WorldWideScience

Sample records for cancer advocacy changing

  1. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... The JPB Foundation 2016 Bladder Cancer ... 2016 Young Investigator Awardees The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) has announced the recipients of the 2016 ...

  2. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences.

  3. The state of advocacy in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, G Larry

    2015-12-01

    Non-profit advocacy organizations have been important in raising public awareness, promoting education, and enhancing political activism for issues related to cancer. Grassroots efforts aimed at fund-raising have substantially augmented federal funding for community outreach and research. The objective of this review was to evaluate successful accomplishments of several major non-profit organizations that are focused on cancer. A review of news media, medical literature, and financial records (using GuideStar) was performed to access the organizational structure and productivity of several successful cancer advocacy organizations. Compared to other cancer advocacy groups, the American Cancer Society is the oldest (>100years old) and worth the most with net assets of over $1.25 billion dollars and an annual total revenue of over $900 million dollars. The ACS also has the highest overhead at 41%. Most of the gynecologic cancer advocacy groups are approximately 20years old and have collective total annual revenue of over $17M dollars. The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund has been the most successful at raising funds and building net assets to date while maintaining an overhead of higher overhead, spend less on total administration, spend more on fund-raising, have more events (rather than a limited number), and use aggressive social media strategies.

  4. Breast cancer advocacy: changing perceptions Abogacía y cáncer de mama: el cambio en las percepciones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia P Koon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a significant health burden worldwide. In the United States, the Breast Cancer Advocacy Movement has increased awareness, enhanced dialogue, and provided significant funding opportunities that previously did not exist. Various advocacy programs are beginning to emerge in developing countries in response to the increasing impact breast cancer is having in these regions of the world. This paper discusses the influence of the Breast Cancer Advocacy Movement in the US and proposes a format for working in conjunction with medical experts, political leaders and patient advocates to stimulate discussion and encourage sustainable outcomes in breast cancer internationally.El cáncer de mama es una carga significativa de salud en el mundo. En Estados Unidos, el Movimiento de Abogacía para el Control del Cáncer de Mama ha hecho conciencia, mejorado el diálogo y provisto de oportunidades de financiamiento antes inexistentes. En los países en desarrollo, están emergiendo programas para el combate del cáncer de mama en respuesta al impacto creciente de la enfermedad en estas regiones. Este artículo aborda la influencia del movimiento en Estados Unidos y propone un formato para trabajar en conjunto con expertos en medicina, líderes políticos y defensores de pacientes y estimular la discusión y promoción de resultados sostenibles internacionalmente en cuanto al cáncer de mama.

  5. Climate Change: On Scientists and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    2014-01-01

    Last year, I asked a crowd of a few hundred geoscientists from around the world what positions related to climate science and policy they would be comfortable publicly advocating. I presented a list of recommendations that included increased research funding, greater resources for education, and specific emission reduction technologies. In almost every case, a majority of the audience felt comfortable arguing for them. The only clear exceptions were related to geo-engineering research and nuclear power. I had queried the researchers because the relationship between science and advocacy is marked by many assumptions and little clarity. This despite the fact that the basic question of how scientists can be responsible advocates on issues related to their expertise has been discussed for decades most notably in the case of climate change by the late Stephen Schneider.

  6. Prison health advocacy and its changing boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy is an important tool for translating population health objectives and research findings into policy and practice, as well as for enhancing stakeholder support for programmes and activities with a potential to improve the health of populations. At the inception of modern prisons, health advocacy approaches focused on appealing to humanitarian and religious sentiments of stakeholders to improve the well-being of prisoners. This approach achieved limited results, not least because of persistent apathy of custodial authorities and the public to prisoners' wellbeing. From the mid twentieth century onwards, a constitutional and human rights approach evolved, with courts becoming actively involved in mandating minimum health standards in prisons. Penal populism eroded public support for a judicial recourse to improving prison health services, and encouraged governments to institute procedural barriers to prisoner-initiated litigation. The author proposes an approach premised on public health principles as an appropriate platform to advocate for improvements in prison health services in this era. Such an advocacy platform combines the altruistic goals of the humanitarian and constitutional rights approaches with an appeal to community's self-interest by alerting the public to the social, financial and health implications inherent in released prisoners suffering from major communicable and chronic diseases re-entering the community.

  7. Advocacy, support and survivorship in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, J; Casey, C; Sandoe, D; Hyde, M K; Cheron-Sauer, M-C; Lowe, A; Oliffe, J L; Chambers, S K

    2017-02-01

    Across Australia, prostate cancer support groups (PCSG) have emerged to fill a gap in psychosocial care for men and their families. However, an understanding of the triggers and influencers of the PCSG movement is absent. We interviewed 21 SG leaders (19 PC survivors, two partners), of whom six also attended a focus group, about motivations, experiences, past and future challenges in founding and leading PCSGs. Thematic analysis identified four global themes: illness experience; enacting a supportive response; forming a national collective and challenges. Leaders described men's feelings of isolation and neglect by the health system as the impetus for PCSGs to form and give/receive mutual help. Negotiating health care systems was an early challenge. National affiliation enabled leaders to build a united voice in the health system and establish a group identity and collective voice. Affiliation was supported by a symbiotic relationship with tensions between independence, affiliation and governance. Future challenges were group sustainability and inclusiveness. Study findings describe how a grassroots PCSG movement arose consistent with an embodied health movement perspective. Health care organisations who seek to leverage these community resources need to be cognisant of SG values and purpose if they are to negotiate effective partnerships that maximise mutual benefit.

  8. Advocacy coalitions, REDD+, and forest governance in Papua New Guinea: how likely is transformational change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Babon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tropical forests in developing countries are increasingly being valued for their role in carbon sequestration. Such interest is reflected in the emergence of international initiatives for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+. REDD+ requires addressing both tropical forests as complex social-ecological systems and the multiple sectors involved in tropical forest resources, which may necessitate transformational change away from business-as-usual approaches to forest governance. We studied the potential for REDD+ to mobilize an influential coalition of actors promoting transformational change in forest governance in Papua New Guinea (PNG, a leading proponent of REDD+ internationally. Combining policy network approaches with the advocacy coalition framework, we identified four advocacy coalitions in the REDD+ policy domain in PNG and estimated the influence of each coalition. We found the most influential advocacy coalition is promoting the status quo rather than governance reforms capable of reducing deforestations and forest degradation, leading us to suggest that business as usual is the dominant perspective in the REDD+ policy domain in PNG. This may explain why, despite the large amount of REDD+ rhetoric, there has been only modest change in formal policy or practice in PNG to date. However, we did find influential coalitions calling for transformational change. Although these are currently minority coalitions, we identified several pathways through which they could increase their power to realize transformational change

  9. Effective social justice advocacy: a theory-of-change framework for assessing progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klugman, Barbara

    2011-11-01

    This article offers a theory-of-change framework for social justice advocacy. It describes broad outcome categories against which activists, donors and evaluators can assess progress (or lack thereof) in an ongoing manner: changes in organisational capacity, base of support, alliances, data and analysis from a social justice perspective, problem definition and potential policy options, visibility, public norms, and population level impacts. Using these for evaluation enables activists and donors to learn from and rethink their strategies as the political context and/or actors change over time. The paper presents a case study comparing factors that facilitated reproductive rights policy wins during the transition from apartheid to democracy in South Africa and factors that undermined their implementation in the post-apartheid period. It argues that after legal and policy victories had been won, failure to maintain strong organizations and continually rethink strategies contributed to the loss of government focus on and resources for implementation of new policies. By implication, evaluating effectiveness only by an actual policy change does not allow for ongoing learning to ensure appropriate strategies. It also fails to recognise that a policy win can be overturned and needs vigilant monitoring and advocacy for implementation. This means that funding and organising advocacy should seldom be undertaken as a short-term proposition. It also suggests that the building and maintenance of organisational and leadership capacity is as important as any other of the outcome categories in enabling success.

  10. The role of advocacy in occasioning community and organizational change in a medical-legal partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Carpenter, Kaston D; Collie-Akers, Vicki; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Cronin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities among low-income individuals remain a significant problem. A number of social determinants are associated with adverse health outcomes. Medical-legal partnerships address legal concerns of low-income individuals to improve health and wellness in adults and children. The Medical-Legal Partnership at Legal Aid of Western Missouri provides free direct legal services for patients with legal concerns affecting health. There is limited evidence regarding the association between advocacy-related efforts and changes within both the medical-legal partnership structure and in health-care facilities. Three health-care organizations in Kansas City, MO participated in implementing the medical-legal partnership model between 2007 and 2010. Advocacy efforts conducted by key medical-legal partnership personnel were strongly associated with changes in health-care organizations and within the medical-legal partnership structure. This study extends the current evidence base by examining the types of advocacy efforts required to bring about community and organizational changes.

  11. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leas, Eric C; Althouse, Benjamin M; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H; Noar, Seth M; Allem, Jon-Patrick; Ayers, John W

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this "organic advocacy" may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio's 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms "climate change" or "global warming" reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573-699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the "DiCaprio effect" surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for "climate change" or "global warming" increased 261% (95%CI, 186-335) and 210% (95%CI 149-272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP's daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio's speech (e.g., "hottest year"), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., "electric car"). Because these data are freely available in real time our analytical strategy provides substantial lead time

  12. Human papillomavirus and cancer prevention: gaps in knowledge and prospects for research, policy, and advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Eduardo L; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Broker, Thomas R; Stanley, Margaret A; Chevarie-Davis, Myriam; Isidean, Sandra D; Schiffman, Mark

    2012-11-20

    The recognition that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the central, necessary cause of cervical cancer paved the way to new fronts of prevention via improved screening methods and HPV vaccination. Much has been learned in all fronts, from the molecular basis of our understanding of how HPV causes disease to the health economics of preventive strategies at the individual and population levels. Progress in other areas of cancer control has yet to show the same multi- and trans-disciplinary gains seen in research on HPV-associated malignancies, which is one of the unequivocal success stories in disease prevention. Yet, as an embarrassment of riches, much more research is needed to fill the gaps in knowledge that remain before we are able to reap the benefits from the knowledge translation from all fronts. Public health research on setting-specific implementation of HPV-based preventive strategies and more concerted advocacy to counter barriers facing the adoption of these strategies are likely to yield major dividends in reducing the burden of HPV-associated diseases. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012.

  13. The impact of patient advocacy: the case of innovative breast cancer drug reimbursement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahuis, Roel; Boon, Wouter P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Current research into patient advocacy focuses on attempts of patient groups to mobilise resources and to influence researchers, pharmaceutical companies and policy-makers. This paper adopts a ‘framing political opportunities’ approach to draw attention to other kinds of advocacy strategies. In a ca

  14. Circus monkeys or change agents? Civil society advocacy for HIV/AIDS in adverse policy environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Neil; Harmer, Andrew; Aleshkina, Julia; Bogdan, Daryna; Chkhatarashvili, Ketevan; Murzalieva, Gulgun; Rukhadze, Natia; Samiev, Arnol; Walt, Gill

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the factors enabling and undermining civil society efforts to advocate for policy reforms relating to HIV/AIDS and illicit drugs in three countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine. It examines how political contexts and civil society actors' strengths and weaknesses inhibit or enable advocacy for policy change - issues that are not well understood in relation to specific policy areas such as HIV/AIDS, or particular regions of the world where national policies are believed to be major drivers of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The study is based on in-depth interviews with representatives of civil society organizations (CSOs) (n = 49) and national level informants including government and development partners (n = 22). Our policy analysis identified a culture of fear derived from concerns for personal safety but also risk of losing donor largesse. Relations between CSOs and government were often acrimonious rather than synergistic, and while we found some evidence of CSO collective action, competition for external funding - in particular for HIV/AIDS grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was often divisive. Development partners and government tend to construct CSOs as service providers rather than advocates. While some advocacy was tolerated by governments, CSO participation in the policy process was, ultimately, perceived to be tokenistic. This was because there are financial interests in maintaining prohibitionist legislation: efforts to change punitive laws directed at the behaviors of minority groups such as injecting drug users have had limited impact.

  15. Big Data Sensors of Organic Advocacy: The Case of Leonardo DiCaprio and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althouse, Benjamin M.; Dredze, Mark; Obradovich, Nick; Fowler, James H.; Noar, Seth M.; Allem, Jon-Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The strategies that experts have used to share information about social causes have historically been top-down, meaning the most influential messages are believed to come from planned events and campaigns. However, more people are independently engaging with social causes today than ever before, in part because online platforms allow them to instantaneously seek, create, and share information. In some cases this “organic advocacy” may rival or even eclipse top-down strategies. Big data analytics make it possible to rapidly detect public engagement with social causes by analyzing the same platforms from which organic advocacy spreads. To demonstrate this claim we evaluated how Leonardo DiCaprio’s 2016 Oscar acceptance speech citing climate change motivated global English language news (Bloomberg Terminal news archives), social media (Twitter postings) and information seeking (Google searches) about climate change. Despite an insignificant increase in traditional news coverage (54%; 95%CI: -144 to 247), tweets including the terms “climate change” or “global warming” reached record highs, increasing 636% (95%CI: 573–699) with more than 250,000 tweets the day DiCaprio spoke. In practical terms the “DiCaprio effect” surpassed the daily average effect of the 2015 Conference of the Parties (COP) and the Earth Day effect by a factor of 3.2 and 5.3, respectively. At the same time, Google searches for “climate change” or “global warming” increased 261% (95%CI, 186–335) and 210% (95%CI 149–272) the day DiCaprio spoke and remained higher for 4 more days, representing 104,190 and 216,490 searches. This increase was 3.8 and 4.3 times larger than the increases observed during COP’s daily average or on Earth Day. Searches were closely linked to content from Dicaprio’s speech (e.g., “hottest year”), as unmentioned content did not have search increases (e.g., “electric car”). Because these data are freely available in real time our

  16. Southern voices on climate policy choices: Analysis of and lessons learned from civil society advocacy on climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Hannah; Ampomah, Gifty; Prera, Maria Isabel Olazabal; Rabbani, Golam; Zvigadza, Shepard

    2012-05-15

    This report provides an analysis of the tools and tactics advocacy groups use to influence policy responses to climate change at international, regional, national and sub-national levels. More than 20 climate networks and their member organisations have contributed to the report with their experiences of advocacy on climate change, including over 70 case studies from a wide range of countries - including many of the poorest - in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific. These advocacy activities primarily target national governments, but also international and regional processes, donors and the private sector. Analyses and case studies show how civil society plays key roles in pushing for new laws, programmes, policies or strategies on climate change, in holding governments to account on their commitments; in identifying the lack of joined-up government responses to climate change; and in ensuring that national policy making does not forget the poor and vulnerable. The report is the first joint product of the Southern Voices Capacity Building Programme, or for short: Southern Voices on Climate Change.

  17. Key concerns about the current state of bladder cancer: a position paper from the Bladder Cancer Think Tank, the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, and the Society of Urologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Yair; Kamat, Ashish M; Porter, Michael P; Robinson, Victoria L; Shore, Neal; Jewett, Michael; Schelhammer, Paul F; deVere White, Ralph; Quale, Diane; Lee, Cheryl T

    2009-09-15

    Bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the United States and, on a per capita basis, is the most expensive cancer from diagnosis to death. Unfortunately, National Cancer Institute funding for bladder cancer is quite low when compared with other common malignancies. Limited funding has stifled research opportunities for new and established investigators, ultimately encouraging them to redirect research efforts to other organ sites. Waning interest of scientists has further fueled the cycle of modest funding for bladder cancer. One important consequence of this has been a lack of scientific advancement in the field. Patient advocates have decidedly advanced research efforts in many cancer sites. Breast, prostate, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer advocates have organized highly successful campaigns to lobby the federal government and the medical community to devote increased attention and funding to understudied malignancies and to conduct relevant studies to better understand the therapy, diagnosis, and prevention of these diseases. Bladder cancer survivors have lacked a coordinated advocacy voice until recently. A concerted effort to align bladder cancer advocates, clinicians, and urologic organizations is essential to define the greatest needs in bladder cancer and to develop related solutions. This position paper represents a collaborative discussion to define the most concerning trends and greatest needs in the field of bladder cancer as outlined by the Bladder Cancer Think Tank, the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, and the Society of Urologic Oncology.

  18. Scaling up cervical cancer screening in the midst of human papillomavirus vaccination advocacy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawattananon Yot

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening tests for cervical cancer are effective in reducing the disease burden. In Thailand, a Pap smear program has been implemented throughout the country for 40 years. In 2008 the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH unexpectedly decided to scale up the coverage of free cervical cancer screening services, to meet an ambitious target. This study analyzes the processes and factors that drove this policy innovation in the area of cervical cancer control in Thailand. Methods In-depth interviews with key policy actors and review of relevant documents were conducted in 2009. Data analysis was guided by a framework, developed on public policy models and existing literature on scaling-up health care interventions. Results Between 2006 and 2008 international organizations and the vaccine industry advocated the introduction of Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccine for the primary prevention of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, a local study suggested that the vaccine was considerably less cost-effective than cervical cancer screening in the Thai context. Then, from August to December 2008, the MoPH carried out a campaign to expand the coverage of its cervical cancer screening program, targeting one million women. The study reveals that several factors were influential in focusing the attention of policymakers on strengthening the screening services. These included the high burden of cervical cancer in Thailand, the launch of the HPV vaccine onto the global and domestic markets, the country’s political instability, and the dissemination of scientific evidence regarding the appropriateness of different options for cervical cancer prevention. Influenced by the country’s political crisis, the MoPH’s campaign was devised in a very short time. In the view of the responsible health officials, the campaign was not successful and indeed, did not achieve its ambitious target. Conclusion The Thai case study suggests that the political crisis was a

  19. Patient Advocacy in an Obstetric Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan-Fancher, Lisa M

    2016-10-01

    A correlation study design was used to examine the interrelatedness of power, attitudes regarding intermittent fetal monitoring, and perceived barriers to research utilization with a labor and delivery nurse's attitude toward patient advocacy using the conceptual framework of the science of unitary human beings. The linear combination of the three independent variables was significantly correlated to attitude toward patient advocacy and power as knowing participation in change had the greatest impact on patient advocacy.

  20. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-associated......-targeting anti-cancer drugs. In this review we compile our current knowledge on cancer-associated changes in lysosomal composition and discuss the consequences of these alterations to cancer progression and the possibilities they can bring to cancer therapy.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 July 2012; doi...

  1. Experiencing Health Advocacy During Cervical Cancer Awareness Week: A National Initiative for Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Glenn; Finlayson, Sarah; Luna, Vilma; Miller, Dianne; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Objectif : Le Collège royal des médecins et chirurgiens du Canada exige que les résidents fassent preuve de compétence dans le rôle de promoteur de la santé (PS ou promotion de la santé). Nous avons cherché à élaborer et à mettre en œuvre, à l’intention des résidents en obstétrique-gynécologie, un module pédagogique national traitant de ce rôle de PS. Ce programme pilote était centré sur la prévention du cancer du col utérin, soit un sujet se prêtant bien à l’application des principes de la promotion de la santé. Méthodes : Un module pédagogique a été élaboré et transmis à tous les programmes de résidence en obstétrique-gynécologie au Canada. Ce module décrit les options de PS mettant en jeu le dépistage de la dysplasie cervicale (telles qu’une clinique visant l’élargissement de la population desservie ou un forum d’éducation visant le public / la population étudiante) qui devaient être mises en œuvre au cours de la Semaine de sensibilisation au cancer du col de l’utérus. La réussite a été mesurée en fonction du nombre de programmes mettant en œuvre le curriculum, du nombre de résidents y ayant participé, de la diversité des projets mis en œuvre, de la nature des personnes (patientes ou apprenants) atteintes par le programme et de l’expérience globale des stagiaires. Résultats : Trois programmes ont mis en œuvre le curriculum en 2011, un programme l’a fait en 2012 et sept l’ont fait en 2013. Après trois ans, le module s’est attiré la participation directe ou indirecte de sept des 16 facultés de médecine, de plus de 100 résidents et de milliers de femmes. De plus, les attributs de la PS vécus par les résidents ont été identifiés : travail d’équipe, leadership, connaissances accrues au sujet des systèmes, capital social accru au sein de la communauté, créativité, innovation et adaptabilité. Conclusion : Nous avons démontré qu’un module pédagogique, visant

  2. Carrying out a Language Policy Change: Advocacy Coalitions and the Management of Linguistic Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloboda, Marian; Szabo-Gilinger, Eszter; Vigers, Dick; Simicic, Lucija

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on agency in language policy change. The object of the analysis is the processes of bilingualization of signage in three European towns. Located in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Wales, the towns differ in various respects, including the extent to which signage language policies have faced opposition and threatened social…

  3. More than a message: framing public health advocacy to change corporate practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lori; Wallack, Lawrence; Woodruff, Katie

    2005-06-01

    Framing battles in public health illustrate the tension in our society between individual freedom and collective responsibility. This article describes how two frames, market justice and social justice, first articulated in a public health context by Dan Beauchamp, influence public dialogue on the health consequences of corporate practices. The authors argue that public health advocates must articulate the social justice values motivating the changes they seek in specific policy battles that will be debated in the context of news coverage. The authors conclude with lessons for health education practitioners who need to frame public health issues in contentious and controversial policy contexts. Specific lessons include the importance of understanding the existing values and beliefs motivating the public health change being sought, the benefits of articulating core messages that correspond to shared values, and the necessity of developing media skills to compete effectively with adversaries in public debate.

  4. Invoking Subordinate Attitude Change through Counterattitudinal Advocacy: An Experiment in Persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Survey. The majority of the participants were assigned to avionics repair shops although there were participants from other areas as well (jet engine...attitude change, despite the salience of futuro argunents which might otherwise have impacted upon the subordinate. It therefore becomes the imperative...Tactical Fighter Wing’s Avionics Branch in December of 1983 and then served as Maintenance Supervisor of the 1st Component Repair Squadron from March 1985

  5. Breast Cancer Survivor Advocacy at a University Hospital: Development of a Peer Support Program with Evaluation by Patients, Advocates, and Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirrielees, Jennifer A; Breckheimer, Kayla R; White, Teresa A; Denure, Deb A; Schroeder, Michelle M; Gaines, Martha E; Wilke, Lee G; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2017-03-01

    Peer-to-peer support programs provide unique psychosocial and educational support for breast cancer patients. A Patient Survivor Advocacy (PSA) program was developed by the University of Wisconsin Breast Center (UWBC) to provide support for newly diagnosed patients from peers who had completed primary treatment. In this study, we evaluated patient, advocate, and clinician experience with the PSA program. A program matching volunteer peer advocates at least 1 year removed from primary treatment with newly diagnosed patients was developed. Peer advocates were recruited from the practices of UWBC clinicians and received in-person training on six dimensions of peer advocacy. Trained advocates were then paired based on demographic and medical history with new patients referred to the program. Survey assessment tools were distributed to assess peer advocate and patient satisfaction, as well as clinician experience. Forty patients have been matched with seven advocates, with contact largely by email (53 %) or phone (36 %). Patients and peer advocates reported satisfaction with the program. The majority of patients (92.9 %) reported that the program was "helpful" and that they would recommend the PSA program to another woman with breast cancer. All peer advocates (100 %) responded with a sense of achievement in their advocate roles. Clinicians noted challenges in referral to the program. Peer advocates can provide key emotional and psychosocial support to newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. The peer advocate, patient, and clinician feedback collected in this study will inform the future development of this program at our and peer institutions.

  6. Epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jia; Mingzhou Guo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic changes frequently occur in human colorectal cancer.Genomic global hypomethylation,gene promoter region hypermethylation,histone modifications,and alteration of miRNA patterns are major epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer.Loss of imprinting (LOI) is associated with colorectal neoplasia.Folate deficiency may cause colorectal carcinogenesis by inducing gene-specific hypermethylation and genomic global hypomethylation.HDAC inhibitors and demethylating agents have been approved by the FDA for myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia treatment.Non-coding RNA is regarded as another kind of epigenetic marker in colorectal cancer.This review is mainly focused on DNA methylation,histone modification,and microRNA changes in colorectal cancer.

  7. Philosophy + Advocacy = Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutt, Kevin; Townley, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about music advocacy strategies has long been promoted as important for music educators, not only for the benefit of their individual programs but also for the specific benefit of music students and the general public. This article suggests an approach to advocacy grounded in the teacher's professional beliefs, phrased in terms…

  8. Lipids changes in liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jing-ting; XU Ning; ZHANG Xiao-ying; WU Chang-ping

    2007-01-01

    Liver is one of the most important organs in energy metabolism.Most plasma apolipoproteins and endogenous lipids and lipoproteins are synthesized in the liver.It depends on the integrity of liver cellular function,which ensures homeostasis of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism.When liver cancer occurs,these processes are impaired and the plasma lipid and lipoprotein patterns may be changed.Liver cancer is the fifth common malignant tumor worldwide,and is closely related to the infections of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV).HBV and HCV infections are quite common in China and other Southeast Asian countries.In addition,liver cancer is often followed by a procession of chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis,so that hepatic function is damaged obviously on these bases,which may significantly influence lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in vivo.In this review we summarize the clinical significance of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism under liver cancer.

  9. Perspective: Physician advocacy: what is it and how do we do it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Mark A; Wong, Shale L; Federico, Steven G

    2010-01-01

    Many medical authors and organizations have called for physician advocacy as a core component of medical professionalism. Despite widespread acceptance of advocacy as a professional obligation, the concept remains problematic within the profession of medicine because it remains undefined in concept, scope, and practice. If advocacy is to be a professional imperative, then medical schools and graduate education programs must deliberately train physicians as advocates. Accrediting bodies must clearly define advocacy competencies, and all physicians must meet them at some basic level. Sustaining and fostering physician advocacy will require modest changes to both undergraduate and graduate medical education. Developing advocacy training and practice opportunities for practicing physicians will also be necessary. In this article, as first steps toward building a model for competency-based physician advocacy training and delineating physician advocacy in common practice, the authors propose a definition and, using the biographies of actual physician advocates, describe the spectrum of physician advocacy.

  10. The voice of Florence Nightingale on advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selanders, Louise C; Crane, Patrick C

    2012-01-31

    Modern nursing is complex, ever changing, and multi focused. Since the time of Florence Nightingale, however, the goal of nursing has remained unchanged, namely to provide a safe and caring environment that promotes patient health and well being. Effective use of an interpersonal tool, such as advocacy, enhances the care-giving environment. Nightingale used advocacy early and often in the development of modern nursing. By reading her many letters and publications that have survived, it is possible to identify her professional goals and techniques. Specifically, Nightingale valued egalitarian human rights and developed leadership principles and practices that provide useful advocacy techniques for nurses practicing in the 21st century. In this article we will review the accomplishments of Florence Nightingale, discuss advocacy in nursing and show how Nightingale used advocacy through promoting both egalitarian human rights and leadership activities. We will conclude by exploring how Nightingale's advocacy is as relevant for the 21st century as it was for the 19th century.

  11. Advocacy to address disabling diseases: TDR holds brainstorming session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The UN Development Program/World Bank/World Health Organization's Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases hosted a meeting in January 1998 to discuss new ways of generating sustained commitment to combat disabling tropical diseases, such as filariasis and onchocerciasis. The participants agreed that advocacy should be targeted to a wider audience than the health sector, including international donors, industry, national governments, and endemic communities themselves. Advocacy efforts will be supported by development of a standard protocol that will 1) identify and present the type of evidence that generates sustainable commitment, 2) develop and use appropriate messages for each audience, 3) evaluate new advocacy approaches for their impact on behavioral change and disease control, and 4) evaluate advocacy campaigns. Advocacy about lymphatic filariasis will target all levels, while advocacy about onchocerciasis will target national and local levels.

  12. Advocacy and technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A highly structured treatment is presented of adversarial systems as they apply to technology assessment. One approach to the problem of adequate criteria of assessment focuses upon the internal operations of assessment entities; operations include problem perception, problem formulation, selection, utilization, determination, and evaluation. Potential contributions of advocacy as a mode of inquiry in technology are discussed; advocacy is evaluated by representative sets of criteria of adequate assessment which include participant criteria, perspectives criteria, situations criteria, base values criteria, and strategies criteria.

  13. Technological changes in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, L

    1992-01-01

    Exposures and technologies in the workplace are changing due to a variety of factors, including newly developed technologies, mechanization and automation, and improvements in industrial hygiene primarily effected in many developed countries. In addition substitution and removal of carcinogenic constituents in the workplace and general environment are increasing in a number of instances, particularly in North America, Western Europe, and Japan, and they are being accompanied as well by remediation either by source reduction, recycling, or compliance to more stringent national and international regulations and standards. This overview highlights some of the strategies employed in the technological changes in cancer prevention and cites examples in source reduction, changes in formulation, product or process changes, recycling, and hazardous materials management.

  14. Advocacy and Accessibility Standards in the New "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ashley K.; Blackwell, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the changes in the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification's 2010 "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors" as they relate to Section C: Advocacy and Accessibility. Ethical issues are identified and discussed in relation to advocacy skills and to advocacy with, and on behalf of, the client; to…

  15. Technological changes in cancer prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbein, L. (International Life Sciences Institute, Washington (United States). Risk Science Institute)

    1992-01-01

    Exposures and technologies in the workplace are changing due to a variety of factors, including newly developed technologies, mechanization and automation, and improvements in industrial hygiene primarily effected in many developed countries. In addition substitution and removal of carcinogenic constituents in the workplace and general environment are increasing in a number of instances, particularly in North America, Western Europe, and Japan, and they are being accompanied as well by remediation either by source reduction, recycling, or compliance to more stringent national and international regulations and standards. This overview highlights some of the strategies employed in the technological ages in cancer prevention and cites examples in source reduction, changes in formulation, product or process changes, recycling, and hazardous materials management

  16. Public health and media advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lori; Krasnow, Ingrid Daffner

    2014-01-01

    Media advocacy blends communications, science, politics, and advocacy to advance public health goals. In this article, we explain how media advocacy supports the social justice grounding of public health while addressing public health's "wicked problems" in the context of American politics. We outline media advocacy's theoretical foundations in agenda setting and framing and describe its practical application, from the layers of strategy to storytelling, which can illuminate public health solutions for journalists, policy makers, and the general public. Finally, we describe the challenges in evaluating media advocacy campaigns.

  17. Advocacy for eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasiraj D Ravilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of eye care service delivery is often dependant on how the different stakeholders are aligned. These stakeholders range from the ministries of health who have the capacity to grant government subsidies for eye care, down to the primary healthcare workers who can be enrolled to screen for basic eye diseases. Advocacy is a tool that can help service providers draw the attention of key stakeholders to a particular area of concern. By enlisting the support, endorsement and participation of a wider circle of players, advocacy can help to improve the penetration and effectiveness of the services provided. There are several factors in the external environmental that influence the eye care services - such as the availability of trained manpower, supply of eye care consumables, government rules and regulations. There are several instances where successful advocacy has helped to create an enabling environment for eye care service delivery. Providing eye care services in developing countries requires the support - either for direct patient care or for support services such as producing trained manpower or for research and dissemination. Such support, in the form of financial or other resources, can be garnered through advocacy.

  18. Changing paradigm in treatment of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sundaram Viswanath; Abhishek Pathak; Amul Kapoor; Anvesh Rathore; Bhupendra Nath Kapur

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest forms of cancer. It accounts for 13% of all new cancer cases and 19% of cancer-related deaths. In India, lung cancer constitutes 6.9% of all new cancer cases and 9.3% of all cancer cases. There has also been a dramatic rise worldwide in both the absolute and relative frequencies of lung cancer occurrence. In 1953 it became the most common cause of cancer mortality in men. By 1985, it became the leading cause of cancer deaths in women, causing almost twice as many deaths as breast cancer. The demographic proifle of lung cancer has changed greatly over the years; however, methods for diagnosing, screening, and managing lung cancer patients have improved. This is due to our growing understanding of the biology of lung cancer. It is now possible to further deifne lung cancer types beyond small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Moreover, new histology-based therapeutic modalities have been developed, and more new lung cancer biomarkers have been uncovered. Therefore, more detailed histological characterization of lung cancer samples is warranted in order to determine the best course of treatment for speciifc patients. This review article describes how these new molecular technologies are shaping the way lung cancer can be treated in future.

  19. Patient advocacy: the technologist's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2004-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the various ways in which imaging professionals can demonstrate patient advocacy on a day-to-day basis and throughout their careers. Advocacy encompasses a wide range of attitudes and activities, and implementing its principles can bring new enthusiasm to the workplace and increase job satisfaction. After completing this article, readers will: Describe the fundamental aspects of advocacy. Know how to handle conflict and explain why conflict is necessary. Understand the challenges to advocacy. Apply patient advocacy in the context of diagnostic imaging. Recognize the radiologic technologist's important role in ensuring patient safety. Identify how professional codes and standards, as well as federal and state laws, encourage advocacy efforts.

  20. Building a Latin American cancer patient advocacy movement: Latin American cancer NGO regional overview Desarrollando un movimiento de apoyo para pacientes de cáncer en America Latina: resumen regional - ONGs de cáncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Durstine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the this paper is to assess and identify the key strengths and weaknesses for cancer control NGOs in Latin America, with the goal to make recommendations about how to improve thev impact of the patient advocacy movement as it pertains to cancer. The methods included literature review, expert interviews and site visits to Latin American cancer hospitals and NGOs. The overall findings conclude that NGOs currently do not take a leadership role in cancer control in Latin America. The lack of a survivorship movement, faulty patient information services and failure of the governments to include NGOs in policy creation are identified as areas for further project work and collaboration. The stigma of cancer still remains and a burgeoning patient movement can be created to help destigmatize and debunk the myths that surround cancer.El objetivo de este artículo es el de identificar y evaluar las fortalezas y debilidades clave de las ONG dedicadas al control del cáncer en Latinoamérica, con el fin de generar recomendaciones sobre el modo de mejorar el impacto del movimiento de apoyo para pacientes de cáncer. Los métodos incluyeron una revisión de la literatura, entrevistas a expertos y visitas a hospiptales y ONG dedicados al cáncer en Latinoamérica. Los hallazgos principales permiten concluir que en este momento las ONG no tienen un rol de liderazgo para el control del cáncer en Latinoamérica. La ausencia de un movimiento de sobrevivientes, servicios de información deficientes a los pacientes y el fracaso del gobierno para incluir a las ONG en la creación de políticas se identifican como áreas de trabajo y colaboración en proyectos a futuro. El estigma del cáncer aún subsiste y es factible crear un movimiento que florezca y ayude a desvanecerlo al exponer los mitos que rodean este padecimiento.

  1. Advocacy and child neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Scott D

    2014-11-01

    Pediatricians have a unique opportunity to intervene in the lives of children to identify and to prevent neglect. While it remains important to care for individual patients affected by neglect, the ecological model of child neglect requires intervention at the parent, family, community, and societal levels. Pediatricians can improve the outcomes for children by advocating for policies and interventions at each level. Effective advocacy principally requires the willingness to tackle broader issues beyond individual clinical care. Working with local, state, and national organizations, pediatricians can contribute a unified voice to promote evidence-based policies and programs that improve the well-being of children.

  2. Advocacy and IPR, tutorial 4

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    With open access and repositories assuming a high profile some may question whether advocacy is still necessary. Those involved in the business of setting up and populating repositories are aware that in the majority of institutions there is still a great need for advocacy. This tutorial will give participants an opportunity to discuss different advocacy methods and approaches, including the 'top down' and 'bottom up' approach, publicity methods and the opportunities offered by funding body positions on open access. Participants will have the opportunity to share experiences of what works and what doesn't. The advocacy role often encompasses responsibility for advising academics on IPR issues. This is a particularly critical area where repository staff are engaged in depositing content on behalf of academics. The tutorial will offer an opportunity to discuss the IPR issues encountered by those managing repositories. The tutorial will draw on the experience of participants who have been engaged in advocacy act...

  3. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among Iranian nurses. Method This study was conducted by grounded theory method. Participants were 24 Iranian registered nurses working in a large university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and simultaneously Constant comparative analysis was used according to the Strauss and Corbin method. Results Through data analysis, several main themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated patient advocacy. Nurses in this study identified powerlessness, lack of support, law, code of ethics and motivation, limited communication, physicians leading, risk of advocacy, royalty to peers, and insufficient time to interact with patients and families as barriers to advocacy. As for factors that facilitated nurses to act as a patient advocate, it was found that the nature of nurse-patient relationship, recognizing patients' needs, nurses' responsibility, physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills could be influential in adopting the advocacy role. Conclusion Participants believed that in this context taking an advocacy role is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, they make decisions and act as a patient's advocate in any situation concerning patient needs and status of barriers and facilitators. In most cases, they can not act at an optimal level; instead they accept only what they can do, which we called 'limited advocacy' in

  4. Patient advocacy: the role of the nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pin Pin

    2015-06-10

    The role of nurses as patient advocates is well recognised by healthcare professionals, yet the processes and practices involved in patient advocacy are not clearly understood. A suboptimal level of advocacy is often apparent in the literature, encompassing paternalistic concepts of protecting patients from harm. This article examines the concept of patient advocacy and its relevance to nursing, associated goals and outcomes of advocacy and the processes and practices involved. It provides insights into how nurses practise patient advocacy in healthcare settings and how they may develop this role further, through formal education, workplace learning, role modelling by expert nurses and promoting an organisational culture conducive to patient advocacy.

  5. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert L Hollis; Charlie Gourley

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research.

  6. College Student Narratives about Learning and Using Self-Advocacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly-Cano, Meada; Vaccaro, Annemarie; Newman, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Self-advocacy is the ability to communicate one's needs and wants and to make decisions about the supports needed to achieve them (Stodden, Conway, & Chang, 2003). Research shows self-advocacy skills are related to academic performance and successful adaptation to college (Adams & Proctor, 2010; Getzel & Thoma, 2008; Hadley, 2006;…

  7. Exploration of Undergraduate Preservice Teachers' Experiences Learning Advocacy: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengale, Kelley; Childers-McKee, Cherese; Benavides, Aerin

    2014-01-01

    Applying transformational critical advocacy research in college instruction can be a powerful way to engage students in challenging inequity in society and promoting positive changes. Few studies systematically measure the impact of such pedagogy on the development of college students' beliefs about advocacy. In this mixed methods study, we…

  8. Glycan changes: cancer metastasis and anti-cancer vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Min Li; Lujun Song; Xinyu Qin

    2010-12-01

    Complex carbohydrates, which are major components of the cell membrane, perform important functions in cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions, as well as in signal transduction. They comprise three kinds of biomolecules: glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycosphingolipids. Recent studies have also shown that glycan changes in malignant cells take a variety of forms and mediate key pathophysiological events during the various stages of tumour progression. Glycosylation changes are universal hallmarks of malignant transformation and tumour progression in human cancer, which take place on the whole cells or some specific molecules. Accordingly, those changes make them prominent candidates for cancer biomarkers in the meantime. This review mainly focuses on the correlation between glycosylation and the metastasis potential of tumour cells from comprehensive aspects to further address the vital roles of glycans in oncogenesising. Moreover, utilizing these glycosylation changes to ward off tumour metastasis by means of anti-adhesion approach or devising anti-cancer vaccine is one of promising targets of future study.

  9. Practitioner Perceptions of School Library Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    School library advocacy is increasingly important due to decreases in funding and staff. National organizations attempt to engage school librarians in advocacy and have developed resources and tools to assist with this task. However, there is little research examining how practicing school librarians engage in advocacy and how their advocacy…

  10. Competition Advocacy: the Italian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rebecchini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Competition advocacy is considered, together with enforcement, the core business of an antitrust authority. Broadly speaking there are at least three main tasks regularly performed by most, if not all, antitrust agencies that are amenable to the advocacy function: addressing laws and regulations in order to remove unnecessary impediments to competition; engaging in sector enquiries to understand markets behavior and identify critical issues; explaining the benefits of open competitive markets to the public opinion. This article examines these three main tasks and outlines the challenges for competition agencies, with references to the experience of the Italian Competition Authority (ICA and the initiatives undertaken at international level.

  11. Doctors on Values and Advocacy: A Qualitative and Evaluative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Siun; Little, Miles

    2016-05-11

    Doctors are increasingly enjoined by their professional organisations to involve themselves in supraclinical advocacy, which embraces activities focused on changing practice and the system in order to address the social determinants of health. The moral basis for doctors' decisions on whether or not to do so has been the subject of little empirical research. This opportunistic qualitative study of the values of medical graduates associated with the Sydney Medical School explores the processes that contribute to doctors' decisions about taking up the advocate role. Our findings show that personal ideals were more important than professional commitments in shaping doctors' decisions on engagement in advocacy. Experiences in early life and during training, including exposure to power and powerlessness, significantly influenced their role choices. Doctors included supraclinical advocacy in their mature practices if it satisfied their desire to achieve excellence. These findings suggest that common approaches to promoting and facilitating advocacy as an individual professional obligation are not fully congruent with the experiences and values of doctors that are significant in creating the advocate. It would seem important to understand better the moral commitments inherent in advocacy to inform future developments in codes of medical ethics and medical education programs.

  12. Research Advocacy at NCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patient perspective research advocates brings into NCI’s research enterprise helps to inform research focus and support the dissemination of results that lead to new and better cancer prevention, detection, and treatment methods.

  13. Breast Cancer Cells May Change When They Spread to Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162415.html Breast Cancer Cells May Change When They Spread to Brain: ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When breast cancer spreads to the brain, important molecular changes may ...

  14. Advocacy Networks and Romani Politics in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vermeersch

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the impact of the activity of international solidarity and human rights organizations on the political involvement of the Roma in Central and Eastern Europe. It will conclude that the increase of an international advocacy network focussing on the plight of the Roma has offered new opportunities to domestic Romani organizations for pressuring governments to change state behaviour or to introduce new policy. In some cases, governments have even appointed Romani personalities from well-known advocacy organizations to advisory positions. However, the influence of a growing advocacy network has not been able yet to create a better democratically elected representation of the Roma in the central arenas of political decision-making on domestic level. Moreover, within domestic Romani movements there is growing discussion about the legitimacy and accountability of Romani advisors.

