palliation. Chemotherapy may be offered to patients with good performance status. Local treatment in the form of radiotherapy may be added for palliation of symptoms. Intense follow-up every 3 months is required for initial 2 years as most recurrences occur in the first 24 months. After 2 nd year follow up is done at 4-6 months interval. At each follow up screening

  19. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Debasish Paul; Avinash Kumar; Akshada Gajbhiye; Santra, Manas K.; Rapole Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE,...

  20. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence. PMID:27078836

  1. Serum uPAR as Biomarker in Breast Cancer Recurrence: A Mathematical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenrui; Friedman, Avner

    2016-01-01

    There are currently over 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States and, according to the American Cancer Society, 10 to 20 percent of these women will develop recurrent breast cancer. Early detection of recurrence can avoid unnecessary radical treatment. However, self-examination or mammography screening may not discover a recurring cancer if the number of surviving cancer cells is small, while biopsy is too invasive and cannot be frequently repeated. It is therefore important to identify non-invasive biomarkers that can detect early recurrence. The present paper develops a mathematical model of cancer recurrence. The model, based on a system of partial differential equations, focuses on tissue biomarkers that include the plasminogen system. Among them, only uPAR is known to have significant correlation to its concentration in serum and could therefore be a good candidate for serum biomarker. The model includes uPAR and other associated cytokines and cells. It is assumed that the residual cancer cells that survived primary cancer therapy are concentrated in the same location within a region with a very small diameter. Model simulations establish a quantitative relation between the diameter of the growing cancer and the total uPAR mass in the cancer. This relation is used to identify uPAR as a potential serum biomarker for breast cancer recurrence. PMID:27078836

  2. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about rectal cancer clinical management: The radiation oncologist’s expert review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Although rectal and colon cancer management has progressed greatly in the last few decades clinical outcomes still need to be optimized. Furthermore, consensus is required on several issues as some of the main international guidelines provide different recommendations. The European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) drew up documents to standardize management and care in Europe and aid in decision-making. Material and Methods: In the present section the panel of experts reviews and discusses data from the literature on rectal cancer, focusing on recommendations for selecting between short-course radiotherapy (SCRT) and long-course radio-chemotherapy (LCRTCT) as preoperative treatment as well as on the controversies about adjuvant treatment in patients who had received a pre-operative treatment. Results: The starting-point of the present EURECCA document is that adding SCRT or LCRTCT to TME improved loco-regional control but did not increase overall survival in any single trial which, in any case, had improved with the introduction of total mesorectal excision (TME) into clinical practice. Moderate consensus was achieved for cT3 anyNM0 disease. In this frame, agreement was reached on either SCRT followed by immediate surgery or LCRTCT with delayed surgery for mesorectal fascia (MRF) negative tumors at presentation. LCRTCT was recommended for tumor shrinkage in MRF+ at presentations but if patients were not candidates for chemotherapy, SCRT with delayed surgery is an option/alternative. LCRTCT was recommended for cT4 anycNM0. SCRT offers the advantages of less acute toxicity and lower costs, and LCRTCT tumor shrinkage and down-staging, with 13–36% pathological complete response (pCR) rates. To improve the efficacy of preoperative treatment both SCRT and LCRTCT have been, or are being, associated with diverse schedules of chemotherapy and even new targeted therapies but without any definitive evidence of benefit. Nowadays, standard

  3. No benefit for consensus double reading at baseline screening for lung cancer with the use of semiautomated volumetry software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wang (Ying); R.J. van Klaveren (Rob); G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); Y. Zhao (Yingru); R. Vernhout; A.L.M. Leusveld (Anne); E.T. Scholten (Ernst); J. Verschakelen (Johny); W.P. Mali (Willem); H.J. de Koning (Harry); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To retrospectively evaluate the performance of consensus double reading compared with single reading at baseline screening of a lung cancer computed tomography (CT) screening trial. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the Dutch Minister of Health and ethical committ

  4. No Benefit for Consensus Double Reading at Baseline Screening for Lung Cancer with the Use of Semiautomated Volumetry Software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; van Klaveren, R.J.; de Bock, G.H.; Zhao, Y.; Vernhout, R.; Leusveld, A.; Scholten, E.; Verschakelen, J.; Mali, W.; de Koning, H.; Oudkerk, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the performance of consensus double reading compared with single reading at baseline screening of a lung cancer computed tomography (CT) screening trial. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the Dutch Minister of Health and ethical committees. Written

  5. Biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer and polyps: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Reena; Jones, Emma; Vidart, Victoire; Kuppen, Peter J K; Conti, John A; Francis, Nader K

    2014-09-01

    There is growing interest in early detection of colorectal cancer as current screening modalities lack compliance and specificity. This study systematically reviewed the literature to identify biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer and polyps. Literature searches were conducted for relevant papers since 2007. Human studies reporting on early detection of colorectal cancer and polyps using biomarkers were included. Methodologic quality was evaluated, and sensitivity, specificity, and the positive predictive value (PPV) were reported. The search strategy identified 3,348 abstracts. A total of 44 papers, examining 67 different tumor markers, were included. Overall sensitivities for colorectal cancer detection by fecal DNA markers ranged from 53% to 87%. Combining fecal DNA markers increased the sensitivity of colorectal cancer and adenoma detection. Canine scent detection had a sensitivity of detecting colorectal cancer of 99% and specificity of 97%. The PPV of immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) is 1.26%, compared with 0.31% for the current screening method of guaiac fecal occult blood test (gFOBT). A panel of serum protein biomarkers provides a sensitivity and specificity above 85% for all stages of colorectal cancer, and a PPV of 0.72%. Combinations of fecal and serum biomarkers produce higher sensitivities, specificities, and PPVs for early detection of colorectal cancer and adenomas. Further research is required to validate these biomarkers in a well-structured population-based study. PMID:25004920

  6. Biomarker Validation for Aging: Lessons from mtDNA Heteroplasmy Analyses in Early Cancer Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Barker

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The anticipated biological and clinical utility of biomarkers has attracted significant interest recently. Aging and early cancer detection represent areas active in the search for predictive and prognostic biomarkers. While applications differ, overlapping biological features, analytical technologies and specific biomarker analytes bear comparison. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA as a biomarker in both biological models has been evaluated. However, it remains unclear whether mtDNA changes in aging and cancer represent biological relationships that are causal, incidental, or a combination of both. This article focuses on evaluation of mtDNA-based biomarkers, emerging strategies for quantitating mtDNA admixtures, and how current understanding of mtDNA in aging and cancer evolves with introduction of new technologies. Whether for cancer or aging, lessons from mtDNA based biomarker evaluations are several. Biological systems are inherently dynamic and heterogeneous. Detection limits for mtDNA sequencing technologies differ among methods for low-level DNA sequence admixtures in healthy and diseased states. Performance metrics of analytical mtDNA technology should be validated prior to application in heterogeneous biologically-based systems. Critical in evaluating biomarker performance is the ability to distinguish measurement system variance from inherent biological variance, because it is within the latter that background healthy variability as well as high-value, disease-specific information reside.

  7. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P; Rosell, R; Stahel, R; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the...... treatment of first-line, and second-line/third-line therapy in metastatic NSCLC are reported in this article. The recommendations detailed here are based on an expert consensus after careful review of published data. All participants have approved this final update....

  8. Predictive biomarkers for personalised anti-cancer drug use: discovery to clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alymani, Nayef A; Smith, Murray D; Williams, David J; Petty, Russell D

    2010-03-01

    A priority translational research objective in cancer medicine is the discovery of novel therapeutic targets for solid tumours. Ideally, co-discovery of predictive biomarkers occurs in parallel to facilitate clinical development of agents and ultimately personalise clinical use. However, the identification of clinically useful predictive biomarkers for solid tumours has proven challenging with many initially promising biomarkers failing to translate into clinically useful applications. In particular, the 'failure' of a predictive biomarker has often only become apparent at a relatively late stage in investigation. Recently, the field has recognised the need to develop a robust clinical biomarker development methodology to facilitate the process. This review discusses the recent progress in this area focusing on the key stages in the biomarker development process: discovery, validation, qualification and implementation. Concentrating on predictive biomarkers for selecting systemic therapies for individual patients in the clinic, the advances and progress in each of these stages in biomarker development are outlined and the key remaining challenges are discussed. Specific examples are discussed to illustrate the challenges identified and how they have been addressed. Overall, we find that significant progress has been made towards a formalised biomarker developmental process. This holds considerable promise for facilitating the translation of predictive biomarkers from discovery to clinical implementation. Further enhancements could eventually be found through alignment with regulatory processes. PMID:20138504

  9. Considering Exosomal miR-21 as a Biomarker for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Shi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a fatal human disease. Early diagnosis of cancer is the most effective method to prevent cancer development and to achieve higher survival rates for patients. Many traditional diagnostic methods for cancer are still not sufficient for early, more convenient and accurate, and noninvasive diagnosis. Recently, the use of microRNAs (miRNAs, such as exosomal microRNA-21(miR-21, as potential biomarkers was widely reported. This initial systematic review analyzes the potential role of exosomal miR-21 as a general biomarker for cancers. A total of 10 studies involving 318 patients and 215 healthy controls have covered 10 types of cancers. The sensitivity and specificity of pooled studies were 75% (0.70–0.80 and 85% (0.81–0.91, with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs, while the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC was 0.93. Additionally, we examined and evaluated almost all other issues about biomarkers, including cutoff points, internal controls and detection methods, from the literature. This initial meta-analysis indicates that exosomal miR-21 has a strong potential to be used as a universal biomarker to identify cancers, although as a general biomarker the case number for each cancer type is small. Based on the literature, a combination of miRNA panels and other cancer antigens, as well as a selection of appropriate internal controls, has the potential to serve as a more sensitive and accurate cancer diagnosis tool. Additional information on miR-21 would further support its use as a biomarker in cancer.

  10. Considering Exosomal miR-21 as a Biomarker for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a fatal human disease. Early diagnosis of cancer is the most effective method to prevent cancer development and to achieve higher survival rates for patients. Many traditional diagnostic methods for cancer are still not sufficient for early, more convenient and accurate, and noninvasive diagnosis. Recently, the use of microRNAs (miRNAs), such as exosomal microRNA-21(miR-21), as potential biomarkers was widely reported. This initial systematic review analyzes the potential role of exosomal miR-21 as a general biomarker for cancers. A total of 10 studies involving 318 patients and 215 healthy controls have covered 10 types of cancers. The sensitivity and specificity of pooled studies were 75% (0.70-0.80) and 85% (0.81-0.91), with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), while the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.93. Additionally, we examined and evaluated almost all other issues about biomarkers, including cutoff points, internal controls and detection methods, from the literature. This initial meta-analysis indicates that exosomal miR-21 has a strong potential to be used as a universal biomarker to identify cancers, although as a general biomarker the case number for each cancer type is small. Based on the literature, a combination of miRNA panels and other cancer antigens, as well as a selection of appropriate internal controls, has the potential to serve as a more sensitive and accurate cancer diagnosis tool. Additional information on miR-21 would further support its use as a biomarker in cancer. PMID:27043643

  11. RNA-Seq accurately identifies cancer biomarker signatures to distinguish tissue of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Iris H; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Hui; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic cancer of unknown primary (CUP) accounts for up to 5% of all new cancer cases, with a 5-year survival rate of only 10%. Accurate identification of tissue of origin would allow for directed, personalized therapies to improve clinical outcomes. Our objective was to use transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify lineage-specific biomarker signatures for the cancer types that most commonly metastasize as CUP (colorectum, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, prostate, and stomach). RNA-Seq data of 17,471 transcripts from a total of 3,244 cancer samples across 26 different tissue types were compiled from in-house sequencing data and publically available International Cancer Genome Consortium and The Cancer Genome Atlas datasets. Robust cancer biomarker signatures were extracted using a 10-fold cross-validation method of log transformation, quantile normalization, transcript ranking by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and stepwise logistic regression. The entire algorithm was then repeated with a new set of randomly generated training and test sets, yielding highly concordant biomarker signatures. External validation of the cancer-specific signatures yielded high sensitivity (92.0% ± 3.15%; mean ± standard deviation) and specificity (97.7% ± 2.99%) for each cancer biomarker signature. The overall performance of this RNA-Seq biomarker-generating algorithm yielded an accuracy of 90.5%. In conclusion, we demonstrate a computational model for producing highly sensitive and specific cancer biomarker signatures from RNA-Seq data, generating signatures for the top eight cancer types responsible for CUP to accurately identify tumor origin. PMID:25425966

  12. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  13. Biomarkers that currently effect clinical practice in lung cancer: EGFR, ALK, MET, ROS-1 and KRAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GrzegorzJanuszKorpanty

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains the most lethal malignancy in the world. Despite improvements in surgical treatment, systemic therapy and radiotherapy, the 5-year survival rate for all patients diagnosed with lung cancer remains between 15-20%. Newer therapeutic strategies rely on specific molecular alterations, or biomarkers, that provide opportunities for a personalized approach to specific patient populations. Classification of lung cancer is becoming increasingly focused on these biomarkers, which renders the term “non-small cell lung” cancer less clinically useful. Non-small cell lung cancer is now recognized as a complex malignancy and its molecular and genomic diversity allows for patient-centered treatment options. Here we review advances in targeted treatment of lung adenocarcinoma with respect to five clinically relevant biomarkers - EGFR, ALK, MET, ROS-1 and KRAS.

  14. A prospective evaluation of early detection biomarkers for ovarian cancer in the European EPIC cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terry, Kathryn L; Schock, Helena; Fortner, Renée T; Hüsing, Anika; Fichorova, Raina N; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Vitonis, Allison F; Johnson, Theron; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Mesrine, Sylvie; Severi, Gianluca; Dossus, Laure; Rinaldi, Sabina; Boeing, Heiner; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Krogh, Vittorio; Kuhn, Elisabetta; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H; Gram, Inger Torhild; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Duell, Eric J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Ardanaz, Eva; Etxezarreta, Nerea; Navarro, Carmen; Idahl, Annika; Lundin, Eva; Jirström, Karin; Manjer, Jonas; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Smith Byrne, Karl; Travis, Ruth C; Gunter, Marc J; Merritt, Melissa A; Riboli, Elio; Cramer, Daniel; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    source of information to evaluate early detection biomarkers. Here we evaluate the most promising ovarian cancer screening biomarkers in prospectively collected samples from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We measured CA125, HE4, CA72......PURPOSE: About 60% of ovarian cancers are diagnosed at late stage, when 5-year survival is less than 30% in contrast to 90% for local disease. This has prompted search for early detection biomarkers. For initial testing, specimens taken months or years before ovarian cancer diagnosis are the best.......4 and CA15.3 in 810 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 1,939 controls. We calculated the sensitivity at 95% and 98% specificity as well as Area under the Receiver Operator Curve (C-statistic) for each marker individually and in combination. Additionally, we evaluated marker performance by...

  15. Current status of predictive biomarkers for neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norihisa; Uemura; Tadashi; Kondo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy has been proven to be extremely valuable and is widely used for advanced esophageal cancer. However, a significant proportion of treated patients(60%-70%) does not respond well to neoadjuvant treatments and develop severe adverse effects. Therefore, predictive markers for individualization of multimodality treatments are urgently needed in esophageal cancer. Recently, molecular biomarkers that predict the response to neoadjuvant therapy have been explored in multimodal approaches in esophageal cancer and successful examples of biomarker identification have been reported. In this review, promising candidates for predictive molecular biomarkers developed by using multiple molecular approaches are reviewed. Moreover, treatment strategies based on the status of predicted biomarkers are discussed, while considering the international differences in the clinical background. However, in the absence of adequate treatment options related to the results of the biomarker test, the usefulness of these diagnostic tools is limited and new effective therapies for biomarker-identified nonresponders to cancer treatment should be concurrent with the progress of predictive technologies. Further improvement in the prognosis of esophageal cancer patients can be achieved through the introduction of novel therapeutic approaches in clinical practice.

  16. Similar Source of Differential Blood mRNAs in Lung Cancer and Pulmonary Inflammatory Diseases: Calls for Improved Strategy for Identifying Cancer-Specific Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Guini; Chen, Beibei; Li, Hongdong; Zhang, Wenjing; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Shan; Shi, Tongwei; Ao, Lu; Guo, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies try to identify cancer diagnostic biomarkers by comparing peripheral whole blood (PWB) of cancer samples and healthy controls, explicitly or implicitly assuming that such biomarkers are potential candidate biomarkers for distinguishing cancer from nonmalignant inflammation-associated diseases. Methods Multiple PWB gene expression profiles for lung cancer/inflammation-associated pulmonary diseases were used for differential mRNAs identification and comparison and for pr...

  17. Inflammatory biomarkers and risk of cancer in 84,000 individuals from the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allin, Kristine H; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-10-01

    Inflammation and cancer are tightly linked. This study tests the hypothesis that an inflammatory score based on plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen and whole blood leukocyte count is associated with risk of colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancer. A score ranging from none through three elevated biomarkers was constructed in 84,000 individuals from the Danish general population. During a median follow-up time of 4.8 years, 4,081 incident cancers occurred. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of incident cancer. Multifactor-adjusted HRs for colorectal cancer were 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.62), 1.79 (95% CI, 1.41 to 2.27) and 2.18 (95% CI, 1.67 to 2.86) for individuals with elevated levels of one, two and three inflammatory biomarkers compared to individuals with none elevated biomarkers. A similar stepwise increasing risk was observed for lung and breast cancer with HRs of 3.03 (95% CI, 2.25 to 4.08) and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.80) for three versus none elevated biomarkers. HRs were highest within the first years of follow-up. Absolute 5-year risk of lung cancer was 7.8 (95% CI, 6.1 to 10)% among older smokers with three elevated biomarkers compared to 3.8 (95% CI, 2.6 to 5.6)% among those with none elevated biomarkers. In conclusion, simultaneously elevated CRP, fibrinogen and leukocyte count are associated with an increased risk of colorectal, lung and breast cancer. Cancer as a promoter of inflammation may be more likely to account for our findings than low-grade inflammation promoting cancer development. PMID:27194008

  18. Mitochondrial DNA mutations—candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Rowshan Ara Begum; Abu Din Ahmed Shahinuzzaman; Atiqur Rahman; Gazi Nurun Nahar Sultana; Chowdhury Faiz Hossain

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem that affects more than 24% of women in Bangladesh. Further- more, among low-income countries including Bangladesh, individuals have a high risk for developing breast cancer. This study aimed to identify candidate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women to be used as a preventive approach. We screened the blood samples from 24 breast cancer patients and 20 healthy controls to detect polymorphisms in the D-loo...

  19. Current Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Functional Mechanisms in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaile; Zhou, Shukui; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Jianlong; Zou, Qingsong; Zhao, Weixin; Fu, Qiang; Fang, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Currently there is little effective treatment available for castration resistant prostate cancer, which is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer related deaths. Emerging evidence suggested that cancer stem cells might play an important role in resistance to traditional cancer therapies, and the studies of cancer stem cells (including specific isolation and targeting on those cells) might benefit the discovery of novel treatment of prostate cancer, especially castration resistant disease. In this review, we summarized major biomarkers for prostate cancer stem cells, as well as their functional mechanisms and potential application in clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients. PMID:27447616

  20. Consensus and controversy on the treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma; Consensus et controverse au sujet du traitement des cancers thyroidiens differencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellabarba, D.; Langlois, M.F.; Carpentier, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas are the most common endocrine neoplasia. Because of their rather benign evolution, the treatment varies widely from minimal to aggressive interventions. Therefore there are considerable controversies as to the best therapeutic choice. In this article we review the literature on the subject and we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of the different treatments. Furthermore we present a consensus on the subject recently adopted by ``l`Association des endocrinologues du Quebec``. We propose an ipsilateral lobectomy for small papillary cancers of less than 1.5 cm without metastasis, in patients less than 40 year-old. In all the other tumors we recommend a total thyroidectomy followed by a dose of 131 I for complete ablation of the thyroid tissue. (authors). 12 refs., 1 tab.

  1. In Vitro Evaluation of Biofield Treatment on Cancer Biomarkers Involved in Endometrial and Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Increasing cancer rates particularly in the developed world are associated with related lifestyle and environmental exposures. Combined immunotherapy and targeted therapies are the main treatment approaches in advanced and recurrent cancer. An alternate approach, energy medicine is increasingly used in life threatening problems to promote human wellness. This study aimed to investigate the effect of biofield treatment on cancer biomarkers involved in human endometrium and prostate cancer cell...

  2. Locoregional surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases: expert consensus statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Eddie K; Bauer, Todd W; Chun, Yun S; D'Angelica, Michael; Kooby, David A; Jarnagin, William R

    2013-02-01

    Selection of the optimal surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) requires multidisciplinary discussion of treatment strategies early in the trajectory of the individual patient's care. This paper reports on expert consensus on locoregional and interventional therapies for the treatment of advanced CRLM. Resection remains the reference treatment for patients with bilateral CRLM and synchronous presentation of primary and metastatic cancer. Patients with oligonodular bilateral CRLM may be candidates for one-stage multiple segmentectomies; two-stage resection with or without portal vein embolization may allow complete resection in patients with more advanced disease. After downsizing with preoperative systemic and/or regional therapy, curative-intent hepatectomy requires resection of all initial and currently known sites of disease; debulking procedures are not recommended. Many patients with synchronous primary disease and CRLM can safely undergo simultaneous resection of all disease. Staged resections should be considered for patients in whom the volume of the future liver remnant is anticipated to be marginal or inadequate, who have significant medical comorbid condition(s), or in whom extensive resections are required for the primary cancer and/or CRLM. Priority for liver-first or primary-first resection should depend on primary tumour-related symptoms or concern for the progression of marginally resectable CRLM during treatment of the primary disease. Chemotherapy delivered by hepatic arterial infusion represents a valid option in patients with liver-only disease, although it is best delivered in experienced centres. Ablation strategies are not recommended as first-line treatments for resectable CRLM alone or in combination with resection because of high local failure rates and limitations related to tumour size, multiplicity and intrahepatic location. PMID:23297723

  3. Consensus conference: multimodality management of early- and intermediate-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Rodolfo

    2008-09-01

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment in early- and intermediate-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), yet recurrences are frequent. Studies have documented the benefits of chemotherapy administered after resection, but a number of questions remain regarding how overall outcomes can be further improved. To provide the oncology community with direction on these issues, a consensus conference of leading experts in the NSCLC field was held at the Fifth Annual Atlanta Lung Cancer Symposium on October 25-27, 2007. The available scientific literature is presented and when such literature is lacking, clinical experience is provided to support the following conclusions. Preoperative staging should be done in accordance with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, but endoscopic fine needle aspiration of enlarged mediastinal nodes can be used, and if histology is positive for malignancy, mediastinoscopy can be avoided. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy is not generally recommended but can be considered to downstage an unresectable patient. There is currently no role for preoperative radiation or chemoradiation. Adjuvant systemic therapy is not recommended for stage IA and IB patients; however, adverse prognostic factors are acceptable reasons to consider adjuvant systemic therapy in the latter. Adjuvant systemic therapy is recommended for stage IIA, IIB, and IIIA patients, consistent with recent American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines. A cisplatin-based regimen should be started within 60 days after surgery, but if relatively contraindicated, carboplatin is an acceptable alternative. Adjuvant radiation therapy is not recommended for N0 and N1 patients, but is used in N2 patients to decrease local recurrence. PMID:18779538

  4. Simultaneous Imaging of Two Different Cancer Biomarkers Using Aptamer-Conjugated Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghwan Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Studying gene expression profile in a single cancer cell is important because multiple genes are associated with cancer development. Quantum dots (QDs have been utilized as biological probes for imaging and detection. QDs display specific optical and electrical properties that depend on their size that can be applied for imaging and sensing applications. In this study, simultaneous imaging of the cancer biomarkers, tenascin-C and nucleolin, was performed using two types of aptamer-conjugated QDs. The simultaneous imaging of these two different cancer markers in three cancer cell lines was reliable and cell line-specific. Current requirements for cancer imaging technologies include the need for simple preparation methods and the ability to detect multiple cancer biomarkers and evaluate their intracellular localizations. The method employed in this study is a feasible solution to these requirements.

  5. MicroRNA biomarkers in whole blood for detection of pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Dehlendorff, Christian; Jensen, Benny V;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Biomarkers for the early diagnosis of patients with pancreatic cancer are needed to improve prognosis. OBJECTIVES To describe differences in microRNA expression in whole blood between patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and healthy participants and to identify panels...... of microRNAs for use in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer compared with the cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A case-control study that included 409 patients with pancreatic cancer and 25 with chronic pancreatitis who had been included prospectively in the Danish BIOPAC...... (Biomarkers in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer) study (July 2008-October 2012) plus 312 blood donors as healthy participants. The microRNA expressions in pretreatment whole blood RNA samples were collected and analyzed in 3 randomly determined subcohorts: discovery cohort (143 patients with pancreatic cancer...

  6. Exosome-encapsulated microRNAs as circulating biomarkers for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Doireann P; Kerin, Michael J; Dwyer, Róisín M

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer is a highly prevalent disease, accounting for 29% of invasive cancers in women. Survival from this disease depends on the stage at diagnosis, with patients who are detected earlier having more favourable outcomes. It is because of this that research groups are focusing on the development of a blood-based biomarker for breast cancer. Such biomarkers may facilitate the detection of breast cancer in its infancy before it has spread beyond the primary site. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have shown immense potential in this setting. These short, non-coding RNA sequences have been shown to be dysregulated in breast cancer. Despite showing immense promise, miRNAs have not been successfully implemented in the clinical setting due to a lack of a standardised approach which has resulted in conflicting results. These challenges may be addressed at least in part through the study of exosomes. The biomarker potential for exosomes holds huge promise and may revolutionise the way in which we diagnose and manage breast cancer. These nanovesicles may be isolated from a variety of bodily fluids, including serum, and their miRNA content has been shown to reflect that of the parent breast cancer cell. This review will highlight the nomenclature and defining characteristics of exosomes, and current methods of isolation of serum-derived exosomes. Initial promising reports on the potential utility of exosomal miRNAs to be used as breast cancer biomarkers will also be addressed. PMID:27170104

  7. Prediagnostic serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers are correlated with future development of lung and esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Brieze R; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Pak, Jamie S; Brennan, Paul; Khademi, Hooman; Genden, Eric M; Abnet, Christian C; Dawsey, Sanford M; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sikora, Andrew G

    2014-09-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that prediagnostic serum levels of 20 cancer-associated inflammatory biomarkers correlate directly with future development of head and neck, esophageal, and lung cancers in a high-risk prospective cohort. This is a nested case-control pilot study of subjects enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, an ongoing epidemiologic project assessing cancer trends in Golestan, Iran. We measured a panel of 20 21 cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory molecules using Luminex technology in serum samples collected 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis in 78 aerodigestive cancer cases and 81 controls. Data was analyzed using Wilcoxon rank sum test, odds ratios, receiver operating characteristic areas of discrimination, and multivariate analysis. Biomarkers were profoundly and globally elevated in future esophageal and lung cancer patients compared to controls. Odds ratios were significant for association between several biomarkers and future development of esophageal cancer, including interleukin-1Rα (IL-1Ra; 35.9), interferon α2 (IFN-a2; 34.0), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2; 17.4), and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; 17.4). The same pattern was observed among future lung cancer cases for G-CSF (27.7), GM-CSF (13.3), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a; 8.6). By contrast, the majority of biomarkers studied showed no significant correlation with future head and neck cancer development. This study provides the first direct evidence that multiple inflammatory biomarkers are coordinately elevated in future lung and esophageal cancer patients 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis. PMID:25040886

  8. Molecular biomarkers of colorectal cancer: prognostic and predictive tools for clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-qin JIANG; Fang-fang FU; Yang-xia LI; Wei-bin WANG; Hao-hao WANG; Hai-ping JIANG; Li-song TENG

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the most common types of cancer and leading causes of cancer death worldwide.Although we have made steady progress in chemotherapy and targeted therapy,evidence suggests that the majority of patients undergoing drug therapy experience severe,debilitating,and even lethal adverse drug events which considerably outweigh the benefits.The identification of suitable biomarkers will allow clinicians to deliver the most appropriate drugs to specific patients and spare them ineffective and expensive treatments.Prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been the subjects of many published papers,but few have been widely incorporated into clinical practice.Here,we want to review recent biomarker data related to colorectal cancer,which may have been ready for clinical use.

  9. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Rapid point-of-care breath test for biomarkers of breast cancer and abnormal mammograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Phillips

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported volatile organic compounds (VOCs in breath as biomarkers of breast cancer and abnormal mammograms, apparently resulting from increased oxidative stress and cytochrome p450 induction. We evaluated a six-minute point-of-care breath test for VOC biomarkers in women screened for breast cancer at centers in the USA and the Netherlands. METHODS: 244 women had a screening mammogram (93/37 normal/abnormal or a breast biopsy (cancer/no cancer 35/79. A mobile point-of-care system collected and concentrated breath and air VOCs for analysis with gas chromatography and surface acoustic wave detection. Chromatograms were segmented into a time series of alveolar gradients (breath minus room air. Segmental alveolar gradients were ranked as candidate biomarkers by C-statistic value (area under curve [AUC] of receiver operating characteristic [ROC] curve. Multivariate predictive algorithms were constructed employing significant biomarkers identified with multiple Monte Carlo simulations and cross validated with a leave-one-out (LOO procedure. RESULTS: Performance of breath biomarker algorithms was determined in three groups: breast cancer on biopsy versus normal screening mammograms (81.8% sensitivity, 70.0% specificity, accuracy 79% (73% on LOO [C-statistic value], negative predictive value 99.9%; normal versus abnormal screening mammograms (86.5% sensitivity, 66.7% specificity, accuracy 83%, 62% on LOO; and cancer versus no cancer on breast biopsy (75.8% sensitivity, 74.0% specificity, accuracy 78%, 67% on LOO. CONCLUSIONS: A pilot study of a six-minute point-of-care breath test for volatile biomarkers accurately identified women with breast cancer and with abnormal mammograms. Breath testing could potentially reduce the number of needless mammograms without loss of diagnostic sensitivity.

  11. Biomarkers for Pancreatic Cancer: Is it Ready for Primetime?

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Wasif Saif; Minsig Choi; Richard Kim; Amit Mahipal

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal disease with brief survival especially in patients with advanced disease. Within this decade pancreatic cancer will become the second leading cause of cancer death in the Unites States after lung cancer. It is estimated that 45,220 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and about 38,460 people will die of pancreatic cancer [1].

  12. A Serum Biomarker Model to Diagnose Pancreatic Cancer Using Proteomic Fingerprint Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunlin Ge; Ning Ma; Dianbo Yao; Fengming Luan; Chaojun Hu; Yongzhe Li; Yongfeng Liu

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To establish a serum protein pattern model for screening pancreatic cancer.METHODS Twenty-nine serum samples from patients with pancreatic cancer were collected before surgery,and an additional 57 serum samples from age and sex-matched individuals without cancer were used as controls.WCX magnetic beans and a PBS Ⅱ-C protein chip reader(Ciphergen Biosystems Inc)were employed to detect the protein fingerprint expression of all serum samples.The resulting profiles comparing serum from cancer and normal patients were analyzed with the Biomarker Wizard system,to establish a model using the Biomarker Pattern system software.A double-blind test was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the model.RESULTS A group of 4 biomarkers (relative molecular weights were 5,705 Da,4,935 Da,5,318 Da,3,243 Da)were selected to set up a decision tree to produce the classification model to effectively screen pancreatic cancer patients.The results yielded a sensitivitv of 100%(20/20),specificity of 97.4%(37/38).The ROC curve was 99.7%.A double-blind test used to challenge the model resulted in a sensitivity of 88.9% and a specifcity of 89.5%.CONCLUSION New serum biomarkers of pancreatic cancer have been identified.The pattern of combined markers provides a powerful and reliable diagnostic method for pancreatic cancer with high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Novel serum protein biomarker panel revealed by mass spectrometry and its prognostic value in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Liping; Moore, Katrina; Phillips, Leo; Boyle, Frances M.; Marsh, Deborah J.; Baxter, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Serum profiling using proteomic techniques has great potential to detect biomarkers that might improve diagnosis and predict outcome for breast cancer patients (BC). This study used surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) to identify differentially expressed proteins in sera from BC and healthy volunteers (HV), with the goal of developing a new prognostic biomarker panel. Methods Training set serum samples from 99 BC and 51 H...

  14. Personalized Medicine and Oncology Practice Guidelines: A Case Study of Contemporary Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Robin K; Van Bebber, Stephanie L; Phillips, Kathryn A; Venook, Alan P.

    2011-01-01

    Predictive and prognostic biomarkers offer a potential means to personalize cancer medicine, although many reach the marketplace before they have been validated, and their adoption is often hindered by variable clinical evidence. Because of this variability in supporting evidence, clinical practice guidelines formulated by panels of subspecialty experts may be particularly important in guiding stakeholders’ acceptance and use of new personalized medicine biomarker tests and other nascent tech...

  15. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics in Molecular Diagnostics: Discovery of Cancer Biomarkers Using Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis and proper monitoring of cancer patients remain a key obstacle for successful cancer treatment and prevention. Therein comes the need for biomarker discovery, which is crucial to the current oncological and other clinical practices having the potential to impact the diagnosis and prognosis. In fact, most of the biomarkers have been discovered utilizing the proteomics-based approaches. Although high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches like SILAC, 2D-DIGE, and iTRAQ are filling up the pitfalls of the conventional techniques, still serum proteomics importunately poses hurdle in overcoming a wide range of protein concentrations, and also the availability of patient tissue samples is a limitation for the biomarker discovery. Thus, researchers have looked for alternatives, and profiling of candidate biomarkers through tissue culture of tumor cell lines comes up as a promising option. It is a rich source of tumor cell-derived proteins, thereby, representing a wide array of potential biomarkers. Interestingly, most of the clinical biomarkers in use today (CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9, and PSA were discovered through tissue culture-based system and tissue extracts. This paper tries to emphasize the tissue culture-based discovery of candidate biomarkers through various mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches.

  16. REG4 Is Highly Expressed in Mucinous Ovarian Cancer: A Potential Novel Serum Biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtinen, Laura; Vesterkvist, Pia; Roering, Pia; Korpela, Taina; Hattara, Liisa; Kaipio, Katja; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Hynninen, Johanna; Auranen, Annika; Davidson, Ben; Haglund, Caj; Iljin, Kristiina; Grenman, Seija; Siitari, Harri; Carpen, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative diagnostics of ovarian neoplasms rely on ultrasound imaging and the serum biomarkers CA125 and HE4. However, these markers may be elevated in non-neoplastic conditions and may fail to identify most non-serous epithelial cancer subtypes. The objective of this study was to identify histotype-specific serum biomarkers for mucinous ovarian cancer. The candidate genes with mucinous histotype specific expression profile were identified from publicly available gene-expression databases and further in silico data mining was performed utilizing the MediSapiens database. Candidate biomarker validation was done using qRT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining of tumor tissue microarrays. The expression level of the candidate gene in serum was compared to the serum CA125 and HE4 levels in a patient cohort of prospectively collected advanced ovarian cancer. Database searches identified REG4 as a potential biomarker with specificity for the mucinous ovarian cancer subtype. The specific expression within epithelial ovarian tumors was further confirmed by mRNA analysis. Immunohistochemical staining of ovarian tumor tissue arrays showed distinctive cytoplasmic expression pattern only in mucinous carcinomas and suggested differential expression between benign and malignant mucinous neoplasms. Finally, an ELISA based serum biomarker assay demonstrated increased expression only in patients with mucinous ovarian cancer. This study identifies REG4 as a potential serum biomarker for histotype-specific detection of mucinous ovarian cancer and suggests serum REG4 measurement as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for postoperative follow-up of patients with mucinous ovarian cancer. PMID:26981633

  17. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Brown

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecting PSA levels. As bone metastases develop, factors derived from bone metabolism are released into blood and urine, including N- and C-terminal peptide fragments of type 1 collagen and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, which represent potentially useful biomarkers for monitoring metastatic bone disease. A number of clinical trials have investigated these bone biomarkers with respect to their diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive values. Results suggest that higher levels of bone biomarkers are associated with an increased risk of skeletal-related events and/or death. As a result of these findings, bone biomarkers are now being increasingly used as study end points, particularly in studies investigating novel agents with putative bone effects. Data from prospective clinical trials are needed to validate the use of bone biomarkers and to confirm that marker levels provide additional information beyond traditional methods of response evaluation for patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

  18. Clinical application of biomarkers in colon cancer: studies on apoptosis, proliferation and the immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Zeestraten, Eliane Cornelia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is a major contributor to can- cer-related mortality worldwide. Death from colon cancer occurs in the majority of cases from widespread metastatic disease. Only 15% of stage II colon cancer patients that develop metastasis will benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, all of them will suffer from treatment-related toxicity. This makes it essential for the clinician to precisely identify the patient cohort at risk for metastasis. Prognostic biomarkers might improve current staging crit...

  19. MicroRNAs: Promising chemoresistance biomarkers in gastric cancer with diagnostic and therapeutic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Matuszcak, Christiane; Haier, Joerg; Hummel, Richard; Lindner, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer worldwide and ranks second in global cancer mortality statistics. Perioperative chemotherapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of advanced stage disease. However, response to chemotherapy varies widely, with some patients presenting no or only minor response to treatment. Hence, chemotherapy resistance is a major clinical problem that impacts on outcome. Unfortunately, to date there are no reliable biomarkers available...

  20. Prediagnostic serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers are correlated with future development of lung and esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Keeley, Brieze R; Islami, Farhad; Pourshams, Akram; Poustchi, Hossein; Pak, Jamie S; Brennan, Paul; Khademi, Hooman; Genden, Eric M.; Abnet, Christian C.; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that prediagnostic serum levels of 20 cancer-associated inflammatory biomarkers correlate directly with future development of head and neck, esophageal, and lung cancers in a high-risk prospective cohort. This is a nested case–control pilot study of subjects enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, an ongoing epidemiologic project assessing cancer trends in Golestan, Iran. We measured a panel of 20 21cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory molecules using Luminex...

  1. RNA-Seq Accurately Identifies Cancer Biomarker Signatures to Distinguish Tissue of Origin1

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Iris H.; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Hui; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Arul M Chinnaiyan

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic cancer of unknown primary (CUP) accounts for up to 5% of all new cancer cases, with a 5-year survival rate of only 10%. Accurate identification of tissue of origin would allow for directed, personalized therapies to improve clinical outcomes. Our objective was to use transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify lineage-specific biomarker signatures for the cancer types that most commonly metastasize as CUP (colorectum, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, prostate, and stomach)....

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor in the circulation in cancer patients may not be a relevant biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    Tatjana M H Niers; Richel, Dick J.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Schlingemann, Reinier O.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Levels of circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have widely been used as biomarker for angiogenic activity in cancer. For this purpose, non-standardized measurements in plasma and serum were used, without correction for artificial VEGF release by platelets activated ex vivo. We hypothesize that "true" circulating (c)VEGF levels in most cancer patients are low and unrelated to cancer load or tumour angiogenesis. METHODOLOGY: We determined VEGF levels in PECT, a medi...

  3. Stress-induced Phosphoprotein 1 as a Secreted Biomarker for Human Ovarian Cancer Promotes Cancer Cell Proliferation*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chao, Angel; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Chang, Chih-Long; Chen, Shun-Hua; Lee, Yun-Shien; Chen, Jen-Kun; Lin, Yi-Jun; Chang, Pi-Yueh; Wang, Chin-Jung; Chao, An-Shine; Chang, Shuenn-Dyh; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Wang, Hsin-Shih

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancers are frequently not diagnosed until advanced stages, resulting in a high case fatality rate. Because of this, more tumor markers, in addition to CA125, for detecting and monitoring ovarian cancer are needed. During a systematic search for potential biomarkers of ovarian cancer, we compared the protein profiles between tumor interstitial fluid and normal interstitial fluid of ovaries, rationalizing that abnormal levels of proteins in tumor interstitial fluid may be detected in p...

  4. Cell-free microRNAs in blood and other body fluids, as cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) in serum, plasma and other body fluids has yielded an invaluable potential source of non-invasive biomarkers for cancer and other non-malignant diseases. miRNAs in the blood and other body fluids are highly stable in biological samples and are resistant to environmental conditions, such as freezing, thawing or enzymatic degradation, which makes them convenient as potential biomarkers. In addition, they are more easily sampled than tissue miRNAs. Altered levels of cell-free miRNAs have been found in every type of cancer analysed, and increasing evidence indicates that they may participate in carcinogenesis by acting as cell-to-cell signalling molecules. This review summarizes the biological characteristics and mechanisms of release of cell-free miRNAs that make them promising candidates as non-invasive biomarkers of cancer. PMID:27218664

  5. Ultrasensitive Detection of Dual Cancer Biomarkers with Integrated CMOS-Compatible Nanowire Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Na; Gao, Anran; Dai, Pengfei; Mao, Hongju; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2015-11-17

    A direct, rapid, highly sensitive and specific biosensor for detection of cancer biomarkers is desirable in early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. However, the existing methods of detecting cancer biomarkers suffer from poor sensitivity as well as the requirement of enzymatic labeling or nanoparticle conjugations. Here, we proposed a two-channel PDMS microfluidic integrated CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire (SiNW) field-effect transistor arrays with potentially single use for label-free and ultrasensitive electrical detection of cancer biomarkers. The integrated nanowire arrays showed not only ultrahigh sensitivity of cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) with detection to at least 1 fg/mL in buffer solution but also highly selectivity of discrimination from other similar cancer biomarkers. In addition, this method was used to detect both CYFRA21-1 and PSA real samples as low as 10 fg/mL in undiluted human serums. With its excellent properties and miniaturization, the integrated SiNW-FET device opens up great opportunities for a point-of-care test (POCT) for quick screening and early diagnosis of cancer and other complex diseases. PMID:26473941

  6. New trends in molecular and cellular biomarker discovery for colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghagolzadeh, Parisa; Radpour, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide, which is consequence of multistep tumorigenesis of several genetic and epigenetic events. Since CRC is mostly asymptomatic until it progresses to advanced stages, the early detection using effective screening approaches, selection of appropriate therapeutic strategies and efficient follow-up programs are essential to reduce CRC mortalities. Biomarker discovery for CRC based on the personalized genotype and clinical information could facilitate the classification of patients with certain types and stages of cancer to tailor preventive and therapeutic approaches. These cancer-related biomarkers should be highly sensitive and specific in a wide range of specimen(s) (including tumor tissues, patients’ fluids or stool). Reliable biomarkers which enable the early detection of CRC, can improve early diagnosis, prognosis, treatment response prediction, and recurrence risk. Advances in our understanding of the natural history of CRC have led to the development of different CRC associated molecular and cellular biomarkers. This review highlights the new trends and approaches in CRC biomarker discovery, which could be potentially used for early diagnosis, development of new therapeutic approaches and follow-up of patients. PMID:27433083

  7. ESMO Consensus Guidelines for management of patients with colon and rectal cancer. a personalized approach to clinical decision making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmoll, H J; Van Cutsem, E; Stein, A;

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common tumour type in both sexes combined in Western countries. Although screening programmes including the implementation of faecal occult blood test and colonoscopy might be able to reduce mortality by removing precursor lesions and by making diagnosis...... patients by a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. Treatment decisions must be based on the available evidence, which has been the basis for this consensus conference-based guideline delivering a clear proposal for diagnostic and treatment measures in each stage of rectal and colon cancer...

