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Sample records for cancer absolutely normal

  1. Cosmic backgrounds of relic gravitons and their absolute normalization

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Provided the consistency relations are not violated, the recent Bicep2 observations pin down the absolute normalization, the spectral slope and the maximal frequency of the cosmic graviton background produced during inflation. The properly normalized spectra are hereby computed from the lowest frequencies (of the order of the present Hubble rate) up to the highest frequency range in the GHz region. Deviations from the conventional paradigm cannot be excluded and are examined by allowing for different physical possibilities including, in particular, a running of the tensor spectral index, an explicit breaking of the consistency relations and a spike in the high-frequency tail of the spectrum coming either from a post-inflationary phase dominated by a stiff fluid of from the contribution of waterfall fields in a hybrid inflationary context. The direct determinations of the tensor to scalar ratio at low frequencies, if confirmed by the forthcoming observations, will also affect and constrain the high-frequencies...

  2. Absolute lymphocyte count predicts the response to new H1N1 vaccination in pediatric cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mavinkurve-Groothuis, A.M.C.; Flier, M. van der; Stelma, F.F.; Leer-Buter, C.C. van; Preijers, F.W.M.B.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We measured the vaccination response to the new H1N1 in relation to lymphocyte count prior to vaccination in pediatric cancer patients. Absolute lymphocyte count above the lower normal limits (LNL) for age prior to vaccination predicts the response to influenza vaccination in pediatric cancer

  3. BACOM2.0 facilitates absolute normalization and quantification of somatic copy number alterations in heterogeneous tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yi; Yu, Guoqiang; Levine, Douglas A.; Wang, Niya; Shih, Ie-Ming; Zhang, Zhen; Clarke, Robert; Wang, Yue

    2015-09-01

    Most published copy number datasets on solid tumors were obtained from specimens comprised of mixed cell populations, for which the varying tumor-stroma proportions are unknown or unreported. The inability to correct for signal mixing represents a major limitation on the use of these datasets for subsequent analyses, such as discerning deletion types or detecting driver aberrations. We describe the BACOM2.0 method with enhanced accuracy and functionality to normalize copy number signals, detect deletion types, estimate tumor purity, quantify true copy numbers, and calculate average-ploidy value. While BACOM has been validated and used with promising results, subsequent BACOM analysis of the TCGA ovarian cancer dataset found that the estimated average tumor purity was lower than expected. In this report, we first show that this lowered estimate of tumor purity is the combined result of imprecise signal normalization and parameter estimation. Then, we describe effective allele-specific absolute normalization and quantification methods that can enhance BACOM applications in many biological contexts while in the presence of various confounders. Finally, we discuss the advantages of BACOM in relation to alternative approaches. Here we detail this revised computational approach, BACOM2.0, and validate its performance in real and simulated datasets.

  4. Absolute lymphocyte count is associated with survival in ovarian cancer independent of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Katy; Alexander, Cheryl; Webb, John R; Sun, Winnie; Dillon, Kristy; Kalloger, Steve E; Gilks, C Blake; Clarke, Blaise; Köbel, Martin; Nelson, Brad H

    2012-02-27

    The immune system strongly influences outcome in patients with ovarian cancer. In particular, the absolute lymphocyte count in peripheral blood (ALC) and the presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) have each been associated with favourable prognosis. However, the mechanistic relationships between ALC, TIL and prognosis are poorly understood. We hypothesized that high ALC values might be associated with stronger tumor immunity as manifested by increased TIL, decreased tumor burden and longer survival. ALC values were collected from patient records ≥ 2 years before, during or after primary treatment for high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). Lymphocyte subsets were assessed in peripheral blood by flow cytometry. CD8+ and CD20+ TIL were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Overall, patients had normal ALC values two or more years prior to diagnosis of HGSC. These values were not predictive of disease severity or survival upon subsequent development of HGSC. Rather, ALC declined upon development of HGSC in proportion to disease burden. This decline involved all lymphocyte subsets. ALC increased following surgery, remained stable during chemotherapy, but rarely recovered to pre-diagnostic levels. ALC values recorded at diagnosis did not correlate with CD8+ or CD20+ TIL but were associated with progression-free survival. Patients with high intrinsic ALC values show no clinical or survival advantage upon subsequent development of HGSC. ALC values at diagnosis are prognostic due to an association with disease burden rather than TIL. Therapeutic enhancement of ALC may be necessary but not sufficient to improve survival in HGSC.

  5. OCT angiography by absolute intensity difference applied to normal and diseased human retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruminski, Daniel; Sikorski, Bartosz L.; Bukowska, Danuta; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Krawiec, Krzysztof; Malukiewicz, Grazyna; Bieganowski, Lech; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    We compare four optical coherence tomography techniques for noninvasive visualization of microcapillary network in the human retina and murine cortex. We perform phantom studies to investigate contrast-to-noise ratio for angiographic images obtained with each of the algorithm. We show that the computationally simplest absolute intensity difference angiographic OCT algorithm that bases only on two cross-sectional intensity images may be successfully used in clinical study of healthy eyes and eyes with diabetic maculopathy and branch retinal vein occlusion. PMID:26309740

  6. Normal incidence spectrophotometer using high density transmission grating technology and highly efficiency silicon photodiodes for absolute solar EUV irradiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Korde, R.

    1992-01-01

    New developments in transmission grating and photodiode technology now make it possible to realize spectrometers in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (wavelengths less than 1000 A) which are expected to be virtually constant in their diffraction and detector properties. Time dependent effects associated with reflection gratings are eliminated through the use of free standing transmission gratings. These gratings together with recently developed and highly stable EUV photodiodes have been utilized to construct a highly stable normal incidence spectrophotometer to monitor the variability and absolute intensity of the solar 304 A line. Owing to its low weight and compactness, such a spectrometer will be a valuable tool for providing absolute solar irradiance throughout the EUV. This novel instrument will also be useful for cross-calibrating other EUV flight instruments and will be flown on a series of Hitchhiker Shuttle Flights and on SOHO. A preliminary version of this instrument has been fabricated and characterized, and the results are described.

  7. Greater absolute risk for all subtypes of breast cancer in the US than Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Hisani N; Beena Devi, C R; Sung, Hyuna; Tang, Tieng Swee; Rosenberg, Philip S; Hewitt, Stephen M; Sherman, Mark E; Anderson, William F; Yang, Xiaohong R

    2015-01-01

    Hormone receptor (HR) negative breast cancers are relatively more common in low-risk than high-risk countries and/or populations. However, the absolute variations between these different populations are not well established given the limited number of cancer registries with incidence rate data by breast cancer subtype. We, therefore, used two unique population-based resources with molecular data to compare incidence rates for the 'intrinsic' breast cancer subtypes between a low-risk Asian population in Malaysia and high-risk non-Hispanic white population in the National Cancer Institute's surveillance, epidemiology, and end results 18 registries database (SEER 18). The intrinsic breast cancer subtypes were recapitulated with the joint expression of the HRs (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). Invasive breast cancer incidence rates overall were fivefold greater in SEER 18 than in Malaysia. The majority of breast cancers were HR-positive in SEER 18 and HR-negative in Malaysia. Notwithstanding the greater relative distribution for HR-negative cancers in Malaysia, there was a greater absolute risk for all subtypes in SEER 18; incidence rates were nearly 7-fold higher for HR-positive and 2-fold higher for HR-negative cancers in SEER 18. Despite the well-established relative breast cancer differences between low-risk and high-risk countries and/or populations, there was a greater absolute risk for HR-positive and HR-negative subtypes in the US than Malaysia. Additional analytical studies are sorely needed to determine the factors responsible for the elevated risk of all subtypes of breast cancer in high-risk countries like the United States.

  8. "Unremarkable" recoveries: normalizing adversity and cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, Moira; Schlitz, Marilyn Jean; Lewis, Nola

    2002-02-01

    Much of the existing popular literature suggests that survival from life-threatening diseases encourages a process of self-transformation. Seventeen long-term survivors of metastatic cancer were interviewed about the impact of a life-threatening condition on their life stories. Contrary to the existing literature, which suggests such an event greatly transforms the individual, nearly all of those interviewed for this study framed their unusual recoveries as being largely unremarkable. Traditional North American cultural values, which normalize adversity, appear to bolster the participants' beliefs that one can have control over one's health and can even resist a recurrence of cancer.

  9. Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen at 1.25 Atmospheres Absolute with Normal Air on Macrophage Number and Infiltration during Rat Skeletal Muscle Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on ...

  10. Projecting Individualized Absolute Invasive Breast Cancer Risk in US Hispanic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banegas, Matthew P; John, Esther M; Slattery, Martha L; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; Yu, Mandi; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Pee, David; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Hines, Lisa M; Thompson, Cynthia A; Gail, Mitchell H

    2017-02-01

    There is no model to estimate absolute invasive breast cancer risk for Hispanic women. The San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study (SFBCS) provided data on Hispanic breast cancer case patients (533 US-born, 553 foreign-born) and control participants (464 US-born, 947 foreign-born). These data yielded estimates of relative risk (RR) and attributable risk (AR) separately for US-born and foreign-born women. Nativity-specific absolute risks were estimated by combining RR and AR information with nativity-specific invasive breast cancer incidence and competing mortality rates from the California Cancer Registry and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to develop the Hispanic risk model (HRM). In independent data, we assessed model calibration through observed/expected (O/E) ratios, and we estimated discriminatory accuracy with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) statistic. The US-born HRM included age at first full-term pregnancy, biopsy for benign breast disease, and family history of breast cancer; the foreign-born HRM also included age at menarche. The HRM estimated lower risks than the National Cancer Institute's Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT) for US-born Hispanic women, but higher risks in foreign-born women. In independent data from the Women's Health Initiative, the HRM was well calibrated for US-born women (observed/expected [O/E] ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81 to 1.40), but seemed to overestimate risk in foreign-born women (O/E ratio = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.41 to 1.07). The AUC was 0.564 (95% CI = 0.485 to 0.644) for US-born and 0.625 (95% CI = 0.487 to 0.764) for foreign-born women. The HRM is the first absolute risk model that is based entirely on data specific to Hispanic women by nativity. Further studies in Hispanic women are warranted to evaluate its validity. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the

  11. Assessing absolute changes in breast cancer risk due to modifiable risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quante, Anne S; Herz, Julia; Whittemore, Alice S; Fischer, Christine; Strauch, Konstantin; Terry, Mary Beth

    2015-07-01

    Clinical risk assessment involves absolute risk measures, but information on modifying risk and preventing cancer is often communicated in relative terms. To illustrate the potential impact of risk factor modification in model-based risk assessment, we evaluated the performance of the IBIS Breast Cancer Risk Evaluation Tool, with and without current body mass index (BMI), for predicting future breast cancer occurrence in a prospective cohort of 665 postmenopausal women. Overall, IBIS's accuracy (overall agreement between observed and assigned risks) and discrimination (AUC concordance between assigned risks and outcomes) were similar with and without the BMI information. However, in women with BMI > 25 kg/m(2), adding BMI information improved discrimination (AUC = 63.9 % and 61.4 % with and without BMI, P risk difference for a woman with high (27 kg/m(2)) versus low (21 kg/m(2)) BMI was only 0.3 % for a woman with neither affected first-degree relatives nor BRCA1 mutation, compared to 4.5 % for a mutation carrier with three such relatives. This contrast illustrates the value of using information on modifiable risk factors in risk assessment and in sharing information with patients of their absolute risks with and without modifiable risk factors.

  12. In vivo preclinical cancer and tissue engineering applications of absolute oxygen imaging using pulse EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Boris; Kotecha, Mrignayani; Halpern, Howard J.

    2017-07-01

    The value of any measurement and a fortiori any measurement technology is defined by the reproducibility and the accuracy of the measurements. This implies a relative freedom of the measurement from factors confounding its accuracy. In the past, one of the reasons for the loss of focus on the importance of imaging oxygen in vivo was the difficulty in obtaining reproducible oxygen or pO2 images free from confounding variation. This review will briefly consider principles of electron paramagnetic oxygen imaging and describe how it achieves absolute oxygen measurements. We will provide a summary review of the progress in biomedical EPR imaging, predominantly in cancer biology research, discuss EPR oxygen imaging for cancer treatment and tissue graft assessment for regenerative medicine applications.

  13. Interval breast cancers: Absolute and proportional incidence and blinded review in a community mammographic screening program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonaro, Luca A., E-mail: luca.carbonaro@gmail.com [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Azzarone, Antonio [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Paskeh, Bijan Babaei [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Brambilla, Giorgio [Dipartimento di Radiologia, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano (Mi) 20089 (Italy); Brunelli, Silvia [Centro di Prevenzione Senologica, ULSS 20, Piazza Lambranzi, Verona 37034 (Italy); Calori, Anna [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Caumo, Francesca [Centro di Prevenzione Senologica, ULSS 20, Piazza Lambranzi, Verona 37034 (Italy); Malerba, Paolo [Dipartimento di Radiologia, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano (Mi) 20089 (Italy); Menicagli, Laura [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca M. [Unità di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza E. Malan 2, San Donato Milanese (Mi) 20097 (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Vadalà, Giuseppe [Servizio di Radiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Circolo di Melegnano, Via Pandina 1, Vizzolo Predabissi (Mi) 20070 (Italy); Brambilla, Gelma; Fantini, Luigi [Servizio di Medicina Preventiva delle Comunità, ASL Milano 2, Via Friuli 2, Lacchiarella (Mi) 20084 (Italy); Ciatto, Stefano [Screening Program, ULSS 16, Padova (Italy); and others

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the first years since the beginning of a mammographic population-based screening program. Materials and methods: Women aged 49–69 were invited biennially for two-view film-screen mammography and double reading without arbitration was performed. Interval cancers (ICs) from 2001 to 2006 were identified using screening archives, local pathology archives, and hospital discharge records. The proportional incidence of IC was determined considering breast cancers expected without screening. Three offsite radiologists experienced in breast cancer screening blindly evaluated mammograms prior to diagnosis, randomly mixed with negative mammograms (1:2 ratio). Cases unrecalled at review were considered as true ICs, those recalled by only one reviewer as minimal signs, and those recalled by two or three reviewers as missed cancers. T and N stage of the reviewed ICs were evaluated and compared. Results: A total of 86,276 first level mammograms were performed. Mean recall rate was 6.8% at first and 4.6% at repeat screening. We had 476 screen-detected cancers and 145 ICs (10 of them ductal carcinomas in situ). Absolute incidence was 17 per 10,000 screening examinations. Invasive proportional incidence was 19% (44/234) in the first year, 39% (91/234) in the second year, and 29% (135/468) in the two-year interval. Of 145 ICs, 130 (90%) were reviewed mixed with 287 negative controls: 55% (71/130) resulted to be true ICs, 24% (31/130) minimal signs, and 22% (28/130) missed cancers. The rate of ICs diagnosed in the first year interval was 21% (15/71) for true ICs, 46% (13/28) for missed cancers, and 39% (12/31) for minimal signs, with a significant difference of true ICs rate compared to missed cancers rate (p = 0.012). A higher rate of T3 and T4 stages was found for missed cancers (18%, 5/28) compared to minimal signs (6%, 2/31) or true ICs (8%, 6/71), while the rate of N2 and N3 stage for both minimal signs (19%, 6/31) or missed cancers (25

  14. Interval breast cancers: absolute and proportional incidence and blinded review in a community mammographic screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Luca A; Azzarone, Antonio; Paskeh, Bijan Babaei; Brambilla, Giorgio; Brunelli, Silvia; Calori, Anna; Caumo, Francesca; Malerba, Paolo; Menicagli, Laura; Sconfienza, Luca M; Vadalà, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Gelma; Fantini, Luigi; Ciatto, Stefano; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the performance of the first years since the beginning of a mammographic population-based screening program. Women aged 49-69 were invited biennially for two-view film-screen mammography and double reading without arbitration was performed. Interval cancers (ICs) from 2001 to 2006 were identified using screening archives, local pathology archives, and hospital discharge records. The proportional incidence of IC was determined considering breast cancers expected without screening. Three offsite radiologists experienced in breast cancer screening blindly evaluated mammograms prior to diagnosis, randomly mixed with negative mammograms (1:2 ratio). Cases unrecalled at review were considered as true ICs, those recalled by only one reviewer as minimal signs, and those recalled by two or three reviewers as missed cancers. T and N stage of the reviewed ICs were evaluated and compared. A total of 86,276 first level mammograms were performed. Mean recall rate was 6.8% at first and 4.6% at repeat screening. We had 476 screen-detected cancers and 145 ICs (10 of them ductal carcinomas in situ). Absolute incidence was 17 per 10,000 screening examinations. Invasive proportional incidence was 19% (44/234) in the first year, 39% (91/234) in the second year, and 29% (135/468) in the two-year interval. Of 145 ICs, 130 (90%) were reviewed mixed with 287 negative controls: 55% (71/130) resulted to be true ICs, 24% (31/130) minimal signs, and 22% (28/130) missed cancers. The rate of ICs diagnosed in the first year interval was 21% (15/71) for true ICs, 46% (13/28) for missed cancers, and 39% (12/31) for minimal signs, with a significant difference of true ICs rate compared to missed cancers rate (p=0.012). A higher rate of T3 and T4 stages was found for missed cancers (18%, 5/28) compared to minimal signs (6%, 2/31) or true ICs (8%, 6/71), while the rate of N2 and N3 stage for both minimal signs (19%, 6/31) or missed cancers (25%, 7/28) was higher than that for true ICs (10

  15. High-Risk and Low-Risk Human Papillomavirus and the Absolute Risk of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia or Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louise T; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Munk, Christian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or cervical cancer (CIN 3 or worse) after detection of low-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and after a negative high-risk HPV test. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, consecutive liquid-based cer......OBJECTIVE: To determine the absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or cervical cancer (CIN 3 or worse) after detection of low-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and after a negative high-risk HPV test. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, consecutive liquid...

  16. Oncopression: gene expression compendium for cancer with matched normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Chulhee

    2017-07-01

    Expression profile of normal tissue is primary source to find genes showing aberrant expression pattern specific in matched cancer tissue, but sample number of normal control in public gene expression repositories is disproportionally small compared to cancer and scattered in several datasets. We built oncopression by integrating several datasets into one large dataset for comprehensive analysis about 25 types of human cancers including 20 640 cancer samples and 6801 normal control profiles. Expression profiles in cancers can be directly compared to normal tissue counterparts. Validity of the integration was tested using immunohistochemical staining results and principal component analysis. We have utilized the pre-release version of oncopression to identify cancer-specific genes in several studies. Free access at http://www.oncopression.com and all expression data are available for download at the site. cchoi@kaist.ac.kr or jungsullee@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with normal air on macrophage number and infiltration during rat skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries.

  18. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with normal air on macrophage number and infiltration during rat skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Fujita

    Full Text Available Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries.

  19. Are cancer cells really softer than normal cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Charlotte; Goud, Bruno; Manneville, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-05-01

    Solid tumours are often first diagnosed by palpation, suggesting that the tumour is more rigid than its surrounding environment. Paradoxically, individual cancer cells appear to be softer than their healthy counterparts. In this review, we first list the physiological reasons indicating that cancer cells may be more deformable than normal cells. Next, we describe the biophysical tools that have been developed in recent years to characterise and model cancer cell mechanics. By reviewing the experimental studies that compared the mechanics of individual normal and cancer cells, we argue that cancer cells can indeed be considered as softer than normal cells. We then focus on the intracellular elements that could be responsible for the softening of cancer cells. Finally, we ask whether the mechanical differences between normal and cancer cells can be used as diagnostic or prognostic markers of cancer progression. © 2017 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pursuing Normality: Reflections on Cancer Survivorship Care of Lymphoma Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Louise S; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-16

    The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. The aim of this study was to understand the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors to aid the future planning of cancer survivorship care and overcome barriers to participation. Data were generated in a hematological ward during 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation and 46 semistructured interviews with 9 lymphoma survivors. Interpretive description methodology and social practice theory guided the analytical framework. "Pursuing normality" was an overall finding and was comprised of 2 overarching patterns, "future prospects" and "survivorship care perceptions," both implying an influence on whether to participate in cancer survivorship care programs. Because of "pursuing normality," 8 of 9 participants opted out of cancer survivorship care programming due to prospects of "being cured" and perceptions of cancer survivorship care as "a continuation of the disease." The findings add to our understanding of possible barriers for participation in cancer survivorship care and outline important aspects to account for in the practice of health professionals. The study findings may guide practice to establish a systematic approach for providing information to cancer survivors regarding the possible management of their symptoms and of the content and purpose of cancer survivorship care.