  15. Advocacy and policy issues Tutorial 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    This tutorial is aimed at those who are new to the area of repositories and who want to learn more about key advocacy and policy issues. The tutorial will include information and advice on putting together an institutional advocacy campaign and developing policies for your repository. There will be opportunities for participants to share experiences and to ask questions. The tutorial will include a practical exercise in developing an advocacy presentation. Participants with experience of advocacy are welcome to attend the session to share their experiences, but should bear in mind that it is aimed primarily at those looking for help and advice in advocacy matters.

  16. Walker's Sampler: Youth Advocacy Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Clarence; And Others

    This resource book, which provides a sampling of programs developed by the Youth Advocacy Projects of the Teacher Corps on behalf of troubled youth, is organized ln tbree major sections. Section I presents outlines, resources, and critiques of staff development courses, organized according to target youth group(s) and by subject area. Section II…

  17. Self-reported evaluation of competencies and attitudes by physicians-in-training before and after a single day legislative advocacy experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntoon Kristin M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advocacy is increasingly being recognized as a core element of medical professionalism and efforts are underway to incorporate advocacy training into graduate and undergraduate medical school curricula. While limited data exist to quantify physician attitudes toward advocacy, even less has been done to assess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of future physicians. The purpose of this study was to assess students’ experiences and attitudes toward legislative advocacy, cutting out using a convience sample. Methods A paper survey based on previously validated surveys was administered to a convenience sample of premedical and medical student participants attending a National Advocacy Day in Washington, DC, in March 2011, both before and after their advocacy experiences. Responses were anonymous and either categorical ( or ordinal, using a 5-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed statistically to evaluate demographics and compare changes in pre- and post-experience attitude and skills. Results Data from 108 pre-advocacy and 50 post-advocacy surveys were analyzed yielding a response rate of 46.3%. Following a single advocacy experience, subjects felt they were more likely to contact their legislators about healthcare issues (p = 0.03, to meet in person with their legislators (p  Conclusions A one-time practical advocacy experience has a positive influence on students’ knowledge, skills and attitudes towards legislative advocacy. Practical experience is an important method of furthering medical education in advocacy and further research is necessary to assess its impact in a broader population.

  18. Reducing violent injuries: priorities for pediatrician advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolins, J C; Christoffel, K K

    1994-10-01

    A basic framework for developing an advocacy plan must systematically break down the large task of policy development implementation into manageable components. The basic framework described in detail in this paper includes three steps: Setting policy objectives by narrowing the scope of policy, by reviewing policy options, and by examining options against selected criteria. Developing strategies for educating the public and for approaching legislative/regulatory bodies. Evaluating the effectiveness of the advocacy action plan as a process and as an agent for change. To illustrate the variety of ways in which pediatricians can be involved in the policy process to reduce violent injuries among children and adolescents, we apply this systematic approach to three priority areas. Prohibiting the use of corporal punishment in schools is intended to curb the institutionalized legitimacy of violence that has been associated with future use of violence. Efforts to remove handguns from the environments of children and adolescents are aimed at reducing the numbers of firearm injuries inflicted upon and by minors. Comprehensive treatment of adolescent victims of assault is intended to decrease the reoccurrence of violent injuries.

  19. Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    TITLE: Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer? PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Harikrishna Nakshatri, B.V.Sc., PhD. Kasi...Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer? 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1...positive breast cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Diabetes , Intrinsic subtypes, Breast Cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  20. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  1. 78 FR 73586 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project..., Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  2. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  3. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... cancellation of the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee..., Acting Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  4. Population-focused nursing: advocacy for vulnerable populations in an RN-BSN program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Melissa; Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an innovative learning activity for online RN-BSN students designed to foster advocacy for vulnerable populations. The Vulnerable Population Advocacy Assignment, included as a component of the online Population-Focused Nursing class, provides students with the opportunity to identify and develop an awareness of issues impacting vulnerable populations and to advocate for policy changes that will influence the health of individuals, families, and populations. RN-BSN students build on previous knowledge and skills in professional communication and advocacy as they develop a policy statement designed to address health disparities impacting local, national, and global populations.

  5. Child maltreatment law and policy as a foundation for child advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bross, Donald C; Krugman, Richard D

    2009-04-01

    Advocacy for children is a fundamental pediatric concern and activity. Notwithstanding achievements for children to date, pediatrics can do more in the twenty-first century to advocate for children and promote research on ways in which advocacy for children can be improved. Evidence-based advocacy should take many directions including legislation, system change in local and state agencies such as social services and health departments, financial assistance including Medicaid, evidence provided to courts at trial and on appeal through "friend of the court" participation, family guidance, public education, and the promotion of pediatric law and bioethics.

  6. Cancer type-specific epigenetic changes: gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major cause of mortality despite declining rate in the world. Epigenetic alterations contribute significantly to the development and progression of gastric tumors. Epigenetic refers to the number of modifications of the chromatin structure that affect gene expression without altering the primary sequence of DNA, and these changes lead to transcriptional activation or silencing of the gene. Over the years, the study of epigenetic processes has increased, and novel therapeutic approaches have emerged. This chapter summarizes the main epigenomic mechanisms described recently involved in gastric carcinogenesis, focusing on the roles that aberrant DNA methylation, histone modifications (histone acetylation and methylation), and miRNAs (oncogenic and tumor suppressor function of miRNA) play in the onset and progression of gastric tumors. Clinical implications of these epigenetic alterations in GC are also discussed.

  7. From Classroom to Capitol: Building Advocacy Capacity Through State-Level Advocacy Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Lydia; Starry, Bethany; Gangi, Catherine; Lube, Lauren M; Cedergren, Anders; Whitney, Emily; Rees, Keely

    2016-11-01

    This commentary provides insight from Community Health Education and Master of Public Health students on the benefits of participating in a state-level Advocacy Experience and provides a theoretical framework for increased advocacy intention among students as a result of participating in a state-level Advocacy Experience. Providing students the opportunity to translate what they learn about advocacy in the classroom into advocacy in action with policy makers is vital to the career development of our future health education professionals and is key to increasing advocacy capacity within our profession. This article builds on previous work from emerging public health professionals highlighting the role of policy advocacy in professional development and provides additional perspectives from the next generation of health education specialists.

  8. Autism Advocacy: A Network Striving for Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkonen, Tiina; Ream, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, we examine the rise of autism on the policy agenda and the new generation of autism advocacy. We focus especially on interconnections between the rhetoric about autism in the media and the emergence and political effectiveness of Autism Speaks, the nation's largest autism advocacy group. We portray how…

  9. Health Advocacy--Counting the Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Lorna; Marama, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Access to, and delivery of, safe and culturally appropriate health services is increasingly important in New Zealand. This paper will focus on counting the costs of health advocacy through the experience of a small non government charitable organisation, the Health Advocates Trust, (HAT) which aimed to provide advocacy services for a wide range of…

  10. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advocacy responsibilities. 1321.13 Section 1321.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES... AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  11. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  12. Advocacy for Development: Effectiveness, Monitoring and Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, J.B.; Wessel, van M.G.J.; Hilhorst, D.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation of advocacy for development is an emerging field. Many CSOs, donors and evaluators are now involved with advocacy. Questions of how to understand and assess programmes are urgent. This e-book seeks to contribute to practical capacity on this front on the basis of lessons le

  13. Pengembangan Panduan Pelatihan Self Advocacy Siswa SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariadi Ahmad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Individu sebagai makhluk sosial mempunyai dorongan untuk berintraksi, dalam interaksi sosial individu memerlukan keterampilan sosial yang baik. Self advocacy sebagai salah satu bagian keterampilan sosial sangat perlu diajarkan kepada siswa. Siswa merupakan individu yang sedang mengalami perubahan pisik, psikis, fase transisi, kebimbangan jati diri dan identitas diri. Penelitian ini adalah penelitian pengembangan panduan pelatihan self advocacy siswa SMP, yang bertujuan meng-hasilkan panduan yang memenuhi akseptabilitas dan efektif meningkatkan self advocacy siswa SMP. Model pengembagan meggunakan model Borg & Gall (1983. Hasil uji ahli dan uji pengguna terhadap panduan telah memenuhi kriteria akseptabilitas, dari hasil pretest dan posttest siswa yang diukur dengan skala self advocacy menunjukkan peningkatan. Kata kunci : pengembangan, panduan pelatihan, self advocacy

  14. Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    TITLE: Can Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of Breast Cancer ? PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Harikrishna Nakshatri, B.V.Sc., PhD Kasi R... Diabetes Change the Intrinsic Subtype Specificity of 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0651...as in type II diabetes , to disrupt GATA- 3:FOXA1:ERα network. Insulin induced the expression of T-bet in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and MCF-7 cells

  15. Experiencing existential changes: the lived experience of having cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, S; Hamrin, E

    1996-02-01

    This phenomenological study was designed to explore the lived experience of having cancer, as perceived by people who have been diagnosed and treated for cancer. The aim of the study was to add to the knowledge and understanding of this complex human phenomenon. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with nine people who were in the remission or recovery phase of cancer. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim for each participant. Through intersubjective interactions and thematic analysis, the essential description of the lived experience of having cancer was constructed. The overriding theme of the lived experience of having cancer is "experiencing existential changes." Five basic subthemes were identified in the participants accounts, all of which are part of the existential changes involved in the lived experience of having cancer. These are: uncertainty, vulnerability, isolation, discomfort, and redefinition. The study can increase the understanding of what it is like to have cancer.

  16. Community Health Worker Professional Advocacy: Voices of Action from the 2014 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Samantha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Phillips, David; Haywoord, Catherine; Redondo, Floribella; Bell, Melanie L; Ingram, Maia

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explores community health worker (CHW) engagement in professional advocacy. Data from the National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey (n = 1661) assessed the relationship between CHW professional advocacy and CHW demographics, and work characteristics. Qualitative data articulated the quality of professional advocacy efforts. Approximately, 30% of CHW respondents advocated for professional advancement or collaborated with other CHWs to advance the workforce. Advocacy was more prevalent among CHWs affiliated with a professional network. CHW advocacy targeted recognition of the field, appropriate training and compensation, and sustainable funding. CHW professional advocacy is imperative to advancement of the field.

  17. The Changing Landscape of Lung Cancer Research and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Along with the Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) community, the National Cancer Institute will be co-hosting a lively and interactive Google Hangout on Air about the changing landscape of lung cancer research and treatment. During the chat, viewers will have the opportunity to pose questions to a panel of lung cancer experts including NCI's Dr. Shakun Malik, the head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Chief of Medical Oncology, Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven and David Tom Cooke MD FACS, Head, Section of General Thoracic Surgery University of California, Davis. You can also learn more and follow along on the #LCSM Chat page. The chat will be moderated by lung cancer advocate and #LCSM co-founder, Janet Freeman-Daily. To ask questions of our experts, simply use the #LCSM hashtag during the chat.

  18. 议联盟框架视角下我国计划生育政策变迁分析%An Analysis of the Changes in China’s Family Planning Policy From the Perspective of the Advocacy Coalition Framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔开华; 徐菡; 蒋文丽

    2015-01-01

    The Advocacy Coalition Framework,a replacement for policy stage theory,has long been used in analyzing policy changes in western countries. Based on the Advocacy Coalition Framework,this paper analyzes the three phases of the change of China’s family planning policy: the exploration phase when PRC was first founded,1970s when the policy was under formulation and 1980s when the policy was completed and launched. With the analysis we test the practicability of Advocacy Coalition Framework in interpreting China’s public policy change. Although there exist some problems in its interpretation of the change process of China’s family planning policy due to political and social differences,Advocacy Coalition Framework still provides us with a new way to understand policy change.%倡议联盟框架作为对政策阶段论的替代,在西方国家用来分析政策变迁已经有较长的历史。本文紧扣我国计划生育政策变迁这一社会热点问题,在介绍倡议联盟框架基本结构的基础上,分析了我国计划生育政策变迁的三个阶段——新中国成立之初的探索阶段、20世纪70年代的基本形成阶段以及20世纪80年代政策出台和完善阶段的基本情况,并用倡议联盟框架的基本理论探讨和研究我国计划生育政策的变迁过程,检验倡议联盟框架对我国公共政策变迁的解释性和实用性。当然,由于政治和社会环境的差异,倡议联盟框架对我国计划生育政策变迁过程的解释存在一些不足,但是仍然为人们提供了一个理解政策变迁过程的新途径。

  19. Prevention of Cancer Through Lifestyle Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. James Barnard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA and an abundance of evidence suggests that lifestyle factors including smoking, the typical high-fat, refined-sugar diet and physical inactivity account for the majority of cancer. This review focuses on diet and inactivity as major factors for cancer promotion by inducing insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Elevated levels of serum insulin impact on the liver primarily, increasing the production of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I while reducing the production of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1 resulting in stimulation of tumor cell growth and inhibition of apoptosis (programmed cell death. Adopting a diet low in fat and high in fiber-rich starch foods, which would also include an abundance of antioxidants, combined with regular aerobic exercise might control insulin resistance, reduce the resulting serum factors and thus reduce the risk for many different cancers commonly seen in the USA.

  20. Advocacy in the Western Hemisphere Region: some FPA success stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D J

    1996-01-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation's Vision 2000 Strategic Plan has emphasized advocacy and the training of family planning associations (FPAs) in the Western Hemisphere region. During the summer of 1995 training programs in advocacy leadership management were sponsored for six FPAs in the Bahamas, Suriname, Belize, Colombia, Honduras, and Brazil. At the Western Hemisphere Regional Council Meeting in September 1995 awards were presented to FPAs for media outstanding projects. These FPAs used outreach to the community to promote the goals of Vision 2000. The Bahamas FPA won the Rosa Cisneros Award for articles published in a magazine that is distributed in primary and secondary schools and deals with the activities, achievements, and opinions of students. Issues include: love, relationships, responsibility, and teen pregnancy. A weekly television talk show also addresses the issues facing youth including education, music, community work, sexuality, pregnancy, and the relationship between teenagers and adults. The Family Planning Association of Honduras was also nominated for the award for a radio show on the health of mothers and children, the problems of adolescents, and FP. The newspaper Tiempo received the award for feature articles on social issues and FP. In 1994 the Association distributed thousands of booklets on contraceptives as well as fliers on vasectomy, female sterilization, oral contraceptives, IUDs, condoms, responsible parenthood, high-risk pregnancy, vaginal cytology, and cervical cancer. Similar posters were placed in hospitals and health centers, in 1997 FP posts, and 400 commercial outlets. The Family Planning Association of Suriname also carried out an impressive advocacy program during the period of 1968-93 with the goals of establishing a balance between population growth and the available resources to achieve well-being with regard to education, health care, nutrition, and housing.

  1. Epigenetic changes in virus-associated human cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin Pai LI; Yu Wei LEU; Yu Sun CHANG

    2005-01-01

    Epigenetics of human cancer becomes an area of emerging research direction due to a growing understanding of specific epigenetic pathways and rapid development of detection technologies. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation is a prevalent phenonmena in human cancers. Tumor suppressor genes are often hypermethylated due to the increased activity or deregulation of DNMTs. Increasing evidence also reveals that viral genes are one of the key players in regulating DNA methylation. In this review, we will focus on hypermethylation and tumor suppressor gene silencing and the signal pathways that are involved, particularly in cancers closely associated with the hepatitis B virus, simian virus 40 (SV40), and Epstein-Barr virus. In addition, we will discuss current technologies for genome-wide detection of epigenetically regulated targets, which allow for systematic DNA hypermethylation analysis. The study of epigenetic changes should provide a global view of gene profile in cancer, and epigenetic markers could be used for early detection,prognosis, and therapy of cancer.

  2. Changing patterns of recurrent disease in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, I.; Doornbos, P. M.; Klaase, J. M.; de Bock, G. H.; Wiggers, T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to changes in staging, (neo)-adjuvant treatment and surgical techniques for colorectal cancer (CRC), it is expected that the recurrence pattern will change as well. This study aims to report the current incidence of, and time to recurrent disease (RD), further the localization(s) and

  3. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  4. The Changing World of Breast Cancer: A Radiologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Christiane K

    2015-09-01

    Compared with other fields of medicine, there is hardly an area that has seen such fast development as the world of breast cancer. Indeed, the way we treat breast cancer has changed fundamentally over the past decades. Breast imaging has always been an integral part of this change, and it undergoes constant adjustment to new ways of thinking. This relates not only to the technical tools we use for diagnosing breast cancer but also to the way diagnostic information is used to guide treatment. There is a constant change of concepts for and attitudes toward breast cancer, and a constant flux of new ideas, new treatment approaches, and new insights into the molecular and biological behavior of this disease. Clinical breast radiologists and even more so, clinician scientists, interested in breast imaging need to keep abreast with this rapidly changing world. Diagnostic or treatment approaches that are considered useful today may be abandoned tomorrow. Approaches that seem irrelevant or far too extravagant today may prove clinically useful and adequate next year. Radiologists must constantly question what they do, and align their clinical aims and research objectives with the changing needs of contemporary breast oncology. Moreover, knowledge about the past helps better understand present debates and controversies. Accordingly, in this article, we provide an overview on the evolution of breast imaging and breast cancer treatment, describe current areas of research, and offer an outlook regarding the years to come.

  5. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J. [Elon University, Elon, NC (United States). School Community

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  6. 76 FR 69799 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on...

  7. 76 FR 12418 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: March 14, 2011 through April 29, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The mission of...

  8. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Burden Reduction Project Committee scheduled... cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Audrey...

  9. 75 FR 68403 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment, ideas, and suggestions on...

  10. 76 FR 75951 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel scheduled for Tuesday, December 6, 2011, and Wednesday.... ] Dated: November 30, 2011. Shawn Collins, Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  11. Examining School Counselors' Commitments to Social Justice Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldwisch, Rachel P.

    2016-01-01

    Many school counselors endorse using social justice advocacy to close achievement gaps. In this study, school counselors from a single state scored in the moderate to high range on the Social Issues Advocacy Scale. Results showed alignment between school counselors' self-endorsement of social justice advocacy and scores on the Advocacy…

  12. Development and Assessment of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Linnemeyer, Rachel M.; Bahner, Angela D.; Misialek, Leah Hanson

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and the initial psychometric evaluation of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale in two studies. In the first study, an exploratory factor analysis (n = 278) revealed a four-factor scale, accounting for 71.4% of the variance, measuring different aspects of social issue advocacy: Political and Social Advocacy,…

  13. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melhado, Rachel E., E-mail: raye732001@yahoo.co.uk; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga [Academic Department of Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-28

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  14. The role of evidence-based media advocacy in the promotion of tobacco control policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Ch'uyasonqo H; Carter, Marina I

    2012-06-01

    This article discusses the role of evidence-based media advocacy in the promotion of tobacco control policies. Evidence is a driving force for campaigns seeking to implement a tobacco control policy. An effective campaign is based in evidence that demonstrates why a policy should be implemented, and what the potential benefits are. Media advocacy is the process of disseminating information through the communications media where the aim is to effect action, such as a change of policy, or to alter the public's view of an issue. Discussion focuses on: 1) the importance of, and methods for, collecting and communicating evidence and information to make it clear and usable for legislators, the media, and the public; and 2) the role of earned and paid media in advancing tobacco control issues. The discussion is made within the context of a specific advocacy example; in this case the 2010 campaign to increase the tobacco tax in Mexico.

  15. Effects of a promotor training on local school wellness advocacy capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Eddy A; Ritterman Weintraub, Miranda; Clifton-Hawkins, Nancy; Martinez, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    There is gap between the enactment and implementation of local school wellness policies. Building the capacity of promotores to engage parents in strengthening local school wellness policy implementation is an innovative strategy. This evaluation study examines the effects of 6 hours of promotor advocacy training to improve local school wellness policy implementation. Consistent with psychological empowerment theory, the training and the related toolkit were designed to increase promotores' knowledge and self-efficacy to engage parents in advocating for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Pre-post training questionnaires (n = 74), five posttraining participant focus groups, and four staff member focus groups explored changes in promotor and participating organization capacity. Findings show increased participant self-efficacy, knowledge, and attitudes to advocate for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Participating organizations reported intention to continue supporting promotor local school wellness policy advocacy. Findings illuminate strategies to strengthen promotor capacity to engage parents in local school wellness policy advocacy.

  16. Personal Branding and Employee Advocacy in Finnish Companies : Is Personal Branding and Employee Advocacy beneficial

    OpenAIRE

    Katila, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to determine if companies can benefit from employee advocacy and personal branding; how can they benefit from it and if there are any negative sides to it. The research is limited specifically to Finnish companies. A literature review was conducted to gain an overview of how marketing and branding has evolved until this year and to help understand how employee advocacy and personal branding can be used in companies and to see what benefits and disadvantages...

  17. Advocacy and political convergence under preference uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Reuben; C. Traxler; F. van Winden

    2015-01-01

    We study the formation of advocacy groups and how they can impact policy outcomes by revealing information about voters׳ preferences to uninformed political candidates. We conduct a laboratory experiment based on a two-candidate spatial electoral competition setting where the policy preferences of v

  18. Educational Expertise, Advocacy, and Media Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Joel R.; Lubienski, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The efforts of many advocacy organizations to advance their preferred policies despite conflicting evidence of the effectiveness of these policies raise questions about factors that shape successful policy promotion. While many may like to think that expertise on an issue in question is an essential prerequisite for influence in public policy…

  19. Classroom Advocacy? A Christian Pacifist's Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Christian professors and professors generally, whether teaching at religiously affiliated or secular institutions, face an age-old question: Can one safely use the classroom to advocate one's personal position with regard to controversial issues or not? Positions examined include that of "value-free" science, "value-full" advocacy, and an…

  20. Health care advocacy turns into political activism.

    OpenAIRE

    Spears, T

    1995-01-01

    Some advocacy groups are becoming more willing to engage in political activism. One is the Ontario Lung Association, which has been calling attention to government inaction on air-pollution issues such as controlling smog and improving indoor air quality. These lobbying efforts are supported by some physicians, who believe that environmental factors are behind the increased incidence of respiratory illness.

  1. Science Advocacy in a Shifting Policy Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 50 years, federal investment in research as a share of total spending has declined from a little more than 10% in 1963 to less than 4% in 2013 (AAAS, 2013). In an era of sequestration and shrinking budgets, more and more scientists are advocating directly to policymakers (and their staff) to gain support for research programs and funding. The best advocates understand the political and policy processes, and anticipate policy shifts that may affect them. While scientists are trained with the technical skills to conduct their science, teach it to others, and market their work in order to win grants and publish papers, the policy advocacy arena is unfamiliar territory to many. Acquiring yet another area of expertise mid-career can be daunting, but science advocacy need not require another academic degree. Connecting with policymakers is the first step, and then an understanding of each policymaker's issue history and top priorities will inform the sales pitch. Here, I present some experiences on both the pitching and receiving ends of science advocacy from my year in the US Senate as an AGU/AAAS Congressional Science Fellow, and some guidance for meeting with policymakers and successful science advocacy.

  2. Be Proactive with Parent Advocacy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    This article elaborates on parent advocacy groups, a key component in meeting the needs of gifted children. The case for parent groups couldn't be stronger--or more urgent. According to Nancy Green, Executive Director of the National Association for Gifted Children, "Quality gifted education exists in places where there are strong parent groups."…

  3. A holistic model of advocacy: factors that influence its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubsch, Sylvia M; Sternard, Marsha J; Hovarter, Rebecca; Matzke, Vicki

    2004-02-01

    Although advocacy is embraced by nursing as an essential component of holistic philosophy, its scope is often limited in practice. In this article, a research study that examined the use of an expanded definition of advocacy is described. A link to the role of advocacy as a complementary therapy and in relation to facilitating the use of complementary therapies by patients is provided. Fifty-two registered nurses completed a researcher developed advocacy research instrument that assessed the use of moral-ethical, legal, political, spiritual, and substitutive advocacy along with various factors thought to influence the use of advocacy including moral development, perceived assertiveness, and perceived job security. An additional 40 RN-BSN students generated case studies of advocacy enacted in practice that were used as examples of the five categories of advocacy and to support the findings of the survey. Results indicated that moral-ethical advocacy was used more often than the other four categories. Moral stage development had a significant effect on substitutive advocacy but assertiveness and job security were not significant factors influencing any category of advocacy.

  4. Utilizing Professional Learning Community Concepts and Social Networking for State Advocacy: The Arkansas Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Shelly; Chadwick, Mona; Bangs, David; Holt, Carleton; Longing, Jeff; Duyar, Ibrihim

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of National Council of Professors of Educational Administration (NCPEA) state affiliate, Arkansas Professors of Educational Administration's (ARPEA), activities, accomplishments, and advocacy efforts. Faced with numerous changes being implemented in education in the state, it became imperative for ARPEA's…

  5. Breast Cancer Screening: What are the Last Changes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selda Secginli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammography, clinical breast-examination (CBE and breast self-examination (BSE are the mainly recommended screening methods for early diagnosis of breast cancer. In recent years, guidelines concerning screening methods were revised. To date, CBE and BSE are not routinely recommended for early diagnosis of breast cancer in western countries. Due to important value in decreasing breast cancer mortality rate, mammography, is the recommended breast cancer screening method; but the changes related with the time of mammography screening is rised to notice. In 2010, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF which is one of the important health authority, guidelines concerning screening mammography were revised. Accordingly, while the mammography that is recommended for women starting aged 40 years by many health authorities, the USPSTF no longer advises routine screening mammography for women aged 40–49 and for those aged ≥75.; and biennial screening is advised for those aged 50–74. It is necessary for health professionals working in breast health area to learn the last changes concerning about breast cancer screening methods. Together with CBE and BSE, it is also important to encourage women to participate mammography screening with an understanding of its benefits and risks. In this article, it is aimed to critique new guidelines about breast cancer screening methods. It is also critiqued the potential benefits and risks of mammography that is currently considered the ‘‘gold standard’’ for breast cancer screening for women. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 193-200

  6. Changes in NAD/ADP-ribose metabolism in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yalcintepe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The extent of ADP-ribosylation in rectal cancer was compared to that of the corresponding normal rectal tissue. Twenty rectal tissue fragments were collected during surgery from patients diagnosed as having rectal cancer on the basis of pathology results. The levels of ADP-ribosylation in rectum cancer tissue samples (95.9 ± 22.1 nmol/ml was significantly higher than in normal tissues (11.4 ± 4 nmol/ml. The level of NAD+ glycohydrolase and ADP-ribosyl cyclase activities in rectal cancer and normal tissue samples were measured. Cancer tissues had significantly higher NAD+ glycohydrolase and ADP-ribosyl cyclase activities than the control tissues (43.3 ± 9.1 vs 29.2 ± 5.2 and 6.2 ± 1.6 vs 1.6 ± 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1. Approximately 75% of the NAD+ concentration was consumed as substrate in rectal cancer, with changes in NAD+/ADP-ribose metabolism being observed. When [14C]-ADP-ribosylated tissue samples were subjected to SDS-PAGE, autoradiographic analysis revealed that several proteins were ADP-ribosylated in rectum tissue. Notably, the radiolabeling of a 113-kDa protein was remarkably greater than that in control tissues. Poly(ADP-ribosylation of the 113-kDa protein in rectum cancer tissues might be enhanced with its proliferative activity, and poly(ADP-ribosylation of the same protein in rectum cancer patients might be an indicator of tumor diagnosis.

  7. Changes in breast cancer reports after pathology second opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Vicente; Muntal, Teresa; García-Hernandez, Felip; Cortes, Javier; Gonzalez, Begoña; Rubio, Isabel T

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer pathology reports contain valuable information about the histologic diagnosis, prognostic factors and predictive indicators of therapeutic response. A second opinion may be requested by medical oncologists and surgeons, when a patient is referred from another institution for treatment. We report the experience with pathology second opinion in selected patients referred to the Breast Oncology Unit. 205 cases referred to the Breast Oncology Unit were selected for second opinion after clinical evaluation, between 2002 and 2012. The cases reviewed included 102 core needle biopsies, 88 surgical specimens from the breast and 18 lymphadenopathies, 14 from the axillary region. Pathology second opinion was based on a review of hematoxylin-eosin preparations, recuts of submitted paraffin blocks and written external pathology reports. Immunohistochemical studies for hormone receptors, HER2, myoepithelial cells, and other markers were performed in selected cases. A case was reclassified as showing major change when second opinion showed a potential for significant change in prognosis or treatment. Otherwise, it was considered to represent minor change or to be concordant. In 52 cases (25.4%), the pathology review showed changes. Thirty-three (16%) patients were reclassified for major changes and 19 (9.2%) as minor changes. In six patients, more than one major change was identified. The major discrepancies identified were related to the histologic classification (12 cases), the presence or absence of invasion in ductal carcinoma (15 cases), the results of hormone receptors (5 cases), and HER2 (7 cases). Major changes in histologic classification included two cases diagnosed as invasive ductal carcinoma and reclassified as benign, four cases with diagnosis of breast cancer reclassified as metastatic lung cancer, one case diagnosed as small cell carcinoma of lung metastatic in the breast, reclassified as primary carcinoma of the breast, and three cases with

  8. Advocacy for Education in Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Museum education finds itself in the midst of significant changes as both the museum and education fields respond to internal and external challenges that require new approaches. Today, museums recognize that the choice is no longer theirs and that they "must" change to adapt to new economic realities. As museums adapt to new economic realities…

  9. Patient advocacy in the USA: key communication role functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donald R; Tipton, Bryan K

    2007-09-01

    Researchers have long documented the importance of patient advocacy programs as a means of providing customer service in health-care organizations. Yet, while effective communication is often acknowledged as key to effective patient advocacy, knowledge of the specific communication role functions enacted by patient advocates remains limited, as does our understanding of the function of patient advocacy at the organizational level. This qualitative investigation not only provides a typology of communication roles enacted by patient advocates while solving problems on behalf of patients and their family members, but also integrates scholarly research on "boundary-spanning" as a means of theoretically contextualizing the advocacy role at the organizational level.

  10. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  11. 75 FR 47348 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  12. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  13. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  14. 76 FR 56879 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  15. 76 FR 10941 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  16. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  17. 75 FR 10864 - Open meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  18. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  19. 75 FR 4140 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  20. 76 FR 32021 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  1. 75 FR 55404 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  2. 75 FR 7540 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  3. 78 FR 64064 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  4. 75 FR 39333 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  5. 76 FR 17993 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  6. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  7. 75 FR 33893 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  8. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  9. 76 FR 63717 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  10. 76 FR 37196 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  11. 75 FR 62629 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  12. 78 FR 78517 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  13. 76 FR 45005 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  14. 76 FR 2194 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  15. Transcultural nursing: facing the challenges of advocacy and diversity/universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, K H

    1993-01-01

    This paper is in response to an invitation to address the topic of advocacy and diversity from the perspective of past and present transcultural nursing. With origins in nursing, with its philosophy of active intervention, and in anthropology, where relativism proposes merit in diverse (including non-interventive) approaches to health and illness, transcultural nursing grapples with potential epistemological conflict as it helps shape health care in highly industrialized, multicultural societies and even more varied global contexts. As a developing subdiscipline, transcultural nursing continuously reexamines dialectical relationships between change and preservation and between health care needs and the risk of imposition. Whereas advocacy is viewed as a moral imperative in nursing, diversity (which can be used to argue against acknowledgement of differences and to promote the pretense that everything is the same for everyone) remains better developed conceptually than operationally, while universality too often falls prey to misuse as an argument against acknowledgement of diversity. Within a framework constructed from the juxtaposition of advocacy with diversity/universality (Leininger, 1988c, 1991), this article appraises the accomplishments and challenges of transcultural nursing as it moves into its second quarter century. It is proposed that the future of transcultural nursing should emphasize development of realistic nursing roles that include a confluence of advocacy and diversity/universality and negotiation of responsible social conceptualizations of cultural issues such as "race" and diversity.

  16. Pregnancy-induced changes in breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Irma H; Russo, Jose

    2011-09-01

    Breast cancer is the malignant disease most frequently diagnosed in women of all races and nationalities. Since the 1970s the worldwide incidence of this disease has increased 30-40% in postmenopausal women, in whom, paradoxically, the risk of developing breast cancer is significantly reduced by an early first full term pregnancy (FTP) as compared to nulliparous and late parous women. Although the cause of breast cancer is not known, the mechanisms mediating the protection conferred by an early FTP have been identified to reside in the breast itself, and to be modulated by endogenous and environmental exposures that might negatively affect this organ during specific windows in its development that extend from prenatal life until the first pregnancy. Soon after conception the embryo initiates the production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), the glycoprotein hormone that is diagnostic of pregnancy. HCG in conjunction with ovarian steroid hormones primes the hypothalamic neuroendocrine system for maintaining the pregnancy. Higher levels of hCG during the first trimester of pregnancy have been associated with a reduction in maternal breast cancer incidence after age 50. In preclinical studies it has been demonstrated that both FTP and hCG treatment of virgin rats prevent the development of chemically-induced mammary tumors, a phenomenon mediated by the differentiation of the mammary gland epithelial cells prior to carcinogen exposure. Complete differentiation proceeds through complex morphological, physiological and molecular changes that occur during pregnancy and lactation, that ultimately result in increased DNA repair capabilities of the mammary epithelium, activation of genes controlling differentiation and programmed cell death and imprinting in the breast epithelium a specific and permanent genomic signature of pregnancy. This signature is indicative of a reduced breast cancer risk and serves as a molecular biomarker of differentiation for evaluating the

  17. Advocacy--answering old mail. Canadian Association of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R G

    1999-06-01

    Since its inception in 1977, the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) has struggled with its responsibility to represent general surgeons in practices across this country. The CAGS has tended to be mute in the presentation of many of its accomplishments, which have improved the role of specialists in community practice, training programs and the subspecialties of general surgery. With the forthcoming changes in direction for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, based on a recent external survey, the CAGS has a golden opportunity to advocate for a clear identity, autonomous from the Royal College for the purposes of scientific meetings, continuing professional development, scientific and practice affiliation with other surgical specialty societies, and new developments with corporate sector support for advancements in science technology and education. Advocacy for general surgery must be stressed as the priority for the CAGS into the future.

  18. Surviving breast cancer: women's experiences with their changed bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Jennifer; Sabiston, Catherine M; Burke, Shaunna

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we explored women's experiences with their bodies following treatment for breast cancer. Eleven women who had been treated for the disease (M(time since treatment)=4.45 years) were interviewed. Data were collected and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith et al., 2009). Four main themes emerged from the data: changing visibly and invisibly; experiencing intense thoughts and emotions; meaning of the body: a vehicle of health, well-being, and social expression; and managing and dealing with physical changes. Overall, the women experienced various physical changes that shaped, mostly in a negative way, their perceptions, thoughts, attitudes, feelings, and beliefs about their bodies. The women described attempts to make positive lifestyle behavior choices (e.g., diet, participate in physical activity), and used other strategies (e.g., wigs, make-up, clothes) to manage their appearances and restore positive body-related experiences. Based on these findings, it is important to be cognizant of women's body image concerns following breast cancer given the poignant and lasting effects they can have on their psychosocial and emotional well-being.

  19. Disease Advocacy Organizations Catalyze Translational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Fontaine Terry

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease advocacy organizations have long played an important role in the continuum from basic science to therapy development in rare disease research. PXE International has sometimes led the field in innovative ways, venturing into specific activities that have traditionally been conducted by scientists. As lay founders, we have engaged in gene discovery, gene patenting, diagnostic development, epidemiological studies, clinical trials and therapy research and development. This article will describe the steps that we took, and the ways in which we have scaled these efforts for the larger community.

  20. Nursing advocacy for women veterans and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies.

  1. School Counselors United in Professional Advocacy: A Systems Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Havlik, Stacey Gaenzle; Malott, Krista M.; Jones, SaDohl Goldsmith

    2015-01-01

    Limited budgets may place educational positions in jeopardy and if school counseling positions become jeopardized, then school counselors must communicate their role and impact more effectively. However, school counselors may lack training and experience in professional self-advocacy practices, and advocacy efforts may be undermined by role…

  2. Speaking up about Advocacy: Findings from a Partnership Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Melanie; Bannister, Susan; Davies, Julie; Fleming, Simon; Graham, Claire; Mcmaster, Andrea; Seddon, Angela; Wheldon, Anita; Whittell, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a partnership research project carried out by a research team consisting of people with learning disabilities and people without learning disabilities. The research explored people's understandings of advocacy and identified gaps in advocacy provision for people with learning disabilities and their families. Four focus…

  3. Exploring Nonoffending Caregiver Satisfaction with a Children's Advocacy Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonach, Kathryn; Mabry, J. Beth; Potts-Henry, Candice

    2010-01-01

    This study is a case evaluation research report on one Children's Advocacy Center that provides a coordinated response to allegations of child maltreatment, particularly sexual abuse. The data come from a mailed survey of nonoffending caregivers measuring their satisfaction with services provided through the Children's Advocacy Center. The results…

  4. A Media Advocacy Intervention Linking Health Disparities and Food Insecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Melanie J.; McIntyre, Lynn; Persaud, Steven A.; Thomas, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Media advocacy is a well-established strategy for transmitting health messages to the public. This paper discusses a media advocacy intervention that raised issues about how the public interprets messages about the negative effects of poverty on population health. In conjunction with the publication of a manuscript illustrating how income-related…

  5. Advocacy for Child Wellness in High-Poverty Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Child wellness needs to be understood holistically so that children and youth from high-poverty environments can succeed in schooling and life. Teachers who foster advocacy in themselves are well equipped to teach students to take ownership of their own well-being. Such advocacy can enrich the classroom curriculum and mitigate the negative effects…

  6. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Cristi C; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami; Peterson, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively.

  7. Protein expression changes in breast cancer and their importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Semerci Sevimli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies about nucleic acids have increased after thepublication of DNA’s three dimensional structure by Watsonand Crick. Nucleic acids are the heritable moleculeswhich contain codes for proteins. Proteins are the mostimportant elements in molecular world because they arethe basic structural and functional components of a livingorganism. Clarifying the celluler events that involve proteinsare important in many areas for example diagnosisand treatment determination of diseases or developmentof new drugs. Proteome that comes from a combinationof the terms protein and genome, is one of the importantfield in these days. The studies in this area have acceleratedand gained a different place especially with afterthe completion of human genome project. In synthesis ofa protein just only genetic information is not enough. Atthe same time the change or changes of a protein afterthe synthesis, the final version and transporting to finallocalization of it also important. Because having defects inmailing cells of breast cancer, the first targets of treatmentmust be proteins. In this way the studies on proteins areimportant to determine prognostic and diagnostic diseasemarkers and also significant for identifying new treatmentstrategies.Key words: Genom, proteom, breast cancer

  8. [Early detection of cervical cancer in Chile: time for change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léniz Martelli, Javiera; Van De Wyngard, Vanessa; Lagos, Marcela; Barriga, María Isabel; Puschel Illanes, Klaus; Ferreccio Readi, Catterina

    2014-08-01

    Mortality rates for cervical cancer (CC) in Chile are higher than those of developed countries and it has an unequal socioeconomic distribution. The recognition of human papilloma virus (HPV) as the causal agent of cervical cancer in the early 80's changed the prevention paradigms. Current goals are to prevent HPV infection by vaccination before the onset of sexual activity and to detect HPV infection in women older than 30 years. This article reviews CC prevention and early detection methods, discusses relevant evidence to support a change in Chile and presents an innovation proposal. A strategy of primary screening based on HPV detection followed by triage of HPV-positive women by colposcopy in primary care or by cytological or molecular reflex testing is proposed. Due to the existence in Chile of a well-organized nationwide CC prevention program, the replacement of a low-sensitivity screening test such as the Papanicolau test with a highly sensitive one such as HPV detection, could quickly improve the effectiveness of the program. The program also has a network of personnel qualified to conduct naked-eye inspections of the cervix, who could easily be trained to perform triage colposcopy. The incorporation of new prevention strategies could reduce the deaths of Chilean women and correct inequities.

  9. Advocacy for Art Education: Beyond Tee-Shirts and Bumper Stickers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobick, Bryna; DiCindio, Carissa

    2012-01-01

    Advocacy is not new to art education. Over the years, Goldfarb (1979), Hodsoll (1985), and Erickson and Young (1996) have written about the importance of arts advocacy, but the concept of advocacy has evolved with the times. For example, in the 1970s, arts advocacy was described as a "movement" and brought together art educators,…

  10. 42 CFR 51.31 - Conduct of protection and advocacy activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conduct of protection and advocacy activities. 51... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Protection and Advocacy Services § 51.31 Conduct of protection and advocacy activities. (a) Consistent with...

  11. 45 CFR 1386.23 - Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.23 Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System. (a) By January 1 of each year the Protection and Advocacy System shall...

  12. 77 FR 8327 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, March 28, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  13. 78 FR 56269 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  14. 78 FR 11277 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  15. 77 FR 20488 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  16. 78 FR 48231 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  17. 75 FR 62631 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint ] Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, November 23, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  18. 75 FR 33894 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, July 8,...

  19. 77 FR 55526 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, October 24, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  20. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  1. 78 FR 3500 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, February 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  2. 76 FR 56880 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, October 27, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  3. 77 FR 67736 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, December 13, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  4. 77 FR 47166 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, September 26, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  5. 75 FR 4141 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, February 23, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  6. 75 FR 18957 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement...

  7. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, August 6 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m....

  8. 77 FR 40410 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, August 22, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  9. 75 FR 47347 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint ] Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, September 28, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  10. 75 FR 18958 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy...

  11. 77 FR 74921 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  12. 76 FR 63717 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 23, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  13. 77 FR 5313 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 2 p.m., Eastern Time...

  14. 78 FR 15126 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  15. 76 FR 37197 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, August 25, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  16. 75 FR 55407 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, October 26, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  17. 77 FR 37102 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting ] public... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, July 19, 2012, at 8 a.m....

  18. 75 FR 76522 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, January 25, 2011, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  19. 76 FR 32021 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Monday, July 25,...

  20. 76 FR 2193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Monday, February 24, 2011, at 2 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  1. 77 FR 61054 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  2. 76 FR 45006 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, September 22, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  3. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer Symptoms Symptoms of cancer ... tumor Obesity Pancreatic cancer Prostate cancer Stomach cancer Testicular cancer Throat or larynx cancer Thyroid cancer Patient Instructions ...