  8. New Concepts in Cancer Biomarkers: Circulating miRNAs in Liquid Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrea, Erika; Sole, Carla; Manterola, Lorea; Goicoechea, Ibai; Armesto, María; Arestin, María; Caffarel, María M; Araujo, Angela M; Araiz, María; Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Lawrie, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    The effective and efficient management of cancer patients relies upon early diagnosis and/or the monitoring of treatment, something that is often difficult to achieve using standard tissue biopsy techniques. Biological fluids such as blood hold great possibilities as a source of non-invasive cancer biomarkers that can act as surrogate markers to biopsy-based sampling. The non-invasive nature of these "liquid biopsies" ultimately means that cancer detection may be earlier and that the ability to monitor disease progression and/or treatment response represents a paradigm shift in the treatment of cancer patients. Below, we review one of the most promising classes of circulating cancer biomarkers: microRNAs (miRNAs). In particular, we will consider their history, the controversy surrounding their origin and biology, and, most importantly, the hurdles that remain to be overcome if they are really to become part of future clinical practice. PMID:27128908

  9. Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd; Sulchek Team; McDonald Team

    2013-03-01

    The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

  10. Exosomal microRNA Biomarkers: Emerging Frontiers in Colorectal and Other Human Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Camargo, Oscar A; Toden, Shusuke; Goel, Ajay

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic strategies, particularly non-invasive blood-based screening approaches, are gaining increased attention for the early detection and attenuation of mortality associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the majority of current screening approaches are inadequate at replacing the conventional CRC diagnostic procedures. Yet, due to technological advances and better understanding of molecular events underlying human cancer, a new category of biomarkers are on the horizon. Recent evidence indicates that cells release a distinct class of small vesicles called 'exosomes', which contain nucleic acids and proteins that reflect and typify host-cell molecular architecture. Intriguingly, exosomes released from cancer cells have a distinct genetic and epigenetic makeup, which allows them to undertake their tumorigenic function. From a clinical standpoint, these unique cancer-specific fingerprints present in exosomes appear to be detectable in a small amount of blood, making them very attractive substrates for developing cancer biomarkers, particularly noninvasive diagnostic approaches. PMID:26892862

  11. Identification of an epigenetic biomarker panel with high sensitivity and specificity for colorectal cancer and adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lind Guro E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of cancer-specific DNA methylation patterns in epithelial colorectal cells in human feces provides the prospect of a simple, non-invasive screening test for colorectal cancer and its precursor, the adenoma. This study investigates a panel of epigenetic markers for the detection of colorectal cancer and adenomas. Methods Candidate biomarkers were subjected to quantitative methylation analysis in test sets of tissue samples from colorectal cancers, adenomas, and normal colonic mucosa. All findings were verified in independent clinical validation series. A total of 523 human samples were included in the study. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis was used to evaluate the performance of the biomarker panel. Results Promoter hypermethylation of the genes CNRIP1, FBN1, INA, MAL, SNCA, and SPG20 was frequent in both colorectal cancers (65-94% and adenomas (35-91%, whereas normal mucosa samples were rarely (0-5% methylated. The combined sensitivity of at least two positives among the six markers was 94% for colorectal cancers and 93% for adenoma samples, with a specificity of 98%. The resulting areas under the ROC curve were 0.984 for cancers and 0.968 for adenomas versus normal mucosa. Conclusions The novel epigenetic marker panel shows very high sensitivity and specificity for both colorectal cancers and adenomas. Our findings suggest this biomarker panel to be highly suitable for early tumor detection.

  12. Identification of cystatin SN as a novel biomarker for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie; Liu, Hui-Ling; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Tan, Si-Wei; Wu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Cystatin SN (cystatin 1, CST1) is a member of the cystatin superfamily that inhibits the proteolytic activity of cysteine proteases. CST1 is a tumor biomarker that provides useful information for the diagnosis of esophageal, gastric, and colorectal carcinomas. However, the significance of CST1 in pancreatic cancer is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether CST1 is a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of malignant pancreatic neoplasms. Microarray analysis of mRNA extracted from pancreatic cancer and pancreatic normal tissues was performed. Bioinformatics revealed that CST1 was one of the highest expressed genes on the array in pancreatic cancer, compared with normal tissue. In addition, the upregulation of CST1 in pancreatic cancer and several pancreatic cancer cell lines was confirmed using real-time PCR (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Next, CST1 knockdown using siRNA reduced the expression of the proliferation-related proteins p-AKT and PCNA significantly, as well as colony formation and xenograft development in vitro. Consistent with this, CST1 mRNA overexpression was correlated closely with malignancy-associated proteins such as PCNA, cyclin D1, cyclin A2, and cyclin E in pancreatic cancer cell lines. In conclusion, our data suggest that CST1 might contribute to the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells and could be a potential biomarker for the early detection of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25577248

  13. AKAP4 is a circulating biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Chang, David H.; Liu, Qin; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Yan, Jinchun; Korst, Robert J.; Nam, Brian T.; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Lin; Ganepola, Ganepola A.P.; Showe, Louise C.; Huang, Qihong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTAs) are widely expressed in tumor tissues, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and in cancer derived exosomes that are frequently engulfed by lymphoid cells. To determine whether tumor derived CTA mRNAs could be detected in RNA from purified peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, we assayed for the expression of 116 CTAs in PBMC RNA in a discovery set and identified AKAP4 as a potential NSCLC biomarker. We validated AKAP4 as a highly accurate biomarker in a cohort of 264 NSCLCs and 135 controls from 2 different sites including a subset of controls with high risk lung nodules. When all (264) lung cancers were compared with all (135) controls the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.9714. When 136 stage I NSCLC lung cancers are compared with all controls the AUC is 0.9795 and when all lung cancer patients were compared to 27 controls with histologically confirmed benign lung nodules, a comparison of significant clinical importance, the AUC was 0.9825. AKAP4 expression increases significantly with tumor stage, but independent of age, gender, smoking history or cancer subtype. Follow-up studies in a small number of resected NSCLC patients revealed a decrease of AKAP4 expression post-surgical resection that remained low in patients in remission and increased with tumor recurrence. AKAP4 is a highly accurate biomarker for the detection of early stage lung cancer. PMID:26160834

  14. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  15. Blinded Validation of Breath Biomarkers of Lung Cancer, a Potential Ancillary to Chest CT Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael; Bauer, Thomas L.; Cataneo, Renee N.; Lebauer, Cassie; Mundada, Mayur; Pass, Harvey I.; Ramakrishna, Naren; Rom, William N.; Vallières, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been reported as biomarkers of lung cancer, but it is not known if biomarkers identified in one group can identify disease in a separate independent cohort. Also, it is not known if combining breath biomarkers with chest CT has the potential to improve the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening. Methods Model-building phase (unblinded): Breath VOCs were analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry in 82 asymptomatic smokers having screening chest CT, 84 symptomatic high-risk subjects with a tissue diagnosis, 100 without a tissue diagnosis, and 35 healthy subjects. Multiple Monte Carlo simulations identified breath VOC mass ions with greater than random diagnostic accuracy for lung cancer, and these were combined in a multivariate predictive algorithm. Model-testing phase (blinded validation): We analyzed breath VOCs in an independent cohort of similar subjects (n = 70, 51, 75 and 19 respectively). The algorithm predicted discriminant function (DF) values in blinded replicate breath VOC samples analyzed independently at two laboratories (A and B). Outcome modeling: We modeled the expected effects of combining breath biomarkers with chest CT on the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening. Results Unblinded model-building phase. The algorithm identified lung cancer with sensitivity 74.0%, specificity 70.7% and C-statistic 0.78. Blinded model-testing phase: The algorithm identified lung cancer at Laboratory A with sensitivity 68.0%, specificity 68.4%, C-statistic 0.71; and at Laboratory B with sensitivity 70.1%, specificity 68.0%, C-statistic 0.70, with linear correlation between replicates (r = 0.88). In a projected outcome model, breath biomarkers increased the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest CT for lung cancer when the tests were combined in series or parallel. Conclusions Breath VOC mass ion biomarkers identified lung cancer in a

  16. Tissue Microarrays in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Reliability of Immunohistochemically-Determined Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen Ege; Holst, René;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reliability of immunohistochemically-determined biomarkers using tissue microarrays (TMAs) of clinical specimens has long been open to question. Heterogeneity related to tumor biology might compromise determination of accurate biomarker expression in tumors, especially in small core...... biopsies. We evaluated the reliability of immunohistochemical staining scoring in small core biopsies using 11 biomarkers in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four 1-mm tumor cores from 178 NSCLCs, 2 representing peripheral areas close to the border of normal lung tissue and 2...... representing central areas, were examined. The biomarkers analyzed included p63, p40, cytokeratin 1/5/10/14, cytokeratin 7, thyroid transcription factor-1, napsin A, cyclin-D1, p53, Ki-67, integrin beta-1, and thymidylate synthase. RESULTS: Using a random intercept logistic regression model...

  17. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach

  18. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Turner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  19. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Natalie [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Pestrin, Marta [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca [Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Malorni, Luca [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Translational Research Laboratory, Prato Hospital, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy); Di Leo, Angelo, E-mail: adileo@usl4.toscana.it [Sandro Pitigliani Medical Oncology Department, Prato Hospital, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Ugo Foscolo, Prato, PO 59100 (Italy)

    2014-03-25

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach.

  20. Chromosomal aberrations and SCEs as biomarkers of cancer risk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Norppa, H.; Bonassi, S.; Hansteen, I. L.; Hagmar, L.; Strömberg, U.; Rössner st., Pavel; Boffetta, P.; Lindholm, C.; Gundy, S.; Lazutka, J.; Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Fabiánová, E.; Šrám, Radim; Knudsen, L. E.; Barale, R.; Fucic, A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 600, - (2006), s. 37-45. ISSN 0027-5107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : biomarkers * chromosomal aberration * sister chromatid exchange Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2006

  1. Current Challenges in Development of Differentially Expressed and Prognostic Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Predicting the aggressiveness of prostate cancer at biopsy is invaluable in making treatment decisions. In this paper we review the differential expression of genes and microRNAs identified through microarray analysis as potentially useful markers for prostate cancer prognosis and discuss some of the challenges associated with their development. Methods. A review of the literature was conducted through Medline. Articles were identified through searches of the following terms: “prostate cancer AND differential expression”, “prostate cancer prognosis”, and “prostate cancer AND microRNAs”. Results. Though numerous differentially expressed genes and microRNAs were identified as possible prognostic markers, the significance of several of these genes is either debated due to conflicting results or is not validated in other study populations. A few of the articles constructed predictive nomograms using a panel of biomarkers which require further validation. Challenges to the development of useful markers include different methodology, cancer heterogeneity, and sampling error. These can be overcome by categorizing prognostic factors into particular gene pathways or by supplementing biopsy information with blood or urine-based biomarkers. Conclusion. Though biomarkers based on differential expression offer the potential to improve decision making concerning prostate cancer, further validation of their utility and accuracy at the biopsy level is needed.

  2. The Clinical Impact of Recent Advances in LC-MS for Cancer Biomarker Discovery and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Camp, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has become an indispensable tool in biomedical research with broad applications ranging from fundamental biology, systems biology, and biomarker discovery. Recent advances in LC-MS have made it become a major technology in clinical applications, especially in cancer biomarker discovery and verification. To overcome the challenges associated with the analysis of clinical samples, such as extremely wide dynamic range of protein concentrations in biofluids and the need to perform high throughput and accurate quantification, significant efforts have been devoted to improve the overall performance of LC-MS bases clinical proteomics. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in LC-MS in the aspect of cancer biomarker discovery and quantification, and discuss its potentials, limitations, and future perspectives.

  3. The clinical impact of recent advances in LC-MS for cancer biomarker discovery and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Tao; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Camp, David G

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) -based proteomics has become an indispensable tool with broad applications in systems biology and biomedical research. With recent advances in liquid chromatography (LC) and MS instrumentation, LC-MS is making increasingly significant contributions to clinical applications, especially in the area of cancer biomarker discovery and verification. To overcome challenges associated with analyses of clinical samples (for example, a wide dynamic range of protein concentrations in bodily fluids and the need to perform high throughput and accurate quantification of candidate biomarker proteins), significant efforts have been devoted to improve the overall performance of LC-MS-based clinical proteomics platforms. Reviewed here are the recent advances in LC-MS and its applications in cancer biomarker discovery and quantification, along with the potentials, limitations and future perspectives. PMID:26581546

  4. Exercise, weight loss and biomarkers for breast cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Gemert, W.A.M. van

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postmenopausal breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in Western women. There are several known risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer of which few are lifestyle-related and, thereby, modifiable. These risk factors provide an opportunity for primary prevention. In this thesis, we estimated that one out of four (25.7%) breast cancer cases in the Dutch female population of >40 years is attributable to lifestyle, i.e., overweight/obesity, physical inactivity, alcohol consu...

  5. Altered Endosome Biogenesis in Prostate Cancer has Biomarker Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Ian R D; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J.; Shandala, Tetyana; Weigert, Roberto; Lisa M Butler; Brooks, Doug A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer in males, affecting one in eight men by the time they reach the age of 70. Current diagnostic tests for prostate cancer have significant problems with both false negatives and false positives, necessitating the search for new molecular markers. A recent investigation of endosomal and lysosomal proteins revealed that the critical process of endosomal biogenesis might be altered in prostate cancer. Here, a panel of endosomal markers was e...

  6. Molecular biomarker set for early detection of ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-06-16

    Embodiments of the present invention concern methods and compositions related to detection of ovarian cancer, including detection of the stage of ovarian cancer, in some cases. In particular, the invention encompasses use of expression of TFAP2A and in some embodiments CA125 and/or E2F5 to identify ovarian cancer, including detecting mRNA and/or protein levels of the respective gene products. Kits for detection of ovarian cancer are also described.

  7. Phosphoprotein Secretome of Tumor Cells as a Source of Candidates for Breast Cancer Biomarkers in Plasma*

    OpenAIRE

    Zawadzka, Anna M.; Schilling, Birgit; Cusack, Michael P.; Sahu, Alexandria K.; Drake, Penelope; Fisher, Susan J.; Benz, Christopher C.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease whose molecular diversity is not well reflected in clinical and pathological markers used for prognosis and treatment selection. As tumor cells secrete proteins into the extracellular environment, some of these proteins reach circulation and could become suitable biomarkers for improving diagnosis or monitoring response to treatment. As many signaling pathways and interaction networks are altered in cancerous tissues by protein phosphorylation, changes...

  8. Prostate cancer serum biomarker discovery through proteomic analysis of alpha-2 macroglobulin protein complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Earle F.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Tabb, David L.; Billheimer, Dean; Roth, Bruce J.; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Hinton, Timothy J.; Cheek, Kristin L.; Hill, Salisha; Jennifer A Pietenpol

    2008-01-01

    Alpha-2 macroglobulin (A2M) functions as a universal protease inhibitor in serum and is capable of binding various cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we investigated if immunoaffinity enrichment and proteomic analysis of A2M protein complexes from human serum could improve detection of biologically relevant and novel candidate protein biomarkers in prostate cancer. Serum samples from six patients with androgen-independent, metastatic prostate cancer and six control patients without ...

  9. A Novel Electrochemical Microfluidic Chip Combined with Multiple Biomarkers for Early Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yao; Zhi, Xiao; Su, Haichuan; Wang, Kan; Yan, Zhen; He, Nongyue; Zhang, Jingpu; Chen, Di; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-12-01

    Early diagnosis is very important to improve the survival rate of patients with gastric cancer and to understand the biology of cancer. In order to meet the clinical demands for early diagnosis of gastric cancer, we developed a disposable easy-to-use electrochemical microfluidic chip combined with multiple antibodies against six kinds of biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), Helicobacter pylori CagA protein (H.P.), P53oncoprotein (P53), pepsinogen I (PG I), and PG-II). The six kinds of biomarkers related to gastric cancer can be detected sensitively and synchronously in a short time. The specially designed three electrodes system enables cross-contamination to be avoided effectively. The linear ranges of detection of the electrochemical microfluidic chip were as follows: 0.37-90 ng mL-1 for CEA, 10.75-172 U mL-1 for CA19-9, 10-160 U L-1 for H.P., 35-560 ng mL-1 for P53, 37.5-600 ng mL-1 for PG I, and 2.5-80 ng mL-1for PG II. This method owns better sensitivity compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results of 394 specimens of gastric cancer sera. Furthermore, we established a multi-index prediction model based on the six kinds of biomarkers for predicting risk of gastric cancer. In conclusion, the electrochemical microfluidic chip for detecting multiple biomarkers has great potential in applications such as early screening of gastric cancer patients, and therapeutic evaluation, and real-time dynamic monitoring the progress of gastric cancer in near future.

  10. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer1

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Janet E.; Sim, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecti...

  11. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Janet E.; Sheryl Sim

    2010-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecti...

  12. Body fluid MMP-2 as a putative biomarker in metastatic breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    NOH, SEWON; Jung, Jae-Joon; Jung, Minkyu; KIM, KI-HYANG; Lee, Ha-young; WANG, BRANDON; CHO, JOANNA; Kim, Tae Soo; Jeung, Hei-Cheul; Rha, Sun Young

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 as novel biomarkers in the body fluid of patients with metastatic breast cancer. We measured the expression of MMPs in 37 samples of body fluid (10 peritoneal and 27 pleural fluids) from metastatic breast cancer patients between 2000 and 2009. Zymography and ELISA assays were used to determine the cut-off level and to quantify MMP expression from a positive control, HT-1080 conditioned media. MMP express...

  13. Proteomic Serum Biomarkers and Their Potential Application in Cancer Screening Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Deelder, André M; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Mertens, Bart J.; Yuri E. M. van der Burgt; Anouck Huijbers; Tim J. A. Dekker; Wilma E. Mesker; Berit Velstra

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis of cancer is of pivotal importance to reduce disease-related mortality. There is great need for non-invasive screening methods, yet current screening protocols have limited sensitivity and specificity. The use of serum biomarkers to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons might be a tool to improve screening programs. Mass spectrometry based proteomics is widely applied as a technology for mapping and identifying peptides and proteins in body fluids. One commonly use...

  14. Urinary high molecular weight matrix metalloproteinases as non-invasive biomarker for detection of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Seleim, Manar F; Abdalla, Mohga S.; Sharada, Hayat M; Abdel Wahab, Abdel Hady A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key molecules for tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Over-expression of different MMPs in tumor tissues can disturb the homeostasis and increase the level of various body fluids. Many MMPs including high molecular weights (HMWs) were detected in the urine of prostate and bladder cancer patients. Our aim here is to assess the usefulness of HMW MMPs as non invasive biomarkers in bilharzial bladder cancer in Egyptian patients. Methods The activ...

  15. DNA Methylation in Peripheral Blood: A Potential Biomarker for Cancer Molecular Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lian; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Sung, Hyuna; Park, Sue K; Oze, Isao; Pan, Kai-Feng; You, Wei-cheng; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Matsuo, Keitaro; Kim, Woo Ho; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Kang, Daehee

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is associated with cancer development and progression. There are several types of specimens from which DNA methylation pattern can be measured and evaluated as an indicator of disease status (from normal biological process to pathologic condition) and even of pharmacologic response to therapy. Blood-based specimens such as cell-free circulating nucleic acid and DNA extracted from leukocytes in peripheral blood may be a potential source of noninvasive cancer biomarkers...

  16. Non-invasive biomarkers in pancreatic cancer diagnosis: what we need versus what we have

    OpenAIRE

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is probably the most lethal tumor being forecast as the second most fatal cancer by 2020 in developed countries. Only the earliest forms of the disease are a curable disease but it has to be diagnosed before symptoms starts. Detection at curable phase demands screening intervention for early detection and differential diagnosis. Unfortunately, no successful strategy or image technique has been concluded as effective approach and currently non-invasive biomarkers are the...

  17. Glypican-1 in exosomes as biomarker for early detection of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2016-01-01

    On June 24, 2015 Nature published an article entitle “Glypican-1 identifies cancer exosomes and detects early pancreatic cancer’’, which demonstrates that exosomes positives for the proteoglycan glypican-1 (GPC1) are expressed in serum of patients with pancreatic cancer since very early stages but not in benign pancreatic disease. Additionally, these GPC1+ circulating exosomes correlate with tumor burden and could be used as prognostic biomarker in pre and post-surgical patients. The study is...

  18. Expert consensus statement on diagnosis and treatment of cancer-related depressed mood state based on Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaodan Tian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This consensus statement is organized into six parts: 1 Definitions: cancer-related depressed mood state is defined as a group of depressive symptoms, rather than major depressive disorder. Thus, “cancer-related depression” or “depressed mood state” is introduced as standard terminology and associated with the Chinese medicine concept of “yu zheng” (depression syndrome. 2 Pathogenesis: factors including psychological stress, cancer pain, cancer fatigue, sleep disorders, surgery trauma, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are strongly associated with cancer-related depressed mood state. Crucial elements of pathogenesis are cancer caused by depression, depression caused by cancer, and the concurrence of phlegm, dampness, and stasis from constrained liver-qi and spleen deficiency. 3 Symptoms: these include core symptoms, psychological symptoms, and somatic symptoms. Depressed mood and loss of interest are the main criteria for diagnosis. 4 Clinical evaluation: based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and a numeric rating scale, and taking mood changes during cancer diagnosis and treatment into consideration, a questionnaire can be drafted to distinguish between major depressive disorder and cancer-related depression. The aim is to assist oncology clinicians to identify, treat, and refer patients with cancer-related depression. 5 Diagnosis: diagnosis should be based on the Chinese Classification for Mental Disorders (CCMD-3, taking patients' mood changes during diagnosis and treatment into consideration. 6 Treatment: treatments for cancer-related depression must be performed concurrently with cancer treatment. For mild depression, non-pharmacologic comprehensive therapies, including psychological intervention, music therapy, patient education, physical activity, and acupuncture, are recommended; for moderate depression, classical Chinese herbal formulas based on syndrome pattern differentiation combined with

  19. Can Prostate Specific Antigen Be Used as New Biomarker for Early Diagnosis of Breast Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Shiryazdi

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Plasma PSA level is not a reliable biomarker to diagnose breast cancer, though regarding existing scientific evidence, more comprehensive studies are required to consider other features of malignant samples so as to evaluate the role of PSA in differentiating breast neoplastic lesions in a more meticulous way based on the degree of tumor differentiation.

  20. Global DNA hypomethylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a biomarker of cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global DNA hypomethylation is an early molecular event in carcinogenesis. Whether methylation measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) DNA is a clinically reliable biomarker for early detection or cancer risk assessment is to be established. From an original sample-set of 753 male and...

  1. Circulating microRNAs as specific biomarkers for breast cancer detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders K O Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed microRNAs (miRNAs in plasma are potential biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection. Here, we aimed to develop specific blood-based miRNA assay for breast cancer detection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TaqMan-based miRNA profiling was performed in tumor, adjacent non-tumor, corresponding plasma from breast cancer patients, and plasma from matched healthy controls. All putative markers identified were verified in a training set of breast cancer patients. Selected markers were validated in a case-control cohort of 170 breast cancer patients, 100 controls, and 95 other types of cancers and then blindly validated in an independent set of 70 breast cancer patients and 50 healthy controls. Profiling results showed 8 miRNAs were concordantly up-regulated and 1 miRNA was concordantly down-regulated in both plasma and tumor tissue of breast cancer patients. Of the 8 up-regulated miRNAs, only 3 were significantly elevated (p<0.0001 before surgery and reduced after surgery in the training set. Results from the validation cohort showed that a combination of miR-145 and miR-451 was the best biomarker (p<0.0001 in discriminating breast cancer from healthy controls and all other types of cancers. In the blind validation, these plasma markers yielded Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve area of 0.931. The positive predictive value was 88% and the negative predictive value was 92%. Altered levels of these miRNAs in plasma have been detected not only in advanced stages but also early stages of tumors. The positive predictive value for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS cases was 96%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggested that these circulating miRNAs could be a potential specific biomarker for breast cancer screening.

  2. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  3. Serum biomarkers reflecting specific tumor tissue remodeling processes are valuable diagnostic tools for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, such as collagen type I and elastin, and intermediate filament (IMF) proteins, such as vimentin are modified and dysregulated as part of the malignant changes leading to disruption of tissue homeostasis. Noninvasive biomarkers that reflect such changes may have a great potential for cancer. Levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) generated fragments of type I collagen (C1M), of elastin (ELM), and of citrullinated vimentin (VICM) were measured in serum from patients with lung cancer (n = 40), gastrointestinal cancer (n = 25), prostate cancer (n = 14), malignant melanoma (n = 7), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 13), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 10), as well as in age-matched controls (n = 33). The area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) was calculated and a diagnostic decision tree generated from specific cutoff values. C1M and VICM were significantly elevated in lung cancer patients as compared with healthy controls (AUROC = 0.98, P < 0.0001) and other cancers (AUROC = 0.83 P < 0.0001). A trend was detected when comparing lung cancer with COPD+IPF. No difference could be seen for ELM. Interestingly, C1M and VICM were able to identify patients with lung cancer with a positive predictive value of 0.9 and an odds ratio of 40 (95% CI = 8.7–186, P < 0.0001). Biomarkers specifically reflecting degradation of collagen type I and citrullinated vimentin are applicable for lung cancer patients. Our data indicate that biomarkers reflecting ECM and IMF protein dysregulation are highly applicable in the lung cancer setting. We speculate that these markers may aid in diagnosing and characterizing patients with lung cancer

  4. Current Challenges in Volatile Organic Compounds Analysis as Potential Biomarkers of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial in reducing mortality among people suffering from cancer. There is a lack of characteristic early clinical symptoms in most forms of cancer, which highlights the importance of investigating new methods for its early detection. One of the most promising methods is the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs. VOCs are a diverse group of carbon-based chemicals that are present in exhaled breath and biofluids and may be collected from the headspace of these matrices. Different patterns of VOCs have been correlated with various diseases, cancer among them. Studies have also shown that cancer cells in vitro produce or consume specific VOCs that can serve as potential biomarkers that differentiate them from noncancerous cells. This review identifies the current challenges in the investigation of VOCs as potential cancer biomarkers, by the critical evaluation of available matrices for the in vivo and in vitro approaches in this field and by comparison of the main extraction and detection techniques that have been applied to date in this area of study. It also summarises complementary in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies conducted to date in order to try to identify volatile biomarkers of cancer.

  5. PET imaging biomarkers in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Differding, Sarah; Gregoire, Vincent [Universite Catholique de Louvain, St-Luc University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, and Center for Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology (MIRO), Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Brussels (Belgium); Hanin, Francois-Xavier [Universite Catholique de Louvain, St-Luc University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, and Center for Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology (MIRO), Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    In locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), the role of imaging becomes more and more critical in the management process. In this framework, molecular imaging techniques such as PET allow noninvasive assessment of a range of tumour biomarkers such as metabolism, hypoxia and proliferation, which can serve different purposes. First, in a pretreatment setting they can influence therapy selection strategies and target delineation for radiation therapy. Second, their predictive and/or prognostic value could help enhance the therapeutic ratio in the management of HNSCC. Third, treatment modification can be performed through the generation of a molecular-based heterogeneous dose distribution with dose escalation to the most resistant parts of the tumour, a concept known as dose painting. Fourth, they are increasingly becoming a tool for monitoring response to therapy. In this review, PET imaging biomarkers used in the routine management of HNSCC or under investigation are discussed. (orig.)

  6. AGR3 in Breast Cancer: Prognostic Impact and Suitable Serum-Based Biomarker for Early Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garczyk, Stefan; von Stillfried, Saskia; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Hartmann, Arndt; Schrauder, Michael G.; Fasching, Peter A.; Anzeneder, Tobias; Tannapfel, Andrea; Ergönenc, Yavuz; Knüchel, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Blood-based early detection of breast cancer has recently gained novel momentum, as liquid biopsy diagnostics is a fast emerging field. In this study, we aimed to identify secreted proteins which are up-regulated both in tumour tissue and serum samples of breast cancer patients compared to normal tissue and sera. Based on two independent tissue cohorts (n = 75 and n = 229) and one serum cohort (n = 80) of human breast cancer and healthy serum samples, we characterised AGR3 as a novel potential biomarker both for breast cancer prognosis and early breast cancer detection from blood. AGR3 expression in breast tumours is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor α (P<0.001) and lower tumour grade (P<0.01). Interestingly, AGR3 protein expression correlates with unfavourable outcome in low (G1) and intermediate (G2) grade breast tumours (multivariate hazard ratio: 2.186, 95% CI: 1.008-4.740, P<0.05) indicating an independent prognostic impact. In sera analysed by ELISA technique, AGR3 protein concentration was significantly (P<0.001) elevated in samples from breast cancer patients (n = 40, mainly low stage tumours) compared to healthy controls (n = 40). To develop a suitable biomarker panel for early breast cancer detection, we measured AGR2 protein in human serum samples in parallel. The combined AGR3/AGR2 biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 89.5% as shown by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve statistics. Thus our data clearly show the potential usability of AGR3 and AGR2 as biomarkers for blood-based early detection of human breast cancer. PMID:25875093

  7. Combined RASSF1A and RASSF2A Promoter Methylation Analysis as Diagnostic Biomarker for Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Meng; Alexander Huebner; Ahmad Shabsigh; Arnab Chakravarti; Tim Lautenschlaeger

    2012-01-01

    Promoter hypermethylation, a widely studied epigenetic event known to influence gene expression levels, has been proposed as a potential biomarker in multiple types of cancer. Clinical diagnostic biomarkers are needed for reliable prediction of bladder cancer recurrence. In this paper, DNA promoter methylation of five C-terminal Ras-association family members (RASSF1A, RASSF2A, RASSF4, RASSF5, and RASSF6) was studied in 64 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) bladder cancer and normal adja...

  8. Glycoprotein Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Early Detection Research Network of the NCI is charged with the discovery, development and validation of biomarkers for early detection and prognosis related to neoplastic disease. Our laboratory is an NCI EDRN (U01CA152813) working on "Glycoprotein biomarkers for the early detection of aggressive prostate cancer". This EDRN administratiVE! supplement is a collaboration with Robert Veltri on his project to identify men with very low risk (indolent) prostate cancer (CaP) at the diagnostic biopsy at selection for active surveillance (AS). We will assess biopsy tissue using quantitative nuclear histomorphometric measurements and molecular biomarkers to predict an unexpected catastrophic CaP in such men with indolent CaP. At Johns Hopkins Hospital w1e use the Epstein criteria that includes; PSA density (PSAD) aggressive disease from a AS diagnostic biopsy. Our approach will combine nuclear morphometry measured by digital microscopy with a unique biopsy tissue biomarker profile (DNA content, Ki67, Her2neu, CACND1 and periostin). Fc•r the molecular targets we will us•e a multiplex tissue blot (MTB) immunohistochemistry method. The Aims o'f our work include 1) to utilize retrospective archival biopsy material from 70 AS cases where the outcome was unexpected and disastrous and collect an equal number of AS cases (n=140) and perform assays for morphology and biomarker targi ts proposed, 2) and predict failure using Cox proportional hazards statistical modeling.

  9. Non-invasive biomarkers in pancreatic cancer diagnosis: what we need versus what we have.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is probably the most lethal tumor being forecast as the second most fatal cancer by 2020 in developed countries. Only the earliest forms of the disease are a curable disease but it has to be diagnosed before symptoms starts. Detection at curable phase demands screening intervention for early detection and differential diagnosis. Unfortunately, no successful strategy or image technique has been concluded as effective approach and currently non-invasive biomarkers are the hope. Multiple translational research studies have explored minimally or non-invasive biomarkers in biofluids-blood, urine, stool, saliva or pancreatic juice, but diagnostic performance has not been validated yet. Nowadays no biomarker, alone or in combination, has been superior to carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in sensitivity and specificity. Although the number of novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of PC has been increasing during the last couple of years, no molecular signature is ready to be implemented in clinical routine. Under the uncertain future, miRNAs profiling and methylation status seem to be the most promising biomarkers. However, good results in larger validations are urgently needed before application. Industry efforts through biotech and pharmaceutical companies are urgently required to demonstrate accuracy and validate promising results from basic and translational results. PMID:27162784

  10. Amino acid profiling as a method of discovering biomarkers for early diagnosis of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simińska, Edyta; Koba, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in the world and its early detection significantly increases chances of patients' survival. High cancer mortality rate is caused mainly by late-stage diagnosis and lack of non-invasive and reliable methods for early diagnosis, such as plasma biomarkers. The incidence of cancers in the world still grows so it is crucial to develop a new, faster, high specificity and more sensitive diagnostic technologies. Several recent researchers indicate amino acids as a potential marker for cancer detection. An ideal cancer biomarker should be characterized by high specificity and sensitivity, reliability, ease of measurement and, what is important, ability to detect disease in its early stage. This study is focused on indicating metabolic amino acid profiling as a method of identifying biomarkers for cancer early detection and screening. Presented results are derived from the most recent studies where patients in early, often asymptomatic stages of disease constituted a large percentage of all the patients and, what is important, where researchers have observed alterations in these patients' amino acid profiles. This review is concentrated on analyzing studies on the most common cancers with high mortality rate. Inventing effective methods of early diagnosis is particularly important in case of such diseases. Research presented in this publication is focused on patients with lung, breast and colon cancer. In all analyzed cases, significant changes in the amino acid profile in cancer patients comparing to healthy controls were observed. This study indicates potential of amino acid profiling as method for early cancer detection. PMID:27033065

  11. In Silico discovery of transcription factors as potential diagnostic biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Kaur, Mandeep

    2011-09-19

    Background: Our study focuses on identifying potential biomarkers for diagnosis and early detection of ovarian cancer (OC) through the study of transcription regulation of genes affected by estrogen hormone.Results: The results are based on a set of 323 experimentally validated OC-associated genes compiled from several databases, and their subset controlled by estrogen. For these two gene sets we computationally determined transcription factors (TFs) that putatively regulate transcription initiation. We ranked these TFs based on the number of genes they are likely to control. In this way, we selected 17 top-ranked TFs as potential key regulators and thus possible biomarkers for a set of 323 OC-associated genes. For 77 estrogen controlled genes from this set we identified three unique TFs as potential biomarkers.Conclusions: We introduced a new methodology to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers for OC. This report is the first bioinformatics study that explores multiple transcriptional regulators of OC-associated genes as potential diagnostic biomarkers in connection with estrogen responsiveness. We show that 64% of TF biomarkers identified in our study are validated based on real-time data from microarray expression studies. As an illustration, our method could identify CP2 that in combination with CA125 has been reported to be sensitive in diagnosing ovarian tumors. 2011 Kaur et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  12. Integrating biomarkers in colorectal cancer trials in the West and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejpar, Sabine; Shen, Lin; Wang, Xicheng; Schilsky, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    The discovery of biomarkers that provide information on drug efficacy is recognized as essential for successful and cost-effective treatment of cancer. However, biomarker discovery is difficult, and requires multiple independent studies to identify a target that serves as a suitable predictor of efficacy and to ensure appropriate biomarker validation. Clinical trials that are performed, sometimes sequentially, in Europe, the USA or Asia, are often similar in their design, in part owing to regulatory, marketing, or safety considerations. We believe some of these trials offer additional unique opportunities for biomarker discovery or validation. There are multiple hurdles to overcome, such as homogenous tissue acquisition and analysis, defining and aligning biomarker hypotheses across trials, and the need to adapt sample sizes and trial designs. Nevertheless, we believe that a collaborative engagement of the academic, regulatory and pharmaceutical community can go a long way in addressing these issues and producing more-rapid results in the field of personalized medicine. In this Perspectives, we describe our views on the current fragmented approach to biomarker discovery and validation in relevant trials run within our own regions-that is, Europe, China, and the USA-and hope this article serves as a base for further reflection. PMID:25963094

  13. Fucose: A biomarker in grading of oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Satish; Saxena, Mona; Srinivas, Kandakurtis; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Early diagnosis of cancer helps a great deal in the management of oral cancer patients. Number of proteinous markers have been employed for this purpose. Majority of them are not specific. Recently conjugated oligosaccharide with proteins and lipids have gained considerable importance in the present postgenomics and postproteomic period in the diagnostic and prognostics of cancer cases. Materials and Methods: In this study, serum fucose levels were estimated in 50 control cases ...

  14. [Pathological diagnosis, work-up and reporting of breast cancer. Recommendations of the 3rd Hungarian Consensus Conference on Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserni, Gábor; Kulka, Janina; Francz, Monika; Járay, Balázs; Kálmán, Endre; Kovács, Ilona; Krenács, Tibor; Udvarhelyi, Nóra; Vass, László

    2016-09-01

    There have been relevant changes in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer to implement the updating of the 2010 recommendations made during the 2nd national consensus conference on the disease. Following a wide interdisciplinary consultation, the present recommendations have been finalized after their public discussion at the 3rd Hungarian Consensus Conference on Breast Cancer. The recommendations cover non-operative and intraoperative diagnostics, the work-up of operative specimens, the determination of prognostic and predictive markers and the content of the cytology and histology reports. Furthermore, it touches some special issues such as the current status of multigene molecular markers, the role of pathologists in clinical trials and prerequisites for their involvement, some relevant points about the future. PMID:27579721

  15. Xenograft assessment of predictive biomarkers for standard head and neck cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a challenging cancer to treat with overall 5-year survival on the order of 50–60%. Therefore, predictive biomarkers for this disease would be valuable to provide more effective and individualized therapeutic approaches for these patients. While prognostic biomarkers such as p16 expression correlate with outcome; to date, no predictive biomarkers have been clinically validated for HNSCC. We generated xenografts in immunocompromised mice from six established HNSCC cell lines and evaluated response to cisplatin, cetuximab, and radiation. Tissue microarrays were constructed from pre- and posttreatment tumor samples derived from each xenograft experiment. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a semiautomated imaging and analysis platform to determine the relative expression of five potential predictive biomarkers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phospho-EGFR, phospho-Akt, phospho-ERK, and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1). Biomarker levels were compared between xenografts that were sensitive versus resistant to a specific therapy utilizing a two-sample t-test with equal standard deviations. Indeed the xenografts displayed heterogeneous responses to each treatment, and we linked a number of baseline biomarker levels to response. This included low ERCC1 being associated with cisplatin sensitivity, low phospho-Akt correlated with cetuximab sensitivity, and high total EGFR was related to radiation resistance. Overall, we developed a systematic approach to identifying predictive biomarkers and demonstrated several connections between biomarker levels and treatment response. Despite these promising initial results, this work requires additional preclinical validation, likely involving the use of patient-derived xenografts, prior to moving into the clinical realm for confirmation among patients with HNSCC

  16. A meta analysis of pancreatic microarray datasets yields new targets as cancer genes and biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin C W Goonesekere

    Full Text Available The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC, which has a five year survival rate of less than 5%. Improved screening for earlier diagnosis, through the detection of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers provides the best hope of increasing the rate of curatively resectable carcinomas. Though many serum markers have been reported to be elevated in patients with PC, so far, most of these markers have not been implemented into clinical routine due to low sensitivity or specificity. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly upregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We demonstrate that the biological functions ascribed to these genes are clearly associated with PC and metastasis, and that that these genes exhibit a strong link to pathways involved with inflammation and the immune response. This investigation has yielded new targets for cancer genes, and potential biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. The candidate list of cancer genes includes protein kinase genes, new members of gene families currently associated with PC, as well as genes not previously linked to PC. In this study, we are also able to move towards developing a signature for hypomethylated genes, which could be useful for early detection of PC. We also show that the significantly upregulated 800+ genes in our analysis can serve as an enriched pool for tissue and serum protein biomarkers in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Collections of simultaneously altered genes as biomarkers of cancer cell drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-03-15

    Computational analysis of cancer pharmacogenomics data has resulted in biomarkers predictive of drug response, but the majority of response is not captured by current methods. Methods typically select single biomarkers or groups of related biomarkers but do not account for response that is strictly dependent on many simultaneous genetic alterations. This shortcoming reflects the combinatorics and multiple-testing problem associated with many-body biologic interactions. We developed a novel approach, Multivariate Organization of Combinatorial Alterations (MOCA), to partially address these challenges. Extending on previous work that accounts for pairwise interactions, the approach rapidly combines many genomic alterations into biomarkers of drug response, using Boolean set operations coupled with optimization; in this framework, the union, intersection, and difference Boolean set operations are proxies of molecular redundancy, synergy, and resistance, respectively. The algorithm is fast, broadly applicable to cancer genomics data, is of immediate use for prioritizing cancer pharmacogenomics experiments, and recovers known clinical findings without bias. Furthermore, the results presented here connect many important, previously isolated observations. PMID:23338612

  18. A Combined Shotgun and Targeted Mass Spectrometry Strategy for Breast Cancer Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Martin; Ossola, Reto; Breslin, Thomas; Rinner, Oliver; Malmström, Lars; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Malmström, Johan; Niméus, Emma

    2015-07-01

    It is of highest importance to find proteins responsible for breast cancer dissemination, for use as biomarkers or treatment targets. We established and performed a combined nontargeted LC-MS/MS and a targeted LC-SRM workflow for discovery and validation of protein biomarkers. Eighty breast tumors, stratified for estrogen receptor status and development of distant recurrence (DR ± ), were collected. After enrichment of N-glycosylated peptides, label-free LC-MS/MS was performed on each individual tumor in triplicate. In total, 1515 glycopeptides from 778 proteins were identified and used to create a map of the breast cancer N-glycosylated proteome. Based on this specific proteome map, we constructed a 92-plex targeted label-free LC-SRM panel. These proteins were quantified across samples by LC-SRM, resulting in 10 proteins consistently differentially regulated between DR+/DR- tumors. Five proteins were further validated in a separate cohort as prognostic biomarkers at the gene expression level. We also compared the LC-SRM results to clinically reported HER2 status, demonstrating its clinical accuracy. In conclusion, we demonstrate a combined mass spectrometry strategy, at large scale on clinical samples, leading to the identification and validation of five proteins as potential biomarkers for breast cancer recurrence. All MS data are available via ProteomeXchange and PASSEL with identifiers PXD001685 and PASS00643. PMID:25944384

  19. Biomarkers in bladder cancer: A metabolomic approach using in vitro and ex vivo model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Daniela; Jerónimo, Carmen; Henrique, Rui; Belo, Luís; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Carvalho, Márcia

    2016-07-15

    Metabolomics has recently proved to be useful in the area of biomarker discovery for cancers in which early diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed, as is the case of bladder cancer (BC). This article presents a comprehensive review of the literature on the metabolomic studies on BC, highlighting metabolic pathways perturbed in this disease and the altered metabolites as potential biomarkers for BC detection. Current disease model systems used in the study of BC metabolome include in vitro-cultured cancer cells, ex vivo neoplastic bladder tissues and biological fluids, mainly urine but also blood serum/plasma, from BC patients. The major advantages and drawbacks of each model system are discussed. Based on available data, it seems that BC metabolic signature is mainly characterized by alterations in metabolites related to energy metabolic pathways, particularly glycolysis, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, known to be crucial for cell proliferation, as well as glutathione metabolism, known to be determinant in maintaining cellular redox balance. In addition, purine and pyrimidine metabolism as well as carnitine species were found to be altered in BC. Finally, it is emphasized that, despite the progress made in respect to novel biomarkers for BC diagnosis, there are still some challenges and limitations that should be addressed in future metabolomic studies to ensure their translatability to clinical practice. PMID:26804544

  20. Serial Patterns of Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers in a Prediagnosis Longitudinal Dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Blyuss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of ovarian cancer through screening may have impact on mortality from the disease. Approaches based on CA125 cut-off have not been effective. Longitudinal algorithms such as the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA to interpret CA125 have been shown to have higher sensitivity and specificity than a single cut-off. The aim of this study was to investigate whether other ovarian cancer-related biomarkers, Human Epididymis 4 (HE4, glycodelin, mesothelin, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7, and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1, could improve the performance of CA125 in detecting ovarian cancer earlier. Serum samples (single and serial predating diagnosis from 47 women taking part in the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS who went on to develop primary invasive ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal cancer (index cancer (170 samples and 179 matched controls (893 samples were included in the study. A multiplex immunobased assay platform (Becton Dickinson allowing simultaneous measurement of the six serum markers was used. The area under the ROC curve for the panel of three biomarkers (CA125, HE4, and glycodelin was higher than for CA125 alone for all analysed time groups, indicating that these markers can improve on sensitivity of CA125 alone for ovarian cancer detection.

  1. Circulating microRNAs as minimally invasive biomarkers for cancer theragnosis and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. S. Cho

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Novel cancer biomarker discovery is urgently needed for cancer theragnosis and prognosis, and among the many possible types of samples, blood is regarded to be ideal for this discovery as it can be collected easily in a minimally invasive manner. Results of the last few years have ascertained the quantification of microRNA (miRNA as a promising approach for the detection and prognostication of cancer. Indeed, an increasing number of studies have shown that circulating cancer-associated miRNAs are readily measured in plasma or serum and they can robustly discriminate cancer patients from healthy controls, as well as distinguishing between good-prognosis and poor-prognosis patients. Furthermore, recent findings also suggest the potential of circulating miRNAs in the screening, monitoring, and treatment of cancer. This article summarizes the most significant and latest discoveries of original researches on circulating miRNAs involvement in cancer, focusing on the potential of circulating miRNAs as minimally invasive biomarkers for cancer theragnosis and prognosis.