  1. Confusing Relative Risk with Absolute Risk Is Associated with More Enthusiastic Beliefs about the Value of Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caverly, Tanner J; Prochazka, Allan V; Binswanger, Ingrid A; Kutner, Jean S; Matlock, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Reviews of how data are presented in medical literature document that the benefit from an intervention is often exaggerated relative to the harm (e.g., relative risk for benefit and absolute risk for harm). Such mismatched presentations may create unwarranted enthusiasm, especially among those who misinterpret the statistics presented. The objective was to determine whether misinterpretation of risk data predicts enthusiasm for cancer screening. The authors administered a survey with 14 items assessing beliefs about cancer screening and 6 items measuring data interpretation ability. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the association between data interpretation and enthusiasm for cancer screening, with adjustment for gender and year graduated from medical school. Eighty-eight of 139 physicians at a state-wide professional meeting returned completed surveys (63% response rate). Lower data interpretation scores were associated with higher enthusiasm for cancer screening scores (P = 0.004) in the adjusted primary analysis. Confusing relative risk with absolute risk appeared to drive the overall association. Biased presentations of risk data could affect general beliefs about the value of cancer screening, especially among physicians who uncritically accept mismatched presentations of data. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Protecting the normal in order to better kill the cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingya; Ezeogu, Lewis; Zellmer, Lucas; Yu, Baofa; Xu, Ningzhi; Joshua Liao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the only option for oncologists when a cancer has widely spread to different body sites. However, almost all currently available chemotherapeutic drugs will eventually encounter resistance after their initial positive effect, mainly because cancer cells develop genetic alterations, collectively coined herein as mutations, to adapt to the therapy. Some patients may still respond to a second chemo drug, but few cases respond to a third one. Since it takes time for cancer cells to develop new mutations and then select those life-sustaining ones via clonal expansion, “run against time for mutations to emerge” should be a crucial principle for treatment of those currently incurable cancers. Since cancer cells constantly change to adapt to the therapy whereas normal cells are stable, it may be a better strategy to shift our focus from killing cancer cells per se to protecting normal cells from chemotherapeutic toxicity. This new strategy requires the development of new drugs that are nongenotoxic and can quickly, in just hours or days, kill cancer cells without leaving the still-alive cells with time to develop mutations, and that should have their toxicities confined to only one or few organs, so that specific protections can be developed and applied. PMID:26177855

  3. Carbon Nanotubes Preserve Normal Phenotypes Under Cancer-Promoting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailes, Elizabeth; Levi-Polyachenko, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts and cancer cells have long been known to create a feedback loop that further stimulates the cancer. While this has been explored from a molecular biology standpoint, little is known about the physical relationship of the cell types even though both sets of cells are known to be mechanosensitive. Indeed, for both fibroblasts and cancer, mechanical signals can make the difference between a normal or pathological cell. To evaluate this relationship and test if it can be manipulated to favor normal cells, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal microscopy was performed on fibroblast and breast cancer cell co-cultures with a collagen gel matrix to simulate the extracellular matrix. Pathological behavior was encouraged through the addition of transforming growth factor beta (TGF- β) . In a separate group, this behavior was discouraged through the doping of the collagen gel with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Significant differences were observed both in the elastic moduli of each cell type and the cancer cells' propensity to migrate through the gel as a model for metastasis. These results shed new light on how cancer progresses and promote the further investigation of nano-mechanical solutions to cancer.

  4. Microfluidic channel for characterizing normal and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    TruongVo, T. N.; Kennedy, R. M.; Chen, H.; Chen, A.; Berndt, A.; Agarwal, M.; Zhu, L.; Nakshatri, H.; Wallace, J.; Na, S.; Yokota, H.; Ryu, J. E.

    2017-03-01

    A microfluidic channel was designed and fabricated for the investigation of behaviors of normal and cancer cells in a narrow channel. A specific question addressed in this study was whether it is possible to distinguish normal versus cancer cells by detecting their stationary and passing behaviors through a narrow channel. We hypothesized that due to higher deformability, softer cancer cells will pass through the channel further and quicker than normal cells. Two cell lines, employed herein, were non-tumor breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A; 11.2  ±  2.4 µm in diameter) and triple negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231; 12.4  ±  2.1 µm in diameter). The microfluidic channel was 300 µm long and linearly tapered with a width of 30 µm at an inlet to 5 µm at an outlet. The result revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells entered and stuck further toward the outlet than MCF-10A cells in response to a slow flow (2 µl min-1). Further, in response to a fast flow (5 µl min-1), the passage time (mean  ±  s.d.) was 26.6  ±  43.9 s for normal cells (N  =  158), and 1.9  ±  1.4 s for cancer cells (N  =  128). The measurement of stiffness by atomic force microscopy as well as model-based predictions pointed out that MDA-MB-231 cells are significantly softer than MCF-10A cells. Collectively, the result in this study suggests that analysis of an individual cell’s behavior through a narrow channel can characterize deformable cancer cells from normal ones, supporting the possibility of enriching circulating tumor cells using novel microfluidics-based analysis.

  5. An absolute risk model to identify individuals at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P; Lindström, Sara; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Steplowski, Emily; Arslan, Alan A; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jacobs, Eric J; Lacroix, Andrea; Li, Donghui; Mandelson, Margaret T; Olson, Sara H; Petersen, Gloria M; Risch, Harvey A; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Zheng, Wei; Amundadottir, Laufey; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Bamlet, William R; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Buring, Julie E; Bracci, Paige M; Canzian, Federico; Clipp, Sandra; Cotterchio, Michelle; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne; Gaziano, J Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Hallmans, Göran; Hassan, Manal; Hutchinson, Amy; Hunter, David J; Kooperberg, Charles; Kurtz, Robert C; Liu, Simin; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Patel, Alpa V; Rabe, Kari G; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slimani, Nadia; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wolpin, Brian M; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Chanock, Stephen J; Hoover, Robert N; Hartge, Patricia; Kraft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates. Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62]), heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76]), obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45]), diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk. Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.

  6. An absolute risk model to identify individuals at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison P Klein

    Full Text Available We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer.Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates.Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62], heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76], obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2 (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45], diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32], family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12], non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37] to (BB vs. OO genotype (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59], rs3790844(chr1q32.1 (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40], rs401681(5p15.33 (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26] and rs9543325(13q22.1 (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]. The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk.Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.

  7. Expression of K+ channels in normal and cancerous human breast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brevet, Marie; Ahidouch, Ahmed; Sevestre, Henri; Merviel, Philippe; El Hiani, Yassine; Robbe, Micheline; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima

    2008-01-01

    ...), Ca2+-activated K channel (K Ca 1.1), voltage activated K+ channels (KV 1.1 and KV 1.3) and of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 in normal and cancerous breast tissues and compared their expression with clinicopathological data...

  8. Measurement of somatostatin receptor subtype 2 mRNA in breast cancer and corresponding normal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, C; Raggi, C Casini; Bianchi, S; Distante, V; Simi, L; Vezzosi, V; Gelmini, S; Pinzani, P; Smith, M Cameron; Buonamano, A; Lazzeri, E; Pazzagli, M; Cataliotti, L; Maggi, M; Serio, M

    2004-06-01

    Somatostatin analogs are effective in inhibiting growth of human breast cancer cell lines. These antiproliferative effects are mediated by specific receptors located on cell membranes. The somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) is the principal mediator of somatostatin effects in normal and cancer cells, and its presence has already been demonstrated in breast cancer. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical relevance of the expression of sst2 by quantifying its mRNA in a large group of infiltrating breast cancers and their corresponding normal tissues. The expression of sst2 mRNA was measured with quantitative real time RT-PCR in 169 breast cancers and in their corresponding unaffected tissues. We evaluated the association of sst2 expression with the commonest clinical-pathologic features of breast cancer. The correlation with a marker of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and with receptor concentration was also evaluated. In cancer tissues, we found that the absolute concentrations of sst2 mRNA were significantly higher in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive samples (P=0.002) as well as in lymph-node-negative cancers (P=0.04) (Student's t-test or one-way ANOVA). In addition, sst2 mRNA was significantly higher in breast cancers than in corresponding unaffected tissues (P=0.0002). However, when the clinical-pathologic parameters were considered, this gradient maintained its statistical significance only in tumors expressing positive prognostic markers, such as the presence of ER (P=0.0005) and progesterone receptors (PgR) (P=0005), and the lack of lymph-node involvement (P=0.0003). The same difference was also significant in postmenopausal women (P=0.001) and in T1 patients (P=0.001). In addition, sst2 mRNA expression was significantly higher (P=0.008) in low-proliferating breast cancers. Finally, we found that the quantitative expression of sst2 mRNA was directly related to the PgR concentration in breast cancer tissues (Pbreast cancers which, on the basis of

  9. Cancer patients' experiences with nature: Normalizing dichotomous realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Sarah; O'Callaghan, Clare C; Schofield, Penelope; Salander, Pär

    2017-01-01

    To explore cancer patients' subjective experiences with nature in order to examine the relevance of nature-based care opportunities in cancer care contexts. The rationale was to describe the underlying mechanisms of this interaction and produce translatable knowledge. Qualitative research design informed by grounded theory. Sampling was initially convenience and then theoretical. Competent adults with any cancer diagnosis were eligible to participate in a semi-structured interview exploring views about the role of nature in their lives. Audio-recorded and transcribed interviews were analyzed using inductive, cyclic, and constant comparative analysis. Twenty cancer patients (9 female) reported detailed description about their experiences with nature from which a typology of five common nature interactions emerged. A theory model was generated constituting a core category and two inter-related themes explaining a normalization process in which patients negotiate their shifting realities (Core Category). Nature functioned as a support structure and nurtured patients' inner and outer capacities to respond and connect more effectively (Theme A). Once enabled and comforted, patients could engage survival and reconstructive maneuvers and explore the consequences of cancer (Theme B). A dynamic relationship was evident between moving away while, simultaneously, advancing towards the cancer reality in order to accept a shifting normality. From a place of comfort and safety, patients felt supported to deal differently and more creatively with the threat and demands of cancer diagnosis, treatment and outlook. New understanding about nature's role in cancer patients' lives calls attention to recognizing additional forms of psychosocial care that encourage patients' own coping and creative processes to deal with their strain and, in some cases, reconstruct everyday lives. Further research is required to determine how nature opportunities can be feasibly delivered in the cancer

  10. Mechanical properties of normal versus cancerous breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelser, Amanda M; Macosko, Jed C; O'Dell, Adam P; Smyre, Scott; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2015-11-01

    A cell's mechanical properties are important in determining its adhesion, migration, and response to the mechanical properties of its microenvironment and may help explain behavioral differences between normal and cancerous cells. Using fluorescently labeled peroxisomes as microrheological probes, the interior mechanical properties of normal breast cells were compared to a metastatic breast cell line, MDA-MB-231. To estimate the mechanical properties of cell cytoplasms from the motions of their peroxisomes, it was necessary to reduce the contribution of active cytoskeletal motions to peroxisome motion. This was done by treating the cells with blebbistatin, to inhibit myosin II, or with sodium azide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose, to reduce intracellular ATP. Using either treatment, the peroxisomes exhibited normal diffusion or subdiffusion, and their mean squared displacements (MSDs) showed that the MDA-MB-231 cells were significantly softer than normal cells. For these two cell types, peroxisome MSDs in treated and untreated cells converged at high frequencies, indicating that cytoskeletal structure was not altered by the drug treatment. The MSDs from ATP-depleted cells were analyzed by the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation to estimate the interior viscoelastic modulus G* and its components, the elastic shear modulus G' and viscous shear modulus G", at angular frequencies between 0.126 and 628 rad/s. These moduli are the material coefficients that enter into stress-strain relations and relaxation times in quantitative mechanical models such as the poroelastic model of the interior regions of cancerous and non-cancerous cells.

  11. Body weight, hemoglobin, and absolute neutrophil count in patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer who received chemotherapy: A single-center study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Y.; Winarto, H.

    2017-08-01

    The side effects of chemotherapy, a treatment modality of ovarian cancer, can disrupt overall treatment. To date, the clinical and laboratory profiles of ovarian cancer patients during chemotherapy have not been investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the clinical and laboratory profiles of patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer who received chemotherapy in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, including body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin (Hb), and absolute neutrophil count (ANC). To generate these clinical and laboratory profiles, we collected secondary data from the medical records of advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer patients who received six cycles of carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy. We enrolled 23 patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer patients who received six cycles of chemotherapy. Mean patient BMI before and after chemotherapy was 22.86 kg/m2 and 21.78 kg/m2, respectively. Hb levels before chemotherapy were 8-13 g/dl, with Hb neutropenia, four patients (17.39%) had moderate neutropenia, and one patient (4.35%) had severe neutropenia. Of the 22 patients with Hb ≥ 10 g/dl before chemotherapy, 16 (72.72%) experienced a decrease in ANC during chemotherapy. Of the 20 patients (60.87%) with normal BMI or higher, 14 experienced a decrease in ANC during chemotherapy. The mean patient body weight decreased after six cycles of chemotherapy. Hb and ANC were persistently decreased in approximately a quarter of the 23 subjects. The decrease in ANC was not influenced by initial Hb and BMI.

  12. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  13. Bridging the etiologic and prognostic outlooks in individualized assessment of absolute risk of an illness: application in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Igor; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leffondré, Karen; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2016-11-01

    Assessment of individual risk of illness is an important activity in preventive medicine. Development of risk-assessment models has heretofore relied predominantly on studies involving follow-up of cohort-type populations, while case-control studies have generally been considered unfit for this purpose. To present a method for individualized assessment of absolute risk of an illness (as illustrated by lung cancer) based on data from a 'non-nested' case-control study. We used data from a case-control study conducted in Montreal, Canada in 1996-2001. Individuals diagnosed with lung cancer (n = 920) and age- and sex-matched lung-cancer-free subjects (n = 1288) completed questionnaires documenting life-time cigarette-smoking history and occupational, medical, and family history. Unweighted and weighted logistic models were fitted. Model overfitting was assessed using bootstrap-based cross-validation and 'shrinkage.' The discriminating ability was assessed by the c-statistic, and the risk-stratifying performance was assessed by examination of the variability in risk estimates over hypothetical risk-profiles. In the logistic models, the logarithm of incidence-density of lung cancer was expressed as a function of age, sex, cigarette-smoking history, history of respiratory conditions and exposure to occupational carcinogens, and family history of lung cancer. The models entailed a minimal degree of overfitting ('shrinkage' factor: 0.97 for both unweighted and weighted models) and moderately high discriminating ability (c-statistic: 0.82 for the unweighted model and 0.66 for the weighted model). The method's risk-stratifying performance was quite high. The presented method allows for individualized assessment of risk of lung cancer and can be used for development of risk-assessment models for other illnesses.

  14. Mammographic breast density and breast cancer risk: interactions of percent density, absolute dense, and non-dense areas with breast cancer risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghjyan, Lusine; Colditz, Graham A; Rosner, Bernard; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2015-02-01

    We investigated if associations of breast density and breast cancer differ according to the level of other known breast cancer risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), age at menarche, parity, age at first child's birth, age at menopause, alcohol consumption, a family history of breast cancer, a history of benign breast disease, and physical activity. This study included 1,044 postmenopausal incident breast cancer cases diagnosed within the Nurses' Health Study cohort and 1,794 matched controls. Percent breast density, absolute dense, and non-dense areas were measured from digitized film images with computerized techniques. Information on breast cancer risk factors was obtained prospectively from biennial questionnaires. Percent breast density was more strongly associated with breast cancer risk in current postmenopausal hormone users (≥50 vs. 10 %: OR 5.34, 95 % CI 3.36-8.49) as compared to women with past (OR 2.69, 95 % CI 1.32-5.49) or no hormone history (OR 2.57, 95 % CI 1.18-5.60, p-interaction = 0.03). Non-dense area was inversely associated with breast cancer risk in parous women, but not in women without children (p-interaction = 0.03). Associations of density with breast cancer risk did not differ by the levels of BMI, age at menarche, parity, age at first child's birth, age at menopause, alcohol consumption, a family history of breast cancer, a history of benign breast disease, and physical activity. Women with dense breasts, who currently use menopausal hormone therapy are at a particularly high risk of breast cancer. Most breast cancer risk factors do not modify the association between mammographic breast density and breast cancer risk.

  15. Comparative study of trace elements in normal and cancerous colorectal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoriadis, G.C.; Apostolidis, N.S.; Romanos, A.N.; Paradellis, T.P.

    1983-08-01

    Quantitative study of the Zn, Cu, K, Rb, Mn, Pb and Ni trace elements by the x-ray fluorescence method in normal and cancerous tissue samples, obtained from 18 patients suffering from cancer of the colon and rectum, shows that cancerous tissues exhibit statistically higher K, Rb, and Cu concentration than corresponding normal tissues. There are evidences that also Ni and Pb are elevated in cancerous tissues. Finally Zn and Mn do not show any appreciable difference in normal and cancerous tissues.

  16. Aspirin Prevents Colorectal Cancer by Normalizing EGFR Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Zhu, Feng; Boardman, Lisa A; Wang, Lei; Oi, Naomi; Liu, Kangdong; Li, Xiang; Fu, Yang; Limburg, Paul J; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2015-05-01

    Aspirin intake reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the molecular underpinnings remain elusive. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed in about 80% of CRC cases, is implicated in the etiology of CRC. Here, we investigated whether aspirin can prevent CRC by normalizing EGFR expression. Immunohistochemistry staining was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections from normal colon mucosa, adenomatous polyps from FAP patients who were classified as regular aspirin users or nonusers. The interplay between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and EGFR was studied in primary intestinal epithelial cells isolated from Apc(Min) mice, immortalized normal human colon epithelial cells (HCEC) as well as murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Immunohistochemistry staining results established that EGFR overexpression is an early event in colorectal tumorigenesis, which can be greatly attenuated by regular use of aspirin. Importantly, EGFR and COX-2 were co-overexpressed and co-localized with each other in FAP patients. Further mechanistic studies revealed that COX-2 overexpression triggers the activation of the c-Jun-dependent transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1), which binds to the Egfr promoter. Binding facilitates the cellular accumulation of EGFR and lowers the threshold required for pre-neoplastic cells to undergo transformation. Aspirin might exert its chemopreventive activity against CRC, at least partially, by normalizing EGFR expression in gastrointestinal precancerous lesions.

  17. Duplication of the genome in normal and cancer cell cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Jennifer L; Calvi, Brian R

    2002-01-01

    It is critical to discover the mechanisms of normal cell cycle regulation if we are to fully understand what goes awry in cancer cells. The normal eukaryotic cell tightly regulates the activity of origins of DNA replication so that the genome is duplicated exactly once per cell cycle. Over the last ten years much has been learned concerning the cell cycle regulation of origin activity. It is now clear that the proteins and cell cycle mechanisms that control origin activity are largely conserved from yeast to humans. Despite this conservation, the composition of origins of DNA replication in higher eukaryotes remains ill defined. A DNA consensus for predicting origins has yet to emerge, and it is of some debate whether primary DNA sequence determines where replication initiates. In this review we outline what is known about origin structure and the mechanism of once per cell cycle DNA replication with an emphasis on recent advances in mammalian cells. We discuss the possible relevance of these regulatory pathways for cancer biology and therapy.