  4. Promoting dietary change in the Stockholm Cancer Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanström, L; Holm, L E

    1992-01-01

    The Stockholm Cancer Prevention Program (SCPP) is a community-based program aimed at reducing cancer incidence and mortality by reducing risk factors related to life-style: dietary habits, tobacco use, and sunbathing. The program, which came about as a result of a political initiative and commitment, has as its dietary objectives to reduce fat intake to 30% of energy and to increase fiber intake to 30 g/day. SCPP strives to achieve these goals by simultaneously affecting food supply and food demand. To date, the program collaborates with 12 municipalities and several large occupational health services and restaurant chains. It has developed cook books for caterers and the general public and has organized food fairs targeting policymakers and those working with food, education, or health promotion. SCPP emphasizes collaboration across sectors of society and has initiated contests for students studying food service technology and for retailers with the aim of promoting dietary change. The intervention is based on the principles and strategies of community organization.

  5. Pediatric behavior guidance in the 21st century workshop C report - advocacy and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinonez, Rocio B; Nelson, Travis

    2014-01-01

    This report outlines a series of recommendations derived from an advocacy and policy workshop at the 2013 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) Behavior Guidance Symposium. The committee charge was to address two questions: (1) what should be done to change public and media perception of behavior guidance, if anything, and: (2) what should be done to insure that needed behavior guidance techniques will be available for practicing pediatric dentists in the future. Members of the workshop voiced a wide variety of opinions and impressions of how public perception and media promotion of behavior guidance affect the practice of pediatric dentistry. A diverse assortment of strategies to promote the availability of these techniques in the future was suggested. This report will serve to inform policy and advocacy efforts by AAPD to improve children's oral health and promote excellence in patient care.

  6. Priorities for future innovation, research, and advocacy in dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T; Fox, C H; Rekow, E D

    2013-11-01

    Innovations in materials science, both within and outside of dentistry, open opportunities for the development of exciting direct restorative materials. From rich dialog among experts from dental and non-dental academic institutions and industry, as well as those from policy, research funding, and professional organizations, we learned that capitalizing on these opportunities is multifactorial and far from straightforward. Beginning from the point when a restoration is needed, what materials, delivery systems, and skills are needed to best serve the most people throughout the world's widely varied economic and infrastructure systems? New research is a critical element in progress. Effective advocacy can influence funding and drives change in practice and policy. Here we articulate both research and advocacy priorities, with the intention of focusing the energy and expertise of our best scientists on making a difference, bringing new innovations to improve oral health.

  7. CAMPAIGN JOURNALISM ON ROMANIAN TELEVISIONS: TOWARDS A NORMATIVE VIEW OF ADVOCACY IN THE MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRINA DIANA MĂDROANE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advocacy media campaigns, staged by Romanian television channels and focused on changing social policies, have gained increasing visibility in the Romanian public sphere. The article examines models of journalism and normative theories about the role of the press in a democracy in order to carve out a normative position from which this emerging media format can be analysed. It situates media advocacy within the frame of interpretive journalism, aimed both at facilitating democratic debate and citizen participation (civic journalism, and at social reform (radical journalism. The reassessment of media strategies based on emotions and interpretation as mediators of social reality may lead to a positive, ‘optimistic’ view of campaign journalism. However, the advanced commercialisation of the media and the struggles for political representation interfere with and make the task of socially responsible journalism an incredibly challenging one

  8. THE ROLE OF PERSONAL BRAND IN THE ADVOCACY ACTIVITY,IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Anamaria IOAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The advocacy activity is of significant importance for the business community, the perception of its need to influence the legislative process in order to have a transparent legislative procedure, the necessity of understanding the way in which the decisions are taken and the desire of the business community to assist the changing of laws and norms being linking elements of the advocacy activity to the business environment. The branding impact is practically immeasurable in social and cultural terms as it over exceeded the commercial origins. It has spread in education, sports, fashion, tourism, arts, theater, literature, regional and national politics and in almost all other fields that we could think of. The non-profit and charitable organizations that compete with the commercial brands in the emotional territory of the minds and hearts of people, for the money in their pockets, use branding more and more.

  9. Change of SPARC expression after chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Yin Gao; Xin-Yuan Zhang; Yi Ba; Ding-Zhi Huang; Ru-Bing Han; Xia Wang; Shao-Hua Ge; Hong-Li Li; Ting Deng; Rui Liu; Ming Bai; Li-Kun Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The expression of tumor biomarkers may change after chemotherapy. However, whether secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) expression changes atfer chemotherapy in gastric cancer (GC) is unclear. hTis study investigated the inlfuence of chemotherapy on SPARC expression in GC. Methods:Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze SPARC expression in 132 GC cases (including 54 cases with preoperative chemotherapy and 78 cases without preoperative chemotherapy). SPARC expression of postoperative specimens with and without preoperative chemotherapy was assessed to analyze the inlfuence of chemotherapy on SPARC expression. Results:SPARC was highly expressed in GC compared with the desmoplastic stroma surrounding tumor cells and noncancerous tissues. High SPARC expression was correlated with invasion depth, lymph node, and TNM stage. After chemotherapy, a lower proportion of high SPARC expression was observed in patients with preoperative chemotherapy than in the controls. For 54 patients with preoperative chemotherapy, gross type, histology, depth of invasion, lymph node, TNM stage, and SPARC expression were related to overall survival. Further multivariate analysis showed that lymph node, histology, and SPARC expression atfer chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors. Conclusion:SPARC expression may change after chemotherapy in GC. SPARC expression should be reassessed for patients with GC atfer chemotherapy.

  10. Minority Women and Advocacy for Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanyika, Shiriki K.; Morssink, Christiaan B.; Nestle, Marion

    2001-01-01

    US minority health issues involve racial/ethnic disparities that affect both women and men. However, women's health advocacy in the United States does not consistently address problems specific to minority women. The underlying evolution and political strength of the women's health and minority health movements differ profoundly. Women of color comprise only one quarter of women's health movement constituents and are, on average, socioeconomically disadvantaged. Potential alliances may be inhibited by vestiges of historical racial and social divisions that detract from feelings of commonality and mutual support. Nevertheless, insufficient attention to minority women's issues undermines the legitimacy of the women's health movement and may prevent important advances that can be achieved only when diversity is fully considered. PMID:11527764

  11. 3 Lifestyle Changes to Help Prevent Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many other cancers and chronic disease," said Alice Bender, head of nutrition programs at AICR. The first ... obesity increases the risk of 10 other cancers, Bender said in an institute news release. The second ...

  12. Community-based advocacy opportunities for tobacco control: experience from Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaruki, Lutgard K

    2010-06-01

    Tanzania is third in Africa in tobacco production after Malawi and Zimbabwe. In spite of increased production, Tanzania remains a poor country, with tobacco farmers getting poorer and the country losing more than 16,500 hectares of forests annually from tobacco curing alone. Tanzania grows fire-cured and air-cured tobacco. Regarding tobacco use, 35% of Tanzanians smoke tobacco regularly and about 32% of all cancers at Ocean Road Cancer Institute are attributed to tobacco use, with the country spending more than $30m annually to treat tobacco-related cancers. Unfortunately, knowledge on tobacco-related hazards is limited even among policy/decision makers. However, surveys indicate that more than 65% of resource-poor tobacco farmers favour alternative livelihoods when assured of sustainable markets. There is need of intensifying advocacy campaigns against tobacco, in order to improve the socio-economic status of tobacco farmers, enhance public health and sustain the environment in Tanzania.

  13. Changes in mammographic density and breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lokate, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer among women worldwide. One of the most important risk factors for breast cancer is high mammographic density. Mammographic density represents the amount of fibroglandular tissue relative to the fat tissue in the breast. Women with >75% of their b

  14. The Concept of Advocacy in Nursing: A Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaitzidis, Evdokia; Jewell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As health care professionals practice as a team, they take on responsibilities that are specific to their roles-responsibilities that are recognized and understood by the team and management as pertaining to their professional domain and expertise. Is advocacy part of the role of the nurse? Members of the nursing profession commonly maintain that it is, but is there a consensus on this issue, both within the profession and among other stakeholders? Is there a clear understanding of the term advocacy, and is this reflected in Codes of Practice and research into practice? An examination of significant documents and reports of empirical research reveals conflicting conceptions and opinions. There is potential for a common definition, but agreements need to be reached on whether advocacy is an essential function of nursing within the management of health care, and if so, what is advocacy's importance, focus, and limits.

  15. Literal and Metaphorical Advocacy: Differentiating the Limited Preparation Speaking Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, C. Thomas, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Argues that a substantive differentiation of extemporaneous and impromptu forensic speaking events is possible and appropriate. Offers suggestions to distinguish the literal argumentative skills inherent to extemporaneous speaking from the metaphorical advocacy ideally inherent in impromptu speaking. (PRA)

  16. Handicapped Infants and Euthanasia: A Challenge to Our Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David

    1985-01-01

    The issue of pediatric euthanasia for handicapped newborns is examined and contrasting viewpoints emphasizing the quality and the sanctity of life are considered. The author asserts that advocacy for handicapped children involves decisions regarding the euthanasia question. (CL)

  17. Can exercise change the stereotypes associated with individuals with cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément-Guillotin, C; Falzon, C; d'Arripe-Longueville, F

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether exercising can positively influence the stereotypes associated with individuals with cancer and, more specifically, have an effect on the impression formation related to warmth and competence. A total of 193 French college students (Mage  = 21.08, SD = 1.44 years; 88 females and 105 males) were randomly assigned to one of the conditions of a 2 (participant sex) × 2 (target health status: cancer vs no information) × 3 (target exercise status: exerciser vs non-exerciser vs no information) experimental design. Results indicated that exercising target with cancer was perceived as the most competent compared with targets with cancer and those without information about cancer. These results suggest that exercising could be an effective way to undermine cancer stereotypes and reduce discrimination against people with cancer.

  18. In delicate balance: stem cells and spinal cord injury advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Sara; Illes, Judy

    2011-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major focus for stem cell therapy (SCT). However, the science of SCT has not been well matched with an understanding of perspectives of persons with SCI. The online advocacy community is a key source of health information for primary stakeholders and their caregivers. In this study, we sought to characterize the content of SCI advocacy websites with respect to their discussion of SCT and stem cell tourism. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SCI advocacy websites identified through a web search and verified by expert opinion. Two independent researchers coded the information for major themes (e.g., scientific & clinical facts, research & funding, policy, ethics) and valence (positive, negative, balanced, neutral). Of the 40 SCI advocacy websites that met inclusion criteria, 50% (N=20) contained information about SCT. Less than 18% (N=7) contained information on stem cell tourism. There were more than ten times as many statements about SCT with a positive valence (N=67) as with a negative valence (N=6). Ethics-related SCT information comprised 20% (N=37) of the total content; the largest proportion of ethics-related content was devoted to stem cell tourism (80%, N=30 statements). Of those, the majority focused on the risks of stem cell tourism (N=16). Given the still-developing science behind SCT, the presence of cautionary information about stem cell tourism at advocacy sites is ethically appropriate. The absence of stem cell tourism information at the majority of advocacy sites represents a lost educational opportunity.

  19. Assessment of a tool for measuring non-profit advocacy efforts in India, Uganda and Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Tanya; Rajaratnam, Julie Knoll; McOwen, Jordan; Gordis, Deborah J; Bowen, Lisa A; Bernson, Jeff

    2016-03-01

    To improve maternal and child health, the White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood (WRA) implemented an innovative policy advocacy project in India, Uganda and Yemen from 2009 to 2011. PATH assisted WRA in designing an approach to measure the short- and long-term results of WRA's advocacy efforts.Expert rating instruments have been widely used since 1970s to track country-level program efforts focusing on family planning, maternal and neonatal health, and HIV/AIDS. This article assesses and establishes the strength and applicability of an expert rating tool, the Maternal Health Policy Score (MHPS), in measuring and guiding a non-profit's advocacy efforts.The tool was assessed using five criteria: validity of results, reproducibility of results, acceptability to respondents, internal consistency and cost. The tool proved effective for measuring improvements in the policy environment at both the national and subnational levels that the non-profit intended to effect and useful for identifying strong and weak policy domains. The results are reproducible, though ensuring fidelity in implementation during different rounds of data collection may be difficult. The acceptability of the tool was high among respondents, and also among users of the information.MHPS provides a quick, low-cost method to measure overall changes in the policy environment, giving advocacy organizations and grant makers timely information to gauge the influence of their work and take corrective action. WRA demonstrated the use of MHPS at multiple points in the project: at the onset of a project to identify and strategize around policy domains that need attention, during and at the end of the project to monitor progress made and redirect efforts.

  20. Changes in mammographic density over time in breast cancer cases and women at high risk for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Meghan E; Reimers, Laura L; Quante, Anne S; Crew, Katherine D; Whiffen, Amy; Terry, Mary Beth

    2014-10-01

    High mammographic breast density is one of the strongest intermediate markers of breast cancer risk, and decreases in density over time have been associated with decreases in breast cancer risk. Using repeated measures of mammographic density in a cohort of high-risk women, the Women at Risk (WAR) cohort at Columbia University Medical Center (N = 2670), we examined whether changes in prediagnostic mammographic density differed among 85 prospectively-ascertained breast cancer cases and 85 age-matched controls, using a nested case-control design. Median age at first mammogram was 51 years (range, 29-77 years), with a median of 4 years between first and second prediagnostic mammogram (range, 1-15 years). Using linear regression with change in percent density as the outcome, we found that in women who did not go on to be diagnosed with breast cancer, change in percent density decreased as time between first and second mammogram increased (β = -1.62% per year, p = 0.004). However, in women who did go on to be diagnosed with breast cancer, there was no overall change in percent density associated with time between first and second mammogram (β = 0.29% per year, p = 0.61); the change over time was statistically significantly different between cases versus controls (p breast cancer risk.

  1. Social justice advocacy in nursing: what is it? How do we get there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Siobhan O'Mahony

    2011-01-01

    Social justice advocacy is an expectation of all nurses as expressed in the professional codes that guide nursing practice. Nursing literature reflects this shift in the focus of nursing advocacy, providing insight into the potentials and challenges associated with nursing's evolution toward a broader social justice advocacy model. This article describes the concept of social justice advocacy as currently reflected in professional codes and nursing literature and contrasts this with the individual patient-nurse advocacy model, which continues to dominate in nursing practice today. Challenges associated with movement toward a social justice advocacy model and options for addressing these hurdles are also discussed.

  2. Research methods to change clinical practice for patients with rare cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingham, Lucinda; Malottki, Kinga; Steven, Neil

    2016-02-01

    Rare cancers are a growing group as a result of reclassification of common cancers by molecular markers. There is therefore an increasing need to identify methods to assess interventions that are sufficiently robust to potentially affect clinical practice in this setting. Methods advocated for clinical trials in rare diseases are not necessarily applicable in rare cancers. This Series paper describes research methods that are relevant for rare cancers in relation to the range of incidence levels. Strategies that maximise recruitment, minimise sample size, or maximise the usefulness of the evidence could enable the application of conventional clinical trial design to rare cancer populations. Alternative designs that address specific challenges for rare cancers with the aim of potentially changing clinical practice include Bayesian designs, uncontrolled n-of-1 trials, and umbrella and basket trials. Pragmatic solutions must be sought to enable some level of evidence-based health care for patients with rare cancers.

  3. Changing Trends of Breast Cancer Survival in Sultanate of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyam Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in women, with elevated incidence in developing countries. This retrospective study included all 122 patients diagnosed with breast cancer from January 2003 to December 2008 in the Sultanate of Oman. Age at presentation was 47.41 years (SD±12.88, with one-third of patients younger than 40 years. The majority of patients presented with stage III (41.2% and IV (18.2% breast cancer. T size (=.023, skin involvement (=.003, and stage at presentation (=.004 were significantly associated with overall survival. Skin involvement at presentation (=.003, T size (=.09, lymph node status (=.013, and stage (=.003 were strong predictors of relapse-free survival. Patients had a 5-year survival of 78%, compared to 64% of breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1996 and 2002 identified in our previously published study. Thus, despite Omani breast cancer patients continuing to present with advanced breast cancer, survival rates have significantly improved.

  4. Effect of Phyllanthus amarus on serum biochemical changes in azaserine induced pancreatic cancer in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Prajapati, Ankit S.; Raval, Sunant K; Suprita Sinha; Varia, Tapan N.; Mashiyava, Parimal H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was performed to investigate the effect of Phyllanthus amarus extracts on serum biochemical changes in azaserine induced pancreatic cancer in Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Pancreatic cancer was developed in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal administration of azaserine (cancer inducer) for 21 days at the concentration of 5 mg/kg body weight. Aqueous and alcoholic extracts were given to rats of different groups as per protocol. Results: The results data revealed that o...

  5. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients’ health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  6. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy.

  7. Gender relations and couple negotiations of British men's food practice changes after prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mróz, Lawrence W; Robertson, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition plays an important role in the health of men diagnosed with prostate cancer and dietary interventions can therefore be a significant part of prostate cancer survivorship supportive care. Family food provision, however, involves complex social interactions, which shape how men engage with their diets and dietary interventions. The role that gender plays in shaping prostate cancer couples' food practices and men's diets after a prostate cancer diagnosis is thought to be important but is little understood. This study explored couples' accounts of nutrition information seeking and diet change to gain a better understanding of how gender relations shaped men's food practices after prostate cancer diagnosis. Qualitative health interviews with men and their partners were conducted and analysed using interpretive descriptive methods. Findings demonstrated how couples navigated food change journeys that involved seeking information, deciding what changes were warranted and implementing and regulating diet changes. Two overarching themes that illustrated couples' food negotiations were called 'Seeking information and deciding on food changes' and 'Monitoring food changes'. Additional sub-themes described who led food changes, women's filtering of information, and moderation or 'treats'. Throughout these food change journeys, interactions between men and women were at play, demonstrating how gender relations and dynamics acted to shape couples' food negotiations and men's food practices. Findings reveal that attention to gender relations and the men's family food dynamics should inform diet interventions for men with prostate cancer in order to improve uptake.

  8. Management of rectal cancer: Times they are changing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Cravo

    2014-09-01

    In this review, we critically examine recent advances in staging, surgery, and chemoradiation in the management of patients with rectal cancer which have not typically been incorporated in published treatment guidelines.

  9. Predicting Levels of Policy Advocacy Engagement Among Acute-Care Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Bird, Melissa; Ward, Cathy Rogers; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to describe the factors that predict health professionals' engagement in policy advocacy. The researchers used a cross-sectional research design with a sample of 97 nurses, 94 social workers, and 104 medical residents from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven predictor scales were associated with health professionals' policy advocacy engagement and revealed that five of the eight factors were significantly associated with it (p advocacy engagement, eagerness, skills, tangible support, and organizational receptivity. Regression analysis examined whether the seven scales, when controlling for sociodemographic variables and hospital site, predicted levels of policy advocacy engagement. Results revealed that patient advocacy engagement (p advocacy engagement. Ethical commitment did not predict policy advocacy engagement. The model explained 36% of the variance in policy advocacy engagement. Limitations of the study and its implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed.

  10. The changing epidemiology of smoking and lung cancer histology.

    OpenAIRE

    Wynder, E. L.; Muscat, J E

    1995-01-01

    In 1950, the first large-scale epidemiological studies demonstrated that lung cancer is causatively associated with cigarette smoking, a finding subsequently confirmed by the Royal College of Physicians in London, the U.S. Surgeon General, and the World Health Organization. Although cigarette consumption has gradually decreased in the United States from a high of about 3800 cigarettes per adult per year in 1965 to about 2800 cigarettes in 1993, death from lung cancer has reached a high among ...

  11. The Changing Landscape of Breast Cancer: How Biology Drives Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Friend

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most prevalent life-threatening cancer in women. Optimizing therapy to increase cure rates in early stage disease, and improving life expectancy and palliation for advanced stages, are goals driving major areas of research. The armamentarium of targeted treatments for breast cancer is ever expanding as understanding of breast cancer biology deepens. A revolution in our treatment was heralded a decade ago by the introduction of trastuzumab for human epidermal receptor-2 positive (HER2+ disease resulting in remarkable reductions in recurrence and improvements in overall survival (OS. Advances continue to be made in other breast cancer subtypes targeting key activating pathways for therapeutic development. However, for these other targeted agents, improvement in OS has been elusive. This article focuses on the development of targeted therapy in breast cancer focusing primarily on the last 5 years, to illustrate that as we understand the complex pathways allowing the dysregulated cell to become malignant, it also propels us closer towards the promise of precision and personalized medicine.

  12. Changing Epidemiology of Common Cancers in Southern Iran, 2007-2010: A Cross Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Masoom Masoompour

    Full Text Available We have evaluated the ever changing epidemiology of cancers in Fars province, Iran since the re-establishment of Fars cancer registry. Based on the collected data from all related sources in Fars province from 2007-2010 we calculated the cancer age-standardized rates per 100,000 person-years (ASRs. The results are presented as incidence rates of cases by site according to the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O, sex, age, crude rate, and ASRs. In women the total ASR was 41.70 per 100,000 from 1985-1989 which had increased to 55.50 and 95.46 during 1998-2002 and 2007-2010. The incidence of breast cancer in women during 2007-2010 was about two and four times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. The incidence of colorectal cancer in women during 2007-2010 was about three and five times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. In men the total ASR was 62.9 per 100,000 in 1985-1989 that increased to 64.50 and 101.48 during 1998-2002 and 2007-2010. Although stomach cancer was the most common cancer among men during 1985-1989 and 1998-2002, but in recent study bladder cancer was the most common cancer among men in Fars province. The incidence of colorectal cancer in men during 2007-2010 was about three times higher than 1998-2002 and 1985-1989. This study shows growing incidence of cancer in southern Iran. The colorectal cancer in both genders had increased and its pattern is similar to western countries. In men, bladder and prostate cancers had a growing rate and the incidences of these cancers in the present study were greater than stomach cancer.

  13. Insights from Breast Cancer Survivors: The Interplay between Context, Epistemology, and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggan, Chad

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the processes by which a group of breast cancer survivors experienced positive learning and growth from their cancer experiences. The author argues that such learning and growth can be considered transformative learning, especially from ontological perspectives of the theory. The participants' change process consisted of…

  14. Psychometric Properties of the Patient Self-Advocacy Scale: The Persian Version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghayegh Vahdat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advances in science and technology and the changes in lifestyle have changed the concept of health in terms of etiology and mortality. The aim of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the original Patient Self-Advocacy Scale for use with an Iranian population. Methods: In the current study, 50 chronic patients between the ages of 25 and 75 were selected as samples. This study was conducted in May 2013 at Bou Ali Sina Hospital in Sari. The translation process and cultural adaptation of the Patient Self-Advocacy Scale were conducted. The face validity and content validity of the instrument were formally verified by analyzing the feedback of patients and health professionals. In order to evaluate questionnaire’s reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was calculated for each item and each domain; and the Cronbach’s alpha was calculated for the entire instruments and each domain. Results: Of the 50 patients participating in the study, 36% were male and 64% were female. The mean age of the patients was 42.5. To comply with the Iranian culture and the study target population, slight changes were applied to the process of translation and validation. In the present study, intraclass correlation coefficient for each item was 0.8-1, which demonstrates excellent reliability of the questionnaire. The Cronbach’s alpha value was 0.75 for overall scale. Conclusion: The Persian version of Patient Self-Advocacy Scale was valid and reliable. Hence, it can be used by public health researchers and health system policy makers for programming and offering patient-oriented health services based on patients’ comments, needs, and preferences.

  15. International Dengue Vaccine Communication and Advocacy: Challenges and Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Ana; Van Roy, Rebecca; Andrus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine impact, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge.

  16. How changes in extracellular matrix mechanics and gene expression variability might combine to drive cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Werfel

    Full Text Available Changes in extracellular matrix (ECM structure or mechanics can actively drive cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we explore whether this process could be mediated by changes in cell shape that lead to increases in genetic noise, given that both factors have been independently shown to alter gene expression and induce cell fate switching. We do this using a computer simulation model that explores the impact of physical changes in the tissue microenvironment under conditions in which physical deformation of cells increases gene expression variability among genetically identical cells. The model reveals that cancerous tissue growth can be driven by physical changes in the microenvironment: when increases in cell shape variability due to growth-dependent increases in cell packing density enhance gene expression variation, heterogeneous autonomous growth and further structural disorganization can result, thereby driving cancer progression via positive feedback. The model parameters that led to this prediction are consistent with experimental measurements of mammary tissues that spontaneously undergo cancer progression in transgenic C3(1-SV40Tag female mice, which exhibit enhanced stiffness of mammary ducts, as well as progressive increases in variability of cell-cell relations and associated cell shape changes. These results demonstrate the potential for physical changes in the tissue microenvironment (e.g., altered ECM mechanics to induce a cancerous phenotype or accelerate cancer progression in a clonal population through local changes in cell geometry and increased phenotypic variability, even in the absence of gene mutation.

  17. Educating for advocacy: recommendations for professional preparation and development based on a needs and capacity assessment of health education faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, Susan M; Galer-Unti, Regina A; Tappe, Marlene K

    2009-01-01

    An electronic survey was used to conduct a needs and capacity assessment of health education faculty to determine the extent to which advocacy instruction is present in undergraduate and graduate curricula in health education and to identify faculty members' needs and capacity to provide professional preparation and development experiences related to advocacy. An analysis of the results reveals that most undergraduate and graduate health education programs include advocacy instruction. Although faculty believe advocacy and instruction related to advocacy are important, many lack advocacy-related professional preparation and development experiences and do not participate in advocacy-related training initiatives and advocacy activities. There is wide variability in faculty confidence in their competence to provide advocacy instruction. Partnerships among professional organizations, health education practitioners, university faculty, individuals engaged in policy advocacy initiatives, and policy makers are needed to enhance the capacity of university faculty to provide professional preparation and development experiences related to advocacy.

  18. Political activity for physical activity: health advocacy for active transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rosalina; Murdoch, Linda; Reeder, Anthony I; Amun, Qa-t-a

    2011-05-29

    Effective health advocacy is a priority for efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Local councils are an important audience for this advocacy. The aim of the current study was to describe features of advocacy for active transport via submissions to city council annual plans in New Zealand, and the impact of an information sheet to encourage the health sector to be involved in this process. Written submissions to city council's annual consultation process were requested for 16 city councils over the period of three years (2007/08, 2008/09, and 2009/10). Submissions were reviewed and categories of responses were created. An advocacy information sheet encouraging health sector participation and summarising some of the evidence-base related to physical activity, active transport and health was released just prior to the 2009/10 submission time. Over the period of the study, city councils received 47,392 submissions, 17% of which were related to active transport. Most submissions came from city residents, with a small proportion (2%) from the health sector. The largest category of submissions was in support of pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, design and maintenance of facilities and additional features to support use of these transport modes. Health arguments featured prominently in justifications for active transport initiatives, including concerns about injury risk, obesity, physical inactivity, personal safety and facilities for people with disabilities. There was evidence that the information sheet was utilised by some health sector submitters (12.5%), providing tentative support for initiatives of this nature. In conclusion, the study provides novel information about the current nature of health advocacy for active transport and informs future advocacy efforts about areas for emphasis, such as health benefits of active transport, and potential alliances with other sectors such as environmental sustainability, transport and urban

  19. NIH scientists map gene changes driving tumors in common pediatric soft-tissue cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have mapped the genetic changes that drive tumors in rhabdomyosarcoma, a pediatric soft-tissue cancer, and found that the disease is characterized by two distinct genotypes. The genetic alterations identified in this malignancy could be useful

  20. The Nature, Correlates, and Conditions of Parental Advocacy in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Although parents often advocate for the best educational services for their children with disabilities, few studies examine parents' advocacy activities; identify parent-school relationship, parent, and student correlates of advocacy; or describe the conditions of advocacy. Responding to a national, web-based survey, 1087 parents of students with…

  1. 45 CFR 1386.20 - Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.20 Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency. (a) The designating official must designate the State official or public...

  2. 45 CFR 1386.21 - Requirements and authority of the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.21 Section 1386.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.21 Requirements and authority of the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) In order for a State to receive...

  3. 42 CFR 51.7 - Eligibility for protection and advocacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility for protection and advocacy services... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.7 Eligibility for protection and advocacy services. In accordance with section...

  4. 45 CFR 1386.24 - Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.24 Section 1386.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.24 Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) Federal financial participation is not allowable...

  5. 34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program? 381.1 Section 381.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... ADVOCACY OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS General § 381.1 What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual...

  6. 75 FR 11999 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  7. 78 FR 22948 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  8. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  9. 75 FR 25316 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  10. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  11. 76 FR 10945 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  12. 75 FR 39332 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  13. 75 FR 7542 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  14. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  15. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  16. 76 FR 17996 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  17. 78 FR 22948 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  18. 78 FR 36303 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  19. 76 FR 22170 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  20. 77 FR 30591 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee. AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  1. 77 FR 21156 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  2. 76 FR 22168 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  3. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  4. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  5. 78 FR 28945 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  6. 75 FR 25316 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  7. Anatomy of Advocacy: A Case Study of the White House Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth; Kimmel, Sue; Dickinson, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Little research has been conducted examining advocacy efforts in the school library field despite the fact that program advocate is a prominent role for school librarians. One element of advocacy is the engagement in political initiatives that may affect school library programs. This case study investigates the effectiveness of one advocacy effort…

  8. Expert and Advocacy Group Consensus Findings on the Horizon of Public Health Genetic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Modell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Description: Among the two leading causes of death in the United States, each responsible for one in every four deaths, heart disease costs Americans $300 billion, while cancer costs Americans $216 billion per year. They also rank among the top three causes of death in Europe and Asia. In 2012 the University of Michigan Center for Public Health and Community Genomics and Genetic Alliance, with the support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Public Health Genomics, hosted a conference in Atlanta, Georgia to consider related action strategies based on public health genomics. The aim of the conference was consensus building on recommendations to implement genetic screening for three major heritable contributors to these mortality and cost figures: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, and Lynch syndrome (LS. Genetic applications for these three conditions are labeled with a “Tier 1” designation by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because they have been fully validated and clinical practice guidelines based on systematic review support them. Methodology: The conference followed a deliberative sequence starting with nationally recognized clinical and public health presenters for each condition, followed by a Patient and Community Perspectives Panel, working group sessions for each of the conditions, and a final plenary session. The 74 conference participants represented disease research and advocacy, public health, medicine and nursing, genetics, governmental health agencies, and industry. Participants drew on a public health framework interconnecting policy, clinical intervention, surveillance, and educational functions for their deliberations. Results: Participants emphasized the importance of collaboration between clinical, public health, and advocacy groups in implementing Tier 1 genetic screening. Advocacy groups could help with individual and institutional

  9. Changes in symptoms and pain intensity of cancer patients after enrollment in palliative care at home

    OpenAIRE

    Dumitrescu, Luminita; van den Heuvel-Olaroiu, Marinela; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the activities and interventions carried out by an at-home palliative care team treating cancer patients who died within two years of being enrolled in a palliative care program. It analyzes which changes in symptoms and pain occurred and which sociodemographic and medical characteristics were related to these changes. The analysis is based on 102 cancer patients. Data were collected through systematic registration during the palliative care process. At enrollment, patien...

  10. Changing patterns of colorectal cancer in China over a period of 20 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Jin Gu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether any changes have occurred on the patterns of colorectal cancer in China.METHODS: Data from 21 Chinese articles published from 1980 to 1999, were used to analyze the time trend of colorectal cancer according to the patients' age at diagnosis,sex, the site of the tumor, stage, and the pathology.RESULTS: From 1980s to 1990s, the mean age of the colorectal cancer patients has increased. The percentage of the female patients rose. The distribution of colorectal carcinoma shows a predominance of rectal cancer. However,the proportion of proximal colon cancer (including transverse and ascending colon) increased significantly accompanied by a decline in the percentage of rectal cancer. Similarity in the percentage of distal colon cancer between two decades was revealed. In the 1990s, statistically more Stage B patients were found than those in 1980s. In addition, databases show a significant decrease in the Stage D cases. The proportion of adenocarcinoma increased, but the mucinous adenocarcinoma decreased during two decades.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that the patternof colorectal cancer in China has been changing. Especially,a proximal shift due to the increasing proportion of ascending and transverse colon cancer has occurred in China.

  11. Metabolic changes in cancer: beyond the Warburg effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Wu; Shimin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Altered metabolism is one of the hallmarks of cancer cells.The best-known metabolic abnormality in cancer cells is the Warburg effect,which demonstrates an increased glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen.However,tumor-related metabolic abnormalities are not limited to altered balance between glucose fermentation and oxidative phosphorylation.Key tumor genes such as p53 and c-myc are found to be master regulators of metabolism.Metabolic enzymes such as succinate dehydrogenase,fumarate hydratase,pyruvate kinase,and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations or expressing level alterations are all linked to tumorigenesis.In this review,we introduce some of the cancer-associated metabolic disorders and current understanding of their molecular tumorigenic mechanisms.

  12. Collagen mRNA levels changes during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Hanne; Anthonsen, Dorit; Lothe, Inger M B;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive growth of epithelial cancers is a complex multi-step process which involves dissolution of the basement membrane. Type IV collagen is a major component in most basement membranes. Type VII collagen is related to anchoring fibrils and is found primarily in the basement membrane....... In addition, corresponding tissue was examined from healthy volunteers (n = 20). mRNA levels were normalized to beta-actin. Immunohistochemical analysis of the distributions of type IV and type VII collagens were performed on normal and affected tissues from colorectal cancer patients. RESULTS: The alpha1(IV......). The level of alpha 6(IV) was 5-fold lower in colorectal cancer tissue as compared to healthy individuals (p collagen was visualized by immunohistochemical staining. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of alpha 6(IV) mRNA coincides...

  13. Cancer treatment outcome prediction by assessing temporal change: application to cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Jeffrey W.; Zhang, Dongqing; Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina A.; Yuh, William T. C.; Saltz, Joel; Gurcan, Metin

    2008-03-01

    In this paper a novel framework is proposed for the classification of cervical tumors as susceptible or resistant to radiation therapy. The classification is based on both small- and large-scale temporal changes in the tumors' magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) response. The dataset consists of 11 patients who underwent radiation therapy for advanced cervical cancer. Each patient had dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI studies before treatment and early into treatment, approximately 2 weeks apart. For each study, a T1-weighted scan was performed before injection of contrast agent and again 75 seconds after injection. Using the two studies and the two series from each study, a set of tumor region of interest (ROI) features were calculated. These features were then exhaustively searched for the most separable set of three features based on a treatment outcome of local control or local recurrence. The dimensionality of the three-feature set was then reduced to two dimensions using principal components analysis (PCA). Finally, the classification performance was tested using three different classification procedures: support vector machines (SVM), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and k-nearest neighbor (KNN). The most discriminatory features were those of volume, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, and fractal dimension. Combinations of these features resulted in 100% classification accuracy using each of the three classifiers.

  14. [Model calculations of the effect of demographic changes on the incidence of cancer in Saarland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, H; Ziegler, H

    1989-12-01

    Resulting from the population structure and current fertility and mortality rates, a rapid aging of the West German society is to be expected. The impact of these demographic changes on numbers of cancer cases and incidence rates is quantitatively assessed for the Saarland, which is the only state with reliable population-based cancer registration in the FRG. Despite a projected decrease in population size during the next decades, numbers of incident cases are expected to rise substantially in males and to remain almost constant in females for all of the most common forms of cancer. The projected changes have model character for other parts of the FRG.

  15. Changes in alcohol intake and risk of upper digestive tract cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau C; Keiding, Niels; Johansen, Christoffer

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Alcohol intake measured at one point in time is a strong predictor for later development of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx and esophagus. In this prospective cohort study, we examined whether changes in individual alcohol intake resulted in subsequent altered risk...... of these cancers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the Copenhagen City Heart Study we assessed alcohol intake among 4 896 men and 6 239 women who participated at both the first (1976-1978) and second (1981-1983) examination of the study. Alcohol intake changes on risk of upper digestive tract cancer 1981-2002 were...

  16. Changes in intrinsic subtype of breast cancer during tumor progression in the same patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chungyeul; Lee, Jungjoo; Lee, Wonyoung; Kim, Aeree

    2015-01-01

    Hormone receptor (HR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and Ki67 are important prognostic factors and key variables in classification of the intrinsic subtype, which is essential for choice of adjuvant therapy in breast cancer management. There has been earlier reports that instability of hormonal and HER2 status during progression of tumor. However, breast cancer treatment guidelines recently recommended using the intrinsic subtype that is determined by four immunohistochemical (IHC) assays, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), HER2 and Ki67. The purpose of study was to investigate whether the intrinsic subtype changes during the tumor progression from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to lymph node metastasis. The study included 90 patients with breast cancer in Korea University Guro Hospital, between 1992 and 2008. All individuals had DCIS, invasive carcinoma and lymph node metastasis lesion. IHC staining for ER, PR, HER2 and Ki67 as well as SISH assay for HER2 gene amplification was done with following standard method. Overall 25% of breast cancer changed their intrinsic phenotype during progression. Study demonstrated that a subset of breast cancers can change their intrinsic subtype during cancer progression. These changes have an impact on patient prognosis and management, because each breast cancer subtype has their own differently optimized treatment options according to St. Gallen and NCCN guideline.

  17. [Metabolico-nutritional changes in the cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi Fanelli, F; Cangiano, C; Muscaritoli, M; Cascino, A

    1989-09-01

    The severe impairment of the nutritional state, which usually accompanies malignant diseases, heavily contributes to the high morbidity and mortality rates observed in cancer patients. Nevertheless, the utility of an artificial energy supply to these patients is still controversial because the nutrients given to replete the host may also stimulate tumor growth. Consequently, a correct nutritional approach for cancer patients should be based upon a well-defined understanding of tumor as well as host-metabolic needs. In this regard, the most typical metabolic abnormalities observed in cancer patients and experimental animals are examined. Specific modifications of the plasma levels of different groups of amino acids--including glucogenic, aromatic, sulphur-containing and branched-chain amino acids--have been observed in cancer patients independently of the their degree of malnutrition, glucose tolerance and tumor diffusion. This may reflect a series of specific modifications induced by the neoplastic tissue on host's protein turnover. Little information is available regarding the protein metabolism in the neoplastic tissue. A number of attempts have been made to reduce tumor growth by withholding single amino acids considered essential to the tumor; nevertheless, the results obtained are still controversial. The two major abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism observed in cancer patients are an increased glucose turnover and an impaired glucose tissue disposal. The former seems to be due to an increased glucogenesis, whereas the latter may be attributed to an insulin resistance in contrast to the high anaerobic glucose utilization observed in the neoplastic tissue.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. [Exploring the changes of the lived experience among siblings of children with cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Chi; Lo, Li-Hua

    2005-10-01

    Few nursing studies in the past two decades have focused on siblings of children with cancer. Taking care of a hospitalized child with cancer, parents might neglect other children at home. Nursing providers need more information related to siblings and their psychosocial adaptation when one of their children is diagnosed with cancer and undergoing a variety of treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to explore the changes in the experiences of preschool and school age siblings of children with cancer. A phenomenological study was conducted at a teaching hospital in southern Taiwan. Three children aged between five and nine years old who were siblings of a hospitalized cancer patient were approached in 2003-2004. Their families were also interviewed. Data included in-depth, formal and informal interviews, process recordings, drawings by the children, and a diary of reflections kept by the first author. Interviews lasted between 30 and 90 minutes. The qualitative data analysis method devised by Miles and Huberman (1994) was used. The findings indicated that there were three different changes in experience: Changes in psychological status, i.e., increase in worry about life, anxiety about the disease, and negative self-concepts; Changes in family interaction, i.e., relationship with mother, relationship with father, relationship with other siblings; Changes in social relationship, i.e., hunger for companions, changing recreation. Siblings do experience changes in their lives and may experience mal-adaptation. Nursing providers need to be aware of these changes and identify the health needs among caregivers and siblings of children with cancer. The findings of this study may be helpful to clinical nurses seeking to understand the needs of siblings of children with cancer.

  19. Senior Centers and Policy Advocacy: Changing Public Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardasani, Manoj; Goldkind, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    As critical components of the aging continuum of care, senior centers promote older adult health and well-being by providing opportunities for recreation, socialization, nutrition, health education, and access to vital social services. Nationally, a vast network of 11,000 senior centers serves over four million older adults annually. As the United…

  20. Evolution of breast cancer management in Ireland: a decade of change.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heneghan, Helen M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the last decade there has been a paradigm shift in the management of breast cancer, subsequent to revised surgical oncology guidelines and consensus statements which were derived in light of landmark breast cancer clinical trials conducted throughout the latter part of the 20th century. However the sheer impact of this paradigm shift upon all modalities of treatment, and the current trends in management of the disease, are largely unknown. We aimed to assess the changing practices of breast cancer management over the last decade within a specialist tertiary referral Breast Cancer Centre. METHODS: Comparative analysis of all aspects of the management of breast cancer patients, who presented to a tertiary referral Breast Cancer Centre in 1995\\/1996 and 2005\\/2006, was undertaken and measured against The European Society for Surgical Oncology guidelines for the surgical management of mammographically detected lesions [1998]. RESULTS: 613 patients\\' case profiles were analysed. Over the last decade we observed a dramatic increase in incidence of breast cancer [>100%], a move to less invasive diagnostic and surgical therapeutic techniques, as well as increased use of adjuvant therapies. We also witnessed the introduction of immediate breast reconstruction as part of routine practice CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that radical changes have occurred in the management of breast cancer in the last decade, in keeping with international guidelines. It remains incumbent upon us to continue to adapt our practice patterns in light of emerging knowledge and best evidence.

  1. Newspaper Advocacy Advertising: A Medium for Discussing Public Issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Eugene H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Content analysis of 288 advocacy ads in the "Washington Post" and 373 in the "New York Times" showed that (1) for-profit organizations place such ads more frequently, although nonprofit groups are increasing their use; (2) 3 organizations placed a quarter of all the ads; (3) economic and social welfare issues predominated; and (4) primary…

  2. Critical Literacy as Policy and Advocacy: Lessons from Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Raúl Alberto

    2014-01-01

    This article, the first column for this issue's Policy and Advocacy department, features a discussion about a recent experience in a graduate program in Medellín, Colombia introducing students to critical literacy. Graduate students used ideas from critical literacy to engage in an in-depth analysis of textbooks they had used in their…

  3. 75 FR 9028 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... improving IRS service and customer satisfaction. The TAP serves as an advisory body to the Secretary of the... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are inviting individuals to help improve...