  2. Application of biomarkers in cancer risk management: evaluation from stochastic clonal evolutionary and dynamic system optimization points of view.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Aside from primary prevention, early detection remains the most effective way to decrease mortality associated with the majority of solid cancers. Previous cancer screening models are largely based on classification of at-risk populations into three conceptually defined groups (normal, cancer without symptoms, and cancer with symptoms. Unfortunately, this approach has achieved limited successes in reducing cancer mortality. With advances in molecular biology and genomic technologies, many candidate somatic genetic and epigenetic "biomarkers" have been identified as potential predictors of cancer risk. However, none have yet been validated as robust predictors of progression to cancer or shown to reduce cancer mortality. In this Perspective, we first define the necessary and sufficient conditions for precise prediction of future cancer development and early cancer detection within a simple physical model framework. We then evaluate cancer risk prediction and early detection from a dynamic clonal evolution point of view, examining the implications of dynamic clonal evolution of biomarkers and the application of clonal evolution for cancer risk management in clinical practice. Finally, we propose a framework to guide future collaborative research between mathematical modelers and biomarker researchers to design studies to investigate and model dynamic clonal evolution. This approach will allow optimization of available resources for cancer control and intervention timing based on molecular biomarkers in predicting cancer among various risk subsets that dynamically evolve over time.

  3. Investigation of prostate cancer cells using NADH and Tryptophan as biomarker: multiphoton FLIM-FRET microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Shagufta; O'Melia, Meghan J.; Wallrabe, Horst; Svindrych, Zdenek; Chandra, Dhyan; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) can be used to understand the metabolic activity in cancer. Prostate cancer is one of the leading cancers in men in the USA. This research focuses on FLIM measurements of NAD(P)H and Tryptophan, used as biomarkers to understand the metabolic activity in prostate cancer cells. Two prostate cancers and one normal cell line were used for live-cell FLIM measurements on Zeiss780 2P confocal microscope with SPCM FLIM board. Glucose uptake and glycolysis proceeds about ten times faster in cancer than in non-cancerous tissues. Therefore, we assessed the glycolytic activity in the prostate cancer in comparison to the normal cells upon glucose stimulation by analyzing the NAD(P)H and Trp lifetime distribution and efficiency of energy transfer (E%). Furthermore, we treated the prostate cancer cells with 1μM Doxorubicin, a commonly used anti-cancer chemotherapeutic. Increase in NADH a2%, an indicator of increased glycolysis and increased E% between Trp and NAD(P)H were seen upon glucose stimulation for 30min. The magnitude of shift to the right for NAD(P)H a2% and E% distribution was higher in prostate cancer versus the normal cells. Upon treatment with Doxorubicin decrease in cellular metabolism was seen at 15 and 30 minutes. The histogram for NAD(P)H a2% post-treatment for prostate cancer cells showed a left shift compared to the untreated control suggesting decrease in glycolysis and metabolic activity opposite to what was observed after glucose stimulation. Hence, NAD(P)H and Trp lifetimes can be used biomarkers to understand metabolic activity in prostate cancer and upon chemotherapeutic interventions.

  4. DNA methylome and the complexity of discovering prostate cancer biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahriar Koochekpour

    2011-01-01

    @@ Prostate cancer (PCa) remains the most common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men.Molecular discrimination at an early stage between indolent and aggressive primary tumors in pathologically confirmed PCa is required to develop personalized therapeutic interventions.

  5. Multi-transcript profiling in archival diagnostic prostate cancer needle biopsies to evaluate biomarkers in non-surgically treated men

    OpenAIRE

    Kachroo, Naveen; Warren, Anne Y; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most biomarkers in prostate cancer have only been evaluated in surgical cohorts. The value of these biomarkers in a different therapy context remains unclear. Our objective was to test a panel of surgical biomarkers for prognostic value in men treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT). Methods The Fluidigm® PCR array was used for multi-transcript profiling of laser microdissected tumours from archival formalin-fixed diagnostic biop...

  6. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pereira

    Full Text Available High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools.Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival.Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic dilemma and a potential

  7. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanya; Sebra, Robert; Catalina Camacho, Sandra; Garnar-Wortzel, Leopold; Nair, Navya; Moshier, Erin; Wooten, Melissa; Uzilov, Andrew; Chen, Rong; Prasad-Hayes, Monica; Zakashansky, Konstantin; Beddoe, Ann Marie; Schadt, Eric; Dottino, Peter; Martignetti, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools. Methods and Findings Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT) scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival. Conclusions Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic

  8. MicroRNA-18a as a promising biomarker for cancer detection: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Shan; Tan, Shi-Sheng; Li, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cancer discovered at an early stage have relatively high survival rates. Increasing researches have shown the potential of detecting dysregulated microRNA-18a (miR-18a) to diagnose cancer. However, non-uniform results in previous studies were found. Thus, this meta-analysis was conducted to further explore the clinical applicability of miR-18a as an ideal biomarker for cancer detection. Suitable articles were obtained from online databases like PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, CBM and ...

  9. Potentials of plasma NGAL and MIC-1 as biomarker(s in the diagnosis of lethal pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhwinder Kaur

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC is lethal malignancy with very high mortality rate. Absence of sensitive and specific marker(s is one of the major factors for poor prognosis of PC patients. In pilot studies using small set of patients, secreted acute phase proteins neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL and TGF-β family member macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1 are proposed as most potential biomarkers specifically elevated in the blood of PC patients. However, their performance as diagnostic markers for PC, particularly in pre-treatment patients, remains unknown. In order to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of NGAL and MIC-1, their levels were measured in plasma samples from patients with pre-treatment PC patients (n = 91 and compared it with those in healthy control (HC individuals (n = 24 and patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP, n = 23. The diagnostic performance of these two proteins was further compared with that of CA19-9, a tumor marker commonly used to follow PC progression. The levels of all three biomarkers were significantly higher in PC compared to HCs. The mean (± standard deviation, SD plasma NGAL, CA19-9 and MIC-1 levels in PC patients was 111.1 ng/mL (2.2, 219.2 U/mL (7.8 and 4.5 ng/mL (4.1, respectively. In comparing resectable PC to healthy patients, all three biomarkers were found to have comparable sensitivities (between 64%-81% but CA19-9 and NGAL had a higher specificity (92% and 88%, respectively. For distinguishing resectable PC from CP patients, CA19-9 and MIC-1 were most specific (74% and 78% respectively. CA19-9 at an optimal cut-off of 54.1 U/ml is highly specific in differentiating resectable (stage 1/2 pancreatic cancer patients from controls in comparison to its clinical cut-off (37.1 U/ml. Notably, the addition of MIC-1 to CA19-9 significantly improved the ability to distinguish resectable PC cases from CP (p = 0.029. Overall, MIC-1 in combination with CA19-9 improved the diagnostic

  10. AGE metabolites: a biomarker linked to cancer disparity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Dion; Spruill, Laura; Walter, Katherine R; Nogueira, Lourdes M; Fedarovich, Hleb; Turner, Ryan Y; Ahmed, Mahtabuddin; Salley, Judith D; Ford, Marvella E; Findlay, Victoria J; Turner, David P

    2014-10-01

    Socioeconomic and environmental influences are established factors promoting cancer disparity, but the contribution of biologic factors is not clear. We report a mechanistic link between carbohydrate-derived metabolites and cancer that may provide a biologic consequence of established factors of cancer disparity. Glycation is the nonenzymatic glycosylation of carbohydrates to macromolecules, which produces reactive metabolites called advanced glycation end products (AGE). A sedentary lifestyle and poor diet all promote disease and the AGE accumulation pool in our bodies and also increase cancer risk. We examined AGE metabolites in clinical specimens of African American and European American patients with prostate cancer and found a higher AGE concentration in these specimens among African American patients when compared with European American patients. Elevated AGE levels corresponded with expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE or AGER). We show that AGE-mediated increases in cancer-associated processes are dependent upon RAGE. Aberrant AGE accumulation may represent a metabolic susceptibility difference that contributes to cancer disparity. PMID:25053712

  11. Molecular profiling of childhood cancer: Biomarkers and novel therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Saletta

    2014-06-01

    General significance: The increasing recognition of the heterogeneity of molecular causes of cancer favors the continued development of molecularly targeted agents, and their transfer to pediatric and adolescent populations.

  12. Argonaute proteins: potential biomarkers for human colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although Argonaute proteins are considered to play important roles in stem cell self-renewal, RNA interference (RNAi) and translational regulation, relatively little is known about their functions in human disease. In this study, we investigated the expression of eight members of human Argonaute family in colon cancer and identified their potential roles in tumor development and progression. Antibodies against human Argonaute proteins were prepared by immunizing rabbits with synthetic peptides derived from the sequences of Argonaute members. Then we constructed a tissue microarray containing 75 specimens from colon cancer and 75 specimens from adjacent non-cancer tissue, and assayed eight different proteins (EIF2C1, EIF2C2, EIF2C3, EIF2C4, PIWIL1, PIWIL2, PIWIL3 and PIWIL4) by immunohistochemistry on consecutive formalin-fixed tissue microarray sections. The expression of EIF2C1-4 and PIWIL1-4 was significantly higher in tumorous tissue than in adjacent tissue. Notably, a significant correlation was observed between the positive expression of EIF2C2, EIF2C3, EIF2C4, PIWIL4 and the presence of distant metastasis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an increased expression of EIF2C1 and PIWIL2 was significantly associated with occurrence of colon cancer tissue compared with non-cancer tissue. Argonaute proteins are overexpressed in colon cancer relative to adjacent non-cancer tissue. The expression of EIF2C2-4 and PIWIL4 appears increased in advanced tumors with distant metastasis, suggesting it may promote tumor invasion. Furthermore, EIF2C1 and PIWIL2 might represent novel colon cancer markers with early diagnostic significance

  13. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Registration, Screening and Prognostic Biomarker Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Barrow, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the research was to investigate the benefits of a hereditary colorectal cancer registry in the management of patients and families with Lynch syndrome. In study one, a systematic review was performed to quantify the impact of registration and screening on colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality, with comparison between familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome (LS). In study two, a regional Lynch syndrome registry was utilised to evaluate the uptake ...

  14. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Project on Criteria for Clinical Trials in Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease: III. The 2014 Biomarker Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczesny, Sophie; Hakim, Frances T; Pidala, Joseph; Cooke, Kenneth R; Lathrop, Julia; Griffith, Linda M; Hansen, John; Jagasia, Madan; Miklos, David; Pavletic, Steven; Parkman, Robertson; Russek-Cohen, Estelle; Flowers, Mary E D; Lee, Stephanie; Martin, Paul; Vogelsang, Georgia; Walton, Marc; Schultz, Kirk R

    2015-05-01

    Biology-based markers to confirm or aid in the diagnosis or prognosis of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation or monitor its progression are critically needed to facilitate evaluation of new therapies. Biomarkers have been defined as any characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of a normal biological or pathogenic process, or of a pharmacologic response to a therapeutic intervention. Applications of biomarkers in chronic GVHD clinical trials or patient management include the following: (1) diagnosis and assessment of chronic GVHD disease activity, including distinguishing irreversible damage from continued disease activity; (2) prognostic risk to develop chronic GVHD; and (3) prediction of response to therapy. Sample collection for chronic GVHD biomarkers studies should be well documented following established quality control guidelines for sample acquisition, processing, preservation, and testing, at intervals that are both calendar and event driven. The consistent therapeutic treatment of subjects and standardized documentation needed to support biomarker studies are most likely to be provided in prospective clinical trials. To date, no chronic GVHD biomarkers have been qualified for use in clinical applications. Since our previous chronic GVHD Biomarkers Working Group report in 2005, an increasing number of chronic GVHD candidate biomarkers are available for further investigation. This paper provides a 4-part framework for biomarker investigations: identification, verification, qualification, and application with terminology based on Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency guidelines. PMID:25644957

  15. Recent patents and advances in genomic biomarker discovery for colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quyun, Chen; Ye, Zhiyun; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Lin, Biaoyang

    2010-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. Early diagnosis of colorectal cancer is the key to reducing the death rate of CRC patients. Predicting the response to current therapeutic modalities of CRC will also have a great impact on patient care. This review summarizes recent advances and patents in biomarker discovery in CRC under five major categories; including genomic changes, expression changes, mutations, epigenetic changes and microRNAs. The interesting patents include: 1) a patent for a method to differentiate normal exfoliated cells from cancer cells based on whether they were subjected to apoptosis and DNA degradation; 2) A model (PM-33 multiple molecular marker model) based on expression changes of up-regulation of the MDM2, DUSP6, and NFl genes down-regulation of the RNF4, MMD and EIF2S3 genes, which achieved an 88% sensitivity, and an 82% specificity for CRC diagnosis; 3) gene mutations in PTEN, KRAS, PIK3CA for predicting the response to anti-EGFR therapies, a common drug used for CRC treatment; 4) patents on epigenetic changes of ITGA4, SEPT9, ALX4, TFAP2E FOXL2, SARM1, ID4 etc. and many key miRNAs. Finally, future directions in the fields were commented on or suggested, including the combination of multiple categories of biomarkers and pathway central or network-based biomarker panels. PMID:20426761

  16. Consensus for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer: results from a European workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirker, Robert; Herth, Felix J F; Kerr, Keith M; Filipits, Martin; Taron, Miquel; Gandara, David; Hirsch, Fred R; Grunenwald, Dominique; Popper, Helmut; Smit, Egbert; Dietel, Manfred; Marchetti, Antonio; Manegold, Christian; Schirmacher, Peter; Thomas, Michael; Rosell, Rafael; Cappuzzo, Federico; Stahel, Rolf; de Stricker, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Activating somatic mutations of the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have recently been characterized in a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients harboring these mutations in their tumors show excellent response to EGFR...... tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). The EGFR-TKI gefitinib has been approved in Europe for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC with activating mutations of the EGFR TK. Because EGFR mutation testing is not yet well established across Europe, biomarker...

  17. ellipsoidFN: a tool for identifying a heterogeneous set of cancer biomarkers based on gene expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xianwen; Wang, Yong; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Jin, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Computationally identifying effective biomarkers for cancers from gene expression profiles is an important and challenging task. The challenge lies in the complicated pathogenesis of cancers that often involve the dysfunction of many genes and regulatory interactions. Thus, sophisticated classification model is in pressing need. In this study, we proposed an efficient approach, called ellipsoidFN (ellipsoid Feature Net), to model the disease complexity by ellipsoids and seek a set of heterogeneous biomarkers. Our approach achieves a non-linear classification scheme for the mixed samples by the ellipsoid concept, and at the same time uses a linear programming framework to efficiently select biomarkers from high-dimensional space. ellipsoidFN reduces the redundancy and improves the complementariness between the identified biomarkers, thus significantly enhancing the distinctiveness between cancers and normal samples, and even between cancer types. Numerical evaluation on real prostate cancer, breast cancer and leukemia gene expression datasets suggested that ellipsoidFN outperforms the state-of-the-art biomarker identification methods, and it can serve as a useful tool for cancer biomarker identification in the future. The Matlab code of ellipsoidFN is freely available from http://doc.aporc.org/wiki/EllipsoidFN. PMID:23262226

  18. miRNAs as potential biomarkers in early breast cancer detection following mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Sidney W; Lee, Woojin; Coffey, Caitrin; Lean, Alexa; Wu, Xiaoling; Tan, Xiaohui; Man, Yan-Gao; Brem, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. About 12 % women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. Currently one of the most accepted model/theories is that ductal breast cancer (most common type of breast cancer) follows a linear progression: from normal breast epithelial cells to ductal hyperplasia to atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and finally to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Distinguishing pure ADH diagnosis from DCIS and/or IDC on mammography, and even combined with follow-up core needle biopsy (CNB) is still a challenge. Therefore subsequent surgical excision cannot be avoided to make a definitive diagnosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a highly abundant class of endogenous non-coding RNAs, which contribute to cancer initiation and progression, and are differentially expressed between normal and cancer tissues. They can function as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes. With accumulating evidence of the role of miRNAs in breast cancer progression, including our own studies, we sought to summarize the nature of early breast lesions and the potential use of miRNA molecules as biomarkers in early breast cancer detection. In particular, miRNA biomarkers may potentially serve as a companion tool following mammography screening and CNB. In the long-term, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the miRNA signatures associated with breast cancer development could potentially result in the development of novel strategies for disease prevention and therapy. PMID:26819702

  19. Serum Amyloid A (SAA): a Novel Biomarker for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, Emiliano; Bellone, Stefania; El-Sahwi, Karim; Cargnelutti, Marilisa; Buza, Natalia; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A.; Schwartz, Peter E.; Rutherford, Thomas J.; Pecorelli, Sergio; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2009-01-01

    Background We investigated the expression of Serum-Amyloid-A (SAA) in endometrial endometrioid carcinoma (EEC), and evaluated its potential as a serum biomarker. Methods SAA gene and protein expression levels were evaluated in EEC and normal endometrial tissues (NEC), by real time-PCR, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry. SAA concentration in 194 serum samples from 50 healthy-women, 42 women with benign diseases and 102 patients including 49 grade-1, 38 grade-2 and 15 grade-3 EEC was also studied by a sensitive bead-based-immunoassay. Results SAA gene expression levels were significantly higher in EEC when compared to NEC (mean-copy-number by RT-PCR = 182 vs 1.9; P=0.001). IHC revealed diffuse cytoplasmic SAA protein staining in poorly differentiated EEC tissues. High intracellular levels of SAA were identified in primary EEC cell lines evaluated by flow cytometry and SAA was found to be actively secreted in vitro. SAA concentrations (μg/ml) had medians of 6.0 in normal healthy females and 6.0 in patients with benign disease (P=0.92). In contrast, SAA values in the serum of EEC patients had a median of 23.7 significantly higher than those of the healthy group (P=0.001) and benign group (P=0.001). Patients harboring G3 EEC were found to have SAA concentrations significantly higher than G1/G2 patients. Conclusions SAA is not only a liver-secreted-protein but is also an EEC-cell product. SAA is expressed and actively secreted by G3-EEC and it is present in high concentration in the serum of EEC patients. SAA may represent a novel biomarker for EEC to monitor disease recurrence and response to therapy. PMID:20041483

  20. Identification of carboxyl terminal peptide of Fibrinogen as a potential serum biomarker for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng; Luo, Zhiwen; Tang, Dan; Liu, Lijie; Yao, Dingkang; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a very common disease worldwide where new serum biomarkers are urgently needed to improve their early diagnosis. In this study, we aim to search for the potential serum protein/peptide biomarkers of GC by using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). We first obtained the serum protein/peptide profiles from a training dataset including 30 patients with GC, 16 cases with chronic benign gastric disease (CGD), and 30 normal controls (CON) where 15 protein peaks were identified to exhibit the obvious deviation (P CGD, and CON analyzed by Biomarker Wizard 3.1 software with three protein peaks with mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio 5910, 5342, and 6439 further confirmed in the validation dataset. Among the three protein peaks, peak 5910 displayed the most significantly different which could distinguish GC patients from CGD and CON with a sensitivity of 86.3 %, a specificity of 91.3 %, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.89 by using the optimal cutoff value of 17.3. We further identified peak 5910 as the carboxyl terminal fraction of Fibrinogen α by LC-MS and validated its identity by antiserum-mediated SELDI-based immunodepletion assays. In sum, SELDI-TOF-MS method could effectively generate serum peptidome in cancer patients and provide a new approach to identify potentially diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cancer. The carboxyl terminal fraction of Fibrinogen α may be a potential serological biomarker for GC diagnosis. PMID:26662807

  1. Metabolomic profile in pancreatic cancer patients: a consensus-based approach to identify highly discriminating metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Di Gangi, Iole Maria; Mazza, Tommaso; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Fusilli, Caterina; Ippolito, Antonio; Mattivi, Fulvio; Latiano, Anna; Andriulli, Angelo; Vrhovsek, Urska; Pazienza, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths due to its aggressive behavior and poor clinical outcome. There is a considerable variability in the frequency of serum tumor markers in cancer' patients. We performed a metabolomics screening in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Two targeted metabolomic assays were conducted on 40 serum samples of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40 healthy controls. Multivariate m...

  2. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  3. Identification and validation of oncologic miRNA biomarkers for luminal A-like breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailbhe M McDermott

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer is a common disease with distinct tumor subtypes phenotypically characterized by ER and HER2/neu receptor status. MiRNAs play regulatory roles in tumor initiation and progression, and altered miRNA expression has been demonstrated in a variety of cancer states presenting the potential for exploitation as cancer biomarkers. Blood provides an excellent medium for biomarker discovery. This study investigated systemic miRNAs differentially expressed in Luminal A-like (ER+PR+HER2/neu- breast cancer and their effectiveness as oncologic biomarkers in the clinical setting. METHODS: Blood samples were prospectively collected from patients with Luminal A-like breast cancer (n = 54 and controls (n = 56. RNA was extracted, reverse transcribed and subjected to microarray analysis (n = 10 Luminal A-like; n = 10 Control. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified by artificial neural network (ANN data-mining algorithms. Expression of specific miRNAs was validated by RQ-PCR (n = 44 Luminal A; n = 46 Control and potential relationships between circulating miRNA levels and clinicopathological features of breast cancer were investigated. RESULTS: Microarray analysis identified 76 differentially expressed miRNAs. ANN revealed 10 miRNAs for further analysis (miR-19b, miR-29a, miR-93, miR-181a, miR-182, miR-223, miR-301a, miR-423-5p, miR-486-5 and miR-652. The biomarker potential of 4 miRNAs (miR-29a, miR-181a, miR-223 and miR-652 was confirmed by RQ-PCR, with significantly reduced expression in blood of women with Luminal A-like breast tumors compared to healthy controls (p = 0.001, 0.004, 0.009 and 0.004 respectively. Binary logistic regression confirmed that combination of 3 of these miRNAs (miR-29a, miR-181a and miR-652 could reliably differentiate between cancers and controls with an AUC of 0.80. CONCLUSION: This study provides insight into the underlying molecular portrait of Luminal A-like breast

  4. Embracing an integromic approach to tissue biomarker research in cancer: Perspectives and lessons learned

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gerald; Bankhead, Peter; Dunne, Philip D.; O'Reilly, Paul G; James, Jacqueline A.; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Hamilton, Peter; McArt, Darragh G.

    2016-01-01

    Modern approaches to biomedical research and diagnostics targeted towards precision medicine are generating ‘big data’ across a range of high-throughput experimental and analytical platforms. Integrative analysis of this rich clinical, pathological, molecular and imaging data represents one of the greatest bottlenecks in biomarker discovery research in cancer and other diseases. Following on from the publication of our successful framework for multimodal data amalgamation and integrative anal...

  5. Composite Biomarkers For Non-invasive Screening, Diagnosis And Prognosis Of Colorectal Cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-09-11

    The present invention concerns particular biomarkers for diagnosing and/or prognosticating colorectal cancer, in particular in a non-invasive manner. The methods and compositions concern analysis of methylation patterns of one or more genes from a set of 29 genes identified as described herein. In certain embodiments, the gene set includes at least P15.INK4b, SST, GAS7, CNRIP1, and PIK3CG.

  6. Osteopontin is a prognostic biomarker in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rud, Ane Kristine Kongsgaard; Pedersen, Kjetil Boye; Øijordsbakken, Miriam; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Solberg, Steinar; Berge, Gisle; Helland, Åslaug; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Mælandsmo, Gunhild

    2013-01-01

    Background: In a previously published report we characterized the expression of the metastasis-associated proteins S100A4, osteopontin (OPN) and ephrin-A1 in a prospectively collected panel of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. The aim of the present follow-up study was to investigate the prognostic impact of these potential biomarkers in the same patient cohort. In addition, circulating serum levels of OPN were measured and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the −44...

  7. Quantitative proteomics in resected renal cancer tissue for biomarker discovery and profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Atrih, A; Mudaliar, M A V; Zakikhani, P; Lamont, D J; Huang, J T-J; Bray, S.E.; Barton, G.; Fleming, S; Nabi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proteomics-based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. We present state-of-art label-free quantitative proteomics method to assess proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) compared with noncancer renal tissues. Methods: Fresh frozen tissue samples from eight primary RCC lesions and autologous adjacent normal renal tissues were obtained from surgically resected tumour-bearing kidneys. Proteins were extracted by complete solubilisation of...

  8. Tissue Biomarkers in Prognostication of Serous Ovarian Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Binny Khandakar; Sandeep R Mathur; Lalit Kumar; Sunesh Kumar; Siddhartha Datta Gupta; Venkateswaran K Iyer; Kalaivani, M.

    2014-01-01

    Serous ovarian cancer (SOC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in females with poor prognosis because of advanced stage at presentation. Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is being used for management of advanced SOC, but role of tissue biomarkers in prognostication following NACT is not well established. The study was conducted on advanced stage SOC patients (n = 100) that were treated either conventionally (n = 50) or with NACT (n = 50), followed by surgery. In order t...

  9. Radiotherapy diagnostic biomarkers in radioresistant human H460 lung cancer stem-like cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Song, Jie-Young; Park, In-Chul; KIM, JAE-SUNG; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor cell radioresistance is a major contributor to radiotherapy failure, highlighting the importance of identifying predictive biomarkers for radioresistance. In this work, we established a radioresistant H460 (RR-H460) cell line from parental radiosensitive H460 lung cancer cells by exposure to fractionated radiation. The radiation-resistant, anti-apoptotic phenotype of RR-H460 cell lines was confirmed by their enhanced clonogenic survival and increased expression of the radioresi...

  10. Biomarkers of endometrial cancer and related gynaecological malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeber, L.M.S.

    2010-01-01

    In the Western World, endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. Endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC or Type I tumour), accounts for approximately 75% of cases. Type II tumours, of which uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is the most common subtype, are

  11. Systematic review and meta-analysis of tumor biomarkers in predicting prognosis in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is a frequently occurring cancer with poor prognosis despite combined therapeutic strategies. Many biomarkers have been proposed as predictors of adverse events. We sought to assess the prognostic value of biomarkers in predicting the overall survival of esophageal cancer and to help guide personalized cancer treatment to give patients the best chance at remission. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature to summarize evidence for the discriminatory ability of prognostic biomarkers for esophageal cancer. Relevant literature was identified using the PubMed database on April 11, 2012, and conformed to the REMARK criteria. The primary endpoint was overall survival and data were synthesized with hazard ratios (HRs). We included 109 studies, exploring 13 different biomarkers, which were subjected to quantitative meta-analysis. Promising markers that emerged for the prediction of overall survival in esophageal squamous cell cancer included VEGF (18 eligible studies, n = 1476, HR = 1.85, 95% CI, 1.55-2.21), cyclin D1 (12 eligible studies, n = 1476, HR = 1.82, 95% CI, 1.50-2.20), Ki-67 (3 eligible studies, n = 308, HR = 1.11, 95% CI, 0.70-1.78) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (5 eligible studies, n = 700, HR = 1.28, 95% CI, 0.97-1.69); prognostic markers for esophageal adenocarcinoma included COX-2 (2 eligible studies, n = 235, HR = 3.06, 95% CI, 2.01-4.65) and HER-2 (3 eligible studies, n = 291, HR = 2.15, 95% CI, 1.39-3.33); prognostic markers for uncategorized ECs included p21 (9 eligible studies, n = 858, HR = 1.27, 95% CI, 0.75-2.16), p53 (31 eligible studies, n = 2851, HR = 1.34, 95% CI, 1.21-1.48), CRP (8 eligible studies, n = 1382, HR = 2.65, 95% CI, 1.64-4.27) and hemoglobin (5 eligible studies, n = 544, HR = 0.91, 95% CI, 0.83-1.00). Although some modest bias cannot be excluded, this review supports the involvement of biomarkers to be associated with EC overall survival

  12. Nano and Microparticle-Enhanced Immunosensor Approaches for the Detection of Cancer Biomarker Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Vigneshwaran

    Accurate, sensitive, point-of-care multiplexed protein measurements are critical for early disease detection and monitoring, impacting biomarker and drug discovery, and personalized medicine. Significant application involves monitoring panels of proteins in the blood that are biomarkers for diagnosing cancer. However, measurements of biomarker panels in blood or other bodily fluids have been slow to integrate into current practice of cancer diagnostics partly due to the lack of technically simple, low-cost, sensitive, point-of-care multiplexed measurement devices, as well as the lack of rigorously validated protein panels. The present thesis in part addresses these limitations by the development of electrochemical and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensors utilizing 1mum superparamagnetic labels for accurate detection of prostate cancer biomarker proteins in patient serum samples. Electrochemical discrete immunosensors featuring nanostructured surface with densely packed 5 nm glutathione-coated gold nanoparticles coupled with multi-enzyme magnetic particle (MP) labels enabled measurement of prostate specific antigen (PSA) with a detection limit (DL) of 0.5 pg mL-1 in undiluted serum. Such low DLs are attributed to high surface area, conductivity of nanostructured surface, and multi-enzyme signal amplification. DLs are further improved by utilizing MP bioconjugated with more than 100,000 antibody labels to offline capture proteins from the serum sample matrix, minimizing nonspecific binding of interfering proteins on sensor surface before detection. This approach provided an unprecedented 10 fg DL mL-1 for PSA in undiluted serum using a flow SPR biosensor. Finally electrochemical microfluidic immunoarrays featuring nanostructured surface and offline protein capture by multi-label MPs enabled multiplexed detection of prostate cancer biomarkers PSA and interleukin-6 (IL-6). These approaches provided up to 1000-fold lower DLs compared to commercial bead based

  13. Plasma levels of the MMP-9:TIMP-1 complex as prognostic biomarker in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Stine Buch; Christensen, Sarah Louise T; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg;

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide more than one million women are annually diagnosed with breast cancer. A considerable fraction of these women receive systemic adjuvant therapy; however, some are cured by primary surgery and radiotherapy alone. Prognostic biomarkers guide stratification of patients into different risk...... groups and hence improve management of breast cancer patients. Plasma levels of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and its natural inhibitor Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) have previously been associated with poor patient outcome and resistance to certain forms of chemotherapy. To...

  14. Proteomic Serum Biomarkers and Their Potential Application in Cancer Screening Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M. Deelder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of cancer is of pivotal importance to reduce disease-related mortality. There is great need for non-invasive screening methods, yet current screening protocols have limited sensitivity and specificity. The use of serum biomarkers to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons might be a tool to improve screening programs. Mass spectrometry based proteomics is widely applied as a technology for mapping and identifying peptides and proteins in body fluids. One commonly used approach in proteomics is peptide and protein profiling. Here, we present an overview of profiling methods that have the potential for implementation in a clinical setting and in national screening programs.

  15. The novel prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3 biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bourdoumis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PCA3 is a prostate specific, nonprotein coding RNA that is significantly over expressed in prostate cancer, without any correlation to prostatic volume and/or other prostatic diseases (e.g. prostatitis. It can now easily be measured in urine with a novel transcription-mediated amplification based test. Quantification of PCA3 mRNA levels can predict the outcome of prostatic biopsies with a higher specificity rate in comparison to PSA. Several studies have demonstrated that PCA3 can be used as a prognostic marker of prostate cancer, especially in conjunction with other predictive markers. Novel PCA3-based nomograms have already been introduced into clinical practice. PCA3 test may be of valuable help in several PSA quandary situations such as negative prostatic biopsies, concomitant prostatic diseases, and active surveillance. Results from relevant clinical studies, comparative with PSA, are warranted in order to confirm the perspective of PCA3 to substitute PSA.

  16. Circulating Biomarkers in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients Randomly Assigned to Three Bevacizumab-Based Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Martinetti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The need to identify biomarkers for bevacizumab-based treatment in advanced colorectal cancer is imperative. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of circulating VEGF, PDGF, SDF-1, osteopontin and CEA in patients randomly assigned to three bevacizumab-based regimens. Plasma samples from 50 patients treated at a single Institution were analysed using the multiplex assay BioPlex™ 2200 (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc, Berkeley, CA, USA at baseline, before first three cycles and subsequently every three cycles until disease progression. Prognostic analyses of baseline values were performed using multivariable Cox models, including disease extension >10 cm or ≤10 cm (measured as the sum of the diameters for all target lesions as adjustment factor. The association between progression-free and overall survival and biomarkers modulation during treatment was studied using multivariable Cox models, which included summary statistics synthesizing during-treatment modulation together with disease extension. The biomarkers significantly associated with disease extension were baseline CEA (p = 0.012 and SDF-1 (p = 0.030. High values of VEGF and SDF-1 tended to be associated with worse prognosis, especially in terms of overall survival. The negative prognostic trend was more marked for baseline CEA as compared to other biomarkers; increasing values during treatment was significantly related to worse prognosis independently of disease extension (p = 0.007 and 0.016 for progression-free and overall survival, respectively. VEGF is related to bevacizumab pharmacodynamics and is associated to other angiogenic cytokines; some of the proposed biomarkers such as SDF-1 and CEA should be further validated for prognosis assessment and monitoring of bevacizumab-based treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

  17. Biomarkers of endometrial cancer and related gynaecological malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Seeber, L.M.S.

    2010-01-01

    In the Western World, endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. Endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC or Type I tumour), accounts for approximately 75% of cases. Type II tumours, of which uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is the most common subtype, are less common. Since classification as EEC or UPSC has therapeutic and prognostic implications, it is important to make the proper diagnosis. UPSC share their aggressive clinical behaviour and their ...

  18. Impact of biospecimens handling on biomarker research in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callari Maurizio

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling is moving from the research setting to the practical clinical use. Gene signatures able to correctly identify high risk breast cancer patients as well as to predict response to treatment are currently under intense investigation. While technical issues dealing with RNA preparation, choice of array platforms, statistical analytical tools are taken into account, the tissue collection process is seldom considered. The time elapsed between surgical tissue removal and freezing of samples for biological characterizations is rarely well defined and/or recorded even for recently stored samples, despite the publications of standard operating procedures for biological sample collection for tissue banks. Methods Breast cancer samples from 11 patients were collected immediately after surgical removal and subdivided into aliquots. One was immediately frozen and the others were maintained at room temperature for respectively 2, 6 and 24 hrs. RNA was extracted and gene expression profile was determined using cDNA arrays. Phosphoprotein profiles were studied in parallel. Results Delayed freezing affected the RNA quality only in 3 samples, which were not subjected to gene profiling. In the 8 breast cancer cases with apparently intact RNA also in sample aliquots frozen at delayed times, 461 genes were modulated simply as a function of freezing timing. Some of these genes were included in gene signatures biologically and clinically relevant for breast cancer. Delayed freezing also affected detection of phosphoproteins, whose pattern may be crucial for clinical decision on target-directed drugs. Conclusion Time elapsed between surgery and freezing of samples appears to have a strong impact and should be considered as a mandatory variable to control for clinical implications of inadequate tissue handling.

  19. Role of MGMT as biomarker in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Inno, Alessandro; Fanetti, Giuseppe; Di Bartolomeo, Maria; Gori, Stefania; Maggi, Claudia; Cirillo, Massimo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Nichetti, Federico; Martinetti, Antonia; de Braud, Filippo; Bossi, Ilaria; Pietrantonio, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation plays an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, occurring in about 30%-40% of metastatic colorectal cancer. Its prognostic role has not been defined yet, but loss of expression of MGMT, which is secondary to gene promoter methylation, results in an interesting high response to alkylating agents such as dacarbazine and temozolomide. In a phase 2 study on heavily pre-treated patients with MGMT methylated metastatic co...

  20. International expert panel on inflammatory breast cancer: consensus statement for standardized diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    S Dawood; Merajver, S. D.; Viens, P.; Vermeulen, P B; Swain, S. M.; Buchholz, T. A.; Dirix, L Y; Levine, P. H.; Lucci, A.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Robertson, F. M.; Woodward, W. A.; W. T. Yang; Ueno, N T; Cristofanilli, M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) represents the most aggressive presentation of breast cancer. Women diagnosed with IBC typically have a poorer prognosis compared with those diagnosed with non-IBC tumors. Recommendations and guidelines published to date on the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of women with breast cancer have focused primarily on non-IBC tumors. Establishing a minimum standard for clinical diagnosis and treatment of IBC is needed.

  1. Biomarker-specific conjugated nanopolyplexes for the active coloring of stem-like cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yoochan; Lee, Eugene; Choi, Jihye; Haam, Seungjoo; Suh, Jin-Suck; Yang, Jaemoon

    2016-06-01

    Stem-like cancer cells possess intrinsic features and their CD44 regulate redox balance in cancer cells to survive under stress conditions. Thus, we have fabricated biomarker-specific conjugated polyplexes using CD44-targetable hyaluronic acid and redox-sensible polyaniline based on a nanoemulsion method. For the most sensitive recognition of the cellular redox at a single nanoparticle scale, a nano-scattering spectrum imaging analyzer system was introduced. The conjugated polyplexes showed a specific targeting ability toward CD44-expressing cancer cells as well as a dramatic change in its color, which depended on the redox potential in the light-scattered images. Therefore, these polyaniline-based conjugated polyplexes as well as analytical processes that include light-scattering imaging and measurements of scattering spectra, clearly establish a systematic method for the detection and monitoring of cancer microenvironments.

  2. Biomarker-specific conjugated nanopolyplexes for the active coloring of stem-like cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yoochan; Lee, Eugene; Choi, Jihye; Haam, Seungjoo; Suh, Jin-Suck; Yang, Jaemoon

    2016-06-01

    Stem-like cancer cells possess intrinsic features and their CD44 regulate redox balance in cancer cells to survive under stress conditions. Thus, we have fabricated biomarker-specific conjugated polyplexes using CD44-targetable hyaluronic acid and redox-sensible polyaniline based on a nanoemulsion method. For the most sensitive recognition of the cellular redox at a single nanoparticle scale, a nano-scattering spectrum imaging analyzer system was introduced. The conjugated polyplexes showed a specific targeting ability toward CD44-expressing cancer cells as well as a dramatic change in its color, which depended on the redox potential in the light-scattered images. Therefore, these polyaniline-based conjugated polyplexes as well as analytical processes that include light-scattering imaging and measurements of scattering spectra, clearly establish a systematic method for the detection and monitoring of cancer microenvironments. PMID:27098318

  3. B-Cell Activating Factor as a Cancer Biomarker and Its Implications in Cancer-Related Cachexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Rihacek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell activating factor (BAFF is a cytokine and adipokine of the TNF ligand superfamily. The main biological function of BAFF in maintaining the maturation of B-cells to plasma cells has recently made it a target of the first FDA-approved selective BAFF antibody, belimumab, for the therapy of systemic lupus erythematosus. Concomitantly, the role of BAFF in cancer has been a subject of research since its discovery. Here we review BAFF as a biomarker of malignant disease activity and prognostic factor in B-cell derived malignancies such as multiple myeloma. Moreover, anti-BAFF therapy seems to be a promising approach in treatment of B-cell derived leukemias/lymphomas. In nonhematologic solid tumors, BAFF may contribute to cancer progression by mechanisms both dependent on and independent of BAFF’s proinflammatory role. We also describe ongoing research into the pathophysiological link between BAFF and cancer-related cachexia. BAFF has been shown to contribute to inflammation and insulin resistance which are known to worsen cancer cachexia syndrome. Taking all the above together, BAFF is emerging as a biomarker of several malignancies and a possible hallmark of cancer cachexia.

  4. Cell cycle arrest biomarkers in human lung cancer cells after treatment with selenium in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swede, Helen; Dong, Yan; Reid, Mary; Marshall, James; Ip, Clement

    2003-11-01

    In the planning of future intervention trials using chemopreventive agents against lung cancer, it is critical to evaluate the effect on biomarkers implicated specifically in lung carcinogenesis. With the use of the H520 and H522 human lung cancer cell lines, the present study showed that treatment with selenium (in the form of methylseleninic acid) inhibited cell growth, arrested cell cycle progression at G(1), and induced apoptosis as a late event. Because H520 cells were more sensitive to selenium than H522 cells (IC(50) of MSA was 2.5 or 10 micro M for H520 or H522 cells, respectively, at 24 h), a panel of nine cell cycle regulatory proteins known to be involved in G(1)-->S transition was assessed by Western analysis using whole cell lysate from H520 cells. These nine proteins (DP1, cdc25A, cyclin A, cyclin B(1), cyclin D(1), cdk1, cdk5, p21(WAF1), and GADD153) have been reported previously by our laboratory to be modulated by MSA in human breast and prostate cancer cells. Our data showed that only four (DP1, cdc25A, p21(WAF1), and GADD153) of nine biomarkers produced the expected changes after treatment of lung cancer cells with MSA. This finding raises the possibility that the molecular targets sensitive to selenium modulation may be tissue specific. Thus, the selection of selenium biomarkers for evaluation in an intervention trial must be based on empirical data derived from the cancer cell type of interest. PMID:14652289

  5. Warehousing re-annotated cancer genes for biomarker meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, M; Travaglione, A; Capobianco, E

    2013-07-01

    Translational research in cancer genomics assigns a fundamental role to bioinformatics in support of candidate gene prioritization with regard to both biomarker discovery and target identification for drug development. Efforts in both such directions rely on the existence and constant update of large repositories of gene expression data and omics records obtained from a variety of experiments. Users who interactively interrogate such repositories may have problems in retrieving sample fields that present limited associated information, due for instance to incomplete entries or sometimes unusable files. Cancer-specific data sources present similar problems. Given that source integration usually improves data quality, one of the objectives is keeping the computational complexity sufficiently low to allow an optimal assimilation and mining of all the information. In particular, the scope of integrating intraomics data can be to improve the exploration of gene co-expression landscapes, while the scope of integrating interomics sources can be that of establishing genotype-phenotype associations. Both integrations are relevant to cancer biomarker meta-analysis, as the proposed study demonstrates. Our approach is based on re-annotating cancer-specific data available at the EBI's ArrayExpress repository and building a data warehouse aimed to biomarker discovery and validation studies. Cancer genes are organized by tissue with biomedical and clinical evidences combined to increase reproducibility and consistency of results. For better comparative evaluation, multiple queries have been designed to efficiently address all types of experiments and platforms, and allow for retrieval of sample-related information, such as cell line, disease state and clinical aspects. PMID:23639751

  6. Correlations between diffusion-weighted imaging and breast cancer biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martincich, Laura; Deantoni, Veronica; Bertotto, Ilaria; Liotti, Michele; Regge, Daniele [Unit of Radiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Redana, Stefania; Rossi, Valentina; Aglietta, Massimo; Montemurro, Filippo [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Division of Medical Oncology, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Kubatzki, Franziska; Ponzone, Riccardo [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Division of Gynecological Oncology, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Sarotto, Ivana [Unit of Pathology, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Candiolo, Turin (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    We evaluated whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) provided by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) varies according to biological features in breast cancer. DWI was performed in 190 patients undergoing dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for local staging. For each of the 192 index cancers we studied the correlation between ADC and classical histopathological and immunohistochemical breast tumour features (size, histological type, grade, oestrogen receptor [ER] and Ki-67 expression, HER2 status). ADC was compared with immunohistochemical surrogates of the intrinsic subtypes (Luminal A; Luminal B; HER2-enriched; triple-negative). Correlations were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests. A weak, statistically significant correlation was observed between ADC values and the percentage of ER-positive cells (-0.168, P = 0.020). Median ADC values were significantly higher in ER-negative than in ER-positive tumours (1.110 vs 1.050 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, P = 0.015). HER2-enriched tumours had the highest median ADC value (1.190 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, range 0.950-2.090). Multiple comparisons showed that this value was significantly higher than that of Luminal A (1.025 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s [0.700-1.340], P = 0.004) and Luminal B/HER2-negative (1.060 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s [0.470-2.420], P = 0.008) tumours. A trend towards statistical significance (P = 0.018) was seen with Luminal B/HER2-positive tumours. ADC values vary significantly according to biological tumour features, suggesting that cancer heterogeneity influences imaging parameters. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of serum procathepsin B, cystatin B and cystatin C as possible biomarkers of ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Gashenko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate procathepsin B, as well as endogenous inhibitors of cysteine proteases (cystatin B and cystatin C in biological fluids as possible biomarkers of ovarian cancer. To observe levels of serum procathepsin B in different age groups. Study design. The sample (N=27 of women with gynaecological tumours included 18 patients with ovarian cancer (n=18 and 9 patients with benign ovarian tumours (n=9; 72 healthy women were in the control group. All patients were treated in Novosibirsk Regional Oncological Center, Russia. Serum samples of healthy women (n=40 aged 18–70 years were used as controls for common biomarker of ovarian cancer CA-125. In the Procathepsin B study, serum samples of healthy women (n=32 aged 18–40 years (n=14, 41–55 years (n=10 and 56–80 (n=8 years were used as controls. Methods. Common biomarker of ovarian cancer, CA-125, was assayed by using a commercial kit (Vector, Koltsovo, Novosibirsk Region, Russia. Procathepsin B was measured by means of a commercial kit for human procathepsin B (R&D, USA; cystatin C was measured by commercial ELISA kits for human (BioVendor, Czechia; cystatin B was measured by ELISA kits for human (USCN Life Science Inc., Wuhan, China. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA (Statistica 10 Program. Results. In the control group, serum procathepsin B concentration did not reveal age dependency. In the ovarian cancer group, both levels of serum procathepsin B and standard biomarker CA-125 increased significantly (both p<0.001 compared with the control group. In the benign ovarian tumour group, serum procathepsin B (p<0.001 and CA-125 (p=0.004 increased about 2.5- and 8-fold compared to the control group. Serum cystatin B level increased up to 1.7-fold in the ovarian cancer group compared to the control group. The increase of serum CA-125 was about 3.5-fold higher (p=0.017 and procathepsin B was 1.8-fold higher (p<0.05 in the ovarian cancer group compared to the benign

  8. Screening for colorectal cancer risk biomarkers related to diet

    OpenAIRE

    Da Pieve, Chiara; Moore, Sharon; Velasco, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background: Red and processed meat are associated with high risks of colorectal cancer due to the endogenous formation of O6-carboxymethyl guanine (O6CMG), a potent carcinogen. The aim of our research is to develop liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analytical methods for the measurement of the DNA adducts, such as O6CMG and its nucleoside O6-carboxymethyl deoxyguanosine (O6CMdG), in urine samples and correlate it to different diets. Methods: Urine samples were coll...