  18. Dial A440 for absolute pitch: absolute pitch memory by non-absolute pitch possessors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas A; Schmuckler, Mark A

    2008-04-01

    Listeners without absolute (or "perfect") pitch have difficulty identifying or producing isolated musical pitches from memory. Instead, they process the relative pattern of pitches, which remains invariant across pitch transposition. Musically untrained non-absolute pitch possessors demonstrated absolute pitch memory for the telephone dial tone, a stimulus that is always heard at the same absolute frequency. Listeners accurately classified pitch-shifted versions of the dial tone as "normal," "higher than normal" or "lower than normal." However, the role of relative pitch processing was also evident, in that listeners' pitch judgments were also sensitive to the frequency range of stimuli.

  19. A simple algebraic cancer equation: calculating how cancers may arise with normal mutation rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Darryl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this article is to present a relatively easy to understand cancer model where transformation occurs when the first cell, among many at risk within a colon, accumulates a set of driver mutations. The analysis of this model yields a simple algebraic equation, which takes as inputs the number of stem cells, mutation and division rates, and the number of driver mutations, and makes predictions about cancer epidemiology. Methods The equation [p = 1 - (1 - (1 - (1 - udkNm ] calculates the probability of cancer (p and contains five parameters: the number of divisions (d, the number of stem cells (N × m, the number of critical rate-limiting pathway driver mutations (k, and the mutation rate (u. In this model progression to cancer "starts" at conception and mutations accumulate with cell division. Transformation occurs when a critical number of rate-limiting pathway mutations first accumulates within a single stem cell. Results When applied to several colorectal cancer data sets, parameter values consistent with crypt stem cell biology and normal mutation rates were able to match the increase in cancer with aging, and the mutation frequencies found in cancer genomes. The equation can help explain how cancer risks may vary with age, height, germline mutations, and aspirin use. APC mutations may shorten pathways to cancer by effectively increasing the numbers of stem cells at risk. Conclusions The equation illustrates that age-related increases in cancer frequencies may result from relatively normal division and mutation rates. Although this equation does not encompass all of the known complexity of cancer, it may be useful, especially in a teaching setting, to help illustrate relationships between small and large cancer features.

  20. Absolute Zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  1. Absolute Summ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  2. PARP inhibitors may affect normal cells in patients with a BRCA mutation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PARP inhibition has been approved for treatment of advanced ovarian cancer with BRAC1 and BRAC2 mutations and is being studied in the treatment advanced breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer.  A new study by Center for Cancer Research scientists in the Mouse Cancer Genetics Program and the Laboratory of Genome Integrity, raises concerns that when cancer patients with a BRCA mutation are treated with PARP inhibitors their normal cells may also be affected.  

  3. RelB Expression Determines the Differential Effects of Ascorbic Acid in Normal and Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaowei; Xu, Yong; Xu, Fang Fang; Chaiswing, Luksana; Schnell, David; Noel, Teresa; Wang, Chi; Chen, Jinfei; St Clair, Daret K; St Clair, William H

    2017-03-15

    Cancer cells typically experience higher oxidative stress than normal cells, such that elevating pro-oxidant levels can trigger cancer cell death. Although pre-exposure to mild oxidative agents will sensitize cancer cells to radiation, this pre-exposure may also activate the adaptive stress defense system in normal cells. Ascorbic acid is a prototype redox modulator that when infused intravenously appears to kill cancers without injury to normal tissues; however, the mechanisms involved remain elusive. In this study, we show how ascorbic acid kills cancer cells and sensitizes prostate cancer to radiation therapy while also conferring protection upon normal prostate epithelial cells against radiation-induced injury. We found that the NF-κB transcription factor RelB is a pivotal determinant in the differential radiosensitization effects of ascorbic acid in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate epithelial cells. Mechanistically, high reactive oxygen species concentrations suppress RelB in cancer cells. RelB suppression decreases expression of the sirtuin SIRT3 and the powerful antioxidant MnSOD, which in turn increases oxidative and metabolic stresses in prostate cancer cells. In contrast, ascorbic acid enhances RelB expression in normal cells, improving antioxidant and metabolic defenses against radiation injury. In addition to showing how RelB mediates the differential effects of ascorbic acid on cancer and normal tissue radiosensitivities, our work also provides a proof of concept for the existence of redox modulators that can improve the efficacy of radiotherapy while protecting against normal tissue injury in cancer settings. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1345-56. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Classification of normal and abnormal images of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Divyesh; Tiwari, Amit Kumar; Vijayarajan, V.; Krishnamoorthy, A.

    2017-11-01

    To find the exact symptoms of lung cancer is difficult, because of the formation of the most cancers tissues, wherein large structure of tissues is intersect in a different way. This problem can be evaluated with the help of digital images. In this strategy images will be examined with basic operation of PCA Algorithm. In this paper, GLCM method is used for pre-processing of the snap shots and function extraction system and to test the level of diseases of a patient in its premature stage get to know it is regular or unusual. With the help of result stage of cancer will be evaluated. With the help of dataset and result survival rate of cancer patient can be estimated. Result is based totally on the precise and wrong arrangement of the patterns of tissues.

  5. I-Xe systematics of the impact plume produced chondrules from the CB carbonaceous chondrites: Implications for the half-life value of 129I and absolute age normalization of 129I-129Xe chronometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdivtseva, O; Meshik, A; Hohenberg, C M; Krot, A N

    2017-03-15

    It is inferred that magnesian non-porphyritic chondrules in the CB (Bencubbin-type) carbonaceous chondrites formed in an impact generated plume of gas and melt at 4562.49 ± 0.21 Ma (Bollard et al., 2015) and could be suitable for the absolute age normalization of relative chronometers. Here xenon isotopic compositions of neutron irradiated chondrules from the CB chondrites Gujba and Hammadah al Hamra (HH) 237 have been analyzed in an attempt to determine closure time of their I-Xe isotope systematics. One of the HH 237 chondrules, #1, yielded a well-defined I-Xe isochron that corresponds to a closure time of 0.29 ± 0.16 Ma after the Shallowater aubrite standard. Release profiles and diffusion properties of radiogenic 129*Xe and 128*Xe, extracted from this chondrule by step-wise pyrolysis, indicate presence of two iodine host phases with distinct activation energies of 73 and 120 kcal/mol. In spite of the activation energy differences, the I-Xe isotope systematics of these two phases closed simultaneously, suggesting rapid heating and cooling (possibly quenching) of the CB chondrules. The release profiles of U-fission Xe and I-derived Xe correlate in the high temperature host phase supporting simultaneous closure of 129I-129Xe and 207Pb-206Pb systematics. The absolute I-Xe age of Shallowater standard is derived from the observed correlation between I-Xe and Pb-Pb ages in a number of samples. It is re-evaluated here using Pb-Pb ages adjusted for an updated 238U/235U ratio of 137.794 and meteorite specific U-isotope ratios. With the addition of the new data for HH 237 chondrule #1, the re-evaluated absolute I-Xe age of Shallowater is 4562.4 ± 0.2 Ma. The absolute I-Xe age of the HH 237 chondrule #1 is 4562.1 ± 0.3 Ma, in good agreement with U-corrected Pb-Pb ages of the Gujba chondrules (Bollard et al., 2015) and HH 237 silicates (Krot et al., 2005). All I-Xe data used here, and in previous estimates of the absolute age of Shallowater, are calculated using 15.7

  6. Utility of relative and absolute measures of mammographic density vs clinical risk factors in evaluating breast cancer risk at time of screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolell, Mohamed; Tsuruda, Kaitlyn M; Lightfoot, Christopher B; Payne, Jennifer I; Caines, Judy S; Iles, Sian E

    2016-01-01

    Various clinical risk factors, including high breast density, have been shown to be associated with breast cancer. The utility of using relative and absolute area-based breast density-related measures was evaluated as an alternative to clinical risk factors in cancer risk assessment at the time of screening mammography. Contralateral mediolateral oblique digital mammography images from 392 females with unilateral breast cancer and 817 age-matched controls were analysed. Information on clinical risk factors was obtained from the provincial breast-imaging information system. Breast density-related measures were assessed using a fully automated breast density measurement software. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted, and area under the receiver-operating characteristic (AUROC) curve was used to evaluate the performance of three cancer risk models: the first using only clinical risk factors, the second using only density-related measures and the third using both clinical risk factors and density-related measures. The risk factor-based model generated an AUROC of 0.535, while the model including only breast density-related measures generated a significantly higher AUROC of 0.622 (p risk factor model (p cancer compared with clinical risk factors. Breast cancer risk models based on density-related measures alone can outperform risk models based on clinical factors. Such models may support the development of personalized breast-screening protocols.

  7. Art Therapy with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Helping Normal Children Cope with Abnormal Circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Councill, Tracy

    1993-01-01

    Notes that art therapy with pediatric cancer patients addresses emotional and developmental needs of normal population under extreme stress. Reviews literature on the problems likely to be encountered by pediatric cancer patient and presents case examples to illustrate the emergence of these issues and their management in art therapy. (Author/NB)

  8. Variation in Carbohydrates between Cancer and Normal Cell Membranes Revealed by Super?Resolution Fluorescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Junling; Liu, Tianzhou; Gao, Jing; Gao, Lan; Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Shi, Yan; Xiong, Wenyong; Jiang, Junguang; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate alterations on cell membranes are associated with various cancer processes, including tumorigenesis, malignant transformation, and tumor dissemination. However, variations in the distributions of cancer?associated carbohydrates are unclear at the molecular level. Herein, direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy is used to reveal that seven major types of carbohydrates tended to form obvious clusters on cancer cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes (both cul...

  9. Absolute Quantification of Choline-Related Biomarkers in Breast Cancer Biopsies by Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Mimmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been repeatedly demonstrated that choline metabolism is altered in a wide variety of cancers. In breast tumours, the choline metabolite profile is characterized by an elevation of phosphocholine and total choline-compounds. This pattern is increasingly being exploited as biomarker in cancer diagnosis.

  10. Discrimination of Breast Cancer from Normal Tissue with Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.-B.; Wang, W.; Liu, Ch.-H.; Zhang, G.-J.

    2015-07-01

    Conventional Raman spectra of normal and cancerous breast tissues were acquired at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm and subjected to a discrimination analysis. First the spectra were pretreated with wavelet transform and polynomial fitting; next, cancerous tissue was identified by applying an adaptive local hyperplane K-nearest neighbor (ALHK) method to the pretreated spectra. The best discrimination accuracy of the ALHK method was 93.2%. In summary, normal and cancerous breast tissue were accurately distinguished by a miniature laser Raman spectrometer and the chemometrics method (ALHK), which might prove to be a portable and accessible diagnostic system.

  11. Tissue specific DNA methylation in normal human breast epithelium and in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelet Avraham

    Full Text Available Cancer is a heterogeneous and tissue-specific disease. Thus, the tissue of origin reflects on the natural history of the disease and dictates the therapeutic approach. It is suggested that tissue differentiation, mediated mostly by epigenetic modifications, could guide tissue-specific susceptibility and protective mechanisms against cancer. Here we studied breast specific methylation in purified normal epithelium and its reflection in breast cancers. We established genome wide methylation profiles of various normal epithelial tissues and identified 110 genes that were differentially methylated in normal breast epithelium. A number of these genes also showed methylation alterations in breast cancers. We elaborated on one of them, TRIM29 (ATDC, and showed that its promoter was hypo-methylated in normal breast epithelium and heavily methylated in other normal epithelial tissues. Moreover, in breast carcinomas methylation increased and expression decreased whereas the reverse was noted for multiple other carcinomas. Interestingly, TRIM29 regulation in breast tumors clustered according to the PAM50 classification. Thus, it was repressed in the estrogen receptor positive tumors, particularly in the more proliferative luminal B subtype. This goes in line with previous reports indicating tumor suppressive activity of TRIM29 in estrogen receptor positive luminal breast cells in contrast to oncogenic function in pancreatic and lung cancers. Overall, these findings emphasize the linkage between breast specific epigenetic regulation and tissue specificity of cancer.

  12. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  13. Fingerprinting Breast Cancer vs. Normal Mammary Cells by Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjing; Sinues, Pablo Martinez-Lozano; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Xue; Detmar, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive diagnostic methods for early cancer detection, to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients. Identification of volatile metabolic compounds may provide an approach for noninvasive early diagnosis of malignant diseases. Here we analyzed the volatile metabolic signature of human breast cancer cell lines versus normal human mammary cells. Volatile compounds in the headspace of conditioned culture medium were directly fingerprinted by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were subsequently treated statistically to identify discriminating features between normal vs. cancerous cell types. We were able to classify different samples by using feature selection followed by principal component analysis (PCA). Additionally, high-resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to propose their chemical structures for some of the most discriminating molecules. We conclude that cancerous cells can release a characteristic odor whose constituents may be used as disease markers.

  14. Optical redox imaging indices discriminate human breast cancer from normal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-11-01

    Our long-term goal was to investigate the potential of incorporating redox imaging technique as a breast cancer (BC) diagnosis component to increase the positive predictive value of suspicious imaging finding and to reduce unnecessary biopsies and overdiagnosis. We previously found that precancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. We also revealed abnormal mitochondrial redox state in cancerous specimens from three BC patients. Here, we extend our study to include biopsies of 16 patients. Tissue aliquots were collected from both apparently normal and cancerous tissues from the affected cancer-bearing breasts shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen and scanned with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the three-dimensional cryogenic NADH/Fp (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide/oxidized flavoproteins) fluorescence imager. We found both Fp and NADH in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled that in the normal tissues (p<0.05). The redox ratio Fp/(NADH + Fp) was ˜27% higher in the cancerous tissues (p<0.05). Additionally, Fp, or NADH, or the redox ratio alone could predict cancer with reasonable sensitivity and specificity. Our findings suggest that the optical redox imaging technique can provide parameters independent of clinical factors for discriminating cancer from noncancer breast tissues in human patients.

  15. A Cancer-Indicative microRNA Pattern in Normal Prostate Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schlomm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the levels of selected micro-RNAs in normal prostate tissue to assess their potential to indicate tumor foci elsewhere in the prostate. Histologically normal prostate tissue samples from 31 prostate cancer patients and two cancer negative control groups with either unsuspicious or elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA levels (14 and 17 individuals, respectively were analyzed. Based on the expression analysis of 157 microRNAs in a pool of prostate tissue samples and information from data bases/literature, we selected eight microRNAs for quantification by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs. Selected miRNAs were analyzed in histologically tumor-free biopsy samples from patients and healthy controls. We identified seven microRNAs (miR-124a, miR-146a & b, miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a & b, which displayed significant differential expression in normal prostate tissue from men with prostate cancer compared to both cancer negative control groups. Four microRNAs (miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a and let-7b remained to significantly discriminate normal tissues from prostate cancer patients from those of the cancer negative control group with elevated PSA levels. The transcript levels of these microRNAs were highly indicative for the presence of cancer in the prostates, independently of the PSA level. Our results suggest a microRNA-pattern in histologically normal prostate tissue, indicating prostate cancer elsewhere in the organ.

  16. Cytostasis of tumor cell lines by granulocytes from cancer patients and normal human donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, S; Herberman, R B; Cannon, G B; Reid, J; Braatz, J A

    1981-08-15

    Granulocytes of normal human donors were previously shown to have cytostatic activity in vitro against a variety of tumor cell lines. In the present study, we have compared the levels of granulocyte-mediated cytostatic activity in cancer patients and normal donors. In an initial study of 25 tumor-bearing patients and 21 individuals with benign or no disease, decreased cytostatic activity was observed in 84% of the cancer patients. Nine cancer patients with no evidence of disease had reactivity in the normal range. Granulocytes separated by a one-step method on a double Ficoll-Percoll gradient showed decreased reactivity. This procedure eliminated the differences previously detected between tumor-bearing patients and controls. Addition of either pooled normal AB human serum or autologous serum to the assay restored the reactivity. Only with autologous serum and not with allogeneic serum, were the differences between tumor-bearing patients and controls again seen. Therefore, in a subsequent study, we examined the effect of serum on cytostasis by normal granulocytes that were isolated on double gradients. We observed lowered serum restorative activity (SRA) in 41 of the 46 (89%) tumor-bearing patients tested. Fractionation of sera by Sephadex G-200 chromatography indicated that SRA of both cancer patients and normal donors was in the 100,000 molecular weight region.

  17. 'Normalizing' the malignant phenotype of luminal breast cancer cells via alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Tayeh, Hanan; Weidenfeld, Keren; Zhilin-Roth, Alisa; Schif-Zuck, Sagi; Thaler, Sonja; Cotarelo, Cristina; Tan, Tuan Z; Thiery, Jean P; Green, Jeffrey E; Klorin, Geula; Sabo, Edmond; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Tzukerman, Maty; Barkan, Dalit

    2016-12-01

    Reestablishing tissue organization of breast cancer cells into acini was previously shown to override their malignant phenotype. In our study, we demonstrate that alpha(v)beta(3) integrin (Int-αvβ3), previously shown to play a role in cancer progression, promoted differentiation and growth arrest of organoids derived from luminal A breast cancer cells grown in their relevant three-dimensional microenvironment. These organoids differentiated into normal-like acini resembling a benign stage of breast tissue. Likewise, we demonstrate that Int-αvβ3 is selectively expressed in the epithelium of the benign stage of breast tissues, and is lost during the early stages of luminal A breast cancer progression. Notably, the organoids' reversion into normal-like acini was mediated by cancer luminal progenitor-like cells expressing both EpCAM(high)CD49f(low)CD24(+) and Int-αvβ3. Furthermore, downregulation of Notch4 expression and downstream signaling was shown to mediate Int-αvβ3-induced reversion. Intriguingly, when luminal A breast cancer cells expressing Int-αvβ3 were injected into a humanized mouse model, differentiated tumors developed when compared with that generated by control cells. Hence, our data suggest that promoting differentiation of luminal A breast cancer cells by signaling emanating from Int-αvβ3 can potentially promote 'normalization' of their malignant phenotype and may prevent the malignant cells from progressing.

  18. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  19. Comparison of serum lipid profiles between normal controls and breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikul Laisupasin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Researchers have reported association of plasma/serum lipids and lipoproteins with different cancers. Increase levels of circulating lipids and lipoproteins have been associated with breast cancer risk. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare serum lipid profiles: total-cholesterol (T-CHOL, triglyceride (TG, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C between breast cancer patients and normal participants. Materials and Methods: A total of 403 women in this study were divided into two groups in the period during May 2006-April 2007. Blood samples were collected from 249 patients with early stage breast cancer and 154 normal controls for serum lipid profiles (T-CHOL, TG, HDL-C, LDL-C and VLDL-C analysis using Hitachi 717 Autoanalyzer (Roche Diagnostic GmbH, Germany. TG, LDL-C and VLDL-C levels in breast cancer group were significantly increased as compared with normal controls group (P < 0.001, whereas HDL-C and T-CHOL levels were not. Results: The results of this study suggest that increased serum lipid profiles may associate with breast cancer risk in Thai women. Further studies to group important factors including, cancer stages, types of cancer, parity, and menopausal status that may affect to lipid profiles in breast cancer patients along with an investigation of new lipid profiles to clarify most lipid factors that may involve in breast cancer development are needed.

  20. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  1. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of capecitabine in head and neck cancer and normal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wisniewska-Jarosinska, Maria; Sliwinski, Tomasz; Kasznicki, Jacek; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Krupa, Renata; Bloch, Karolina; Drzewoski, Jozef; Chojnacki, Jan; Blasiak, Janusz; Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between a chemical and a cell may strongly depend on whether this cell is normal or pathological. Side effects of anticancer drugs may sometimes overcome their benefit action, so it is important to investigate their effect in both the target and normal cells. Capecitabine (Xeloda, CAP), a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil, is mainly used in colon cancer, but little is known about its action in head and neck cancer. We compared the cyto- and genotoxicity of CAP in head and neck HTB-43 ...