  4. 77 FR 13390 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... improving IRS service and customer satisfaction. The TAP serves as an advisory body to the Secretary of the... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) are inviting individuals to help improve...

  5. Latina/o School Principals: Identity, Leadership and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Hernandez, Frank; Mendez-Morse, Sylvia; Byrne-Jimenez, Monica

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to further define and inform about the influence of Latina/o principals in schools as an alternative to traditional forms of leadership. The principals' Latina/o identity, their leadership styles and advocacy towards the improvement of student achievement were examined. This research focused on three questions: (a) How did…

  6. Critical Literacy as Policy and Advocacy: Lessons from Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Raúl Alberto

    2014-01-01

    This article, the first column for this issue's Policy and Advocacy department, features a discussion about a recent experience in a graduate program in Medellín, Colombia introducing students to critical literacy. Graduate students used ideas from critical literacy to engage in an in-depth analysis of textbooks they had used in their practice.…

  7. Height, weight, weight change and risk of breast cancer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise Bezerra de Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The relationship between body size and breast cancer still remains controversial in considering menopausal status. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of height, weight and weight changes with breast cancer in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: National Cancer Institute (INCA, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ. SAMPLE: 177 incident cases of invasive breast cancer admitted to the main hospital of INCA between May 1995 and February 1996, and 377 controls recruited from among female visitors to the same hospital. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Height and weight were measured and information on maximum weight, weight at ages 18 and 30 years, and potential risk factors were ascertained by interview at the hospital. RESULTS: Height was not related to risk of breast cancer among both pre and postmenopausal women. Nevertheless, women in this study were shorter than in studies that have found a positive association. Premenopausal women in the upper quartile of recent body mass index (BMI and maximum BMI showed a reduced risk of breast cancer (P for trend <= 0.03. Weight loss between ages 18 and 30 years and from 18 years to present was also associated with breast cancer among premenopausal women. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may merely indicate the known association between leanness and breast cancer. Further studies should explore the role of weight loss on breast cancer risk.

  8. Advocacy for active transport: advocate and city council perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenby Marieah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective advocacy is an important part of efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Research about effective health advocacy is scarce, however, the health sector can learn from the experiences and knowledge of community advocates and those who are on the receiving end of this advocacy. The aim of this study is to explore advocacy for active transport from the perspectives of community advocates and representatives from City councils. Methods Cycling and walking advocates were identified from the local contact list of Cycling Advocates Network and Living Streets Aotearoa. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with cycle and walking advocates from throughout New Zealand. Advocates also nominated a suitable council officer at their local City council to be interviewed. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and categories of responses for each of the questions created. Results Several processes were used by advocates to engage with council staff, including formal council submissions, meetings, stakeholder forums and partnership in running community events promoting active transport. Several other agencies were identified as being influential for active transport, some as potential coalition partners and others as potential adversaries. Barriers to improving conditions for active transport included a lack of funding, a lack of will-power among either council staff or councillors, limited council staff capacity (time or training and a culture of providing infrastructure for motor vehicles instead of people. Several suggestions were made about how the health sector could contribute to advocacy efforts, including encouraging political commitment, engaging the media, communicating the potential health benefits of active transport to the general public and being role models in terms of personal travel mode choice and having workplaces that support participation in active transport

  9. Epigenetic changes of DNA repair genes in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Lahtz; Gerd P. Pfeifer

    2011-01-01

    'Every Hour Hurts, The Last One Kills'. That is an old saying about getting old. Every day, thousands of DNA damaging events take place in each cell of our body, but efficient DNA repair systems have evolved to prevent that. However, our DNA repair system and that of most other organisms are not as perfect as that of Deinococcus radiodurans, for example, which is able to repair massive amounts of DNA damage at one time. In many instances, accumulation of DNA damage has been linked to cancer, and genetic deficiencies in specific DNA repair genes are associated with tumor-prone phenotypes. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes may promote tumorigenesis. This review will summarize current knowledge of the epigenetic inactivation of different DNA repair components in human cancer.

  10. From Individuals to International Policy: Achievements and Ongoing Needs in Diabetes Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Oser, Sean M; Close, Kelly L; Liu, Nancy F; Hood, Korey K; Anderson, Barbara J

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impacts tens of millions of people in the United States of America and 9 % of the worldwide population. Given the public health implications and economic burden of diabetes, the needs of people with diabetes must be addressed through strategic and effective advocacy efforts. Diabetes advocacy aims to increase public awareness about diabetes, raise funds for research and care, influence policy impacting people with diabetes, and promote optimal individual outcomes. We present a framework for diabetes advocacy activities by individuals and at the community, national, and international levels and identify challenges and gaps in current diabetes advocacy. Various groups have organized successful diabetes advocacy campaigns toward these goals, and lessons for further advancing diabetes advocacy can be learned from other health-related populations. Finally, we discuss the role of healthcare providers and mental/behavioral health professionals in advocacy efforts that can benefit their patients and the broader population of people with diabetes.

  11. A changing landscape in castration resistant prostate cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eFelici

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the leading cause of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-death among men in the Western world. About 10%-20% of men with PC present with metastatic disease at diagnosis, while 20%-30% of patients diagnosed with localized disease will eventually develop metastases. Although most respond to initial androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, progression to castration resistant PC (CRPC is universal. In 2004 the docetaxel/prednisone regimen was approved for the management of patients with metastatic CRPC, becoming the standard first-line therapy. Recent advances have now led to an unprecedented number of new drug approvals within the past years, providing many new treatment options for patients with metastatic CRPC. Four new drugs have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approval in 2010 and 2011: sipuleucel-T, an immunotherapeutic agent; cabazitaxel, a novel microtubule inhibitor; abiraterone acetate, a new androgen biosynthesis inhibitor; and denosumab, a bone-targeting agent. The data supporting the approval of each of these agents are described in this review, as are current approaches in the treatment of metastatic CRPC and ongoing clinical trials of novel treatments and strategies.

  12. Specific changes in the expression of imprinted genes in prostate cancer-implications for cancer progression and epigenetic regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodora Ribarska; Klaus-Marius Bastian; Annemarie Koch; Wolfgang A Schulz

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic dysregulation comprising DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation,enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2)overexpression and altered patterns of histone modifications is associated with the progression of prostate cancer.DNA methylation,EZH2 and histone modifications also ensure the parental-specific monoallelic expression of at least 62 imprinted genes.Although it is therefore tempting to speculate that epigenetic dysregulation may extend to imprinted genes,expression changes in cancerous prostates are only well documented for insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2).A literature and database survey on imprinted genes in prostate cancer suggests that the expression of most imprinted genes remains unchanged despite global disturbances in epigenetic mechanisms.Instead,selective genetic and epigenetic changes appear to lead to the inactivation of a sub-network of imprinted genes,which might function in the prostate to limit cell growth induced viathe PI3K/Akt pathway,modulate androgen responses and regulate differentiation.Whereas dysregulation of IG F2 may constitute an early change in prostate carcinogenesis,inactivation of this imprinted gene network is rather associated with cancer progression.

  13. Changing constituents of genitourinary cancer in recent 50 years in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾方六

    2003-01-01

    Objective To assess the changes in constituents of genitourinary cancer inpatients in Beijing following the growing economy of China.Methods Urological inpatients treated from January 1951 to December 2000 at the Institute of Urology, Peking University were studied restrospectively.Results In the period of about 50 years 28 474 urological inpatients were reviewed. Cancer patients aged 0-25 years and 26-50 years comprised 19.5% and 28.2%, respectively. Since the 1970s the incidence rates of renal cancer and prostate cancer increased dramatically from 10.4% to 28.7% and from 3.3% to 13.4%, respectively.Conclusion The introduction of new diagnostic instruments, the expansion of the aged population and a high fat diet are considered to be responsible for the change of constituents of genitourimary concer inpatients.

  14. Changes in nutritional status associated with unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigmore, S J; Plester, C E; Richardson, R A; Fearon, K C

    1997-01-01

    Weight loss is common in patients with pancreatic cancer; however, the nature and progress of their nutritional depletion are not well documented. In this study, pre-illness weight and duration of weight loss were recorded in 20 patients with histologically confirmed unresectable cancer of the pancreas. Patients then underwent nutritional analysis at monthly intervals until death. The median period of assessment was 27 weeks (interquartile range 22.5-38.0 weeks). At the time of diagnosis, all patients had lost weight [median 14.2% (10.0-20.0%) of pre-illness stable weight], and this weight loss was progressive, increasing to a median of 24.5% by the time of the last assessment (P =0.0004). Body mass index was significantly reduced from a pre-illness median value of 24.9 kg m-2 (22.4-27.4 kg m-2) to 20.7 kg m-2 (19.5-23.6 kg m-2) at the time of diagnosis and further to 17.7 kg m-2 (16.6-23.1 kg m-2) just before death (P =0.0003). Further evidence of tissue depletion was evident from the significant reductions in lean body mass [43.4 kg (36.9-53.0 kg) to 40.1 kg (33.5-50.7 kg) P =0.008] and fat mass [12.5 kg (8.9-17.8 kg) to 9.6 kg (6.3-15.1 kg) P =0.03). This study confirms that the majority of patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer have already undergone significant weight loss by the time of diagnosis and that the natural history of this process is one of inexorable progression. These results highlight the need for selective non-toxic therapeutic intervention to attenuate cachexia and indicate that such interventions should be instituted early in the course of the disease.

  15. Motivational change towards physical activity participation from physiological testing in cancer survivors attending rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Arnesen, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Aim: Stimulating physical activity (PA) participation is particularly important to cancer survivors, to reduce late effects from cancer and medical treatment and promote health. Physiological tests are procedures that aim to assess the individuals’ level of cardio-pulmonary fitness or performance, and are commonly integrated in rehabilitation programs, to specify exercise programs and motivate to PA participation. Still there is limited research to the field motivational changes fro...

  16. Changing Management of Clinical Low-Stage Testicular Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Gilligan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stage I and II testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs are almost always cured with appropriate treatment and most ongoing research regarding these tumors focuses on minimizing treatment toxicity. The management of clinical stage I testicular GCTs has grown more complicated due to the emergence of a brief course of chemotherapy as an additional treatment option for stage I seminomas and stage I nonseminomas. In addition, growing concern about radiation-induced cancers and other late toxicity has dulled enthusiasm for radiotherapy as a treatment for stage I seminomas. However, recent randomized trials have shown that radiotherapy doses and field sizes can be lowered without compromising cure rates and it is possible that this reduction in radiation exposure will reduce the rate of secondary cancers. At this point in history, stage I patients have three treatment options following radical orchiectomy: adjuvant (sometimes called “primary” chemotherapy (carboplatin for seminomas and the combined regimen of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin for nonseminomas, surveillance, and either retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (for nonseminomas or radiotherapy (for pure seminomas. Clinical studies have made it possible to identify subgroups of patients at high and low risk for relapse and this has made it possible to tailor treatment decisions to the individual patient's postorchiectomy relapse risk.

  17. Base changes in tumour DNA have the power to reveal the causes and evolution of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollstein, M; Alexandrov, L B; Wild, C P; Ardin, M; Zavadil, J

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has demonstrated that the cancer genomes are peppered with mutations. Although most somatic tumour mutations are unlikely to have any role in the cancer process per se, the spectra of DNA sequence changes in tumour mutation catalogues have the potential to identify the mutagens, and to reveal the mutagenic processes responsible for human cancer. Very recently, a novel approach for data mining of the vast compilations of tumour NGS data succeeded in separating and precisely defining at least 30 distinct patterns of sequence change hidden in mutation databases. At least half of these mutational signatures can be readily assigned to known human carcinogenic exposures or endogenous mechanisms of mutagenesis. A quantum leap in our knowledge of mutagenesis in human cancers has resulted, stimulating a flurry of research activity. We trace here the major findings leading first to the hypothesis that carcinogenic insults leave characteristic imprints on the DNA sequence of tumours, and culminating in empirical evidence from NGS data that well-defined carcinogen mutational signatures are indeed present in tumour genomic DNA from a variety of cancer types. The notion that tumour DNAs can divulge environmental sources of mutation is now a well-accepted fact. This approach to cancer aetiology has also incriminated various endogenous, enzyme-driven processes that increase the somatic mutation load in sporadic cancers. The tasks now confronting the field of molecular epidemiology are to assign mutagenic processes to orphan and newly discovered tumour mutation patterns, and to determine whether avoidable cancer risk factors influence signatures produced by endogenous enzymatic mechanisms. Innovative research with experimental models and exploitation of the geographical heterogeneity in cancer incidence can address these challenges. PMID:27270430

  18. Image and pathological changes after microwave ablation of breast cancer: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenbin [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Jiang, Yanni [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Chen, Lin; Ling, Lijun; Liang, Mengdi; Pan, Hong [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Siqi [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Ding, Qiang [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Liu, Xiaoan, E-mail: liuxiaoan@126.com [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China); Wang, Shui, E-mail: ws0801@hotmail.com [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We report successful experience of MWA in breast cancer under local anesthesia. • We report MR imaging evaluation of microwave ablation zone in breast cancer. • Pathological changes after microwave ablation in breast cancer was reported. • 2 min MWA caused an ablation zone with three diameters > 2 cm in breast cancer. - Abstract: Purpose: To prospectively assess MR imaging evaluation of the ablation zone and pathological changes after microwave ablation (MWA) in breast cancer. Materials and methods: Twelve enrolled patients, diagnosed with non-operable locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), were treated by MWA and then neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by surgery. MR imaging was applied to evaluate the effect of MWA. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to analyze the ablated area. Results: All MWA procedures were performed successfully under local anesthesia. For a mean duration of 2.15 min, the mean largest, middle and smallest diameters in the ablated zone 24-h post-ablation in MR imaging were 2.98 cm ± 0.53, 2.51 cm ± 0.41 and 2.23 cm ± 0.41, respectively. The general shape of the ablation zone was close to a sphere. The ablated area became gradually smaller in MR imaging. No adverse effects related to MWA were noted in all 12 patients during and after MWA. HE staining could confirm the effect about 3 months after MWA, which was confirmed by TEM. Conclusions: 2 min MWA can cause an ablation zone with three diameters larger than 2 cm in breast cancer, which may be suitable for the local treatment of breast cancer up to 2 cm in largest diameter. However, the long-term effect of MWA in the treatment of small breast cancer should be determined in the future.

  19. The effect of demographic and lifestyle changes on the burden of breast cancer in Iranian women: A projection to 2030

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vostakolaei, F.A.; Broeders, M.J.M.; Mousavi, S.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Iran is rapidly becoming an "ageing society" with a related increase in cancer incidence including breast cancer. This paper evaluates the trend in breast cancer incidence from the past to the present, in order to predict the future burden in Iran and to quantify the effect of changes in known risk

  20. Weight change in middle adulthood and breast cancer risk in the EPIC-PANACEA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emaus, Marleen J; van Gils, Carla H; Bakker, Marije F

    2014-01-01

    diagnosed during a median follow-up of 7.5 years (from second weight assessment onward). High weight gain (Q5: 0.83-4.98 kg/year) was related to a slightly, but significantly higher breast cancer risk (HRQ5_versus_Q2/3 : 1.09, 95% CI: 1.01-1.18). The association was more pronounced for breast cancer...... diagnosed before or at age 50 (HRQ5_versus_Q2/3 : 1.37, 95% CI: 1.02-1.85). Weight loss was not associated with breast cancer risk. There was no evidence for heterogeneity by hormone receptor status. In conclusion, high weight gain in middle adulthood increases the risk of breast cancer. The association......Long-term weight gain (i.e., weight gain since age 20) has been related to higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, but a lower risk of premenopausal breast cancer. The effect of weight change in middle adulthood is unclear. We investigated the association between weight change in middle...

  1. A Research Agenda for Appearance Changes Due to Breast Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia K. Markey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent forms of cancer in the US. It is estimated that more than 180,000 American women will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in 2008. Fortunately, the survival rate is relatively high and continually increasing due to improved detection techniques and treatment methods. However, maintaining quality of life is a factor often under emphasized for breast cancer survivors. Breast cancer treatments are invasive and can lead to deformation of the breast. Breast reconstruction is important for restoring the survivor’s appearance. However, more work is needed to develop technologies for quantifying surgical outcomes and understanding women’s perceptions of changes in their appearance. A method for objectively measuring breast anatomy is needed in order to help both the breast cancer survivors and their surgeons take expected changes to the survivor’s appearance into account when considering various treatment options. In the future, augmented reality tools could help surgeons reconstruct a survivor’s breasts to match her preferences as much as possible.

  2. To assess the effects of nutritional intervention based on advocacy approach on malnutrition status among school-aged children in Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Joulaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study was carried out to assess the effects of community nutrition intervention based on advocacy approach on malnutrition status among school-aged children in Shiraz, Iran. Materials and Methods: This case-control nutritional intervention has been done between 2008 and 2009 on 2897 primary and secondary school boys and girls (7-13 years old based on advocacy approach in Shiraz, Iran. The project provided nutritious snacks in public schools over a 2-year period along with advocacy oriented actions in order to implement and promote nutritional intervention. For evaluation of effectiveness of the intervention growth monitoring indices of pre- and post-intervention were statistically compared. Results: The frequency of subjects with body mass index lower than 5% decreased significantly after intervention among girls (P = 0.02. However, there were no significant changes among boys or total population. The mean of all anthropometric indices changed significantly after intervention both among girls and boys as well as in total population. The pre- and post-test education assessment in both groups showed that the student′s average knowledge score has been significantly increased from 12.5 ± 3.2 to 16.8 ± 4.3 (P < 0.0001. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential success and scalability of school feeding programs in Iran. Community nutrition intervention based on the advocacy process model is effective on reducing the prevalence of underweight specifically among female school aged children.

  3. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O'Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2011-09-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health.

  4. Nursing Actions in practicing inpatient advocacy in a Burn Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Carniato Dalle Nogario

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVEUnderstanding nursing actions in the practice of inpatient advocacy in a burn unit.METHODA single and descriptive case study, carried out with nurses working in a referral burn center in southern Brazil. Data were collected through focus group technique, between February and March 2014, in three meetings. Data was analysed through discursive textual analysis.RESULTSThree emerging categories were identified, namely: (1 instructing the patient; (2 protecting the patient; and (3 ensuring the quality of care.CONCLUSIONSThis study identified that the nurses investigated exercised patient advocacy and that the recognition of their actions is an advance for the profession, contributing to the autonomy of nurses and the effectiveness of patients' rights and social justice.

  5. Patient advocacy groups: Need and opportunity in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing number of corporate hospitals, healthcare related issues, research trials and undue attention by media in India, there is a need to focus more on patient′s rights and protection. In India, multiple agencies like regulatory bodies, scientific review committees, ethics committees, NGOs, etc. work toward patient rights and protection. However, these agencies are inadequate to cater to the general issues related to patient′s rights. There′s a need to have a separate group of people who provide advocacy to the patient, or simply, a patient advocacy group which will work explicitly in these areas to increase transparency and credibility of healthcare system in India. This group will provide special attention to patient care and protection of rights from the planning stage rather than at the troubleshooting stage.

  6. The Social Work Reinvestment Initiative: advocacy and social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Elizabeth Peffer; McMillin, Joan A

    2014-07-01

    In 2006, NASW launched the Social Work Reinvestment Initiative by granting each state chapter $15,000 in seed money to address the most pressing social work needs in the state. This article describes how NASW-SD, with 246 members, launched an epic campaign that resulted in the establishment of the only MSW program in South Dakota. Using historical research methods, this article demonstrates the power of social work advocacy when members unify in pursuit of a common goal and describes how the social workers rallied to educate policymakers and the public on the value of social work and its delivery of necessary social services at all levels and in all fields of practice. The research highlights an uphill battle of advocacy and the skillful planning and implementation of a campaign to secure state funding to establish the first MSW program in the state, at the beginning of the most difficult economic recession since the Great Depression.

  7. Recent changes in bacteremia in patients with cancer: a systematic review of epidemiology and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montassier, E; Batard, E; Gastinne, T; Potel, G; de La Cochetière, M F

    2013-07-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complication in patients with cancer. Significant changes in the spectrum of microorganisms isolated from blood culture have been reported in cancer patients over the past years. The aim of our systematic review was to inventory the recent trends in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms causing bacteremia in cancer patients. Data for this review was identified by searches of Medline, Scopus and Cochrane Library for indexed articles and abstracts published in English since 2008. The principal search terms were: "antimicrobial resistance", "bacteremia", "bacterial epidemiology", "bloodstream infection", "cancer patients", "carbapenem resistance", "Escherichia coli resistance", "extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli", "febrile neutropenia", "fluoroquinolone resistance", "neutropenic cancer patient", "vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus", and "multidrug resistance". Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and widen the search. Altogether, 27 articles were selected to be analyzed in the review. We found that Gram-negative bacteria were the most frequent pathogen isolated, particularly in studies with minimal use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Another important trend is the extensive emergence of antimicrobial-resistant strains associated with increased risk of morbidity, mortality and cost. This increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance has been reported in Gram-negative bacteria as well as in Gram-positive bacteria. This exhaustive review, reporting the recent findings in epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacteremia in cancer patients, highlights the necessity of local continuous surveillance of bacteremia and stringent enforcement of antibiotic stewardship programs in cancer patients.

  8. Oral mucosal lesions, microbial changes, and taste disturbances induced by adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Siri Beier; Mouridsen, Henning T.; Bergmann, Olav Jonas

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine oral mucosal lesions, microbial changes, and taste disturbances induced by adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) in breast cancer patients during and 1 year after treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Forty-five consecutive breast cancer patients, eligible for adjuvant CT...... with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin or methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil were followed before, during, 6 months and 1 year after CT and were compared to a control group of 31 breast cancer patients not receiving adjuvant CT. RESULTS: During CT, oral mucosal lesions developed including erythema (n = 10, 22%) and ulceration...... in the CT group. CONCLUSION: In breast cancer patients, moderate-intensive adjuvant CT caused oral mucosal lesions, oral candidosis, taste disturbances and a more acidophilic oral microflora. These adverse effects were temporary and the majority of the patients were mildly affected....

  9. Navy Family Advocacy Program. Appendix. Analysis of Central Registry Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    2/76) 2 Suspected Abuzso/Malect/Sexua1 Assault an ae2404 65.) "Suspected Abuso /Neglect/ Sexual Assault and Rape Report" 2226 60.5 NAVMED 6320/15A...ANALYSIS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT REPORTS ........... 50 HAPTER V: SUMAY ANALYSIS Or rAMILY ADVOCACY PROGRAM REPORTS . 56 APPENDIX...cont’d)I PAGE CHAPTER IV: SEXUAL ASSAULT TV-1 Fore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 IV-2 Type of Maltreatment ............... 53 IV-3

  10. Changing pattern of age-specific breast cancer incidence in the Swiss canton of Geneva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchardy, Christine; Usel, Massimo; Verkooijen, Helena M; Fioretta, Gérald; Benhamou, Simone; Neyroud-Caspar, Isabelle; Schaffar, Robin; Vlastos, Georges; Wespi, Yves; Schäfer, Peter; Rapiti, Elisabetta

    2010-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use declined sharply after mid-2002, when the Women's Health Initiative trial reported an association between breast cancer occurrence and HRT. Hypothesized mechanism behind this association is that HRT promotes growth of pre-existing small tumors, leading to earlier tumor detection. We evaluated the impact of the sudden decline in HRT use on age distribution of breast cancer in Geneva. We included all incident breast cancer cases recorded from 1975 to 2006 at the Geneva cancer registry. We calculated mean annual incidence rates per 100,000 for 2 year periods for three age groups and assessed temporal changes by joinpoint regression. We compared age-specific incidence curves for different periods, reflecting different prevalence rates of HRT use. After increasing constantly between 1986 and 2002 among women aged 50-69 years [annual percent change (APC): +4.4, P Geneva, breast cancer incidence rates among post-menopausal women decreased considerably with striking changes in age-specific incidence rates before, during and after the peak in HRT prevalence.

  11. Changes in brain activation in breast cancer patients depend on cognitive domain and treatment type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menning, Sanne; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Veltman, Dick J.; Boogerd, Willem; Oldenburg, Hester S. A.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive problems in breast cancer patients are common after systemic treatment, particularly chemotherapy. An increasing number of fMRI studies show altered brain activation in breast cancer patients after treatment, suggestive of neurotoxicity. Previous prospective fMRI studies administered a single cognitive task. The current study employed two task paradigms to evaluate whether treatment-induced changes depend on the probed cognitive domain. Methods Participants were breast cancer patients scheduled to receive systemic treatment (anthracycline-based chemotherapy +/- endocrine treatment, n = 28), or no systemic treatment (n = 24) and no-cancer controls (n = 31). Assessment took place before adjuvant treatment and six months after chemotherapy, or at similar intervals. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation and performance were measured during an executive functioning task and an episodic memory task. Group-by-time interactions were analyzed using a flexible factorial design. Results Task performance did not differ between patient groups and did not change over time. Breast cancer patients who received systemic treatment, however, showed increased parietal activation compared to baseline with increasing executive functioning task load compared to breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic treatment. This hyperactivation was accompanied by worse physical functioning, higher levels of fatigue and more cognitive complaints. In contrast, in breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic treatment, parietal activation normalized over time compared to the other two groups. Conclusions Parietal hyperactivation after systemic treatment in the context of stable levels of executive task performance is compatible with a compensatory processing account of hyperactivation or maintain adequate performance levels. This over-recruitment of brain regions depends on the probed cognitive domain and may represent a response to decreased neural

  12. Rivalry of Advocacy Coalitions in the Czech Pension Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potůček Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic, as many other countries of Central and Eastern Europe, faced and is still facing a pension-reform challenge. The diversification of pension pillars led to the massive displacements of participant contributions from the public PAYG pension pillars to the newly constructed private, defined-contribution, fully-funded pillars. In the Czech Republic, the adoption of the relevant law was preceded by serious political conflict between supporters and opponents of this step (both among different political actors and among professionals. In an analysis of the conflict we critically apply the Advocacy Coalition Framework. We work mainly with the analysis of policy documents, public statements of the individual actors and an analysis of voting on the relevant law in both chambers of the Czech Parliament towards the identification of the crystallization process of two clear-cut coalitions between actors from both sides of the spectrum. The Advocacy Coalition Framework in exploring the dynamics of the public-policy process proved to be able to explain situations where there is sharp political conflict. Through the lens of the devil-shift of both camps (advocacy coalitions with different beliefs, each fell into extreme positions within the coalition to affirm the correctness of their arguments and positions.

  13. Anthropometric Changes Using a Walking Intervention in African American Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Kilpatrick, PhD

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction African American women exhibit a higher mortality rate from breast cancer than do white women. African American women are more likely to gain weight at diagnosis, which may increase their risk of cancer recurrence and comorbidities. Physical activity has been shown to decrease body mass index and improve quality of life in cancer survivors. This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and impact of a community-based exercise intervention in African American breast cancer survivors. Methods A theory-based eight-week community intervention using pedometers with scheduling, goal setting, and self-assessment was tested in a convenience sample of African American breast cancer survivors (n = 24. Data were collected at three time points to examine changes in steps walked per day, body mass index, and other anthropometric measures, attitudes, and demographic variables. Results Statistically significant increases in steps walked per day and attitude toward exercise as well as significant decreases in body mass index, body weight, percentage of body fat, and waist, hip, and forearm circumferences, as well as blood pressure, were reported from baseline to immediate post-intervention. Positive changes were retained or improved further at three-month follow-up except for attitude toward exercise. Participant retention rate during eight-week intervention was 92%. Conclusion Increasing walking for exercise, without making other changes, can improve body mass index, anthropometric measures, and attitudes, which are associated with improved quality of life and reduced risk of cancer recurrence. The high participant retention rate, along with significant study outcomes, demonstrate that among this sample of African American breast cancer survivors, participants were motivated to improve their exercise habits.

  14. Survey of changes in dietary preferences in cancer patients in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Li; Liqiong Zhang; Qiujun Tang; Xianglin Yuan 

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in dietary preferences in cancer patients in China and to determine the need for encouraging the adherence to a sensible diet among such patients. Methods A total of 468 cancer patients were interviewed using a self-designed questionnaire focusing on changes in the intake of specific foods. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0. Results Most patients completely avoided roosters and carp (73.1%), condiments (51.9%), and meat of aquatic species (40.4%). Al other types of the specific foods were completely avoided by dif erent sub-populations of the patients. Conclusion In addition to focusing on disease treatment, medical professionals need to help cancer pa-tients overcome barriers associated with the customs of avoiding specific foods encompassed by the term ”fawu” and provide them with dietary guidance in order to prevent negative nutritional ef ects.

  15. The perioperative changes in physical function and physique of patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to observe the long-term change in physical function and physique from perioperative to discharge of patients with gastrointestinal cancer. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 47 perioperative patients with gastrointestinal cancer [25 men and 22 women aged 61.3 ± 11.0 years (mean ± SD)]. Six-minute walk distance was measured for physical function and body mass index and calf circumference were measured for physique. These items were evaluated at three time points: before surgery, after surgery, and after discharge. [Results] Significant declines in physical function and physique were observed temporarily after surgery. Physical function improved equally before surgery in after discharge. On the other hand, postoperative physique was significantly lower than that observed pre-operatively. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the perioperative changes in physical function and physique follow different courses in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

  16. The elevated homocysteine stimulates changes of haemostatic function of plasma isolated from breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Malinowska, Joanna; Glowacki, Rafal; Olas, Beata; Bald, Edward; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Piekarski, Janusz

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to explain the effect of elevated homocysteine (measured by HPLC) on haemostatic activity of plasma from breast cancer patients (fibrin polymerization and lysis; the thrombin and prothrombin time), because homocysteine (Hcys) induces changes in haemostasis, as well blood clotting as fibrinolysis. Patients were hospitalized in Department of Oncological Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. All patients have not had preadjuvant therapy, and samples from patients were taken before surgery. We observed that changes of selected parameters of haemostatic properties of plasma, e.g., the prothrombin time and thrombin time were prolonged in plasma from invasive breast cancer when compared with the control group (healthy subjects) and patients with benign breast diseases. Our results showed also that the correlation between the increased amount of Hcys and changes of selected parameters of haemostasis in invasive breast cancer patients exists. Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that the elevated Hcys in invasive breast cancer patients may induce the changes of haemostatic properties of plasma isolated from these patients.

  17. Changes in symptoms and pain intensity of cancer patients after enrollment in palliative care at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumitrescu, Luminita; van den Heuvel-Olaroiu, Marinela; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the activities and interventions carried out by an at-home palliative care team treating cancer patients who died within two years of being enrolled in a palliative care program. It analyzes which changes in symptoms and pain occurred and which sociodemographic and medical chara

  18. Changes in body composition after childhood cancer treatment : Impact on future health status - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, C. A. J.; Gietema, J. A.; Kamps, W. A.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Postma, A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe data on changes in body composition in childhood cancer survivors. Underlying mechanisms in development of obesity are addressed, in order to discuss intervention strategies. Methods: A systematic literature search was undertaken with a number of search terms. Results: Female su

  19. Validation of a Milk Consumption Stage of Change Algorithm among Adolescent Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Darren; Gerfen, Elissa; Mosher, Revonda B.; Shad, Aziza T.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the construct validity of a milk consumption Stages of Change (SOC) algorithm among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer ages 11 to 21 years (n = 75). Methods: Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate a health behavior intervention were analyzed. Assessments included a milk consumption SOC…

  20. Prospective weight change and colon cancer risk in male US health professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Grønbaek, Morten; Johansen, Christoffer;

    2008-01-01

    year during follow-up from 1986 to 2004. Updated weight change between consecutive questionnaires during follow-up and recalled weight gain since age 21 was evaluated. All eligible men were cancer-free at baseline. Proportional hazard and restricted spline regression models were implemented. Over an 18...

  1. Adult BMI Change and Risk of Colon Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyla Blake-Gumbs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We recently reported an association of adult BMI change with colon cancer risk. Here, we sought to further explore this association with respect to postmenopausal HRT use in a larger study population. Methods. We included 1,457 postmenopausal women participating in an ongoing population-based case-control study of colon cancer. Results. We confirmed a previously reported association of adulthood weight gain and increased risk of colon cancer: compared to those with 10 kg/m2 BMI changes since their 20s had OR estimates of 1.54 (95% CI = 1.09–2.19 and 1.45 (95% CI = 0.90–2.33, respectively (P for trend = 0.05. Stratified analyses showed that this association was limited to HRT nonusers: ORs were 1.77 (95% CI = 1.02–3.05 and 2.21 (95% CI = 1.09–4.45, respectively (P for trend = 0.03, for BMI changes occurring between the 20s decade and time of recruitment among non-users. Similar associations were observed for BMI changes since the 30s decade. There was no association among HRT users. Conclusion. Our results suggest early adulthood weight gain increases colon cancer risk in postmenopausal women who do not use HRT.

  2. Changes in body mass index in long-term childhood cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santen, HM; Geskus, Ronald B; Raemaekers, Steven; van Trotsenburg, A S Paul; Vulsma, Thomas; van der Pal, Helena J H; Caron, Hubert N; Kremer, Leontien C M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported changes in the body mass index (BMI) with time in childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) during follow-up. The limitations of these studies include that they described only a subgroup of survivors or used questionnaires with self-reported heights and weights. Th

  3. Acute chemotherapy-induced cardiovascular changes in patients with testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuver, J; Smit, AJ; van der Meer, J; van den Berg, MP; van der Graaf, WTA; Meinardi, MT; Sleijfer, DT; Hoekstra, HJ; van Gessel, AI; van Roon, AM; Gietema, JA

    2005-01-01

    Purpose; After cisplatin- and bleomycin-containing chemotherapy for testicular cancer, part of the patient population will develop acute or long-term cardiovascular toxicity. It is largely unknown whether standard tests can be used to assess chemotherapy-induced cardiovascular changes. Patients and

  4. CHANGES IN NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND DIETARY INTAKE DURING AND AFTER HEAD AND NECK CANCER TREATMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Vissink, Arjan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.; Pruim, Jan; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to test whether nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer changes during and after treatment. Methods. Nutritional status (including body weight, lean mass, and fat mass) and dietary intake were assessed in 29 patients with head and neck cance

  5. Advocacy Interventions to Reduce or Eliminate Violence and Promote the Physical and Psychosocial Wellbeing of Women Who Experience Intimate Partner Abuse: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivas, C

    2016-01-01

    had considerable clinical heterogeneity in relation to staff delivering advocacy; setting (community, shelter, antenatal, healthcare; advocacy intensity (from 30 minutes to 80 hours; and abuse severity. Three trials evaluated advocacy within multi-component interventions. Eleven measured some form of abuse (eight scales, six assessed quality of life (three scales, and six measured depression (three scales. Countries and ethnic groups varied (one or more minority ethnic groups in the USA or UK, and local populations in Hong Kong and Peru. Setting was associated with intensity and duration of advocacy. Risk of bias was high in five studies, moderate in five, and low in three. The quality of evidence (considering multiple factors such as risk of bias, study size, missing data was moderate to low for brief advocacy and very low for intensive advocacy. Incidence of abuse Physical abuse Moderate quality pooled data from two healthcare studies (moderate risk of bias and one community study (low risk of bias, all with 12-month follow-up data, showed no effect on physical abuse for brief (< 12 hours advocacy interventions (standardised mean difference (SMD 0.00, 95% confidence interval (CI - 0.17 to 0.16; n = 558. One antenatal study (low risk of bias showed an association between brief advocacy and reduced minor physical abuse at one year (mean difference (MD change - 1.00, 95% CI - 1.82 to - 0.18; n = 110. An antenatal, multi-component study showed a greater likelihood of physical abuse ending (odds ratio (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.75 immediately after advocacy (number needed to treat (NNT = 8; we cannot exclude impact from other components. Low to very low quality evidence from two intensive advocacy trials (12 hours plus duration showed reduced severe physical abuse in women leaving a shelter at 24 months (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.77; NNT = 8, but not at 12 or 36 months. Sexual abuse Meta-analysis of two studies (n = 239 showed no effect of advocacy on sexual abuse (SMD

  6. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart Massad, L.; Evans, Charlesnika T.; Weber, Kathleen M.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Hessol, Nancy A.; Wright, Rodney L.; Colie, Christine; Strickler, Howard D.; Wilson, Tracey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe changes in knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccination among women at high risk for cervical cancer in the first five years after introduction of HPV vaccination. Methods In 2007, 2008–9, and 2011, women in a multicenter U.S. cohort study completed 44-item self-report questionnaires assessing knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, HPV, and HPV vaccination. Results across time were assessed for individuals, and three study enrollment cohorts were compared. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic variables, measures of education and attention, and medical factors. Associations were assessed in multivariable models. Results In all, 974 women completed three serial questionnaires; most were minority, low income, and current or former smokers. The group included 652 (67%) HIV infected and 322 (33%) uninfected. Summary knowledge scores (possible range 0–24) increased from 2007 (12.8, S.D. 5.8) to 2008–9 (13.9, S.D. 5.3, P < 0.001) and to 2011 (14.3, S.D. 5.2, P < 0.0001 vs 2007 and < 0.04 vs 2008–9). Higher knowledge scores at first and follow-up administration of questionnaires, higher income, and higher education level were associated with improved knowledge score at third administration. Women not previously surveyed had scores similar to those of the longitudinal group at baseline. Conclusion Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding. PMID:25870859

  7. Promoting Sex and Reproductive Health Education among Adolescent Should Place Emphasis on Advocacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-liang LIU; Jin WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To make a exploration of the function of advocacy in the promotion of sex and reproductive health education for adolescents.Methods The advocacy played a key role on the promotion of adolescent sex and reproductive education by taking "International cooperation project to promote Chinese youth reproductive health "(YRH project) as example.Results The successful experience of YRH project indicated advocacy's important function in the promotion of sex and reproductive health education for adolescents.Conclusion Advocacy is a crucial element in promoting adolescent sex and reproductive health education.

  8. Advocacy Priorities and Strategies for ASAHP: A Survey of the ASAHP Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Donna; Demo, David H; Devine, Nancy; Butler, Andrew; Saladin, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) recently established a strategic goal to increase advocacy efforts. The purpose of this study was to identify advocacy priorities and preferred advocacy strategies among the ASAHP membership. A brief Advocacy Priorities and Strategies Survey was sent to 234 ASAHP members included in the ASAHP email list using an online survey software. Forty-eight members (20%) completed the survey. Data were analyzed using the online survey software and response frequency counts. ASAHP members identified the following federal advocacy priorities: 1) support for students entering allied health professions, 2) support for faculty seeking higher degrees to enhance quality of education in allied health programs, 3) support for higher education institutions to increase capacity of professional programs to address projected allied health workforce needs identified by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and 4) support for research funding from federal agencies for allied health. The need for education regarding allied health professions to enhance advocacy efforts was also reported. Preferred advocacy strategies included scheduling ASAHP conferences in Washington, DC, to facilitate trips to Capitol Hill and visiting legislators in home states. Members also indicated a need to participate in advocacy training to enhance their advocacy skills.

  9. Sleep disturbances and changes in urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels in patients with breast cancer undergoing lumpectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt Hansen, Melissa; Madsen, M T; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disturbances and changes in self-reported discomfort and melatonin secretion are common in the post-operative period. We aimed to study the distribution of sleep stages in the perioperative period and evaluate changes in secretion of the melatonin metabolite aMT6s and subjective parameters ...... of sleepiness, pain, general well-being and fatigue in patients undergoing surgery for breast cancer....

  10. Family Day Care Zoning Advocacy Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Carol; And Others

    Designed to help family day care providers and the agencies that support them reform local zoning laws that make it difficult or impossible to legally care for children in their homes, this guide outlines the process of obtaining a use permit, changing local laws, and strategizing for the passage of state legislation that preempts local laws. A…

  11. Library Advocacy Now! Library Advocate's Handbook. [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    Libraries are one of the world's greatest assets. Changes in the political, social, and economic climate in the U.S. mean that people cannot take public access to information for granted. Intense competition for public, private, and institutional dollars makes it more crucial than ever that policymakers understand that libraries--public, school,…

  12. Ultrasensitive fluorescent ratio imaging probe for the detection of glutathione ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Caixia; Wang, Kui; Xuan, Xiaopeng; Lv, Qingzhang; Jiang, Kai

    2016-11-15

    Glutathione (GSH) ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells can mildly and effectively induce cancer cells apoptosis in early stage. Thus, if GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells could be recognized and imaged, it will be beneficial for fundamental research of cancer therapy. There have reported a lot of fluorescent probes for GSH, but the fluorescent probe with ultrasensitivity and high selectivity for the ratio imaging of GSH ultratrace changes in mitochondria of cancer cells is scarce. Herein, based on different reaction mechanism of sulfonamide under different pH, a sulfonamide-based reactive ratiometric fluorescent probe (IQDC-M) was reported for the recognizing and imaging of GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells. The detection limit of IQDC-M for GSH ultratrace change is low to 2.02nM, which is far less than 1.0‰ of endogenic GSH in living cells. And during the recognition process, IQDC-M can emit different fluorescent signals at 520nm and 592nm, which results in it recognizing GSH ultratrace change on ratio mode. More importantly, IQDC-M recognizing GSH ultratrace change specifically occurs in mitochondria of cancer cells because of appropriate water/oil amphipathy (log P) of IQDC-M. So, these make IQDC-M possible to image and monitor GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria during cancer cells apoptosis for the first time.