  9. Aberrant p16 promoter hypermethylation in bronchial mucosae as a biomarker for the early detection of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guang-shun; HOU Ai-rong; LI Long-yun; GAO Yan-ning; CHENG Shu-jun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related death in the world and its mortality could be greatly reduced by diagnosis and treatment in its early stages. Effective tools for the early detection of lung cancer and its high risk factors remain a major challenge. Biomarkers that detect lung cancer in its early stages or identify its pretumour lesions,enabling early therapeutic intervention, would be invaluable to improve its dismal prognosis.

  10. Detection of Melanoma Cancer Biomarker Dimethyl Disulfide Using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy at 266 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhennan; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Chuji

    2016-06-01

    Skin cells emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and some of them can be used as biomarkers for screening specific diseases. Dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) has been recently reported as a biomarker of melanoma skin cancer (Kwak et al. "Volatile Biomarkers from Human Melanoma Cells". J. Chromatogr. B. 2013. 931: 90-96.). With the motivation of diagnosing melanoma using DMDS as its biomarker, we explore the potential of measuring DMDS using an advanced laser spectroscopic technique as an alternative method. We report on the first DMDS measurements using an experimental system based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS). The test samples were mixtures of DMDS vapor and nitrogen in different concentrations. Two sampling methods were investigated to dilute the DMDS sample to low concentrations for ringdown measurements. The results showed that the ringdown system responded to various DMDS concentrations linearly and a theoretical detection limit of sub-ppb (parts per billion) could be achieved at the absorption wavelength of 266 nm. This ringdown system exhibited a high dynamic range for DMDS measurements, from ppm (parts per million) to ppt (parts per trillion) levels, given different laser wavelengths used. The feasibility of developing a portable melanoma screening sensor using the CRDS technique was also demonstrated in this study. PMID:27076515

  11. The ADAMs family of proteases: new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for cancer?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2011-06-09

    Abstract The ADAMs are transmembrane proteins implicated in proteolysis and cell adhesion. Forty gene members of the family have been identified, of which 21 are believed to be functional in humans. As proteases, their main substrates are the ectodomains of other transmembrane proteins. These substrates include precursor forms of growth factors, cytokines, growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors and several different types of adhesion molecules. Although altered expression of specific ADAMs has been implicated in different diseases, their best-documented role is in cancer formation and progression. ADAMs shown to play a role in cancer include ADAM9, ADAM10, ADAM12, ADAM15 and ADAM17. Two of the ADAMs, i.e., ADAM10 and 17 appear to promote cancer progression by releasing HER\\/EGFR ligands. The released ligands activate HER\\/EGFR signalling that culminates in increased cell proliferation, migration and survival. Consistent with a causative role in cancer, several ADAMs are emerging as potential cancer biomarkers for aiding cancer diagnosis and predicting patient outcome. Furthermore, a number of selective ADAM inhibitors, especially against ADAM10 and ADAM17, have been shown to have anti-cancer effects. At least one of these inhibitors is now undergoing clinical trials in patients with breast cancer.

  12. Mass spectrometry based translational proteomics for biomarker discovery and application in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong; Chen, Guilin; Guo, Mingquan

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Clinically, early detection of the disease is the most effective approach to tackle this tough challenge. Discovery and development of reliable and effective diagnostic tools for the assessment of prognosis and prediction of response to drug therapy are urgently needed for personalized therapies and better treatment outcomes. Among many ongoing efforts in search for potential CRC biomarkers, MS-based translational proteomics provides a unique opportunity for the discovery and application of protein biomarkers toward better CRC early detection and treatment. This review updates most recent studies that use preclinical models and clinical materials for the identification of CRC-related protein markers. Some new advances in the development of CRC protein markers such as CRC stem cell related protein markers, SRM/MRM-MS and MS cytometry approaches are also discussed in order to address future directions and challenges from bench translational research to bedside clinical application of CRC biomarkers. PMID:26616366

  13. Prostate cancer serum biomarker discovery through proteomic analysis of alpha-2 macroglobulin protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Earle F.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Tabb, David L.; Billheimer, Dean; Roth, Bruce J.; Chang, Sam S.; Cookson, Michael S.; Hinton, Timothy J.; Cheek, Kristin L.; Hill, Salisha; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-2 macroglobulin (A2M) functions as a universal protease inhibitor in serum and is capable of binding various cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we investigated if immunoaffinity enrichment and proteomic analysis of A2M protein complexes from human serum could improve detection of biologically relevant and novel candidate protein biomarkers in prostate cancer. Serum samples from six patients with androgen-independent, metastatic prostate cancer and six control patients without malignancy were analyzed by immunoaffinity enrichment of A2M protein complexes and MS identification of associated proteins. Known A2M substrates were reproducibly identified from patient serum in both cohorts, as well as proteins previously undetected in human serum. One example is heat shock protein 90 alpha (HSP90α), which was identified only in the serum of cancer patients in this study. Using an ELISA, the presence of HSP90α in human serum was validated on expanded test cohorts and found to exist in higher median serum concentrations in prostate cancer (n = 18) relative to control (n = 13) patients (median concentrations 50.7 versus 27.6 ng/mL, respectively, p = 0.001). Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of this approach and support the analysis of A2M protein complexes for proteomic-based serum biomarker discovery. PMID:20107526

  14. Biomarker and animal models for assessment of retinoid efficacy in cancer chemoprevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M NILES

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential for normal growth and development. Epidemiology and laboratory studies suggest that decreased vitamin A levels and defective metabo-lisrn/action may contribute to the genesis of certain cancers. Based on this information, natural and synthetic derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) have been used for chemoprevention of cancer. Retinoids have had some success in the chemoprevention of leukoplakia and in the decreased incidence of second prima-ties in head and neck cancer. There is little information on biomarkers that can be used to assess the efficacy of the chemopreventive activity of retinoids. The ability of retinoids to induce RARb has been consistently shown to correlate with the response of cells and tissues to retinoic acid, but few other biomarkers have been certified as indicators of retinoid activity. In light of the failure of the ATBC and CARET clinical intervention trials for chemoprevention of lung cancer, greater use of animal models for chemoprevention studies is necessary. The potential combination of phytochemicals that inhibit DNA methyltransferase activity with retinoids holds promise for more effective chemoprevention of retinoid-unrespon-sive premalignant lesions.

  15. Cytochrome P450 1A1 genetic polymorphisms as cancer biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase I metabolic enzyme CYP1A1 plays an important role in xenobiotics metabolism and has been extensively studied as a cancer risk biomarker. CYP1A1 is polymorphic and its four variants, e.g., CYP1A1* 2 A, CYP1A1* 2C, CYP1A1* 3 and CYP1A1* 4 with trivial names m1, m2, m3, and m4 respectively, are most commonly studied for cancer link. Gene- gene interaction studies combining polymorphisms of this enzyme with those of phase II detoxifying enzymes, especially glutathione S- transferases (GSTs revealed greater risk for cancer susceptibility. Variants of CYP1A1 have also been found to be associated with chemotherapeutic adverse- effects. Results of these studies, however, remained largely contradictory mainly because of lack of statistical power due to involvement of small sample size. Strongly powered experimental designs involving gene- gene, gene- environment interactions are required in order to validate CYP1A1 as reliable cancer- biomarker.

  16. Exosomes are fingerprints of originating cells: potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Miharu Kobayashi, Gregory E Rice, Jorge Tapia, Murray D Mitchell, Carlos Salomon Exosome Biology Laboratory, Centre for Clinical Diagnostics, University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Abstract: The past decade has seen an extraordinary explosion of research in the field of extracellular vesicles, especially in a specific type of extracellular vesicles originating from endosomal compartments, called exosomes. Exosomes are a specific subtype of secreted vesicles that are defined as small (~30–120 nm but very stable membrane vesicles that are released from a wide range of cells, including normal and cancer cells. As the content of exosomes is cell type specific, it is believed that they are a "fingerprint" of the releasing cell and its metabolic status. We hypothesized that the exosomes and their specific exosomal content (eg, microribonucleic acid represent a precious biomedical tool and may be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of malignant tumors. In addition, exosomes may modify the phenotype of the parent and/or target cell by transferring pro-oncogenic molecules to induce cancerous phenotype of recipient cells and contribute to the formation of the premetastatic niche. The mechanism involved in these phenomena remains unclear; however, inclusion of signaling mediators into exosomes or exosome release may reduce their intracellular bioavailability in the parent cell, thereby altering cell phenotype and their metastatic potential. The aim of this review therefore is to analyze the biogenesis and role of exosomes from tumor cells, focusing primarily on ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer, and an effective early diagnosis has the potential to improve patient survival. Ovarian cancer currently lacks a reliable method for early detection, however, exosomes have received great attention as potential biomarkers and mediators

  17. Mitochondrial DNA mutations—candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gazi Nurun Nahar Sultana; Atiqur Rahman; Abu Din Ahmed Shahinuzzaman; Rowshan Ara Begum; Chowdhury Faiz Hossain

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem that affects more than 24% of women in Bangladesh.Furthermore,among low-income countries including Bangladesh,individuals have a high risk for developing breast cancer.This study aimed to identify candidate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women to be used as a preventive approach.We screened the blood samples from 24 breast cancer patients and 20 healthy controls to detect polymorphisms in the D-loop and the ND3- and ND4-coding regions of mtDNA by direct sequencing.Among 14 distinct mutations,10 polymorphisms were found in the D-loop,3 were found in the ND3-coding region,and 1 was found in the ND4-coding region.The frequency of two novel polymorphisms in the D-loop,one at position 16290 (T-ins) and the other at position 16293 (A-del),was higher in breast cancer patients than in control subjects (position 16290:odds ratio =6.011,95% confidence interval =1.2482 to 28.8411,P =0.002; position 16293:odds ratio =5.6028,95% confidence interval =1.4357 to 21.8925,P =0.010).We also observed one novel mutation in the ND3-coding region at position 10316 (A > G) in 69% of breast cancer patients but not in control subjects.The study suggests that two novel polymorphisms in the D-loop may be candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA mutations--candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowshan Ara Begum

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem that affects more than 24% of women in Bangladesh. Further- more, among low-income countries including Bangladesh, individuals have a high risk for developing breast cancer. This study aimed to identify candidate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women to be used as a preventive approach. We screened the blood samples from 24 breast cancer patients and 20 healthy controls to detect polymorphisms in the D-loop and the ND3- and ND4-coding regions of mtDNA by direct sequencing. Among 14 distinct mutations, 10 polymorphisms were found in the D-loop, 3 were found in the ND3-coding region, and 1 was found in the ND4-coding region. The frequency of two novel polymorphisms in the D-loop, one at position 16290 (T-ins and the other at position 16293 (A-del, was higher in breast cancer patients than in control subjects (position 16290: odds ratio = 6.011, 95% confidence interval = 1.2482 to 28.8411, P = 0.002; position 16293: odds ratio = 5.6028, 95% confidence interval = 1.4357 to 21.8925, P = 0.010. We also observed one novel mutation in the ND3-coding region at position 10316 (A > G in 69% of breast cancer patients but not in control subjects. The study suggests that two novel polymorphisms in the D-loop may be candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women.

  19. Identification of biomarkers for cervical cancer in peripheral blood lymphocytes using oligonucleotide microarrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Jie; ZHANG Wei-yuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Oligonucleotide microarrays are increasingly being used to identify gene expression profiles that associated with complex genetic diseases. Peripheral lymphocytes communicate with cells and extracellular matrixes in almost all tissues and organs in human body, suggesting that the gene expression profiles in peripheral lymphocytes may reflect the presence of disease in the body. This study aimed to identify molecular biomarkers for cervical cancer in peripheral blood lymphocytes by using oligonucleotide microarrays.Methods Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of 24 early stage cervical cancer patients and 18 healthy controls. We used 22K Human Genome microarrays to profile peripheral blood lymphocytes from 4 early stage cervical cancer patients and compared their gene expression profiles with those from 3 healthy controls. Differentially expressed genes would be identified if they had adjusted P values of less than 0.05 and a groupwise average fold change greater than 1.5 or less than 0.67. Then the selected 5 genes were validated in the remaining 20 early stage cervical cancer patients and the 15 healthy controls by using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results Genes identified by the gene selection program expressed differently between the blood samples of the early stage cervical cancer patients and those of the healthy controls. To validate the gene expression data, 5 genes were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. In three of the 5 identified genes, tenasin-c (TNC), nuceolin (NCL), and enolase 2 (ENO2) showed a significant up-regulation in the blood samples of the early stage cervical cancer patients versus that of the healthy controls.Conclusions The up-regulation of TNC, NCL, and ENO2 in peripheral blood may be used to identify novel blood biomarkers for detecting cervical cancer in a clinically accessible surrogate tissue, and thus to provide a possibility to develop a noninvasive and predictive

  20. Second St. Gallen European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference: consensus recommendations on controversial issues in the primary treatment of rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Manfred P; Zalcberg, John R; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Ruers, Theo; Ducreux, Michel; Arnold, Dirk; Aust, Daniela; Brown, Gina; Bujko, Krzysztof; Cunningham, Christopher; Evrard, Serge; Folprecht, Gunnar; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Haustermans, Karin; Holm, Torbjörn; Kuhlmann, Koert F; Lordick, Florian; Mentha, Gilles; Moehler, Markus; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Puciarelli, Salvatore; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Sorbye, Halfdan; Van Cutsem, Eric; Weitz, Jürgen; Otto, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Primary treatment of rectal cancer was the focus of the second St. Gallen European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference. In the context of the conference, a multidisciplinary international expert panel discussed and voted on controversial issues which could not be easily answered using published evidence. Main topics included optimal pretherapeutic imaging, indication and type of neoadjuvant treatment, and the treatment strategies in advanced tumours. Here we report the key recommendations and summarise the related evidence. The treatment strategy for localised rectal cancer varies from local excision in early tumours to neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (RCT) in combination with extended surgery in locally advanced disease. Optimal pretherapeutic staging is a key to any treatment decision. The panel recommended magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MRI + endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) as mandatory staging modalities, except for early T1 cancers with an option for local excision, where EUS in addition to MRI was considered to be most important because of its superior near-field resolution. Primary surgery with total mesorectal excision was recommended by most panellists for some early tumours with limited risk of recurrence (i.e. cT1-2 or cT3a N0 with clear mesorectal fascia on MRI and clearly above the levator muscles), whereas all other stages were considered for multimodal treatment. The consensus panel recommended long-course RCT over short-course radiotherapy for most clinical situations where neoadjuvant treatment is indicated, with the exception of T3a/b N0 tumours where short-course radiotherapy or even no neoadjuvant therapy were regarded to be an option. In patients with potentially resectable tumours and synchronous liver metastases, most panel members did not see an indication to start with classical fluoropyrimidine-based RCT but rather favoured preoperative short-course radiotherapy with systemic

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of serum biomarkers for head and neck cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva; Rêgo, Daniela Fortunato; Elias, Silvia Taveira; Coletta, Ricardo D; Mezzomo, Luis André Mendonça; Gozal, David; De Luca Canto, Graziela

    2016-05-01

    Serum biomarkers could be helpful to characterize head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Thus, the purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the diagnostic capability of serum biomarkers in the assessment of HNSCC patients. Studies were gathered by searching LILACS, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus and Web of Science up to April 10th, 2015. Studies that focused on serum biomarkers in the diagnosis of HNSCC compared with controls were considered. Sixty-five studies were identified, and the sample size included 9098 subjects. Combined biomarkers demonstrated improved accuracy than those tested individually. Therefore, 12.8% of single and 34.3% of combined indicated that serum biomarkers discriminate patients with HNSCC from controls. The combined biomarkers with better diagnostic capability included Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)+Cyclin D1 and squamous cell cancer-associated antigen (SCCA)+EGFR+Cyclin D1. Beta2-microglobin may also be a promising single biomarker for future studies. Serum biomarkers can be potentially useful in the diagnosis of HNSCC. However, further research is required to validate these biomarkers. PMID:26971993

  2. Potentiometric Sensors Based on Surface Molecular Imprinting: Detection of Cancer Biomarkers and Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z; Jain, V; Yi, J; Mueller, S; Sokolov, J; Liu, Z; Levon, K; Rigas, B; Rafailovich, M

    2010-01-01

    The continuing discovery of cancer biomarkers necessitates improved methods for their detection. Molecular imprinting using artificial materials provides an alternative to the detection of a wide range of substances. We applied surface molecular imprinting using self-assembled monolayers to design sensing elements for the detection of cancer biomarkers and other proteins. These elements consist of a gold-coated silicon chip onto which hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiol molecules and template biomolecule are co-adsorbed, where the thiol molecules are chemically bound to the metal substrate and self-assembled into highly ordered monolayers, the biomolecules can be removed, creating the foot-print cavities in the monolayer matrix for this kind of template molecules. Re-adsorption of the biomolecules to the sensing chip changes its potential, which can be measured potentiometrically. We applied this method to the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both solutions of purified CEA and in the culture medium of a CEA-producing human colon cancer cell line. The CEA assay, validated also against a standard immunoassay, was both sensitive (detection range 2.5-250 ng/mL) and specific (no cross-reactivity with hemoglobin; no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Similar results were obtained for human amylase. In addition, we detected virions of poliovirus in a specific manner (no cross-reactivity to adenovirus, no response by a non-imprinted sensor). Our findings demonstrate the application of the principles of molecular imprinting to the development of a new method for the detection of protein cancer biomarkers and to protein-based macromolecular structures such as the capsid of a virion. This approach has the potential of generating a general assay methodology that could be highly sensitive, specific, simple and likely inexpensive.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of a HAp-based biomarker with controlled drug release for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Maykel; Merino, Ulises; Vargas, Susana; Quintanilla, Francisco; Rodríguez, Rogelio

    2016-04-01

    A biocompatible hybrid porous polymer-ceramic material was synthesized to be used as a biomarker in the treatment of breast cancer. This device was equipped with the capacity to release medicaments locally in a controlled manner. The biomaterial was Hydroxyapatite(HAp)-based and had a controlled pore size and pore volume fraction. It was implemented externally using a sharp end and a pair of barbed rings placed opposite each other to prevent relative movement once implanted. The biomarker was impregnated with cis-diamine dichloride platinum (II) [Cl2-Pt-(NH3)2]; the rate of release was obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and release occurred over the course of three months. Different release profiles were obtained as a function of the pore volume fraction. The biomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26838911

  4. A Systematic Review of Therapeutic Alliance, Group Cohesion, Empathy, and Goal Consensus/Collaboration in Psychotherapeutic Interventions in Cancer: Uncommon Factors?

    OpenAIRE

    Schnur, Julie B.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of four empirically supported therapeutic relationship factors (therapeutic alliance, empathy, goal consensus/collaboration, and group cohesion) on the outcome of psychotherapeutic interventions conducted with individuals living with cancer were systematically reviewed. PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched from their inception through November 13, 2008. Studies of psychotherapeutic interventions targeted to individuals living with cancer, which also empirically assessed the ...

  5. Reproducible cancer biomarker discovery in SELDI-TOF MS using different pre-processing algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been much interest in differentiating diseased and normal samples using biomarkers derived from mass spectrometry (MS studies. However, biomarker identification for specific diseases has been hindered by irreproducibility. Specifically, a peak profile extracted from a dataset for biomarker identification depends on a data pre-processing algorithm. Until now, no widely accepted agreement has been reached. RESULTS: In this paper, we investigated the consistency of biomarker identification using differentially expressed (DE peaks from peak profiles produced by three widely used average spectrum-dependent pre-processing algorithms based on SELDI-TOF MS data for prostate and breast cancers. Our results revealed two important factors that affect the consistency of DE peak identification using different algorithms. One factor is that some DE peaks selected from one peak profile were not detected as peaks in other profiles, and the second factor is that the statistical power of identifying DE peaks in large peak profiles with many peaks may be low due to the large scale of the tests and small number of samples. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the DE peak detection power in large profiles could be improved by the stratified false discovery rate (FDR control approach and that the reproducibility of DE peak detection could thereby be increased. CONCLUSIONS: Comparing and evaluating pre-processing algorithms in terms of reproducibility can elucidate the relationship among different algorithms and also help in selecting a pre-processing algorithm. The DE peaks selected from small peak profiles with few peaks for a dataset tend to be reproducibly detected in large peak profiles, which suggests that a suitable pre-processing algorithm should be able to produce peaks sufficient for identifying useful and reproducible biomarkers.

  6. Ultrasensitive, multiplexed detection of cancer biomarkers directly in serum by using a quantum dot-based microfluidic protein chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mei; Yan, Juan; He, Yao; Lu, Haoting; Weng, Lixing; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; Wang, Lianhui

    2010-01-26

    Sensitive and selective detection for cancer biomarkers are critical in cancer clinical diagnostics. Here we developed a microfluidic protein chip for an ultrasensitive and multiplexed assay of cancer biomarkers. Aqueous-phase-synthesized CdTe/CdS quantum dots (aqQDs) were employed as fluorescent signal amplifiers to improve the detection sensitivity. Secondary antibodies (goat anti-mouse IgG) were conjugated to luminescent CdTe/CdS QDs to realize a versatile fluorescent probe that could be used for multiplexed detection in both sandwich and reverse phase immunoassays. We found that our microfluidic protein chip not only possessed ultrahigh femtomolar sensitivity for cancer biomarkers, but was selective enough to be directly used in serum. This protein chip thus combines the high-throughput capabilities of a microfluidic network with the high sensitivity and multicolor imaging ability offered by highly fluorescent QDs, which can become a promising diagnostic tool in clinical applications. PMID:20041634

  7. Evaluation of candidate biomarkers to predict cancer cell sensitivity or resistance to PARP-1 inhibitor treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oplustilova, L.; Wolanin, K.; Bartkova, J.;

    2012-01-01

    (ADp-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), an enzyme critical for repair pathways alternative to HR. While promising, treatment with PARP-1 inhibitors (PARP-1i) faces some hurdles, including (1) acquired resistance, (2) search for other sensitizing, non-BRCA1/2 cancer defects and (3) lack of biomarkers to predict response......Impaired DNA damage response pathways may create vulnerabilities of cancer cells that can be exploited therapeutically. One such selective vulnerability is the sensitivity of BRCA1- or BRCA2-defective tumors (hence defective in DNA repair by homologous recombination, HR) to inhibitors of the poly...... to PARP-1i. Here we addressed these issues using PARP-1i on 20 human cell lines from carcinomas of the breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and ovary. Aberrations of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex sensitized cancer cells to PARP-1i, while p53 status was less predictive, even in response to PARP-1i...

  8. Consensus Statement on Proton Therapy in Early-Stage and Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joe Y; Jabbour, Salma K; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Schild, Steven E; Simone, Charles B; Rengan, Ramesh; Feigenberg, Steven; Khan, Atif J; Choi, Noah C; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Zhu, Xiaorong R; Lomax, Antony J; Hoppe, Bradford S

    2016-05-01

    Radiation dose escalation has been shown to improve local control and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer in some studies, but randomized data have not supported this premise, possibly owing to adverse effects. Because of the physical characteristics of the Bragg peak, proton therapy (PT) delivers minimal exit dose distal to the target volume, resulting in better sparing of normal tissues in comparison to photon-based radiation therapy. This is particularly important for lung cancer given the proximity of the lung, heart, esophagus, major airways, large blood vessels, and spinal cord. However, PT is associated with more uncertainty because of the finite range of the proton beam and motion for thoracic cancers. PT is more costly than traditional photon therapy but may reduce side effects and toxicity-related hospitalization, which has its own associated cost. The cost of PT is decreasing over time because of reduced prices for the building, machine, maintenance, and overhead, as well as newer, shorter treatment programs. PT is improving rapidly as more research is performed particularly with the implementation of 4-dimensional computed tomography-based motion management and intensity modulated PT. Given these controversies, there is much debate in the oncology community about which patients with lung cancer benefit significantly from PT. The Particle Therapy Co-operative Group (PTCOG) Thoracic Subcommittee task group intends to address the issues of PT indications, advantages and limitations, cost-effectiveness, technology improvement, clinical trials, and future research directions. This consensus report can be used to guide clinical practice and indications for PT, insurance approval, and clinical or translational research directions. PMID:27084663

  9. Development of micro immunosensors to study genomic and proteomic biomarkers related to cancer and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha

    A report from the National Institutes of Health defines a disease biomarker as a "characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention." Early diagnosis is a crucial factor for incurable disease such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD). During the last decade researchers have discovered that biochemical changes caused by a disease can be detected considerably earlier as compared to physical manifestations/symptoms. In this dissertation electrochemical detection was utilized as the detection strategy as it offers high sensitivity/specificity, ease of operation, and capability of miniaturization and multiplexed detection. Electrochemical detection of biological analytes is an established field, and has matured at a rapid pace during the last 50 years and adapted itself to advances in micro/nanofabrication procedures. Carbon fiber microelectrodes were utilized as the platform sensor due to their high signal to noise ratio, ease and low-cost of fabrication, biocompatibility, and active carbon surface which allows conjugation with biorecognition moieties. This dissertation specifically focuses on the detection of 3 extensively validated biomarkers for cancer and AD. Firstly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) a cancer biomarker was detected using a one-step, reagentless immunosensing strategy. The immunosensing strategy allowed a rapid and sensitive means of VEGF detection with a detection limit of about 38 pg/mL with a linear dynamic range of 0--100 pg/mL. Direct detection of AD-related biomarker amyloid beta (Abeta) was achieved by exploiting its inherent electroactivity. The quantification of the ratio of Abeta1-40/42 (or Abeta ratio) has been established as a reliable test to diagnose AD through human clinical trials. Triple barrel carbon fiber microelectrodes were used to simultaneously detect Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 in

  10. Prediction of lung cancer based on serum biomarkers by gene expression programming methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhuang; Chen, Xiao-Zheng; Cui, Lian-Hua; Si, Hong-Zong; Lu, Hai-Jiao; Liu, Shi-Hai

    2014-01-01

    In diagnosis of lung cancer, rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors is very important. Serum markers, including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), neurone specific enolase (NSE) and Cyfra21-1, are reported to reflect lung cancer characteristics. In this study classification of lung tumors was made based on biomarkers (measured in 120 NSCLC and 60 SCLC patients) by setting up optimal biomarker joint models with a powerful computerized tool - gene expression programming (GEP). GEP is a learning algorithm that combines the advantages of genetic programming (GP) and genetic algorithms (GA). It specifically focuses on relationships between variables in sets of data and then builds models to explain these relationships, and has been successfully used in formula finding and function mining. As a basis for defining a GEP environment for SCLC and NSCLC prediction, three explicit predictive models were constructed. CEA and NSE are frequently- used lung cancer markers in clinical trials, CRP, LDH and Cyfra21-1 have significant meaning in lung cancer, basis on CEA and NSE we set up three GEP models-GEP 1(CEA, NSE, Cyfra21-1), GEP2 (CEA, NSE, LDH), GEP3 (CEA, NSE, CRP). The best classification result of GEP gained when CEA, NSE and Cyfra21-1 were combined: 128 of 135 subjects in the training set and 40 of 45 subjects in the test set were classified correctly, the accuracy rate is 94.8% in training set; on collection of samples for testing, the accuracy rate is 88.9%. With GEP2, the accuracy was significantly decreased by 1.5% and 6.6% in training set and test set, in GEP3 was 0.82% and 4.45% respectively. Serum Cyfra21-1 is a useful and sensitive serum biomarker in discriminating between NSCLC and SCLC. GEP modeling is a promising and excellent tool in diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25422226

  11. Label-free electrical detection of ovarian cancer biomarker CA-125 with a novel nanoscale coaxial array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Michelle; Rizal, Binod; Cai, Dong; Connolly, Timothy; Burns, Michael; Naughton, Michael; Chiles, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Technologies to detect early stage cancer would provide significant benefit to cancer disease patients. Clinical measurement of biomarkers offers the promise of a noninvasive and cost effective screening for early stage detection. We have developed a novel 3-dimensional nanocavity array for the detection of human cancer biomarkers. This all-electronic diagnostic sensor is based on a nanoscale coaxial array architecture that enables molecular-level detection. Each individual sensor in the array is a vertically-oriented coaxial capacitor, whose capacitance is measurably changed when target molecules enter the coax annulus. The coaxial array facilitates electrical-based detection in response to antibody or molecular imprint based recognition of a specific cancer biomarker, thereby providing a label-free, non-optical measurement. Here, we describe this nanoscale 3D architecture and its application to the detection of the ovarian cancer biomarker CA-125. We report our efforts on the development of molecular detection of CA-125 based on antibody-functionalized nanocoax arrays as well as molecular imprints. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using these arrays as ultrasensitive devices to detect a wide range of molecular targets, including disease biomarkers. Supported by the NIH grants NCI CA137681 and NIAID AI100216.

  12. Molecular biomarkers in extrahepatic bile duct cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for gross residual disease after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyeon Kang; Kim, Kyu Bo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hae Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To analyze the outcomes of chemoradiotherapy for extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer patients who underwent R2 resection or bypass surgery and to identify prognostic factors affecting clinical outcomes, especially in terms of molecular biomarkers. Medical records of 21 patients with EHBD cancer who underwent R2 resection or bypass surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy from May 2001 to June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All surgical specimens were re-evaluated by immunohistochemical staining using phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAKT), CD24, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), survivin, and {beta}-catenin antibodies. The relationship between clinical outcomes and immunohistochemical results was investigated. At a median follow-up of 20 months, the actuarial 2-year locoregional progression-free, distant metastasis-free and overall survival were 37%, 56%, and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis using clinicopathologic factors, there was no significant prognostic factor. In the immunohistochemical staining, cytoplasmic staining, and nuclear staining of pAKT was positive in 10 and 6 patients, respectively. There were positive CD24 in 7 patients, MMP9 in 16 patients, survivin in 8 patients, and {beta}-catenin in 3 patients. On univariate analysis, there was no significant value of immunohistochemical results for clinical outcomes. There was no significant association between clinical outcomes of patients with EHBD cancer who received chemoradiotherapy after R2 resection or bypass surgery and pAKT, CD24, MMP9, survivin, and {beta}-catenin. Future research is needed on a larger data set or with other molecular biomarkers.

  13. MiRNAs and LincRNAs: Could They Be Considered as Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Garcia-Foncillas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the field of RNA research have provided compelling evidence implicating microRNA (miRNA and long non-coding RNA molecules in many diverse and substantial biological processes, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, genomic imprinting, and modulation of protein activity. Thus, studies of non-coding RNA (ncRNA may contribute to the discovery of possible biomarkers in human cancers. Considering that the response to chemotherapy can differ amongst individuals, researchers have begun to isolate and identify the genes responsible. Identification of targets of this ncRNA associated with cancer can suggest that networks of these linked to oncogenes or tumor suppressors play pivotal roles in cancer development. Moreover, these ncRNA are attractive drug targets since they may be differentially expressed in malignant versus normal cells and regulate expression of critical proteins in the cell. This review focuses on ncRNAs that are differently expressed in malignant tissue, and discusses some of challenges derived from their use as potential biomarkers of tumor properties.

  14. MicroRNA dysregulation as a prognostic biomarker in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most potentially curable cancers, yet it remains the fourth most common overall cause of cancer death worldwide. The identification of robust molecular prognostic biomarkers can refine the conventional tumor–node–metastasis staging system, avoid understaging of tumor, and help pinpoint patients with early-stage CRC who may benefit from aggressive treatments. Recently, epigenetic studies have provided new molecular evidence to better categorize the CRC subtypes and predict clinical outcomes. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the prognostic potential of microRNAs (miRNAs) in CRC. We first discuss the prognostic value of three tissue miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-29-3p, miR-148-3p) that have been examined in multiple studies. We also summarize the dysregulation of miRNA processing machinery DICER in CRC and its association with risk for mortality. We also reviewe the potential application of miRNA-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms as prognostic biomarkers for CRC, especially the miRNA-associated polymorphism in the KRAS gene. Last but not least, we discuss the microsatellite instability-related miRNA candidates. Among all these candidates, miR-21-5p is the most promising prognostic marker, yet further prospective validation studies are required before it can go into clinical usage

  15. Merging person-specific bio-markers for predicting oral cancer recurrence through an ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Dario; Picone, Marco; Arredondo, María Teresa; Cabrera-Umpierrez, María Fernanda; Esteban, Ángel; Steger, Sebastian; Poli, Tito

    2013-01-01

    One of the major problems related to cancer treatment is its recurrence. Without knowing in advance how likely the cancer will relapse, clinical practice usually recommends adjuvant treatments that have strong side effects. A way to optimize treatments is to predict the recurrence probability by analyzing a set of bio-markers. The NeoMark European project has identified a set of preliminary bio-markers for the case of oral cancer by collecting a large series of data from genomic, imaging, and clinical evidence. This heterogeneous set of data needs a proper representation in order to be stored, computed, and communicated efficiently. Ontologies are often considered the proper mean to integrate biomedical data, for their high level of formality and for the need of interoperable, universally accepted models. This paper presents the NeoMark system and how an ontology has been designed to integrate all its heterogeneous data. The system has been validated in a pilot in which data will populate the ontology and will be made public for further research. PMID:22955869

  16. miRNAs and Other Epigenetic Changes as Biomarkers in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mathe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is characterised by the lack of receptors for estrogen (ER, progesterone (PR, and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2. Since it cannot be treated by current endocrine therapies which target these receptors and due to its aggressive nature, it has one of the worst prognoses of all breast cancer subtypes. The only treatments remain chemo- and/or radio-therapy and surgery and because of this, novel biomarkers or treatment targets are urgently required to improve disease outcomes. MicroRNAs represent an attractive candidate for targeted therapies against TNBC, due to their natural ability to act as antisense interactors and regulators of entire gene sets involved in malignancy and their superiority over mRNA profiling to accurately classify disease. Here we review the current knowledge regarding miRNAs as biomarkers in TNBC and their potential use as therapeutic targets in this disease. Further, we review other epigenetic changes and interactions of these changes with microRNAs in this breast cancer subtype, which may lead to the discovery of new treatment targets for TNBC.

  17. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offersen, B.V.; Boersma, L.J.; Kirkove, C.; Hol, S.; Aznar, M.C.; Sola, A. Biete; Kirova, Y.M.; Pignol, J.P.; Remouchamps, V.; Verhoeven, K.; Weltens, C.; Arenas, M.; Gabrys, D.; Kopek, N.; Krause, M.; Lundstedt, D.; Marinko, T.; Montero, A.; Yarnold, J.; Poortmans, P.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. T

  18. Salvage ablative therapy in prostate cancer: International multidisciplinary consensus on trial design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W.; Muller, B.G.; Bruin, D.M. de; Abreu, A.L. de Castro; Chaussy, C.; Coleman, J.A.; Finelli, A.; Gill, I.S.; Gross, M.E.; Jenniskens, S.F.M.; Kahmann, F.; Laguna-Pes, M.P.; Rastinehad, A.R.; Simmons, L.A.; Sulser, T.; Villers, A.; Ward, J.F.; Rosette, J.J.M.C.H. de la

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Salvage ablative therapy (SAT) has been developed as a form of localized treatment for localized recurrence of prostate cancers following radiation therapy. To better address the utility of SAT, prospective clinical trials must address the aspects of accepted standards in the initial e

  19. Single-walled carbon nanotube based transparent immunosensor for detection of a prostate cancer biomarker osteopontin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Abhinav; Hong, Seongkyeol; Singh, Renu [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaesung, E-mail: jjang@unist.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • A transparent CNT immunosensor is presented for detection of a prostate cancer biomarker osteopontin. • This immunosensor showed a highly linear and reproducible behavior from 1 pg mL{sup −1} to 1 μg mL{sup −1}. • The limit of detection of the immunosensor was 0.3 pg mL{sup −1}. • This immunosensor demonstrated high selectivity against bovine serum albumin and human serum. - Abstract: Osteopontin (OPN) is involved in almost all steps of cancer development, and it is being investigated as a potential biomarker for a diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. Here, we report a label-free, highly sensitive and transparent immunosensor based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) for detection of OPN. A high density of −COOH functionalized SWCNTs was deposited between two gold/indium tin oxide electrodes on a glass substrate by dielectrophoresis. Monoclonal antibodies specific to OPN were covalently immobilized on the SWCNTs. Relative resistance change of the immunosensors was measured as the concentration of OPN in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and human serum was varied from 1 pg mL{sup −1} to 1 μg mL{sup −1} for different channel lengths of 2, 5, and 10 μm, showing a highly linear and reproducible behavior (R{sup 2} > 97%). These immunosensors were also specific to OPN against another test protein, bovine serum albumin, PBS and human serum, showing that a limit of detection for OPN was 0.3 pg mL{sup −1}. This highly sensitive and transparent immunosensor has a great potential as a simple point-of-care test kit for various protein biomarkers.

  20. Urine metabolomic analysis identifies potential biomarkers and pathogenic pathways in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Ganti, Sheila; Guo, Lining; Osier, Michael V; Weiss, Robert H

    2011-05-01

    Kidney cancer is the seventh most common cancer in the Western world, its incidence is increasing, and it is frequently metastatic at presentation, at which stage patient survival statistics are grim. In addition, there are no useful biofluid markers for this disease, such that diagnosis is dependent on imaging techniques that are not generally used for screening. In the present study, we use metabolomics techniques to identify metabolites in kidney cancer patients' urine, which appear at different levels (when normalized to account for urine volume and concentration) from the same metabolites in nonkidney cancer patients. We found that quinolinate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and gentisate are differentially expressed at a false discovery rate of 0.26, and these metabolites are involved in common pathways of specific amino acid and energetic metabolism, consistent with high tumor protein breakdown and utilization, and the Warburg effect. When added to four different (three kidney cancer-derived and one "normal") cell lines, several of the significantly altered metabolites, quinolinate, α-ketoglutarate, and gentisate, showed increased or unchanged cell proliferation that was cell line-dependent. Further evaluation of the global metabolomics analysis, as well as confirmation of the specific potential biomarkers using a larger sample size, will lead to new avenues of kidney cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:21348635

  1. Identification of a novel prostate cancer biomarker, caveolin-1: Implications and potential clinical benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While prostate cancer is a common disease in men, it is uncommonly life-threatening. To better understand this phenomenon, tumor biologists have sought to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the development of virulent prostate cancer. The recent discovery that caveolin-1 (Cav-1) functions as an important oncogene involved in prostate cancer progression reflects the success of this effort. Cav-1 is a major structural coat protein of caveolae, specialized plasma membrane invaginations involved in multiple cellular functions, including molecular transport, cell adhesion, and signal transduction. Cav-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in human prostate cancer, with higher levels evident in metastatic versus primary sites. Intracellular Cav-1 promotes cell survival through activation of Akt and enhancement of additional growth factor pro-survival pathways. Cav-1 is also secreted as a biologically active molecule that promotes cell survival and angiogenesis within the tumor microenvironment. Secreted Cav-1 can be reproducibly detected in peripheral blood using a sensitive and specific immunoassay. Cav-1 levels distinguish men with prostate cancer from normal controls, and preoperative Cav-1 levels predict which patients are at highest risk for relapse following radical prostatectomy for localized disease. Thus, secreted Cav-1 is a promising biomarker in identifying clinically significant prostate cancer

  2. Clinical relevance of breast cancer-related genes as potential biomarkers for oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC) is a common cancer form with relatively low 5-year survival rates, due partially to late detection and lack of complementary molecular markers as targets for treatment. Molecular profiling of head and neck cancer has revealed biological similarities with basal-like breast and lung carcinoma. Recently, we showed that 16 genes were consistently altered in invasive breast tumors displaying varying degrees of aggressiveness. To extend our findings from breast cancer to another cancer type with similar characteristics, we performed an integrative analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data to evaluate the prognostic significance of the 16 putative breast cancer-related biomarkers in OSCC using independent microarray datasets and immunohistochemistry. Predictive models for disease-specific (DSS) and/or overall survival (OS) were calculated for each marker using Cox proportional hazards models. We found that CBX2, SCUBE2, and STK32B protein expression were associated with important clinicopathological features for OSCC (peritumoral inflammatory infiltration, metastatic spread to the cervical lymph nodes, and tumor size). Consequently, SCUBE2 and STK32B are involved in the hedgehog signaling pathway which plays a pivotal role in metastasis and angiogenesis in cancer. In addition, CNTNAP2 and S100A8 protein expression were correlated with DSS and OS, respectively. Taken together, these candidates and the hedgehog signaling pathway may be putative targets for drug development and clinical management of OSCC patients

  3. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L. Tonry

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate Cancer (PCa is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease; (ii would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making.

  4. Candidate serum biomarkers for early intestinal cancer using 15N metabolic labeling and quantitative proteomics in the Apcmin/+ mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Ivancic, Melanie M.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Chen, Xiaodi; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Irving, Amy A; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Dove, William F.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Current screening procedures for colorectal cancer are imperfect, highly invasive and result in increased mortality rates due to low compliance. The goal of the experiments reported herein is to identify potential blood-based biomarkers indicative of early-stage intestinal cancers using the ApcMin/+ mouse model of intestinal cancer as an experimental system. Serum proteins from tumor-bearing ApcMin/+ mice were quantitatively compared to tumor-free Apc+/+ wild-type mice via in anima metabolic ...

  5. Extracellular vesicles – biomarkers and effectors of the cellular interactome in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz eRak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In multicellular organisms both health and disease are defined by patterns of communications between the constituent cells. In addition to networks of soluble mediators, cells are also programmed to exchange complex messages pre-assembled as multimolecular cargo of membraneous structures known extracellular vesicles (EV. Several biogenetic pathways produce EVs with different properties and known as exosomes, ectosomes and apoptotic bodies. In cancer, EVs carry molecular signatures and effectors of the disease, such as mutant oncoproteins, oncogenic transcripts, microRNA and DNA sequences. Intercellular trafficking of such EVs (oncosomes may contribute to horizontal cellular transformation, phenotypic reprogramming and functional re-education of recipient cells, both locally and systemically. The EV-mediated, reciprocal molecular exchange also includes tumor suppressors, phosphoproteins, proteases, growth factors and bioactive lipids, all of which participate in the functional integration of multiple cells and their collective involved in tumor angiogenesis, inflammation, immunity, coagulopathy, mobilization of bone marrow derived effectors, metastasis, drug resistance or cellular stemness. In cases where the EV involvement is rate limiting their production and uptake may represent and unexplored anticancer therapy target. Moreover, oncosomes circulating in biofluids of cancer patients offer an unprecedented, remote and non-invasive access to crucial molecular information about cancer cells, including their driver mutations, classifiers, molecular subtypes, therapeutic targets and biomarkers of drug resistance. New nanotechnologies are being developed to exploit this unique biomarker platform. Indeed, embracing the notion that human cancers are defined not only by processes occurring within cancer cells, but also between them, and amidst the altered tumor and systemic microenvironment may open new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities.