  2. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  3. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  4. The histological characteristics of clinically normal mucosa adjacent to oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Milos Cankovic; Miroslav P Ilic; Nada Vuckovic; Marija Bokor-Bratic

    2013-01-01

    Background: The ′field cancerization′ theory tries to explain the risk of local recurrences and development of second primary tumors in oral sqamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. According to this theory it is assumed that clinically normal mucosa adjacent to oral cancer, except molecular, has already developed certain premalignant histopathological changes. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine histological characteristics of clinically normal-looking mucosa at different distanc...

  5. Differential gene expression in tumor adjacent histologically normal prostatic tissue indicates field cancerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, C M; Heaphy, C M; Butler, K S; Fischer, E G; Griffith, J K; Bisoffi, M

    2009-09-01

    Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of aberrant cells in tumor adjacent histologically normal tissues (TAHN). To characterize field cancerization in prostate cancer, we used RNA from paired patient tumor and TAHN tissues excised at 1 cm from the tumor margin and subjected them to microarray expression analysis comparative to RNA from normal cancer-free prostatic tissues. Eleven novel transcripts were significantly up-regulated in TAHN tissues and also in tumors. Expression of early growth response protein 1, tristetraprolin, testican, and fatty acid synthase, mutually up-regulated at different levels in tumors and TAHN tissues was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in the experimental and in an independent validation set. This study offers proof of expressional changes in field cancerized prostatic TAHN tissues at defined distances from tumor margins. Markers of field cancerized prostatic tissues could be early diagnostic indicators in biopsies after abnormal prostate-specific antigen and digital rectal examination and independent of cancerous histology and/or early targets for chemo-preventive intervention in pre-malignant disease.

  6. Antiapoptotic effects of estrogen in normal and cancer human cervical epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qifang; Li, Xin; Wang, Liqin; Feng, Ying-Hong; Zeng, Robin; Gorodeski, George

    2004-12-01

    The present study investigated the antiapoptotic effects of estrogen in normal and cancer human cervical cells and the mechanisms involved. Baseline apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells is mediated predominantly by P2X7-receptor-induced, Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the mitochondrial (caspase-9) pathway. Treatment with 10 nM 17beta-estradiol blocked apoptosis induced by the P2X7-receptor ligands ATP and 2',3'-0-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP in normal human cervical epithelial cells (hECEs) and attenuated the effect in hECEs immortalized with human papillomavirus-16 (ECE16-1) and the cancer cervical cells HT3 and CaSki. Diethylstilbestrol and to a lesser degree estrone could mimic the effects of 17beta-estradiol, whereas actinomycin-D and cycloheximide attenuated the response. The antiapoptotic effect of estrogen did not depend on cell cycle phase, and in both normal and cancer cervical cells, it involved attenuation of activation of caspase-9 and the terminal caspase-3. However, involvement of cascades upstream to the caspase-9 differed in normal vs. cancer cervical cells. In the normal hECEs estrogen blocked P2X7-receptor-induced calcium influx. In contrast, in the cancer CaSki cells, estrogen up-regulated expression of Bcl-2 and attenuated Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling (i.e. formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores). Estrogen had no effect on P2X7-receptor-induced apoptosis in the anaplastic SiHa and Hela cells. These results point to a novel antiapoptotic effect of estrogen in the cervix that is independent of its mitogenic function. The results also suggest that cancer cervical cells evolved antiapoptotic mechanisms that enable the cells to evade apoptosis and could therefore promote tumor progression.

  7. Quality of life in children with cancer and their normal siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Hilda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Cancer treatment in children influences the quality of life of patients and their families. The Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL inventory is a questionnaire to assess quality of life of the healthy and ill children. Objective To compare quality of life in children with cancer and their normal siblings, and to compare quality of life in those with hematologic malignancies to those with solid tumors. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 5-to-18- year-olds at the Hematology-Oncology Division at Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Medan, North Sumatera, from May to July 2012. The case group (subjects with cancer filled the PedsQL 3.0 and 4.0 questionnaires, while the control group (normal siblings filled only the PedsQL 4.0 questionnaire. Independent T-test was used to compare the quality of life between children with cancer and their normal siblings. Results There were 46 children in each group. The PedsQL 4.0 results in children with cancer and their normal siblings, and PedsQL 3.0 between hematology malignant and solid cancer were as follows: physical function 36.9 vs. 80.7, respectively (95%CI of differences -52.639 to -34.990; P= 0.0001, emotional function 40.4 vs. 69.3, respectively (95%CI of differences -35.912 to -21.914; P=0.0001, social function 71.5 vs. 93.9, respectively (95%CI of differences - 29.238 to -15.587; P=0.0001, school function 20.7 vs. 74.2, respectively (95%CI of differences - 62.124 to -44.832; P=0.0001, and total score 42.1 vs. 79.3, respectively (95%CI of differences - 43.066 to -31.344; P=0.0001. School function was the most affected parameter in children with cancer compared to their normal siblings. Conclusion There is a significant difference in quality of life between children with cancer and their normal siblings, for all four parameters examined by the PedsQL inventory. However, there are no significant differences in quality of life between children with hematologic malignancy and those with

  8. Comparison of membrane fraction proteomic profiles of normal and cancerous human colorectal tissues with gel-assisted digestion and iTRAQ labeling mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Chen, Kuei-Tien; Fan, Chung-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Chen, Yu-Ju; Yu, Jau-Song; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chien, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chien-Peng; Hung, Ray-Ping; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover the membrane protein profile differences between colorectal carcinoma and neighboring normal mucosa from colorectal cancer patients. Information from cellular membrane proteomes can be used not only to study the roles of membrane proteins in fundamental biological processes, but also to discover novel targets for improving the management of colorectal cancer patients. We used solvent extraction and a gel-assisted digestion method, together with isobaric tags with related and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) reagents to label tumoral and adjacent normal tissues in a pairwise manner (n = 8). For high-throughput quantification, these digested labeled peptides were combined and simultaneously analyzed using LC-MS/MS. Using the shotgun approach, we identified a total of 438 distinct proteins from membrane fractions of all eight patients. After comparing protein expression between cancerous and corresponding normal tissue, we identified 34 upregulated and eight downregulated proteins with expression changes greater than twofold (Student's t-test, P assisted digestion and iTRAQ labeling MS is a potential approach for uncovering and comparing membrane protein profiles of tissue samples that has the potential to identify novel biomarkers.

  9. The histological characteristics of clinically normal mucosa adjacent to oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankovic, Milos; Ilic, Miroslav P; Vuckovic, Nada; Bokor-Bratic, Marija

    2013-01-01

    The 'field cancerization' theory tries to explain the risk of local recurrences and development of second primary tumors in oral sqamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. According to this theory it is assumed that clinically normal mucosa adjacent to oral cancer, except molecular, has already developed certain premalignant histopathological changes. The aim of this study was to determine histological characteristics of clinically normal-looking mucosa at different distances from the apparent tumor lesion margins in OSCC patients. Normal-appearing oral mucosa biopsy specimens were obtained from 30 new (untreated) oral cancer patients from sites at a distance of 10 mm and 20 mm from the tumor lesion margins and were compared with normal oral mucosa from 30 control patients with benign oral lesions. A total of 21 patients (70%) in the OSCC group demonstrated histological abnormalities under microscopic examination versus 7 (23.3%) control patients (Poral cancer patients (57%) showed significant difference in incidence and type of histological changes of normal-looking mucosa at a distance of 10 mm from the tumor lesion; 8 (27%) demonstrated reactive changes, 6 (20%) mild dysplasia and 3 (10%) squamous cell carcinoma, compared to histological abnormalities registered in 11 (OSCC) patients (36%) at a distance of 20 mm from the tumor; 10 (33%) displayed reactive changes and 1 (3%) mild dysplasia. Histological abnormalities of clinically normal-looking oral mucosa taken at different distances from the tumor lesion indicated the existence of subclinical field change and represent an important parameter during the assessment of the adequacy of surgical resection margins in oral cancer management.

  10. TE = 32 ms vs TE = 100 ms echo-time (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in prostate cancer: Tumor metabolite depiction and absolute concentrations in tumors and adjacent tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharat, Meer; Payne, Geoffrey S; Morgan, Veronica A; Parker, Chris; Dearnaley, David; deSouza, Nandita M

    2015-10-01

    To compare the depiction of metabolite signals in short and long echo time (TE) prostate cancer spectra at 3T, and to quantify their concentrations in tumors of different stage and grade, and tissues adjacent to tumor. First, single-voxel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectra were acquired from voxels consisting entirely of tumor, as defined on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI and from a biopsy-positive octant, at TEs of 32 msec and 100 msec in 26 prostate cancer patients. Then, in a separate cohort of 26 patients, single-voxel TE = 32 msec MR spectroscopy (MRS) was performed over a partial-tumor region and a matching, contralateral normal-appearing region, defined similarly. Metabolite depiction was compared between TEs using Cramér-Rao lower bounds (CRLB), and absolute metabolite concentrations were calculated from TE = 32 msec spectra referenced to unsuppressed water spectra. Citrate and spermine resonances in tumor were better depicted (had significantly lower CRLB) at TE = 32 msec, while the choline resonance was better depicted at TE = 100 msec. Citrate and spermine concentrations were significantly lower in patients of more advanced stage, significantly lower in Gleason grade 3+4 than 3+3 tumors, and significantly lower than expected from the tumor fraction in partial-tumor voxels (by 14 mM and 4 mM, respectively, P TE than long TE in tumors. Reduction in these concentrations is related to increasing tumor stage and grade in vivo, while reductions in the normal-appearing tissues immediately adjacent to tumor likely reflect tumor field effects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Novel cancerization marker, TP53, and its role in distinguishing normal tissue adjacent to cancerous tissue from normal tissue adjacent to benign tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guo-Yan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histopathological and molecular heterogeneity of normal tissue adjacent to cancerous tissue (NTAC and normal tissue adjacent to benign tissue (NTAB, and the availability of limited specimens make deciphering the mechanisms of carcinogenesis challenging. Our goal was to identify histogenetic biomarkers that could be reliably used to define a transforming fingerprint using RNA in situ hybridization. Methods We evaluated 15 tumor-related RNA in situ hybridization biomarkers using tumor microarray and samples of seven tumor-adjacent normal tissues from 314 patients. Biomarkers were determined using comprehensive statistical methods (significance of support vector machine-based artificial intelligence and area under curve scoring of classification distribution. Results TP53 was found to be a most reliable index (P -7; area under curve >87% for distinguishing NTAC from NTAB, according to the results of a significance panel (BCL10, BECN1, BRCA2, FITH, PTCH11 and TP53. Conclusions The genetic alterations in TP53 between NTAC and NTAB may provide new insight into the field of cancerization and tumor transformation.

  12. Novel cancerization marker, TP53, and its role in distinguishing normal tissue adjacent to cancerous tissue from normal tissue adjacent to benign tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The histopathological and molecular heterogeneity of normal tissue adjacent to cancerous tissue (NTAC) and normal tissue adjacent to benign tissue (NTAB), and the availability of limited specimens make deciphering the mechanisms of carcinogenesis challenging. Our goal was to identify histogenetic biomarkers that could be reliably used to define a transforming fingerprint using RNA in situ hybridization. Methods We evaluated 15 tumor-related RNA in situ hybridization biomarkers using tumor microarray and samples of seven tumor-adjacent normal tissues from 314 patients. Biomarkers were determined using comprehensive statistical methods (significance of support vector machine-based artificial intelligence and area under curve scoring of classification distribution). Results TP53 was found to be a most reliable index (P 87%) for distinguishing NTAC from NTAB, according to the results of a significance panel (BCL10, BECN1, BRCA2, FITH, PTCH11 and TP53). Conclusions The genetic alterations in TP53 between NTAC and NTAB may provide new insight into the field of cancerization and tumor transformation. PMID:23170979

  13. Normal stroma suppresses cancer cell proliferation via mechanosensitive regulation of JMJD1a-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukonen, Riina; Mai, Anja; Georgiadou, Maria; Saari, Markku; De Franceschi, Nicola; Betz, Timo; Sihto, Harri; Ventelä, Sami; Elo, Laura; Jokitalo, Eija; Westermarck, Jukka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Joensuu, Heikki; Grenman, Reidar; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-08-04

    Tissue homeostasis is dependent on the controlled localization of specific cell types and the correct composition of the extracellular stroma. While the role of the cancer stroma in tumour progression has been well characterized, the specific contribution of the matrix itself is unknown. Furthermore, the mechanisms enabling normal-not cancer-stroma to provide tumour-suppressive signals and act as an antitumorigenic barrier are poorly understood. Here we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) generated by normal fibroblasts (NFs) is softer than the CAF matrix, and its physical and structural features regulate cancer cell proliferation. We find that normal ECM triggers downregulation and nuclear exit of the histone demethylase JMJD1a resulting in the epigenetic growth restriction of carcinoma cells. Interestingly, JMJD1a positively regulates transcription of many target genes, including YAP/TAZ (WWTR1), and therefore gene expression in a stiffness-dependent manner. Thus, normal stromal restricts cancer cell proliferation through JMJD1a-dependent modulation of gene expression.

  14. The histological characteristics of clinically normal mucosa adjacent to oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Cankovic

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Histological abnormalities of clinically normal-looking oral mucosa taken at different distances from the tumor lesion indicated the existence of subclinical field change and represent an important parameter during the assessment of the adequacy of surgical resection margins in oral cancer management.

  15. Raman spectra of normal and cancerous mouse mammary gland tissue using near infrared excitation energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Vaman; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Dai, H.; Shukla, N.; Weber, R.; Thakur, J. S.; Freeman, D. C.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Miller, R. F.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra of normal mammary gland tissues, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph nodes have been recorded using fresh tissue from mice. Tumors were induced in mice by subcutaneously injecting 4T1 BALB/c mammary tumor (a highly malignant) cell line. The Raman spectra were collected using the same tissues that were examined by histopathology for determining the cancerous/normal state of the tissue. Differences in various peak intensities, peak shifts and peak ratios were analyzed to determine the Raman spectral features that differentiate mammary gland tumors from non-tumorous tissue. Tissues that were confirmed by pathology as cancerous (tumors) show several distinctive features in the Raman spectra compared to the spectra of the normal tissues. For example, the cancerous tissues show Raman peaks at 621, 642, 1004, 1032, 1175 and 1208 cm-1 that are assignable to amino acids containing aromatic side-chains such as phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. Further, the cancerous tissues show a greatly reduced level of phospholipids compared to the normal tissues. The Raman spectral regions that are sensitive to pathologic alteration in the tissue will be discussed.

  16. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  17. Passive microrheology of normal and cancer cells after ML7 treatment by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyapunova, Elena, E-mail: lyapunova@icmm.ru [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Ak. Korolev Str. 1, Perm, 614013 (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, Kuibyishev Str. 48, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation); Nikituk, Alexander, E-mail: nas@icmm.ru; Bayandin, Yuriy; Naimark, Oleg, E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Ak. Korolev Str. 1, Perm, 614013 (Russian Federation); Rianna, Carmela, E-mail: cr@biophysik.uni-bremen.de; Radmacher, Manfred, E-mail: mr@biophysik.uni-bremen.de [Institute of Biophysics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, NW1, Bremen, 28359 Germany (Germany)

    2016-08-02

    Mechanical properties of living cancer and normal thyroidal cells were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cell mechanics was compared before and after treatment with ML7, which is known to reduce myosin activity and induce softening of cell structures. We recorded force curves with extended dwell time of 6 seconds in contact at maximum forces from 500 pN to 1 nN. Data were analyzed within different frameworks: Hertz fit was applied in order to evaluate differences in Young’s moduli among cell types and conditions, while the fluctuations of the cantilever in contact with cells were analyzed with both conventional algorithms (probability density function and power spectral density) and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We found that cancer cells were softer than normal cells and ML7 had a substantial softening effect on normal cells, but only a marginal one on cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that all recorded signals for normal and cancer cells were monofractal with small differences between their scaling parameters. Finally, the applicability of wavelet-based methods of data analysis for the discrimination of different cell types is discussed.

  18. The absolute environmental performance of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brejnrod, Kathrine Nykjær; Kalbar, Pradip; Petersen, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Our paper presents a novel approach for absolute sustainability assessment of a building's environmental performance. It is demonstrated how the absolute sustainable share of the earth carrying capacity of a specific building type can be estimated using carrying capacity based normalization factors...... sustainability for the standard house were proposed focusing on three measures: minimizing environmental impacts from building construction, minimizing impacts from energy consumption during use phase, and reducing the living area per person. In an intermediate path, absolute sustainability can be obtained...

  19. Hypothesis of mitochondrial oncogenesis as the trigger of normal cells to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianping

    2014-06-01

    The Warburg Effect showed that energy metabolism of cancer cells was similar to prokaryotic cells, which were different from normal eucaryotic cells. The Endosymbiotic Theory offered a plausible explanation that the eucaryotic cells were evolved from prokaryotic cells, by which host cells (ancient prokaryotic cells) had ingested mitochondria (ancient aerobic bacteria), which depended on oxidative phosphorylation rather than glycolysis for generating energy. The alteration of energy metabolism might mean that the survival style of cancer cells were the re-evolution from eucaryotic cells to prokaryotic cells. But how this alteration happened was still unknown. This hypothesis tries to explain how mitochondria take part in the re-evolution from normal cell to cancer cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bladder cancer mapping in Libya based on standardized morbidity ratio and log-normal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhdiri, Maryam Ahmed; Samat, Nor Azah; Mohamed, Zulkifley

    2017-05-01

    Disease mapping contains a set of statistical techniques that detail maps of rates based on estimated mortality, morbidity, and prevalence. A traditional approach to measure the relative risk of the disease is called Standardized Morbidity Ratio (SMR). It is the ratio of an observed and expected number of accounts in an area, which has the greatest uncertainty if the disease is rare or if geographical area is small. Therefore, Bayesian models or statistical smoothing based on Log-normal model are introduced which might solve SMR problem. This study estimates the relative risk for bladder cancer incidence in Libya from 2006 to 2007 based on the SMR and log-normal model, which were fitted to data using WinBUGS software. This study starts with a brief review of these models, starting with the SMR method and followed by the log-normal model, which is then applied to bladder cancer incidence in Libya. All results are compared using maps and tables. The study concludes that the log-normal model gives better relative risk estimates compared to the classical method. The log-normal model has can overcome the SMR problem when there is no observed bladder cancer in an area.

  1. Alteration of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers in human normal ovaries and neoplastic ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bo-Rim; Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Ye-Seul; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Most ovarian cancers originate in the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Ovarian cancers might undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to various mediators or regulators such as EMT-inducing factors. In this study, ovarian tumor specimens from patients were analyzed to demonstrate alteration of EMT-related markers according to benign and malignant types of ovarian cancers. In the three ovarian cancer cell lines, OVCAR-3, SKOV-3, and BG-1, the expression of epithelial (E-cadherin) and mesenchymal (vimentin) cell markers was identified by RNA and protein analysis. OVCAR-3 and BG-1 cells strongly expressed E-cadherin as well as morphological features such as epithelial cells, but vimentin was not observed. In contrast to these cancer cells, SKOV-3 showed a phenotype typical of mesenchymal cells. Alteration of EMT markers and EMT-related transcriptional factors were confirmed in clinical ovarian tissue samples obtained from 74 patients. E-cadherin was expressed in 57.1% of benign tumors, while vimentin was expressed in 83.3% of normal ovaries by immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of E-cadherin and vimentin revealed the phenomenon in the tissue specimens. Evaluation of the EMT-associated transcriptional factors Snail, Slug, and Twist revealed that Snail was overexpressed by 7.1-fold in malignant ovarian cancer compared to normal ovaries or benign tumors. Although expression levels of other factors were higher in benign and malignant ovarian tumors, they were not closely correlated with the aforementioned ovarian cancer types. Overall, Snail may affect the EMT process in ovarian cancer development and upregulation of Snail expression followed by the downregulation of E-cadherin enhances the invasiveness of ovarian cancer.