  13. Changes in Female Support Network Systems and Adaptation after Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Differences between Older and Younger Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Sato; Palmquist, Aunchalee E. L.; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Singletary, S. Eva; Koehly, Laura M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the changes in social networks of older and younger breast cancer patients over a 6-month period following their first diagnosis and how such modifications are associated with changes in the patients' mood state. Design and Methods: Newly diagnosed breast cancer patients were interviewed shortly after their diagnosis…

  14. A qualitative analysis of changes in relationship dynamics and roles between people with cancer and their primary informal carer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, Jane M; Tim Wong, W K; Perz, Janette

    2011-11-01

    It is widely accepted that cancer is an intersubjective experience that impacts upon the psychological well-being of people with cancer and informal carers, as well as on couple relationships. This qualitative study examined the nature and consequences of cancer on the relationship between informal carers and the person with cancer, from the perspective of Australian cancer carers. Sixty-two carers (42 women and 20 men), across a range of cancer types, stages and relationship dyads took part in semi-structured interviews. Participants reported that cancer had precipitated a change in roles and in the dynamics of the relationship, including having to take on quasi-medical tasks and decisions, neglecting self and other relationships, changes to the emotions or personality of the person with cancer, changed patterns of communication, and changes to sexuality and intimacy. The impact of the changed relationship included sadness, anger and frustration, as well as feelings of love and being closer together, resulting in relationship enhancement. Women were more likely to report changes in the person with cancer and to mourn the previous relationship, while more men reported relationship enhancement.

  15. Dynamic changes and surveillance function of prion protein expression in gastric cancer drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Heng Wang; Jing-Ping Du; Ying-Hai Zhang; Xiao-Jun Zhao; Ru-Ying Fan; Zhi-Hong Wang; Zi-Tao Wu; Ying Han

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the dynamic changes of prion protein (PrPc) in the process of gastric cancer drug resistance and the role of PrPc expression in the prognosis of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. METHODS: A series of gastric cancer cell lines resistant to different concentrations of adriamycin was established,and the expression of PrPc, Bcl-2 and Bax was detected in these cells. Apoptosis was determined using Annexin V staining. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression of PrPc in patients receiving chemotherapy and to explore the role of PrPc expression in predicting the chemosensitivity and the outcome of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Follow-up was performed for 2 years. RESULTS: PrPc expression was increased with the increase in drug resistance. Bcl-2, together with PrPc, increased the level of anti-apoptosis of cancer cells. Increased PrPc expression predicted the enhanced level of anti-apoptosis and resistance to anticancer drugs. PrPc expression could be used as a marker for predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognosis of gastric cancer. Increased PrPc expression predicted both poor chemosensitivity and a low 2-year survival rate. Contrarily, low PrPc expression predicted favorable chemosensitivity and a relatively high 2-year survival rate.CONCLUSION: PrPc expression is associated with histological types and differentiation of gastric cancer cells; The PrPc expression level might be a valuable marker in predicting the efficacy of chemotherapy and the prognosis of gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

  16. Quantifying the changes in survival inequality for Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baade, Peter D; Dasgupta, Paramita; Dickman, Paul W; Cramb, Susanna; Williamson, John D; Condon, John R; Garvey, Gail

    2016-08-01

    The survival inequality faced by Indigenous Australians after a cancer diagnosis is well documented; what is less understood is whether this inequality has changed over time and what this means in terms of the impact a cancer diagnosis has on Indigenous people. Survival information for all patients identified as either Indigenous (n=3168) or non-Indigenous (n=211,615) and diagnosed in Queensland between 1997 and 2012 were obtained from the Queensland Cancer Registry, with mortality followed up to 31st December, 2013. Flexible parametric survival models were used to quantify changes in the cause-specific survival inequalities and the number of lives that might be saved if these inequalities were removed. Among Indigenous cancer patients, the 5-year cause-specific survival (adjusted by age, sex and broad cancer type) increased from 52.9% in 1997-2006 to 58.6% in 2007-2012, while it improved from 61.0% to 64.9% among non-Indigenous patients. This meant that the adjusted 5-year comparative survival ratio (Indigenous: non-Indigenous) increased from 0.87 [0.83-0.88] to 0.89 [0.87-0.93], with similar improvements in the 1-year comparative survival. Using a simulated cohort corresponding to the number and age-distribution of Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer in Queensland each year (n=300), based on the 1997-2006 cohort mortality rates, 35 of the 170 deaths due to cancer (21%) expected within five years of diagnosis were due to the Indigenous: non-Indigenous survival inequality. This percentage was similar when applying 2007-2012 cohort mortality rates (19%; 27 out of 140 deaths). Indigenous people diagnosed with cancer still face a poorer survival outlook than their non-Indigenous counterparts, particularly in the first year after diagnosis. The improving survival outcomes among both Indigenous and non-Indigenous cancer patients, and the decreasing absolute impact of the Indigenous survival disadvantage, should provide increased motivation to continue and enhance

  17. Science Film: An Aperture into Science Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The current funding environment for scientific research necessitates a change in how we foster support for the endeavor. Federal spending is not likely to grow unless constituents--APS members--help communicate the value of science to members of Congress and the public in a compelling and individual way. The event explores how popular film with science-based plots can help physicists communicate the value of science to members of Congress and an increasingly diverse electorate.

  18. Sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis and ultrastructural changes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Peng-Chao; Ma, Yan-Bin; Fan, Rong; Gao, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Jing-Wei; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of sodium butyrate (NaB) on Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) breast cancer cells and analyzed the relevant mechanism. Here, we demonstrated that a certain concentration of NaB effectively induced MCF-7 cell apoptosis. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to detect cell viability and the apoptosis rate. Western blotting was used to detect changes in the Bcl-2 expression level. We observed cell shape changes with microscopy. Immunofluorescence revealed some apoptotic nuclei. Electron microscopy revealed thick nucleoli, chromatin margination, reduced mitochondria, and dramatic vacuoles. Collectively, our findings elucidated the morphological mechanism by which NaB changed the ultrastructure of MCF-7 cells.

  19. Evaluation of resident attitudes and self-reported competencies in health advocacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fok Mark C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CanMEDS Health Advocate role, one of seven roles mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Canada, pertains to a physician's responsibility to use their expertise and influence to advance the wellbeing of patients, communities, and populations. We conducted our study to examine resident attitudes and self-reported competencies related to health advocacy, due to limited information in the literature on this topic. Methods We conducted a pilot experience with seven internal medicine residents participating in a community health promotion event. The residents provided narrative feedback after the event and the information was used to generate items for a health advocacy survey. Face validity was established by having the same residents review the survey. Content validity was established by inviting an expert physician panel to review the survey. The refined survey was then distributed to a cohort of core Internal Medicine residents electronically after attendance at an academic retreat teaching residents about advocacy through didactic sessions. Results The survey was completed by 76 residents with a response rate of 68%. The majority agreed to accept an advocacy role for societal health needs beyond caring for individual patients. Most confirmed their ability to identify health determinants and reaffirmed the inherent requirements for health advocacy. While involvement in health advocacy was common during high school and undergraduate studies, 76% of residents reported no current engagement in advocacy activity, and 36% were undecided if they would engage in advocacy during their remaining time as residents, fellows or staff. The common barriers reported were insufficient time, rest and stress. Conclusions Medical residents endorsed the role of health advocate and reported proficiency in determining the medical and bio-psychosocial determinants of individuals and communities. Few residents, however, were

  20. Changes of histology and expression of MMP-2 and nm23-H1 in primary and metastatic gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Bo Wang; Zhi-Nong Jiang; Miao-Ying Fan; Chao-Yang Xu; Wen-Jun Chen; Jian-Guo Shen

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the changes of histology and expression of MMP-2 and nm23-H1 in primary and metastatic gastric cancer.METHODS:One hundred and seventy-seven gastric cancer patients with lymph node and/or distal metastasis between 1997 and 2001 were reviewed.Differences in histology of the primary and metastatic gastric cancer were assessed.MMP-2 and nm23-H1 immunoreactivity was compared in 44 patients with tumor infiltration to the serosa layer.RESULTS:Poorly and moderately differentiated metastatic gastric cancer was found in 88.7% (157/177)and primary gastric cancer in 75.7% (134/177) of the patients.The histological type of metastatic gastric cancer that was not completely in accordance with the preponderant histology of primary gastric cancer was observed in 25 patients (14.1%).MMP-2 immunoreactivity in metastatic gastric cancer was significantly stronger than that in primary gastric cancer,while nm23-H1 immunoreactivity showed no difference in primary and metastatic gastric cancer.CONCLUSION:Metastatic gastric cancer presents more aggressive histological morphology and higher MMP-2 immunoreactivity than primary gastric cancer.This heterogeneity may elicit a possible mechanism of gastric cancer metastasis.

  1. Changing paradigm of cancer therapy:precision medicine by next-generation sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xue; William R Wilcox

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine aims to identify the right drug, for the right patient, at the right dose, at the right time, which is particularly important in cancer therapy. Problems such as the variability of treatment response and resistance to medication have been long-standing challenges in oncology, especially for development of new medications. Solid tumors, unlike hematologic malignancies or brain tumors, are remarkably diverse in their cellular origins and developmental timing. The ability of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze the comprehensive landscape of genetic alterations brings promises to diseases that have a highly complex and heterogeneous genetic composition such as cancer. Here we provide an overview of how NGS is able to facilitate precision medicine and change the paradigm of cancer therapy, especially for solid tumors, through technical advancements, molecular diagnosis, response monitoring and clinical trials.

  2. Longitudinal study of sexual function and vaginal changes after radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille T; Groenvold, Mogens; Klee, Marianne C

    2003-01-01

    % of the patients, and 45% were never, or only occasionally, able to complete sexual intercourse. Despite sexual dysfunction and vaginal adverse effects, 63% of those sexually active before having cancer remained sexually active after treatment, although with a considerably decreased frequency. CONCLUSIONS......: Patients who are disease free after RT for locally advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer are at high risk of experiencing persistent sexual and vaginal problems compromising their sexual activity and satisfaction.......PURPOSE: To investigate the longitudinal course of self-reported sexual function and vaginal changes in patients disease free after radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 118 patients referred for RT were included...

  3. Professional advocacy: linking Virginia's story to public policy-making theory, learning from the past and applying it to our future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Melody K

    2012-05-01

    Too often the nursing profession has been shortsighted regarding its ability to educate legislators and the public on the value of the nurse and the need for policy change. This has stagnated the profession's agenda setting, influence, and position. Virginia nurses, however, rose to the challenge a few years ago. They addressed the nursing faculty shortage by introducing legislation to improve faculty salaries and promote nursing education. They fully defined their problem, formed a unified coalition to develop a solution, and found the political environment favorable for policy change. Their advocacy success story can lend guidance and encouragement for advocacy for the profession. Linking their successful road to policy change to the B. B. Longest (2010) public policy-making framework provides a roadmap for future success.

  4. Changes of Th17/Treg cell and related cytokines in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Lei; Mo, Qingjiang; Dong, Yuqian; Wang, Guoqiang; Ji, Ankui

    2015-01-01

    To explore the mechanism of Th17 cells and Treg cells in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer through analyzing the changes of the related genes and cytokines expression. 40 patients were divided into three groups based on clinical staging, and 20 healthy subjects were treated as normal control. Proportion of Th17 cells and Treg cells were detected by flow cytometry. RORα, RORγt, FoxP3, and CTLA-4 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were detected by RT-PCR. IL-10, IL-23, INF-γ, TGF-β, and IL-17 cytokine levels in peripheral blood were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The proportion of Th17 cells in peripheral blood of pancreatic cancer patients was lower than that in the normal control, while the proportion of Treg was higher. RORα and RORγt mRNA expression in Th17 cells from pancreatic cancer patients decreased, while FoxP3 and CTLA-4 mRNA expressions in Treg cells increased compared with the normal control. And the correlation analysis revealed that they were significantly correlated with clinical staging. Compared with healthy control, IL-23, IL-17 and INF-γ levels were lower in pancreatic cancer patients, while IL-10 and TGF-β levels were higher. Following the progression of disease, patients in advanced stage exhibited higher level of IL-10 and TGF-β, and lower levels of IL-23 and INF-γ. Pancreatic cancer patients exhibited Th17/Treg balance disorders with higher Treg and lower Th17 cells. They affect cytokine IL-10, IL-23, INF-γ, TGF-β, and IL-17 expression changes mainly through regulating transcription factors such as RORα, RORγt, FoxP3 and CTLA-4, suggesting that Th17/Treg balance disorders plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Epigenetics changes caused by the fusion of human embryonic stem cell and ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ke; Qu, Hu; Xu, Li-Nan; Gao, Jun; Cheng, Fu-Yi; Xiang, Peng; Zhou, Can-Quan

    2016-10-01

    To observe the effect of gene expression and tumorigenicity in hybrid cells of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using a mouse model, and to determine its feasibility in reprogramming tumour cells growth and apoptosis, for a potential exploration of the role of hESCs and tumour cells fusion in the management of ovarian cancer. Stable transgenic hESCs (H1) and ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3 were established before fusion, and cell fusion system was established to analyse the related indicators. PTEN expression in HO-H1 cells was higher than those in the parental stem cells and lower than those in parental tumour cells; the growth of OV-H1 (RFP+GFP) hybrid cells with double fluorescence expressions were obviously slower than that of human embryonic stem cells and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. The apoptosis signal of the OV-H1 hybrid cells was significantly higher than that of the hESCs and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. In vivo results showed that compared with 7 days, 28 days and 35 days after inoculation of OV-H1 hybrid cells; also, apoptotic cell detection indicated that much stronger apoptotic signal was found in OV-H1 hybrid cells inoculated mouse. The hESCs can inhibit the growth of OVCAR-3 cells in vitro by suppressing p53 and PTEN expression to suppress the growth of tumour that may be achieved by inducing apoptosis of OVCAR-3 cells. The change of epigenetics after fusion of ovarian cancer cells and hESCs may become a novel direction for treatment of ovarian cancer.

  6. Preliminary Study of Brain Glucose Metabolism Changes in Patients with Lung Cancer of Different Histological Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ling Li; Chang Fu; Ang Xuan; Da-Peng Shi; Yong-Ju Gao; Jie Zhang; Jun-Ling Xu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Cerebral glucose metabolism changes are always observed in patients suffering from malignant tumors.This preliminary study aimed to investigate the brain glucose metabolism changes in patients with lung cancer of different histological types.Methods:One hundred and twenty patients with primary untreated lung cancer,who visited People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University from February 2012 to July 2013,were divided into three groups based on histological types confirmed by biopsy or surgical pathology,which included adenocarcinoma (52 cases),squamous cell carcinoma (43 cases),and small-cell carcinoma (25 cases).The whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (1 8F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) of these cases was retrospectively studied.The brain PET data of three groups were analyzed individually using statistical parametric maps (SPM) software,with 50 age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls for comparison.Results:The brain resting glucose metabolism in all three lung cancer groups showed regional cerebral metabolic reduction.The hypo-metabolic cerebral regions were mainly distributed at the left superior and middle frontal,bilateral superior and middle temporal and inferior and middle temporal gyrus.Besides,the hypo-metabolic regions were also found in the right inferior parietal lobule and hippocampus in the small-cell carcinoma group.The area of the total hypo-metabolic cerebral regions in the small-cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 3255) was larger than those in the adenocarcinoma group (total voxel value 1217) and squamous cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 1292).Conclusions:The brain resting glucose metabolism in patients with lung cancer shows regional cerebral metabolic reduction and the brain hypo-metabolic changes are related to the histological types of lung cancer.

  7. What History Is Teaching Us: 100 Years of Advocacy in "Music Educators Journal"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgecoth, David M.; Fischer, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    As "Music Educators Journal" celebrates its centennial, it is appropriate to look back over the past century to see how advocacy in music education has evolved. Of the more than 200 submitted articles on advocacy, four main themes emerged: music education in community, the relevancy of music education, the value of music education, and…

  8. Development of the Policy Advocacy Behavior Scale: Initial Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Linda Plitt; Shields, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary trends in social service delivery systems require human service agencies to engage in greater levels of advocacy to reform structures and protect programs that serve vulnerable populations. Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure the policy advocacy behavior of nonprofit human service agencies.…

  9. Questioning the Role of "21st-Century Skills" in Arts Education Advocacy Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, Leann F.

    2013-01-01

    The revised Core Arts Standards offer music educators the chance to examine the contradictions that currently permeate the arts advocacy discourse. This article examines the emphasis on 21st-century workplace skills in claims made by arts advocacy proponents. An alternative approach focuses instead on lifelong learning in the arts and the array of…

  10. Understanding Parent Advocacy during the Transition to School of Children with Developmental Disabilities: Three Canadian Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nancy L.; Pyle, Angela; Villeneuve, Michelle; Dods, Jennifer; Dalton, C. J.; Minnes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown the benefits of parent involvement for student participation in education. Parent advocacy is a critical form of involvement by parents for children who are young, have disabilities, and are making transitions. Studies have classified forms of parent advocacy but have not illuminated the components necessary for effective parent…

  11. 76 FR 78931 - Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy... Disease Patient Advocacy Day. This meeting is intended to enhance the awareness of the rare disease..., and devices) intended for the diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment of rare diseases or...

  12. Successful Strategies for Promoting Self-Advocacy among Students with LD: The LEAD Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Al; Lambros, Stan; Karvonen, Meagan; Test, David W.; Algozzine, Bob; Wood, Wendy; Martin, James E.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes methods used by one school district to promote self-advocacy skills for students with learning disabilities. Through multicomponent group activities, students learned about their strengths and disabilities and how to advocate for educational needs and rights. Advocacy skills were applied to leadership roles, mentoring, and…

  13. A Conceptual Framework of Self-Advocacy for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; Wood, Wendy M.; Brewer, Denise M.; Eddy, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Based on a review of the literature and input from stakeholders, we developed a conceptual framework of self-advocacy involving four components: knowledge of self, knowledge of rights, communication, and leadership. This article summarizes the definitions and components of self-advocacy found in the literature that were used to develop this…

  14. Learning about Advocacy, A Case-Study of Challenges, Everyday Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringsing, B.; Leeuwis, C.

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy has become an important area of development support. Simultaneously, the interest in learning-oriented monitoring of advocacy programmes has increased. Starting from the premise that learning has sociopolitical dimensions, this article explores how the challenges and contradictions of such

  15. Management, Leadership, and User Control in Self-Advocacy: An English Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative research project on an English self-advocacy organization. In light of recent political and economic developments that have threatened the sustainability of a number of self-advocacy groups for people with intellectual disability, I seek to explore how one particular organization managed to survive…

  16. Mental Health Professionals in Children's Advocacy Centers: Is There Role Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Theodore P.; Fine, Janet E.; Jones, Lisa M.; Walsh, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    Two recent chapters in professional books have criticized children's advocacy centers for creating role conflict for mental health professionals because of their work with criminal justice and child protection professionals in children's advocacy centers as part of a coordinated response to child abuse. This article argues that these critiques…

  17. Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going? A Conceptual Framework for Child Advocacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cascardi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this article is to chart the development of child advocacy as an interdisciplinary field of study and conclude with a conceptual framework for research and higher education in child advocacy. Historically, child advocacy has justifiably focused on protection needs. Values and assumptions about children’s best interest have also governed child advocacy, in part because evidence to inform decisions was lacking and in part because of its history as an activist movement. Against this historical backdrop, we describe contemporary trends in child advocacy that reconcile children’s protection with their inherent rights to personhood. We rely on the principles and articles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, most notably children’s rights to participation and self-expression. At the same time, we demonstrate how values and ideology are being integrated with empiricism and objective analysis to inform policy and practice in child advocacy. The future of child advocacy depends on continued synthesis of rights and protection as well as values and rigorous analysis. From this perspective, we offer a conceptual framework for research and education in child advocacy.

  18. POLICY ADVOCACY IN SCIENCE: PREVALENCE, PERSPECTIVES, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION BIOLOGISTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much debate and discussion has focused on the relationship between science and advocacy, and the role of scientists in influencing public policy. Some argue that advocacy is widespread within scientific literature, however, data to evaluate that contention are lacking. We examine...

  19. Weber's Critique of Advocacy in the Classroom: Critical Thinking and Civic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the four aspects of Max Weber's argument against including advocacy in the political science classroom. Believes that Weber's critique is a useful starting point for considering the issue in relation to contemporary education. Describes two models, critical thinking and civic education, that present advocacy in the political science…

  20. Epigenetic changes of pituitarytumor-derived transforming gene 1 in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mang-Li Zhang; Sen Lu; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with abnormal genetic changes. The pituitary tumor-derived transforming gene (PTTG) is considered to be implicated in the tumorigenesis of cancers when the gene is epigenetically transformed. In this study, we investigated the relationships between aberrant expression and epigenetic changes of the PTTG1 gene in pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We chose 4 cell lines (PANC-1, Colo357, T3M-4 and PancTuⅠ) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. After using restriction isoschizomer endonucleases (MspⅠ/HpaⅡ) to digest the DNA sequence (5'-CCGG-3'), we performed PCR reaction to amplify the product. And RT-PCR was applied to determine the gene expression. RESULTS: The mRNA expression of the PTTG1 gene was higher in pancreatic tumor than in normal tissue. The gene was also expressed in the 4 PDAC cell lines. The methylation states of the upstream regions of the PTTG1 gene were almost identical in normal, tumor pancreatic tissues and the 4 PDAC cell lines. Some (5'-CCGG-3') areas in the upstream region of PTTG1 were methylated, while some others were unmethylated. CONCLUSIONS: The oncogene PTTG1 was overexpressed in pancreatic tumor tissues and veriifed by RT-PCR detection. The methylation status of DNA in promoter areas was involved in the gene expression with the help of other factors in pancreatic cancer.

  1. Risk for colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis: Changes, causes and management strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Laszlo Lakatos; Laszlo Lakatos

    2008-01-01

    The risk of colorectal cancer for any patient with ulcerative colitis is known to be elevated, and is estimated to be 2% after 10 years, 8% after 20 years and 18% after 30 years of disease. Risk factors for cancer include extent and duration of ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, a family history of sporadic colorectal cancer, severity of histologic bowel inflammation, and in some studies, young age at onset of colitis. In this review, the authors discuss recent epidemiological trends and causes for the observed changes. Population-based studies published within the past 5 years suggest that this risk has decreased over time, despite the low frequency of colectomies. The crude annual incidence rate of colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis ranges from approximately 0.06% to 0.16% with a relative risk of 1.0-2.75. The exact mechanism for this change is unknown; it may partly be explained by the more widespread use of maintenance therapy and surveillance colonoscopy.

  2. Risk for colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis: changes, causes and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter-Laszlo; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2008-07-07

    The risk of colorectal cancer for any patient with ulcerative colitis is known to be elevated, and is estimated to be 2% after 10 years, 8% after 20 years and 18% after 30 years of disease. Risk factors for cancer include extent and duration of ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, a family history of sporadic colorectal cancer, severity of histologic bowel inflammation, and in some studies, young age at onset of colitis. In this review, the authors discuss recent epidemiological trends and causes for the observed changes. Population-based studies published within the past 5 years suggest that this risk has decreased over time, despite the low frequency of colectomies. The crude annual incidence rate of colorectal cancer in ulcerative colitis ranges from approximately 0.06% to 0.16% with a relative risk of 1.0-2.75. The exact mechanism for this change is unknown; it may partly be explained by the more widespread use of maintenance therapy and surveillance colonoscopy.

  3. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-18

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  4. 78 FR 56269 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  5. 78 FR 29207 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  6. 78 FR 36304 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  7. 78 FR 3500 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer.... (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee...

  8. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  9. 78 FR 11277 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  10. 77 FR 74920 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer.... (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee...

  11. 78 FR 78517 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  12. 78 FR 69939 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  13. 78 FR 15126 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  14. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be held...

  15. 77 FR 67735 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone...

  16. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee will be...

  17. The Effects of Advocacy Advertising and Situational Crisis on Perceptions of Social Responsibility, Potential Supportive Behavior and Attitudes Toward Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozby, Jeanie G.; And Others

    Data were collected from 176 college students in a study of the effects of corporate advocacy advertising in crisis situations. The subjects read one of two sets of oil company advertisements, one set using a low advocacy and the other set using a high advocacy approach to explain company activities in relation to current events and social issues.…

  18. Tobacco control advocacy in Australia: reflections on 30 years of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, S; Wakefield, M

    2001-06-01

    Australia has one of the world's most successful records on tobacco control. The role of public health advocacy in securing public and political support for tobacco control legislation and policy and program support is widely acknowledged and enshrined in World Health Organization policy documents yet is seldom the subject of analysis in the public health policy research literature. Australian public health advocates tend to not work in settings where evaluation and systematic planning are valued. However, their day-to-day strategies reveal considerable method and grounding in framing theory. The nature of media advocacy is explored, with differences between the conceptualization of routine "programmatic" public health interventions and the modus operandi of media advocacy highlighted. Two case studies on securing smoke-free indoor air and banning all tobacco advertising are used to illustrate advocacy strategies that have been used in Australia. Finally, the argument that advocacy should emanate from communities and be driven by them is considered.

  19. Weight change later in life and colon and rectal cancer risk in participants in the EPIC-PANACEA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steins Bisschop, Charlotte N; van Gils, Carla H; Emaus, Marleen J;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A moderate association exists between body mass index (BMI) and colorectal cancer. Less is known about the effect of weight change. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the relation between BMI and weight change and subsequent colon and rectal cancer risk. DESIGN: This was studied among 328......-specific quintiles, with quintiles 2 and 3 combined as the reference category (men: -0.6 to 0.3 kg/y; women: -0.4 to 0.4 kg/y). In the subsequent years, participants were followed for the occurrence of colon and rectal cancer (median period: 6.8 y). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were...... used to study the association. RESULTS: A total of 1261 incident colon cancer and 747 rectal cancer cases were identified. BMI at recruitment was statistically significantly associated with colon cancer risk in men (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.07). Moderate weight gain (quintile 4) in men increased risk...

  20. Global Epigenetic Changes May Underlie Ethnic Differences and Susceptibility to Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    with ESRD and diabetes patients without nephropathy . Epigenetics 2011; 6: 20–28. 19 Toperoff G, Aran D, Kark JD, Rosenberg M, Dubnikov T, Nissan B et al...therapeutic targets for prostate cancer treatment . In this study we sought to investigate whether differential DNA methylation changes may...genomic DNA extracted from prostate tissues were modified by sodium bisulfite treatment . The bisulfite treated DNA were used in a PCR reaction with

  1. Thermally induced changes of optical and vital parameters in human cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, C.; Schwandt, D.; Beuthan, J.; Mildaziene, V.; Zabarylo, U.; Minet, O.

    2010-11-01

    Minimally invasive laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) presents an alternative method to conventional tumor therapeutically interventions, such as surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy or nuclear medicine. Optical tissue characteristics of tumor cells and their heat-induced changes are essential issues for controlling LITT progressions. Therefore, it is indispensable to exactly know the absorption coefficient μa, the scattering coefficient μs and the anisotropy factor g as well as their changes under rising temperatures in order to simulate the treatment parameters successfully. Optical parameters of two different cancer model tissues - breast cancer cells species MX1 and colon cancer cells species CX1 - were measured in the spectral range 400 - 1100 nm as well as in the temperature range 37 - 60°C. The absorption coefficient of both cell species was low throughout the spectral range analyzed, while μs of both species rose with increasing temperatures. The anisotropy factor g however dropped for both tissues with increasing temperatures. Light scatterings inside tissues proceeded continuously forward for all species tested. It was demonstrated that optical tissue properties undergo significant changes along with the vital status of the cells when the temperature increases.

  2. Managing appearance changes resulting from cancer treatment: resilience in adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Melissa L; Harcourt, Diana; Rumsey, Nichola; Foot, Annabel

    2007-11-01

    Typically, adolescence is marked by cognitive and physical developments impacting on self-esteem, independence and sexual awareness, often resulting in increased appearance awareness and dissatisfaction. Adolescents with cancer have the additional burden of illness, treatments and resultant appearance changes. This study aimed to explore the impact of these changes on adolescents who have had cancer. In depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with six females between 14 and 19 years who had completed treatment within the previous two years, and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Concerns around an altered appearance were significant during treatment, serving as a constant reminder of 'difference' and a marker of illness. However, since treatment, participants expressed an apparent shift in views and expectations of their appearance, as well as the value placed on it -- expressing increased satisfaction with their own appearance and a decrease in its importance. While important to acknowledge the distress and challenges experienced by participants, results highlight the need for research and care to focus on positive experiences of patients, rather than simply maladjustment. Explanations for the findings are explored, including the temporary nature of many appearance changes and the life-threatening nature of cancer.

  3. The development of an integrated platform to identify breast cancer glycoproteome changes in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhi; Hincapie, Marina; Haab, Brian B; Hanash, Samir; Pitteri, Sharon J; Kluck, Steven; Hogan, Jason M; Kennedy, Jacob; Hancock, William S

    2010-05-07

    Protein glycosylation represents one of the major post-translational modifications and can have significant effects on protein function. Moreover, changes in the carbohydrate structure are increasingly being recognized as an important modification associated with cancer etiology. In this report, we describe the development of a proteomics approach to identify breast cancer related changes in either concentration and/or the carbohydrate structures of glycoprotein(s) present in blood samples. Diseased and healthy serum samples were processed by an optimized sample preparation protocol using multiple lectin affinity chromatography (M-LAC) that partitions serum proteins based on glycan characteristics. Subsequently, three separate procedures, 1D SDS-PAGE, isoelectric focusing and an antibody microarray, were applied to identify potential candidate markers for future study. The combination of these three platforms is illustrated in this report with the analysis of control and cancer glycoproteomic fractions. Firstly, a molecular weight based separation of glycoproteins by 1D SDS-PAGE was performed, followed by protein, glycoprotein staining, lectin blotting and LC-MS analysis. To refine or confirm the list of interesting glycoproteins, isoelectric focusing (targeting sialic acid changes) and an antibody microarray (used to detect neutral glycan shifts) were selected as the orthogonal methods. As a result, several glycoproteins including alpha-1B-glycoprotein, complement C3, alpha-1-antitrypsin and transferrin were identified as potential candidates for further study.

  4. The Texas Dental Association and advocacy: a TDA president's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Frank K; Jeske, Arthur H

    2008-08-01

    The TDA can take pride in the joint efforts of its leadership, its grassroots members, and its elected representatives in the middle of the decade of the 1990's. When asked about his legacy for the leadership of our organization, Dr. Eggleston emphatically states, "You have to act. You have to do the right thing even when you have critics and detractors." More recently, during his campaign for ADA President-elect, he constantly stressed the importance of our relationship with each other. Our relationship, in Dr. Eggleston's words now and during his TDA presidency, "is more important than all issues put together". As this brief retrospective illustrates, the issues faced by dentists and the TDA are never trivial and are always tied to the legislative process. Political advocacy by our association is, therefore, our first priority now, no less so than it was in the mid-1990's. As described in the recent "TDA Report Card" on our legislative agenda for the 80th Texas Legislature, our challenges continue unabated, but these challenges are answered, and in many cases, successfully overcome as a result of our advocacy efforts. Our need for constant involvement in the legislative process is perhaps best summarized by advice given to Dr. Eggleston by Senator (and oral surgeon) David Sibley at the 1995 TDA Annual Session. Senator Sibley complimented TDA on its achievements during the 1995 Texas legislative session, and added "but you've got to keep your garden weeded."

  5. The dynamics and prognostic potential of DNA methylation changes at stem cell gene loci in women's cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Zhuang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation is an important cancer hallmark, yet the dynamics of DNA methylation changes in human carcinogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, the role of DNA methylation for prediction of clinical outcome is still uncertain and confined to specific cancers. Here we perform the most comprehensive study of DNA methylation changes throughout human carcinogenesis, analysing 27,578 CpGs in each of 1,475 samples, ranging from normal cells in advance of non-invasive neoplastic transformation to non-invasive and invasive cancers and metastatic tissue. We demonstrate that hypermethylation at stem cell PolyComb Group Target genes (PCGTs occurs in cytologically normal cells three years in advance of the first morphological neoplastic changes, while hypomethylation occurs preferentially at CpGs which are heavily Methylated in Embryonic Stem Cells (MESCs and increases significantly with cancer invasion in both the epithelial and stromal tumour compartments. In contrast to PCGT hypermethylation, MESC hypomethylation progresses significantly from primary to metastatic cancer and defines a poor prognostic signature in four different gynaecological cancers. Finally, we associate expression of TET enzymes, which are involved in active DNA demethylation, to MESC hypomethylation in cancer. These findings have major implications for cancer and embryonic stem cell biology and establish the importance of systemic DNA hypomethylation for predicting prognosis in a wide range of different cancers.

  6. Relationship between mucositis and changes in oral microflora during cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napeñas, Joel J; Brennan, Michael T; Bahrani-Mougeot, Farah K; Fox, Philip C; Lockhart, Peter B

    2007-01-01

    It is thought that the incidence and severity of cancer chemotherapy-associated mucositis is caused in part by changes in the oral bacterial microflora. This systematic review examined the role of oral bacterial microflora changes in the development of oral mucositis during chemotherapy. Thirteen prospective clinical trials were identified, involving 300 patients with 13 different cancer diagnoses. There was great variability in patient populations, bacterial sample collection methodology, and oral sample sites. No clear pattern regarding qualitative and quantitative oral flora changes emerged among these studies. The most frequent Gram-negative species isolated during chemotherapy were from the Enterobacteriaceae family, Pseudomonas sp. and E. coli. The most common Gram-positive species isolated were Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Five studies assessed the role of oral flora changes in the genesis of oral mucosal changes, with no consensus among them. More detailed studies are required to understand the relationship between chemotherapy, alterations in the nature and magnitude of the oral microflora, and the presence of mucositis.

  7. Advocacy and coverage of needle exchange programs: results of a comparative study of harm reduction programs in Brazil, Bangladesh, Belarus, Ukraine, Russian Federation, and China

    OpenAIRE

    Burrows, Dave

    2006-01-01

    To prevent or mitigate an AIDS epidemic among injecting drug users (IDUs), effective activities need to be implemented on a large enough scale to reach and assist sufficient numbers of drug users and thereby change their risk behaviors related to drug use and sex. Recent work by UNAIDS on "high coverage sites", adopting the above strategies, has shown that one of the key elements in achieving high coverage is ongoing and sophisticated advocacy. High coverage harm reduction sites were studied ...

  8. Inflammatory changes in biopsy specimens from patients with suspected prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Wolski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in elderly men, and accounts for 30% of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer. The development of the ‘clinically insignificant’ prostate cancer into its invasive form is still unclear, and it is believed that chronic inflammation may play its role, as proposed by De Marzo in 1999. However, there is no clear opinion on the subject of existence of dependencies between changes of the inflammatory type and PCa.Material and methods. The study involved 1,010 men, suspected of prostate cancer development by positive digital rectal examination (DRE and/or elevated PSA value. The 10 cores, TRUS guided biopsy was performed. In those with ASAP, HG–PIN or inflammation the second biopsy was proposed.Results. In the first biopsy PCa was diagnosed in 336 patients (33.27%. ASAP was found in 58 (5.74%, HG–PIN in 82 (8.11%, and the coexistence of both was found in 19 (1.88%. Chronic prostatitis was diagnosed in 101 (10% men. Of those who underwent second biopsy, PCa was diagnosed in six of 19 patients (31.57% who were diagnosed with HG–PIN in the first biopsy, in four of 40 (10% with BPH in the first biopsy, in four of 18 (22.22% with ASAP or LG–PIN together with ASAP, and in two out of five (40% with the coexistence of ASAP and HG–PIN. Malignancy was not confirmed in any of the patients in whom the diagnosis of BPH, HG–PIN, or ASAP was accompanied by chronic prostatitis.Conclusions. Chronic prostatitis does not significantly increase the value of PSA in patients with benign changes (BPH. The presence of prostatitis in the first biopsy did not predict cancer in subsequent biopsy, because the second biopsy did not reveal prostate cancer in any of the patients in whom prostatitis was diagnosed in the first biopsy.

  9. Kentucky Teen Institute: Results of a 1-Year, Health Advocacy Training Intervention for Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kristi M; Rice, Jason A; Steinbock, Stacie; Reno-Weber, Ben; Okpokho, Ime; Pile, Amanda; Carrico, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    The Kentucky Teen Institute trains youth throughout the state to advocate for policies that promote health in their communities. By evaluating two program summits held at universities, regularly scheduled community meetings, ongoing technical support, and an advocacy day at the state Capitol, the aims of this study were to assess the impact of the intervention on correlates of youths' advocacy intentions and behaviors and to assess youth participants' and other key stakeholders' perceptions of the intervention. An ecological model approach and the theory of planned behavior served as theoretical frameworks from which pre-post, one-group survey and qualitative data were collected (June 2013-June 2014). An equal number of low-income and non-low-income youth representing five counties participated in the Summer Summit pretest (n = 24) and Children's Advocacy Day at the Capitol posttest (n = 14). Survey data revealed that youths' attitude toward advocacy, intentions to advocate, and advocacy behaviors all improved over the intervention. Observations, interviews, a focus group, and other written evaluations identified that the youths', as well as their mentors' and advocacy coaches', confidence, communities' capacity, and mutually beneficial mentorship strengthened. Stronger public speaking skills, communication among the teams, and other recommendations for future advocacy interventions are described.

  10. A Public Policy Advocacy Project to Promote Food Security: Exploring Stakeholders' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkey, Kayla M; Raine, Kim D; Storey, Kate E; Willows, Noreen D

    2016-09-01

    To achieve food security in Canada, comprehensive approaches are required, which involve action at the public policy level. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 14 stakeholders engaging in a 9-month participatory public policy advocacy project to promote community food security in the province of Alberta through the initiation of a campaign to develop a Universal School Food Strategy. Through this exploration, four main themes were identified; a positive and open space to contribute ideas, diversity and common ground, confidence and capacity, and uncertainty. Findings from this study suggest that the participatory advocacy project provided a positive and open space for stakeholders to contribute ideas, through which the group was able to narrow its focus and establish a goal for advocacy. The project also seems to have contributed to the group's confidence and capacity to engage in advocacy by creating a space for learning and knowledge sharing, though stakeholders expressed uncertainty regarding some aspects of the project. Findings from this study support the use of participatory approaches as a strategy for facilitating engagement in public policy advocacy and provide insight into one group's advocacy experience, which may help to inform community-based researchers and advocates in the development of advocacy initiatives to promote community food security elsewhere.

  11. Radiation-Induced Changes in Serum Lipidome of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Jelonek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer radiotherapy (RT induces response of the whole patient’s body that could be detected at the blood level. We aimed to identify changes induced in serum lipidome during RT and characterize their association with doses and volumes of irradiated tissue. Sixty-six patients treated with conformal RT because of head and neck cancer were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were collected before, during and about one month after the end of RT. Lipid extracts were analyzed using MALDI-oa-ToF mass spectrometry in positive ionization mode. The major changes were observed when pre-treatment and within-treatment samples were compared. Levels of several identified phosphatidylcholines, including (PC34, (PC36 and (PC38 variants, and lysophosphatidylcholines, including (LPC16 and (LPC18 variants, were first significantly decreased and then increased in post-treatment samples. Intensities of changes were correlated with doses of radiation received by patients. Of note, such correlations were more frequent when low-to-medium doses of radiation delivered during conformal RT to large volumes of normal tissues were analyzed. Additionally, some radiation-induced changes in serum lipidome were associated with toxicity of the treatment. Obtained results indicated the involvement of choline-related signaling and potential biological importance of exposure to clinically low/medium doses of radiation in patient’s body response to radiation.

  12. Treatment related changes of the serum epidermal growth factor receptor in advanced colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, K G; Aalund Olsen, Dorte; Brandslund, I

    2009-01-01

    ) in rectal cancer patients and third-line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan (CETIRI) in advanced disease, to elucidate the predictive or prognostic value in these settings. METHODS: We included 126 healthy controls and 118 patients with chemorefractory mCRC treated with cetuximab (initial 400/m(2) mg...... followed by weekly 250mg/m(2)) and irinotecan (350 mg/m(2) q3w). Response was evaluated according to RECIST. Furthermore, 114 patients with locally advanced rectal tumours were treated with CRT (60 Gy/30 fractions and concomitant uftoral (300 mg/m(2))/leukovorin (22.5 mg) on treatment days, followed...... and thereby a better change of response. Furthermore, we suggest a potential prognostic value of sEGFR measurement during CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer. No significant financial relationships to disclose....

  13. Do changes in lymph node status distribution explain trends in survival of breast cancer patients in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Klaus; Vaeth, Michael; Rootzén, Helle;

    2006-01-01

    We studied the impact on survival of changes in breast cancer patients' distribution by lymph node status at the time of diagnosis. Our study included breast cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 1994 in Denmark, where the treatment schemes for breast cancer patients were fairly stable, and wher...... distribution explained half of the improvement in 5-year relative survival, and seem to be the single most important cause behind the improved survival of breast cancer patients in Denmark.......We studied the impact on survival of changes in breast cancer patients' distribution by lymph node status at the time of diagnosis. Our study included breast cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 1994 in Denmark, where the treatment schemes for breast cancer patients were fairly stable, and where...... mammography screening was limited. We measured lymph node status by the proportion of positive lymph nodes of all excised lymph nodes, as assessed by a pathologist. This measure was available for two-thirds of the breast cancer patients. The outcome was 5-year relative survival. Changes in lymph node status...