  6. Targeted biomarker profiling of matched primary and metastatic estrogen receptor positive breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica B Schleifman

    Full Text Available Patients with newly diagnosed, early stage estrogen receptor positive (ER+ breast cancer often show disease free survival in excess of five years following surgery and systemic adjuvant therapy. An important question is whether diagnostic tumor tissue from the primary lesion offers an accurate molecular portrait of the cancer post recurrence and thus may be used for predictive diagnostic purposes for patients with relapsed, metastatic disease. As the class I phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase (PI3K pathway is frequently activated in ER+ breast cancer and has been linked to acquired resistance to hormonal therapy, we hypothesized pathway status could evolve over time and treatment. Biomarker analyses were conducted on matched, asynchronous primary and metastatic tumors from 77 patients with ER+ breast cancer. We examined whether PIK3CA and AKT1 alterations or PTEN and Ki67 levels showed differences between primary and metastatic samples. We also sought to look more broadly at gene expression markers reflective of proliferation, molecular subtype, and key receptors and signaling pathways using an mRNA analysis platform developed on the Fluidigm BioMark™ microfluidics system to measure the relative expression of 90 breast cancer related genes in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue. Application of this panel of biomarker assays to matched tumor pairs showed a high concordance between primary and metastatic tissue, with generally few changes in mutation status, proliferative markers, or gene expression between matched samples. The collection of assays described here has been optimized for FFPE tissue and may have utility in exploratory analyses to identify patient subsets responsive to targeted therapies.

  7. Serum level of interleukin-17 and interleukin-35 as a biomarker for diagnosis of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum level of interleukin-17 (IL-17 and IL-35 in thyroid cancer patients and its diagnostic value as a biomarker. Methods: Sixty-one thyroid carcinoma patients were recruited from January 2012 to December 2014 in our hospital. Of the 61 included cases, 42 subjects were pathology confirmed with thyroid cancer and other 19 cases were diagnosed with thyroid adenoma. The serum level of IL-17 and IL-35 were compared between the two groups. The diagnosed sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC for serum IL-17 and IL-35 were evaluated according to Bayes theorem. Results: The serum level of IL-17 were 16.3 ± 4.1 pg/ml and 9.4 ± 3.6 pg/ml for the thyroid cancer and thyroid adenoma patients respectively, with statistical difference (P < 0.05. The serum level of IL-35 were 48.8 ± 7.8 pg/ml and 62.3 ± 9.6 pg/ml for the thyroid cancer and thyroid adenoma patients, respectively, which indicated that the thyroid adenoma group was much higher with statistical difference (P < 0.05. The diagnosis sensitivity and specificity for serum IL-17 were 71.4% and 80.2% at the cutoff value of 12.1 pg/ml with the area under the ROC of 0.8239. The diagnosis sensitivity and specificity for serum IL-35 were 76.8% and 82.4% at the cutoff value of 57.6 pg/ml with the area under the ROC of 0.8722. Conclusion: The serum level of IL-17 and IL-35 was significantly different between thyroid cancer and thyroid adenoma patients, which could be a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of malignant thyroid tumor.

  8. Protein Z: A putative novel biomarker for early detection of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Matthew R; Walker, Michael J; Williamson, Andrew J K; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ryan, Andy; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Skates, Steven; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Dive, Caroline; Pernemalm, Maria; Humphryes, Phillip C; Fourkala, Evangelia-Ourania; Whetton, Anthony D; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian; Graham, Robert L J

    2016-06-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) has the highest mortality of all gynaecological cancers. Early diagnosis offers an approach to achieving better outcomes. We conducted a blinded-evaluation of prospectively collected preclinical serum from participants in the multimodal group of the United Kingdom Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening. Using isobaric tags (iTRAQ) we identified 90 proteins differentially expressed between OC cases and controls. A second targeted mass spectrometry analysis of twenty of these candidates identified Protein Z as a potential early detection biomarker for OC. This was further validated by ELISA analysis in 482 serial serum samples, from 80 individuals, 49 OC cases and 31 controls, spanning up to 7 years prior to diagnosis. Protein Z was significantly down-regulated up to 2 years pre-diagnosis (p = 0.000000411) in 8 of 19 Type I patients whilst in 5 Type II individuals, it was significantly up-regulated up to 4 years before diagnosis (p = 0.01). ROC curve analysis for CA-125 and CA-125 combined with Protein Z showed a statistically significant (p= 0.00033) increase in the AUC from 77 to 81% for Type I and a statistically significant (p= 0.00003) increase in the AUC from 76 to 82% for Type II. Protein Z is a novel independent early detection biomarker for Type I and Type II ovarian cancer; which can discriminate between both types. Protein Z also adds to CA-125 and potentially the Risk of Ovarian Cancer algorithm in the detection of both subtypes. PMID:26815306

  9. The Effect of Atorvastatin on Breast Cancer Biomarkers in High-Risk Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, YongLi; Rounds, Tiffany; Crocker, Abigail; Sussman, Betsy; Hovey, Russell C; Kingsley, Fonda; Muss, Hyman B; Garber, Judy E; Wood, Marie E

    2016-05-01

    Statins have the potential to reduce breast cancer incidence and recurrence as shown in both epidemiologic and laboratory studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a lipophilic statin, atorvastatin, on breast cancer biomarkers of risk [mammographic density (MD) and insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1)] in high-risk premenopausal women.Premenopausal women at increased risk for breast cancer received either 40 mg of atorvastatin or placebo for 1 year. Biomarker assessment was performed prior to initiation and at completion of study medication. MD was determined using both Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System and the visual analogue scale. Serum IGF-1 was determined by ELISA assay at the end of the study.Sixty-three women were enrolled between December 2005 and May 2010. Sixteen (25%) women withdrew. The mean age of participants was 43 (range, 35-50), 100% were white, and the average body mass index (BMI) was 26.4. The statin group demonstrated a significant decrease in cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), suggesting compliance with study medication. After accounting for BMI, there was no difference in change in MD between groups. There was a significant increase in serum IGF-1 in the statin group.In this multi-institutional randomized prospective clinical trial of premenopausal women at increased risk for breast cancer, we did not see an effect of atorvastatin on MD. Further investigation of statins may be warranted; however, design of prior trials and potential mechanism of action of the agent need to be considered in the design of future trials. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 379-84. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26908565

  10. Spermine and citrate as metabolic biomarkers for assessing prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guro F Giskeødegård

    Full Text Available Separating indolent from aggressive prostate cancer is an important clinical challenge for identifying patients eligible for active surveillance, thereby reducing the risk of overtreatment. The purpose of this study was to assess prostate cancer aggressiveness by metabolic profiling of prostatectomy tissue and to identify specific metabolites as biomarkers for aggressiveness. Prostate tissue samples (n = 158, 48 patients with a high cancer content (mean: 61.8% were obtained using a new harvesting method, and metabolic profiles of samples representing different Gleason scores (GS were acquired by high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS. Multivariate analysis (PLS, PLS-DA and absolute quantification (LCModel were used to examine the ability to predict cancer aggressiveness by comparing low grade (GS = 6, n = 30 and high grade (GS≥7, n = 81 cancer with normal adjacent tissue (n = 47. High grade cancer tissue was distinguished from low grade cancer tissue by decreased concentrations of spermine (p = 0.0044 and citrate (p = 7.73·10(-4, and an increase in the clinically applied (total choline+creatine+polyamines/citrate (CCP/C ratio (p = 2.17·10(-4. The metabolic profiles were significantly correlated to the GS obtained from each tissue sample (r = 0.71, and cancer tissue could be distinguished from normal tissue with sensitivity 86.9% and specificity 85.2%. Overall, our findings show that metabolic profiling can separate aggressive from indolent prostate cancer. This holds promise for the benefit of applying in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS within clinical MR imaging investigations, and HR-MAS analysis of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies has a potential as an additional diagnostic tool.

  11. Identification of Tetranectin as a Potential Biomarker for Metastatic Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Hu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Lymph node involvement is the most important predictor of survival rates in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. A biomarker that can indicate lymph node metastasis would be valuable to classify patients with OSCC for optimal treatment. In this study, we have performed a serum proteomic analysis of OSCC using 2-D gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. One of the down-regulated proteins in OSCC was identified as tetranectin, which is a protein encoded by the CLEC3B gene (C-type lectin domain family 3, member B. We further tested the protein level in serum and saliva from patients with lymph-node metastatic and primary OSCC. Tetranectin was found significantly under-expressed in both serum and saliva of metastatic OSCC compared to primary OSCC. Our results suggest that serum or saliva tetranectin may serve as a potential biomarker for metastatic OSCC. Other candidate serum biomarkers for OSCC included superoxide dismutase, ficolin 2, CD-5 antigen-like protein, RalA binding protein 1, plasma retinol-binding protein and transthyretin. Their clinical utility for OSCC detection remains to be further tested in cancer patients.

  12. Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (Fgf21) as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker in Renal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, ME; Minatta, JN; Roulet, L; Gueglio, G; Pasik, L; Ranuncolo, SM; Nuñez, M; Puricelli, L; De Lorenzo, MS

    2016-01-01

    Background The finding of new biomarkers is needed to have a better sub-classification of primary renal tumors (RCC) as well as more reliable predictors of outcome and therapy response. In this study, we evaluated the role of circulating FGF21, an endocrine factor, as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for ccRCC. Materials and Methods Serum samples from healthy controls (HC), clear cell and chromophobe RCC cancer patients were obtained from the serum biobank “Biobanco Público de Muestras Séricas Oncológicas” (BPMSO) of the “Instituto de Oncología “Ángel H. Roffo”. Serum FGF21 and leptin were measured by ELISA while other metabolic markers were measured following routinely clinical procedures. Results One of our major findings was that FGF21 levels were significantly increased in ccRCC patients compared with HC. Moreover, we showed an association between the increased serum FGF21 levels and the shorter disease free survival in a cohort of 98 ccRCC patients, after adjustment for other predictors of outcome. Conclusion Our results suggest that higher FGF21 serum level is an independent prognostic biomarker, associated with worse free-disease survival. PMID:27358750

  13. ESMO consensus guidelines for the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    E. Van Cutsem; Cervantes, A.; Adam, R.; Sobrero, A; van Krieken, J. H.; Aderka, D; Aranda Aguilar, E; Bardelli, A.; Benson, A; Bodoky, G; Ciardiello, F; D'Hoore, A; Diaz-Rubio, E; Douillard, J-Y; Ducreux, M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in Western countries. Over the last 20 years, and the last decade in particular, the clinical outcome for patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) has improved greatly due not only to an increase in the number of patients being referred for and undergoing surgical resection of their localised metastatic disease but also to a more strategic approach to the delivery of systemic therapy and an expansion in the use of ablative techniques. ...

  14. Noncoding RNA Expression Aberration Is Associated with Cancer Progression and Is a Potential Biomarker in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Sugihara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is the major histological type of esophageal cancer in Eastern Asian countries. Several types of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs function as key epigenetic regulators of gene expression and are implicated in various physiological processes. Unambiguous evidence indicates that dysregulation of ncRNAs is deeply implicated in carcinogenesis, cancer progression and metastases of various cancers, including ESCC. The current review summarizes recent findings on the ncRNA-mediated mechanisms underlying the characteristic behaviors of ESCC that will help support the development of biomarkers and the design of novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. Oncoprotein DEK as a tissue and urinary biomarker for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bladder cancer is a significant healthcare problem in the United States of America with a high recurrence rate. Early detection of bladder cancer is essential for removing the tumor with preservation of the bladder, avoiding metastasis and hence improving prognosis and long-term survival. The objective of this study was to analyze the presence of DEK protein in voided urine of bladder cancer patients as a urine-based bladder cancer diagnostic test. We examined the expression of DEK protein by western blot in 38 paired transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) bladder tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissue. The presence of DEK protein in voided urine was analyzed by western blot in 42 urine samples collected from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals. The DEK protein is expressed in 33 of 38 bladder tumor tissues with no expression in adjacent normal tissue. Based on our sample size, DEK protein is expressed in 100% of tumors of low malignant potential, 92% of tumors of low grade and in 71% of tumors of high grade. Next, we analyzed 42 urine samples from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease, non-malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals for DEK protein expression by western blot analysis. We are the first to show that the DEK protein is present in the urine of bladder cancer patients. Approximately 84% of TCC patient urine specimens were positive for urine DEK. Based on our pilot study of 38 bladder tumor tissue and 42 urine samples from patients with active TCC, other malignant urogenital disease, non-malignant urogenital disease and healthy individuals; DEK protein is expressed in bladder tumor tissue and voided urine of bladder cancer patients. The presence of DEK protein in voided urine is potentially a suitable biomarker for bladder cancer and that the screening for the presence of DEK protein in urine can be explored as a noninvasive diagnostic test for bladder cancer

  16. iTRAQ identification of candidate serum biomarkers associated with metastatic progression of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Ishtiaq; Evans, Caroline A; Glen, Adam; Cross, Simon S; Eaton, Colby L; Down, Jenny; Pesce, Giancarlo; Phillips, Joshua T; Yen, Ow Saw; Thalmann, George N; Wright, Phillip C; Hamdy, Freddie C

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in the management of patients with prostate cancer is identifying those individuals at risk of developing metastatic disease, as in most cases the disease will remain indolent. We analyzed pooled serum samples from 4 groups of patients (n = 5 samples/group), collected prospectively and actively monitored for a minimum of 5 yrs. Patients groups were (i) histological diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia with no evidence of cancer 'BPH', (ii) localised cancer with no evidence of progression, 'non-progressing' (iii) localised cancer with evidence of biochemical progression, 'progressing', and (iv) bone metastasis at presentation 'metastatic'. Pooled samples were immuno-depleted of the 14 most highly abundant proteins and analysed using a 4-plex iTRAQ approach. Overall 122 proteins were identified and relatively quantified. Comparisons of progressing versus non-progressing groups identified the significant differential expression of 25 proteins (pfactor 1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1), one of the candidates identified, was significantly higher in osteoblasts in close proximity to metastatic tumour cells compared with osteoblasts in control bone (p = 0.0353, Mann Whitney U). Our proteomic approach has identified leads for potentially useful serum biomarkers associated with the metastatic progression of prostate cancer. The panels identified, including eEF1A1 warrant further investigation and validation. PMID:22355332

  17. Cancer Biomarkers from Genome-Scale DNA Methylation: Comparison of Evolutionary and Semantic Analysis Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Valavanis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation profiling exploits microarray technologies, thus yielding a wealth of high-volume data. Here, an intelligent framework is applied, encompassing epidemiological genome-scale DNA methylation data produced from the Illumina’s Infinium Human Methylation 450K Bead Chip platform, in an effort to correlate interesting methylation patterns with cancer predisposition and, in particular, breast cancer and B-cell lymphoma. Feature selection and classification are employed in order to select, from an initial set of ~480,000 methylation measurements at CpG sites, predictive cancer epigenetic biomarkers and assess their classification power for discriminating healthy versus cancer related classes. Feature selection exploits evolutionary algorithms or a graph-theoretic methodology which makes use of the semantics information included in the Gene Ontology (GO tree. The selected features, corresponding to methylation of CpG sites, attained moderate-to-high classification accuracies when imported to a series of classifiers evaluated by resampling or blindfold validation. The semantics-driven selection revealed sets of CpG sites performing similarly with evolutionary selection in the classification tasks. However, gene enrichment and pathway analysis showed that it additionally provides more descriptive sets of GO terms and KEGG pathways regarding the cancer phenotypes studied here. Results support the expediency of this methodology regarding its application in epidemiological studies.

  18. Scientific basis of biomarkers and benefits of functional foods for reduction of disease risk: cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Joseph J

    2002-11-01

    One of the most promising areas for the development of functional foods lies in modification of the activity of the gastrointestinal tract by use of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics. While a myriad of healthful effects have been attributed to the probiotic lactic acid bacteria, perhaps the most controversial remains that of anticancer activity. However, it must be emphasised that, to date, there is no direct experimental evidence for cancer suppression in man as a result of consumption of lactic cultures in fermented or unfermented dairy products, although there is a wealth of indirect evidence, based largely on laboratory studies. Presently, there are a large number of biomarkers available for assessing colon cancer risk in dietary intervention studies, which are validated to varying degrees. These include colonic mucosal markers, faecal water markers and immunological markers. Overwhelming evidence from epidemiological, in vivo, in vitro and clinical trial data indicates that a plant-based diet can reduce the risk of chronic disease, particularly cancer. It is now clear that there are components in a plant-based diet other than traditional nutrients that can reduce cancer risk. More than a dozen classes of these biologically active plant chemicals, now known as 'phytochemicals', have been identified. Although the vast number of naturally occurring health-enhancing substances appear to be of plant origin, there are a number of physiologically active components in animal products (such as the probiotics referred to above) that deserve attention for their potential role in cancer prevention. PMID:12495463

  19. Chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes predict human cancer: a report from the European Study Group on Cytogenetic Biomarkers and Health (ESCH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagmar, L; Bonassi, S; Strömberg, U; Brøgger, A; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Norppa, H; Reuterwall, C

    1998-01-01

    .35-2.89) was obtained for those with a high CA frequency level, whereas the SMRs for those with medium or low did not noticeably differ from unity. Cox's proportional hazards models gave no evidence that the effect of CAs on total cancer incidence/mortality was modified by gender, age at test, or time since...... test. No association was seen between the SCEs or the MN frequencies and subsequent cancer incidence/mortality. The present study further supports our previous observation on the cancer predictivity of the CA biomarker, which seems to be independent of age at test, gender, and time since test. The risk...... patterns were similar within each national cohort. This result suggests that the frequency of CAs in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a relevant biomarker for cancer risk in humans, reflecting either early biological effects of genotoxic carcinogens or individual cancer susceptibility....

  20. Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer. From the Preclinical Setting to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Joan; Postigo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second largest cause of cancer mortality in Western countries, mostly due to metastasis. Understanding the natural history and prognostic factors in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) is essential for the optimal design of clinical trials. The main prognostic factors currently used in clinical practice are related to tumor behavior (e.g., white blood counts, levels of lactate dehydrogenase, levels of alkaline phosphatase) disease extension (e.g., presence of extrahepatic spread, number of organs affected) and general functional status (e.g., performance status as defined by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group). However, these parameters are not always sufficient to establish appropriate therapeutic strategies. First-line therapy in mCRC combines conventional chemotherapy (CHT) (e.g., FOLFOX, FOLFIRI, CAPOX) with a number of agents targeted to specific signaling pathways (TA) (e.g., panitumumab and cetuximab for cases KRAS/NRAS WT, and bevacizumab). Although the response rate to this combination regime exceeds 50%, progression of the disease is almost universal and only less than 10% of patients are free of disease at 2 years. Current clinical trials with second and third line therapy include new TA, such as tyrosin-kinase receptors inhibitors (MET, HER2, IGF-1R), inhibitors of BRAF, MEK, PI3K, AKT, mTORC, NOTCH and JAK1/JAK2, immunotherapy modulators and check point inhibitors (anti-PD-L1 and anti- PD1). Despite the identification of multiple prognostic and predictive biomarkers and signatures, it is still unclear how expression of many of these biomarkers is modulated by CHT and/or TA, thus potentially affecting response to treatment. In this review we analyzed how certain biomarkers in tumor cells and microenvironment influence the response to new TA and immune-therapies strategies in mCRC pre-treated patients. PMID:26452385

  1. Proteomic profiling of mammary carcinomas identifies C7orf24, a gamma-glutamyl cyclotransferase, as a potential cancer biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Friis, Esbern;

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women today and is the most common cancer (excluding skin cancers) among women in the Western world. Although cancers detected by screening mammography are significantly smaller than nonscreening ones, noninvasive biomarkers for detection...... found in other cancer types. Four of these were investigated in greater detail, and we found that a proportion of tumors (58% in cervical, 38% in lung, 72% in colon, and 46% in breast cancer) expressed C7orf24 at levels exceeding those seen in normal samples. The observed overexpression of this protein...... in different types of cancer suggests deregulation of C7orf24 to be a general event in epithelial carcinogenesis, indicating that this protein may play an important role in cancer cell biology and thus constitute a novel therapeutic target. Furthermore, as C7orf24 is externalized to the tissue extracellular...

  2. YKL-40—A Protein in the Field of Translational Medicine: A Role as a Biomarker in Cancer Patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YKL-40 is a 40 kDa glycoprotein produced by cancer cells, inflammatory cells and stem cells. It probably has a role in cell proliferation and differentiation, inflammation, protection against apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of extracellular tissue remodelling. Plasma levels of YKL-40 are often elevated in patients with localized or advanced cancer compared to age-matched healthy subjects. Several studies have demonstrated that high plasma YKL-40 is an independent prognostic biomarker of short survival in patients with different types of cancer. However, there is not yet sufficient data to support determination of plasma YKL-40 outside research projects as a biomarker for screening of gastrointestinal cancer and determination of treatment response and poor prognosis before or during treatment and follow-up. Plasma YKL-40 is also elevated in patients with other diseases than cancer, e.g., severe infections, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive lung disease, asthma, liver fibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Co-morbidity should therefore always be considered in patients with cancer, since other sources than cancer cells can increase plasma YKL-40 levels. Future focused translational research projects combining basic and clinical research are needed in a joint effort to answer questions of the complex function and regulation of YKL-40 and the question if plasma YKL-40 is a clinical useful biomarker in patients with cancer

  3. YKL-40—A Protein in the Field of Translational Medicine: A Role as a Biomarker in Cancer Patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Nicolai A. [Departments of Surgical Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Johansen, Julia S., E-mail: julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk [Departments of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark); Departments of Medicine, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev (Denmark)

    2010-07-12

    YKL-40 is a 40 kDa glycoprotein produced by cancer cells, inflammatory cells and stem cells. It probably has a role in cell proliferation and differentiation, inflammation, protection against apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of extracellular tissue remodelling. Plasma levels of YKL-40 are often elevated in patients with localized or advanced cancer compared to age-matched healthy subjects. Several studies have demonstrated that high plasma YKL-40 is an independent prognostic biomarker of short survival in patients with different types of cancer. However, there is not yet sufficient data to support determination of plasma YKL-40 outside research projects as a biomarker for screening of gastrointestinal cancer and determination of treatment response and poor prognosis before or during treatment and follow-up. Plasma YKL-40 is also elevated in patients with other diseases than cancer, e.g., severe infections, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive lung disease, asthma, liver fibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Co-morbidity should therefore always be considered in patients with cancer, since other sources than cancer cells can increase plasma YKL-40 levels. Future focused translational research projects combining basic and clinical research are needed in a joint effort to answer questions of the complex function and regulation of YKL-40 and the question if plasma YKL-40 is a clinical useful biomarker in patients with cancer.

  4. YKL-40—A Protein in the Field of Translational Medicine: A Role as a Biomarker in Cancer Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia S. Johansen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available YKL-40 is a 40 kDa glycoprotein produced by cancer cells, inflammatory cells and stem cells. It probably has a role in cell proliferation and differentiation, inflammation, protection against apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of extracellular tissue remodelling. Plasma levels of YKL-40 are often elevated in patients with localized or advanced cancer compared to age-matched healthy subjects. Several studies have demonstrated that high plasma YKL-40 is an independent prognostic biomarker of short survival in patients with different types of cancer. However, there is not yet sufficient data to support determination of plasma YKL-40 outside research projects as a biomarker for screening of gastrointestinal cancer and determination of treatment response and poor prognosis before or during treatment and follow-up. Plasma YKL-40 is also elevated in patients with other diseases than cancer, e.g., severe infections, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive lung disease, asthma, liver fibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Co-morbidity should therefore always be considered in patients with cancer, since other sources than cancer cells can increase plasma YKL-40 levels. Future focused translational research projects combining basic and clinical research are needed in a joint effort to answer questions of the complex function and regulation of YKL-40 and the question if plasma YKL-40 is a clinical useful biomarker in patients with cancer.

  5. Salivary microRNAs as promising biomarkers for detection of esophageal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijun Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tissue microRNAs (miRNAs can detect cancers and predict prognosis. Several recent studies reported that tissue, plasma, and saliva miRNAs share similar expression profiles. In this study, we investigated the discriminatory power of salivary miRNAs (including whole saliva and saliva supernatant for detection of esophageal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: By Agilent microarray, six deregulated miRNAs from whole saliva samples from seven patients with esophageal cancer and three healthy controls were selected. The six selected miRNAs were subjected to validation of their expression levels by RT-qPCR using both whole saliva and saliva supernatant samples from an independent set of 39 patients with esophageal cancer and 19 healthy controls. RESULTS: Six miRNAs (miR-10b*, miR-144, miR-21, miR-451, miR-486-5p, and miR-634 were identified as targets by Agilent microarray. After validation by RT-qPCR, miR-10b*, miR-144, and miR-451 in whole saliva and miR-10b*, miR-144, miR-21, and miR-451 in saliva supernatant were significantly upregulated in patients, with sensitivities of 89.7, 92.3, 84.6, 79.5, 43.6, 89.7, and 51.3% and specificities of 57.9, 47.4, 57.9%, 57.9, 89.5, 47.4, and 84.2%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found distinctive miRNAs for esophageal cancer in both whole saliva and saliva supernatant. These miRNAs possess discriminatory power for detection of esophageal cancer. Because saliva collection is noninvasive and convenient, salivary miRNAs show great promise as biomarkers for detection of esophageal cancer in areas at high risk.

  6. Screening biomarkers of bladder cancer using combined miRNA and mRNA microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ning; Jin, Xuefei; Gu, Xinquan; Na, Wanli; Zhang, Muchun; Zhao, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Biomarkers, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) may be useful for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying bladder cancer, differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRNAs) and their target genes in bladder cancer were analyzed. In the present study, miRNA and mRNA expression profiles (GSE40355) were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus. These consisted of healthy bladder samples (n=8) and urothelial carcinoma samples (low-grade, n=8 and high-grade, n=8). DE-miRNAs and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the limma package and the Benjamin and Hochberg method from the multtest package in R. Target genes of DE-miRNAs were screened. Associations between DEGs were investigated using STRING, and an interaction network was constructed using Cytoscape. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed for DEGs from the interaction network. 87 DE-miRNAs and 2058 DEGs were screened from low-grade bladder cancer samples, and 40 DE-miRNAs and 2477 DEGs were screened from high-grade bladder cancer samples. DE-target genes were significantly associated with the regulation of cell apoptosis. Bladder cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer biological pathways were found to be enriched. The results of the present study demonstrated that E2F transcription factor 1, which is targeted by miR-106b, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) and V-Erb-B2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog-2, which are targeted by miR-125b, participate in the bladder cancer pathway. In conclusion, DE-miRNAs in bladder cancer tissue samples and DE-targeted genes, such as miR-106b and CDKN2A, which were identified in the present study, may provide the basis for targeted therapy for breast cancer and enhance understanding of its pathogenesis. PMID:25955758

  7. TMPRSS2-ERG -specific transcriptional modulation is associated with prostate cancer biomarkers and TGF-β signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions occur in about 50% of all prostate cancer cases and represent promising markers for molecular subtyping. Although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion seems to be a critical event in prostate cancer, the precise functional role in cancer development and progression is still unclear. We studied large-scale gene expression profiles in 47 prostate tumor tissue samples and in 48 normal prostate tissue samples taken from the non-suspect area of clinical low-risk tumors using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST microarrays. Comparison of gene expression levels among TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive and negative tumors as well as benign samples demonstrated a distinct transcriptional program induced by the gene fusion event. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection like CRISP3 were found to be associated with the gene fusion status. WNT and TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways were significantly associated with genes upregulated in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive tumors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion results in the modulation of transcriptional patterns and cellular pathways with potential consequences for prostate cancer progression. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection were found to be associated with the gene fusion. Our results suggest that the fusion status should be considered in retrospective and future studies to assess biomarkers for prostate cancer detection, progression and targeted therapy

  8. TMPRSS2-ERG -specific transcriptional modulation is associated with prostate cancer biomarkers and TGF-β signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brase Jan C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions occur in about 50% of all prostate cancer cases and represent promising markers for molecular subtyping. Although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion seems to be a critical event in prostate cancer, the precise functional role in cancer development and progression is still unclear. Methods We studied large-scale gene expression profiles in 47 prostate tumor tissue samples and in 48 normal prostate tissue samples taken from the non-suspect area of clinical low-risk tumors using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST microarrays. Results Comparison of gene expression levels among TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive and negative tumors as well as benign samples demonstrated a distinct transcriptional program induced by the gene fusion event. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection like CRISP3 were found to be associated with the gene fusion status. WNT and TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways were significantly associated with genes upregulated in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive tumors. Conclusions The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion results in the modulation of transcriptional patterns and cellular pathways with potential consequences for prostate cancer progression. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection were found to be associated with the gene fusion. Our results suggest that the fusion status should be considered in retrospective and future studies to assess biomarkers for prostate cancer detection, progression and targeted therapy.

  9. Predictive and Prognostic Protein Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Recommendation for Future Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Due to its lack of symptoms, this disease is diagnosed at an advanced stage when the cancer has already spread to secondary sites. While initial rates of response to first treatment is >80%, the overall survival rate of patients is extremely low, mainly due to development of drug resistance. To date, there are no reliable clinical factors that can properly stratify patients for suitable chemotherapy strategies. Clinical parameters such as disease stage, tumor grade and residual disease, although helpful in the management of patients after their initial surgery to establish the first line of treatment, are not efficient enough. Accordingly, reliable markers that are independent and complementary to clinical parameters are needed for a better management of these patients. For several years, efforts to identify prognostic factors have focused on molecular markers, with a large number having been investigated. This review aims to present a summary of the recent advances in the identification of molecular biomarkers in ovarian cancer patient tissues, as well as an overview of the need and importance of molecular markers for personalized medicine in ovarian cancer

  10. Predictive and Prognostic Protein Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Recommendation for Future Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Le Page

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Due to its lack of symptoms, this disease is diagnosed at an advanced stage when the cancer has already spread to secondary sites. While initial rates of response to first treatment is >80%, the overall survival rate of patients is extremely low, mainly due to development of drug resistance. To date, there are no reliable clinical factors that can properly stratify patients for suitable chemotherapy strategies. Clinical parameters such as disease stage, tumor grade and residual disease, although helpful in the management of patients after their initial surgery to establish the first line of treatment, are not efficient enough. Accordingly, reliable markers that are independent and complementary to clinical parameters are needed for a better management of these patients. For several years, efforts to identify prognostic factors have focused on molecular markers, with a large number having been investigated. This review aims to present a summary of the recent advances in the identification of molecular biomarkers in ovarian cancer patient tissues, as well as an overview of the need and importance of molecular markers for personalized medicine in ovarian cancer.

  11. Proteomic Profiling of Exosomes Leads to the Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijvesz, Diederick; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hoogland, Marije; Vredenbregt-van den Berg, Mirella S.; Willemsen, Rob; Luider, Theo N.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Jenster, Guido

    2013-12-31

    Introduction: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, biomarker discovery from body fluids is often hampered by the high abundance of many proteins unrelated to disease. An attractive alternative biomarker discovery approach is the isolation of small vesicles (exosomes, ~100 nm). They contain proteins that are specific to the tissue from which they are derived and therefore can be considered as treasure chests for disease-specific marker discovery. Profiling prostate cancer-derived exosomes could reveal new markers for this malignancy. Materials and Methods: Exosomes were isolated from 2 immortalized primary prostate epithelial cells (PNT2C2 and RWPE-1) and 2 PCa cell lines (PC346C and VCaP) by ultracentrifugation. Proteomic analyses utilized a nanoLC coupled with an LTQ-Orbitrap operated in tandem MS (MS/MS) mode, followed by the Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag approach. Exosomal proteins were validated by Western blotting. A Tissue Micro Array, containing 481 different PCa samples (radical prostatectomy), was used to correlate candidate markers with several clinical-pathological parameters such as PSA, Gleason score, biochemical recurrence, and (PCa-related) death. Results: Proteomic characterization resulted in the identification of 263 proteins by at least 2 peptides. Specifically analysis of exosomes from PNT2C2, RWPE-1, PC346C, and VCaP identified 248, 233, 169, and 216 proteins, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed 52 proteins differently expressed between PCa and control cells, 9 of which were more abundant in PCa. Validation by Western blotting confirmed a higher abundance of FASN, XPO1 and PDCD6IP (ALIX) in PCa exosomes. The Tissue Micro 4 Array showed strong correlation of higher Gleason scores and local recurrence with increased cytoplasmic XPO1 (P<0.001). Conclusions: Differentially abundant proteins of cell line-derived exosomes make a clear subdivision between

  12. DNA Repair Biomarkers Predict Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Brian M., E-mail: bmalexander@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang Xiaozhe [On-Q-ity, Inc., Waltham, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weaver, David T. [On-Q-ity, Inc., Waltham, Massachusetts (United States); Mak, Raymond H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Roof, Kevin S. [Southeast Radiation Oncology, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Fidias, Panagiotis [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wain, John [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection for esophageal cancer has improved clinical outcomes in some trials. Pathologic complete response (pCR) following neoadjuvant therapy is associated with better clinical outcome in these patients, but only 22% to 40% of patients achieve pCR. Because both chemotherapy and radiotherapy act by inducing DNA damage, we analyzed proteins selected from multiple DNA repair pathways, using quantitative immunohistochemistry coupled with a digital pathology platform, as possible biomarkers of treatment response and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We identified 79 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between October 1994 and September 2002, with biopsy tissue available, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital and used their archived, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy samples to create tissue microarrays (TMA). TMA sections were stained using antibodies against proteins in various DNA repair pathways including XPF, FANCD2, PAR, MLH1, PARP1, and phosphorylated MAPKAP kinase 2 (pMK2). Stained TMA slides were evaluated using machine-based image analysis, and scoring incorporated both the intensity and the quantity of positive tumor nuclei. Biomarker scores and clinical data were assessed for correlations with clinical outcome. Results: Higher scores for MLH1 (p = 0.018) and lower scores for FANCD2 (p = 0.037) were associated with pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation on multivariable analysis. Staining of MLH1, PARP1, XPF, and PAR was associated with recurrence-free survival, and staining of PARP1 and FANCD2 was associated with overall survival on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: DNA repair proteins analyzed by immunohistochemistry may be useful as predictive markers for response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. These results are hypothesis generating and need

  13. Noncoding RNAs as potential biomarkers to predict the outcome in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaizhou Jin,1–3,* Guopei Luo,1–3,* Zhiwen Xiao,1–3 Zuqiang Liu,1–3 Chen Liu,1–3 Shunrong Ji,1–3 Jin Xu,1–3 Liang Liu,1–3 Jiang Long,1–3 Quanxing Ni,1–3 Xianjun Yu1–3 1Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 3Pancreatic Cancer Institute, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC, a common digestive system cancer, is highly malignant and has a poor disease outcome. Currently, all available examination and detection methods cannot accurately predict the clinical outcome. Therefore, it is extremely important to identify novel molecular biomarkers for personalized medication and to significantly improve the overall outcome. The “noncoding RNAs” (ncRNAs are a group of RNAs that do not code for proteins, and they are categorized as structural RNAs and regulatory RNAs. It has been shown that microRNAs and long ncRNAs function as regulatory RNAs to affect the progression of various diseases. Many studies have confirmed a role for ncRNAs in the progression of PDAC during the last few years. Because of the significant role of ncRNAs in PDAC, ncRNA profiling may be used to predict PDAC outcome with high accuracy. This review comprehensively analyzes the value of ncRNAs as potential biomarkers to predict the outcome in PDAC and the possible mechanisms thereof. Keywords: pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, microRNA, long noncoding RNA, outcome prediction

  14. DNA Repair Biomarkers Predict Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection for esophageal cancer has improved clinical outcomes in some trials. Pathologic complete response (pCR) following neoadjuvant therapy is associated with better clinical outcome in these patients, but only 22% to 40% of patients achieve pCR. Because both chemotherapy and radiotherapy act by inducing DNA damage, we analyzed proteins selected from multiple DNA repair pathways, using quantitative immunohistochemistry coupled with a digital pathology platform, as possible biomarkers of treatment response and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We identified 79 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between October 1994 and September 2002, with biopsy tissue available, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital and used their archived, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy samples to create tissue microarrays (TMA). TMA sections were stained using antibodies against proteins in various DNA repair pathways including XPF, FANCD2, PAR, MLH1, PARP1, and phosphorylated MAPKAP kinase 2 (pMK2). Stained TMA slides were evaluated using machine-based image analysis, and scoring incorporated both the intensity and the quantity of positive tumor nuclei. Biomarker scores and clinical data were assessed for correlations with clinical outcome. Results: Higher scores for MLH1 (p = 0.018) and lower scores for FANCD2 (p = 0.037) were associated with pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation on multivariable analysis. Staining of MLH1, PARP1, XPF, and PAR was associated with recurrence-free survival, and staining of PARP1 and FANCD2 was associated with overall survival on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: DNA repair proteins analyzed by immunohistochemistry may be useful as predictive markers for response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. These results are hypothesis generating and need

  15. A consensus-based guideline defining the clinical target volume for pelvic lymph nodes in external beam radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to develop a consensus-based guideline as well as an atlas defining pelvic nodal clinical target volumes in external beam radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. A working subgroup to establish the consensus-based guideline on clinical target volumes for uterine cervical cancer was formulated by the Radiation Therapy Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group in July 2008. The working subgroup consisted of seven radiation oncologists. The process resulting in the consensus included a comparison of contouring on CT images among the members, reviewing of published textbooks and the relevant literature and a distribution analysis of metastatic nodes on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging of actual patients. The working subgroup defined the pelvic nodal clinical target volumes for cervical cancer and developed an associated atlas. As a basic criterion, the lymph node clinical target volume was defined as the area encompassed by a 7 mm margin around the applicable pelvic vessels. Modifications were made in each nodal area to cover adjacent adipose tissues at risk of microscopic nodal metastases. Although the bones and muscles were excluded, the bowel was not routinely excluded in the definition. Each of the following pelvic node regions was defined: common iliac, external iliac, internal iliac, obturator and presacral. Anatomical structures bordering each lymph node region were defined for six directions; anterior, posterior, lateral, medial, cranial and caudal. Drafts of the definition and the atlas were reviewed by members of the JCOG Gynecologic Cancer Study Group (GCSG). We developed a consensus-based guideline defining the pelvic node clinical target volumes that included an atlas. The guideline will be continuously updated to reflect the ongoing changes in the field. (author)

  16. Systematic enrichment analysis of gene expression profiling studies identifies consensus pathways implicated in colorectal cancer development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Lascorz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of gene expression profiling (GEP studies on colorectal carcinogenesis have been performed but no reliable gene signature has been identified so far due to the lack of reproducibility in the reported genes. There is growing evidence that functionally related genes, rather than individual genes, contribute to the etiology of complex traits. We used, as a novel approach, pathway enrichment tools to define functionally related genes that are consistently up- or down-regulated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: We started the analysis with 242 unique annotated genes that had been reported by any of three recent meta-analyses covering GEP studies on genes differentially expressed in carcinoma vs normal mucosa. Most of these genes (218, 91.9% had been reported in at least three GEP studies. These 242 genes were submitted to bioinformatic analysis using a total of nine tools to detect enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO categories or Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. As a final consistency criterion the pathway categories had to be enriched by several tools to be taken into consideration. Results: Our pathway-based enrichment analysis identified the categories of ribosomal protein constituents, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, carbonic anhydrase isozymes, and a general category related to inflammation and cellular response as significantly and consistently overrepresented entities. Conclusions: We triaged the genes covered by the published GEP literature on colorectal carcinogenesis and subjected them to multiple enrichment tools in order to identify the consistently enriched gene categories. These turned out to have known functional relationships to cancer development and thus deserve further investigation.

  17. Use of Aleuria alantia Lectin Affinity Chromatography to Enrich Candidate Biomarkers from the Urine of Patients with Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Ambrose

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Developing a urine test to detect bladder tumours with high sensitivity and specificity is a key goal in bladder cancer research. We hypothesised that bladder cancer-specific glycoproteins might fulfill this role. Lectin-ELISAs were used to study the binding of 25 lectins to 10 bladder cell lines and serum and urine from bladder cancer patients and non-cancer controls. Selected lectins were then used to enrich glycoproteins from the urine of bladder cancer patients and control subjects for analysis by shotgun proteomics. None of the lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cancer cell lines over normal urothlelial cell lines or for urinary glycans from bladder cancer patients over those from non-cancer controls. However, several lectins showed a strong preference for bladder cell line glycans over serum glycans and are potentially useful for enriching glycoproteins originating from the urothelium in urine. Aleuria alantia lectin affinity chromatography and shotgun proteomics identified mucin-1 and golgi apparatus protein 1 as proteins warranting further investigation as urinary biomarkers for low-grade bladder cancer. Glycosylation changes in bladder cancer are not reliably detected by measuring lectin binding to unfractionated proteomes, but it is possible that more specific reagents and/or a focus on individual proteins may produce clinically useful biomarkers.

  18. Quantitative proteomic analysis by iTRAQ® for the identification of candidate biomarkers in ovarian cancer serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins LeeAnn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, with the majority of cases diagnosed at an advanced stage when treatments are less successful. Novel serum protein markers are needed to detect ovarian cancer in its earliest stage; when detected early, survival rates are over 90%. The identification of new serum biomarkers is hindered by the presence of a small number of highly abundant proteins that comprise approximately 95% of serum total protein. In this study, we used pooled serum depleted of the most highly abundant proteins to reduce the dynamic range of proteins, and thereby enhance the identification of serum biomarkers using the quantitative proteomic method iTRAQ®. Results Medium and low abundance proteins from 6 serum pools of 10 patients each from women with serous ovarian carcinoma, and 6 non-cancer control pools were labeled with isobaric tags using iTRAQ® to determine the relative abundance of serum proteins identified by MS. A total of 220 unique proteins were identified and fourteen proteins were elevated in ovarian cancer compared to control serum pools, including several novel candidate ovarian cancer biomarkers: extracellular matrix protein-1, leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein-1, lipopolysaccharide binding protein-1, and proteoglycan-4. Western immunoblotting validated the relative increases in serum protein levels for several of the proteins identified. Conclusions This study provides the first analysis of immunodepleted serum in combination with iTRAQ® to measure relative protein expression in ovarian cancer patients for the pursuit of serum biomarkers. Several candidate biomarkers were identified which warrant further development.

  19. YKL-40—A Protein in the Field of Translational Medicine: A Role as a Biomarker in Cancer Patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nicolai A; Johansen, Julia S

    2010-01-01

    sufficient data to support determination of plasma YKL-40 outside research projects as a biomarker for screening of gastrointestinal cancer and determination of treatment response and poor prognosis before or during treatment and follow-up. Plasma YKL-40 is also elevated in patients with other diseases than...... cancer, e.g., severe infections, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive lung disease, asthma, liver fibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Co-morbidity should therefore always be considered in patients with cancer, since other sources than cancer cells can increase plasma YKL-40 levels. Future...

  20. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis, hypo-salivation and xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.), are often debilitating. These effects tend to be underestimated and insufficiently addressed in the medical community. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on clinical definitions and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for developing the consensus, and external experts evaluated the conclusions. This paper contains 10 clusters of statements about the clinical definitions and management of head and neck cancer treatment sequels (dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses) that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia. PMID:26318095

  1. Whole genome RNA expression profiling for the identification of novel biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of biliary tract cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, M H

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is difficult to diagnose, in part related to the lack of reliable tumour markers. The aim of this project was to use whole genome RNA expression profiling in order to identify novel biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis in biliary tract cancer. Chapter 1 summarises clinical aspects of BTC as well as current diagnostic and prognostic tests. Chapter 2 addresses the identification of circulating tumour cells for the diagnosis of BTC. It includes d...