  2. Comparison of viscoelastic properties of cancer and normal thyroid cells on different stiffness substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique to measure the viscoelastic response of cancer and normal thyroid cells on different stiffness polyacrylamide gels. After applying a step in contact we recorded the stress relaxation of cells in order to measure their viscous and elastic properties. With the help of an extended version of the Hertz model, we could quantify for the first time by AFM the elastic modulus and the dynamic viscosity of cells on substrates with different stiffnesses. We have cultured anaplastic carcinoma and normal thyroid cells on three different substrates: polyacrylamide gels with elastic modulus in a range of 3-5 and 30-40 kPa and "infinitely" stiff Petri dishes. Whereas normal thyroid cells adapted their mechanical properties to different stiffness substrates, cancer cells were less affected by the surrounding stiffness. Normal cells changed the elastic modulus from 1.2 to 1.6 and to 2.6 kPa with increasing substrate stiffness; the dynamic viscosity values varied from 230 to 515 and to 470 Pa·s, accordingly. By contrast, the values for cancer cells were rather constant regardless of substrate stiffness (in average the elastic modulus was 1.3 kPa and the dynamic viscosity was 300 Pa·s). This difference in sensing and reacting to the mechanical properties of the substrate shows that normal and cancer cells interact differently with the neighboring tissue, which may be related to the ability of cancer cells to form metastases.

  3. Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between normal, dysplastic and cancerous oral mucosa: a tissue-engineering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Salman A; Yorucu, Ceyla; Ullah, Muhammad Saad; Rehman, Ihtesham U; Colley, Helen E

    2017-11-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Squamous cell carcinoma, the primary cause of HNC, evolves from normal epithelium through dysplasia before invading the connective tissue to form a carcinoma. However, less than 18% of suspicious oral lesions progress to cancer, with diagnosis currently relying on histopathological evaluation, which is invasive and time consuming. A non-invasive, real-time, point-of-care method could overcome these problems and facilitate regular screening. Raman spectroscopy is a non-invasive optical technique with the ability to extract molecular level information to help determine the functional groups present in a tissue and the molecular conformations of tissue constituents. In the present study, Raman spectroscopy was assessed for its ability to discriminate between normal, dysplastic and HNC. Tissue engineered models of normal, dysplastic and HNC were constructed using normal oral keratinocytes, dysplastic and HNC cell lines, and their biochemical content predicted by interpretation of spectral characteristics. Spectral differences were evident in both the fingerprint (600/cm to 1800/cm) and high wave-number compartments (2800/cm to 3400/cm). Visible differences were seen in peaks relating to lipid content (2881/cm), protein structure (amide I, amide III), several amino acids and nucleic acids (600/cm to 1003/cm). Multivariate data analysis algorithms successfully identified subtypes of dysplasia and cancer, suggesting that Raman spectroscopy not only has the potential to differentiate between normal, pre-malignant and cancerous tissue models but could also be sensitive enough to detect subtypes of dysplasia or cancer on the basis of their subcellular differences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. BMI and breast cancer prognosis benefit: mammography screening reveals differences between normal weight and overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Anna; Grimaldi, Maria; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Rinaldo, Massimo; Capasso, Immacolata; Amore, Alfonso; D'Aiuto, Giuseppe; Giudice, Aldo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Montella, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    Few studies are available on the potential impact of body weight on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected patients. Moreover, it is not known whether body mass index (BMI) could have a different prognostic impact in screen-detected versus symptomatic breast cancer patients. To investigate these unsolved issues, we carried out a retrospective study evaluating the effect of BMI on breast cancer prognosis in screen-detected vs symptomatic breast cancer patients. We conducted a follow-up study on 448 women diagnosed with incident, histologically-confirmed breast cancer. Patients were categorized according to their BMI as normal weight, overweight and obese. Disease free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and BMI curves were compared according to mode of cancer detection. Among screen-detected patients, higher BMI was associated with a significant lower DFS, whereas no significant difference was observed among symptomatic patients. OS showed similar results. In the multivariate analysis adjusting for age, education, tumor size, nodal status, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and menopausal status, the risk for high level of BMI among screen-detected patients did not reach the statistical significance for either recurrence or survival. Our study highlights the potential impact of high bodyweight in breast cancer prognosis, the findings confirm that obesity plays a role in women breast cancer prognosis independently from diagnosis mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression profiles of SnoN in normal and cancerous human tissues support its tumor suppressor role in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine S Jahchan

    Full Text Available SnoN is a negative regulator of TGF-β signaling and also an activator of the tumor suppressor p53 in response to cellular stress. Its role in human cancer is complex and controversial with both pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic activities reported. To clarify its role in human cancer and provide clinical relevance to its signaling activities, we examined SnoN expression in normal and cancerous human esophageal, ovarian, pancreatic and breast tissues. In normal tissues, SnoN is expressed in both the epithelium and the surrounding stroma at a moderate level and is predominantly cytoplasmic. SnoN levels in all tumor epithelia examined are lower than or similar to that in the matched normal samples, consistent with its anti-tumorigenic activity in epithelial cells. In contrast, SnoN expression in the stroma is highly upregulated in the infiltrating inflammatory cells in high-grade esophageal and ovarian tumor samples, suggesting that SnoN may potentially promote malignant progression through modulating the tumor microenvironment in these tumor types. The overall levels of SnoN expression in these cancer tissues do not correlate with the p53 status. However, in human cancer cell lines with amplification of the snoN gene, a strong correlation between increased SnoN copy number and inactivation of p53 was detected, suggesting that the tumor suppressor SnoN-p53 pathway must be inactivated, either through downregulation of SnoN or inactivation of p53, in order to allow cancer cell to proliferate and survive. These data strongly suggest that SnoN can function as a tumor suppressor at early stages of tumorigenesis in human cancer tissues.

  6. Genomic Landscape Established by Allelic Imbalance in the Cancerization Field of a Normal Appearing Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubek, Yasminka; Lang, Wenhua; Vattathil, Selina; Garcia, Melinda; Xu, Li; Huang, Lili; Yoo, Suk-Young; Shen, Li; Lu, Wei; Chow, Chi-Wan; Weber, Zachary; Davies, Gareth; Huang, Jing; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Moran, Cesar; Fujimoto, Junya; Mehran, Reza; El-Zein, Randa; Swisher, Stephen G; Wang, Jing; Fowler, Jerry; Spira, Avrum E; Ehli, Erik A; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Scheet, Paul; Kadara, Humam

    2016-07-01

    Visually normal cells adjacent to, and extending from, tumors of the lung may carry molecular alterations characteristics of the tumor itself, an effect referred to as airway field of cancerization. This airway field has been postulated as a model for early events in lung cancer pathogenesis. Yet the genomic landscape of somatically acquired molecular alterations in airway epithelia of lung cancer patients has remained unknown. To begin to fill this void, we sought to comprehensively characterize the genomic architecture of chromosomal alterations inducing allelic imbalance (AI) in the airway field of the most common type of lung tumors, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To do so, we conducted a genome-wide survey of multiple spatially distributed normal-appearing airways, multiregion tumor specimens, and uninvolved normal tissues or blood from 45 patients with early-stage NSCLC. We detected alterations in airway epithelia from 22 patients, with an increased frequency in NSCLCs of squamous histology. Our data also indicated a spatial gradient of AI in samples at closer proximity to the NSCLC. Chromosome 9 displayed the highest levels of AI and comprised recurrent independent events. Furthermore, the airway field AI included oncogenic gains and tumor suppressor losses in known NSCLC drivers. Our results demonstrate that genome-wide AI is common in the airway field of cancerization, providing insights into early events in the pathogenesis of NSCLC that may comprise targets for early treatment and chemoprevention. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3676-83. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. SU-E-T-168: Evaluation of Normal Tissue Damage in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H [IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer by calculating average survival fraction (SF) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for normal tissue cells. Methods: 20 patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were generated using EclipseTM treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The average SF for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from dose spectrum acquired from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Finally, EUDs for three types of normal tissue of each structure were calculated from average SF. Results: The EUDs of the brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, brachial plexus and etc were calculated. Our analysis indicated that the brainstem can absorb as much as 14.3% of prescription dose to the tumor if the cell line is radiosensitive. In addition, as much as 16.1% and 18.3% of prescription dose were absorbed by the brainstem for moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant cells, respectively. For the spinal cord, the EUDs reached up to 27.6%, 35.0% and 42.9% of prescribed dose for the three types of radiosensitivities respectively. Three types of normal cells for parotid glands can get up to 65.6%, 71.2% and 78.4% of prescription dose, respectively. The maximum EUDs of brachial plexsus were calculated as 75.4%, 76.4% and 76.7% of prescription for three types of normal cell lines. Conclusion: The results indicated that EUD can be used to quantify and evaluate the radiation damage to surrounding normal tissues. Large variation of normal tissue EUDs may come from variation of target volumes and radiation beam orientations among the patients.

  8. Genomic aberrations in normal tissue adjacent to HER2-amplified breast cancers: field cancerization or contaminating tumor cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Lal, Aseem; Benz, Stephen C; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Scott, Gary; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul; Waldman, Fred; Benz, Christopher C

    2012-12-01

    Field cancerization effects as well as isolated tumor cell foci extending well beyond the invasive tumor margin have been described previously to account for local recurrence rates following breast conserving surgery despite adequate surgical margins and breast radiotherapy. To look for evidence of possible tumor cell contamination or field cancerization by genetic effects, a pilot study (Study 1: 12 sample pairs) followed by a verification study (Study 2: 20 sample pairs) were performed on DNA extracted from HER2-positive breast tumors and matching normal adjacent mammary tissue samples excised 1-3 cm beyond the invasive tumor margin. High-resolution molecular inversion probe (MIP) arrays were used to compare genomic copy number variations, including increased HER2 gene copies, between the paired samples; as well, a detailed histologic and immunohistochemical (IHC) re-evaluation of all Study 2 samples was performed blinded to the genomic results to characterize the adjacent normal tissue composition bracketing the DNA-extracted samples. Overall, 14/32 (44 %) sample pairs from both studies produced genome-wide evidence of genetic aberrations including HER2 copy number gains within the adjacent normal tissue samples. The observed single-parental origin of monoallelic HER2 amplicon haplotypes shared by informative tumor-normal pairs, as well as commonly gained loci elsewhere on 17q, suggested the presence of contaminating tumor cells in the genomically aberrant normal samples. Histologic and IHC analyses identified occult 25-200 μm tumor cell clusters overexpressing HER2 scattered in more than half, but not all, of the genomically aberrant normal samples re-evaluated, but in none of the genomically normal samples. These genomic and microscopic findings support the conclusion that tumor cell contamination rather than genetic field cancerization represents the likeliest cause of local clinical recurrence rates following breast conserving surgery, and mandate caution

  9. Raman spectroscopic characterization of urine of normal and cervical cancer subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Raja; Prakasarao, Aruna; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in female worldwide; the present method for diagnosis is the biopsy, Pap smear, colposcopy etc. To overcome the drawbacks of diagnosis an alternative technique is required, optical spectroscopy is a new technique where the discrimination of normal and cancer subjects provides valuable potential information in the diagnostic oncology at an early stage. Raman peaks in the spectra suggest interesting differences in various bio molecules. In this regard, non invasive optical detection of cervical cancer using urine samples by Raman Spectroscopy combined with LDA diagnostic algorithm yields an accuracy of 100% for original and cross validated group respectively. As the results were appreciable it is necessary to carry out the analysis for more number of samples to explore the facts hidden at different stages during the development of cervical cancer.

  10. A method for determining weights for excess relative risk and excess absolute risk when applied in the calculation of lifetime risk of cancer from radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Linda [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Oberschleissheim (Germany); University of Manchester, The Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Schneider, Uwe [University of Zurich, Vetsuisse Faculty, Zurich (Switzerland); Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    Radiation-related risks of cancer can be transported from one population to another population at risk, for the purpose of calculating lifetime risks from radiation exposure. Transfer via excess relative risks (ERR) or excess absolute risks (EAR) or a mixture of both (i.e., from the life span study (LSS) of Japanese atomic bomb survivors) has been done in the past based on qualitative weighting. Consequently, the values of the weights applied and the method of application of the weights (i.e., as additive or geometric weighted means) have varied both between reports produced at different times by the same regulatory body and also between reports produced at similar times by different regulatory bodies. Since the gender and age patterns are often markedly different between EAR and ERR models, it is useful to have an evidence-based method for determining the relative goodness of fit of such models to the data. This paper identifies a method, using Akaike model weights, which could aid expert judgment and be applied to help to achieve consistency of approach and quantitative evidence-based results in future health risk assessments. The results of applying this method to recent LSS cancer incidence models are that the relative EAR weighting by cancer solid cancer site, on a scale of 0-1, is zero for breast and colon, 0.02 for all solid, 0.03 for lung, 0.08 for liver, 0.15 for thyroid, 0.18 for bladder and 0.93 for stomach. The EAR weighting for female breast cancer increases from 0 to 0.3, if a generally observed change in the trend between female age-specific breast cancer incidence rates and attained age, associated with menopause, is accounted for in the EAR model. Application of this method to preferred models from a study of multi-model inference from many models fitted to the LSS leukemia mortality data, results in an EAR weighting of 0. From these results it can be seen that lifetime risk transfer is most highly weighted by EAR only for stomach cancer. However

  11. Polarized Raman spectroscopic characterization of normal and oral cancer blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    In India oral cancer ranks the top due to the habitual usage of tobacco in its various forms and remains the major burden. Hence priority is given for early diagnosis as it is the better solution for cure or to improve the survival rate. For the past three decades, optical spectroscopic techniques have shown its capacity in the discrimination of normal and malignant samples. Many research works have conventional Raman in the effective detection of cancer using the variations in bond vibrations of the molecules. However in addition polarized Raman provides the orientation and symmetry of biomolecules. If so can polarized Raman be the better choice than the conventional Raman in the detection of cancer? The present study aimed to found the answer for the above query. The conventional and polarized Raman spectra were acquired for the same set of blood plasma samples of normal subjects and oral malignant (OSCC) patients. Thus, obtained Raman spectral data were compared using linear discriminant analysis coupled with artificial neural network (LDA-ANN). The depolarization ratio of biomolecules such as antioxidant, amino acid, protein and nucleic acid bases present in blood plasma was proven to be the best attributes in the categorization of the groups. The polarized Raman results were promising in discriminating oral cancer blood plasma from that of normal blood plasma with improved efficiency. The results will be discussed in detail.

  12. Routes of conjugation in normal and cancerous tissue from human lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Gerald M.; Gibby, Elizabeth M.; Mehta, Rekha

    1981-06-01

    The selective toxicity of drugs leading to major advances in antibacterial chemotherapy has often resulted from the identification and exploitation of major biochemical differences between bacterial and mammalian species1. Similar progress has not been made in cancer chemotherapy, partly due to a lack of suitable biochemical differences between normal and cancerous tissue other than in DNA synthesis, but also because of many other problems such as those of metastases and resistance, and the presence in tumours of cells at different states of the cell cycle. Here we report a major biochemical difference in the routes of conjugation between normal lung and tumour tissue from patients with lung cancer. Conjugation with glucuronic acid and sulphate constitute two of the most important pathways of metabolism of drugs, other foreign compounds and hormonal steroids2,3. Using 1-naphthol as a model phenolic substrate, normal peripheral lung tissue formed almost exclusively the sulphate ester conjugate, 1-naphthyl sulphate, whereas tumour tissue from squamous carcinomas from the same patients formed predominantly the glucuronic acid conjugate, 1-naphthyl glucuronide. Such major biochemical differences may be exploitable in the design of selectively toxic cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. 'Getting back to normal' or 'a new type of normal'? A qualitative study of patients' responses to the existential threat of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P; Beesley, H; Fletcher, I; Ablett, J; Holcombe, C; Salmon, P

    2016-01-01

    Existential concerns about cancer have been studied extensively in palliative care but less so in curative settings. The present report aims to describe ways in which patients viewed the continuity or discontinuity of their identity in the face of the mortal threat of cancer. Twenty-eight patients with breast, prostate or lung cancer attending pre-treatment, treatment or follow-up appointments were interviewed about their emotional experiences following diagnosis. Qualitative analysis followed an inductive, constant comparative approach. Patients spoke of 'getting back to normal', but presented two distinct accounts of 'normality'. Some, particularly those only recently diagnosed, maintained continuity to past identity by upholding previous routines, emphasising resilience and minimising the impact of cancer. Others talked of a new 'normality' discontinuous with their past. Most accounts, however, evidenced elements of continuity and discontinuity, often in ostensibly contradictory ways. We suggest that holding contradictory perspectives simultaneously characterises an intermediate stage of adjustment for some patients: between reliance on continuity with the past in the aftermath of diagnosis and, later, a sense of being a new person, changed by cancer. Practitioners should appreciate that patients' wishes for 'normality' can signify very different responses to cancer, and that holding such contradictory orientations is functional, not aberrant. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Patterns of Somatically Acquired Amplifications and Deletions in Apparently Normal Tissues of Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Aghili

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Little is understood about the occurrence of somatic genomic alterations in normal tissues and their significance in the context of disease. Here, we identified potential somatic copy number alterations (pSCNAs in apparently normal ovarian tissue and peripheral blood of 423 ovarian cancer patients. There were, on average, two to four pSCNAs per sample detectable at a tissue-level resolution, although some individuals had orders of magnitude more. Accordingly, we estimated the lower bound of the rate of pSCNAs per cell division. Older individuals and BRCA mutation carriers had more pSCNAs than others. pSCNAs significantly overlapped with Alu and G-quadruplexes, and the affected genes were enriched for signaling and regulation. Some of the amplification/deletion hotspots in pan-cancer genomes were hot spots of pSCNAs in normal tissues as well, suggesting that those regions might be inherently unstable. Prevalence of pSCNA in peripheral blood predicted survival, implying that mutations in normal tissues might have consequences for cancer patients.

  15. p53 binding sites in normal and cancer cells are characterized by distinct chromatin context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Feifei; LoVerso, Peter R; Fisk, Jeffrey N; Zhurkin, Victor B; Cui, Feng

    2017-08-18

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 interacts with DNA in a sequence-dependent manner. Thousands of p53 binding sites have been mapped genome-wide in normal and cancer cells. However, the way p53 selectively binds its cognate sites in different types of cells is not fully understood. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of 25 published p53 cistromes and identified 3,551 and 6,039 'high-confidence' binding sites in normal and cancer cells, respectively. Our analysis revealed 2 distinct epigenetic features underlying p53-DNA interactions in vivo. First, p53 binding sites are associated with transcriptionally active histone marks (H3K4me3 and H3K36me3) in normal-cell chromatin, but with repressive histone marks (H3K27me3) in cancer-cell chromatin. Second, p53 binding sites in cancer cells are characterized by a lower level of DNA methylation than their counterparts in normal cells, probably related to global hypomethylation in cancers. Intriguingly, regardless of the cell type, p53 sites are highly enriched in the endogenous retroviral elements of the ERV1 family, highlighting the importance of this repeat family in shaping the transcriptional network of p53. Moreover, the p53 sites exhibit an unusual combination of chromatin patterns: high nucleosome occupancy and, at the same time, high sensitivity to DNase I. Our results suggest that p53 can access its target sites in a chromatin environment that is non-permissive to most DNA-binding transcription factors, which may allow p53 to act as a pioneer transcription factor in the context of chromatin.