  14. Histamine prevents radiation-induced mesenchymal changes in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Tamara E; Mohamad, Nora A; Táquez Delgado, Mónica A; Vedoya, Guadalupe M; Crescenti, Ernesto J; Bergoc, Rosa M; Martín, Gabriela A; Cricco, Graciela P

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a prime option for treatment of solid tumors including breast cancer though side effects are usually present. Experimental evidence shows an increase in invasiveness of several neoplastic cell types through conventional tumor irradiation. The induction of epithelial to mesenchymal transition is proposed as an underlying cause of metastasis triggered by gamma irradiation. Experiments were conducted to investigate the role of histamine on the ionizing radiation-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition events in breast cancer cells with different invasive phenotype. We also evaluated the potential involvement of Src phosphorylation in the migratory capability of irradiated cells upon histamine treatment. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 mammary tumor cells were exposed to a single dose of 2Gy of gamma radiation and five days after irradiation mesenchymal-like phenotypic changes were observed by optical microscope. The expression and subcellular localization of E-cadherin, β-catenin, vimentin and Slug were determined by immunoblot and indirect immunofluorescence. There was a decrease in the epithelial marker E-cadherin expression and an increase in the mesenchymal marker vimentin after irradiation. E-cadherin and β-catenin were mainly localized in cytoplasm. Slug positive nuclei, matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and cell migration and invasion were significantly increased. In addition, a significant enhancement in Src phosphorylation/activation could be determined by immunoblot in irradiated cells. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells also received 1 or 20μM histamine during 24h previous to be irradiated. Notably, pre-treatment of breast cancer cells with 20μM histamine prevented the mesenchymal changes induced by ionizing radiation and also reduced the migratory behavior of irradiated cells decreasing phospho-Src levels. Collectively, our results suggest that histamine may block events related to epithelial to mesenchymal transition in irradiated mammary cancer

  15. HuR knockdown changes the oncogenic potential of oral cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuguchi, Wataru; Kitamura, Tetsuya; Kuroshima, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Makoto; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shindoh, Masanobu; Higashino, Fumihiro

    2010-04-01

    HuR binds to AU-rich element-containing mRNA to protect them from rapid degradation. Here, we show that knockdown of HuR changes the oncogenic properties of oral cancer cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, HSC-3 and Ca9.22, which express HuR protein and cytoplasmic AU-rich element mRNA more abundantly than normal cells, were subjected to HuR knockdown. In the HuR-knockdown cancer cells, the cytoplasmic expression of c-fos, c-myc, and COX-2 mRNAs was inhibited compared with those in cells that had been transfected with a control small interfering RNA, and the half-lives of these mRNAs were shorter than those of their counterparts in the control cells. HuR-knockdown cells failed to make colonies in soft agar, suggesting that the cells had lost their ability for anchorage-independent cell growth. Additionally, the motile and invasive activities of the cells decreased remarkably by HuR knockdown. Furthermore, the expression of cell cycle-related proteins, such as cyclin A, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1, was reduced in HuR-knockdown cancer cells, and HuR bound to cdk1 mRNA to stabilize it. These findings suggest that HuR knockdown changes the features of oral cancer cells, at least in part, by affecting their cell cycle and shows potential as an effective therapeutic approach.

  16. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Stewart Massad

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding.

  17. The legitimate role of advocacy in environmental education: how does it differ from coercion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Cairns

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This paper examines the controversy in the field of environmental education over the role of advocacy versus presentation of scientific information. The former involves a view of education as process, while the latter perceives education solely as content. Environmental issues involve ethical concerns and value judgments. Scientific information cannot give us the answers to our environmental questions, as these questions have all the inherent complexity of any social issue. Advocacy differs from coercion, bias, and prejudice. Coercion, bias, and prejudice have no place in environmental education, while advocacy for ecological systems does.

  18. The role of patient advocacy organizations in shaping genomic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Pei P; Sharp, Richard R

    2013-01-01

    Patient advocacy organizations (PAOs) are nonprofit groups that represent patients and families affected by a significant medical condition or disease. We review some of the different approaches that humanities and social researchers use to study PAOs. Drawing on this recent scholarship, we describe some contemporary patient groups and explore how PAOs can collaborate with biomedical researchers to advance genomic science. We highlight research that aims to describe how PAOs are contributing to multiple aspects of biomedical research, including study design, definition of research goals, data collection and analysis, dissemination of results, and research funding. We also describe several challenges that genomic researchers may encounter in collaborations with PAOs. Throughout our review, we focus on the manner in which new PAO roles challenge traditional boundaries between researchers and subjects, thereby redefining the relationship of patients to science. We consider how this shift may affect our view of scientific collaborations and impact genomic researchers in the future.

  19. Changes of splenic macrophage during the process of liver cancer induced by diethylnitrosamine in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu; LI Zong-fang; PAN Dun; HUANG Chen; ZHOU Rui; LIU Zhong-wei

    2009-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that spleen plays a complex role in the tumor immunity, which would change in the different periods of cancer. In this study, we investigated the changes in the function of splenic macrophage (Mφ) in different stages of liver cancer induced by diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in rats. The aim was to support the characteristics of "two-way" and "phase" of spleen in tumor immunity.Methods The model of pulmonary metastasis of liver cancer was established in forty male SD rats by DEN. In the 8th, 13th and 16th week, 10 rats were randomly chosen and sacrificed, and divided into cirrhosis, liver cancer and pulmonary metastasis groups depending on the pathological result, respectively. The other 10 rats were taken as control group. The Mφ was isolated by anchoring cultivation. The changes in ultrastructure, phagocytosis, cytokine secretion, antigen processing and presenting, and viability of splenic Mφ were detected by transmission electron microscopy, Vybrant~(TM) Phagocytosis Assay, DQ~(TM) Ovalbumin, and rat TNF-α ELISpot kits.Results Under the electron microscope, the Mφ in the control group had some pseudopodium-like prominences, and mitochondria, ribosome, rough endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome can be found in the cytoplasm, and phagocytized RBC. In the liver cirrhosis and liver cancer group, Mφ had more prominences, meanwhile much more mitochondria, ribosome, rough endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome can be found in the cytoplasm, especially in the liver cancer group. In the pulmonary metastasis group, the Mφ was swelling, with few organelle. As compared to the control group, the function of splenic Mφ increased in cirrhosis and cancer groups, but decreased in metastasis group (phagocytosis rate: (84.7±1.9)%, (89.5±3.1)%, and (36.0±2.6)% vs (75.6±1.7)%, P<0.05, P<0.01; viability: (1.53±0.15)%, (1.56±0.14)%, and (1.12±0.29)% vs (1.48±0.17)%, P <0.05, P <0.01; TNF-a secretion: (741.0±52.9)%, (1126.2±174.5)%, and (313.8±50

  20. Towards meeting the research needs of Australian cancer consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saunders Carla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing amount of literature to support the view that active involvement in research by consumers, especially informed and networked consumers, benefits the quality and direction of research itself, the research process and, most importantly, people affected by cancer. Our exploratory project focuses on identifying their priorities and developing a process to assess the research needs of Australian cancer consumers which may be useful beyond the cancer scenario. Methods This project was consumer initiated, developed and implemented, with the assistance of a leading Australian cancer consumer advocacy group, Cancer Voices NSW (CVN. Such direct involvement is unusual and ensures that the priorities identified, and the process itself, are not influenced by other interests, regardless how well-intentioned they may be. The processes established, and data collection via a workshop, followed by a questionnaire to confirm and prioritise findings, and comparison with a similar UK exercise, are detailed in this paper. Results Needs across five topic areas reflecting cancer control domains (prevention and risk; screening and diagnosis; treatment; survivorship; and end of life were identified. Cancer consumers high priority research needs were found to be: earlier diagnosis of metastatic cancers; the extent of use of best practice palliative care guidelines; identifying barriers to cancer risk behaviour change; and environmental, nutrition and lifestyle risk factors for people with cancer. A process for identifying consumers’ research priorities was developed and applied; this may be useful for further investigation in this under-studied area. Conclusion The findings provide a model for developing a consumer derived research agenda in Australia which can be used to inform the strategic direction of cancer research. Consumers have been seeking a workable method to achieve this and have worked in collaboration with a major

  1. Malignant change in a massive pleomorphic adenoma resembling the presentation of advanced inflammatory breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Leonie; Colbert, Serryth; Spedding, Anne V; Brennan, Peter A

    2012-04-01

    Massive tumours of the parotid are uncommon as due to their site, they are usually removed at an earlier stage. We present a bizarre case of a carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma which mimicked an advanced breast cancer, complete with a 'nipple-like' extension and peau d'orange changes in the overlying skin as a result of a dense dermal inflammatory response. A procedure akin to a mastectomy with facial nerve preservation was carried out for removal. To our knowledge, peau d'orange has not been reported before in parotid tumours.

  2. TGF-β Blockade Reduces Mortality and Metabolic Changes in a Validated Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer Cachexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie H Greco

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition characterized by a combination of anorexia, muscle wasting, weight loss, and malnutrition. This condition affects an overwhelming majority of patients with pancreatic cancer and is a primary cause of cancer-related death. However, few, if any, effective therapies exist for both treatment and prevention of this syndrome. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer cachexia, appropriate animal models are necessary. In this study, we developed and validated a syngeneic, metastatic, murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia. Using our model, we investigated the ability of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β blockade to mitigate the metabolic changes associated with cachexia. We found that TGF-β inhibition using the anti-TGF-β antibody 1D11.16.8 significantly improved overall mortality, weight loss, fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral density, and skeletal muscle proteolysis in mice harboring advanced pancreatic cancer. Other immunotherapeutic strategies we employed were not effective. Collectively, we validated a simplified but useful model of pancreatic cancer cachexia to investigate immunologic treatment strategies. In addition, we showed that TGF-β inhibition can decrease the metabolic changes associated with cancer cachexia and improve overall survival.

  3. TGF-β Blockade Reduces Mortality and Metabolic Changes in a Validated Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer Cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Stephanie H; Tomkötter, Lena; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Rokosh, Rae; Avanzi, Antonina; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Deutsch, Michael; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos; Mohaimin, Tasnima; Rendon, Mauricio; Levie, Elliot; Pansari, Mridul; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Pachter, H Leon; Tippens, Daniel; Malik, Hassan; Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating condition characterized by a combination of anorexia, muscle wasting, weight loss, and malnutrition. This condition affects an overwhelming majority of patients with pancreatic cancer and is a primary cause of cancer-related death. However, few, if any, effective therapies exist for both treatment and prevention of this syndrome. In order to develop novel therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer cachexia, appropriate animal models are necessary. In this study, we developed and validated a syngeneic, metastatic, murine model of pancreatic cancer cachexia. Using our model, we investigated the ability of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) blockade to mitigate the metabolic changes associated with cachexia. We found that TGF-β inhibition using the anti-TGF-β antibody 1D11.16.8 significantly improved overall mortality, weight loss, fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral density, and skeletal muscle proteolysis in mice harboring advanced pancreatic cancer. Other immunotherapeutic strategies we employed were not effective. Collectively, we validated a simplified but useful model of pancreatic cancer cachexia to investigate immunologic treatment strategies. In addition, we showed that TGF-β inhibition can decrease the metabolic changes associated with cancer cachexia and improve overall survival.

  4. Quantitative analysis of collagen change between normal and cancerous thyroid tissues based on SHG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwen; Huang, Zufang; Xi, Gangqin; Chen, Yongjian; Lin, Duo; Wang, Jing; Li, Zuanfang; Sun, Liqing; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Rong

    2012-03-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is proved to be a high spatial resolution, large penetration depth and non-photobleaching method. In our study, SHG method was used to investigate the normal and cancerous thyroid tissue. For SHG imaging performance, system parameters were adjusted for high-contrast images acquisition. Each x-y image was recorded in pseudo-color, which matches the wavelength range in the visible spectrum. The acquisition time for a 512×512-pixels image was 1.57 sec; each acquired image was averaged four frames to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Our results indicated that collagen presence as determined by counting the ratio of the SHG pixels over the whole pixels for normal and cancerous thyroid tissues were 0.48+/-0.05, 0.33+/-0.06 respectively. In addition, to quantitatively assess collagen-related changes, we employed GLCM texture analysis to the SHG images. Corresponding results showed that the correlation both fell off with distance in normal and cancerous group. Calculated value of Corr50 (the distance where the correlation crossed 50% of the initial correlation) indicated significant difference. This study demonstrates that SHG method can be used as a complementary tool in thyroid histopathology.

  5. Changes in response properties of nociceptive dorsal horn neurons in a murine model of cancer pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald A. Simone; Sergey G. Khasabov; Darryl T. Hamamoto

    2008-01-01

    Pain associated with cancer that metastasizes to bone is often severe and debilitating. A better understanding of the neural mechanisms that mediate cancer pain is needed for the development of more effective treatments. In this study, we used an established model of cancer pain to characterize changes in response properties of dorsal horn neurons. Fibrosarcoma cells were implanted into and around the calcaneus bone in mice and extracellular electrophysiological recordings were made from wide dynamic range (WDR) and high threshold (HT) dorsal horn neurons. Responses of WDR and HT neurons evoked by mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli applied to the plantar surface of the hind paw were compared between tumor bearing mice and control mice. Mice exhibited hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimuli applied to their tumor-bearing hind paw. WDR neurons in tumor-beating mice exhibited an increase in spontaneous activity, and enhanced responses to mechanical, heat, and cold stimuli as compared to controls. Our findings show that sensitization of WDR neurons, but not HT neurons, contributes to tumor-evoked hyperalgesia.

  6. Quantitative changes in human epithelial cancers and osteogenesis imperfecta disease detected using nonlinear multicontrast microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Javier; Pelegati, Vitor B.; de Thomaz, Andre A.; D'Souza-Li, Lilia; Assunção, Maria do Carmo; Bottcher-Luiz, Fátima; Andrade, Liliana A. L. A.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2012-08-01

    We show that combined multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopies, including two-photon excitation fluorescence, second-harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can be used to detect morphological and metabolic changes associated with stroma and epithelial transformation during the progression of cancer and osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) disease. NLO microscopes provide complementary information about tissue microstructure, showing distinctive patterns for different types of human breast cancer, mucinous ovarian tumors, and skin dermis of patients with OI. Using a set of scoring methods (anisotropy, correlation, uniformity, entropy, and lifetime components), we found significant differences in the content, distribution and organization of collagen fibrils in the stroma of breast and ovary as well as in the dermis of skin. We suggest that our results provide a framework for using NLO techniques as a clinical diagnostic tool for human cancer and OI. We further suggest that the SHG and FLIM metrics described could be applied to other connective or epithelial tissue disorders that are characterized by abnormal cells proliferation and collagen assembly.

  7. Fractionated changes in prostate cancer radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Tzung-Chi, E-mail: tzungchi.huang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Informatics, Asia University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Chou, Kuei-Ting [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Yang, Shih-Neng [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Informatics, Asia University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chih-Kai [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The high mobility of the bladder and the rectum causes uncertainty in radiation doses prescribed to patients with prostate cancer who undergo radiotherapy (RT) multifraction treatments. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose received by the bladder, rectum, and prostate from multifraction treatments using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Overall, 28 patients with prostate cancer who planned to receive radiation treatments were enrolled in the study. The acquired CBCT before the treatment delivery was registered with the planning CT to map the dose distribution used in the treatment plan for estimating the received dose during clinical treatment. For all 28 patients with 112 data sets, the mean percentage differences (± standard deviation) in the volume and radiation dose were 44% (± 41) and 18% (± 17) for the bladder, 20% (± 21) and 2% (± 2) for the prostate, and 36% (± 29) and 22% (± 15) for the rectum, respectively. Substantial differences between the volumes and radiation dose and those specified in treatment plans were observed. Besides the use of image-guided RT to improve patient setup accuracy, further consideration of large changes in bladder and rectum volumes is strongly suggested when using external beam radiation for prostate cancer.

  8. Change of the cell cycle after flutamide treatment in prostate cancer cells and its molecular mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Wang; Wei-Jun Qin; He Wang; Guo-Xing Shao; Chen Shao; Chang-Hong Shi; Lei Zhang; Hong-Hong Yue; Peng-Fei Wang; Bo Yang; Yun-Tao Zhang; Fan Liu

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of androgen receptor (AR) on the expression of the cell cycle-related genes, such as CDKN1A and BTG1, in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Methods: After AR antagonist flutamide treatment and confirmation of its effect by phase contrast microscope and flow cytometry, the differential expression of the cell cycle-related genes was analyzed by a cDNA microarray. The flutamide treated cells were set as the experimental group and the LNCaP cells as the control. We labeled cDNA probes of the experimental group and control group with Cy5 and Cy3 dyes, respectively, through reverse transcription. Then we hybridized the cDNA probes with cDNA microarrays, which contained 8 126 unique human cDNA sequences and the chip was scanned to get the fluorescent values of Cy5 and Cy3 on each spot. After primary analysis, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) tests were carried out to confirm the results of the chips. Results:After AR antagonist flutamide treatment,three hundred and twenty-six genes (3.93 %) expressed differentially, 97 down-regulated and 219 up-regulated.Among them, eight up-regulated genes might be cell cycle-related, namely CDC10, NRAS, BTG1, Weel, CLK3,DKFZP564A122, CDKN1A and BTG2. The CDKN1A and BTG1 gene mRNA expression was confirmed to be higher in the experimental group by RT-PCR, whilep53 mRNA expression had no significant changes. Conclusion: Flutamide treatment might up-regulate CDKN1A and BTG1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The protein expressions of CDKN1A and BTG1 play an important role in inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. CDKN1A has a great impact on the cell cycle of prostate cancer cells and may play a role in the cancer cells in a p53-independent pathway. The prostate cancer cells might affect the cell cycle-related genes by activating AR and thus break the cell cycle control.

  9. DNA Copy Number Changes at 8q11–24 in Metastasized Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Buffart

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-Myc, a well-known oncogene located on 8q24.12–q24.23, is often amplified and over-expressed in both primary and metastasizing colorectal cancer. In addition, PRL-3 (also known as PTP4A3, a tyrosine phosphatase located on 8q24.3, is amplified in colorectal cancer metastasis. Beside PRL-3 and c-myc, other oncogenes located on the 8q23–24 region might be involved in this process. Therefore, the present study aims to correlate DNA copy number status of a series of genes at 8q23–24 in colorectal cancer at high resolution in correlation to metastatic disease. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two cases of colorectal cancer, 10 stage B1, 10 B2 and 12 D (Astler–Coller with their corresponding liver metastasis and one colorectal cell line (colo205, previously analyzed by array-CGH, were included in this study. A chromosome 8 specific MLPA probe mixture was used to analyze the presence of DNA copy number changes. The probe mixture contained 29 probes covering 25 genes on chromosome 8, as well as 6 control probes on other chromosomes. Results and Discussion: MLPA results obtained of the colo205 colorectal cell line were comparable with previous array-CGH results, thus validating the MLPA probe mixture. Astler–Coller B1 and B2 colorectal cancers differed significantly in DNA copy number of the genes, MOS (p = 0.04, MYC (p = 0.007, DDEF1 (p = 0.004, PTK2 (p = 0.02 and PTP4A3 (p = 0.04. When comparing these with Astler–Coller D primary tumors, significant differences were seen for several genes as well (MYC (p < 0.000, DDEF1 (p < 0.000, SLA (p < 0.000, PTK2 (p < 0.000, PTP4A3 (p = 0.002, and RECQL4 (p = 0.01. When comparing primary Astler–Coller D tumors and their corresponding liver metastases, a similar pattern of gains and losses was observed. Most of the liver metastases showed higher DNA copy number ratios than the corresponding primary tumors, but this difference was only significant for TPD52 (p = 0.02 and EIF3S6 (p = 0

  10. DNA methylation changes in ovarian cancer are cumulative with disease progression and identify tumor stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeGeest Koen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands with associated loss of gene expression, and hypomethylation of CpG-rich repetitive elements that may destabilize the genome are common events in most, if not all, epithelial cancers. Methods The methylation of 6,502 CpG-rich sequences spanning the genome was analyzed in 137 ovarian samples (ten normal, 23 low malignant potential, 18 stage I, 16 stage II, 54 stage III, and 16 stage IV ranging from normal tissue through to stage IV cancer using a sequence-validated human CpG island microarray. The microarray contained 5' promoter-associated CpG islands as well as CpG-rich satellite and Alu repetitive elements. Results Results showed a progressive de-evolution of normal CpG methylation patterns with disease progression; 659 CpG islands showed significant loss or gain of methylation. Satellite and Alu sequences were primarily associated with loss of methylation, while promoter CpG islands composed the majority of sequences with gains in methylation. Since the majority of ovarian tumors are late stage when diagnosed, we tested whether DNA methylation profiles could differentiate between normal and low malignant potential (LMP compared to stage III ovarian samples. We developed a class predictor consisting of three CpG-rich sequences that was 100% sensitive and 89% specific when used to predict an independent set of normal and LMP samples versus stage III samples. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed the NKX-2-3 promoter CpG island was hypermethylated with disease progression. In addition, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment of the ES2 and OVCAR ovarian cancer cell lines re-expressed NKX-2-3. Finally, we merged our CpG methylation results with previously published ovarian expression microarray data and identified correlated expression changes. Conclusion Our results show that changes in CpG methylation are cumulative with ovarian cancer progression in a sequence-type dependent manner, and that Cp

  11. Exon-level transcriptome profiling in murine breast cancer reveals splicing changes specific to tumors with different metastatic abilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Bemmo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the second most frequent type of cancer affecting women. We are increasingly aware that changes in mRNA splicing are associated with various characteristics of cancer. The most deadly aspect of cancer is metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads from the primary tumor to distant organs. However, little is known specifically about the involvement of alternative splicing in the formation of macroscopic metastases. Our study investigates transcript isoform changes that characterize tumors of different abilities to form growing metastases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To identify alternative splicing events (ASEs that are associated with the fully metastatic phenotype in breast cancer, we used Affymetrix Exon Microarrays to profile mRNA isoform variations genome-wide in weakly metastatic (168FARN and 4T07 and highly metastatic (4T1 mammary carcinomas. Statistical analysis identified significant expression changes in 7606 out of 155,994 (4% exons and in 1725 out of 189,460 (1% intronic regions, which affect 2623 out of 16,654 (16% genes. These changes correspond to putative alternative isoforms-several of which are novel-that are differentially expressed between tumors of varying metastatic phenotypes. Gene pathway analysis showed that 1224 of genes expressing alternative isoforms were involved in cell growth, cell interactions, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell death and have been previously linked to cancers and genetic disorders. We chose ten predicted splice variants for RT-PCR validation, eight of which were successfully confirmed (MED24, MFI2, SRRT, CD44, CLK1 and HNRNPH1. These include three novel intron retentions in CD44, a gene in which isoform variations have been previously associated with the metastasis of several cancers. CONCLUSION: Our findings reveal that various genes are differently spliced and/or expressed in association with the metastatic phenotype of tumor cells. Identification of

  12. Increased rate change over time of a sphincter-saving procedure for lower rectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiao-jian; WANG Jian-ping; WANG Lei; HE Xiao-sheng; ZOU Yi-feng; LIAN Lei; ZHANG Long-juan; LAN Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background Total mesorectal excision(TME)has increased the rate of sphincter-preservation(SP)for more patients with low-lying rectal cancer.Here,we analyze the change of sphincter preserving rates in lower rectal cancer and their related factors.Methods We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 316 patients with lower rectal cancers,1 to 5 cm from the anorectal line,who had surgical resections from August 1994 to November 2005.The 12-year span was divided into 2 periods:period Ⅰ(August 1994-December 1998)and period Ⅱ(January 1999-November 2005),based on the date (January 1999)when standard total mesorectal excision(TME)was introduced.The patients were divided jnto two groups based on the operation:abdominoperineal resection(APR)or SP surgery.SP rates,leakage and other clinicopathological characteristics were compared between the two time periods and between the two different groups.Results The SP rate increased significantly over the 12 years,from 44.9% in period Ⅰ to 76.2% in period Ⅱ(P=0.000).The factors significantly influencing SP included the distance of the tumor from the anorectal line,gender,time period,circumference of intramural spread and histological differentiation (P<0.05).Significant differences were detected between the two time periods in gender,blood transfusion volume and Dukes'stage(P<0.05).The leakage rate was 2.7% in period Ⅰ and 1.3% in period Ⅱ (P>0.05).Conclusions Over the 12-year period of the study the SP rate in rectal cancers 1-5 cm from the anorectal line has increased significantly while the blood transfusion volume has decreased due to the introduction of TME.However,TME had no effect on operating time and leakage rates.

  13. Nursing beliefs and actions in exercising patient advocacy in a hospital context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Geri Tomaschewski Barlem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEAnalyzing beliefs and actions of nurses in exercising patient advocacy in a hospital context.METHODA quantitative cross-sectional exploratory and descriptive study, conducted with 153 nurses from two hospitals in southern Brazil, one public and one philanthropic, by applying Protective Nursing Advocacy Scale - Brazilian version. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and analysis of variance.RESULTSNurses believe they are advocating for patients in their workplaces, and agree that they should advocate, especially when vulnerable patients need their protection. Personal values and professional skills have been identified as major sources of support for the practice of advocacy.CONCLUSIONNurses do not disagree nor agree that advocating for patients in their working environments can bring them negative consequences. It is necessary to recognize how the characteristics of public and private institutions have helped or not helped in exercising patient advocacy by nurses.

  14. Lessons in media advocacy: a look back at Saskatchewan's nursing education debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurer, Marie Dietrich

    2013-05-01

    Nurses are encouraged to exert their influence in the realm of public policy, particularly policies related to the nursing profession, the health care system and the health of their clients. Media advocacy can be used by nursing organizations to mobilize public support on policy issues in order to influence policy makers. This article retrospectively examined the media advocacy efforts of nursing stakeholders in Saskatchewan, Canada in response to a new government policy that would have impacted educational requirements for licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in that province. Print media sources from the period January to March, 2000 were examined to determine the specific media advocacy techniques used by nursing organizations within the framework of the policy cycle. The success of nursing stakeholders in reversing the government position highlights the effectiveness of media advocacy as a tool to disseminate messages from the nursing profession in order to impact policy.

  15. Coleman Advocates for Children And Youth: a pioneering child advocacy organization (1974-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnochan, Sarah; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Coleman Advocates for Youth and Children is a pioneering 30-year-old child advocacy organization founded by several affluent community members and children's service professionals to stop housing abused and neglected children in juvenile hall. Today, low-income youth and parents in families of color are now assuming leadership in developing a unique hybrid approach that integrates community organizing with more traditional child advocacy strategies and focuses on increasing affordable housing and improving the city's educational system. The strategies employed by Coleman have also evolved, shifting from insider advocacy with administrative officials to public campaigns targeting the city budget process, to local initiative campaigns, and most recently to electoral politics. This organizational history features the issues mission and structure, leadership, managing issues, advocacy strategies and community relations, and funding.

  16. China's climate-change policy 1988-2011: From zero to hero?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stensdal, Iselin

    2012-11-01

    This report describes the evolution of China's domestic climate-change policy over the period 1988-2011, using the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) to explore the policy change. Policy development has been gradual, with the most notable change occurring in 2007, when the National Climate Change Programme elevated climate change to a national policy issue. Within the climate-change policy subsystem there emerged an advocacy coalition - the Climate Change Advocacy Coalition - urging that climate change should be taken into consideration in relevant policies. The ACF points to socioeconomic development and the Climate Change Advocacy Coalition's policy-oriented learning as explanations for the development of climate-change policy in China.(auth)

  17. Planning for the next generation of public health advocates: evaluation of an online advocacy mentoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Emily; Stoneham, Melissa; Saunders, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Despite being viewed as a core competency for public health professionals, public health advocacy lacks a prominent place in the public health literature and receives minimal coverage in university curricula. The Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia (PHAIWA) sought to fill this gap by establishing an online e-mentoring program for public health professionals to gain knowledge through skill-based activities and engaging in a mentoring relationship with an experienced public health advocate. This study is a qualitative evaluation of the online e-mentoring program. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants at the conclusion of the 12-month program to examine program benefits and determine the perceived contribution of individual program components to overall advocacy outcomes. Results Increased mentee knowledge, skills, level of confidence and experience, and expanded public health networks were reported. Outcomes were dependent on participants' level of commitment, time and location barriers, mentoring relationship quality, adaptability to the online format and the relevance of activities for application to participants' workplace context. Program facilitators had an important role through the provision of timely feedback and maintaining contact with participants. Conclusion An online program that combines public health advocacy content via skill-based activities with mentoring from an experienced public health advocate is a potential strategy to build advocacy capacity in the public health workforce. So what? Integrating advocacy as a core component of professional development programs will help counteract current issues surrounding hesitancy by public health professionals to proactively engage in advocacy, and ensure that high quality, innovative and effective advocacy leadership continues in the Australian public health workforce.

  18. “We Are Not Really Marketing Mental Health”: Mental Health Advocacy in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, Reuben; Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Crooks, Megan; Mangezi, Walter; Abas, Melanie; Katz, Craig; Thornicroft, Graham; Semrau, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Few people with mental disorders in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) receive treatment, in part because mental disorders are highly stigmatized and do not enjoy priority and resources commensurate with their burden on society. Advocacy has been proposed as a means of building political will and community support for mental health and reducing stigma, but few studies have explored the practice and promise of advocacy in LMICs. Methods We conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with leaders in health and mental health in Zimbabwe to explore key stakeholder perceptions on the challenges and opportunities of the country’s mental health system. We coded the transcripts using the constant comparative method, informed by principles of grounded theory. Few interview questions directly concerned advocacy, yet in our analysis, advocacy emerged as a prominent, cross-cutting theme across participants and interview questions. Results Two thirds of the respondents discussed advocacy, often in depth, returning to the concept throughout the interview and emphasizing their belief in advocacy’s importance. Participants described six distinct components of advocacy: the advocates, to whom they advocate (“targets”), what they advocate for (“asks”), how advocates reach their targets (“access”), how they make their asks (“arguments”), and the results of their advocacy (“outcomes”). Discussion Despite their perception that mental health is widely misunderstood and under-appreciated in Zimbabwe, respondents expressed optimism that strategically speaking out can reduce stigma and increase access to care. Key issues included navigating hierarchies, empowering service users to advocate, and integrating mental health with other health initiatives. Understanding stakeholder perceptions sets the stage for targeted development of mental health advocacy in Zimbabwe and other LMICs. PMID:27607240

  19. Do amount of variant differentiation and mitotic rate in bladder cancer change with neoadjuvant chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Helen M; D'Souza, Amber M; Green, Ian F; Pohar, Kamal S; Mortazavi, Amir; Zynger, Debra L

    2015-09-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is currently recommended to all candidate patients with muscularis propria-invasive bladder cancer. However, NAC is effective in only a subset of patients, and predictors of response are lacking. Our study aimed to characterize tumoral changes with NAC usage and to identify features at bladder biopsy/transurethral resection (Bx/TUR) that may predict response. A retrospective search was performed to identify patients with bladder cancer that were pT2 at Bx/TUR upon whom a radical cystectomy (RC) was performed from 2007 to 2010. A blinded slide review of the Bx/TUR and RC was conducted. Presence, type, percent of tumor variant morphology, and tumoral mitotic rate were assessed. Ninety RC patients with slides available were identified (46 NAC, 44 non-NAC). In NAC-treated patients, there was a significantly higher percentage of nonurothelial variant differentiation in the RC compared with Bx/TUR, whereas there was no difference in the non-NAC subgroup. Percent variant differentiation at Bx/TUR was not a predictor of response. There was a significant decrease in mitotic rate between Bx/TUR and RC in NAC patients, whereas there was no difference in the non-NAC subgroup, although mitotic rate was not a predictor of response. In conclusion, percent variant differentiation and mitotic rate changed significantly from Bx/TUR to RC with NAC usage, although neither predicted response. Pathologists should be aware that variant differentiation is common in bladder cancer, with increased presence after NAC, in order to improve recognition and documentation of these findings.

  20. Vagal changes following cancer chemotherapy: implications for the development of nausea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, G R; Andrews, P L; Hickok, J T; Stern, R

    2000-05-01

    Many physiological changes that occur contemporaneously with nausea are mediated by the autonomic nervous system, but the specific autonomic changes associated with nausea have not been characterized. Cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) activity as indicated by heart rate variability, measured as the standard deviation of successive differences (SDSD) in beat-to-beat intervals, was assessed in 24 women with ovarian cancer immediately prior to and accompanying nausea that occurred following anticancer chemotherapy. A progressive increase in SDSD followed infusion of the chemotherapy agent, indicating a rise in cardiac parasympathetic (vagal) activity, with onset of nausea consistently occurring after the peak activity had been reached, at a time when SDSD was decreasing. An increase in parasympathetic activity seems to set the stage for the expression of nausea but an additional stimulus is apparently needed to finally trigger the event.

  1. Immunohistochemical and quantitative changes in salivary EGF, amylase and haptocorrin following radiotherapy for oral cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M E; Hansen, H S; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1996-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), amylase and haptocorrin are molecules produced in the salivary glands. The aim of the present study was to determine immunohistochemical and quantitative alterations in EGF as compared with haptocorrin and amylase following radiotherapy for oral cancer. Changes...... in the salivary secretion of EGF are of interest because of the importance of EGF in mucosal regeneration. Immunohistochemical studies on normal tissue from parotid and submandibular glands have demonstrated EGF in the serous acini with a tendency to single cell expression in the parotid gland. Amylase has been...... found in the serous acini of both the submandibular and parotid glands. Haptocorrin was localized in the duct system of both glands. In the submandibular glands with radiotherapy induced sialoadenitis only very few acini with weak or no staining for EGF and amylase were demonstrated, while no changes...

  2. Health behavior changes following breast cancer treatment: a qualitative comparison among Chinese American, Korean American, and Mexican American survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-won; Gonzalez, Patricia; Wang-Letzkus, Ming F; Baik, Okmi; Ashing-Giwa, Kimlin T

    2013-05-01

    This study explored how Chinese American, Korean American, and Mexican American women modify their health behaviors following breast cancer treatment and identified motivators and barriers that influence their changes. An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study was undertaken using six focus groups. Discussions were transcribed and translated for content analysis. Significant differences among the ethnic groups were noted in the following health behavior practices which were most commonly stated as changed behaviors after a breast cancer diagnosis: 1) eating habits, 2) physical activity, 3) alternative medicine, 4) sleeping, 5) social activity, 6) weight control, and 7) alcohol consumption. Family, financial concerns, environment, and religious faith were commonly mentioned as motivators of and/or barriers to changes in health behaviors. Findings provide insight into different perspectives related to changes in health behaviors by ethnicity, which is critical for developing culturally tailored behavioral interventions to improve underserved breast cancer survivors' quality of life and to reduce health disparities.

  3. Medical Advocacy and Supportive Environments for African-Americans Following Abnormal Mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Yamile; Hempstead, Bridgette H; Thompson-Dodd, Jacci; Weatherby, Shauna Rae; Dunbar, Claire; Hohl, Sarah D; Malen, Rachel C; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2015-09-01

    African-American women experience disproportionately adverse outcomes relative to non-Latina White women after an abnormal mammogram result. Research has suggested medical advocacy and staff support may improve outcomes among this population. The purpose of the study was to understand reasons African-American women believe medical advocacy to be important and examine if and how staff can encourage and be supportive of medical advocacy. A convenience-based sample of 30-74-year-old women who self-identified as African-American/Black/of African descent and who had received an abnormal mammogram result was recruited from community-based organizations, mobile mammography services, and the local department of health. This qualitative study included semi-structured interviews. Patients perceived medical advocacy to be particularly important for African-Americans, given mistrust and discrimination present in medical settings and their own familiarity with their bodies and symptoms. Respondents emphasized that staff can encourage medical advocacy through offering information in general in a clear, informative, and empathic style. Cultural competency interventions that train staff how to foster medical advocacy may be a strategy to improve racial disparities following an abnormal mammogram.

  4. Changing patterns in place of cancer death in England: a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most patients with cancer prefer to die at home or in a hospice, but hospitals remain the most common place of death (PoD.This study aims to explore the changing time trends of PoD and the associated factors, which are essential for end-of-life care improvement. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The study analysed all cancer deaths in England collected by the Office for National Statistics during 1993-2010 (n = 2,281,223. Time trends of age- and gender-standardised proportion of deaths in individual PoDs were evaluated using weighted piecewise linear regression. Variables associated with PoD (home or hospice versus hospital were determined using proportion ratio (PR derived from the log-binomial regression, adjusting for clustering effects. Hospital remained the most common PoD throughout the study period (48.0%; 95% CI 47.9%-48.0%, followed by home (24.5%; 95% CI 24.4%-24.5%, and hospice (16.4%; 95% CI 16.3%-16.4%. Home and hospice deaths increased since 2005 (0.87%; 95% CI 0.74%-0.99%/year, 0.24%; 95% CI 0.17%-0.32%/year, respectively, p<0.001, while hospital deaths declined (-1.20%; 95% CI -1.41 to -0.99/year, p<0.001. Patients who died from haematological cancer (PRs 0.46-0.52, who were single, widowed, or divorced (PRs 0.75-0.88, and aged over 75 (PRs 0.81-0.84 for 75-84; 0.66-0.72 for 85+ were less likely to die in home or hospice (p<0.001; reference groups: colorectal cancer, married, age 25-54. There was little improvement in patients with lung cancer of dying in home or hospice (PRs 0.87-0.88. Marital status became the second most important factor associated with PoD, after cancer type. Patients from less deprived areas (higher quintile of the deprivation index were more likely to die at home or in a hospice than those from more deprived areas (lower quintile of the deprivation index; PRs 1.02-1.12. The analysis is limited by a lack of data on individual patients' preferences for PoD or a clinical indication of the most appropriate Po

  5. Cancer patients' experience of positive and negative changes due to the illness : relationships with psychological well-being, coping, and goal reengagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroevers, Maya J.; Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Most studies in cancer patients on psychological changes focused on positive changes (so-called 'posttraumatic growth'), with surprisingly little attention on the possibility that patients may experience both positive and negative changes. This study investigated the relationship between

  6. Early hematologic changes during prostate cancer radiotherapy predictive for late urinary and bowel toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Djukic, Victoria; Klotz, Jens; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Ribbing, Carolina [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The primary objective of the study was to identify early hematologic changes predictive for radiotherapy (RT)-associated genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. In a group of 91 prostate cancer patients presenting for primary (n = 51) or postoperative (n = 40) curative RT, blood samples (blood count, acute phase proteins, and cytokines) were analyzed before (T1), three times during (T2-T4), and 6-8 weeks after (T5) radiotherapy. Before RT (baseline), on the last day (acute toxicity), a median of 2 months and 16 months (late toxicity) after RT, patients responded to a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Acute score changes > 20 points and late changes > 10 points were considered clinically relevant. Radiotherapy resulted in significant changes of hematologic parameters, with the largest effect on lymphocytes (mean decrease of 31-45 %) and significant dependence on target volume. C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation > 5 mg/l and hemoglobin level decrease ≥ 5 G/1 at T2 were found to be independently predictive for acute urinary toxicity (p < 0.01, respectively). CRP elevation was predominantly detected in primary prostate RT (p = 0.02). Early lymphocyte level elevation ≥ 0.3G/l at T2 was protective against late urinary and bowel toxicity (p = 0.02, respectively). Other significant predictive factors for late bowel toxicity were decreasing hemoglobin levels (cut-off ≥ 5 G/l) at T2 (p = 0.04); changes of TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor; p = 0.03) and ferritin levels (p = 0.02) at T5. All patients with late bowel toxicity had interleukin (IL)-6 levels < 1.5 ng/l at T2 (63 % without; p = 0.01). Early hematologic changes during prostate cancer radiotherapy are predictive for late urinary and bowel toxicity. (orig.) [German] Das primaere Ziel der Studie war die Identifikation von fruehen haematologischen Veraenderungen mit praediktiver Bedeutung fuer radiotherapieassoziierte genitourinale und gastrointestinale Toxizitaet. In einer

  7. Morphological changes of apoptosis and cytotoxic effects induced by Caffeic acid phenethyl ester in AGS human gastric cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini-Sarteshnizi Nematollah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastric cancer is the fourth prevalent cancer and the second reason for cancer-associated mortalities worldwide. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE is one of the main medicinal components of propolis. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological apoptotic changes and cytotoxic effects of CAPE in human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS cell. Methods: AGS human gastric cancer cell line was cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM medium in vitro. Cytotoxic effects and morphological changes induced by 72 h treatment with CAPE at different concentrations on AGS cells were investigated by MTT assay test and inverted microscope, respectively. Results: CAPE in a concentration dependent fashion reduced viability of AGS cells. IC50 was obtained approximately 10 μM at 72 h treatment. Also, CAPE induced concentration-dependent morphological apoptotic changes and promoted complete apoptosis program in AGS human gastric cancer cell line. Conclusion: Our results strongly suggest that CAPE stimulates apoptotic process and leads to cell death. Therefore, CAPE could be useful in developing chemotherapeutic agents for treating human gastric cancer.

  8. Neural Changes following Behavioral Activation for a Depressed Breast Cancer Patient: A Functional MRI Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Gawrysiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging is an innovative but at this stage underutilized method to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used in this case study to examine changes in brain activity in a depressed breast cancer patient receiving an 8-session Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD, based on the work of Hopko and Lejuez (2007. A music listening paradigm was used during fMRI brain scans to assess reward responsiveness at pre- and posttreatment. Following treatment, the patient exhibited attenuated depression and changes in blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD response in regions of the prefrontal cortex and the subgenual cingulate cortex. These preliminary findings outline a novel means to assess psychotherapy efficacy and suggest that BATD elicits functional brain changes in areas implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Further research is necessary to explore neurobiological mechanisms of change in BATD, particularly the potential mediating effects of reward responsiveness and associated brain functioning.

  9. Quality of Life and Symptom Burden among Long Term Lung Cancer Survivors: Changing and Adapting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Cheville, Andrea L.; Wampfler, Jason A.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Jatoi, Aminah; Clark, Matthew M.; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Midthun, David E.; Marks, Randolph S.; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Okuno, Scott H.; Williams, Brent A.; Nichols, Francis C.; Trastek, Victor F.; Sugimura, Hiroshi; Sarna, Linda; Allen, Mark S.; Deschamps, Claude; Sloan, Jeff A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Information is limited regarding health-related quality of life (QOL) status of long term (greater than five years) lung cancer survivors (LTLCS). Obtaining knowledge about their QOL changes over time is a critical step towards improving poor and maintaining good QOL. The primary aim of this study was to conduct a seven-year longitudinal study in survivors of primary lung cancer that identified factors associated with either decline or improvement in QOL over time. Methods Between 1997 and 2003, 447 LTLCS were identified and followed through 2007 using validated questionnaires; data on overall QOL and specific symptoms were at two periods: short-term (less than three years) and long-term post diagnosis. The main analyses were of clinically significant changes (greater than 10%) and factors associated with overall QOL and symptom burden for each period and for changes over time. Results Three hundred two (68%) underwent surgical resection only and 122 (27%) received surgical resection and radiation/chemotherapy. Recurrent or new lung malignancies were observed in 84 (19%) survivors. Significant decline or improvement in overall QOL over time were reported in 155 (35%) and 67 (15%) of 447 survivors, respectively. Among the 155 whose QOL declined, significantly worsened symptoms were fatigue (69%), pain (59%), dyspnea (58%), depressed appetite (49%), and coughing (42%). The symptom burden did not lessen among the 67 who reported improvement, suggesting survivors had adapted to their compromised physical condition. Conclusions LTLCS suffered substantial symptom burden that significantly impaired their QOL, indicating a need for targeted interventions to alleviate their symptoms. PMID:22134070

  10. The changing epidemiology of Asian digestive cancers: From etiologies and incidences to preventive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2015-12-01

    Digestive cancers are a major health burden in Asia. Due to the presence of similar "infection-inflammation-cancer" pathways in the carcinogenesis process, eradicating infective pathogens or attenuating relevant inflammatory signaling pathways may reduce digestive cancer incidences and improve patient outcomes. The aim of this paper is to review the recent evidence regarding the epidemiology of three major digestive cancers in Asia: stomach cancer, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer. We focused on the incidence trends, the major etiologies, and especially the potential preventive strategies.