  2. Optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling provides novel biomarker assessment of clinical prostate and breast cancer biopsies

    OpenAIRE

    Fedele Vita; Scott Gary K; Wong Linda; Sensinger Kelly; Bowers Jessica; Benz Christopher C; Mattie Michael D; Ginzinger David; Getts Robert; Haqq Chris

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) are mechanistically involved in the development of various human malignancies, suggesting that they represent a promising new class of cancer biomarkers. However, previously reported methods for measuring miRNA expression consume large amounts of tissue, prohibiting high-throughput miRNA profiling from typically small clinical samples such as excision or core needle biopsies of breast or prostate cancer. Here we describe a no...

  3. Transcriptome analysis of recurrently deregulated genes across multiple cancers identifies new pan-cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Tanaka, Yuji; Kawaji, Hideya; Sandelin, Albin; Andersson, Robin; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R

    2015-01-01

    Genes that are commonly deregulated in cancer are clinically attractive as candidate pan-diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. To globally identify such targets, we compared Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) profiles from 225 different cancer cell lines and 339 corresponding primary cell...... samples to identify transcripts that are deregulated recurrently in a broad range of cancer types. Comparing RNA-seq data from 4,055 tumors and 563 normal tissues profiled in the TCGA and FANTOM5 datasets, we identified a core transcript set with theranostic potential. Our analyses also revealed enhancer...... RNAs which are upregulated in cancer, defining promoters which overlap with repetitive elements (especially SINE/Alu and LTR/ERV1 elements) that are often upregulated in cancer. Lastly, we documented for the first time upregulation of multiple copies of the REP522 interspersed repeat in cancer. Overall...

  4. Global DNA hypomethylation in peripheral blood leukocytes as a biomarker for cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Dong Woo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Good biomarkers for early detection of cancer lead to better prognosis. However, harvesting tumor tissue is invasive and cannot be routinely performed. Global DNA methylation of peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was evaluated as a biomarker for cancer risk. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis to estimate overall cancer risk according to global DNA hypomethylation levels among studies with various cancer types and analytical methods used to measure DNA methylation. Studies were systemically searched via PubMed with no language limitation up to July 2011. Summary estimates were calculated using a fixed effects model. RESULTS: The subgroup analyses by experimental methods to determine DNA methylation level were performed due to heterogeneity within the selected studies (p<0.001, I(2: 80%. Heterogeneity was not found in the subgroup of %5-mC (p = 0.393, I(2: 0% and LINE-1 used same target sequence (p = 0.097, I(2: 49%, whereas considerable variance remained in LINE-1 (p<0.001, I(2: 80% and bladder cancer studies (p = 0.016, I(2: 76%. These results suggest that experimental methods used to quantify global DNA methylation levels are important factors in the association study between hypomethylation levels and cancer risk. Overall, cancer risks of the group with the lowest DNA methylation levels were significantly higher compared to the group with the highest methylation levels [OR (95% CI: 1.48 (1.28-1.70]. CONCLUSIONS: Global DNA hypomethylation in peripheral blood leukocytes may be a suitable biomarker for cancer risk. However, the association between global DNA methylation and cancer risk may be different based on experimental methods, and region of DNA targeted for measuring global hypomethylation levels as well as the cancer type. Therefore, it is important to select a precise and accurate surrogate marker for global DNA methylation levels in the association studies between global DNA methylation levels in peripheral

  5. Serum Ferritin as a Prognostic Biomarker for Survival in Relapsed or Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sookyung; Song, Anna; Eo, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the prognostic impact of serum ferritin for survival in patients with relapsed or refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: This retrospective cohort study reviewed clinicopathological characteristics and laboratory biomarkers in 120 mCRC patients being treated with Korean Medicine (KM). The overall survival (OS) of patients was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and statistical significance was assessed using the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses of Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the prognostic impact for survival in relapsed or refractory mCRC patients. Results: Of the patients, 62.5% had liver metastases, 74.1% underwent greater than second-line chemotherapy, and 80.8% underwent surgery. Median OS was 7.6 months for all patients after the initiation of KM treatment, which was begun 13.7 months, on average, after mCRC diagnosis. Concerning prognostic factors such as the presence of liver metastasis (p = 0.024), high carcinoembryonic antigen level (CEA > 5 ng/mL, p = 0.044), elevated C-reactive protein (CRP ≥ 10.0 mg/L, p = 0.000), high absolute monocyte count (AMC > 413.3 cells/μL, p = 0.034), elevated serum ferritin (ferritin ≥ 150 ng/mL, p = 0.002), low hemoglobin level (Hb 5 ng/mL; HR 2.040, 95% CI 1.203 - 3.460, p = 0.008), and serum ferritin (ferritin ≥ 150 ng/mL; HR 1.763, 95% CI 1.169 - 2.660, p = 0.007) were independent prognostic biomarkers of survival in mCRC patients. Conclusions: These results indicate that serum ferritin acts as an independent prognostic biomarker for survival in relapsed or refractory mCRC patients.

  6. Procalcitonin: A New Biomarker for Medullary Thyroid Cancer? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Apostolos K A; Girio-Fragkoulakis, Constantine; Nakouti, Theodora

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare but aggressive thyroid malignancy. The gold-standard biomarker for its diagnosis and follow-up is calcitonin (CT); however, it has a variable half-life dependent on its circadian variability. It has been suggested that a more stable hormone, procalcitonin (PCT), may overcome these problems and its introduction to routine practice may give more accurate results in the diagnosis and follow-up of MTC. We systematically reviewed Pubmed, Scopus, Biosis Previews and Embase databases up to March 2016. A total of 15 out of 184 articles were retrieved and analyzed. Of these 15 studies, 3 were case reports. In these 15 studies, the values of CT and PCT were assessed in both patients with MTC and patients that were either healthy volunteers or with benign/malignant thyroid nodular disease or with bacterial infection. Our search suggests that PCT seems to be a useful biomarker for the diagnosis and follow-up of MTC when used in conjunction with CT, particularly in a small proportion of tumors that are CT-negative or secrete low levels of CT. So far, there has not been enough data to suggest a specific threshold for normal PCT. However, most studies indicate a value of 0.1 ng/ml as an acceptable cut-off in everyday clinical practice. At present, CT should continue to be the primary biomarker in MTC with the addition of PCT in some patient groups. Nevertheless, larger patient series need to be conducted in order to provide safer and more accurate results. PMID:27466480

  7. Discovery of dachshund 2 protein as a novel biomarker of poor prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodin Björn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dachshund homolog 2 (DACH2 gene has been implicated in development of the female genital tract in mouse models and premature ovarian failure syndrome, but to date, its expression in human normal and cancerous tissue remains unexplored. Using the Human Protein Atlas as a tool for cancer biomarker discovery, DACH2 protein was found to be differentially expressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. Here, the expression and prognostic significance of DACH2 was further evaluated in ovarian cancer cell lines and human EOC samples. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of DACH2 was examined in tissue microarrays with 143 incident EOC cases from two prospective, population-based cohorts, including a subset of benign-appearing fallopian tubes (n = 32. A nuclear score (NS, i.e. multiplier of staining fraction and intensity, was calculated. For survival analyses, cases were dichotomized into low (NS 3 using classification and regression tree analysis. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the impact of DACH2 expression on survival. DACH2 expression was analysed in the cisplatin sensitive ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and its cisplatin resistant derivative A2780-Cp70. The specificity of the DACH2 antibody was tested using siRNA-mediated silencing of DACH2 in A2780-Cp70 cells. Results DACH2 expression was considerably higher in the cisplatin resistant A2780-Cp70 cells compared to the cisplatin-sensitive A2780 cells. While present in all sampled fallopian tubes, DACH2 expression ranged from negative to strong in EOC. In EOC, DACH2 expression correlated with several proteins involved in DNA integrity and repair, and proliferation. DACH2 expression was significantly higher in carcinoma of the serous subtype compared to non-serous carcinoma. In the full cohort, high DACH2 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in univariable analysis, and in carcinoma of the serous subtype

  8. Cell-free nucleic acids as noninvasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Hicham

    2014-08-27

    Cell-free nucleic acids (CFNA) have been reported by several authors in blood, stool, and urine of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). These genetic biomarkers can be an indication of neoplastic colorectal epithelial cells, and can thus potentially be used as noninvasive tests for the detection of the disease in CRC patients and monitor their staging, without the need to use heavier and invasive tools. In a number of test-trials, these genetic tests have shown the advantage of non-invasiveness, making them well accepted by most of the patients, without major side effects. They have also shown a promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of malignant and premalignant neoplasms. Moreover, costs for performing such tests are very low. Several studies reported and confirmed the proof of the principle for these genetic tests for screening, diagnosis, and prognosis; the main challenge of translating this approach from research to clinical laboratory is the validation from large and long-term randomized trials to prove sustainable high sensitivity and specificity. In this paper, we present a review on the noninvasive genetics biomarkers for CRC detection described in the literature and the challenges that can be encountered for validation processes.

  9. Current status on microRNAs as biomarkers for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahm, Kira Philipsen; Novotny, Guy Wayne; Høgdall, Claus; Høgdall, Estrid

    2016-05-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the Western world, and has a very poor prognosis, often due to late diagnosis and emergence of chemotherapy resistance. Therefore, there is an essential need for new diagnostic and prognostic markers that can improve and initiate more personalized treatment, eventually improving survival of the patients. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules, that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Several studies have within the last decade shown that microRNAs are deregulated in OC and have potential as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for OC. Recently studies have also focused on microRNAs as predictors of chemotherapy responses and their potential as therapeutic targets. However, many of the published studies are difficult to interpret as a whole due to various methods of analysis. Future focus should be aimed at developing a general standardized analytical method, which can limit differences between studies thus allowing easier comparison across them. In addition, validation of studies in independent series that ideally should be histotype-specific is essential to determine the clinical role of microRNAs in different types of OC. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of microRNAs as potential biomarkers for OC, with focus on their clinical relevance. PMID:26809719

  10. Tissue Biomarkers in Prognostication of Serous Ovarian Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binny Khandakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous ovarian cancer (SOC is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in females with poor prognosis because of advanced stage at presentation. Recently, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT is being used for management of advanced SOC, but role of tissue biomarkers in prognostication following NACT is not well established. The study was conducted on advanced stage SOC patients (n=100 that were treated either conventionally (n=50 or with NACT (n=50, followed by surgery. In order to evaluate the expression of tissue biomarkers (p53, MIB1, estrogen and progesterone receptors, Her-2/neu, E-cadherin, and Bcl2, immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative scoring were done following morphological examination. Following NACT, significant differences in tumor histomorphology were observed as compared to the native neoplasms. MIB 1 was significantly lower in cases treated with NACT and survival outcome was significantly better in cases with low MIB 1. ER expression was associated with poor overall survival. No other marker displayed any significant difference in expression or correlation with survival between the two groups. Immunophenotype of SOC does not differ significantly in samples from cases treated with NACT, compared to upfront surgically treated cases. The proliferating capacity of the residual tumor cells is less, depicted by low mean MIB1 LI. MIB 1 and ER inversely correlate with survival.

  11. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    , the differing perceptions are each in their own way rooted in an argument for democratic legitimacy. We therefore argue that national interpretations of consensus conferences, and of their ability to functions as a tool for public participation, depend to a great extent on the dominant ideals of...... democratic legitimacy embedded in national political cultures....

  12. Consensus and controversies on delineation of radiotherapy target volume for patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the consensus and controversies on delineation of radiotherapy target volume for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Study questionnaires were designed by radiation oncologists in Peking University School of Oncology. The forms were sent through e mail to radiation oncologists in 10 radiation departments in China and 2 departments in US in November, 2007. The brief introduction and PET/CT digital data of one patient with NSCLC were sent to radiation oncologists in 10 departments in Beijing. On Jan. 12, 2008, the case discussion was held by more than 300 radiation oncologists from Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, Liaoning Province and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. Results: All receivers of the questionnaire responded. The set up error was 5-7 mm. For patients with locally advanced NSCLC treated with radiotherapy concurrently with near full dose chemotherapy, 11 out of 12 responding departments defined planning target volume (PTV) of primary tumor as gross tumor volume(GTV) plus 6-8 mm plus set-up error and respiratory movements, and only one defined PTV as GTV plus set-up error and respiratory movements. For PTV of the mediastinal lymph nodes in the same patient, 9 out of 12 responding departments defined PTV as GTV plus 6-8 mm plus set-up error and respiratory movements, and 3 (of China) out of 12 defined PTV as GTV plus set-up error and respiratory movements. Stereotactic body radiotherapy with high fraction dose was used in 11 out of 12 responding departments with fraction dose varying from 6 to 20 Gy, including 6 of which defined PTV of primary tumor as GTV plus 6-8 mm plus respiratory movements and set-up error, and 5 defined PTV of early stage lung cancer as GTV plus respiratory movements and set-up error. The consensus on delineation of primary tumor of the case discussion was that the appropriate window width and window level were 1600 Hounsfield Units(HU) and -600 HU for lung window, and 400 HU and 20 HU for

  13. Biomarker and Phenotypic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Lymphedema | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

     DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Lymphedema (LE) following treatment for breast cancer is the most common form of secondary LE in the industrialized world. It occurs in 20% to 87% of patients following treatment for breast cancer and results in significant disability. At the |

  14. The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Consensus Statement on Optimizing Management of EGFR Mutation-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Status in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Daniel S W; Yom, Sue S; Tsao, Ming S; Pass, Harvey I; Kelly, Karen; Peled, Nir; Yung, Rex C; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Yatabe, Yasushi; Unger, Michael; Mack, Philip C; Wynes, Murry W; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Weder, Walter; Yankelevitz, David; Herbst, Roy S; Gandara, David R; Carbone, David P; Bunn, Paul A; Mok, Tony S K; Hirsch, Fred R

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) represent one of the most frequent "actionable" alterations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Typified by high response rates to targeted therapies, EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are now established first-line treatment options and have transformed the treatment paradigm for NSCLC. With the recent breakthrough designation and approval of the third-generation EGFR TKI osimertinib, available systemic and local treatment options have expanded, requiring new clinical algorithms that take into account individual patient molecular and clinical profiles. In this International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer commissioned consensus statement, key pathologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic considerations, such as optimal choice of EGFR TKI and management of brain metastasis, are discussed. In addition, recommendations are made for clinical guidelines and research priorities, such as the role of repeat biopsies and use of circulating free DNA for molecular studies. With the rapid pace of progress in treating EGFR-mutant NSCLC, this statement provides a state-of-the-art review of the contemporary issues in managing this unique subgroup of patients. PMID:27229180

  15. Obesity, insulin resistance, adipocytokines and breast cancer: New biomarkers and attractive therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalamaga, Maria

    2013-08-20

    Worldwide, breast cancer (BC) represents the most common type of non-skin human malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths amid women in Western countries. Obesity and its metabolic complications have rapidly become major global health issues and are associated with increased risk for cancer, especially BC in postmenopausal women. Adipose tissue is considered as a genuine endocrine organ secreting a variety of bioactive adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin and nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase/visfatin. Recent evidence has indicated that the constellation of obesity, insulin resistance and adipokines is associated with the risk and prognosis of postmenopausal BC. Direct evidence is growing rapidly supporting the stimulating and/or inhibiting role of adipokines in the process of development and progression of BC. Adipokines could exert their effects on the normal and neoplastic mammary tissue by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. Recent studies support a role of adipokines as novel risk factors and potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in BC. This editorial aims at providing important insights into the potential pathophysiological mechanisms linking adipokines to the etiopathogenesis of BC in the context of a dysfunctional adipose tissue and insulin resistance in obesity. A better understanding of these mechanisms may be important for the development of attractive preventive and therapeutic strategies against obesity-related breast malignancy. PMID:24520544

  16. MicroRNA functional network in pancreatic cancer: From biology to biomarkers of disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jin Wang; Subrata Sen

    2011-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs), the 17- to 25-nucleotide-long non-coding RNAs, regulate expression of approximately 30% of the protein-coding genes at the post-transcriptional level and have emerged as critical components of the complex functional pathway networks controlling important cellular processes, such as proliferation, development, differentiation, stress response' and apoptosis. Abnormal expression levels of miRs, regulating critical cancerassociated pathways, have been implicated to play important roles in the oncogenic processes, functioning both as oncogenes and as tumour suppressor genes. Elucidation of the genetic networks regulated by the abnormally expressing miRs in cancer cells is proving to be extremely significant in understanding the role of these miRs in the induction of malignant-transformation-associated phenotypic changes. As a result, the miRs involved in the oncogenic transformation process are being investigated as novel biomarkers of disease detection and prognosis as well as potential therapeutic targets for human cancers. In this \\article, we review the existing literature in the field documenting the significance of aberrantly expressed miRs in human pancreatic cancer and discuss how the oncogenic miRs may be involved in the genetic networks regulating functional pathways deregulated in this malignancy.

  17. Biomarker-driven trial in metastatic pancreas cancer: feasibility in a multicenter study of saracatinib, an oral Src inhibitor, in previously treated pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Src tyrosine kinases are overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, and the oral Src inhibitor saracatinib has shown antitumor activity in preclinical models of pancreas cancer. We performed a CTEP-sponsored Phase II clinical trial of saracatinib in previously treated pancreas cancer patients, with a primary endpoint of 6-month survival. A Simon MinMax two-stage phase II design was used. Saracatinib (175 mg/day) was administered orally continuously in 28-day cycles. In the unselected portion of the study, 18 patients were evaluable. Only two (11%) patients survived for at least 6 months, and three 6-month survivors were required to move to second stage of study as originally designed. The study was amended as a biomarker-driven trial (leucine rich repeat containing protein 19 [LRRC19] > insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 [IGFBP2] “top scoring pairs” polymerase chain reaction [PCR] assay, and PIK3CA mutant) based on preclinical data in a human pancreas tumor explant model. In the biomarker study, archival tumor tissue or fresh tumor biopsies were tested. Biomarker-positive patients were eligible for the study. Only one patient was PIK3CA mutant in a 3′ untranslated region (UTR) portion of the gene. This patient was enrolled in the study and failed to meet the 6-month survival endpoint. As the frequency of biomarker-positive patients was very low (<3%), the study was closed. Although we were unable to conclude whether enriching for a subset of second/third line pancreatic cancer patients treated with a Src inhibitor based on a biomarker would improve 6-month survival, we demonstrate that testing pancreatic tumor samples for a biomarker-driven, multicenter study in metastatic pancreas cancer is feasible

  18. Antioxidant vitamins and cancer risk: is oxidative damage to DNA a relevant biomarker?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter; Cooke, Marcus S; Rozalski, Rafal; Olinski, Ryszard

    -dihydroguanine (8-oxodG) are increasingly being regarded as reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress and they may have a predictive value of cancer risk, although this needs to be established independently in several cohort studies. A survey of intervention studies of the ingestion of antioxidant-containing foods......Oxidative damage to DNA is regarded as an important step in carcinogenesis. These lesions may arise as a consequence of exposure to xenobiotics, but are also generated as a consequence of endogenous generation of oxidizing compounds. Measurements of oxidative damage to guanines, such as 8-oxo-7, 8...... or tablets of antioxidants indicate that about one-third of the studies reported a protective effect in terms of lower levels of oxidative damage to DNA in white blood cells or decreased urinary excretion of 8-oxodG. Although firm conclusions cannot be reached, there appears to be links between...

  19. Imaging biomarkers in prostate cancer: role of PET/CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picchio, M.; Mapelli, P.; Incerti, E.; Gianolli, L. [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Milan (Italy); Panebianco, V.; Barchetti, F. [Sapienza University, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Rome (Italy); Castellucci, P.; Nanni, C.; Fanti, S. [Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi - University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Bologna (Italy); Briganti, A.; Gandaglia, G.; Montorsi, F. [Urological Research Institute, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Kirienko, M. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently the most widely used biomarker of prostate cancer (PCa). PSA suggests the presence of primary tumour and disease relapse after treatment, but it is not able to provide a clear distinction between locoregional and distant disease. Molecular and functional imaging, that are able to provide a detailed and comprehensive overview of PCa extension, are more reliable tools for primary tumour detection and disease extension assessment both in staging and restaging. In the present review we evaluate the role of PET/CT and MRI in the diagnosis, staging and restaging of PCa, and the use of these imaging modalities in prognosis, treatment planning and response assessment. Innovative imaging strategies including new radiotracers and hybrid scanners such as PET/MRI are also discussed. (orig.)

  20. Serum Biomarkers for the Detection of Cardiac Toxicity after Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibo eTian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modality cancer treatments that include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted agents are highly effective therapies. Their use, especially in combination, is limited by the risk of significant cardiac toxicity. The current paradigm for minimizing cardiac morbidity, based on serial cardiac function monitoring, is suboptimal. An alternative approach based on biomarker testing, has emerged as a promising adjunct and a potential substitute to routine echocardiography. Biomarkers, most prominently cardiac troponins and natriuretic peptides, have been evaluated for their ability to describe the risk of potential cardiac dysfunction in clinically asymptomatic patients. Early rises in cardiac troponin concentrations have consistently predicted the risk and severity of significant cardiac events in patients treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Biomarkers represent a novel, efficient, and robust clinical decision tool for the management of cancer therapy-induced cardiotoxicity. This article aims to review the clinical evidence that supports the use of established biomarkers such as cardiac troponins and natriuretic peptides, as well as emerging data on proposed biomarkers.

  1. Assessment of range of uric and serum biomarkers in determination of bladder cancer severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkov V.M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish efficiency of a range of uric and serum biomarkers of bladder cancer for diagnostics and the prognosis of risk of development of disease recurrence. Material and methods: TPA and TPS, VEGF level research in blood serum, UBC in urine in 176 people, among which 135 patients with bladder cancer (RMP have been conducted. Group of comparison has included16 patients (patients with cystitis. The control group has been made of 25 almost healthy men. 75 patients had non-muscle invasive RMP (Ta-1N0M0. Results. It has been statistically determined that reliable growth of of TPA, TPS in blood serum and UBC in urine in patients with non-muscle invasive RMP in comparison with patients in groups of control and comparison has been established. The increase of UBC in urine of patients of this group with recurrence of tumoral growth within a year has been noted. In comparison with cytological research of urine sedimentation, molecular markers of RMP (the uric UBC and serum TPA, TPS possess diagnostic sensitivity, allow to confirm the presence of disease, to carry out diagnostics of stages of organ and extra invasion. RMP is possible to consider as an additional prognostic serum marker increase in the VEGF level in blood serum. Conclusion. Inclusion in diagnostic process in the clinical research of biomarkers showed that identification of NMIRMP increased from 18,1% in 2006 to 55,6% in 2011. The chosen volume of complex treatment allowed to reduce recurrence and lethality in the first two years from 32 to 15,5%.

  2. Neural network cascade optimizes microRNA biomarker selection for nasopharyngeal cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenliang; Kan, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be promising biomarkers in predicting cancer prognosis. However, inappropriate or poorly optimized processing and modeling of miRNA expression data can negatively affect prediction performance. Here, we propose a holistic solution for miRNA biomarker selection and prediction model building. This work introduces the use of a neural network cascade, a cascaded constitution of small artificial neural network units, for evaluating miRNA expression and patient outcome. A miRNA microarray dataset of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was retrieved from Gene Expression Omnibus to illustrate the methodology. Results indicated a nonlinear relationship between miRNA expression and patient death risk, implying that direct comparison of expression values is inappropriate. However, this method performs transformation of miRNA expression values into a miRNA score, which linearly measures death risk. Spearman correlation was calculated between miRNA scores and survival status for each miRNA. Finally, a nine-miRNA signature was optimized to predict death risk after nasopharyngeal carcinoma by establishing a neural network cascade consisting of 13 artificial neural network units. Area under the ROC was 0.951 for the internal validation set and had a prediction accuracy of 83% for the external validation set. In particular, the established neural network cascade was found to have strong immunity against noise interference that disturbs miRNA expression values. This study provides an efficient and easy-to-use method that aims to maximize clinical application of miRNAs in prognostic risk assessment of patients with cancer. PMID:25310846

  3. Neural network cascade optimizes microRNA biomarker selection for nasopharyngeal cancer prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenliang Zhu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to be promising biomarkers in predicting cancer prognosis. However, inappropriate or poorly optimized processing and modeling of miRNA expression data can negatively affect prediction performance. Here, we propose a holistic solution for miRNA biomarker selection and prediction model building. This work introduces the use of a neural network cascade, a cascaded constitution of small artificial neural network units, for evaluating miRNA expression and patient outcome. A miRNA microarray dataset of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was retrieved from Gene Expression Omnibus to illustrate the methodology. Results indicated a nonlinear relationship between miRNA expression and patient death risk, implying that direct comparison of expression values is inappropriate. However, this method performs transformation of miRNA expression values into a miRNA score, which linearly measures death risk. Spearman correlation was calculated between miRNA scores and survival status for each miRNA. Finally, a nine-miRNA signature was optimized to predict death risk after nasopharyngeal carcinoma by establishing a neural network cascade consisting of 13 artificial neural network units. Area under the ROC was 0.951 for the internal validation set and had a prediction accuracy of 83% for the external validation set. In particular, the established neural network cascade was found to have strong immunity against noise interference that disturbs miRNA expression values. This study provides an efficient and easy-to-use method that aims to maximize clinical application of miRNAs in prognostic risk assessment of patients with cancer.

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor in the circulation in cancer patients may not be a relevant biomarker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana M H Niers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Levels of circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF have widely been used as biomarker for angiogenic activity in cancer. For this purpose, non-standardized measurements in plasma and serum were used, without correction for artificial VEGF release by platelets activated ex vivo. We hypothesize that "true" circulating (cVEGF levels in most cancer patients are low and unrelated to cancer load or tumour angiogenesis. METHODOLOGY: We determined VEGF levels in PECT, a medium that contains platelet activation inhibitors, in citrate plasma, and in isolated platelets in 16 healthy subjects, 18 patients with metastatic non-renal cancer (non-RCC and 12 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. In non-RCC patients, circulating plasma VEGF levels were low and similar to VEGF levels in controls if platelet activation was minimized during the harvest procedure by PECT medium. In citrate plasma, VEGF levels were elevated in non-RCC patients, but this could be explained by a combination of increased platelet activation during blood harvesting, and by a two-fold increase in VEGF content of individual platelets (controls: 3.4 IU/10(6, non-RCC: 6.2 IU/10(6 platelets, p = 0.001. In contrast, cVEGF levels in RCC patients were elevated (PECT plasma: 64 pg/ml vs. 21 pg/ml, RCC vs. non-RCC, p<0.0001, and not related to platelet VEGF concentration. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that "true" freely cVEGF levels are not elevated in the majority of cancer patients. Previously reported elevated plasma VEGF levels in cancer appear to be due to artificial release from activated platelets, which in cancer have an increased VEGF content, during the blood harvest procedure. Only in patients with RCC, which is characterized by excessive VEGF production due to a specific genetic defect, were cVEGF levels elevated. This observation may be related to limited and selective success of anti-VEGF agents, such as bevacizumab and sorafenib, as monotherapy in

  5. Molecular Biomarkers of Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Their Implications in Early Diagnosis and Therapeutic Intervention of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junli; Xie, Keping; Zheng, Shaojiang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of early detection and effective interventions is a major reason for the poor prognosis and dismal survival rates for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) is the most common precursor of invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Each stage in the progression from PanIN to PDAC is well characterized by multiple significant genetic alterations affecting signaling pathways. Understanding the biological behavior and molecular alterations in the progression from PanIN to PDAC is crucial to the identification of noninvasive biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis and the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies for control of pancreatic cancer progression. This review focuses on molecular biomarkers of PanIN and their important roles in early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26929736

  6. Which benefits and harms of preoperative radiotherapy should be addressed? A Delphi consensus study among rectal cancer patients and radiation oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We previously found considerable variation in information provision on preoperative radiotherapy (PRT) in rectal cancer. Our aims were to reach consensus among patients and oncologists on which benefits/harms of PRT should be addressed during the consultation, and to assess congruence with daily clinical practice. Materials and methods: A four-round Delphi-study was conducted with two expert panels: (1) 31 treated rectal cancer patients and (2) 35 radiation oncologists. Thirty-seven possible benefits/harms were shown. Participants indicated whether addressing the benefit/harm was (1) essential, (2) desired, (3) not necessary, or (4) to be avoided. Consensus was assumed when ⩾80% of the panel agreed. Results were compared to 81 audio-taped consultations. Results: The panels reached consensus that six topics should be addressed in all patients (local control, survival, long term altered defecation pattern and faecal incontinence, perineal wound healing problems, advice to avoid pregnancy), three in male patients (erectile dysfunction, ejaculation disorder, infertility), and four in female patients (vaginal dryness, pain during intercourse, menopause, infertility). On average, less than half of these topics were addressed in daily clinical practice. Conclusions: This study showed substantial overlap between benefits/harms that patients and oncologists consider important to address during the consultation, and at the same time poor congruence with daily clinical practice

  7. Selective Nodal Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancer Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: Application of RTOG Consensus Guidelines in Routine Clinical Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have been using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for selective neck irradiation. This article presents an analysis of patterns of failure and their dosimetric correlation. Methods and Materials: Between October 2003 and January 2008, 83 patients with head-and-neck cancer were treated with IMRT. Nodal levels were contoured as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines. Results: There were 32 relapses with 23 local relapses (21 local relapses alone and 2 local and regional relapses, simultaneously), 9 regional relapses (including 2 simultaneous local and regional relapses), and 5 distant relapses, of which 2 patients had local relapses. At 2 and 3 years, the locoregional relapse-free survival rates were was 68.3% and 60.8%, respectively, while the overall survival rates were 84.1% and 81.7%, respectively. Subgroup analyses revealed significant differences in locoregional relapse-free survival rates for total treatment times of 53 days, a volume of CTV1PTV (i.e., the volume prescribed 70 Gy) 177 cc, a V100 for CTV1PTV of 91%, and a minimum dose to CTV1PTV of 54 Gy. There were no failures in the elective nodal volume, substantiating both the nodal selection criteria and the RTOG consensus guidelines for delineation of neck node levels. Conclusions: IMRT for head-neck cancer is feasible, using elective nodal selection criteria along with RTOG consensus guidelines for the radiological boundaries of levels of neck nodes.

  8. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.) are often debilitating and underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for this consensus and external experts evaluated the conclusions. The paper contains 20 clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of stomatological issues that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecrosis (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia (10 clusters of statements). PMID:27061883

  9. Targeted radiosensitization with PARP1 inhibition: optimization of therapy and identification of biomarkers of response in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Felix Y; Speers, Corey; Liu, Meilan; Jackson, William C; Moon, Dominic; Rinkinen, Jacob; Wilder-Romans, Kari; Jagsi, Reshma; Pierce, Lori J

    2014-08-01

    Sustained locoregional control of breast cancer is a significant issue for certain patients. Inhibition of PARP1 is a promising strategy for radiosensitization (RS). We sought to optimize therapy with PARP1 inhibition and radiation (RT) by establishing the most effective treatment schedule, degree of PARP1-mediated RS, and identify early biomarkers predictive of efficacy in breast cancer models. Using clonogenic survival assays, we assessed intrinsic radiosensitivity and RS induced by PARP1 inhibition in breast cancer cell lines. Potential biomarkers of response were evaluated using western blotting, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence with validation in vivo using tumor xenograft experiments. Across a panel of BC and normal breast epithelial cell lines, the PARP1 inhibitor ABT-888 preferentially radiosensitizes breast cancer (vs. normal) cells with enhancement ratios (EnhR) up to 2.3 independent of intrinsic BC subtype or BRCA mutational status. Concurrent and adjuvant therapy resulted in the highest EnhR of all schedules tested. The degree of RS did not correlate with pretreatment markers of PARP1 activity, DNA damage/repair, or cell cycle distribution. Increases in PARP1 activity 24 h after RT were associated with sensitivity after combination treatment. Findings were confirmed in breast cancer xenograft models. Our study demonstrates that PARP1 inhibition improves the therapeutic index of RT independent of BC subtype or BRCA1 mutational status and that PARP1 activity may serve as a clinically relevant biomarker of response. These studies have led to a clinical trial (TBCRC024) incorporating intratreatment biomarker analyses of PARP1 inhibitors and RT in breast cancer patients. PMID:25104443

  10. Correlation of Various Biomarkers with Axillary Nodal Metastases: Can a Panel of Such Biomarkers Guide Selective Use of Axillary Surgery in T1 Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Tufale A; Rakesh, Sharma; Prakash, K Patil; Singh, Chandraveer

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the correlation of various clinic-pathological variables with axillary nodal involvement in T1 breast cancer & to identify a sub-group of T1 cancers, on the basis of observed variables, with a low risk of axillary nodal metastases. Clinico-pathological variables observed included tumor size, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), histological grade of tumor, tumor palpability, estrogen/progesterone (ER/PR) & her2/neu receptors, age, family history, histological type of tumor, axillary nodal metastases for 100 patients without clinically palpable nodes who underwent axillary lymph node dissection in Bombay Hospital & Medical Research Center from March, 2009. Data compiled was analyzed by univariate & multivariate analysis. All the variables viz. tumor size, LVI, histological grade, tumor palpability & ER/PR/Her2 receptor profile, which were found to be significantly associated with axillary lymph node involvement (ALNI) on univariate analysis were also found to be independent predictors of ALNI on multivariate analysis. Age of the patient, family history & histological type of tumor were not significantly correlated with ALNI. None of the 12 patients with tumor biomarker profile of T1a-b tumors without LVI & with histological grade I, had ALNI. The risk of ALNI can be predicted by using various tumor biomarker variables. Based on the predicted risk of ALNI, the management strategy for axilla can be individualized. The omission of operative axillary staging may be considered in patients with low predictive risk of ALNI. PMID:27065659

  11. A window-of-opportunity biomarker study of etodolac in resectable breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observational data show that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use is associated with a lower rate of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of etodolac, an FDA-approved NSAID reported to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes and the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR), on rationally identified potential biomarkers in breast cancer. Patients with resectable breast cancer planned for initial management with surgical resection were enrolled and took 400 mg of etodolac twice daily prior to surgery. Protein and gene expression levels for genes related to COX-2 and RXRα were evaluated in tumor samples from before and after etodolac exposure. Thirty subjects received etodolac and 17 subjects were assayed as contemporaneous or opportunistic controls. After etodolac exposure mean cyclin D1 protein levels, assayed by immunohistochemistry, decreased (P = 0.03). Notably, pre- versus post cyclin D1 gene expression change went from positive to negative with greater duration of etodolac exposure (r = −0.64, P = 0.01). Additionally, etodolac exposure was associated with a significant increase in COX-2 gene expression levels (fold change: 3.25 [95% CI: 1.9, 5.55]) and a trend toward increased β-catenin expression (fold change: 2.03 [95% CI: 0.93, 4.47]). In resectable breast cancer relatively brief exposure to the NSAID etodolac was associated with reduced cyclin D1 protein levels. Effect was also observed on cyclin D1 gene expression with decreasing levels with longer durations of drug exposure. Increased COX-2 gene expression was seen, possibly due to compensatory feedback. These data highlight the utility of even small clinical trials with access to biospecimens for pharmacodynamic studies

  12. Identification of PADI2 as a potential breast cancer biomarker and therapeutic target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    found that the PADI inhibitor strongly affects the expression of several cell cycle genes implicated in tumor progression, including p21, GADD45α, and Ki67. Together, these results suggest that PADI2 may function as an important new biomarker for HER2/ERBB2+ tumors and that Cl-amidine represents a new candidate for breast cancer therapy

  13. Identification of PADI2 as a potential breast cancer biomarker and therapeutic target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McElwee John L

    2012-10-01

    Cl-amidine treated and control MCF10DCIS cells, and found that the PADI inhibitor strongly affects the expression of several cell cycle genes implicated in tumor progression, including p21, GADD45α, and Ki67. Conclusion Together, these results suggest that PADI2 may function as an important new biomarker for HER2/ERBB2+ tumors and that Cl-amidine represents a new candidate for breast cancer therapy.

  14. Radiotherapy diagnostic biomarkers in radioresistant human H460 lung cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hong Shik; Baek, Jeong-Hwa; Yim, Ji-Hye; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk; Song, Jie-Young; Park, In-Chul; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Chang-Woo; Hwang, Sang-Gu

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cell radioresistance is a major contributor to radiotherapy failure, highlighting the importance of identifying predictive biomarkers for radioresistance. In this work, we established a radioresistant H460 (RR-H460) cell line from parental radiosensitive H460 lung cancer cells by exposure to fractionated radiation. The radiation-resistant, anti-apoptotic phenotype of RR-H460 cell lines was confirmed by their enhanced clonogenic survival and increased expression of the radioresistance genes Hsp90 and Her-3. RR-H460 cells displayed characteristics of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), including induction of the surface marker CD44 and stem cell markers Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. RR-H460 cells also exhibited sphere formation and malignant behavior, further supporting a CSC phenotype. Using proteomic analyses, we identified 8 proteins that were up-regulated in RR-H460 CSC lines and therefore potentially involved in radioresistance and CSC-related biological processes. Notably, 4 of these-PAI-2, NOMO2, KLC4, and PLOD3-have not been previously linked to radioresistance. Depletion of these individual genes sensitized RR-H460 cells to radiotoxicity and additively enhancing radiation-induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest the possibility of integrating molecular targeted therapy with radiotherapy as a strategy for resolving the radioresistance of lung tumors. PMID:26901847

  15. Usefulness of cancer-testis antigens as biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frezza Eldo E

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite advances in our cellular and molecular knowledge, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains one of the major public health problems throughout the world. It is now known to be highly heterogeneous: it encompasses various pathological entities and a wide range of clinical behaviors, and is underpinned by a complex array of gene alterations that affect supra-molecular processes. Four families of HCC tumour markers have been recently proposed: a onco-fetal and glycoprotein antigens; b enzymes and iso-enzymes; c cytokines and d genes. A category of tumour-associated antigens called cancer-testis (CT antigens has been identified and their encoding genes have been extensively investigated. CT antigens are expressed in a limited number of normal tissues as well as in malignant tumors of unrelated histological origin, including the liver. Given that cancers are being recognized as increasingly complex, we here review the role of CT antigens as liver tumour biomarkers and their validation process, and discuss why they may improve the effectiveness of screening HCC patients and help in determining the risk of developing HCC.

  16. miR-1260b is a Potential Prognostic Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deng-Rui; Guan, Quan-Lin; Gao, Ming-Tai; Jiang, Lei; Kang, Hong-Xia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Colorectal cancer (CRC) mainly refers to colon and rectum cancer, which is the most common gastrointestinal malignant tumor. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in tumors participate in multiple processes of malignancy development, including cell differentiation, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. In this study we explored the relationship of miR-1260b abnormal expression with clinical pathological features in CRC patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS The expression of miR-1260b was detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) in 120 cases of CRC tissues. The correlation of miR-1260b expression with the clinicopathologic features of CRC was analyzed by SPSS 21.0 statistical software. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Cox regression analyses were conducted to determine whether miR-1260b was an independent predictor of survival for CRC patients. RESULTS The miR-1260b expression in CRC was significantly higher than the expression levels in the corresponding para-carcinoma tissues (P0.05). The high miR-1260b expression patients survived for shorter times than those CRC patients with low miR-1260b expression (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that high miR-1260b means poor prognosis of patients with CRC. CONCLUSIONS The high expression level of miR-1260b is an independent prognostic biomarker that indicates a worse prognosis for patients with CRC. PMID:27399918

  17. Proteomic analysis of gastric cancer and immunoblot validation of potential biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nina Ko(c)evar; Federico Odreman; Alessandro Vindigni; Snje(z)ana Frkovi(c) Grazio; Radovan Komel

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To search for and validate differentially expressed proteins in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.METHODS:We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to search for differentially expressed proteins in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.A set of proteins was validated with immunoblotting.RESULTS:We identified 30 different proteins involved in various biological processes:metabolism,development,death,response to stress,cell cycle,cell communication,transport,and cell motility.Eight proteinswere chosen for further validation by immunoblotting.Our results show that gastrokine-1,39S ribosomal protein L12 (mitochondrial precursor),plasma cell-induced resident endoplasmic reticulum protein,and glutathione S-transferase mu 3 were significantly underexpressed in gastric adenocarcinoma relative to adjacent non-tumor tissue samples.On the other hand,septin-2,ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 N,and transaldolase were significantly overexpressed.Translationally controlled tumor protein was shown to be differentially expressed only in patients with cancer of the gastric cardia/esophageal border.CONCLUSION:This work presents a set of possible diagnostic biomarkers,validated for the first time.It might contribute to the efforts of understanding gastric cancer carcinogenesis.