  16. Comparisons of Robustness and Sensitivity between Cancer and Normal Cells by Microarray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Sen Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Robustness is defined as the ability to uphold performance in face of perturbations and uncertainties, and sensitivity is a measure of the system deviations generated by perturbations to the system. While cancer appears as a robust but fragile system, few computational and quantitative evidences demonstrate robustness tradeoffs in cancer. Microarrays have been widely applied to decipher gene expression signatures in human cancer research, and quantification of global gene expression profiles facilitates precise prediction and modeling of cancer in systems biology. We provide several efficient computational methods based on system and control theory to compare robustness and sensitivity between cancer and normal cells by microarray data. Measurement of robustness and sensitivity by linear stochastic model is introduced in this study, which shows oscillations in feedback loops of p53 and demonstrates robustness tradeoffs that cancer is a robust system with some extreme fragilities. In addition, we measure sensitivity of gene expression to perturbations in other gene expression and kinetic parameters, discuss nonlinear effects in feedback loops of p53 and extend our method to robustness-based cancer drug design.

  17. Comparative analysis of gene expression in normal and cancer human prostate cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Rosenberg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in men with malignant tumors. The urgent problem was a search for biomarkers of prostate cancer, which would allow distinguishing between aggressive metastatic and latent tumors. The aim of this work was to search for differentially expressed genes in normal epithelial cells PNT2 and prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, produced from tumors with different aggressiveness and metas­tatic ability. Such genes might be used to create a panel of prognostic markers for aggressiveness and metastasis. Relative gene expression of 65 cancer-related genes was determined by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR. Expression of 29 genes was changed in LNCaP cells, 20 genes in DU145 and 16 genes in PC3 cell lines, compared with normal line PNT2. The obtained data make it possible to conclude that the epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition took place, which involved the loss of epithelial markers, reduced cell adhesion and increased migration. We have also found few differentially expressed genes among 3 prostate cancer cell lines. We have found that genes, involved in cell adhesion (CDH1, invasiveness and metastasis (IL8, CXCL2 and cell cycle control (P16, CCNE1 underwent most changes. These genes might be used for diagnosis and prognosis of invasive metastatic prostate tumors.

  18. Quantitative Relationship Between AUEC of Absolute Neutrophil Count and Duration of Severe Neutropenia for G-CSF in Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Ma, Lian; Schrieber, Sarah J; Rahman, Nam Atiqur; Deisseroth, Albert; Farrell, Ann T; Wang, Yaning; Sinha, Vikram; Marathe, Anshu

    2018-02-02

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the quantitative relationship between duration of severe neutropenia (DSN, the efficacy endpoint) and area under effect curve of absolute neutrophil counts (ANC-AUEC, the pharmacodynamic endpoint), based on data from filgrastim products, a human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Clinical data from filgrastim product comparator and test arms of two randomized, parallel-group, phase III studies in breast cancer patients treated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy were utilized. A zero-inflated Poisson regression model best described the negative correlation between DSN and ANC-AUEC. The models predicted that with 10 × 10 9 day/L of increase in ANC-AUEC, the mean DSN would decrease from 1.1 days to 0.93 day in Trial 1 and from 1.2 days to 1.0 day in Trial 2. The findings of the analysis provide useful information regarding the relationship between ANC and DSN that can be used for dose selection and optimization of clinical trial design for G-CSF. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Array-based sensing of normal, cancerous, and metastatic cells using conjugated fluorescent polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Avinash; Miranda, Oscar R; Phillips, Ronnie; Kim, Ik-Bum; Jerry, D Joseph; Bunz, Uwe H F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2010-01-27

    A family of conjugated fluorescent polymers was used to create an array for cell sensing. Fluorescent conjugated polymers with pendant charged residues provided multivalent interactions with cell membranes, allowing the detection of subtle differences between different cell types on the basis of cell surface features. Highly reproducible characteristic patterns were obtained from different cell types as well as from isogenic cell lines, enabling the identification of the cell type as well differentiating between normal, cancerous, and metastatic isogenic cell types with high accuracy.

  2. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babahosseini, H. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Carmichael, B. [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Strobl, J.S. [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Mahmoodi, S.N., E-mail: nmahmoodi@eng.ua.edu [Nonlinear Intelligent Structures Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0276 (United States); Agah, M., E-mail: agah@vt.edu [VT MEMS Laboratory, The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  3. New Castanospermine Glycoside Analogues Inhibit Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis without Affecting Normal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Ghada; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima; Sanchez-Fernandez, Elena M.; Risquez-Cuadro, Rocío; Fernandez, José M. Garcia; Ortiz-Mellet, Carmen; Ahidouch, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    sp2-Iminosugar-type castanospermine analogues have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity. However, their effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism at play are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of two representatives, namely the pseudo-S- and C-octyl glycoside 2-oxa-3-oxocastanospermine derivatives SO-OCS and CO-OCS, on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and MCF-10A mammary normal cell lines. We found that SO-OCS and CO-OCS inhibited breast cancer cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect is specific to breast cancer cells as both molecules had no impact on normal MCF-10A cell proliferation. Both drugs induced a cell cycle arrest. CO-OCS arrested cell cycle at G1 and G2/M in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231cells respectively. In MCF-7 cells, the G1 arrest is associated with a reduction of CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4), cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, pRb phosphorylation, and an overexpression of p21Waf1/Cip1. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CO-OCS reduced CDK1 but not cyclin B1 expression. SO-OCS accumulated cells in G2/M in both cell lines and this blockade was accompanied by a decrease of CDK1, but not cyclin B1 expression. Furthermore, both drugs induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the increased percentage of annexin V positive cells and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Interestingly, in normal MCF-10A cells the two drugs failed to modify cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclins, or CDKs expression. These results demonstrate that the effect of CO-OCS and SO-OCS is triggered by both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting that these castanospermine analogues may constitute potential anti-cancer agents against breast cancer. PMID:24124558

  4. New castanospermine glycoside analogues inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis without affecting normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Allan

    Full Text Available sp²-Iminosugar-type castanospermine analogues have been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity. However, their effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis and the molecular mechanism at play are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effect of two representatives, namely the pseudo-S- and C-octyl glycoside 2-oxa-3-oxocastanospermine derivatives SO-OCS and CO-OCS, on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and MCF-10A mammary normal cell lines. We found that SO-OCS and CO-OCS inhibited breast cancer cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect is specific to breast cancer cells as both molecules had no impact on normal MCF-10A cell proliferation. Both drugs induced a cell cycle arrest. CO-OCS arrested cell cycle at G1 and G2/M in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells respectively. In MCF-7 cells, the G1 arrest is associated with a reduction of CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4, cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression, pRb phosphorylation, and an overexpression of p21(Waf1/Cip1. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CO-OCS reduced CDK1 but not cyclin B1 expression. SO-OCS accumulated cells in G2/M in both cell lines and this blockade was accompanied by a decrease of CDK1, but not cyclin B1 expression. Furthermore, both drugs induced apoptosis as demonstrated by the increased percentage of annexin V positive cells and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Interestingly, in normal MCF-10A cells the two drugs failed to modify cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cyclins, or CDKs expression. These results demonstrate that the effect of CO-OCS and SO-OCS is triggered by both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting that these castanospermine analogues may constitute potential anti-cancer agents against breast cancer.

  5. Synuclein gamma predicts poor clinical outcome in colon cancer with normal levels of carcinoembryonic antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Xiaofang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synuclein gamma (SNCG, initially identified as a breast cancer specific gene, is aberrantly expressed in many different malignant tumors but rarely expressed in matched nonneoplastic adjacent tissues. In this study, we investigated the prognostic potential of SNCG in colon cancer particularly in the patients with normal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA levels. Methods SNCG levels were assessed immunohistochemically in cancer tissues from 229 colon adenocarcinoma patients with a mean follow-up of 44 months. Correlations between SNCG levels and clinicopathologic features, preoperative serum CEA level, and clinical outcome were analyzed statistically using SPSS. Results SNCG levels in colon adenocarcinoma were closely associated with intravascular embolus and tumor recurrence but independent of preoperative serum CEA levels. SNCG expression was an independent prognostic factor of a shorter disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS (P P = 0.001, P = 0.001, 0.002 for 97 patients with normal preoperative serum CEA level. Conclusions Our results suggest for the first time that SNCG is a new independent predicator for poor prognosis in patients with colon adenocarcinoma, including those with normal CEA levels. Combination of CEA with SNCG improves prognostic evaluation for patients with colon adenocarcinoma.

  6. Discrimination of premalignant lesions and cancer tissues from normal gastric tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuwen; Chen, Changshui; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of early detection of gastric cancer using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy (RS) by distinguishing premalignant lesions (adenomatous polyp, n=27) and cancer tissues (adenocarcinoma, n=33) from normal gastric tissues (n=45) is evaluated. Significant differences in Raman spectra are observed among the normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues at 936, 1003, 1032, 1174, 1208, 1323, 1335, 1450, and 1655 cm-1. Diverse statistical methods are employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classifying the Raman spectra of different types of ex vivo gastric tissues, including principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and naive Bayesian classifier (NBC) techniques. Compared with PCA-LDA algorithms, PCA-NBC techniques together with leave-one-out, cross-validation method provide better discriminative results of normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues, resulting in superior sensitivities of 96.3%, 96.9%, and 96.9%, and specificities of 93%, 100%, and 95.2%, respectively. Therefore, NIR RS associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for early diagnosis of gastric premalignant lesions and cancer tissues in molecular level.

  7. Quantitative analysis of collagen change between normal and cancerous thyroid tissues based on SHG method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwen; Huang, Zufang; Xi, Gangqin; Chen, Yongjian; Lin, Duo; Wang, Jing; Li, Zuanfang; Sun, Liqing; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Rong

    2012-03-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is proved to be a high spatial resolution, large penetration depth and non-photobleaching method. In our study, SHG method was used to investigate the normal and cancerous thyroid tissue. For SHG imaging performance, system parameters were adjusted for high-contrast images acquisition. Each x-y image was recorded in pseudo-color, which matches the wavelength range in the visible spectrum. The acquisition time for a 512×512-pixels image was 1.57 sec; each acquired image was averaged four frames to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Our results indicated that collagen presence as determined by counting the ratio of the SHG pixels over the whole pixels for normal and cancerous thyroid tissues were 0.48+/-0.05, 0.33+/-0.06 respectively. In addition, to quantitatively assess collagen-related changes, we employed GLCM texture analysis to the SHG images. Corresponding results showed that the correlation both fell off with distance in normal and cancerous group. Calculated value of Corr50 (the distance where the correlation crossed 50% of the initial correlation) indicated significant difference. This study demonstrates that SHG method can be used as a complementary tool in thyroid histopathology.

  8. Identification of genes with altered expression in medullary breast cancer vs. ductal breast cancer and normal breast epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Benoit, Vivian; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2006-01-01

    Medullary breast cancer (MCB) is a morphologically and biologically distinct subtype that, despite cytologically highly malignant characteristics, has a favorable prognosis compared to the more common infiltrating ductal breast carcinoma. MCB metastasizes less frequently, which has been attributed...... to both immunological and endogenous cellular factors, although little is known about the distinct biology of MCB that may contribute to the improved outcome of MCB patients. To identify candidate genes, we performed gene array expression analysis of cell lines of MCB, ductal breast cancer and normal......) gene families, Vav1, monoglyceride lipase and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme, exhibited altered expression in MCB vs. ductal breast cancer, and the differences for some of these genes were confirmed on an extended panel of cell lines by quantitative PCR. Immunohistochemical analysis further established...

  9. Monoallelic chromatin conformation flanking long-range silenced domains in cancer-derived and normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenic Di Paola

    Full Text Available Epigenetic inactivation of chromatin plays an important role in determining cell phenotype in both normal and cancer cells, but our knowledge is still incomplete with respect to any potential monoallelic nature of the phenomenon. We have genotyped DNA isolated from chromatin of two colorectal cancer-derived lines and a culture of normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC, which was immunoprecipitated with antibodies to acetylated vs. methylated histone H3K9, and presented the data as B allele frequency differences over multiple single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP moving window averages. [B allele is an arbitrary term defined as one of the two alleles at any given SNP, named A and B]. Three different validation tests confirmed that peaks exhibiting differences represented monoallelic domains. These complementary tests confirmed the following: 1 genes in the regions of high B allele frequency difference were expressed monoallelically; 2 in normal cells all five imprinting control regions which carried heterozygous SNPs were characterized by B allele difference peaks; and 3 the haplotypes in the B allele difference peaks were faithfully maintained in the chromatin immunoprecipitated with the respective antibodies. In both samples most of the monoallelic domains were found at the boundaries between regions of open and closed chromatin. With respect to the cancer line, this supports the established concept of conformation spreading, but the results from the normal cells were unexpected. Since these cells were polyclonal, the monoallelic structures were probably not determined by random choice as occurs in X-inactivation, so we propose that epigenetic inactivation in some domains may be heritable and polymorphic in normal human cells.

  10. Novel antioxidants are not toxic to normal tissues but effectively kill cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Aladedunye, Felix; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Li, Dongping; Thomas, James; Kovalchuk, Olga; Przybylski, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals are formed as a result of cellular processes and play a key role in predisposition to and development of numerous diseases and of premature aging. Recently, we reported the syntheses of a number of novel phenolic antioxidants for possible application in food industry. In the present study, analyses of the cellular processes and molecular gene expression effects of some of the novel antioxidants in normal human tissues and in cancer cells were undertaken. Results indicated that whereas the examined antioxidants showed no effects on morphology and gene expression of normal human oral and gingival epithelial tissues, they exerted a profound cell killing effect on breast cancer cells, including on chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer cells and on oral squamous carcinoma cells. Among the tested antioxidants, N-decyl-N-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanamide and N-decyl-N-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanamide were the most promising, with excellent potential for cancer treatment. Moreover, our gene expression databases can be used as a roadmap for future analysis of mechanisms of antioxidant action. PMID:23917379

  11. Human papillomavirus prevalence in women with normal cytology and with cervical cancer in Natal, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, José Veríssimo; Meissner, Rosely de Vasconcellos; Carvalho, Maria Goretti Freire; Fernandes, Thales Allyrio Araújo de Medeiros; Azevedo, Paulo Roberto Medeiros; de Azevedo, Judson Weber Veríssimo; de Araújo, Josélio Maria Galvão

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical specimens obtained from women with normal cytology and with cervical cancer, in order to evaluate their correlation with health status and demographic characteristics, as well as sexual and reproductive activity in women treated at a cancer reference hospital in Natal, Northeast Brazil. A total of 158 women were divided into 2 groups according to their health status: group I comprised 110 women with normal cytology, and group II comprised 48 women with cervical cancer. Cervical smears were analyzed by cytological or histopathological examination for the detection of cytological alterations, and by PCR for HPV DNA detection using MY09/11 primers, followed by HPV genotyping by dot blot hybridization. Results showed overall HPV prevalence to be 24.5% in group I, with 19.1% of patients having single infection and 5.4% double infection. The HPV prevalence in group II was 85.4%, with 79.2% of patients having single and 6.2% double infection. We identified 10 different HPV genotypes, most with high oncogenic potential. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype in the two studied groups, followed by HPV 58 and HPV 18. High-risk HPV genital infection, chronological age, ethnicity, early onset of sexual and reproductive activities, multiple sexual partners and smoking increased the risk for cervical cancer.

  12. Absolute concentrations of mRNA for type I and type VI collagen in the canine meniscus in normal and ACL-deficient knee joints obtained by RNase protection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildey, G M; Billetz, A C; Matyas, J R; Adams, M E; McDevitt, C A

    2001-07-01

    Relatively little is known about the cellular and molecular responses of the knee joint meniscus to joint injury, despite the functional importance of the tissue. We investigated how meniscus cells respond to joint injury in the early stages of post-traumatic osteoarthritis by characterizing the changes in matrix gene expression in menisci at 3 and 12 weeks post-surgery in dogs in which the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in one joint was transected and the other unoperated joint served as a control. Changes in the total RNA and DNA concentrations of the menisci were determined. Absolute concentrations of the mRNA of the COL1A1 gene of type 1 collagen, the major fibrillar collagen of the meniscus, and the COL6A3 gene of type VI collagen, a major repair molecule, were determined by quantitative ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay. The concentration of total RNA in medial and lateral menisci increased from 40 to 60 microg RNA/g wet wt in unoperated, control joints to 200-350 microg RNA/g wet wt in ACL-deficient joints. No significant changes were detected in the concentration of DNA (900-1200 microg DNA/g wet wt). Low concentrations of COL1A1 (2-3 pmol mRNA/g DNA) and COL6A3 (0.3-0.6 pmol mRNA/g DNA) mRNA transcripts were measured in normal menisci. ACL-deficiency induced a 20-38 fold increase in COL1A1 and COL6A3 mRNA concentration at 3 weeks, and an 11-19 fold increase at 12 weeks post-surgery. In general, the increase in COL1A1 and COL6A3 mRNA concentrations was greater in medial menisci than in lateral menisci. These results demonstrate that the menisci initiate a vigorous biosynthetic response to transection of the ACL.

  13. Difference in membrane repair capacity between cancer cell lines and a normal cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; McNeil, Anna K.; Novak, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation-based treatments and other therapies that permeabilize the plasma membrane have been shown to be more devastating to malignant cells than to normal cells. In this study, we asked if a difference in repair capacity could explain this observed difference in sensitivity. Membrane...... repair was investigated by disrupting the plasma membrane using laser followed by monitoring fluorescent dye entry over time in seven cancer cell lines, an immortalized cell line, and a normal primary cell line. The kinetics of repair in living cells can be directly recorded using this technique......, providing a sensitive index of repair capacity. The normal primary cell line of all tested cell lines exhibited the slowest rate of dye entry after laser disruption and lowest level of dye uptake. Significantly, more rapid dye uptake and a higher total level of dye uptake occurred in six of the seven tested...

  14. The selective effect of plasma activated medium in an in vitro co-culture of liver cancer and normal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, J.; Lu, X.; He, G.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a co-culture system with liver cancer cell line HepG2 and normal cell line L02 is used to investigate the selective effect on cancer and normal cells by plasma activated medium (PAM), which is closer to the real environment where cancer cells develop. Besides, the co-culture system is a better model to study the selective effect than the widely used separate culture systems, where the cancer cell line and normal cell line are cultured independently. By using the co-culture system, it is found that there is an optimum dose of PAM to induce significant cancer cell apoptosis while keeping minimum damage to normal cells.

  15. Fluorescence Characteristics and Lifetime Images of Photosensitizers of Talaporfin Sodium and Sodium Pheophorbide a in Normal and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Awasthi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime images of talaporfin sodium and sodium-pheophorbide a, which can be regarded as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, were measured in normal and cancer cells. The reduction of the fluorescence intensity by photoirradiation was observed for both photosensitizers in both cells, but the quenching rate was much faster in cancer cells than in normal cells. These results are explained in terms of the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species via photoexcitation of these photosensitizers in cancer cells. The fluorescence lifetimes of both photosensitizers in cancer cells are different from those in normal cells, which originates from the different intracellular environments around the photosensitizers between normal and cancer cells.

  16. ABSOLUTE NEUTRINO MASSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schechter, J.; Shahid, M. N.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos.......We discuss the possibility of using experiments timing the propagation of neutrino beams over large distances to help determine the absolute masses of the three neutrinos....

  17. Investigating the backscattering characteristics of individual normal and cancerous cells based on experimentally determined three-dimensional refractive index distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Chen; Su, Jing-Wei; Chang, Chih-Chiang; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2012-12-01

    The progression of epithelial dysplasia is accompanied by changes of sub-cellular structures which alter light scattering, particularly backscattering, properties of epithelial cells. In this study, we quantified the refractive index (RI) distributions of normal and cancerous epithelial cells of skin and oral cavity using digital holographic microtomography and investigated the backscattering characteristics of the cells using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The results show that cancerous cells present higher average values of nuclear and nucleolar RI and a higher standard deviation of cytoplasmic RI than normal cells. Both the total scattering and backscattering cross-sections of the cancerous cells are significantly higher than those of the normal cells.