  11. Postirradiation Changes of White Blood Cells and Lymphocyte Subpopulations in Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Ja; Chung, Woong Ki; Nam, Taek Keun; Nah, Byung Sik; Noh, Young Hee [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    Purpose : Radiation-induced alteration in the immune function is well known phenomenon in cancer patients. Our purpose is to evaluate the extent of immune suppression immediately after mediastinal or pelvic irradiation, which include significant volume of active bone marrow in adults. Methods and Materials : 48 cancer patients with mediastinal(N=29) and pelvic irradiation(N=19) were the basis of this analysis. Age ranged from 36 to 76 and mean and median value was 57 years, respectively. Sex ratio was 1.3(M:F 27/21). The immunological parameters were the complete blood cell(CBC) with differential cell(D/C) count, T cell subset(CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19), NK cell test(CD16,CD56), and serum immunoglobulin (lgG, lgA, lgM) level. Results : The mean value of white blood cell(WBC) was reduced from 7017 to 4470 after irradiation (p=0.0000). In the differential count, the number of lymphocyte, neutrophil, and basophil was markedly reduced with statistical significance(p<0.01) and the number of monocyte was not changed and, on the contrary, that of eosinophil was increased by irradiation. In the lymphocyte subpopulation analysis, the number of all subpopulations, CD3(T cell), CD4(helper T cell), CD8(suppressor T cell), CD16(NK cell), CD19(B cell) was reduced with statistical significance. The mean ratio of CD4 to CD8 in all patients was 1.09 initially and reduced to 0.99 after radiotherapy(p = 0.34), but the proportional percentage of all subpopulations was not changed except CD19(B cell) after irradiation.In the immunoglobulin study, initial values of lg G, lg A, and lg M were relatively above the normal range and the only lg M was statistically significantly reduced after radiotherapy(p=0.02). Conclusion : Mediastinal and pelvic irradiation resulted in remarkable suppression of lymphocyte count in contrast to the relatively good preservation of other components of white blood cells. But the further study on the functional changes of lymphocyte after radiotherapy may be

  12. Changes in frequency of recall recommendations of examinations depicting cancer with the availability of either priors or digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Christiane M.; Bandos, Andriy I.; Ganott, Marie A.; Catullo, Victor J.; Chough, Denise M.; Kelly, Amy E.; Shinde, Dilip D.; Sumkin, Jules H.; Wallace, Luisa P.; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Gur, David

    2016-03-01

    Performance changes in a binary environment when using additional information is affected only when changes in recommendations are made due to the additional information in question. In a recent study, we have shown that, contrary to general expectation, introducing prior examinations improved recall rates, but not sensitivity. In this study, we assessed cancer detection differences when prior examinations and/or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) were made available to the radiologist. We identified a subset of 21 cancer cases with differences in the number of radiologists who recalled these cases after reviewing either a prior examination or DBT. For the cases with differences in recommendations after viewing either priors or DBT, separately, we evaluated the total number of readers that changed their recommendations, regardless of the specific radiologist in question. Confidence intervals for the number of readers and a test for the hypothesis of no difference was performed using the non-parameteric bootstrap approach addressing both case and reader-related sources of variability by resampling cases and readers. With the addition of priors, there were 14 cancer cases (out of 15) where the number of "recalling radiologists" decreased. With the addition of DBT, the number of "recalling radiologists" decreased in only five cases (out of 15) while increasing in the remaining 9 cases. Unlike most new approaches to breast imaging DBT seems to improve both recall rates and cancer detection rates. Changes in recommendations were noted by all radiologists for all cancers by type, size, and breast density.

  13. Building a Generation of Physician Advocates: The Case for Including Mandatory Training in Advocacy in Canadian Medical School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Tahara D; Loh, Lawrence C

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the social accountability of physicians as individuals, and of medicine itself. This has led to increasing emphasis on physician advocacy from a wide variety of institutions. The physician advocacy concept is now part of the Health Advocacy competency mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Despite its growing prominence, physician advocacy remains poorly integrated into current medical undergraduate curricula. The authors recommend how and why curricular reform should proceed; they focus on Canadian medical education, although they hope their views will be useful in other countries as well.The authors discuss conflicting definitions of physician advocacy, which have previously hampered curriculum development efforts, and suggest a way of reconciling the conflicts. They review current gaps in advocacy-related curricula, suggest that these can be addressed by incorporating practice-based and skills acquisition elements into current didactic teaching, and offer several strategies by which an advocacy curriculum could be implemented, ranging from small modifications to current curriculum to developing new competencies in medical education nationally.The authors present a case for making an advocacy curriculum mandatory for every Canadian medical trainee; they argue that teaching trainees how to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate may also help them meet the social accountability mandate of medical school education. Finally, the authors explain why making the development and implementation of a mandatory, skill-based curriculum in advocacy should be a priority.

  14. \\Defining Patient Advocacy for the Context of Clinical Ethics Consultation: A Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazg, Tracy; Lindhorst, Taryn; Dudzinski, Denise; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The idea of patient advocacy as a function of clinical ethics consultation (CEC) has been debated in the bioethics literature. In particular, opinion is divided as to whether patient advocacy inherently is in conflict with the other duties of the ethics consultant, especially that of impartial mediator. The debate is complicated, however, because patient advocacy is not uniformly conceptualized. This article examines two literatures that are crucial to understanding patient advocacy in the context of bioethical deliberations: the CEC literature and the literature on advocacy in the social work profession. A review of this literature identifies four distinct approaches to patient advocacy that are relevant to CEC: (1) the best interest approach, (2) the patient rights approach, (3) the representational approach, and (4) the empowerment approach. After providing a clearer understanding of the varied meanings of patient advocacy in the context of CEC, we assert that patient advocacy is not inherently inconsistent with the function of the ethics consultant and the CEC process. Finally, we provide a framework to help consultants determine if they should adopt an advocacy role.

  15. Healthy pigs for healthy people. A cysticercosis advocacy information tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saarnak, Christopher; Johansen, Maria Vang; Mejer, Helena;

    2013-01-01

    Saarnak, C., M. V. Johansen, H. Mejer, C. Trevisan, and U. C. Braae Porcine cysticercosis is an infection of pigs caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium, a tapeworm that causes taeniosis in humans. The disease is common in developing countries and is a serious public health risk. Cysticercos...... to the laymen in the villages, information for supporting practitioners; MD’s in health centres, veterinary and agricultural extension officers and pig traders. Furthermore there will be a policy brief aimed at the key decision makers at ministry level........ Consequently, the intervention strategies to prevent and control cysticercosis must be on health education engaging the communities and creating public awareness. Enhancing basic conditions such as hygiene has an important effect on reducing the risk of transmission. In addition some very simple but effective...... but also other endemic zoonotic diseases. ICONZ and ADVANZ are two One Health neglected zoonotic diseases projects, funded by the European Commission through its 7th framework program. Part of University of Copenhagen’s tasks in these projects is to develop an improved advocacy tool for teaching about...

  16. From Advocacy to Action in Global Adolescent Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, George C; Sawyer, Susan M; Ross, David A; Viner, Russell M; Santelli, John S

    2016-10-01

    In May 2016, The Lancet published a report titled, "Our Future: A Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing," the culmination of three years of work from a geographically diverse interdisciplinary group. The report argued that healthy growth across adolescence and young adulthood shapes life course and intergenerational trajectories so that health investments yield a "triple dividend." With current global interest in adolescent health at an unprecedented level, it outlines three next steps to advance from advocacy to effective action: (1) there is a pressing need for comprehensive and integrated strategies, inclusive of, but extending beyond, sexual and reproductive health, and HIV; (2) interventions should address both adolescent health service coverage and determinants of health that lie in sectors such as education, justice, transport, and industry and employment, as well as families and local communities; and (3) scale-up of responses will require not only investments in country-level capacities for measuring need and responding with evidence-based practice but also the establishment of processes for accountability and meaningful youth engagement.

  17. Changes in cellular mechanical properties during onset or progression of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciasca, Gabriele; Papi, Massimiliano; Minelli, Eleonora; Palmieri, Valentina; De Spirito, Marco

    2016-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) development represents a multistep process starting with specific mutations that affect proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. These mutations confer a selective growth advantage to colonic epithelial cells that form first dysplastic crypts, and then malignant tumours and metastases. All these steps are accompanied by deep mechanical changes at the cellular and the tissue level. A growing consensus is emerging that such modifications are not merely a by-product of the malignant progression, but they could play a relevant role in the cancer onset and accelerate its progression. In this review, we focus on recent studies investigating the role of the biomechanical signals in the initiation and the development of CRC. We show that mechanical cues might contribute to early phases of the tumour initiation by controlling the Wnt pathway, one of most important regulators of cell proliferation in various systems. We highlight how physical stimuli may be involved in the differentiation of non-invasive cells into metastatic variants and how metastatic cells modify their mechanical properties, both stiffness and adhesion, to survive the mechanical stress associated with intravasation, circulation and extravasation. A deep comprehension of these mechanical modifications may help scientist to define novel molecular targets for the cure of CRC.

  18. Genome-wide changes accompanying knockdown of fatty acid synthase in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Jeffrey W

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS is up-regulated in a wide variety of cancers, and is considered a potential metabolic oncogene by virtue of its ability to enhance tumor cell survival. Inhibition of tumor FAS causes both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, indicating FAS is a promising target for cancer treatment. Results Here, we used gene expression profiling to conduct a global study of the cellular processes affected by siRNA mediated knockdown of FAS in MDA-MB-435 mammary carcinoma cells. The study identified 169 up-regulated genes (≥ 1.5 fold and 110 down-regulated genes (≤ 0.67 fold in response to knockdown of FAS. These genes regulate several aspects of tumor function, including metabolism, cell survival/proliferation, DNA replication/transcription, and protein degradation. Quantitative pathway analysis using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis software further revealed that the most pronounced effect of FAS knockdown was down-regulation in pathways that regulate lipid metabolism, glycolysis, the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. These changes were coupled with up-regulation in genes involved in cell cycle arrest and death receptor mediated apoptotic pathways. Conclusion Together these findings reveal a wide network of pathways that are influenced in response to FAS knockdown and provide new insight into the role of this enzyme in tumor cell survival and proliferation.

  19. Expression changes in the stroma of prostate cancer predict subsequent relapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Jia

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are needed to address overtreatment that occurs for the majority of prostate cancer patients that would not die of the disease but receive radical treatment. A possible barrier to biomarker discovery may be the polyclonal/multifocal nature of prostate tumors as well as cell-type heterogeneity between patient samples. Tumor-adjacent stroma (tumor microenvironment is less affected by genetic alteration and might therefore yield more consistent biomarkers in response to tumor aggressiveness. To this end we compared Affymetrix gene expression profiles in stroma near tumor and identified a set of 115 probe sets for which the expression levels were significantly correlated with time-to-relapse. We also compared patients that chemically relapsed shortly after prostatectomy (<1 year, and patients that did not relapse in the first four years after prostatectomy. We identified 131 differentially expressed microarray probe sets between these two categories. 19 probe sets (15 genes overlapped between the two gene lists with p<0.0001. We developed a PAM-based classifier by training on samples containing stroma near tumor: 9 rapid relapse patient samples and 9 indolent patient samples. We then tested the classifier on 47 different samples, containing 90% or more stroma. The classifier predicted the risk status of patients with an average accuracy of 87%. This is the first general tumor microenvironment-based prognostic classifier. These results indicate that the prostate cancer microenvironment exhibits reproducible changes useful for predicting outcomes for patients.

  20. Changes in mutational status during third-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2014-01-01

    KRAS and BRAF mutations are responsible for primary resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) MoAbs in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), but it is unknown what causes wildtype (wt) patients to develop resistance during treatment. We measured circulating free DNA (cfDNA), KRAS...... and BRAF in plasma and report the changes during third line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan. One-hundred-and-eight patients received irinotecan 350 mg/m2 q3w and weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2) until progression (RECIST) or unacceptable toxicity. cfDNA and number of mutated KRAS/BRAF alleles in plasma...... different types of mutations detected in the plasma, including synchronous KRAS and BRAF. Twelve patients had a primary KRAS mutant tumor, but wild-type disease according to baseline plasma analysis, eight of these obtained stabilization of disease. In five patients with primary wt disease a mutation...

  1. Polarized Raman spectroscopy unravels the biomolecular structural changes in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Amuthachelvi; Prakasarao, Aruna; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising technique giving a wealth of information about the orientation and symmetry of bond vibrations in addition to the general chemical information from the conventional Raman spectroscopy. In this regard, polarized Raman Spectroscopic technique was employed to study the changes in the orientation of biomolecules in normal and cancerous conditions. This technique was compared to the conventional Raman spectroscopic technique and was found to yield additional information about the orientation of tyrosine, collagen and DNA. The statistically analyzed depolarization ratios by Linear Discriminant Analysis yielded better accuracy than the statistical results of conventional Raman spectroscopy. Thus, this study reveals that polarized Raman spectroscopy has better diagnostic potential than the conventional Raman spectroscopic technique.

  2. Image of God, religion, spirituality, and life changes in breast cancer survivors: a qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Judith A; Edward, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Religion and spirituality are much studied coping mechanisms; however, their relationship to changes in behaviors, relationships, and goals is unclear. This study explored the impact of a breast cancer diagnosis on religion/faith and changes in behaviors, relationship, or goals. In this qualitative study, women, who participated in a larger, quantitative study, completed written responses to questions regarding the role of religion/faith in their lives, the impact of their diagnosis on their image of God and on faith/religious beliefs, and any changes in behaviors, relationships, or life goals were examined. Based on previous findings noting differences in psychological outcomes based on a higher (HE) or lesser (LE) engaged view of God, 28 (14 HE; 14 LE) women were included in the analysis. Awareness of life and its fleeting nature was common to all. Ensuing behaviors varied from a need to focus on self-improvement-egocentrism (LE)-to a need to focus on using their experiences to help others-altruism (HE). Study results suggest that seemingly small, but highly meaningful, differences based on one's worldview result in considerably different attitudinal and behavioral outcomes.

  3. Changes in and predictors of pain characteristics in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Guro Lindviksmoen; Rustøen, Tone; Miaskowski, Christine; Paul, Steven M; Bjordal, Kristin

    2015-05-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) that is associated with significant decrements in physical and psychological functioning. Only 4 studies have evaluated for changes in and predictors of different pain characteristics in these patients. In this longitudinal study of patients with HNC, changes in pain intensity (i.e., average pain, worst pain), pain interference with function, and pain relief were evaluated from the initiation of radiotherapy and through the following 6 months. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate for changes over time in these 4 pain characteristics, as well as to identify predictors of interindividual variability in each characteristic. Overall, pain intensity and interference with function scores were in the mild-to-moderate range, while pain relief scores were in the moderate range. The occurrence of pain, as well as scores for each pain characteristic, increased from the initiation to the completion of radiotherapy, followed by a gradual decrease to near pretreatment levels at 6 months. However, interindividual variability existed in patients' ratings of each pain characteristic. Predictors of more severe pain characteristic scores were more comorbidities, worse physical functioning, not having surgery before radiotherapy, difficulty swallowing, mouth sores, sleep disturbance, fatigue, more energy, and less social support. Patients with more depressive symptoms had better pain relief. Although some of the predictors cannot be modified (e.g., rrence of surgery), other predictors (e.g., symptoms) can be treated. Therefore, information about these predictors may result in decreased pain in patients with HNC.

  4. Three Pink Decades: Breast Cancer Coverage in Magazine Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbiGhannam, Niveen; Chilek, Lindsay A; Koh, Hyeseung E

    2017-02-02

    Breast cancer advocacy has experienced tremendous success since the 1980s. Yet, the quality and authenticity of breast cancer information in the media are sometimes questionable. Using a content analysis, we examined the informative (donation information, breast cancer advocacy content, etc.) and persuasive (appeals used, cues to action, etc.) contents of magazine advertisements relevant to breast cancer. While ads offered minimal informative content about the disease or about ways by which sales will contribute to the breast cancer cause, they integrated "breast cancer appeals," such as the color pink, the pink ribbon, and mostly positive depictions of survivorship and hope, into the ads. Breast cancer thus took center stage in the persuasive content of the ads, but a back seat when it came to their informative content. We discuss the implications of those findings in light of the meanings and purposes of cause-related marketing campaigns.

  5. Monitoring longitudinal changes in irradiated head and neck cancer xenografts using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Jiang, Shudong; Gunn, Jason R.; Marra, Kayla; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation therapy is often used as the preferred clinical treatment for control of localized head and neck cancer. However, during the course of treatment (6-8 weeks), feedback about functional and/or physiological changes within impacted tissue are not obtained, given the onerous financial and/or logistical burdens of scheduling MRI, PET or CT scans. Diffuse optical sensing is well suited to address this problem since the instrumentation can be made low-cost and portable while still being able to non-invasively provide information about vascular oxygenation in vivo. Here we report results from studies that employed an optical fiber-based portable diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system to longitudinally monitor changes in tumor vasculature within two head and neck cancer cell lines (SCC-15 and FaDu) xenografted in the flanks of nude mice, in two separate experiments. Once the tumor volumes were 100mm3, 67% of animals received localized (electron beam) radiation therapy in five fractions (8Gy/day, for 5 days) while 33% of the animals served as controls. DRS measurements were obtained from each animal on each day of treatment and then for two weeks post-treatment. Reflectance spectra were parametrized to extract total hemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen-saturation and the resulting time-trends of optical parameters appear to be dissimilar for the two cell-lines. These findings are also compared to previous animal experiments (using the FaDu line) that were irradiated using a photon beam radiotherapy protocol. These results and implications for the use of fiber-based DRS measurements made at local (irradiated) tumor site as a basis for identifying early radiotherapy-response are presented and discussed.

  6. [Change in acylneuraminic acid content of T-lymphocytes and in plasma in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickl, H; Huber, W; Faillard, H; Becker, A; Holzhauser, R; Graeff, H

    1991-01-04

    Increased sialic acid levels reflecting tumor burden are found on the surface of T-lymphocytes and in the plasma of patients with carcinoma of the mammary gland. The data of the determinations of sialic acid content and distribution on T-cells, using microanalytical methods such as HPLC and a colorimetric test, show that the total sialic acid content is increased by about 60% and that nearly 80-90% of the sialic acids consist of N-acetyl-9-O-acetyl-neuraminic acid, in comparison to the healthy controls (not containing O-acetylated neuraminic acid). Investigations on lymphocytes of malignant melanoma patients show similar changes of sialic acid content and distribution on the cell surface. Increased sialic acid levels are also found in the plasma of patients with cancer but no O-acetylated derivative can be found. Furthermore the examinations show that the separation of the T-lymphocytes from the total lymphocyte fraction is not required. Determination of sialic acids in the total lymphocyte fraction can be a simplification in carrying out further diagnostic investigations. A high level of sialic acids as "antirecognition factor" seems to be not only a marker of tumor cells but also an attribute of T-lymphocytes, involved in the defence against the malignoma (malignant melanoma, breast cancer). Considering the possible contribution of sialic acid to the immunoregulatory protective mechanism during the first stage of pregnancy, sialic acid content and distribution on T-cells of pregnant women are investigated. Both an increase and a change in the distribution of sialic acids can be excluded.

  7. Integrated analysis of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing reveals diverse transcriptomic aberrations driven by somatic genomic changes in liver cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Shiraishi

    Full Text Available Recent studies applying high-throughput sequencing technologies have identified several recurrently mutated genes and pathways in multiple cancer genomes. However, transcriptional consequences from these genomic alterations in cancer genome remain unclear. In this study, we performed integrated and comparative analyses of whole genomes and transcriptomes of 22 hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs and their matched controls. Comparison of whole genome sequence (WGS and RNA-Seq revealed much evidence that various types of genomic mutations triggered diverse transcriptional changes. Not only splice-site mutations, but also silent mutations in coding regions, deep intronic mutations and structural changes caused splicing aberrations. HBV integrations generated diverse patterns of virus-human fusion transcripts depending on affected gene, such as TERT, CDK15, FN1 and MLL4. Structural variations could drive over-expression of genes such as WNT ligands, with/without creating gene fusions. Furthermore, by taking account of genomic mutations causing transcriptional aberrations, we could improve the sensitivity of deleterious mutation detection in known cancer driver genes (TP53, AXIN1, ARID2, RPS6KA3, and identified recurrent disruptions in putative cancer driver genes such as HNF4A, CPS1, TSC1 and THRAP3 in HCCs. These findings indicate genomic alterations in cancer genome have diverse transcriptomic effects, and integrated analysis of WGS and RNA-Seq can facilitate the interpretation of a large number of genomic alterations detected in cancer genome.

  8. Post-radiation changes in oral tissues - An analysis of cancer irradiation cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Ashokkumar Pandya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiation, commonly employed as neoadjuvant, primary, and adjuvant therapy for head and neck cancer causes numerous epithelial and stromal changes, prominent among which is fibrosis with its early and late consequences. Very little is known about the true nature of the fibrosed tissue and the type of fibers accumulated. Radiotherapy affects the supporting tumor stroma often resulting in a worsening grade of tumor post-radiation. Aim: To study epithelial, neoplastic, stromal, and glandular changes in oral cavity induced by radiation therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC using special stains. Materials and Methods: The study included 27 samples of recurrent OSCC following completion of radiotherapy (recurrence within an average span of 11 months, and 26 non-irradiated cases of OSCC. Patients with a history of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy were not included in the study. The epithelial changes assessed included epithelial atrophy, apoptosis, necrosis, dysplasia, and neoplasia. The connective tissue was evaluated for amount of fibrosis, quality of fibers (using picrosirius red staining, fibrinous exudate, necrosis, pattern of invasion, vessel wall thickening, and salivary gland changes. The aforementioned changes were assessed using light and polarizing microscopy and tabulated. Statistical Analysis: Epithelial and connective tissue parameters were compared between the irradiated and non-irradiated cases using chi square and t-tests. Results: Epithelial and connective tissue parameters were found to be increased in irradiated patients. Pattern of invasion by tumor cells varied from strands and  cords between the two groups studied. The effect of radiation was seen to reflect on the maturity of fibers and the regularity of their distribution.

  9. Change in diffusion weighted MRI during liver cancer radiotherapy: Preliminary observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Haider, Ehsan A.; Haider, Masoom A.; Fung, Sharon; Lockwood, Gina; Dawson, Laura A. (University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    2009-10-15

    Purpose. To evaluate diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in liver and liver cancers during and following conformal radiotherapy (RT). To determine the feasibility of using changes in apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) as a potential surrogate for tumour control or normal tissue injury. Materials and methods. Patients on a six-fraction conformal liver RT protocol underwent DW-MRI at the time of treatment planning, during RT (week one and two) and one month following RT. Diffusion weighted MR images were acquired in exhale breath hold, using b-values of 0 and 600. Regions of interest (ROIs) corresponding to maximal tumour dose, high-dose peri-tumour liver, irradiated normal liver, non-irradiated liver, and spleen were analyzed on ADC maps. Results. Eleven patients (four hepatocellular carcinoma, five liver metastases, two cholangiocarcinoma) were evaluated. The baseline median tumour ADC of 1.56x10-3mm2/sec increased to 1.89x10-3mm2/sec at RT week one, to 1.91x10-3mm2/sec during week two and to 2.01x10-3mm2/sec at one month following treatment (p < 0.0001). Early increases in mean ADC were correlated with higher dose and sustained tumour response, whereas RECIST and volume changes on T2 images were not. Peri-tumour mean ADC also increased, from 1.40x10-3mm2/sec (baseline) to 1.55x10-3mm2/sec (RT week 2) and 1.64 x 10-3mm2/sec (follow-up). Small ADC changes were seen in the irradiated liver, and no significant changes were seen in the un-irradiated liver. Conclusions. Changes in tumour ADC were seen during RT. Larger increases were correlated with higher doses and increased likelihood of response

  10. Systemic Metabolomic Changes in Blood Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Identified by Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Miyamoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We report results from two separate studies using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS to profile metabolites in human blood samples that significantly differ from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC adenocarcinoma and other lung cancer cases. Metabolomic analysis of blood samples from the two studies yielded a total of 437 metabolites, of which 148 were identified as known compounds and 289 identified as unknown compounds. Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05. Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased. Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.

  11. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  12. Changes in Cervical Cancer FDG Uptake During Chemoradiation and Association With Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidd, Elizabeth A., E-mail: ekidd@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Thomas, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh [Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research showed that pretreatment uptake of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), as assessed by the maximal standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and the variability of uptake (FDG{sub hetero}), predicted for posttreatment response in cervical cancer. In this pilot study, we evaluated the changes in SUV{sub max} and FDG{sub hetero} during concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer and their association with post-treatment response. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with stage Ib1-IVa cervical cancer were enrolled. SUV{sub max}, FDG{sub hetero}, and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) were recorded from FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans performed pretreatment and during weeks 2 and 4 of treatment and were evaluated for changes and association with response assessed on 3-month post-treatment FDG-PET/CT. Results: For all patients, the average pretreatment SUV{sub max} was 17.8, MTV was 55.4 cm{sup 3}, and FDG{sub hetero} was -1.33. A similar decline in SUV{sub max} was seen at week 2 compared with baseline and week 4 compared with week 2 (34%). The areas of highest FDG uptake in the tumor remained relatively consistent on serial scans. Mean FDG{sub hetero} decreased during treatment. For all patients, MTV decreased more from week 2 to week 4 than from pretreatment to week 2. By week 4, the average SUV{sub max} had decreased by 57% and the MTV had decreased by 30%. Five patients showed persistent or new disease on 3-month post-treatment PET. These poor responders showed a higher average SUV{sub max}, larger MTV, and greater heterogeneity at all 3 times. Week 4 SUV{sub max} (P=.037), week 4 FDG{sub hetero} (P=.005), pretreatment MTV (P=.008), and pretreatment FDG{sub hetero} (P=.008) were all significantly associated with post-treatment PET response. Conclusions: SUV{sub max} shows a consistent rate of decline during treatment and declines at a faster rate than MTV regresses. Based on this pilot study

  13. Histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen independent prostate cancer tumors: evaluation in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Delgado-Enciso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Meclofenamic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has shown therapeutic potential for different types of cancers, including androgen-independent prostate neoplasms. The antitumor effect of diverse nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been shown to be accompanied by histological and molecular changes that are responsible for this beneficial effect. The objective of the present work was to analyze the histological changes caused by meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer. Tumors were created in a nude mouse model using PC3 cancerous human cells. Meclofenamic acid (10 mg/kg/day; experimental group, n=5 or saline solution (control group, n=5 was administered intraperitoneally for twenty days. Histological analysis was then carried out on the tumors, describing changes in the cellular architecture, fibrosis, and quantification of cellular proliferation and tumor vasculature. Meclofenamic acid causes histological changes that indicate less tumor aggression (less hypercellularity, fewer atypical mitoses, and fewer nuclear polymorphisms, an increase in fibrosis, and reduced cellular proliferation and tumor vascularity. Further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular changes that cause the beneficial and therapeutic effects of meclofenamic acid in androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  14. Changing attitudes toward needle biopsies of breast cancer in Shanghai: experience and current status over the past 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuang; Liu, Zhe-Bin; Ling, Hong; Chen, Jia-Jian; Shen, Ju-Ping; Yang, Wen-Tao; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic patterns in breast cancer have greatly changed over the past few decades, and core needle biopsy (CNB) has become a reliable procedure for detecting breast cancer without invasive surgery. To estimate the changing diagnostic patterns of breast cancer in urban Shanghai, 11,947 women with breast lesions detected by preoperative needle biopsy between January 1995 and December 2012 were selected from the Shanghai Cancer Data base, which integrates information from approximately 50% of breast cancer patients in Shanghai. The CNB procedure uses an automated prone unit, biopsy gun, and 14-gauge needles under freehand or ultrasound guidance and was performed by experienced radiologists and surgeons specializing in needle biopsies. Diagnosis and classification for each patient were independently evaluated by pathologists. Over the indicated 8-year period, biopsy type consisted of 11,947 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsies (UCNBs), 2,015 ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (UVABs), and 654 stereotactic X-ray-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (XVABs). For all the 11,947 women included in this study, image-guided needle biopsy was the initial diagnostic procedure. Approximately 81.0% of biopsied samples were histopathologically determined to be malignant lesions, 5.5% were determined to be high-risk lesions, and 13.5% were determined to be benign lesions. The number of patients choosing UCNB increased at the greatest rate, and UCNB has become a standard procedure for histodiagnosis because it is inexpensive, convenient, and accurate. The overall false-negative rate of CNB was 1.7%, and the specific false-negative rates for UCNB, UVAB, and XVAB, were 1.7%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. This study suggests that the use of preoperative needle biopsy as the initial breast cancer diagnostic procedure is acceptable in urban Shanghai. Preoperative needle biopsy is now a standard procedure in the Shanghai Cancer Center because it may reduce the number of surgeries

  15. Power and Politics in the Global Health Landscape: Beliefs, Competition and Negotiation Among Global Advocacy Coalitions in the Policy-Making Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori McDougall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Advocacy coalitions play an increasingly prominent role within the global health landscape, linking actors and institutions to attract political attention and resources. This paper examines how coalitions negotiate among themselves and exercise hidden forms of power to produce policy on the basis of their beliefs and strategic interests. Methods This paper examines the beliefs and behaviours of health advocacy coalitions using Sabatier’s Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF as an informal theoretical lens. Coalitions are further explored in relation to the concept of transnational advocacy networks (Keck and Sikkink and of productive power (Shiffman. The ACF focuses on explaining how policy change takes place when there is conflict concerning goals and technical approaches among different actors. This study uses participant observation methods, self-reported survey results and semistructured qualitative interviews to trace how a major policy project of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG era, the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, was constructed through negotiations among maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR advocacy coalitions. Results The Global Strategy represented a new opportunity for high-level political attention. Despite differing policy beliefs, MNCH and SRHR actors collaborated to produce this strategy because of anticipated gains in political attention. While core beliefs did not shift fundamentally and collaboration was primarily a short-term tactical response to a time-bound opportunity, MNCH actors began to focus more on human rights perspectives and SRHR actors adopted greater use of quantifiable indicators and economic argumentation. This shift emphasises the inherent importance of SRHR to maternal and child health survival. Conclusion As opportunities arise, coalitions respond based on principles and policy beliefs, as well as to perceptions

  16. Enhancing advocacy for eye care at national levels: what steps to take for the next decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiu, Muhammad Mansur; Al Rajhi, Abdulaziz; Qureshi, Mohammed Babar; Gersbeck, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The global initiative for the elimination of avoidable blindness by the year 2020-(VISION 2020- The Right to Sight), established in 1999, is a partnership of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), governments, bilateral organizations, corporate bodies and the World Health Organization. The goal is to eliminate the major causes of avoidable blindness by the year 2020. Significant progress has been made in the last decade. For example, the adoption of three major World Health Assembly resolutions (WHA 56.26, 59.25 and 62.1) requesting governments to increase support and funding for the prevention of blindness and eye care. Additionally, the approval of the VISION 2020 declaration, development of plans and establishment of prevention of blindness committees and a designation of a coordinator by most participating countries represent other major achievements. Furthermore there has been increased political and professional commitment to the prevention of visual impairment and an increase in the provision of high-quality, sustainable eye care. Most of these achievements have been attributed to the advocacy efforts of VISION 2020 at the international level. The full success of this global initiative will likely depend on the extent to which the WHA resolutions are implemented in each country. However, most ratifying countries have not moved forward with implementation of these resolutions. To date, only few countries have shown consistent government support and funding for eye care pursuant to the resolutions. One of the main reasons for this may be inadequate and inappropriate advocacy for eye care at the national level. As such it is believed that the success of VISION 2020 in the next decade will depend on intense advocacy campaigns at national levels. This review identified some of the countries and health programs that have had fruitful advocacy efforts, to determine the factors that dictated success. The review highlights the factors of successful advocacy in two

  17. Estimating the change in life expectancy after a diagnosis of cancer among the Australian population

    OpenAIRE

    Baade, Peter D; Youlden, Danny R; Andersson, Therese M-L; Youl, Philippa H; Kimlin, Michael G.; Aitken, Joanne F; Biggar, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Communication of relevant prognostic information is critical in helping patients understand the implications of their cancer diagnosis. We describe measures of prognosis to help communicate relevant prognostic information to improve patients’ understanding of the implications of their cancer diagnosis. Setting Australia-wide population-based cancer registry cohort. Participants 870 878 patients aged 15–89 years diagnosed with invasive cancer between 1990 and 2007, with mortality fo...

  18. Highlights from the Ninth European Breast Cancer Conference, Glasgow, 19–21 March 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Munzone, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    The Ninth European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9), one of the largest breast cancer conferences in the world, was held in Glasgow in March 2014, and brought together the voices of doctors, researchers, nurses, and patients. All the major breast cancer advocacy groups and institutions were united in one forum (Europa Donna, the EORTC Breast Cancer group, and EUSOMA). The Scientific Programme for EBCC-9 highlighted a holistic picture of breast cancer, including research, prevention, treatmen...

  19. ADVOCACY FATIGUE: SELF-CARE, PROTEST, AND EDUCATIONAL EQUITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Griffin Basas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Much of the literature in education has focused on the experiences of teachers and school leaders as they encounter students with individualized or “special” learning needs and their families.  This body of literature places the professional at the center of its concern by studying such phenomena as burnout and compassion fatigue.  In this article, the Author argues that this vigilance for the experience of schools has overlooked the material, psychological, and social impact on families that must advocate for their students in the U.S. educational system.   Examining educational conflicts that occur in special education and English Language Learner [ELL] settings, the Author defines this “advocacy fatigue” as the increased strain on resources that comes from continued exposure to system inequities and inequalities.   In the final section of the Article, she identifies strategies for collaboratively addressing educational equity that range from resistance to self-care, community wholeness to professional development.   Une bonne partie de la littérature en matière d’éducation a été consacrée aux expériences que vivent les enseignants et les directeurs d’école lorsqu’ils doivent interagir avec des élèves ayant des besoins d’apprentissage individuels ou « spéciaux » et leurs familles. Cette littérature place le professionnel au cœur des préoccupations en mettant l’accent sur des phénomènes comme l’épuisement professionnel et l’usure de compassion. Dans cet article, l’auteure déplore que l’on ait ainsi occulté les répercussions matérielles, psychologiques et sociales auxquelles font face les familles qui doivent défendre les intérêts de leurs enfants dans le système d’éducation américain. Examinant les conflits pédagogiques qui surviennent dans les milieux de l’éducation spécialisée et de l’apprentissage de l’anglais [ELL], l’auteure définit le phénomène qu

  20. 10-year epidemiological profile changes for cervical and endometrial cancer patients treated by radiotherapy in the Pernambuco state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Franca, Elvis J., E-mail: ejfranca@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Pessoa, Juanna G.; Melo, Ana M.M.A.; Amancio, Francisco F., E-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: amanciobike@gmail.com, E-mail: juannapessoa@gmail.com, E-mail: marianasantos_ufpe@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia; Oliveira Neto, Aristides M.; Melo, Jonathan A., E-mail: aristidesoliveira466@hotmail.com, E-mail: jonathan@truenet.com.br [Centro de Radioterapia de Pernambuco (CERAPE), Santo Amaro, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health problem, its prevention and control are included within 16 strategic objectives of the Brazilian Ministry of Health for the period 2011-2015. Cervical cancer is the fourth most common tumor in the female population, being new 15,590 cases estimated for 2014 according to the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCA). Pernambuco is the fifth state with the highest number of cases of cervical cancer and the seventh in cases of endometrial ones, both estimative for 2014. The understanding of the epidemiological profile of these pathologies corroborates strategies for prevention, control and treatment. As Pernambuco has implemented the radiotherapy for cancer treatment since 1998-1999, this work encompassed the comparison of the 1998-1999 epidemiological profile of patients treated by radiotherapy for cervical and endometrial cancer in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, with 2008-2009 profile - ten years after. Medical record of 490 patients treated at the Center of Radiotherapy of Pernambuco (CERAPE) were compiled according to the patient origin, the affected uterus region, the staging of disease, the type and cell differentiation of the tumor, the age group, and, finally, the realization of hysterectomy as part of the treatment. More than 90% of the patients were affected by cervical cancer in the two investigated periods. For the interval of 1998-1999 the proportion of patients submitted to hysterectomy was quite higher compared to those after ten years. The results also showed a change in the origin of the patients, in which, in 1999, most of the patients were from the capital and the metropolitan area, while, after ten years, patients were mostly from the interior of the State. There was a predominance of squamous cell type tumors in both periods evaluated. For the 1998-1999 interval, tumors were stage 2, moderately differentiated type. Differently, the tumors were mostly stage 3, not differentiated type, for the 2008-2009 period

  1. Changes of Survivin mRNA and Protein Expression during Paclitaxel Treatment in Breast Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Huihua; YU Shiying; ZHUANG Liang; XIONG Hua

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of antiapoptosis gene, survivin in the resistance to palcitaxel, the expression of survivin mRNA and protein in the process of paclitaxel treatment in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was detected. MCF-7 cells were incubated with paclitaxel at different concentrations. The growth inhibition rate of MCF-7 was investigated by tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetry. The change of apoptosis was detected by Annexin-V/PI methods. The changes in the expression of survivin mRNA and protein were studied by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western-blot assay respectively. The growth inhibition rate of MCF-7 was increased in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Paclitaxel of higher concentration could effectively induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells after 48 h, while the expression of survivin was increased at early time (within 6 h) and decreased after 24 h regardless of treatment concentrations of paclitaxel. It suggested that tumor cells might evade the paclitaxel-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by increasing the level of survivin at early treatment time.

  2. Proteomic changes resulting from gene copy number variations in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Geiger

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Along the transformation process, cells accumulate DNA aberrations, including mutations, translocations, amplifications, and deletions. Despite numerous studies, the overall effects of amplifications and deletions on the end point of gene expression--the level of proteins--is generally unknown. Here we use large-scale and high-resolution proteomics combined with gene copy number analysis to investigate in a global manner to what extent these genomic changes have a proteomic output and therefore the ability to affect cellular transformation. We accurately measure expression levels of 6,735 proteins and directly compare them to the gene copy number. We find that the average effect of these alterations on the protein expression is only a few percent. Nevertheless, by using a novel algorithm, we find the combined impact that many of these regional chromosomal aberrations have at the protein level. We show that proteins encoded by amplified oncogenes are often overexpressed, while adjacent amplified genes, which presumably do not promote growth and survival, are attenuated. Furthermore, regulation of biological processes and molecular complexes is independent of general copy number changes. By connecting the primary genome alteration to their proteomic consequences, this approach helps to interpret the data from large-scale cancer genomics efforts.

  3. Changes in expression of imprinted genes following treatment of human cancer cell lines with non-mutagenic or mutagenic carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibui, Takeo; Higo, Yukari; Tsutsui, Takeo W; Uchida, Minoru; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Barrett, J Carl; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2008-08-01

    It remains possible that chemicals that act by mutagenic mechanisms as well as chemicals that do not induce gene mutations may affect epigenetic gene expression. To test the possibility, we investigated the ability of both types of chemicals to alter the expression of five imprinted genes, PEG3, SNRPN, NDN, ZAC and H19, using two human colon cancer cell lines and a human breast cancer cell line. The expression of imprinted genes was changed by some non-mutagenic and mutagenic carcinogens independent of their mutagenic activity. The genes most commonly exhibiting the changes in expression were SNRPN and PEG3. Alterations of the expression of NDN and ZAC were also observed in some conditions. Methylation-specific PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggest the possibility that changes in the expression of SNRPN may be associated with DNA hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the promoters and euchromatinization of the heterochromatic domains of the promoters. Changes in expression of the imprinted genes, PEG3 and NDN, were also observed in cells immortalized by treatment of normal human fibroblasts with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide or aflatoxin B1. We previously demonstrated that expression of the cancer-related gene, INK4a, in these immortal cells was lost via epigenetic mechanisms. The results prove that, in cancer cells, some mutagenic or non-mutagenic carcinogens can epigenetically influence the transcription levels of imprinted genes and also suggest the possibility that some chemical carcinogens may have epigenetic carcinogenic effects in human cells.

  4. Spousal Support and Changes in Distress Over Time in Couples Coping With Cancer : The Role of Personal Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagan, Meirav; Sanderman, Robbert; Schokker, Marike C.; Wiggers, Theo; Baas, Peter C.; van Haastert, Michiel; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study has examined the associations between perceived supportive and unsupportive spousal behavior and changes in distress in couples coping with cancer. We tested whether people relatively low in their sense of personal control were more responsive to spousal supportive and unsupp

  5. The Role of Mitochondria in Cancer Induction, Progression and Changes in Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalinska, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles as energetic centers. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were found in several diseases, including cancers. Studies on cytoplasmic hybrids (cybrids) confirm that directed mutation introduced into mtDNA could be a reason for cancer induction. Mitochondria could also be a factor linking cancer transformation and progression. The importance of mitochondria in cancer also confirms their involvement in the resistance to treatment. Resistance to treatment of cancer cells can frequently be a reason for glycolysis acceleration. It could be explained by cancer cells' high proliferation index and high energy request. The involvement of mitochondria in metabolic disturbances of several metabolic diseases, including cancers, was reported. These data confirm that cancer induction, as well as cancer progression, could have metabolic roots. The aberrant products observed in prostate cells involved in the Krebs cycle could promote cancer progression. These multiple relationships between alterations on a genetic level translated into disturbances in cellular metabolism and their potential relation with epigenetic control of gene expression make cancerogenesis more complicated and prognoses' success in studies on cancer etiology more distant in time.