  18. MAP17 (PDZKIP1) as a novel prognostic biomarker for laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel-Luken, María-José; Chaves-Conde, Manuel; de Miguel-Luken, Verónica; Muñoz-Galván, Sandra; López-Guerra, José Luis; Mateos, Juan C; Pachón, Jerónimo; Chinchón, David; Suarez, Vladimir; Carnero, Amancio

    2015-05-20

    Larynx cancer organ preservation treatments with chemo and radiotherapy have substantially improved laryngoesophageal dysfunction-free survival. However, both of them lead to a high incidence of acute and chronic toxicities and a significant number of patients relapse. To date, there is no evidence available to establish the group of patients that may benefit from preservation approaches and clinical criteria such as primary tumor extension or pretreatment tracheotomy are not validated. MAP17 is a small non-glycosylated membrane protein overexpressed in carcinomas. The tumoral behavior induced by MAP17 is associated with reactive oxygen species production in which SGLT1 seems involved. In this study we found that the levels of MAP17 were related to clinical findings and survival in a cohort of 58 patients with larynx cancer. MAP17 expression is associated with overall survival (pSGLT (p=0.022) and the combination of high levels of MAP17/SGLT also led to an increased overall survival (p=0,028). These findings suggest that MAP17, alone or in combination with SGLT1, may become a novel predictive biomarker for laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:25788275

  19. Evaluation of biomarker changes after administration of various neoadjuvant chemotherapies in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guangchao; Han, Yu; Liu, Cun; Chen, Liansheng; Ding, Butong; Xuan, Shijin; Liu, Xianqiang; Ma, Guohui; Gao, Jun; Tian, Xingsong

    2015-01-01

    To assess the changes in estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and Ki-67 expression in breast cancer patients after various neoadjuvant chemotherapies. Data from 138 locally advanced breast cancer patients with histological diagnoses were reviewed. Seventy patients (group 1) were given 4 cycles of 500 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide and 50 mg/m2 pirarubicin every 21 days. Sixty-eight patients (group 2) were given 4 cycles of 500 mg/m2 cyclophosphamide and 75 mg/m2 docetaxel every 21 days. The biomarker changes of the operated tumor tissues were compared with the initial core biopsies. ER, PR, HER2 and Ki-67 expression changed by 28.6%, 22.9%, 17.1% and 54.3%, respectively, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in group 1 and 16.2%, 22.1%, 13.2% and 70.6%, respectively, after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in group 2. There were significant differences between the groups regarding ER and Ki-67 status changes, and these changes can be used to inform treatment strategies. PMID:25755795

  20. Discovering biomarkers from gene expression data for predicting cancer subgroups using neural networks and relational fuzzy clustering

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    Sharma Animesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The four heterogeneous childhood cancers, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma present a similar histology of small round blue cell tumor (SRBCT and thus often leads to misdiagnosis. Identification of biomarkers for distinguishing these cancers is a well studied problem. Existing methods typically evaluate each gene separately and do not take into account the nonlinear interaction between genes and the tools that are used to design the diagnostic prediction system. Consequently, more genes are usually identified as necessary for prediction. We propose a general scheme for finding a small set of biomarkers to design a diagnostic system for accurate classification of the cancer subgroups. We use multilayer networks with online gene selection ability and relational fuzzy clustering to identify a small set of biomarkers for accurate classification of the training and blind test cases of a well studied data set. Results Our method discerned just seven biomarkers that precisely categorized the four subgroups of cancer both in training and blind samples. For the same problem, others suggested 19–94 genes. These seven biomarkers include three novel genes (NAB2, LSP1 and EHD1 – not identified by others with distinct class-specific signatures and important role in cancer biology, including cellular proliferation, transendothelial migration and trafficking of MHC class antigens. Interestingly, NAB2 is downregulated in other tumors including Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Neuroblastoma but we observed moderate to high upregulation in a few cases of Ewing sarcoma and Rabhdomyosarcoma, suggesting that NAB2 might be mutated in these tumors. These genes can discover the subgroups correctly with unsupervised learning, can differentiate non-SRBCT samples and they perform equally well with other machine learning tools including support vector machines. These biomarkers lead to four simple human interpretable

  1. Differential profiling of breast cancer plasma proteome by isotope-coded affinity tagging method reveals biotinidase as a breast cancer biomarker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of women's death worldwide. It is important to discover a reliable biomarker for the detection of breast cancer. Plasma is the most ideal source for cancer biomarker discovery since many cells cross-communicate through the secretion of soluble proteins into blood. Plasma proteomes obtained from 6 breast cancer patients and 6 normal healthy women were analyzed by using the isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling approach and tandem mass spectrometry. All the plasma samples used were depleted of highly abundant 6 plasma proteins by immune-affinity column chromatography before ICAT labeling. Several proteins showing differential abundance level were selected based on literature searches and their specificity to the commercially available antibodies, and then verified by immunoblot assays. A total of 155 proteins were identified and quantified by ICAT method. Among them, 33 proteins showed abundance changes by more than 1.5-fold between the plasmas of breast cancer patients and healthy women. We chose 5 proteins for the follow-up confirmation in the individual plasma samples using immunoblot assay. Four proteins, α1-acid glycoprotein 2, monocyte differentiation antigen CD14, biotinidase (BTD), and glutathione peroxidase 3, showed similar abundance ratio to ICAT result. Using a blind set of plasmas obtained from 21 breast cancer patients and 21 normal healthy controls, we confirmed that BTD was significantly down-regulated in breast cancer plasma (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, p = 0.002). BTD levels were lowered in all cancer grades (I-IV) except cancer grade zero. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of BTD was 0.78. Estrogen receptor status (p = 0.940) and progesterone receptor status (p = 0.440) were not associated with the plasma BTD levels. Our study suggests that BTD is a potential serological biomarker for the detection of breast cancer

  2. Novel non-invasive biomarkers that distinguish between benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to discover and to validate novel noninvasive biomarkers that distinguish between benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and localized prostate cancer (PCa), thereby helping to solve the diagnostic dilemma confronting clinicians who treat these patients. Quantitative iTRAQ LC/LC/MS/MS analysis was used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in the urine of men with BPH compared with those who have localized PCa. These proteins were validated in 173 urine samples from patients diagnosed with BPH (N = 83) and PCa (N = 90). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictive biomarkers. Three proteins, β2M, PGA3, and MUC3 were identified by iTRAQ and validated by immunoblot analyses. Univariate analysis demonstrated significant elevations in urinary β2M (P < 0.001), PGA3 (P = 0.006), and MUC3 (P = 0.018) levels found in the urine of PCa patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed AUC values ranging from 0.618 for MUC3 (P = 0.009), 0.625 for PGA3 (P < 0.008), and 0.668 for β2M (P < 0.001). The combination of all three demonstrated an AUC of 0.710 (95% CI: 0.631 – 0.788, P < 0.001); diagnostic accuracy improved even more when these data were combined with PSA categories (AUC = 0.812, (95% CI: 0.740 – 0.885, P < 0.001). Urinary β2M, PGA3, and MUC3, when analyzed alone or when multiplexed with clinically defined categories of PSA, may be clinically useful in noninvasively resolving the dilemma of effectively discriminating between BPH and localized PCa. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1284-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  3. Bead-based microarray immunoassay for lung cancer biomarkers using quantum dots as labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lifen; Wu, Simin; Jing, Fengxiang; Zhou, Hongbo; Jia, Chunping; Li, Gang; Cong, Hui; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we developed a multiplex immunoassay system that combines the suspension and planar microarray formats within a single layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using soft lithography technology. The suspension format was based on the target proteins forming a sandwich structure between the magnetic beads and the quantum dot (QD) probes through specific antibody-antigen interactions. The planar microarray format was produced by fabricating an array of micro-wells in PDMS. Each micro-well was designed to trap a single microbead and eventually generated a microbead array within the PDMS chamber. The resultant bead-based on-chip assay could be used for simultaneously detecting three lung cancer biomarkers-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), fragments of cytokeratin 19 (CYFRA21-1) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-in 10 μl of human serum, with a wide linear dynamic range (1.03-111 ng/mL for CEA and CYFRA21-1; 9.26-1000 ng/ml for NSE) and a low detection limit (CEA: 0.19 ng/ml; CYFRA21-1: 0.97 ng/ml; NSE: 0.37 ng/ml; S/N=3). Our micro-well chip does not require complex e-beam lithography or the reactive ion etching process as with existing micro-well systems, which rely on expensive focused ion beam (FIB) milling or optical fiber bundles. Furthermore, the current approach is easy to operate without extra driving equipment such as pumps, and can make parallel detection for multiplexing with rapid binding kinetics, small reagent consumption and low cost. This work has demonstrated the importance of the successful application of on-chip multiplexing sandwich assays for the detection of biomarker proteins. PMID:26852198

  4. Prognostic biomarker study in pathologically staged N1 non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The prognostic influence of 6 biomarkers correlated to histologic subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) on loco-regional control, overall survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and distant disease control (DDC) rates, all measured at 5 years, were examined. Materials and Methods: Cell blocks from the primary tumors of 137 patients with pathologically staged N1 NSCLC at MDACC were analyzed by 6-biomarker status correlated to histological subtypes and their outcomes. Results: The ranges of biomarker values were as follows: apoptotic index, 0.2-2.8%; mitotic index, 0-1.8%; the proportion of cells in S+G2M, 3-36%; p53 status, 0-100%; Ki-67, 0-9.3%; DNA index, 1.0-2.74. Subtypes of 137 cases from the postoperative pathology specimen showed that 74 patients had squamous carcinoma and 63 patients had adenocarcinoma. Mean and median lengths of follow-up were 4.21 years and 2.43 years, respectively. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had a better 5-year survival (p = 0.006), DFS (pp = 0.002) than patients with adenocarcinoma (AC). Among patients with AC, the DNA index was a significant predictor of 5-year DFS (p = 0.02), DDC rate (p = 0.04), and local-regional control (p < 0.05). Higher apoptosis (p 0.03) and mitosis indices (p = 0.03) were also univariate predictors of increased distant disease among patients with AC. Multivariate analysis of patients with AC revealed that the DNA index and Ki-67 were the only significant independent predictors of distant metastasis (p < 0.04 and p < 0.02, respectively) and DFS (p < 0.04 for both). Among patients with SCC, univariate analysis showed that S+G2M proportion (p < 0.05) and Ki-67 levels (p < 0.02) were significant predictors for local-regional control; for SC, multivariate analysis showed that only mitosis was a significant predictor in this case for overall survival (p < 0.04). Conclusion: Spontaneous apoptotic index and Ki-67 were significantly higher in SC than in AC. Patients with SC had less

  5. Plasma-derived exosomal survivin, a plausible biomarker for early detection of prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Khan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivin is expressed in prostate cancer (PCa, and its downregulation sensitizes PCa cells to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro and in vivo. Small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes, secreted from the endosomal membrane compartment, contain RNA and protein that they readily transport via exosome internalization into recipient cells. Recent progress has shown that tumor-derived exosomes play multiple roles in tumor growth and metastasis and may produce these functions via immune escape, tumor invasion and angiogenesis. Furthermore, exosome analysis may provide novel biomarkers to diagnose or monitor PCa treatment. METHODS: Exosomes were purified from the plasma and serum from 39 PCa patients, 20 BPH patients, 8 prostate cancer recurrent and 16 healthy controls using ultracentrifugation and their quantities and qualities were quantified and visualized from both the plasma and the purified exosomes using ELISA and Western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: Survivin was significantly increased in the tumor-derived samples, compared to those from BPH and controls with virtually no difference in the quantity of Survivin detected in exosomes collected from newly diagnosed patients exhibiting low (six or high (nine Gleason scores. Exosome Survivin levels were also higher in patients that had relapsed on chemotherapy compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that Survivin exists in plasma exosomes from both normal, BPH and PCa subjects. The relative amounts of exosomal Survivin in PCa plasma was significantly higher than in those with pre-inflammatory BPH and control plasma. This differential expression of exosomal Survivin was seen with both newly diagnosed and advanced PCa subjects with high or low-grade cancers. Analysis of plasma exosomal Survivin levels may offer a convenient tool for diagnosing or monitoring PCa and may, as it is elevated in low as well as high Gleason scored samples, be used for early detection.

  6. Evaluation of chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer treatment using quantitative CT image biomarkers: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; McMeekin, Scott; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and apply quantitative image biomarkers for early prediction of the tumor response to the chemotherapy among the ovarian cancer patients participated in the clinical trials of testing new drugs. In the experiment, we retrospectively selected 30 cases from the patients who participated in Phase I clinical trials of new drug or drug agents for ovarian cancer treatment. Each case is composed of two sets of CT images acquired pre- and post-treatment (4-6 weeks after starting treatment). A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was developed to extract and analyze the quantitative image features of the metastatic tumors previously tracked by the radiologists using the standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. The CAD scheme first segmented 3-D tumor volumes from the background using a hybrid tumor segmentation scheme. Then, for each segmented tumor, CAD computed three quantitative image features including the change of tumor volume, tumor CT number (density) and density variance. The feature changes were calculated between the matched tumors tracked on the CT images acquired pre- and post-treatments. Finally, CAD predicted patient's 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) using a decision-tree based classifier. The performance of the CAD scheme was compared with the RECIST category. The result shows that the CAD scheme achieved a prediction accuracy of 76.7% (23/30 cases) with a Kappa coefficient of 0.493, which is significantly higher than the performance of RECIST prediction with a prediction accuracy and Kappa coefficient of 60% (17/30) and 0.062, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing quantitative image features to improve the early predicting accuracy of the tumor response to the new testing drugs or therapeutic methods for the ovarian cancer patients.

  7. Development of an Immunosensor Based on Layered Double Hydroxides for MMR Cancer Biomarker Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, M; Soussou, A; Idoudi, F; Cohen-Bouhacina, T; Bouhaouala-Zahar, B; Baccar, Z M

    2015-10-01

    As a potential biomarker for the investigation of cancer inflammatory profiles, macrophage mannose receptor (MMR, CD206) is herein selected to develop an immunosensor based on layered double hydroxide (LDH). Like an endocyte C-type lectin receptor, MMR plays an important role in immune homeostasis by scavenging unwanted mannose glycoproteins. It attracts a progressive attention thanks to its particularly high expression within the tumor microenvironment. There is a great of interest to develop an immunosensor based on an antibody specific to MMR for detection of stroma versus tumor cells. In this work, we studied the feasibility of high sensitive MMR cancer Screen Printed Electrode (SPE) immunosensor. Working electrode of commercialized SPE was modified by immobilization of specific antibody (anti-MMR) into thin layer of LDH nanomaterials. Structural, morphological, and surface properties of LDHs were studied by X-Ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and Infrared spectroscopy in ATR. Cyclic Voltammetry technique was used to study interaction between the human recombinant MMR protein (rHu-MMR, NSO derived) and an immobilized antibody into developed immunosensor. High specific response of -11.72 μA/ng.mL(-1) (with a correlation coefficient of R(2)=0.994 ) were obtained in linear range of 0.05 ng/mL to 10.0 ng/mL of specific recombinant antigen. The limit of detection (LOD) was less than 15.0 pg/mL. From these attractive results, the feasibility of an electrochemical immunosensor for cancer was proved. Additional experiments to study stability and reproducibility the immunosensor should be completed in perspective to use these anti-MMR based immunosensors for sensing human MMR in patient biopsies and sera. PMID:26316191

  8. PVT1 Exon 9: A Potential Biomarker of Aggressive Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilboudo, Adeodat; Chouhan, Jyoti; McNeil, Brian K.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the greatest source of cancer-related mortality in males of African ancestry (MoAA). Interestingly, this has been shown to be associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms around regions 2 and 3 of the 8q24 human chromosomal region. The non-protein coding gene locus Plasmacytoma Variant Translocation 1 (PVT1) is located at 8q24 and is overexpressed in PCa and, therefore, is also a candidate biomarker to explain the well-known disparity in this group. PVT1 has at least 12 exons that make separate transcripts which may have different functions, all of which are at present unknown in PCa. Our aim was to determine if any PVT1 transcripts play a role in aggressiveness and racial disparity in PCa. We used a panel of seven PCa cell lines including three derived from MoAA. Ribonucleic acid extraction, complementary deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed to evaluate expression of all 12 PVT1 exons. Each qPCR was performed in quadruplicates. At least four separate qPCR experiments were performed. Expression of PVT1 exons was inconsistent except for exon 9. There was no significant difference in exon 9 expression between cell lines derived from Caucasian males (CM), and an indolent cell line derived from MoAA. However, exon 9 expression in the aggressive MDA PCa 2b and E006AA-hT cell lines derived from MoAA was significantly higher than in other cell lines. Consequently, we observed differential expression of exon 9 of PVT1 in a manner that suggests that PVT1 exon 9 may be associated with aggressive PCa in MoAA. PMID:26703666

  9. PVT1 Exon 9: A Potential Biomarker of Aggressive Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilboudo, Adeodat; Chouhan, Jyoti; McNeil, Brian K; Osborne, Joseph R; Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the greatest source of cancer-related mortality in males of African ancestry (MoAA). Interestingly, this has been shown to be associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms around regions 2 and 3 of the 8q24 human chromosomal region. The non-protein coding gene locus Plasmacytoma Variant Translocation 1 (PVT1) is located at 8q24 and is overexpressed in PCa and, therefore, is also a candidate biomarker to explain the well-known disparity in this group. PVT1 has at least 12 exons that make separate transcripts which may have different functions, all of which are at present unknown in PCa. Our aim was to determine if any PVT1 transcripts play a role in aggressiveness and racial disparity in PCa. We used a panel of seven PCa cell lines including three derived from MoAA. Ribonucleic acid extraction, complementary deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed to evaluate expression of all 12 PVT1 exons. Each qPCR was performed in quadruplicates. At least four separate qPCR experiments were performed. Expression of PVT1 exons was inconsistent except for exon 9. There was no significant difference in exon 9 expression between cell lines derived from Caucasian males (CM), and an indolent cell line derived from MoAA. However, exon 9 expression in the aggressive MDA PCa 2b and E006AA-hT cell lines derived from MoAA was significantly higher than in other cell lines. Consequently, we observed differential expression of exon 9 of PVT1 in a manner that suggests that PVT1 exon 9 may be associated with aggressive PCa in MoAA. PMID:26703666

  10. Validation of Novel Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Progression by the Combination of Bioinformatics, Clinical and Functional Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Riina-Minna; Mattsson, Jesse; Li, Yifeng; Tallgrén, Terhi; Tong Ochoa, Natalia; Bjartell, Anders; Åkerfelt, Malin; Taimen, Pekka; Boström, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The identification and validation of biomarkers for clinical applications remains an important issue for improving diagnostics and therapy in many diseases, including prostate cancer. Gene expression profiles are routinely applied to identify diagnostic and predictive biomarkers or novel targets for cancer. However, only few predictive markers identified in silico have also been validated for clinical, functional or mechanistic relevance in disease progression. In this study, we have used a broad, bioinformatics-based approach to identify such biomarkers across a spectrum of progression stages, including normal and tumor-adjacent, premalignant, primary and late stage lesions. Bioinformatics data mining combined with clinical validation of biomarkers by sensitive, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), followed by functional evaluation of candidate genes in disease-relevant processes, such as cancer cell proliferation, motility and invasion. From 300 initial candidates, eight genes were selected for validation by several layers of data mining and filtering. For clinical validation, differential mRNA expression of selected genes was measured by qRT-PCR in 197 clinical prostate tissue samples including normal prostate, compared against histologically benign and cancerous tissues. Based on the qRT-PCR results, significantly different mRNA expression was confirmed in normal prostate versus malignant PCa samples (for all eight genes), but also in cancer-adjacent tissues, even in the absence of detectable cancer cells, thus pointing to the possibility of pronounced field effects in prostate lesions. For the validation of the functional properties of these genes, and to demonstrate their putative relevance for disease-relevant processes, siRNA knock-down studies were performed in both 2D and 3D organotypic cell culture models. Silencing of three genes (DLX1, PLA2G7 and RHOU) in the prostate cancer cell lines PC3 and VCaP by siRNA resulted in marked growth arrest

  11. Blood biomarkers are helpful in the prediction of response to chemoradiation in rectal cancer: A prospective, hypothesis driven study on patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/objective: Chemoradiation (CRT) has been shown to lead to downsizing of an important portion of rectal cancers. In order to tailor treatment at an earlier stage during treatment, predictive models are being developed. Adding blood biomarkers may be attractive for prediction, as they can be collected very easily and determined with excellent reproducibility in clinical practice. The hypothesis of this study was that blood biomarkers related to tumor load, hypoxia and inflammation can help to predict response to CRT in rectal cancer. Material/methods: 295 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were planned to undergo CRT were prospectively entered into a biobank protocol ( (NCT01067872)). Blood samples were drawn before start of CRT. Nine biomarkers were selected, based on a previously defined hypothesis, and measured in a standardized way by a certified lab: CEA, CA19-9, LDH, CRP, IL-6, IL-8, CA IX, osteopontin and 25-OH-vitamin D. Outcome was analyzed in two ways: pCR vs. non-pCR and responders (defined as ypT0-2N0) vs. non-responders (all other ypTN stages). Results: 276 patients could be analyzed. 20.7% developed a pCR and 47.1% were classified as responders. In univariate analysis CEA (p = 0.001) and osteopontin (p = 0.012) were significant predictors for pCR. Taking response as outcome CEA (p < 0.001), IL-8 (p < 0.001) and osteopontin (p = 0.004) were significant predictors. In multivariate analysis CEA was the strongest predictor for pCR (OR 0.92, p = 0.019) and CEA and IL-8 predicted for response (OR 0.97, p = 0.029 and OR 0.94, p = 0.036). The model based on biomarkers only had an AUC of 0.65 for pCR and 0.68 for response; the strongest model included clinical data, PET-data and biomarkers and had an AUC of 0.81 for pCR and 0.78 for response. Conclusion: CEA and IL-8 were identified as predictive biomarkers for tumor response and PCR after CRT in rectal cancer. Incorporation of these blood biomarkers leads to an additional accuracy of

  12. SHOX2 DNA Methylation is a Biomarker for the diagnosis of lung cancer based on bronchial aspirates

    OpenAIRE

    Liloglou Triantafillos; Wille Ulrike; Weickmann Sabine; Tetzner Reimo; Distler Jürgen; Lewin Jörn; Seemann Stefanie; Flemming Nadja; Seegebarth Anke; Schlegel Thomas; Kneip Christoph; Dietrich Dimo; Liebenberg Volker; Schmidt Bernd; Raji Olaide

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed to show that SHOX2 DNA methylation is a tumor marker in patients with suspected lung cancer by using bronchial fluid aspirated during bronchoscopy. Such a biomarker would be clinically valuable, especially when, following the first bronchoscopy, a final diagnosis cannot be established by histology or cytology. A test with a low false positive rate can reduce the need for further invasive and costly procedures and ensure early treatment. Methods Marker disc...

  13. A Comprehensive Workflow of Mass Spectrometry-Based Untargeted Metabolomics in Cancer Metabolic Biomarker Discovery Using Human Plasma and Urine

    OpenAIRE

    Jianwen She; Wei Zou; Vladimir V. Tolstikov

    2013-01-01

    Current available biomarkers lack sensitivity and/or specificity for early detection of cancer. To address this challenge, a robust and complete workflow for metabolic profiling and data mining is described in details. Three independent and complementary analytical techniques for metabolic profiling are applied: hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC–LC), reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP–LC), and gas chromatography (GC). All three techniques are coupled to a mass spectro...

  14. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Lung Cancer Biomarker Using Nanoporous Biosensor Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Coupled with Interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Sung Lee; Sae-Wan Kim; Eun-Yoon Jang; Byoung-Ho Kang; Sang-Won Lee; Gopalan Sai-Anand; Seung-Ha Lee; Dae-Hyuk Kwon; Shin-Won Kang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a nanobiosensor to evaluate a lung cancer-specific biomarker. The nanobiosensor is based on an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) chip and functions on the principles of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and interferometry. The pore-depth of the fabricated nanoporous AAO chip was 1 µm and was obtained using a two-step electrochemical anodization process. The sensor chip is sensitive to the refractive index (RI) changes of the surrounding medium and also provides simple and label-...

  15. Multi-level evidence that circulating CK18 is a biomarker of tumour burden in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Greystoke, A; Dean, E; Saunders, M P; Cummings, J; Hughes, A; Ranson, M; Dive, C; Renehan, A G

    2012-01-01

    Background: Circulating total cytokeratin 18 (tCK18) and/or caspase cleaved cytokeratin 18 (cCK18) (measured by M65 and M30 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), respectively) are used as pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarkers of epithelial cell death in clinical trials. Having validated these ELISAs, we assessed their utility in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: We applied the assays in several settings: 53 controls; 97 patients undergoing surgery and 74 patients with metastatic CRC undergoi...

  16. Consensus and differences in primary radiotherapy for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer in Switzerland. A survey on patterns of practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT), with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is an established treatment option for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Despite high-level evidence from several randomized trials, risk group stratification and treatment recommendations vary due to contradictory or inconclusive data, particularly with regard to EBRT dose prescription and ADT duration. Our aim was to investigate current patterns of practice in primary EBRT for prostate cancer in Switzerland. Treatment recommendations on EBRT and ADT for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer were collected from 23 Swiss radiation oncology centers. Written recommendations were converted into center-specific decision trees, and analyzed for consensus and differences using a dedicated software tool. Additionally, specific radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques from the participating centers were assessed. The most commonly prescribed radiation dose was 78 Gy (range 70-80 Gy) across all risk groups. ADT was recommended for intermediate-risk patients for 6 months in over 80 % of the centers, and for high-risk patients for 2 or 3 years in over 90 % of centers. For recommendations on combined EBRT and ADT treatment, consensus levels did not exceed 39 % in any clinical scenario. Arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is implemented for routine prostate cancer radiotherapy by 96 % of the centers. Among Swiss radiation oncology centers, considerable ranges of radiotherapy dose and ADT duration are routinely offered for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer. In the vast majority of cases, doses and durations are within the range of those described in current evidence-based guidelines. (orig.)

  17. Tumor M2-pyruvate kinase in stool as a biomarker for diagnosis of colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Xi Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the diagnosis value of tumor M2-pyruvate kinase (M2-PK in stool as a biomarker for diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Materials and Methods: By searching the databases of Cochrane Library, PubMed, China national knowledge Information and Wanfang, the diagnosis study related to tumor M2-PK in stool as a biomarker for diagnosis of colorectal cancer were screened and included in this study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (+LR, negative likelihood ratio (−LR and the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC were calculated by stata 11.0 software. Results: According to the including criteria, 14 trials including 1990 subjects were finally included in this meta-analysis. The pooled diagnosis sensitivity, specificity, +LR, −LR and area under curve were 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74-0.81, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.76-0.79, 4.38 (95% CI: 3.27-5.88, 0.28 (95% CI: 0.23-0.34 and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.834-0.89. No statistical publication bias was found in this study. Conclusion: Tumor M2-PK in stool can be a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer with relative high sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Lung Cancer Biomarker Using Nanoporous Biosensor Based on Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Coupled with Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Sung Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a nanobiosensor to evaluate a lung cancer-specific biomarker. The nanobiosensor is based on an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO chip and functions on the principles of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR and interferometry. The pore-depth of the fabricated nanoporous AAO chip was 1 µm and was obtained using a two-step electrochemical anodization process. The sensor chip is sensitive to the refractive index (RI changes of the surrounding medium and also provides simple and label-free detection when specific antibodies are immobilized on the gold-deposited surface of the AAO chip. In order to confirm the effectiveness of the sensor, the antibodies were immobilized on the surface of the AAO chip, and the lung cancer-specific biomarker was applied atop of the immobilized-antibody layer using the self-assembled monolayer method. The nanoporous AAO chip was used as a sensor system to detect serum amyloid A1, which is a lung cancer-specific biomarker. The specific reaction of the antigen-antibody contributes to the change in the RI. This in turn causes a shift in the resonance spectrum in the refractive interference pattern. The limit of detection (LOD was found to be 100 ag/mL and the biosensor had high sensitivity over a wide concentration range.

  19. miR-196, an Emerging Cancer Biomarker for Digestive Tract Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Ya-Ching; Chang, Joseph T; Chan, Err-Cheng; Chao, Yin-Kai; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of microRNA (miRNA) research has firmly established this molecular family as a key component in cells. MiRNAs, which function as negative gene regulators, participate in multiple biological processes and maintain homeostasis in cells. The dysregulation of miRNA may contribute to numerous human disorders, including cancer. Recently, miR-196 was found to be aberrantly expressed in a wide range of malignant diseases, which suggests that it plays important role...

  20. Optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling provides novel biomarker assessment of clinical prostate and breast cancer biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedele Vita

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs are mechanistically involved in the development of various human malignancies, suggesting that they represent a promising new class of cancer biomarkers. However, previously reported methods for measuring miRNA expression consume large amounts of tissue, prohibiting high-throughput miRNA profiling from typically small clinical samples such as excision or core needle biopsies of breast or prostate cancer. Here we describe a novel combination of linear amplification and labeling of miRNA for highly sensitive expression microarray profiling requiring only picogram quantities of purified microRNA. Results Comparison of microarray and qRT-PCR measured miRNA levels from two different prostate cancer cell lines showed concordance between the two platforms (Pearson correlation R2 = 0.81; and extension of the amplification, labeling and microarray platform was successfully demonstrated using clinical core and excision biopsy samples from breast and prostate cancer patients. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the prostate biopsy microarrays separated advanced and metastatic prostate cancers from pooled normal prostatic samples and from a non-malignant precursor lesion. Unsupervised clustering of the breast cancer microarrays significantly distinguished ErbB2-positive/ER-negative, ErbB2-positive/ER-positive, and ErbB2-negative/ER-positive breast cancer phenotypes (Fisher exact test, p = 0.03; as well, supervised analysis of these microarray profiles identified distinct miRNA subsets distinguishing ErbB2-positive from ErbB2-negative and ER-positive from ER-negative breast cancers, independent of other clinically important parameters (patient age; tumor size, node status and proliferation index. Conclusion In sum, these findings demonstrate that optimized high-throughput microRNA expression profiling offers novel biomarker identification from typically small clinical samples such as breast

  1. Evaluation of miR-21 and miR-375 as prognostic biomarkers in esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Mette; Alsner, Jan; Tramm, Trine;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been associated with prognosis in esophageal cancer, suggesting a role for miRNAs to help guide treatment decisions. Especially, miR-21 and miR-375 have been investigated as prognostic biomarkers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic potential of...... miR-21 and miR-375 in primary esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) and esophagogastric adenocarcinomas (EAC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pre-therapeutic tumor specimens from 195 patients with loco-regional esophageal cancer treated with neoadjuvant or definitive chemoradiotherapy or perioperative...

  2. Nomograms for predicting prognostic value of inflammatory biomarkers in colorectal cancer patients after radical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqi; Jia, Huixun; Yu, Wencheng; Xu, Ye; Li, Xinxiang; Li, Qingguo; Cai, Sanjun

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that inflammation plays a vital role in tumorigenesis and progression. However, the prognostic value of inflammatory biomarkers in colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been established. In this study, a retrospective analysis was conducted in patients with CRC in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center (FUSCC) between April 1, 2007 and April 30, 2014, and 5,336 patients were identified eligible. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR), and albumin/globulin ratio (AGR) were analyzed. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Cox regression analysis was performed to assess the prognostic factors. Nomograms were established to predict OS and DFS, and Harrell's concordance index (c-index) was adopted to evaluate prediction accuracy. As results, the 5-year OS was 79.2% and the 5-year DFS was 56.0% in the cohort. Patients were stratified into 2 groups by NLR (≤2.72 and >2.72), PLR (≤219.00 and >219.00), LMR (≤2.83 and >2.83) and AGR ( 2.72, PLR > 219.00, LMR ≤ 2.83 and AGR nomograms on OS and DFS were established according to all significant factors, and c-indexes were 0.765 (95% CI: 0.744-0.785) and 0.735 (95% CI: 0.721-0.749), respectively. Nomograms based on OS and DFS can be recommended as practical models to evaluate prognosis for CRC patients. PMID:26933932

  3. ERCC1 as a biomarker for bladder cancer patients likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of adjuvant chemotherapy and the value of molecular biomarkers in bladder cancer have not been determined. We aimed to assess the predictive and prognostic values of excision repair cross-complementation 1 (ERCC1) in identifying appropriate patients who may potentially benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer. A retrospective analysis was performed on 93 patients with completely resected transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. ERCC1 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. ERCC1 expression was analyzed in 57 patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy and 36 who were not treated. Among 93 patients, ERCC1 expression was positive in 54 (58.1%) and negative in 39 (41.9%). ERCC1 positivity was significantly associated with longer survival (adjusted hazard ratio for death, 0.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.014-0.99; P = 0.049) in the group without adjuvant chemotherapy while ERCC1 positivity was associated with shorter survival among patients who have received adjuvant chemotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio for death, 2.64; 95% CI 1.01-6.85; P = 0.047). Therefore, clinical benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with ERCC1 negativity as measured by overall survival (test for interaction, P = 0.034) and by disease-free survival (test for interaction, P = 0.20). Among patients with completely resected transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, those with ERCC1-negative tumors seemed to benefit more from adjuvant gemcitabine plus cisplatin chemotherapy than those with ERCC1-positive tumors. Future prospective, randomized studies are warranted to confirm our findings

  4. miR-1207-3p Is a Novel Prognostic Biomarker of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dibash K; Osborne, Joseph R; Lin, Hui-Yi; Park, Jong Y; Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be dysregulated in prostate cancer (PCa). In this study, we investigated if miR-1207-3p is capable of distinguishing between indolent and aggressive PCa and if it contributes to explaining the disproportionate aggressiveness of PCa in men of African ancestry (moAA). A total of 404 patients with primary adenocarcinoma of the prostate were recruited between 1988 and 2003 at the Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. Patient clinicopathological features and demographic characteristics such as race were identified. RNA samples from 404 postprostatectomy prostate tumor tissue samples were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the mRNA expression of miR-1207-3p. miR-1207-3p expression in PCa that resulted in overall death or PCa-specific death is significantly higher than in PCa cases that did not. The same positive correlation holds true for other clinical characteristics such as biochemical recurrence, Gleason score, clinical stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. Furthermore, miR-1207-3p expression was significantly less in moAA in comparison to Caucasian men. We also evaluated whether miR-1207-3p is associated with clinical outcomes adjusted for age at diagnosis and tumor stage in the modeling. Using competing risk regression, the PCa patients with a high miR-1207-3p expression (≥6 vs 3) had a high risk to develop PCa recurrence (hazard rate = 2.5, P < .001) adjusting for age at diagnosis and tumor stage. In conclusion, miR-1207-3p is a promising novel prognostic biomarker for PCa. Furthermore, miR-1207-3p may also be important in explaining the disproportionate aggressiveness of PCa in moAA. PMID:27267842

  5. p21 promotes oncolytic adenoviral activity in ovarian cancer and is a potential biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockley Michelle

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 replicates selectively within and lyses cells with a dysregulated Rb pathway, a finding seen in > 90% human cancers. dl922-947 is more potent than wild type adenovirus and the E1B-deletion mutant dl1520 (Onyx-015. We wished to determine which host cell factors influence cytotoxicity. SV40 large T-transformed MRC5-VA cells are 3-logs more sensitive to dl922-947 than isogenic parental MRC5 cells, confirming that an abnormal G1/S checkpoint increases viral efficacy. The sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to dl922-947 varied widely: IC50 values ranged from 51 (SKOV3ip1 to 0.03 pfu/cell (TOV21G. Cells sensitive to dl922-947 had higher S phase populations and supported earlier E1A expression. Cytotoxicity correlated poorly with both infectivity and replication, but well with expression of p21 by microarray and western blot analyses. Matched p21+/+ and -/- Hct116 cells confirmed that p21 influences dl922-947 activity in vitro and in vivo. siRNA-mediated p21 knockdown in sensitive TOV21G cells decreases E1A expression and viral cytotoxicity, whilst expression of p21 in resistant A2780CP cells increases virus activity in vitro and in intraperitoneal xenografts. These results highlight that host cell factors beyond simple infectivity can influence the efficacy of oncolytic adenoviruses. p21 expression may be an important biomarker of response in clinical trials.

  6. Electrochemical Sandwich Immunoassay for the Ultrasensitive Detection of Human MUC1 Cancer Biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Taleat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new electrochemical sandwich immunoassay for the ultrasensitive detection of human MUC1 cancer biomarker using protein G-functionalized magnetic beads (MBs and graphite-based screen-printed electrodes (SPEs was developed. Magnetic beads were employed as the platforms for the immobilization and immunoreaction process. A pair of primary and secondary antibodies was used to capture the MUC1 protein. After labeling with a third antibody conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP, the resulting conjugate was trapped at the surface of the graphite-based SPEs and MUC1 determination was carried out by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV at 0.4 V upon H2O2 addition using acetaminophen (APAP as the redox mediator. A linear relationship was obtained for the detection of human MUC1 over a range of 0–25 ppb with the lowest detection limit of 1.34 ppb when HRP was applied as a label. Preliminary experiments were performed using disposable electrochemical sensors in order to optimize some parameters (i.e., incubation times, concentrations, and blocking agent.

  7. Multiplexed detection of lung cancer biomarkers based on quantum dots and microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Simin; Liu, Lifen; Li, Gong; Jing, Fengxiang; Mao, Hongju; Jin, Qinghui; Zhai, Wanyin; Zhang, Hongfeng; Zhao, Jianlong; Jia, Chunping

    2016-08-15

    We have developed a multiplexed fluoroimmunoassay of three lung cancer biomarkers based on multicolor quantum dots (QDs) as detection elements and micro-magnetic beads as immune carriers. QDs have the ability to simplify multiplexed analysis. In our method, the fluorescent signals derived from three cross-talk-free QD conjugated probes with emission maxima at 525, 585 and 625nm could be analyzed to determine the concentrations of the target proteins. With this system, fragments of cytokeratin 19 (CYRFA 21-1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), were simultaneously detected in a single sample with a low detection limit down to the 1.0ng/mL level (364pg/mL for CYRFA 21-1, 38pg/mL for CEA, 370pg/mL for NSE in a single detection). Additional advantages of the presented method include ease of operation, low cost, and a very low sample volume (20µL). PMID:27260434

  8. Computer-assisted immunohistochemical analysis of cervical cancer biomarkers using low-cost and simple software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Luciano Serpa; Korte, Jeffrey E; Tekmal, Rajeshwar Rao; Naud, Paulo; Edelweiss, Maria Isabel; Valente, Philip T; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Kirma, Nameer; Cunha-Filho, João Sabino

    2007-12-01

    The study of biomarkers by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for cervical cancer and intraepithelial lesions is a promising field. However, manual interpretation of IHC and reproducibility of the scoring systems can be highly subjective. In this article, we present a novel and simple computer-assisted IHC interpretation method based on cyan-magenta-yellow-black (CMYK) color format, for tissues with diaminobenzidine cytoplasmatic staining counterstained with methyl green. This novel method is more easily interpreted than previous computer-assisted methods based on red-green-blue (RGB) color format and presents a strong correlation with the manual H-score. It is simple, objective, and requires only low-cost software and minimal computer skills. Briefly, a total of 67 microscopic images of cervical carcinoma, normal cervix, and negative controls were analyzed in Corel Photo Paint X3 software in CMYK and RGB color format, and compared with manual H-score IHC assessments. The clearest and best positive correlation with the H-score was obtained using the image in CMYK color format and crude values of magenta color (Spearman correlation coefficient=0.84; agreement of 93.33%, PCMYK format, select the area of interest for analysis, and open the color histogram tool to visualize the magenta value. PMID:18091391

  9. A reusable electrochemical immunosensor fabricated using a temperature-responsive polymer for cancer biomarker proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wooyoung; Lee, Sooyeon; Jae Kim, Eun; Lee, Maria; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-04-15

    In the present study, we describe a reusable electrochemical immunosensor for the repeated detection of cancer biomarkers using a single platform. The integration of a temperature-responsive polymer on the electrode surface enables easy manipulation of the biological sensing interface (i.e., addition of biotin, streptavidin, and antibody), thus allowing for temperature-induced regeneration and disruption of the interface architecture of the electrode surface. Using our immunosensor, we demonstrate sequential amperometric detection of three tumor markers: CA125, CEA, and PSA. Interestingly, greatly amplified signals are achieved by immersing the immunosensor in a solution of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody-labeled nanoparticles, resulting in a linear range of 0.0064 to 256 U/mL, 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL, and 10 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.007 U/mL, 0.7 pg/mL, and 0.9 pg/mL for CA125, CEA, and PSA, respectively. By alternating temperature, the immunosensor adsorbs and desorbs the biological elements without damage. Our proposed methodology can be expanded to measure other relevant biological species by repeated detection and thus has enormous potential for industrial and clinical applications. PMID:26606310

  10. Immunoprofiles of 11 Biomarkers Using Tissue Microarrays Identify Prognostic Subgroups in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Knösel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND, AIMS: Genomewide expression profiling has identified a number of genes expressed at higher levels in colorectal cancer (CRC than in normal tissues. Our objectives in this study were: 1 to test whether genes were also distinct on the protein level; 2 to evaluate these biomarkers in a series of well-characterized CRCs;, 3 to apply hierarchical cluster analysis to the immunohistochemical data. METHODS: Tissue microarrays (TMAs comprising 351 CRC specimens from 270 patients were constructed to evaluate the genes Adam10, CyclinD1, Annexinll, NFKB, Casein-kinase-2-beta (CK2B, YB-1, P32, Rad51, c-fos, IGFBP4, Connexin26 (Cx26. In total, 3,797 samples were analyzed. RESULTS: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering discovered subgroups of CRC that differed by tumor stage, survival. KaplanMeier analysis showed that reduced Cx26 expression was significantly associated with shorter patient survival, higher tumor grade (G1/G2vs G3, P = .02, Adam10 expression with a higher tumor stage (pT1/2vs pT3/4, P = .04. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights the potential of TMAs for a higher-dimensional analysis by evaluating serial sections of the same tissue core (three-dimensional TMA analysis. In addition, it endorses the use of immunohistochemistry supplemented by hierarchical clustering for the identification of tumor subgroups with diagnostic, prognostic signatures.

  11. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan; Claesson, Mogens; Nielsen, Hans; Rosenberg, Jacob

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction of......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....... responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior to...

  12. Changes in cytokine and biomarker blood levels in patients with colorectal cancer during dendritic cell-based vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Nielsen, Hans J; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Immunotherapy based on dendritic cell vaccination has exciting perspectives for treatment of cancer. In order to clarify immunological mechanisms during vaccination it is essential with intensive monitoring of the responses. This may lead to optimization of treatment and prediction of......-inflammatory cytokines in serum of patients who achieved stable disease following vaccination suggest the occurrence of vaccine-induced Th1 responses. Since Th1 responses seem to be essential in cancer immunotherapy this may indicate a therapeutic potential of the vaccine....... responding patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytokine and biomarker responses in patients with colorectal cancer treated with a cancer vaccine based on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogeneic melanoma cell lysate. Material and methods. Plasma and serum samples were collected prior to...

  13. Acute skin toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy or EGFR inhibitors: Literature review and consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russi, Elvio G; Moretto, Francesco; Rampino, Monica; Benasso, Marco; Bacigalupo, Almalina; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Numico, Gianmauro; Bossi, Paolo; Buglione, Michela; Lombardo, Antonino; Airoldi, Mario; Merlano, Marco C; Licitra, Lisa; Denaro, Nerina; Pergolizzi, Stefano; Pinto, Carmine; Bensadoun, Renè-Jean; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2015-10-01

    The adverse effects of radiation therapy, often integrated with chemotherapy and/or targeted therapies, on the skin include severe acute and chronic dermatitis associated with pain, discomfort, itching, and burning, and may heavily affect patients' quality of life. The management of these skin adverse effects in head and neck cancer patients (HNCPs) are very heterogeneous due to the lack of shared rigorous classification systems and evidence based treatments. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of dermatitis in HNCPs treated with radiotherapy with or without systemic therapies in order to improve skin toxicity management. The Delphi Appropriateness Method was used. External expert reviewers then evaluated the conclusions carefully according to their area of expertise. This paper offers contains seven clusters of statements about the management of dermatitis in HNCPs and a review of recent literature on these topics. PMID:26187236

  14. Identification of biomarkers for radiation-induced acute intestinal symptoms (RIAISs) in cervical cancer patients by serum protein profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced acute intestinal symptoms (RIAISs) are the most frequent complication of radiotherapy that causes great pain and limits the treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to identify serum biomarkers of RIAISs in cervical cancer patients by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). Serum samples were collected from 66 cervical cancer patients prior to pelvic radiotherapy. In our study, RIAISs occurred in 11 patients. An additional 11 patients without RIAISs were selected as controls, whose age, stage, histological type and treatment methods were matched to RIAISs patients. The 22 sera were subsequently analyzed by SELDI-TOF MS, and the resulting protein profiles were evaluated to identify biomarkers using appropriate bioinformatics tools. Comparing the protein profiles of serum samples from the RIAIS group and the control group, it was found that 22 protein peaks were significantly different (P < 0.05), and six of these peaks with mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios of 7514.9, 4603.94, 6887.41, 2769.21, 3839.72 and 4215.7 were successfully identified. A decision tree model of biomarkers was constructed based on three biomarkers (m/z 1270.88, 1503.23 and 7514.90), which separated RIAIS-affected patients from the control group with an accuracy of 81%. This study suggests that serum proteomic analysis by SELDI-TOF MS can identify cervical cancer patients that are susceptible to RIAISs prior to pelvic radiotherapy. (author)

  15. Influence of Long-Distance Bicycle Riding on Serum/Urinary Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we present a study focused on the determination of the influence of long-distance (53 km bicycle riding on levels of chosen biochemical urinary and serum prostate cancer (PCa biomarkers total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA, free PSA (fPSA and sarcosine. Fourteen healthy participants with no evidence of prostate diseases, in the age range from 49–57 years with a median of 52 years, underwent physical exercise (mean race time of 150 ± 20 min, elevation increase of 472 m and pre- and post-ride blood/urine sampling. It was found that bicycle riding resulted in elevated serum uric acid (p = 0.001, median 271.76 vs. 308.44 µmol/L pre- and post-ride, respectively, lactate (p = 0.01, median 2.98 vs. 4.8 mmol/L and C-reactive protein (p = 0.01, 0.0–0.01 mg/L. It is noteworthy that our work supports the studies demonstrating an increased PSA after mechanical manipulation of the prostate. The subjects exhibited either significantly higher post-ride tPSA (p = 0.002, median 0.69 vs. 1.1 ng/mL pre- and post-ride, respectively and fPSA (p = 0.028, median 0.25 vs. 0.35 ng/mL. Contrary to that, sarcosine levels were not significantly affected by physical exercise (p = 0.20, median 1.64 vs. 1.92 µmol/mL for serum sarcosine, and p = 0.15, median 0.02 µmol/mmol of creatinine vs. 0.01 µmol/mmol of creatinine for urinary sarcosine. Taken together, our pilot study provides the first evidence that the potential biomarker of PCa—sarcosine does not have a drawback by means of a bicycle riding-induced false positivity, as was shown in the case of PSA.