  18. Absolute Lymphocyte Count Recovery Independently Predicts Outcome in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Experience From a Tertiary Care Cancer Center of a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anshul; Kapoor, Gauri; Jain, Sandeep; Bajpai, Ram

    2015-04-01

    Accurate risk stratification is essential for successful treatment outcome in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Early recovery of absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) during induction therapy is emerging as a reliable favorable prognostic indicator that may hold its relevance in resource-constraint settings. This is a retrospective chart review of medical records of 212 patients of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, aged less than 18 years, treated between January 1996 and December 2009. Time to lymphocyte recovery was analyzed with respect to various prognostic factors and survival and Martingale residuals were used to define ALC cut-offs. High-risk disease characteristics including older age (10 y and older), National Cancer Institute high risk, and central nervous system disease at diagnosis were associated with delayed lymphocyte recovery. The 5-year event-free, relapse-free, and overall survival of patients with day 15 ALC of ≥ 500 cells/µL and day 29 ALC of ≥ 1000 cells/µL was 81.7% ± 4%, 86.4% ± 2.8%, 91.0% ± 3%, respectively, compared with those with delayed recovery (16.6% ± 5.6%, 19.3% ± 6.4%, 32.8% ± 7.2%, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis both these ALC cut-offs retained their significance as prognostic variables of survival. Our analysis revealed ALC to be an important independent predictor of treatment outcome and may provide key prognostic information in settings where minimal residual disease-based risk stratification is not feasible.

  19. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  20. A van der Waals-like Transition Between Normal and Cancerous Phases in Cell Populations Dynamics of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Kang; Wang, Li-fang; Shen, Jian; Yousif, Alssadig A. M.; He, Peng; Shao, Dan-dan; Zhang, Xiao-min; Kirunda, John B.; Jia, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Based on a deterministic continuous model of cell populations dynamics in the colonic crypt and in colorectal cancer, we propose four combinations of feedback mechanisms in the differentiations from stem cells (SCs) to transit cells (TCs) and then to differentiated cells (DCs), the four combinations include the double linear (LL), the linear and saturating (LS), the saturating and linear (SL), and the double saturating (SS) feedbacks, respectively. The relative fluctuations of the population of SCs, TCs, and DCs around equilibrium states with four feedback mechanisms are studied by using the Langevin method. With the increasing of net growth rate of TCs, it is found that the Fano factors of TCs and DCs go to a peak in a transient phase, and then increase again to infinity in the cases of LS and SS feedbacks. The “up-down-up” characteristic on the Fano factor (like the van der Waals loop) demonstrates that there exists a transient phase between the normal and cancerous phases, our novel findings suggest that the mathematical model with LS or SS feedback might be better to elucidate the dynamics of a normal and abnormal (cancerous) phases. PMID:27857154

  1. A van der Waals-like Transition Between Normal and Cancerous Phases in Cell Populations Dynamics of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Kang; Wang, Li-Fang; Shen, Jian; Yousif, Alssadig A. M.; He, Peng; Shao, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Kirunda, John B.; Jia, Ya

    2016-11-01

    Based on a deterministic continuous model of cell populations dynamics in the colonic crypt and in colorectal cancer, we propose four combinations of feedback mechanisms in the differentiations from stem cells (SCs) to transit cells (TCs) and then to differentiated cells (DCs), the four combinations include the double linear (LL), the linear and saturating (LS), the saturating and linear (SL), and the double saturating (SS) feedbacks, respectively. The relative fluctuations of the population of SCs, TCs, and DCs around equilibrium states with four feedback mechanisms are studied by using the Langevin method. With the increasing of net growth rate of TCs, it is found that the Fano factors of TCs and DCs go to a peak in a transient phase, and then increase again to infinity in the cases of LS and SS feedbacks. The “up-down-up” characteristic on the Fano factor (like the van der Waals loop) demonstrates that there exists a transient phase between the normal and cancerous phases, our novel findings suggest that the mathematical model with LS or SS feedback might be better to elucidate the dynamics of a normal and abnormal (cancerous) phases.

  2. The effect of Stokes shift in the discrimination of urine of cervical cancer from normal subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Brindha, Elumalai; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Stokes shift spectroscopy has been considered as a potential tool in characterization of multiple components present in tissues and biofluids. Since, the intensity and resolution of the fluorophores depends on the Stokes shift, different opinion has been reflected by the researchers in fixing the Stokes shift. Also, not many studies have been reported on the characterization of biofluids and especially on the diagnosis of cancer. Urine is considered as an important diagnostic biofluid as it is rich in many metabolites where many of them are native fluorophores. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the urine of normal subjects and patients with cervical cancer as function of different Stokes shift. It is observed that Neopterin and Riboflavin are the main fluorophores contribute to the variation between normal and cervical cancer subjects. Ratio variables based linear discriminant analysis shows that the Stokes shift of 40 nm and 60 nm may be considered for better characterization with better signal to noise ratio when compared to others.

  3. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cell-Type-Specific Gene Programs of the Normal Human Nephron Define Kidney Cancer Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, David; Eriksson, Pontus; Krawczyk, Krzysztof; Nilsson, Helén; Hansson, Jennifer; Veerla, Srinivas; Sjölund, Jonas; Höglund, Mattias; Johansson, Martin E; Axelson, Håkan

    2017-08-08

    Comprehensive transcriptome studies of cancers often rely on corresponding normal tissue samples to serve as a transcriptional reference. In this study, we performed in-depth analyses of normal kidney tissue transcriptomes from the TCGA and demonstrate that the histological variability in cellularity, inherent in the kidney architecture, lead to considerable transcriptional differences between samples. This should be considered when comparing expression profiles of normal and cancerous kidney tissues. We exploited these differences to define renal-cell-specific gene signatures and used these as a framework to analyze renal cell carcinoma (RCC) ontogeny. Chromophobe RCCs express FOXI1-driven genes that define collecting duct intercalated cells, whereas HNF-regulated genes, specific for proximal tubule cells, are an integral part of clear cell and papillary RCC transcriptomes. These networks may be used as a framework for understanding the interplay between genomic changes in RCC subtypes and the lineage-defining regulatory machinery of their non-neoplastic counterparts. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonlinear optical microscopy for histology of fresh normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues.

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    Wenyan Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of only 1-5%. The acceleration of intraoperative histological examination would be beneficial for better management of pancreatic cancer, suggesting an improved survival. Nonlinear optical methods based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and second harmonic generation (SHG of intrinsic optical biomarkers show the ability to visualize the morphology of fresh tissues associated with histology, which is promising for real-time intraoperative evaluation of pancreatic cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate whether the nonlinear optical imaging methods have the ability to characterize pancreatic histology at cellular resolution, we studied different types of pancreatic tissues by using label-free TPEF and SHG. Compared with other routine methods for the preparation of specimens, fresh tissues without processing were found to be most suitable for nonlinear optical imaging of pancreatic tissues. The detailed morphology of the normal rat pancreas was observed and related with the standard histological images. Comparatively speaking, the preliminary images of a small number of chemical-induced pancreatic cancer tissues showed visible neoplastic differences in the morphology of cells and extracellular matrix. The subcutaneous pancreatic tumor xenografts were further observed using the nonlinear optical microscopy, showing that most cells are leucocytes at 5 days after implantation, the tumor cells begin to proliferate at 10 days after implantation, and the extracellular collagen fibers become disordered as the xenografts grow. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, nonlinear optical imaging was used to characterize the morphological details of fresh pancreatic tissues for the first time. We demonstrate that it is possible to provide real-time histological evaluation of pancreatic cancer by the nonlinear optical methods, which present an

  6. A novel approach for determining cancer genomic breakpoints in the presence of normal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tsueng Liu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available CDKN2A (encodes p16(INK4A and p14(ARF deletion, which results in both Rb and p53 inactivation, is the most common chromosomal anomaly in human cancers. To precisely map the deletion breakpoints is important to understanding the molecular mechanism of genomic rearrangement and may also be useful for clinical applications. However, current methods for determining the breakpoint are either of low resolution or require the isolation of relatively pure cancer cells, which can be difficult for clinical samples that are typically contaminated with various amounts of normal host cells. To overcome this hurdle, we have developed a novel approach, designated Primer Approximation Multiplex PCR (PAMP, for enriching breakpoint sequences followed by genomic tiling array hybridization to locate the breakpoints. In a series of proof-of-concept experiments, we were able to identify cancer-derived CDKN2A genomic breakpoints when more than 99.9% of wild type genome was present in a model system. This design can be scaled up with bioinformatics support and can be applied to validate other candidate cancer-associated loci that are revealed by other more systemic but lower throughput assays.

  7. NGS Absolute Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Absolute Gravity data (78 stations) was received in July 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Gravity Value, Uncertainty, and Vertical Gradient. The...

  8. Array Based Sensing of Normal, Cancerous and Metastatic Cells using Conjugated Fluorescent Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Avinash; Miranda, Oscar R.; Phillips, Ronnie; Kim, Ik-Bum; Jerry, D. Joseph; Bunz, Uwe H. F.; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2010-01-01

    A family of conjugated fluorescent polymers was used to create an array for cell sensing. Fluorescent conjugated polymers with pendant charged residues provided multivalent interactions with cell membranes, allowing the detection of subtle differences between different cell types on the basis of cell surface characteristics. Highly reproducible characteristic patterns were obtained from different cell types as well as from isogenic cell lines, enabling the identification of cell type as well differentiating between normal, cancerous and metastatic isogenic cell types with high accuracy. PMID:20039629

  9. Wnt/β-catenin Signaling in Normal and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C. Valkenburg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Wnt ligands to initiate a signaling cascade that results in cytoplasmic stabilization of, and nuclear localization of, β-catenin underlies their ability to regulate progenitor cell differentiation. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying Wnt/β-catenin signaling and how the pathway regulates normal differentiation of stem cells in the intestine, mammary gland, and prostate. We will also discuss how dysregulation of the pathway is associated with putative cancer stem cells and the potential therapeutic implications of regulating Wnt signaling.

  10. Expression of a family of noncoding mitochondrial RNAs distinguishes normal from cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burzio, Verónica A.; Villota, Claudio; Villegas, Jaime; Landerer, Eduardo; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Martínez, Ronny; Lopez, Constanza; Gaete, Fancy; Toro, Viviana; Rodriguez, Ximena; Burzio, Luis O.

    2009-01-01

    We reported the presence in human cells of a noncoding mitochondrial RNA that contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 815 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). The transcript contains a stem-loop structure and is expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. Here, we demonstrate that, in addition to this transcript, normal human proliferating cells in culture express 2 antisense mitochondrial transcripts. These transcripts also contain stem-loop structures but strikingly they are down-regulated in tumor cell lines and tumor cells present in 17 different tumor types. The differential expression of these transcripts distinguishes normal from tumor cells and might contribute a unique vision on cancer biology and diagnostics. PMID:19470459

  11. Cancer antigen 125 after delivery in women with a normal pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal B; Andersen, Malene R; Bjørngaard, Brian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish reference intervals for cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) in women with expected normal pregnancy, delivery, and early postpartum period. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Obstetrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte...... the gestational period and around delivery. RESULTS: CA-125 was fairly stable below 35 U/mL during pregnancy but increased markedly during vaginal delivery, to a minor degree during emergency cesarean section, and only slightly during elective cesarean section. In the early postpartum period, CA-125 decreased...... it unlikely that small fluctuations in CA-125 can be clinically useful for identifying other conditions. Measuring CA-125 around the time of delivery is not recommended. Gestational age-specific reference intervals during normal pregnancy are not needed....

  12. Decoherence at absolute zero

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Supurna

    2005-01-01

    We present an analytical study of the loss of quantum coherence at absolute zero. Our model consists of a harmonic oscillator coupled to an environment of harmonic oscillators at absolute zero. We find that for an Ohmic bath, the offdiagonal elements of the density matrix in the position representation decay as a power law in time at late times. This slow loss of coherence in the quantum domain is qualitatively different from the exponential decay observed in studies of high temperature envir...

  13. Temsirolimus induced structural transition of cancerous renal cystatin to normal form in rats: In vitro mechanistic approach underlying renal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Anas; Ahmed, Azaj; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-03-01

    Globally, renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) represent a major portion of patients suffering from cancer. Temsirolimus is an anti-renal cancer drug that has already been approved in poor-risk metastatic RCC (mRCC) patients. In our present study, we have evaluated the in vitro effect of varying concentrations of temsirolimus on cancerous rat kidney cystatin; renal cancer was induced in rats making use of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN). It has already been reported that cancerous rat kidney cystatin performs its activity in an efficacious manner as compared to normal rat kidney cystatin, so here an attempt was made to see the effect of temsirolimus on this increased activity of cystatin in renal cancers. Anti-papain activity assay was utilized to see this effect and it was found that temsirolimus reduces the increased activity of cancerous rat kidney cystatin similar to that of normal rat kidney cystatin. Further, to have an insight into temsirolimus induced structural alterations in cancerous rat kidney cystatin; various spectroscopic assays viz. UV, Fluorescence, Circular dichroism (CD) and FTIR spectroscopy were employed. UV and Fluorescence spectroscopy shows cancerous rat kidney cystatin transformation to normal form in the presence of temsirolimus. FTIR and CD spectroscopy confirmed the complete structural reversion of cancerous rat kidney cystatin to normal form in the presence of 40μM temsirolimus. Thus, it can said that temsirolimus causes renal cystatin to revert to normal form; the increased activity of renal cystatin observed in incidences of renal cancer is restored back to normal thereby halting the progression of renal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Unraveling the microenvironmental influences on the normal mammary gland and induction and progression of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigelt, Britta; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-26

    The normal mammary gland and invasive breast cancer are both complex 'organs' composed of multiple cell types as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensional (3D) space. Conventionally, both normal and malignant breast cells are studied in vitro as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of epithelial cells, which results in the loss of structure and tissue function. Many laboratories are now investigating regulation of signaling function in normal mammary gland using 3D cultures. However, it is important also to assay malignant breast cells ex vivo in a physiologically relevant environment to more closely mimic tumor architecture, signal transduction regulation and tumor behavior in vivo. Here we present the potential of these 3D models for drug testing, target validation and guidance of patient selection for clinical trials. We argue also that in order to get full insight into the biology of the normal and malignant breast, and to create in vivo-like models for therapeutic approaches in humans, we need to continue to create more complex heterotypic models to approach the full context the cells encounter in the human body.

  15. Utilizing a reference material for assessing absolute tumor mechanical properties in modality independent elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Kyu; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    There is currently no reliable method for early characterization of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) [1,2]. Given that disruption of normal structural architecture occurs in cancer-bearing tissue, we hypothesize that further structural changes occur in response to NAC. Consequently, we are investigating the use of modalityindependent elastography (MIE) [3-8] as a method for monitoring mechanical integrity to predict long term outcomes in NAC. Recently, we have utilized a Demons non-rigid image registration method that allows 3D elasticity reconstruction in abnormal tissue geometries, making it particularly amenable to the evaluation of breast cancer mechanical properties. While past work has reflected relative elasticity contrast ratios [3], this study improves upon that work by utilizing a known stiffness reference material within the reconstruction framework such that a stiffness map becomes an absolute measure. To test, a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel phantom and a silicone rubber mock mouse tumor phantom were constructed with varying mechanical stiffness. Results showed that an absolute measure of stiffness could be obtained based on a reference value. This reference technique demonstrates the ability to generate accurate measurements of absolute stiffness to characterize response to NAC. These results support that `referenced MIE' has the potential to reliably differentiate absolute tumor stiffness with significant contrast from that of surrounding tissue. The use of referenced MIE to obtain absolute quantification of biomarkers is also translatable across length scales such that the characterization method is mechanics-consistent at the small animal and human application.

  16. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babahosseini, H; Carmichael, B; Strobl, J S; Mahmoodi, S N; Agah, M

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparing cancer vs normal gene expression profiles identifies new disease entities and common transcriptional programs in AML patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jendholm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    in identifying expression changes fundamental to disease etiology. Here we present a method that facilitates the comparison of any cancer sample to its nearest normal cellular counterpart, using acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as a model. We first generated a gene expression-based landscape of the normal...

  18. Evaluation of algorithm methods for fluorescence spectra of cancerous and normal human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The paper focus on the various algorithms on to unravel the fluorescence spectra by unmixing methods to identify cancerous and normal human tissues from the measured fluorescence spectroscopy. The biochemical or morphologic changes that cause fluorescence spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological approach; therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases for in vivo use. The method can further identify tissue biomarkers by decomposing the spectral contributions of different fluorescent molecules of interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of blind source un-mixing methods (backward model) and spectral fitting approaches (forward model) in decomposing the contributions of key fluorescent molecules from the tissue mixture background when certain selected excitation wavelength is applied. Pairs of adenocarcinoma as well as normal tissues confirmed by pathologist were excited by selective wavelength of 340 nm. The emission spectra of resected fresh tissue were used to evaluate the relative changes of collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and Flavin by various spectral un-mixing methods. Two categories of algorithms: forward methods and Blind Source Separation [such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF)] will be introduced and evaluated. The purpose of the spectral analysis is to discard the redundant information which conceals the difference between these two types of tissues, but keep their diagnostically significance. The facts predicted by different methods were compared to the gold standard of histopathology. The results indicate that these key fluorophores within tissue, e.g. tryptophan, collagen, and NADH, and flavin, show differences of relative contents of fluorophores among different types of human cancer and normal tissues. The

  19. NORMALIZATION OF THE VASCULATURE FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER AND OTHER DISEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Shom; Duda, Dan G.; Xu, Lei; Munn, Lance L.; Boucher, Yves; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2012-01-01

    New vessel formation (angiogenesis) is an essential physiological process for embryologic development, normal growth, and tissue repair. Angiogenesis is tightly regulated at the molecular level. Dysregulation of angiogenesis occurs in various pathologies and is one of the hallmarks of cancer. The imbalance of pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling within tumors creates an abnormal vascular network that is characterized by dilated, tortuous, and hyperpermeable vessels. The physiological consequences of these vascular abnormalities include temporal and spatial heterogeneity in tumor blood flow and oxygenation and increased tumor interstitial fluid pressure. These abnormalities and the resultant microenvironment fuel tumor progression, and also lead to a reduction in the efficacy of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy. With the discovery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as a major driver of tumor angiogenesis, efforts have focused on novel therapeutics aimed at inhibiting VEGF activity, with the goal of regressing tumors by starvation. Unfortunately, clinical trials of anti-VEGF monotherapy in patients with solid tumors have been largely negative. Intriguingly, the combination of anti-VEGF therapy with conventional chemotherapy has improved survival in cancer patients compared with chemotherapy alone. These seemingly paradoxical results could be explained by a “normalization” of the tumor vasculature by anti-VEGF therapy. Preclinical studies have shown that anti-VEGF therapy changes tumor vasculature towards a more “mature” or “normal” phenotype. This “vascular normalization” is characterized by attenuation of hyperpermeability, increased vascular pericyte coverage, a more normal basement membrane, and a resultant reduction in tumor hypoxia and interstitial fluid pressure. These in turn can lead to an improvement in the metabolic profile of the tumor microenvironment, the delivery and efficacy of exogenously administered therapeutics

  20. A lung cancer risk classifier comprising genome maintenance genes measured in normal bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jiyoun; Crawford, Erin L; Zhang, Xiaolu; Khuder, Sadik; Chen, Tian; Levin, Albert; Blomquist, Thomas M; Willey, James C