  6. Treatments and services for neurodevelopmental disorders on advocacy websites: Information or evaluation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Pietro, Nina C; Whiteley, Louise Emma; Illes, Judy

    2011-01-01

    The Internet has quickly gained popularity as a major source of health-related information, but its impact is unclear. Here, we investigate the extent to which advocacy websites for three neurodevelopmental disorders—cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and fetal alcohol spectrum...... disorder (FASD)—inform stakeholders about treatment options, and discuss the ethical challenges inherent in providing such information online. We identified major advocacy websites for each disorder and assessed website accountability, the number, attributes, and accessibility of treatments described......, and the valence of treatment information. With the exception of FASD websites, we found that advocacy websites provide a plethora of information about a wide variety of readily available products and services. Treatment information is primarily targeted at families and is overwhelmingly encouraging, regardless...

  7. Health advocacy organizations and the pharmaceutical industry: an analysis of disclosure practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Sheila M; Raveis, Victoria H; Friedman, Anne; Rothman, David J

    2011-04-01

    Health advocacy organizations (HAOs) are influential stakeholders in health policy. Although their advocacy tends to closely correspond with the pharmaceutical industry's marketing aims, the financial relationships between HAOs and the pharmaceutical industry have rarely been analyzed. We used Eli Lilly and Company's grant registry to examine its grant-giving policies. We also examined HAO Web sites to determine their grant-disclosure patterns. Only 25% of HAOs that received Lilly grants acknowledged Lilly's contributions on their Web sites, and only 10% acknowledged Lilly as a grant event sponsor. No HAO disclosed the exact amount of a Lilly grant. As highly trusted organizations, HAOs should disclose all corporate grants, including the purpose and the amount. Absent this disclosure, legislators, regulators, and the public cannot evaluate possible conflicts of interest or biases in HAO advocacy.

  8. Parental advocacy styles for special education students during the transition to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Roberta S; Fisher, Lucille T; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Chesla, Catherine A

    2013-10-01

    In an ethnographic study of planning for the transition to adulthood, we explored parental advocacy styles in special education settings for youth and young adults with chronic health conditions and developmental disabilities. Of 61 parents, 43 were satisfied with outcomes in negotiations for school services for their children. We identified three parental advocacy styles for these parents: (a) high-profile parents, who insisted on specific, wide-ranging services for their children that often resulted in conflict with educators; (b) strategic parents, who negotiated for selected goals and were willing to compromise, and (c) grateful-gratifier parents, who formed close relationships with educators and trusted them to make appropriate decisions. Eighteen parents were overwhelmed, burned out, or unfocused, and generally dissatisfied with outcomes of educational planning meetings. Professional efforts to enhance parental advocacy can target development of skills and strategies that have worked for successful negotiators.

  9. Mortality of breast cancer in Taiwan, 1971–2010: Temporal changes and an age–period–cohort analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M.-L.; Hsiao, Y.-H.; Su, S.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    The current paper describes the age, period and cohort effects on breast cancer mortality in Taiwan. Female breast cancer mortality data were collected from the Taiwan death registries for 1971–2010. The annual percentage changes, age- standardised mortality rates (ASMR) and age–period–cohort model were calculated. The mortality rates increased with advancing age groups when fixing the period. The percentage change in the breast cancer mortality rate increased from 54.79% at aged 20–44 years, to 149.78% in those aged 45–64 years (between 1971–75 and 2006–10). The mortality rates in the 45–64 age group increased steadily from 1971 to 1975 and 2006–10. The 1951 birth cohorts (actual birth cohort; 1947–55) showed peak mortalities in both the 50–54 and 45–49 age groups. We found that the 1951 birth cohorts had the greatest mortality risk from breast cancer. This might be attributed to the DDT that was used in large amounts to prevent deaths from malaria in Taiwan. However, future researches require DDT data to evaluate the association between breast cancer and DDT use. PMID:25020211

  10. Mortality of breast cancer in Taiwan, 1971-2010: temporal changes and an age-period-cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M-L; Hsiao, Y-H; Su, S-Y; Chou, M-C; Liaw, Y-P

    2015-01-01

    The current paper describes the age, period and cohort effects on breast cancer mortality in Taiwan. Female breast cancer mortality data were collected from the Taiwan death registries for 1971-2010. The annual percentage changes, age- standardised mortality rates (ASMR) and age-period-cohort model were calculated. The mortality rates increased with advancing age groups when fixing the period. The percentage change in the breast cancer mortality rate increased from 54.79% at aged 20-44 years, to 149.78% in those aged 45-64 years (between 1971-75 and 2006-10). The mortality rates in the 45-64 age group increased steadily from 1971 to 1975 and 2006-10. The 1951 birth cohorts (actual birth cohort; 1947-55) showed peak mortalities in both the 50-54 and 45-49 age groups. We found that the 1951 birth cohorts had the greatest mortality risk from breast cancer. This might be attributed to the DDT that was used in large amounts to prevent deaths from malaria in Taiwan. However, future researches require DDT data to evaluate the association between breast cancer and DDT use.

  11. Implementing Self-Advocacy Training within a Brief Psychoeducational Group to Improve the Academic Motivation of Black Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowden, Angel Riddick

    2009-01-01

    Black adolescents are confronted with ongoing social barriers that affect their academic motivation. School counselors can improve the educational landscape for Black adolescents by employing advocacy competencies in their schools. In this article I describe a brief psychoeducational group that can be used to teach self-advocacy skills to Black…

  12. Does desire for hastened death change in terminally ill cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Marziliano, Allison; Jacobson, Colleen; Sorger, Brooke; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Brescia, Robert; Breitbart, William

    2014-06-01

    Understanding why some terminally ill patients may seek a hastened death (a construct referred to as "desire for hastened death" or DHD) is critical to understanding how to optimize quality of life during an individual's final weeks, months or even years of life. Although a number of predictor variables have emerged in past DHD research, there is a dearth of longitudinal research on how DHD changes over time and what factors might explain such changes. This study examined DHD over time in a sample of terminally ill cancer patients admitted to a palliative care hospital. A random sample of 128 patients completed the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death (SAHD) at two time points approximately 2-4 weeks apart participated. Patients were categorized into one of four trajectories based on their SAHD scores at both time points: low (low DHD at T1 and T2), rising (low DHD at T1 and high DHD at T2), falling (high DHD at T1 and low DHD at T2) and high (high DHD at T1 and T2). Among patients who were low at T1, several variables distinguished between those who developed DHD and those who did not: physical symptom distress, depression symptom severity, hopelessness, spiritual well-being, baseline DHD, and a history of mental health treatment. However, these same medical and clinical variables did not distinguish between the falling and high trajectories. Overall, there appears to be a relatively high frequency of change in DHD, even in the last weeks of life. Interventions designed to target patients who are exhibiting subthreshold DHD and feelings of hopelessness may reduce the occurrence of DHD emerging in this population.

  13. Parental views on pediatric vaccination: the impact of competing advocacy coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kumanan; Barakat, Meredith; Vohra, Sunita; Ritvo, Paul; Boon, Heather

    2008-04-01

    The debate on pediatric vaccination policy has been characterized by the presence of two distinct coalitions: those in favor of current vaccination policies and those expressing concern about these policies. The target of these coalitions is the vaccination decision of parents. To determine their influence, we conducted four focus groups in Toronto, Canada examining parental decision-making concerning pediatric vaccination. Our focus groups consisted of both fathers and mothers and parents who fully vaccinated and those who did not. Using the Advocacy Coalition Framework as an analytic guide, we identified several themes that provided insights into how effective the two coalitions have been in conveying their viewpoints. In general, we identified a variety of levels of belief systems existing amongst parents concerned about vaccination, some more amenable to change than others. We found that the choice to not vaccinate was largely a result of concerns about safety and, to a lesser extent, about lack of effectiveness. These parental views reflected the ability of the coalition concerned about vaccination to challenge parents' trust in traditional public health sources of information. In contrast, the parental decision to vaccinate was due to recognizing the importance of preventing disease and also a consequence of not questioning recommendations from public health and physicians and feeling pressured to because of school policies. Importantly, parents who fully vaccinate appear to have weaker belief systems that are potentially susceptible to change. While current policies appear to be effective in encouraging vaccination, if trust in public health falters, many who currently support vaccination may reevaluate their position. More research needs to be conducted to identify approaches to communicate the risks and benefits of vaccination to parents.

  14. Comment on Cross, Fine, Jones, and Walsh (2012): Do Mental Health Professionals Who Serve on/with Child Advocacy Centers Experience Role Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Cross, Fine, Jones, and Walsh's (2012) article "Mental Health Professionals in Children's Advocacy Centers: Is There Role Conflict?" challenges two recent publications' criticisms that child advocacy centers create role conflict for mental health professionals and explains how child advocacy centers actually work, describing the different roles…

  15. Adaptive radiotherapy for soft tissue changes during helical tomotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duma, M.N.; Kampfer, S.; Winkler, C.; Geinitz, H. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Universitaetsklinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2012-03-15

    The goal of the present study was to assess the frequency and impact of replanning triggered solely by soft tissue changes observed on the daily setup mega-voltage CT (MVCT) in head and neck cancer (H and N) helical tomotherapy (HT). A total of 11 patients underwent adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using MVCT. Preconditions were a soft tissue change > 0.5 cm and a tight mask. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) derived from the initial planning kVCT (inPlan), the recalculated DVHs of the fraction (fx) when replanning was decided (actSit) and the DVHs of the new plan (adaptPlan) were compared. Assessed were the following: maximum dose (D{sub max}), minimum dose (D{sub min}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the planning target volume (PTV) normalized to the prescribed dose; the D{sub mean}/fx to the parotid glands (PG), oral cavity (OC), and larynx (Lx); and the D{sub max}/fx to the spinal cord (SC) in Gy/fx. No patient had palpable soft tissue changes. The median weight loss at the moment of replanning was 2.3 kg. The median PTV D{sub mean} was 100% for inPlan, 103% for actSit, and 100% for adaptPlan. The PTV was always covered by the prescribed dose. A statistically significant increase was noted for all organs at risk (OAR) in the actSit. The D{sub mean} to the Lx, the D{sub mean} to the OC and the D{sub max} to the SC were statistically better in the adaptPlan. No statistically significant improvement was achieved by ART for the PGs. No significant correlations between weight and volume loss or between the volume changes of the organs to each other were observed, except a strong positive correlation of the shrinkage of the PGs ({rho} = + 0.77, p = 0.005). Soft tissue shrinkage without clinical palpable changes will not affect the coverage of the PTV, but translates into a higher delivered dose to the PTV itself and the normal tissue outside the PTV. The gain by ART in individual patients - especially in patients who receive doses close to the tolerance doses of the OAR

  16. Association of cancer history with Alzheimer’s disease onset and structural brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Nicole Holohan Nudelman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies show a reciprocal inverse association between cancer and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The common mechanistic theory for this effect posits that cells have an innate tendency towards apoptotic or survival pathways, translating to increased risk for either neurodegeneration or cancer. However, it has been shown that cancer patients experience cognitive dysfunction pre- and post-treatment as well as alterations in cerebral gray matter density (GMD on MRI. To further investigate these issues, we analyzed the association between cancer history (CA+/- and age of AD onset, and the relationship between GMD and CA+/- status across diagnostic groups in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI cohort study. Data was analyzed from 1609 participants with information on baseline cancer history and AD diagnosis, age of AD onset, and baseline MRI scans. Participants were CA+ (N=503 and CA- (N=1106 diagnosed with AD, mild cognitive impairment, significant memory concerns, and cognitively normal older adults. As in previous studies, CA+ was inversely associated with AD at baseline (P=0.025; interestingly, this effect appears to be driven by non-melanoma skin cancer, the largest cancer category in this study (P=0.001. CA+ was also associated with later age of AD onset (P<0.001, independent of apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4 allele status, and individuals with two prior cancers had later mean age of AD onset than those with one or no prior cancer (P<0.001, suggesting an additive effect. Voxel-based morphometric analysis of GMD showed CA+ had lower GMD in the right superior frontal gyrus compared to CA- across diagnostic groups (Pcrit<0.001, uncorrected; this cluster of lower GMD appeared to be driven by history of invasive cancer types, rather than skin cancer. Thus, while cancer history is associated with a measurable delay in AD onset independent of APOE ε4, the underlying mechanism does not appear to be cancer

  17. Attitude Certainty and Attitudinal Advocacy: The Unique Roles of Clarity and Correctness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Lauren; Tormala, Zakary L

    2015-11-01

    When and why do people advocate on behalf of their attitudes? Past research suggests that attitude certainty is one important determinant. The current research seeks to provide more nuanced insight into this relationship by (a) exploring the unique roles of attitude clarity and attitude correctness, and (b) mapping clarity and correctness onto different forms of advocacy (sharing intentions and persuasion intentions). Across four studies, we find that correctness but not clarity plays an important role in promoting persuasion intentions, whereas both correctness and clarity help shape sharing intentions. Thus, this research unpacks the certainty-advocacy relation and helps identify experimental manipulations that uniquely drive persuasion and sharing intentions.

  18. Embracing Advocacy: How Visible Minority and Dominant Group Beginning Teachers Take Up Issues of Equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Norquay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is from a four-year research project that followed graduates of a teacher education program from teacher certification through their first three years of teaching. It focuses on participants' narratives about their advocacy efforts in both their pre-service practicum placements and their first year as probationary teachers. Our findings indicate that while dominant group white participants chose to advocate from a position of personal conviction (often based on new knowledge of equity issues, the visible minority participants were often summoned by others to advocate. The paper concludes with a discussion about how teacher education might better address advocacy issues, alongside the focus on equity issues.

  19. Reflections on the New Classification of Tumors by the WHO and Changes in Esophageal Cancer in a High-risk Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifeng Chen

    2006-01-01

    In year 2000, a book entitled the Pathology and Genetics of Tumors of the Digestive System was published by the WHO, presenting some new diagnostic criteria and treatment principles. I have analyzed the epidemiologic change of tumors in over 30 years in the high-risk area with esophageal cancer. The following phenomenon was found: accompanied by the sharp decrease in the incidence and mortality of esophageal cancer, there was an increase in the incidence and death rate of stomach cancer involving cardiac cancer. This fact should be considered when analyzing the sharp decrease in esophageal cancer incidence and mortality rate. More attention was given to diagnosis of cardiac cancer; at the same time it is more practical to improve the early screening of cancers. To observe the development of high and lowgrade intraepithelial neoplasms will be an urgent task for esophageal cancer research in the high risk area, according to WHO's new classification.

  20. Age-related changes in the innervation of the prostate gland: implications for prostate cancer initiation and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carl W; Xie, Jin Han; Ventura, Sabatino

    2013-01-01

    The adult prostate gland grows and develops under hormonal control while its physiological functions are controlled by the autonomic nervous system. The prostate gland receives sympathetic input via the hypogastric nerve and parasympathetic input via the pelvic nerve. In addition, the hypogastric and pelvic nerves also provide sensory inputs to the gland. This review provides a summary of the innervation of the adult prostate gland and describes the changes which occur with age and disease. Growth and development of the prostate gland is age dependent as is the occurrence of both benign prostate disease and prostate cancer. In parallel, the activity and influence of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system changes with age. The influence of the sympathetic nervous system on benign prostatic hyperplasia is well documented and this review considers the possibility of a link between changes in autonomic innervation and prostate cancer progression.

  1. The Change and Implication of p16 Protein in CA and Its Cancerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏向阳; 徐广坤; 苏祖兰; 赖维; 陆春

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role and clinical significance of p16 protein in Condyloma Acuminatum (CA) and its cancerization.Methods.. The expression of p16 protein was tested in 33 CA samples and 7 cancerized CA samples by immunohistochemical assays.Results: There was abnormal expression of p16 protein in CA and cancerized CA, mainly major protein expression. The p16 protein expresseed in different locations in different cases was as follows: In basal layer cells in normal cuits; in spinous layer, granular layer and stratum corneum layer cells in CA;in keratin pearl peripheral and spinous layer cells in cancerized CA.Conclusion: There was major expression of p16 protein in CA and cancerized CA, and these protein of the two groups might not naturally be the same. Our study indicated that in clinical practice, when major p16 protein expression in CA occurs, it's risk of cancerization shoud be suspected.

  2. Pathogen-driven gastrointestinal cancers: Time for a change in treatment paradigm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aituov Bauyrzhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The regulation of cancerous tumor development is converged upon by multiple pathways and factors. Besides environmental factors, gastrointestinal (GI tract cancer can be caused by chronic inflammation, which is generally induced by bacteria, viruses, and parasites. The role of these inducers in cancer development, cell differentiation and transformation, cell cycle deregulation, and in the expression of tumor-associated genes cannot be ignored. Although Helicobacter pylori activates many oncogenic pathways, particularly those in gastric and colorectal cancers, the role of viruses in tumor development is also significant. Viruses possess significant oncogenic potential to interfere with normal cell cycle control and genome stability, stimulating the growth of deregulated cells. An increasing amount of recent data also implies the association of GI cancers with bacterial colonization and viruses. This review focuses on host-cell interactions that facilitate primary mechanisms of tumorigenesis and provides new insights into novel GI cancer treatments.

  3. Lung cancer in never smokers: change of a mindset in the molecular era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Joo; Kim, Joo-Hang; Kim, Se Kyu; Ha, Sang-Jun; Mok, Tony S; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Cho, Byoung Chul

    2011-04-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality across the world. Although the majority of lung cancer is attributed to tobacco smoke, approximately 25% of lung cancers worldwide occur in lifelong never smokers. Over the past decades, the bulk of research on this disease suggested that several genetic, environmental, hormonal, and viral factors might increase the risk of lung cancer among never smokers. However, there has been no dominant risk factor whose significance has been validated across racial and ethnic groups. However, this subset of lung cancers has received renewed attention due to the introduction of the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) inhibitors showing the dramatic therapeutic response on selected patients with activating EGFR mutations which occur more commonly in never smokers. The treatment strategy blocking EGFR pathway in EGFR-mutant lung cancer represents a remarkable example of molecular targeted therapies which completely repress tumor by inhibition of driving oncogenes. More recently, a surprising positive effect of an ALK inhibitor on EML4-ALK-positive lung cancer has been suggested that lung cancer in never smokers is likely to be an assemblage of molecularly defined subsets which would be a good candidate for personalized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  4. Changes in heart-rate variability of survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer during Tai Chi Qigong practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Wong, Janet Y H; Chung, Louisa M Y; Yam, Timothy T T; Chung, Joanne W Y; Lee, Y M; Chow, Lina P Y; Luk, W S; Ng, Shamay S M

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To explore the changes in heart-rate variability (HRV) of survivors of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) before, during, and after a Tai Chi (TC) Qigong exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven survivors of NPC participated voluntarily in the study. The heart rate of each participant was measured continuously for 1 minute before the TC Qigong intervention, during the 5-minute TC Qigong intervention, and for 1 minute after the intervention, using a Polar heart-rate monitor. Spectral HRV was expressed in terms of normalised low frequency (LF) power, normalised high frequency (HF) power, and the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) power ratio. [Results] Both the LF-power and the HF-power components had significant time effects. However, the time effect of the LF/HF power ratio was not significant. Post hoc contrast analysis revealed a significant decrease in LF power and a concomitant increase in HF power during the 4th minute and 5th minute of the TC Qigong exercise. [Conclusion] Five minutes of TC Qigong exercise was found to improve HRV by increasing HF power and decreasing LF power, but these effects were transient. TC Qigong might be an appropriate exercise for improving the ANS function and psychological and cardiac health of survivors of NPC.

  5. Fenugreek induced apoptosis in breast cancer MCF-7 cells mediated independently by fas receptor change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Shafi, Gowhar; Hasan, Tarique Noorul; Syed, Naveed Ahmed; Khoja, Kholoud Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Trigonella foenum in graecum (Fenugreek) is a traditional herbal plant used to treat disorders like diabetes, high cholesterol, wounds, inflammation, gastrointestinal ailments, and it is believed to have anti-tumor properties, although the mechanisms for the activity remain to be elucidated. In this study, we prepared a methanol extract from Fenugreek whole plants and investigated the mechanism involved in its growth-inhibitory effect on MCF- 7 human breast cancer cells. Apoptosis of MCF-7 cells was evidenced by investigating trypan blue exclusion, TUNEL and Caspase 3, 8, 9, p53, FADD, Bax and Bak by real-time PCR assays inducing activities, in the presence of FME at 65 μg/mL for 24 and 48 hours. FME induced apoptosis was mediated by the death receptor pathway as demonstrated by the increased level of Fas receptor expression after FME treatment. However, such change was found to be absent in Caspase 3, 8, 9, p53, FADD, Bax and Bak, which was confirmed by a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. In summary, these data demonstrate that at least 90% of FME induced apoptosis in breast cell is mediated by Fas receptor-independently of either FADD, Caspase 8 or 3, as well as p53 interdependently.

  6. Changing incidence of esophageal cancer among white women: analysis of SEER data (1992–2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Rachna; Deorah, Sundeep; McDowell, Bradley D.; Hejleh, Taher Abu; Lynch, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse trends in the incidence rates of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus (ACE and SCC, respectively) in white women between 1992 and 2010. Material and methods We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER program to identify cases of esophageal cancer). Age adjusted incidence rates (IR) were calculated for ACE and SCC for two different time periods (1992–1996 and 2006–2010) and stratified by age, stage, and histologic type. We used joinpoint analysis to detect changes in rates between 1992 and 2010. Results Between the time periods 1992–1996 and 2006–2010, the age-adjusted incidence rates for SCC in white women decreased from 1.2/100,000 to 0.8/100,000 personyears, and for ACE it increased from 0.5/100,000 to 0.7/100,000 personyears. Similar to white men, the increase in the incidence of ACE was consistent for all stages and all age groups in white women. However, it was most pronounced in women aged 45–59 years, where the incidence of ACE (0.9/100,000 person-years) in 2006–2010 exceeded the incidence of SCC (0.6/100,000 person-years). On joinpoint regression analysis, an inflection point was seen in 1999 for ACE, indicating a slower rate of increase for ACE after 1999 (annual percentage change of 8.00 before 1999 vs. 0.88 starting in 1999). Conclusions The incidence of ACE is increasing in white women, irrespective of age or stage. Indeed, ACE is now more common than SCC in white women between 45 and 59 years of age. PMID:26557784

  7. Evaluating a Human Rights-Based Advocacy Approach to Expanding Access to Pain Medicines and Palliative Care: Global Advocacy and Case Studies from India, Kenya, and Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Diederik; Amon, Joseph J

    2015-12-10

    Palliative care has been defined as care that is person-centered and attentive to physical symptoms and psychological, social, and existential distress in patients with severe or life-threatening illness. The identification of access to palliative care and pain treatment as a human rights issue first emerged among palliative care advocates, physicians, and lawyers in the 1990s, with a basis in the right to health and the right to be free from cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment. Using a case study approach, we evaluate the results of a human rights-based advocacy approach on access to pain medicine and palliative care in India, Kenya, and Ukraine. In each country, human rights advocacy helped raise awareness of the issue, identify structural barriers to care, define government obligations, and contribute to the reform of laws, policies, and practices impeding the availability of palliative care services. In addition, advocacy efforts stimulated civil society engagement and high-level political leadership that fostered the implementation of human rights-based palliative care programs. Globally, access to palliative care was increasingly recognized by human rights bodies and within global health and drug policy organizations as a government obligation central to the right to health.

  8. Rapid Changes in Circulating Tumor DNA in Serially Sampled Plasma During Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Amemiya, Kenji; Nakada, Haruka; Inoue, Masayuki; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Oyama, Toshio; Omata, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 45 Final Diagnosis: Breast cancer Symptoms: Breast tumor Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Analysis of circulating tumor DNA Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: The analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is expected to be a modality to determine the status of cancer in real time. This case indicated utilities and issues in measuring the ctDNA in cancer patients. Case Report: A 45-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer was treated with bevacizumab and paclitaxel. The lung metastases were decreased but the meningitis carcinoma developed rapidly and she died. During the treatment with bevacizumab and paclitaxel, blood samples were taken serially and ctDNA was analyzed using a next-generation sequencer. TP53 frameshift mutation (TP53; p.Arg158fs with 7 nucleotides deletion) was identified in the tumor, and dynamic change in this mutation in ctDNA was observed in serially sampled plasma in this patient. We observed a rapid decrease of TP53 mutation at the beginning of treatment, then it increased as a sign of relapse. However, the high allelic fraction value of TP53 mutation was not consistent during the progression of cancer, suggesting that several factors affected the value of ctDNA. Conclusions: Although this is a single-case experience, it strongly suggests ctDNA could be a modality to determine the cancer status in real time. However, we found that several factors affected the value of ctDNA. Further investigations are needed to reveal the significance of these very high-sensitivity changes. PMID:28065930

  9. [Changes in genotype prevalence of human papillomavirus over 10-year follow-up of a cervical cancer screening cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L; Hu, S Y; Zhang, Q; Feng, R M; Zhang, L; Zhao, X L; Ma, J F; Shi, S D; Zhang, X; Pan, Q J; Zhang, W H; Qiao, Y L; Zhao, F H

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic variation of genotypes distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) over 10-year follow-up in a cervical cancer screening cohort. Methods: Based on the Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Study Ⅰ cohort, we detected HPV genotypes on the well-preserved exfoliated cervical cells from women who were tested HPV positive from year 2005 to year 2014 using reverse linear probe hybridization assay. The changes of prevalence of type-specific HPV over time among the overall population were estimated using linear mixed models. The association between the type-specific HPV and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2 +) was calculated by linear Chi-square test. Finally, the trends of multiple infections of HPV with the increase of the age were analyzed. Results: During the cervical cancer screening of the overall population from 2005 to 2014, the most common genotypes among the population were HPV16 and 52. The prevalence of HPV16 decreased over time from 4.6% in 2005 to 2.2% in 2010 and 2014 (F=8.125, Pcervical cancer screening in the context of regular screening combining with immediate treatment for those CIN2 + women. HPV16 prevalence significantly decreased over time, which indicated that the variation of type-specific HPV prevalence should be considered when regular cervical cancer screening was organized using HPV technique.

  10. Association between changing mortality of digestive tract cancers and water pollution: a case study in the Huai River Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongyan; Wan, Xia; Yang, Fei; Shi, Xiaoming; Xu, Jianwei; Zhuang, Dafang; Yang, Gonghuan

    2014-12-23

    The relationship between the ever-increasing cancer mortality and water pollution is an important public concern in China. This study aimed to explore the association between serious water pollution and increasing digestive cancer mortality in the Huai River Basin (HRB) in China. A series of frequency of serious pollution (FSP) indices including water quality grade (FSPWQG), biochemical oxygen demand (FSPBOD), chemical oxygen demand (FSPCOD), and ammonia nitrogen (FSPAN) were used to characterize the surface water quality between 1997 and 2006. Data on the county-level changing mortality (CM) due to digestive tract cancers between 1975 and 2006 were collected for 14 counties in the study area. Most of investigated counties (eight) with high FSPWQG (>50%) distributed in the northern region of the HRB and had larger CMs of digestive tract cancers. In addition to their similar spatial distribution, significant correlations between FSP indices and CMs were observed by controlling for drinking water safety (DWS), gross domestic product (GDP), and population (POP). Furthermore, the above-mentioned partial correlations were clearly increased when only controlling for GDP and POP. Our study indicated that county-level variations of digestive cancer mortality are remarkably associated with water pollution, and suggested that continuous measures for improving surface water quality and DWS and hygienic interventions should be effectively implemented by local governments.

  11. Coffee Polyphenols Change the Expression of STAT5B and ATF-2 Modifying Cyclin D1 Levels in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlota Oleaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Epidemiological studies suggest that coffee consumption reduces the risk of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms of its chemopreventive effects remain unknown. Objective. To identify differentially expressed genes upon incubation of HT29 colon cancer cells with instant caffeinated coffee (ICC or caffeic acid (CA using whole-genome microarrays. Results. ICC incubation of HT29 cells caused the overexpression of 57 genes and the underexpression of 161, while CA incubation induced the overexpression of 12 genes and the underexpression of 32. Using Venn-Diagrams, we built a list of five overexpressed genes and twelve underexpressed genes in common between the two experimental conditions. This list was used to generate a biological association network in which STAT5B and ATF-2 appeared as highly interconnected nodes. STAT5B overexpression was confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. For ATF-2, the changes in mRNA levels were confirmed for both ICC and CA, whereas the decrease in protein levels was only observed in CA-treated cells. The levels of cyclin D1, a target gene for both STAT5B and ATF-2, were downregulated by CA in colon cancer cells and by ICC and CA in breast cancer cells. Conclusions. Coffee polyphenols are able to affect cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells through the modulation of STAT5B and ATF-2.

  12. Changes in cerebral blood flow and anxiety associated with an 8-week mindfulness programme in women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Daniel A; Kash, Kathryn M; Kunkel, Elisabeth J S; Brainard, George; Wintering, Nancy; Moss, Aleezé S; Rao, Hengyi; Zhu, Senhua; Newberg, Andrew B

    2012-12-01

    This study employed functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) associated with the Mindfulness-based Art Therapy (MBAT) programme and correlate such changes to stress and anxiety in women with breast cancer. Eighteen breast cancer patients were randomized to the MBAT or education control group. The patients received the diagnosis of breast cancer between 6 months and 3 years prior to enrollment and were not in active treatment. The age of participants ranged from 52 to 77 years. A voxel-based analysis was performed to assess differences at rest, during meditation and during a stress task. The anxiety sub-scale of the Symptoms Checklist-90-Revised was compared with changes in resting CBF before and after the programmes. Subjects in the MBAT arm demonstrated significant increases in CBF at rest and during meditation in multiple limbic regions, including the left insula, right amygdala, right hippocampus and bilateral caudate. Patients in the MBAT programme also had a significant correlation between increased CBF in the left caudate and decreased anxiety scores. In the MBAT group, responses to a stressful cue resulted in reduced activation of the posterior cingulate. The results demonstrate that the MBAT programme was associated with significant changes in CBF, which correlated with decreased anxiety over an 8-week period.

  13. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations.

  14. PET/CT may change diagnosis and treatment in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Mie Jung; Høilund-Carlsen, Mette;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The national focus on cancer has propelled the use of PET/CT for cancer imaging in Denmark. We believe that first-year experiences from a large PET centre may be of interest to new users. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from all scans made in the period from February 28 2006 to March 1...

  15. Changes in body weight during various types of chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Beijer, S.; Lieshout, van R.; Barneveld, van D.; Hofstede, ter J.; Kampman, E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Weight gain is a common problem for breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. It increases the risk of several comorbidities and possibly cancer recurrence. We assessed whether weight gain depends on the type of chemotherapy. Methods In a retrospective study among 739 b

  16. Breast cancer: mechanisms involved in action of phytoestrogens and epigenetic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdemir, Aslihan; Durif, Julie; Ngollo, Marjolaine; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we consider phytoestrogens and different epigenetic modifications in breast cancer. Epigenetic phenomena are mediated by several molecular mechanisms comprising histone modifications, small non-coding or anti-sense RNA and DNA methylation. These different modifications are closely interrelated. De-regulation of gene expression is a hallmark of cancer. Although genetic lesions have been the focus of cancer research for many years, it has become increasingly recognized that aberrant epigenetic modifications also play major roles in breast carcinogenesis. The incidence and mortality rates of breast cancer are high in the Western world compared with countries in Asia. There are also differences in the breast cancer incidence rates in different Western countries. This could be related to phytoestrogens.

  17. Urodele p53 tolerates amino acid changes found in p53 variants linked to human cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villiard Éric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urodele amphibians like the axolotl are unique among vertebrates in their ability to regenerate and their resistance to develop cancers. It is unknown whether these traits are linked at the molecular level. Results Blocking p53 signaling in axolotls using the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, inhibited limb regeneration and the expression of p53 target genes such as Mdm2 and Gadd45, suggesting a link between tumor suppression and regeneration. To understand this relationship we cloned the p53 gene from axolotl. When comparing its sequence with p53 from other organisms, and more specifically human we observed multiple amino acids changes found in human tumors. Phylogenetic analysis of p53 protein sequences from various species is in general agreement with standard vertebrate phylogeny; however, both mice-like rodents and teleost fishes are fast evolving. This leads to long branch attraction resulting in an artefactual basal emergence of these groups in the phylogenetic tree. It is tempting to assume a correlation between certain life style traits (e.g. lifespan and the evolutionary rate of the corresponding p53 sequences. Functional assays of the axolotl p53 in human or axolotl cells using p53 promoter reporters demonstrated a temperature sensitivity (ts, which was further confirmed by performing colony assays at 37°C. In addition, axolotl p53 was capable of efficient transactivation at the Hmd2 promoter but has moderate activity at the p21 promoter. Endogenous axolotl p53 was activated following UV irradiation (100 j/m2 or treatment with an alkylating agent as measured using serine 15 phosphorylation and the expression of the endogenous p53 target Gadd45. Conclusion Urodele p53 may play a role in regeneration and has evolved to contain multiple amino acid changes predicted to render the human protein defective in tumor suppression. Some of these mutations were probably selected to maintain p53 activity at low temperature. However

  18. Mental health as an advocacy priority in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Anand

    2014-05-01

    This column reviews the evolution of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) mental health advocacy in relation to modern mental health advocacy efforts. In addition to developments in organized psychiatry (e.g., American Psychiatric Association's LGBT caucus), grassroots LGBT community initiatives are playing an important role (e.g., Trevor Project providing crisis intervention/suicide prevention services to LGBT youth, face-to-face mental health services in LGBT community centers). Studies have found that LGBT individuals are at increased risk for mental health problems (e.g., depression, anxiety, substance misuse, suicidal ideation, self-harm). Mental health advocacy in the LGBT community has been slowed by the long-standing association of the concept of homosexuality with psychopathology in mainstream psychiatry (e.g., homosexuality was only removed from the DSM in 1973, ego dystonic homosexuality still appears in the ICD-10). However, positive developments in LGBT mental health advocacy have been fostered by the proposed minority stress model (i.e., that elevated risk of mental illness in LGBT individuals is a consequence of a hostile stressful environment). A particularly encouraging initiative is the It Gets Better Project, in which thousands of videos, some by prominent individuals, have been posted online to send a message of hope to LGBT youth facing harassment and low self-esteem.

  19. Latcrit Educational Leadership and Advocacy: Struggling over Whiteness as Property in Texas School Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Enrique, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author seeks to re-imagine the political and policy roles of educational leaders of color, offering an alternative method for educational leadership, advocacy, and policy analysis. The author uses critical race theory (CRT) and Latina/o critical (LatCrit) theory to problematize the way politically-active Mexican American…

  20. The Role of Policy Advocacy in Assuring Comprehensive Family Life Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindis, Claire D.; Geierstanger, Sara P.; Faxio, Adrienne

    2009-01-01

    As part of their 10-year $60 million Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Initiative, The California Wellness Foundation funded 18 state and local organizations to conduct policy advocacy to strengthen teen pregnancy prevention policies. This article describes how some of these grantees accomplished noteworthy goals, including the passage of the…

  1. The "Gay Comfort Level": Examining a Media Advocacy Group's Efforts to Combat Youth Homophobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachgal, Tara M.

    2011-01-01

    This article scrutinizes the efforts of a media advocacy group to redress the stigma of youth homosexuality among United States youth: a report published in 2003 by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation called, "How Youth Media Can Help Combat Homophobia Among American Teenagers." The report, authored by Rodger Streitmatter, concluded…

  2. 45 CFR 1321.61 - Advocacy responsibilities of the area agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advocacy responsibilities of the area agency. 1321.61 Section 1321.61 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN... PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING Area Agency Responsibilities § 1321.61...

  3. Empowering Smallholder Farmers in Markets: strengthening the advocacy capacities of national farmer organisations through collaborative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, G.; Grip, de K.; Lançon, F.; Onumah, G.; Proctor, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    The Empowering Smallholder Farmers in Markets programme (ESFIM) supported the advocacy capacities of national farmer organisations (NFOs) for improving smallholder market access. The programme gave NFOs in 11 countries the opportunity to contract local experts to strengthen the evidence-base of thei

  4. Resource Training Manual for Family Advocacy Case Management with Adolescents with Emotional Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnau, John; And Others

    This training manual for social work practitioners is based on the Family Advocacy Model of Case Management, which states that case management with adolescents contains two important elements: work with the adolescent and work with those responsible for his/her care. This manual deals with the first of two elements and is designed to be used in…

  5. A Content and Methodological Review of Self-Advocacy Intervention Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; Brewer, Denise M.; Wood, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    A content and methodological review of the literature of 25 self-advocacy intervention studies was conducted. First, each article was analyzed in terms of purpose, participants, design, dependent variable(s), independent variable(s), and results. Second, each manuscript was reviewed in terms of the quality indicators for single subject (n = 11),…

  6. Educational Advocacy among Adoptive Parents of Adolescents with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Cheryll Ann; Stodel, Emma J.; Fullarton, Stephanie; Hagglund, Karras

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the educational advocacy experiences of 36 adoptive parents of adolescents and young adults with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The participants responded to a questionnaire and 29 of them also engaged in an in-depth individual interview. Data were analysed inductively. Emerging from…

  7. Narrating, Writing, Reading: Life Story Work as an Aid to (Self) Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meininger, Herman P.

    2006-01-01

    This article is about life story work with people with learning disabilities. It talks about reading and writing stories, and listening to them. Telling your life story, writing it down and talking about it with others can be an important part of self-advocacy for people with learning disabilities. Life stories are helpful when they are told or…

  8. Knowledge of Advocacy Options within Services for People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Claudia Da Silva; Willner, Paul; Brown, Amanda; Jenkins, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent to which care managers in learning disability services understand the role of the Independent Mental Capacity Advocate (IMCA) service, and the difference between the newly created statutory IMCA and existing general advocacy (GA) services. Method: There were 22 participants from three…

  9. Specialist Advocacy Services for Parents with Learning Disabilities Involved in Child Protection Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarleton, Beth

    2008-01-01

    Parents with learning disabilities frequently become involved with child protection and judicial proceedings. Parents report not understanding and being disempowered by the child protection system. This paper presents fourteen parents' views regarding how two specialist advocacy services supported them during child protection. The parents believed…

  10. Arts Education Advocacy: The Relative Effects of School-Level Influences on Resources for Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksza, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate advocacy influences that may impact school arts programs using data from the 2009-10 National Center for Education Statistics elementary and secondary school surveys on arts education. Regression models were employed to assess the relative effectiveness of variables representing community support,…

  11. Humanism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism: Essential Elements of Social Justice in Counseling, Education, and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the association between and among humanism, feminism, multiculturalism, and social justice in counseling, education, and advocacy. In so doing, it shows how these theoretical forces, individually and collectively, are essential to professional counseling, client welfare, education, and the promotion of social justice. The…

  12. Interpersonal Violence as Social Construction: The Potentially Undermining Role of Claims Making and Advocacy Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Robin D.; Miller-Perrin, Cindy L.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between empirical research inquiry and advocacy efforts is complex and seldom addressed in the interpersonal violence literature. In this article, we first examine how social conditions come to be seen as social problems, using a social constructionist perspective. Next, we focus specifically on the problem of interpersonal…

  13. Facilitating Trainees' Multicultural Development and Social Justice Advocacy through a Refugee/Immigrant Mental Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Schale, Codi L.; Khamphakdy-Brown, Supavan

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explored trainees' experiences in an outreach program for refugee/immigrant women to examine if those experiences facilitated the development of multicultural competency and social justice advocacy. Twelve students were interviewed, and their responses yielded 3 categories: development of cultural knowledge,…

  14. Using Social Network Analysis to Predict Early Collaboration within Health Advocacy Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Todd C.; Strong, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Within coalitions of consumer advocates formed to advance health insurance coverage expansions, engaging in united advocacy activities soon after formation might be an important precursor to attaining coalition effectiveness in shaping policy. In this article, the authors apply social network analysis (SNA) to examine how organizational…

  15. Challenging the Sports-Industrial Complex: Human Sciences, Advocacy and Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This article is an attempt to provide an alternative view of sports science and future sport worlds. For reasons to do with fundamental science, involved advocacy and committed service, and in a period of intensified globalization, it is necessary to reconfigure the nature and scope of teaching and research within the subdiscipline of sports…

  16. The Personal Is Political: School Counselors' Use of Self in Social Justice Advocacy Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Eleanor H.; Singh, Anneliese A.; Urbano, Alessandra; Haston, Meg

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the aspects of "self" school counselors (N = 16) described as central to advocating for social justice in their school systems. Using grounded theory, this study explored racial, feminist, and advocacy identity development in relation to the personhood of the counselor, and how these elements coalesced around action…

  17. Issues Supervising Family Violence Cases: Advocacy, Ethical Documentation, and Supervisees' Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Dawn L.

    2010-01-01

    Selected clinical and ethical issues associated with providing supervision involving family violence cases are outlined. It is argued that supervisees helping clients with trauma histories require skills beyond learning how to process the trauma with their clients. Advocacy, social action, and coordinating case conferences are some of the…

  18. A legal and empirical investigation into the direct selling industry’s advocacy in the EU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tokaji-Nagy, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation is made up of legal and empirical research into the direct selling industry’s advocacy in the European Union. In the context of the European pluralistic democracy or, somewhat pejoratively, the Brussels “lobbyocracy”, the thesis intends to increase lobbying transparency by mapping

  19. Beyond Study Abroad: A Human Rights Delegation to Teach Policy Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammonley, Denise; Rotabi, Karen Smith; Forte, Janett; Martin, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Advancement of human rights is a core competency in the social work curriculum. Presented is a model to teach policy practice from a human rights perspective based on a violence-against-women delegation visit to Guatemala. Postdelegation policy advocacy responses included White House and State Department briefings on the problems, including…

  20. Make Some Noise: A Research-Driven, Performance-Based Approach to Teaching Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Kadi; Harris, Jean L.

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a research-driven, performance-based approach to teaching advocacy in a school health education online or hybrid course, as well as providing guidance on how to adapt to a face-to-face environment. The project is designed for pre-service school health education students at the college/university level. The primary benefit of…