  16. Influence of Long-Distance Bicycle Riding on Serum/Urinary Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Zbynek; Gumulec, Jaromir; Ondrak, Ales; Skoda, Jan; Zitka, Zdenek; Cernei, Natalia; Masarik, Michal; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we present a study focused on the determination of the influence of long-distance (53 km) bicycle riding on levels of chosen biochemical urinary and serum prostate cancer (PCa) biomarkers total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA) and sarcosine. Fourteen healthy participants with no evidence of prostate diseases, in the age range from 49-57 years with a median of 52 years, underwent physical exercise (mean race time of 150 ± 20 min, elevation increase of 472 m) and pre- and post-ride blood/urine sampling. It was found that bicycle riding resulted in elevated serum uric acid (p = 0.001, median 271.76 vs. 308.44 µmol/L pre- and post-ride, respectively), lactate (p = 0.01, median 2.98 vs. 4.8 mmol/L) and C-reactive protein (p = 0.01, 0.0-0.01 mg/L). It is noteworthy that our work supports the studies demonstrating an increased PSA after mechanical manipulation of the prostate. The subjects exhibited either significantly higher post-ride tPSA (p = 0.002, median 0.69 vs. 1.1 ng/mL pre- and post-ride, respectively) and fPSA (p = 0.028, median 0.25 vs. 0.35 ng/mL). Contrary to that, sarcosine levels were not significantly affected by physical exercise (p = 0.20, median 1.64 vs. 1.92 µmol/mL for serum sarcosine, and p = 0.15, median 0.02 µmol/mmol of creatinine vs. 0.01 µmol/mmol of creatinine for urinary sarcosine). Taken together, our pilot study provides the first evidence that the potential biomarker of PCa-sarcosine does not have a drawback by means of a bicycle riding-induced false positivity, as was shown in the case of PSA. PMID:26999116

  17. Identification of Novel Biomarkers for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Using Angiogenesis-Antibody Array and Intracellular Signaling Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyung Chung

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the three leading causes for cancer mortality. CRC kills over 600,000 people annually worldwide. The most common cause of death from CRC is the metastasis to distant organs. However, biomarkers for CRC metastasis remain ill-defined. We compared primary and metastatic CRC cell lines for their angiogenesis-protein profiles and intracellular signaling profiles to identify novel biomarkers for CRC metastasis. To this end, we used primary and metastatic CRC cell lines as a model system and normal human colon cell line as a control. The angiogenesis profiles two isogenic CRC cell lines, SW480 and SW620, and HT-29 and T84 revealed that VEGF was upregulated in both SW620 and T84 whereas coagulation factor III, IGFBP-3, DPP IV, PDGF AA/AB, endothelin I and CXCL16 were downregulated specifically in metastatic cell lines. Furthermore, we found that TIMP-1, amphiregulin, endostatin, angiogenin were upregulated in SW620 whereas downregulated in T84. Angiogenin was downregulated in T84 and GM-CSF was also downregulated in SW620. To induce CRC cell metastasis, we treated cells with pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Upon IL-6 treatment, epithelial-mesenchymal transition was induced in CRC cells. When DLD-1 and HT-29 cells were treated with IL-6; Akt, STAT3, AMPKα and Bad phosphorylation levels were increased. Interestingly, SW620 showed the same signal activation pattern with IL-6 treatment of HT-29 and DLD-1. Our data suggest that Akt, STAT3, AMPKα and Bad activation can be biomarkers for metastatic colorectal cancer. IL-6 treatment specifically reduced phosphorylation levels of EGFR, HER2 receptor, Insulin R and IGF-1R in receptor tyrosine kinase array study with HT-29. Taken together, we have identified novel biomarkers for metastatic CRC through the angiogenesis-antibody array and intracellular signaling array studies. Present study suggests that those novel biomarkers can be used as CRC prognosis biomarkers, and as

  18. Identification of Gene Biomarkers for Distinguishing Small-Cell Lung Cancer from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using a Network-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer consists of two main subtypes: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC that are classified according to their physiological phenotypes. In this study, we have developed a network-based approach to identify molecular biomarkers that can distinguish SCLC from NSCLC. By identifying positive and negative coexpression gene pairs in normal lung tissues, SCLC, or NSCLC samples and using functional association information from the STRING network, we first construct a lung cancer-specific gene association network. From the network, we obtain gene modules in which genes are highly functionally associated with each other and are either positively or negatively coexpressed in the three conditions. Then, we identify gene modules that not only are differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples, but also show distinctive expression patterns between SCLC and NSCLC. Finally, we select genes inside those modules with discriminating coexpression patterns between the two lung cancer subtypes and predict them as candidate biomarkers that are of diagnostic use.

  19. A Comprehensive Workflow of Mass Spectrometry-Based Untargeted Metabolomics in Cancer Metabolic Biomarker Discovery Using Human Plasma and Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwen She

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Current available biomarkers lack sensitivity and/or specificity for early detection of cancer. To address this challenge, a robust and complete workflow for metabolic profiling and data mining is described in details. Three independent and complementary analytical techniques for metabolic profiling are applied: hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC–LC, reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP–LC, and gas chromatography (GC. All three techniques are coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS in the full scan acquisition mode, and both unsupervised and supervised methods are used for data mining. The univariate and multivariate feature selection are used to determine subsets of potentially discriminative predictors. These predictors are further identified by obtaining accurate masses and isotopic ratios using selected ion monitoring (SIM and data-dependent MS/MS and/or accurate mass MSn ion tree scans utilizing high resolution MS. A list combining all of the identified potential biomarkers generated from different platforms and algorithms is used for pathway analysis. Such a workflow combining comprehensive metabolic profiling and advanced data mining techniques may provide a powerful approach for metabolic pathway analysis and biomarker discovery in cancer research. Two case studies with previous published data are adapted and included in the context to elucidate the application of the workflow.

  20. The correlation between the astro consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The ASTRO Consensus Panel on PSA After Radiation Therapy recently recommended a definition of biochemical failure (BF) following treatment of prostate cancer with radiation therapy. We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the Consensus Panel definition correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease free survival (DFS), cause specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC) rates for a large group of patients from the PSA era. Methods And Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 653 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Of these patients, 568 had a minimum follow-up of 2 years and constitute the study population. The median pre-treatment PSA and Gleason score was 11 ng/ml and 6, respectively. The median dose to the prostate using megavoltage RT was 66.6 Gy (range: 60-70.4 Gy) using a four field or arc technique. No patient received hormonal therapy either prior to, during, or after radiotherapy unless local or distant failure was documented. Pre-treatment and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment PSA after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and first increase in PSA. Five year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Results: Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). The overall 5 year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly better in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p< 0.001). The median time to DM within the BF group was 21 months (range: 2-112 months). When stratifying by pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage, these

  1. Biomarker screening of oral cancer cell lines revealed sub-populations of CD133-, CD44-, CD24- and ALDH1- positive cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC ranks sixth worldwide for cancer-related mortality. For the past several decades the mainstay of treatment for HNSCC has been surgery and external beam radiation, although more recent trials combining chemotherapy and radiation have demonstrated improvements. However, cancer recurrence and treatment failures continue to occur in a significant percentage of patients. Recent advances in tumor biology have led to the discovery that many cancers, including HNSCC, may contain subpopulations of cells with stem cell-like properties that may explain relapse and recurrence. The objective of this study was to screen existing oral cancer cell lines for biomarkers specific for cells with stem cell-like properties. RNA was isolated for RT-PCR screening using primers for specific mRNA of the biomarkers: CD44, CD24, CD133, NANOG, Nestin, ALDH1, and ABCG2 in CAL27, SCC25 and SCC15 cells. This analysis revealed that some oral cancer cell lines (CAL27 and SCC25 may contain small subpopulations of adhesion- and contact-independent cells (AiDC that also express tumor stem cell markers, including CD44, CD133, and CD24. In addition, CAL27 cells also expressed the intracellular tumor stem cell markers, ALDH1 and ABCG2. Isolation and culture of the adhesion- and contact-independent cells from CAL27 and SCC25 populations revealed differential proliferation rates and more robust inhibition by the MEK inhibitor PD98059, as well as the chemotherapeutic agents Cisplatin and Paclitaxel, within the AiDC CAL27 cells. At least one oral cancer cell line (CAL27 contained subpopulations of cells that express specific biomarkers associated with tumor stem cells which were morphologically and phenotypically distinct from other cells within this cell line.

  2. Investigation of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18), lactoferrin and CD163 as potential biomarkers for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ratana; Lappas, Martha; Riley, Clyde;

    2013-01-01

    plasma concentrations of three putative ovarian cancer biomarkers: human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18); lactoferrin; and CD163 in normal healthy women and women with ovarian cancer. METHODS: In this case-control cohort study, ovarian tissue and blood samples were obtained from 164 women (73...

  3. Paired design study by real-time PCR: miR-378* and miR-145 are potent early diagnostic biomarkers of human colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Juan; Xie, Zhengyong; Cheng, Liyang; Zhang, Yuxin; CHEN Junyong; Yu, Hongping; Li, Zehang; Kang, Huixing

    2015-01-01

    Background Although microRNAs offer great potential as cancer biomarkers, effective clinical dignostics and tumor maker have not been verified to diagnose with colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of our study is to systematically assess the expression of miRNAs in matched cancer and normal tissue samples to identify promising diagnostic microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers for CRC. Methods In our study, we examined by Real-Time PCR the expression levels of 96 mature miRNA in 32 CRC patients with diff...

  4. [Consensuses on lung cancer treatment by Chinese medicine experts from Beijing and Guangzhou and medication features in the North and South China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-mei; Lin, Li-zhu; Nie, Hui

    2011-07-01

    To study the consensuses on lung cancer treatment by Chinese medicine experts from North China and South China, and to analyze their medication features from viewpoints such as the medication frequency, combination laws, medication classification by collecting 800 recipes on the treatment of lung cancer patients prescribed by 8 Chinese oncologists from Guanganmen Hospital of China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, the Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Results showed that coix seed, poria, pinelliae tuber were the three herbs most commonly used in treatment of lung cancer by all experts. They generally accepted Pi invigorating and phlegm removing method as the basic treatment method for treating lung cancer. Secondly, they usually used white peony root, heterophylla falsestarwort root, and ophiopogonis tuber, etc. (with higher medication frequency) to nourish yin and moisten Fei. Thirdly, consistency was also shown in clearing heat, detoxication, and anticancer. Smilacis glabra, Rhizoma Smilacis Glabrae, Herba Hedyotis diffusae, Herba Scutellariae Barbatae were herbs used by all experts. However, there were differences between oncologists in North China and South China. Oncologists in South China paid more attention to heat toxin and blood stasis, while those in North China paid more attention to supplementing both qi and yin. PMID:21866673

  5. Implementing an online tool for genome-wide validation of survival-associated biomarkers in ovarian-cancer using microarray data from 1287 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Győrffy, Balázs; Lánczky, András; Szállási, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    ). A Kaplan–Meier survival plot was generated and significance was computed. The tool can be accessed online at www.kmplot.com/ovar. We used this integrative data analysis tool to validate the prognostic power of 37 biomarkers identified in the literature. Of these, CA125 (MUC16; P=3.7x10–5, hazard...... biomarker validation platform that mines all available microarray data to assess the prognostic power of 22 277 genes in 1287 ovarian cancer patients. We specifically used this tool to evaluate the effect of 37 previously published biomarkers on ovarian cancer prognosis....... set up using gene expression data and survival information of 1287 ovarian cancer patients downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and The Cancer Genome Atlas (Affymetrix HG-U133A, HG-U133A 2.0, and HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays). After quality control and normalization, only probes present on all...

  6. Plasma Carotenoids and Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Patients with prior Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J. Hughes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diets high in fruits and vegetables are generally believed protective against several chronic diseases. One suggested mechanism is a reduction in oxidative stress. The carotenoids, nutrients found in colored fruits and vegetables, possess antioxidant properties in vitro, but their role in humans is less well documented. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the relationships between the most abundant plasma carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin, as well as grouped carotenoids (total xanthophylls, carotenes and carotenoids, and urinary excretion of the F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs, stable and specific biomarkers of oxidative damage to lipids. Two F2-IsoP measures were utilized: total F2-IsoPs and 8-iso-PGF2α. The study population (N = 52 was drawn from a study among patients curatively treated for early-stage head and neck cancer. Unadjusted linear regression analyses revealed significant inverse associations between plasma lutein, total xanthophylls and both F2-IsoP measures at baseline. After control for potential confounders, all individual and grouped xanthophylls remained inversely associated with the F2-IsoP measures, but none of these associations achieved significance. The carotenes were not inversely associated with total F2-IsoPs or 8-iso-PGF2a concentrations. The finding of consistent inverse associations between individual and grouped xanthophylls, but not individual and grouped carotenes, and F2-IsoPs is intriguing and warrants further investigation.

  7. In situ energy transfer quenching of quantum dot electrochemiluminescence for sensitive detection of cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengli; Chen, Ying; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2013-12-15

    In this work, we develop a sensitive and selective method for the detection of a cancer biomarker (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA) based on a new electrochemiluminescence (ECL) energy transfer mechanism, in which the energy transfer occurs from the excited quantum dots (QDs) to the in situ electro-generated quenchers. A CdTe QD-containing composite film is first deposited on the electrode followed by the conjugation of the primary antibody (Ab1) on the film. Subsequent incubation of the modified sensing electrode with CEA and the secondary antibody-alkaline phosphatase-gold nanoparticle labels (Ab2-ALP-AuNP) leads to the formation of the Ab1/CEA/Ab2-ALP-AuNPs immunocomplexes on the electrode surface. The captured ALP catalyzes the p-nitrophenyl phosphate disodium salt (p-NPP) substrate in the ECL detection buffer to p-nitrophenol (p-NP). The potential sweep on the electrode results in the oxidation of p-NP to p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) and the generation of excited QDs. The ECL emission of the excited QDs is therefore quenched through direct energy transfer from the excited QDs to p-BQ. This ECL quenching effect is significantly amplified because of the numerous ALP enzymes involved in each antibody-antigen recognition event. This proposed method of amplified quenching of QD ECL emission offers a low detection limit of 1.67 pg mL(-1) for CEA. In addition, this method exhibits high reproducibility and selectivity and can also be applied to serum samples. Given these advantages, this new ECL energy transfer approach holds great promise for the detection of other biological targets and has potential applications in clinical diagnoses. PMID:23891869

  8. Aurora kinase B is important for antiestrogen resistant cell growth and a potential biomarker for tamoxifen resistant breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sarah L; Yde, Christina W; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    endocrine resistance, immunohistochemistry was performed on archival primary tumor tissue from breast cancer patients who have received adjuvant endocrine treatment with tamoxifen. RESULTS: The selective Aurora kinase B inhibitor barasertib was identified to preferentially inhibit growth of fulvestrant...... and PARP cleavage in the fulvestrant resistant cells. Barasertib also exerted preferential growth inhibition of tamoxifen resistant T47D cell lines. Finally, high percentage of Aurora kinase B positive tumor cells was significantly associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival in 261 ER......-positive breast cancer patients, who have received tamoxifen as first-line adjuvant endocrine treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that Aurora kinase B is a driving factor for growth of antiestrogen resistant T47D breast cancer cell lines, and a biomarker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen treatment. Thus...

  9. Development of RTOG Consensus Guidelines for the Definition of the Clinical Target Volume for Postoperative Conformal Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define a prostate fossa clinical target volume (PF-CTV) for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials using postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An RTOG-sponsored meeting was held to define an appropriate PF-CTV after radical prostatectomy. Data were presented describing radiographic failure patterns after surgery. Target volumes used in previous trials were reviewed. Using contours independently submitted by 13 radiation oncologists, a statistical imputation method derived a preliminary 'consensus' PF-CTV. Results: Starting from the model-derived CTV, consensus was reached for a CT image-based PF-CTV. The PF-CTV should extend superiorly from the level of the caudal vas deferens remnant to >8-12 mm inferior to vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA). Below the superior border of the pubic symphysis, the anterior border extends to the posterior aspect of the pubis and posteriorly to the rectum, where it may be concave at the level of the VUA. At this level, the lateral border extends to the levator ani. Above the pubic symphysis, the anterior border should encompass the posterior 1-2 cm of the bladder wall; posteriorly, it is bounded by the mesorectal fascia. At this level, the lateral border is the sacrorectogenitopubic fascia. Seminal vesicle remnants, if present, should be included in the CTV if there is pathologic evidence of their involvement. Conclusions: Consensus on postoperative PF-CTV for RT after prostatectomy was reached and is available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG website. This will allow uniformity in defining PF-CTV for clinical trials that include postprostatectomy RT.

  10. Serum haptoglobin as a novel molecular biomarker predicting colorectal cancer hepatic metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lichao; Hu, Shusheng; Yu, Long; Guo, Chunguang; Sun, Lixin; Yang, Zhihua; Qi, Jun; Ran, Yuliang

    2016-06-01

    Early detection of liver metastasis is important for improving colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. Our previous studies showed haptoglobin was highly expressed in primary CRC tissues, especially in heterochronous metastatic cases. Here, we assessed the potential of serum haptoglobin (sHP) as a biomarker for early detection of CRC liver metastasis by evaluating the sHP in 475 CRC patients and 152 healthy volunteers. In the training set (250 cases), sHP level in CRC-M1 (1773.18 ± 690.25 ng/mL) were significantly increased as compared to in CRC-M0 (1544.37 ± 1497.65 ng/mL) or healthy (917.76 ± 571.59 ng/mL). And the high sHP level was correlated with poor survival. Logistic regression analysis revealed that sHP, serum carcinoembryonic antigen (sCEA) and serum carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (sCA19.9) level were the significant parameters for detecting liver metastasis. In leave-one-out-cross-validation, these three markers resulted in 89.1% sensitivity and 85.8% specificity for hepatic metastasis detection. In an independent test set (225 cases), receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of sHP in CRC liver metastasis showed an area under the curve of 0.735, with a sensitivity of 87.2% and a specificity of 59.9%. Combination of sHP, sCEA and sCA19.9 improved diagnostic accuracy to 0.880, with a sensitivity of 88.5% and a specificity of 87.8%. Silencing of HP by specific shRNA significantly inhibited the LOVO and SW620 cell invasion, and suppressed xenograft tumor invasive growth. In summary, these results demonstrate that sHP is associated with poor prognosis of CRC patients and that HP promotes colorectal cancer cell invasion. sHP combining with sCA19.9 and sCEA may be used as accurate predictors of CRC liver metastasis. PMID:26756179

  11. Bioconjugated lanthanide luminescent helicates as multilabels for lab-on-a-chip detection of cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Moreira, Vanesa; Song, Bo; Sivagnanam, Venkataragavalu; Chauvin, Anne-Sophie; Vandevyver, Caroline D B; Gijs, Martin; Hemmilä, Ilkka; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Bünzli, Jean-Claude G

    2010-01-01

    The lanthanide binuclear helicate [Eu(2)(L(C2(CO(2)H)))(3)] is coupled to avidin to yield a luminescent bioconjugate EuB1 (Q = 9.3%, tau((5)D(0)) = 2.17 ms). MALDI/TOF mass spectrometry confirms the covalent binding of the Eu chelate and UV-visible spectroscopy allows one to determine a luminophore/protein ratio equal to 3.2. Bio-affinity assays involving the recognition of a mucin-like protein expressed on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells by a biotinylated monoclonal antibody 5D10 to which EuB1 is attached via avidin-biotin coupling demonstrate that (i) avidin activity is little affected by the coupling reaction and (ii) detection limits obtained by time-resolved (TR) luminescence with EuB1 and a commercial Eu-avidin conjugate are one order of magnitude lower than those of an organic conjugate (FITC-streptavidin). In the second part of the paper, conditions for growing MCF-7 cells in 100-200 microm wide microchannels engraved in PDMS are established; we demonstrate that EuB1 can be applied as effectively on this lab-on-a-chip device for the detection of tumour-associated antigens as on MCF-7 cells grown in normal culture vials. In order to exploit the versatility of the ligand used for self-assembling [Ln(2)(L(C2(CO(2)H)))(3)] helicates, which sensitizes the luminescence of both Eu(III) and Tb(III) ions, a dual on-chip assay is proposed in which estrogen receptors (ERs) and human epidermal growth factor receptors (Her2/neu) can be simultaneously detected on human breast cancer tissue sections. The Ln helicates are coupled to two secondary antibodies: ERs are visualized by red-emitting EuB4 using goat anti-mouse IgG and Her2/neu receptors by green-emitting TbB5 using goat anti-rabbit IgG. The fact that the assay is more than 6 times faster and requires 5 times less reactants than conventional immunohistochemical assays provides essential advantages over conventional immunohistochemistry for future clinical biomarker detection. PMID:20024180

  12. A three-protein biomarker panel assessed in diagnostic tissue predicts death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only a minority of prostate cancers lead to death. Because no tissue biomarkers of aggressiveness other than Gleason score are available at diagnosis, many nonlethal cancers are treated aggressively. We evaluated whether a panel of biomarkers, associated with a range of disease outcomes in previous studies, could predict death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease. Using a case-only design, subjects were identified from three Australian epidemiological studies. Men who had died of their disease, “cases” (N = 83), were matched to “referents” (N = 232), those who had not died of prostate cancer, using incidence density sampling. Diagnostic tissue was retrieved to assess expression of AZGP1, MUC1, NKX3.1, p53, and PTEN by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC). Poisson regression was used to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) adjusted for age, Gleason score, and stage and to estimate survival probabilities. Expression of MUC1 and p53 was associated with increased mortality (MRR 2.51, 95% CI 1.14–5.54, P = 0.02 and 3.08, 95% CI 1.41–6.95, P = 0.005, respectively), whereas AZGP1 expression was associated with decreased mortality (MRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20–0.96, P = 0.04). Analyzing all markers under a combined model indicated that the three markers were independent predictors of prostate cancer death and survival. For men with localized disease at diagnosis, assessment of AZGP1, MUC1, and p53 expression in diagnostic tissue by IHC could potentially improve estimates of risk of dying from prostate cancer based only on Gleason score and clinical stage

  13. New concepts and challenges in the clinical translation of cancer preventive therapies: the role of pharmacodynamic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Karen; Rufini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Implementation of therapeutic cancer prevention strategies has enormous potential for reducing cancer incidence and related mortality. Trials of drugs including tamoxifen and aspirin have led the way in demonstrating proof-of-principle that prevention of breast and colorectal cancer is feasible. Many other compounds ranging from drugs in widespread use for various indications, including metformin, bisphosphonates, and vitamin D, to dietary agents such as the phytochemicals resveratrol and curcumin, show preventive activity against several cancers in preclinical models. Notwithstanding the wealth of opportunities, major challenges have hindered the development process and only a handful of therapies are currently approved for cancer risk reduction. One of the major obstacles to successful clinical translation of promising preventive agents is a lack of pharmacodynamic biomarkers to provide an early read out of biological activity in humans and for optimising doses to take into large scale randomised clinical trials. A further confounding factor is a lack of consideration of clinical pharmacokinetics in the design of preclinical experiments, meaning results are frequently reported from studies that use irrelevant or unachievable concentrations. This article focuses on recent findings from investigations with dietary-derived agents to illustrate how a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of action, using models that mimic the clinical scenario, together with the development of compound-specific accompanying pharmacodynamic biomarkers could accelerate the developmental pipeline for preventive agents and maximise the chances of success in future clinical trials. Moreover, the concept of a bell-shaped dose-response curve for therapeutic cancer prevention is discussed, along with the need to rethink the traditional 'more is better' approach for dose selection. PMID:26635905

  14. Introducing differential expression of human heat shock protein 27 in hepatocellular carcinoma: moving toward identification of cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rizma; Siddiqui, Nadir Naveed; Ul Haq, Ahtesham; Rahman, M Ataur

    2016-01-01

    Previously, it has to be acknowledged that overexpressed heat shock protein B27 (HSPB27) have been implicated in the etiology of wide range of human cancers. However, the molecular mechanism leading to the disease initiation to progression in liver cancer is still unknown. Present work was undertaken to investigate the differentially expressed HSPB27 in association with those damages that lead to liver cancer development. For the identification of liver cancer biomarker, samples were subjected to comparative proteomic analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and were further validated by Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. After validation, in silico studies were applied to demonstrate the significantly induced phosphorylated and S-nitrosylated signals. The later included the interacting partner of HSPB27, i.e., mitogen-activated protein kinase-3 and 5 (MAPK3 and 5), ubiquitin C (UBC), v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1), mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 (MAPK14), and tumor protein p53 (TP53), which bestowed with critical capabilities, namely, apoptosis, cell cycling, stress activation, tumor suppression, cell survival, angiogenesis, proliferation, and stress resistance. Taking together, these results shed new light on the potential biomarker HSPB27 that overexpression of HSPB27 did lead to upregulation of their interacting partner that together demonstrate their possible role as a novel tumor progressive agent for the treatment of metastasis in liver cancer. HSPB27 is a promising diagnostic marker for liver cancer although further large-scale studies are required. Also, molecular profiling may help pave the road to the discovery of new therapies. PMID:26242269

  15. Tissue-specific and plasma microRNA profiles could be promising biomarkers of histological classification and TNM stage in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Qiang; Huang, Yuchuan; Lu, Yanrong; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Guanglin; Wang, Changguo; Liu, Lunxu; Dai, Ya

    2016-04-26

    In a previous study, we determined that plasma miRNAs are potential biomarkers for cigarette smoking-related lung fibrosis. Herein, we determine whether tissue-specific and plasma miRNA profiles could be promising biomarkers for histological classification and TNM stage in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Plasma miRNA profiling preoperatively and seven days postoperatively, and cancer and normal tissue miRNA profiling were performed in NSCLC patients and matched healthy controls. There was a > twofold change for all signature miRNAs between the NSCLC patients and controls, with P values of staging lung squamous cell carcinoma, and miR-3613-3p, miR-3675-3p, and miR-5571-5p were promising biomarkers of different staging lung adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that tissue-specific and plasma miRNAs could be potential biomarkers of histological classification and TNM stage in NSCLC. PMID:27148421

  16. Consensus for Radiotherapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma from The 5th Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert Meeting (APPLE 2014): Current Practice and Future Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Chul; Yu, Jeong Il; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien; Zeng, Zhao Chong; Hong, Ji Hong; Wang, Michael Lian Chek; Kim, Mi Sook; Chi, Kwan Hwa; Liang, Po-Ching; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lau, Wan-Yee; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    A consensus meeting to develop practice guidelines and to recommend future clinical trials for radiation therapy (RT), including external beam RT (EBRT), and selective internal RT (SIRT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was held at the 5th annual meeting of the Asia-Pacific Primary Liver Cancer Expert consortium. Although there is no randomized phase III trial evidence, the efficacy and safety of RT in HCC has been shown by prospective and retrospective studies using modern RT techniques. Based on these results, the committee came to a consensus on the utility and efficacy of RT in the management of HCC according to each disease stage as follows: in early and intermediate stage HCC, if standard treatment is not compatible, RT, including EBRT and SIRT can be considered. In locally advanced stage HCC, combined EBRT with transarterial chemoembolization or hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and SIRT can be considered. In terminal stage HCC, EBRT can be considered for palliation of symptoms and reduction of morbidity caused by the primary tumor or its metastases. Despite the currently reported benefits of RT in HCC, the committee agreed that there is a compelling need for large prospective studies, including randomized phase III trial evidence evaluating the role of RT. Specifically studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of sequential combination of EBRT and SIRT are strongly recommended. PMID:27493892

  17. A lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform for identification of multiple liver cancer biomarkers in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Oh, Na Ree; Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Hoguen; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-09-18

    Aberrantly glycosylated proteins related to liver cancer progression were captured with specific lectin and identified from human plasma by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry as multiple biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The lectin fractionation for fucosylated protein glycoforms in human plasma was conducted with a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL). Following tryptic digestion of the lectin-captured fraction, plasma samples from 30 control cases (including 10 healthy, 10 hepatitis B virus [HBV], and 10 cirrhosis cases) and 10 HCC cases were quantitatively analyzed by MRM to identify which glycoproteins are viable HCC biomarkers. A1AG1, AACT, A1AT, and CERU were found to be potent biomarkers to differentiate HCC plasma from control plasmas. The AUROC generated independently from these four biomarker candidates ranged from 0.73 to 0.92. However, the lectin-coupled MRM assay with multiple combinations of biomarker candidates is superior statistically to those generated from the individual candidates with AUROC more than 0.95, which can be an alternative to the immunoassay inevitably requiring tedious development of multiple antibodies against biomarker candidates to be verified. Eventually the lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform was found to be efficient to identify multiple biomarkers from human plasma according to cancer progression. PMID:22789673

  18. Detection of cervical cancer biomarker patterns in blood plasma and urine by differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola C Garbett

    Full Text Available Improved methods for the accurate identification of both the presence and severity of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and extent of spread of invasive carcinomas of the cervix (IC are needed. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC has recently been shown to detect specific changes in the thermal behavior of blood plasma proteins in several diseases. This methodology is being explored to provide a complementary approach for screening of cervical disease. The present study evaluated the utility of DSC in differentiating between healthy controls, increasing severity of CIN and early and advanced IC. Significant discrimination was apparent relative to the extent of disease with no clear effect of demographic factors such as age, ethnicity, smoking status and parity. Of most clinical relevance, there was strong differentiation of CIN from healthy controls and IC, and amongst patients with IC between FIGO Stage I and advanced cancer. The observed disease-specific changes in DSC profiles (thermograms were hypothesized to reflect differential expression of disease biomarkers that subsequently bound to and affected the thermal behavior of the most abundant plasma proteins. The effect of interacting biomarkers can be inferred from the modulation of thermograms but cannot be directly identified by DSC. To investigate the nature of the proposed interactions, mass spectrometry (MS analyses were employed. Quantitative assessment of the low molecular weight protein fragments of plasma and urine samples revealed a small list of peptides whose abundance was correlated with the extent of cervical disease, with the most striking plasma peptidome data supporting the interactome theory of peptide portioning to abundant plasma proteins. The combined DSC and MS approach in this study was successful in identifying unique biomarker signatures for cervical cancer and demonstrated the utility of DSC plasma profiles as a complementary diagnostic tool to evaluate

  19. Modulation of circulating protein biomarkers following TRC105 (anti-endoglin antibody) treatment in patients with advanced cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yingmiao; Starr, Mark D.; Brady, John C; Dellinger, Andrew; Pang, Herbert; Adams, Bonne; Theuer, Charles P.; Lee, Nam Y.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Nixon, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    TRC105 is an endoglin-targeting drug that possesses anti-angiogenic and antitumor potential. Analysis of the initial phase I trial of TRC105 demonstrated good tolerability and efficacy in cancer patients. In this report, we analyzed multiple circulating biomarkers at baseline, cycle 2 day 1 (C2D1), and end of study (EOS) for each patient. The baseline level and the fold change from baseline to both C2D1 and EOS for each marker were statistically analyzed. At C2D1, seven markers were significa...

  20. Identification of Serum MicroRNAs as Novel Non-Invasive Biomarkers for Early Detection of Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Ming-yang; Pan, Kai-Feng; Su, Hui-juan; Zhang, Lian; Ma, Jun-ling; Li, Ji-you; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Kang, Daehee; Kim, Yong Sung; You, Wei-cheng

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the potential of serum miRNAs as biomarkers for early detection of gastric cancer (GC), a population-based study was conducted in Linqu, a high-risk area of GC in China. Methodology/Principal Findings All subjects were selected from two large cohort studies. Differential miRNAs were identified in serum pools of GC and control using TaqMan low density array, and validated in individual from 82 pairs of GC and control, and 46 pairs of dysplasia and control by real-time...

  1. Objective consensus from decision trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consensus-based approaches provide an alternative to evidence-based decision making, especially in situations where high-level evidence is limited. Our aim was to demonstrate a novel source of information, objective consensus based on recommendations in decision tree format from multiple sources. Based on nine sample recommendations in decision tree format a representative analysis was performed. The most common (mode) recommendations for each eventuality (each permutation of parameters) were determined. The same procedure was applied to real clinical recommendations for primary radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Data was collected from 16 radiation oncology centres, converted into decision tree format and analyzed in order to determine the objective consensus. Based on information from multiple sources in decision tree format, treatment recommendations can be assessed for every parameter combination. An objective consensus can be determined by means of mode recommendations without compromise or confrontation among the parties. In the clinical example involving prostate cancer therapy, three parameters were used with two cut-off values each (Gleason score, PSA, T-stage) resulting in a total of 27 possible combinations per decision tree. Despite significant variations among the recommendations, a mode recommendation could be found for specific combinations of parameters. Recommendations represented as decision trees can serve as a basis for objective consensus among multiple parties

  2. Reverse phase protein array based tumor profiling identifies a biomarker signature for risk classification of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Sonntag

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A robust subclassification of luminal breast cancer, the most common molecular subtype of human breast cancer, is crucial for therapy decisions. While a part of patients is at higher risk of recurrence and requires chemo-endocrine treatment, the other part is at lower risk and also poorly responds to chemotherapeutic regimens. To approximate the risk of cancer recurrence, clinical guidelines recommend determining histologic grading and abundance of a cell proliferation marker in tumor specimens. However, this approach assigns an intermediate risk to a substantial number of patients and in addition suffers from a high interobserver variability. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify a quantitative protein biomarker signature to facilitate risk classification. Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA were used to obtain quantitative expression data for 128 breast cancer relevant proteins in a set of hormone receptor-positive tumors (n = 109. Proteomic data for the subset of histologic G1 (n = 14 and G3 (n = 22 samples were used for biomarker discovery serving as surrogates of low and high recurrence risk, respectively. A novel biomarker selection workflow based on combining three different classification methods identified caveolin-1, NDKA, RPS6, and Ki-67 as top candidates. NDKA, RPS6, and Ki-67 were expressed at elevated levels in high risk tumors whereas caveolin-1 was observed as downregulated. The identified biomarker signature was subsequently analyzed using an independent test set (AUC = 0.78. Further evaluation of the identified biomarker panel by Western blot and mRNA profiling confirmed the proteomic signature obtained by RPPA. In conclusion, the biomarker signature introduced supports RPPA as a tool for cancer biomarker discovery.

  3. Serum microRNA-21 as a potential diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shichao; Yang, Xiaorong; Yang, Jinmei; Zhen, Jiesheng; Zhang, Dechun

    2016-02-01

    Serum microRNA-21 (miR-21) expression has been shown to be significantly up-regulated in breast cancer, which implies that it could be a biomarker to discriminate breast cancer patients from healthy controls. We therefore performed this meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic value of miR-21 for breast cancer. Relevant articles were collected from PubMed, Scopus, Embase, the Cochrane Library, BioMed Central, ISI Web of Knowledge, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wan Fang Data and Technology of Chongqing databases, from inception to June 10, 2014 by two independent researchers. Diagnostic capacity of miR-21 for breast cancer was assessed using pooled sensitivity and specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), area under the summary receiver operating characteristic (AUC) and Fagan's nomogram. Meta-Disc software and Stata SE 12.0 were used to investigate the source of heterogeneity and to perform the meta-analysis. We used six studies with a total of 438 patients and 228 healthy controls in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity and DOR were 0.79 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.66-0.87], 0.85 (95 % CI 0.75-0.91) and 19.46 (95 % CI 8.74-43.30), respectively; positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5 and 0.25, and AUC was 0.89 (95 % CI 0.86-0.91). In addition, heterogeneity was clearly apparent but was not caused by the threshold effect. This meta-analysis suggests that miR-21 is a potential biomarker for early diagnosis of breast cancer with high sensitivity and specificity, and its clinical application warrants further investigation. PMID:25516467

  4. Differential expression of bio-markers in primary non-small cell lung cancer and metastatic sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The use of bio-markers to evaluate the presence of a target or to select a specific therapy is increasingly advocated. The correlation of bio-marker expression between the primary tumor and its corresponding metastasis has not yet been well documented and analyzed in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), excision repair cross-complementing (ERCC1), vascular-endothelial growth factor receptor, and Ki-67 was immuno-histo-chemically analyzed in tumor samples of primary NSCLC and one corresponding metastasis in a population of 49 patients. Results: Sixteen cases (33%) displayed clear discordance in the EGFR status between the primary tumor and the metastasis, with a significant trend toward downregulation of EGFR in the metastasis (p = 0.01). The ERCC1 status was discordant in 20 cases (41%), with a trend toward overexpression in brain and adrenal metastases (p = 0.01 and p = 0.08, respectively). The vascular-endothelial growth factor receptor and Ki-67 statuses were discordant in 13 (27%) and 15 (31%) cases, respectively. No difference in expression was observed between synchronous and metachronous metastasis. Conclusion: bio-marker expression is discordant between the primary tumor and its corresponding metastasis in about one third of patients with NSCLC. These findings should be considered in the setting of clinical trials and further explored using frozen material and high-throughput techniques. (authors)

  5. Prospective evaluation of 64 serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer in a true screening setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongda; Werner, Simone; Butt, Julia; Zörnig, Inka; Knebel, Phillip; Michel, Angelika; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Jäger, Dirk; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-03-29

    Novel blood-based screening tests are strongly desirable for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to identify and evaluate autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens as biomarkers for early detection of CRC. 380 clinically identified CRC patients and samples of participants with selected findings from a cohort of screening colonoscopy participants in 2005-2013 (N=6826) were included in this analysis. Sixty-four serum autoantibody markers were measured by multiplex bead-based serological assays. A two-step approach with selection of biomarkers in a training set, and validation of findings in a validation set, the latter exclusively including participants from the screening setting, was applied. Anti-MAGEA4 exhibited the highest sensitivity for detecting early stage CRC and advanced adenoma. Multi-marker combinations substantially increased sensitivity at the price of a moderate loss of specificity. Anti-TP53, anti-IMPDH2, anti-MDM2 and anti-MAGEA4 were consistently included in the best-performing 4-, 5-, and 6-marker combinations. This four-marker panel yielded a sensitivity of 26% (95% CI, 13-45%) for early stage CRC at a specificity of 90% (95% CI, 83-94%) in the validation set. Notably, it also detected 20% (95% CI, 13-29%) of advanced adenomas. Taken together, the identified biomarkers could contribute to the development of a useful multi-marker blood-based test for CRC early detection. PMID:26909861

  6. Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for human ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jingjing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is overexpressed in human cancer cells and plays an essential role in cancer cell growth. However, the significance of MR-1 in human ovarian cancer has not yet been explored. The aim of this study was to examine whether MR-1 is a predictor of ovarian cancer and its value as a therapeutic target in ovarian cancer patients. Methods Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect MR-1 mRNA levels in tissue samples from 26 ovarian cancer patients and 25 controls with benign ovarian disease. Anti-MR-1 polyclonal antibodies were prepared, tested by ELISA and western blotting, and then used for immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples. Adhesion and invasion of 292T cells was also examined after transfection of a pMX-MR-1 plasmid. Knockdown of MR-1 expression was achieved after stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a short hairpin DNA pGPU6/GFP/Neo plasmid against the MR-1 gene. In addition, SKOV3 cells were treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin, and a potential role for MR-1 as a therapeutic target was evaluated. Results MR-1 was overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissues and SKOV3 cells. 293T cells overexpressed MR-1, and cellular spread and invasion were enhanced after transfection of the pMX-MR-1 plasmid, suggesting that MR-1 is critical for ovarian cancer cell growth. Knockdown of MR-1 expression inhibited cell adhesion and invasion, and treatment with anti-cancer drugs decreased its expression in cancer cells. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which MR-1 might serve as a novel biological marker and potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Conclusions MR-1 may be a biomarker for diagnosis of ovarian cancer. It may also be useful for monitoring of the effects of anti-cancer therapies. Further studies are needed to clarify whether MR-1 is an early

  7. BMI1, stem cell factor acting as novel serum-biomarker for Caucasian and African-American prostate cancer.

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    Hifzur Rahman Siddique

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lack of reliable predictive biomarkers is a stumbling block in the management of prostate cancer (CaP. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA widely used in clinics has several caveats as a CaP biomarker. African-American CaP patients have poor prognosis than Caucasians, and notably the serum-PSA does not perform well in this group. Further, some men with low serum-PSA remain unnoticed for CaP until they develop disease. Thus, there is a need to identify a reliable diagnostic and predictive biomarker of CaP. Here, we show that BMI1 stem-cell protein is secretory and could be explored for biomarker use in CaP patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Semi-quantitative analysis of BMI1 was performed in prostatic tissues of TRAMP (autochthonous transgenic mouse model, human CaP patients, and in cell-based models representing normal and different CaP phenotypes in African-American and Caucasian men, by employing immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and Slot-blotting. Quantitative analysis of BMI1 and PSA were performed in blood and culture-media of siRNA-transfected and non-transfected cells by employing ELISA. BMI1 protein is (i secreted by CaP cells, (ii increased in the apical region of epithelial cells and stromal region in prostatic tumors, and (iii detected in human blood. BMI1 is detectable in blood of CaP patients in an order of increasing tumor stage, exhibit a positive correlation with serum-PSA and importantly is detectable in patients which exhibit low serum-PSA. The clinical significance of BMI1 as a biomarker could be ascertained from observation that CaP cells secrete this protein in higher levels than cells representative of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: BMI1 could be developed as a dual bio-marker (serum and biopsy for the diagnosis and prognosis of CaP in Caucasian and African-American men. Though compelling these data warrant further investigation in a cohort of African-American patients.

  8. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in castration resistant prostate cancer: a randomized, controlled, biomarker study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Fuereder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs and circulating endothelial cells (CECs are potential biomarkers of response to anti-angiogenic treatment regimens. In the current study, we investigated the effect of docetaxel and sunitinib on CEP/CEC kinetics and clinical response in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Chemonaive patients with CRPC were enrolled in this study to receive either sunitinib (37.5 mg/d, in combination with docetaxel (75 mg/m2 or docetaxel alone. CEP and CEC kinetics were analyzed for every cycle. The primary objective was to compare CEP/CEC pharmacodynamics between both treatment arms. We also investigated if CEC/CEP spikes, induced by MTD docetaxel, are suppressed by sunitinib in patients treated with docetaxel/sunitinib relative to docetaxel monotherapy. RESULTS: A total of 27 patients were enrolled. We observed a significant increase of CEP/CEC (total/viable counts over time within each cycle (coefficients 0.29233, 0.22092 and 0.26089, respectively; p<0.001. However, no differences between the treatment groups, in terms of CEP and CEC kinetics, were detected. In the docetaxel monotherapy arm 4 (30% patients responded to therapy with a 50% PSA decline, while 9 (64% patients showed a PSA decline in the combination group (n.s.. The median PFS in the docetaxel monotherapy group was 3.1 months (2.6-3.6 months, 95% CI and 6.2 months (4.9-7.4 months, 95% CI; p = 0.062 in the combination arm. Sunitinib/docetaxel was reasonably well tolerated and toxicity manageable. CONCLUSION: In summary, no significant differences in CEC and CEP kinetics between the treatment arms were observed, although a highly significant increase of CEPs/CECs within each cycle over time was detected. These results mirror the challenge we have to face when employing anti-angiogenic strategies in CRPC. Additional preclinical research is needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. However

  9. miRNAs as potential biomarkers in early breast cancer detection following mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Sidney W.; Lee, Woojin; Coffey, Caitrin; Lean, Alexa; Wu, Xiaoling; Tan, Xiaohui; Man, Yan-Gao; Brem, Rachel F.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. About 12 % women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. Currently one of the most accepted model/theories is that ductal breast cancer (most common type of breast cancer) follows a linear progression: from normal breast epithelial cells to ductal hyperplasia to atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and finally to invasive ductal carcin...

  10. Enhanced resting-state dynamics of the hemoglobin signal as a novel biomarker for detection of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The work presented here demonstrates an application of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) to the problem of breast-cancer diagnosis. The potential for using spatial and temporal variability measures of the hemoglobin signal to identify useful biomarkers was studied. Methods: DOT imaging data were collected using two instrumentation platforms the authors developed, which were suitable for exploring tissue dynamics while performing a simultaneous bilateral exam. For each component of the hemoglobin signal (e.g., total, oxygenated), the image time series was reduced to eight scalar metrics that were affected by one or more dynamic properties of the breast microvasculature (e.g., average amplitude, amplitude heterogeneity, strength of spatial coordination). Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analyses, comparing groups of subjects with breast cancer to various control groups (i.e., all noncancer subjects, only those with diagnosed benign breast pathology, and only those with no known breast pathology), were performed to evaluate the effect of cancer on the magnitudes of the metrics and of their interbreast differences and ratios. Results: For women with known breast cancer, simultaneous bilateral DOT breast measures reveal a marked increase in the resting-state amplitude of the vasomotor response in the hemoglobin signal for the affected breast, compared to the contralateral, noncancer breast. Reconstructed 3D spatial maps of observed dynamics also show that this behavior extends well beyond the tumor border. In an effort to identify biomarkers that have the potential to support clinical aims, a group of scalar quantities extracted from the time series measures was systematically examined. This analysis showed that many of the quantities obtained by computing paired responses from the bilateral scans (e.g., interbreast differences, ratios) reveal statistically significant differences between the cancer-positiv