    2017-05-02

    Annual low dose CT (LDCT) screening of individuals at high demographic risk reduces lung cancer mortality by more than 20%. However, subjects selected for screening based on demographic criteria typically have less than a 10% lifetime risk for lung cancer. Thus, there is need for a biomarker that better stratifies subjects for LDCT screening. Toward this goal, we previously reported a lung cancer risk test (LCRT) biomarker comprising 14 genome-maintenance (GM) pathway genes measured in normal bronchial epithelial cells (NBEC) that accurately classified cancer (CA) from non-cancer (NC) subjects. The primary goal of the studies reported here was to optimize the LCRT biomarker for high specificity and ease of clinical implementation. Targeted competitive multiplex PCR amplicon libraries were prepared for next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of transcript abundance at 68 sites among 33 GM target genes in NBEC specimens collected from a retrospective cohort of 120 subjects, including 61 CA cases and 59 NC controls. Genes were selected for analysis based on contribution to the previously reported LCRT biomarker and/or prior evidence for association with lung cancer risk. Linear discriminant analysis was used to identify the most accurate classifier suitable to stratify subjects for screening. After cross-validation, a model comprising expression values from 12 genes (CDKN1A, E2F1, ERCC1, ERCC4, ERCC5, GPX1, GSTP1, KEAP1, RB1, TP53, TP63, and XRCC1) and demographic factors age, gender, and pack-years smoking, had Receiver Operator Characteristic area under the curve (ROC AUC) of 0.975 (95% CI: 0.96-0.99). The overall classification accuracy was 93% (95% CI 88%-98%) with sensitivity 93.1%, specificity 92.9%, positive predictive value 93.1% and negative predictive value 93%. The ROC AUC for this classifier was significantly better (p < 0.0001) than the best model comprising demographic features alone. The LCRT biomarker reported here displayed high accuracy and ease

  1. Fhit-deficient normal and cancer cells are mitomycin C and UVC resistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottey, M; Han, S-Y; Druck, T; Barnoski, B L; McCorkell, K A; Croce, C M; Raventos-Suarez, C; Fairchild, C R; Wang, Y; Huebner, K

    2004-01-01

    To identify functions of the fragile tumour suppressor gene, FHIT, matched pairs of Fhit-negative and -positive human cancer cell clones, and normal cell lines established from Fhit −/− and +/+ mice, were stressed and examined for differences in cell cycle kinetics and survival. A larger fraction of Fhit-negative human cancer cells and murine kidney cells survived treatment with mitomycin C or UVC light compared to matched Fhit-positive cells; ∼10-fold more colonies of Fhit-deficient cells survived high UVC doses in clonigenic assays. The human cancer cells were synchronised in G1, released into S and treated with UVC or mitomycin C. At 18 h post mitomycin C treatment ∼6-fold more Fhit-positive than -negative cells had died, and 18 h post UVC treatment 3.5-fold more Fhit-positive cells were dead. Similar results were obtained for the murine −/− cells. After low UVC doses, the rate of DNA synthesis in −/− cells decreased more rapidly and steeply than in +/+ cells, although the Atr–Chk1 pathway appeared intact in both cell types. UVC surviving Fhit −/− cells appear transformed and exhibit >5-fold increased mutation frequency. This increased mutation burden could explain the susceptibility of Fhit-deficient cells in vivo to malignant transformation. PMID:15494723

  2. DNA damage in oral cancer and normal cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Kapaldo, James; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) have been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory operates based on dielectric barrier discharge. It consists of two copper electrodes alternatively wrapping around a fused silica tube with nitrogen as a feed gas. It is generally more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, N2 provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to noble gases, thus this design can be beneficial for the future long-term clinical use. To compare the effects of plasma on cancer cells (SCC25) and normal cells (OKF), the cells from both types were treated at the same experimental condition for various treatment times. The effective area with different damage levels after the treatment was visualized as 3D maps. The delayed damage effects were also explored by varying the incubation times after the treatment. All of these studies are critical for a better understanding of the damage responses of cellular systems exposed to the plasma radiation, thus are useful for the development of the advanced plasma cancer therapy. The research described herein was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, United States Department of Energy through Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  3. A novel three serum phospholipid panel differentiates normal individuals from those with prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Patel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The results of prostate specific antigen (PSA and digital rectal examination (DRE screenings lead to both under and over treatment of prostate cancer (PCa. As such, there is an urgent need for the identification and evaluation of new markers for early diagnosis and disease prognosis. Studies have shown a link between PCa, lipids and lipid metabolism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the concentrations and distribution of serum lipids in patients with PCa as compared with serum from controls. METHOD: Using Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS lipid profiling, we analyzed serum phospholipids from age-matched subjects who were either newly diagnosed with PCa or healthy (normal. RESULTS: We found that cholester (CE, dihydrosphingomyelin (DSM, phosphatidylcholine (PC, egg phosphatidylcholine (ePC and egg phosphatidylethanolamine (ePE are the 5 major lipid groups that varied between normal and cancer serums. ePC 38:5, PC 40:3, and PC 42:4 represent the lipids species most prevalent in PCa as compared with normal serum. Further analysis revealed that serum ePC 38:5 ≥0.015 nmoles, PC 40.3 ≤0.001 nmoles and PC 42:4 ≤0.0001 nmoles correlated with the absence of PCa at 94% prediction. Conversely, serum ePC 38:5 ≤0.015 nmoles, PC 40:3 ≥0.001 nmoles, and PC 42:4 ≥0.0001 nmoles correlated with the presence of PCa. CONCLUSION: In summary, we have demonstrated that ePC 38:5, PC 40:3, and PC 42:4 may serve as early predictive serum markers for the presence of PCa.

  4. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  5. Monitoring of permeability of different analytes in human normal and cancerous bladder tissues in vitro using optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingsong Lei; Xiaoyuan Deng; Huajiang Wei; Zhouyi Guo [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, Guangdong Province (China); Guoyong Wu [Department of Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China); Hongqin Yang; Shusen Xie [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education of China, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007, Fujian (China); Yonghong He [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China)

    2014-12-31

    We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) diffusion in normal and cancerous human bladder tissues in vitro by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The permeability coefficients (PCs) of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose are found to be (7.92 ± 0.81) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.19 ± 0.13) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The PCs of 50% DMSO are calculated to be (8.99 ± 0.93) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.43 ± 0.17) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The obtained results show a statistically significant difference in permeability of normal and cancerous tissue and indicate that the PC of 50% DMSO is about 1.13-and 1.21-fold higher than that of 30% glucose in normal bladder and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. Thus, the quantitative measurements with the help of PCs from OCT images can be a potentially powerful method for bladder cancer detection. (optical coherence tomography)

  6. Quantitation of human mammary epithelial antigens in cells cultured from normal and cancerous breast tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, M; Peterson, J A; Ceriani, R L

    1981-02-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay technique was developed to quantitate the level of human breast celltype specific antigens on cells from normal breast and from various established cell lines of breast and nonbreast origins. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed four major proteinaceous components (150,000; 75,000; 60,000; and 48,000) in human milk fat globule membranes that were used to immunize rabbits in order to elicit antimammary epithelial cell antibody. Antisera obtained were rendered specific by absorptions and were able to recognize three specific mammary epithelial components of the breast epithelial cell. Human mammary epithelial (HME) antigen expression was highest (1290 ng/10(6) cells) in normal breast epithelial cells from primary cultures of normal breasts. Lower levels (range: 955 to 330 ng/10(6) cells) were found in breast epithelial cells from cell lines established from cancerous breast tissue. Cells of nonbreast origins as well as fibroblasts from breast gave much lower values (less than 30 ng/10(6) cells). On treatment, with trypsin, of two breast epithelial cell lines (MDA-MB-157 and MCF-7) 80 to 85% of their HME antigen expression was lost, suggesting that a majority of these breast antigens reside on the cell surface.

  7. The myoepithelial cell: its role in normal mammary glands and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopel, M

    2010-02-01

    Mammary gland epithelium is composed of an inner layer of secretory cells (luminal) and an outer layer of myoepithelial cells (MEC) bordering the basal lamina which separates the epithelial layer from the extracellular matrix. Mature MECs morphologically resemble smooth muscle cells; however, they exhibit features typical for epithelial cells, such as the presence of specific cytokeratin filaments. During lactation, secretory cells synthesize milk components, which are collected in alveoli and duct lumen, and transported to the nipple as a result of MEC contraction. Although the induction of MEC contraction results from oxytocin action, also other, still unknown auto/paracrine mechanisms participate in the regulation of this process. As well as milk ejection, MECs are involved in mammary gland morphogenesis in all developmental stages, modulating proliferation and differentiation of luminal cells. They take part in the formation of extracellular matrix, synthesizing its components and secreting proteinases and their inhibitors. In addition, MECs are regarded as natural cancer suppressors, stabilizing the normal structure of the mammary gland, they secrete suppressor proteins (e.g. maspin) limiting cancer growth, invasiveness, and neoangiogenesis. The majority of malignant breast cancers are derived from luminal cells, whereas neoplasms of MEC origin are the most seldom and usually benign form of breast tumours. MECs are markedly resistant to malignant transformation and they are able to suppress the transformation of neighboring luminal cells. Therefore, a deeper insight into the role of MECs in the physiology and pathology of mammary glands would allow a better understanding of cancerogenesis mechanisms and possible application of specific MEC markers in the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer.

  8. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and σΛ, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, γ and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (fΔμ) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between fΔμs in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the complete absence of

  9. Normal breast tissue DNA methylation differences at regulatory elements are associated with the cancer risk factor age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin C; Houseman, E Andres; King, Jessica E; Christensen, Brock C

    2017-07-10

    The underlying biological mechanisms through which epidemiologically defined breast cancer risk factors contribute to disease risk remain poorly understood. Identification of the molecular changes associated with cancer risk factors in normal tissues may aid in determining the earliest events of carcinogenesis and informing cancer prevention strategies. Here we investigated the impact cancer risk factors have on the normal breast epigenome by analyzing DNA methylation genome-wide (Infinium 450 K array) in cancer-free women from the Susan G. Komen Tissue Bank (n = 100). We tested the relation of established breast cancer risk factors, age, body mass index, parity, and family history of disease, with DNA methylation adjusting for potential variation in cell-type proportions. We identified 787 cytosine-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites that demonstrated significant associations (Q value age. Notably, DNA methylation was not strongly associated with the other evaluated breast cancer risk factors. Age-related DNA methylation changes are primarily increases in methylation enriched at breast epithelial cell enhancer regions (P = 7.1E-20), and binding sites of chromatin remodelers (MYC and CTCF). We validated the age-related associations in two independent populations, using normal breast tissue samples (n = 18) and samples of normal tissue adjacent to tumor tissue (n = 97). The genomic regions classified as age-related were more likely to be regions altered in both pre-invasive (n = 40, P = 3.0E-03) and invasive breast tumors (n = 731, P = 1.1E-13). DNA methylation changes with age occur at regulatory regions, and are further exacerbated in cancer, suggesting that age influences breast cancer risk in part through its contribution to epigenetic dysregulation in normal breast tissue.

  10. Cancer associated epigenetic transitions identified by genome-wide histone methylation binding profiles in human colorectal cancer samples and paired normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enroth, Stefan; Rada-Iglesisas, Alvaro; Andersson, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Despite their well-established functional roles, histone modifications have received less attention than DNA methylation in the cancer field. In order to evaluate their importance in colorectal cancer (CRC), we generated the first genome-wide histone modification profiles in paired normal colon...

  11. EZH2 protein expression in normal breast epithelium and risk of breast cancer: results from the Nurses' Health Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beca, Francisco; Kensler, Kevin; Glass, Benjamin; Schnitt, Stuart J; Tamimi, Rulla M; Beck, Andrew H

    2017-03-02

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a polycomb-group protein that is involved in stem cell renewal and carcinogenesis. In breast cancer, increased EZH2 expression is associated with aggressiveness and has been suggested to identify normal breast epithelium at increased risk of breast cancer development. However, the association between EZH2 expression in benign breast tissue and breast cancer risk has not previously been evaluated in a large prospective cohort. We examined the association between EZH2 protein expression and subsequent breast cancer risk using logistic regression in a nested case-control study of benign breast disease (BBD) and breast cancer within the Nurses' Health Studies. EZH2 immunohistochemical expression in normal breast epithelium and stroma was evaluated by computational image analysis and its association with breast cancer risk was analyzed after adjusting for matching factors between cases and controls, the concomitant BBD diagnosis, and the Ki67 proliferation index. Women with a breast biopsy in which more than 20% of normal epithelial cells expressed EZH2 had a significantly increased risk of developing breast cancer (odds ratio (OR) 2.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-7.84) compared to women with less than 10% EZH2 epithelial expression. The risk of developing breast cancer increased for each 5% increase in EZH2 expression (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.02-1.46, p value 0.026). Additionally, women with high EZH2 expression and low estrogen receptor (ER) expression had a 4-fold higher risk of breast cancer compared to women with low EZH2 and low ER expression (OR 4.02, 95% CI 1.29-12.59). These results provide further evidence that EZH2 expression in the normal breast epithelium is independently associated with breast cancer risk and might be used to assist in risk stratification for women with benign breast biopsies.

  12. Absolute Poverty Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Mahrt, Kristi; Tarp, Finn

    2017-01-01

    ’ approach, employing multiple methods, is the best available mode for addressing these limitations. A first fundamental choice is whether to estimate an absolute poverty line at all. Consumption-based poverty metrics provide only a partial view into the welfare of individuals or households, which may or may...

  13. Approach to Absolute Zero

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Approach to Absolute Zero Below 10 milli-Kelvin. R Srinivasan. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 8-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/10/0008-0016 ...

  14. Approach To Absolute Zero

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 12. Approach to Absolute Zero Liquefaction of Gases. R Srinivasan. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 12 December 1996 pp 6-16. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/12/0006-0016 ...

  15. Comparison of methods of estimating body fat in normal subjects and cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY); Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Sawitsky, A.; Gartenhaus, W.; Yasumura, S.; Vaswani, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    Total body fat can be indirectly estimated by the following noninvasive techniques: determination of lean body mass by measurement of body potassium or body water, and determination of density by underwater weighing or by skinfold measurements. The measurement of total body nitrogen by neutron activation provides another technique for estimating lean body mass and hence body fat. The nitrogen measurement can also be combined with the measurement of total body potassium in a two compartment model of the lean body mass from which another estimate of body fat can be derived. All of the above techniques are subject to various errors and are based on a number of assumptions, some of which are incompletely validated. These techniques were applied to a population of normal subjects and to a group of cancer patients. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed in terms of their ability to estimate total body fat.

  16. Comparison of methods of estimating body fat in normal subjects and cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, S H; Ellis, K J; Vartsky, D; Sawitsky, A; Gartenhaus, W; Yasumura, S; Vaswani, A N

    1981-12-01

    Total body fat can be indirectly estimated by the following noninvasive techniques: determination of lean body mass by measurement of body potassium or body water, and determination of density by underwater weighing or by skinfold measurements. The measurement of total body nitrogen by neutron activation provides another technique for estimating lean body mass and hence body fat. The nitrogen measurement can also be combined with the measurement of total body potassium in a two compartment model of the lean body mass from which another estimate of body fat can be derived. All of the above techniques are subject to various errors and are based on a number of assumptions, some of which are incompletely validated. These techniques were applied to a population of normal subjects and to a group of cancer patients. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed in terms of their ability to estimate total body fat.

  17. Noninvasive discrimination between human normal and cancer cells by analysis of intracellular distribution of phase-shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Mutsumi; Tokunaga, Naochika

    2015-08-01

    Aiming to establish a method for the noninvasive discrimination of cancer cells from normal cells in adherent culture, we investigated to employ all phase shift data for all pixels inside a cell. The bird's-eye views of phase shifts of human prostate epithelial cells (PRECs) and human prostatic carcinoma epithelial cell (PC-3) lines acquired by phase-shifting laser microscopy showed tableland and cone shapes, respectively, while treatment of PRECs with cytochalasin D resulted in the cone shape. So, the profile of phase shift in both sections towards the x- and y-axes of the views through the peaks of the phase shifts in PRECs and PC-3 cells were trapezoid-like and triangle-like, respectively. Typical profiles of phase shifts in a section in PRECs or PC-3 cells were calculated by averaging from 10 cells and smoothing. Cancer index is defined as the deduction of sums of the squared difference between a real cell and the typical profiles for a PREC and a PC-3 cell. The cancer indices for PC-3 and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines were positive, while those for PRECs and human normal cryopreserved hepatocytes were negative. Cancer indices along the major axis of fibroblast-like cells of normal mesenchymal stem cells and the osteosarcoma cell line were negative and positive, respectively. Consequently, several cancer cells could be noninvasively discriminated from normal cells by calculating the cancer index employing phase shift for all pixels inside the cells.

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies driver mutations in asymptomatic computed tomography-detected lung cancers with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, Elena; Veronesi, Giulia; Rotta, Luca; Volorio, Sara; Sardella, Domenico; Bernard, Loris; Pece, Salvatore; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Fumagalli, Caterina; Barberis, Massimo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Riva, Laura

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of curative surgery for lung cancer could be largely improved by non-invasive screening programs, which can detect the disease at early stages. We previously showed that 18% of screening-identified lung cancers demonstrate a normal karyotype and, following high-density genome scanning, can be subdivided into samples with 1) numerous; 2) none; and 3) few copy number alterations. Whole exome sequencing was applied to the two normal karyotype, screening-detected lung cancers, constituting group 2, as well as normal controls. We identified mutations in both tumors, including KEAP1 (commonly mutated in lung cancers) in one, and TP53, PMS1, and MSH3 (well-characterized DNA-repair genes) in the other. The two normal karyotype screening-detected lung tumors displayed a typical lung cancer mutational profile that only next generation sequencing could reveal, which offered an additional contribution to the over-diagnosis bias concept hypothesized within lung cancer screening programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Alteration of gene expression in macroscopically normal colonic mucosa from individuals with a family history of sporadic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chun-Yi; Moore, Dan H; Wong, Patrick; Bennington, James L; Lee, Nancy M; Chen, Ling-Chun

    2005-02-15

    We have shown that the expression of several genes associated with human colon cancer is altered in the morphologically normal colonic mucosa (MNCM) of APC(min) mice and humans with colon cancers. To determine whether these alterations also occur in the MNCM of individuals who have not developed colon cancer but are at high risk of doing so, we measured gene expression in the MNCM of individuals with a family history of colon cancer. Expression of 16 genes in the MNCM of 12 individuals with a first-degree relative with sporadic colon cancer and 16 normal controls were measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. All subjects tested had normal colonoscopic examinations. Biopsy samples of MNCM were obtained from the ascending, transverse, descending, and rectosigmoid regions of the colon (2-8 biopsy samples were obtained from each region). Relative to normal controls, the expression of several genes, including PPAR-gamma, SAA1, and IL-8 were significantly altered in the macroscopically normal rectosigmoid mucosa from individuals with a family history of colon cancer. Molecular abnormalities that precede the appearance of adenomatous polyp are present in the MNCM of individuals who have a family history of colon cancer. This observation raises the possibility of screening for individuals who are at an increased risk of developing colon cancer by analysis of gene expression in rectosigmoid biopsy samples. To assess this possibility, prospective studies will be needed to determine whether or not altered gene expression is associated with the subsequent development of adenomatous polyps and/ or colonic carcinomas.

  20. The absolute environmental performance of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brejnrod, Kathrine Nykjær; Kalbar, Pradip; Petersen, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    sustainability for the standard house were proposed focusing on three measures: minimizing environmental impacts from building construction, minimizing impacts from energy consumption during use phase, and reducing the living area per person. In an intermediate path, absolute sustainability can be obtained......Our paper presents a novel approach for absolute sustainability assessment of a building's environmental performance. It is demonstrated how the absolute sustainable share of the earth carrying capacity of a specific building type can be estimated using carrying capacity based normalization factors....... A building is considered absolute sustainable if its annual environmental burden is less than its share of the earth environmental carrying capacity. Two case buildings – a standard house and an upcycled single-family house located in Denmark – were assessed according to this approach and both were found...

  1. Breast Cancer Stem Cells Transition between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Reflective of their Normal Counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suling Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs mediate metastasis, are resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and contribute to relapse. Although several BCSC markers have been described, it is unclear whether these markers identify the same or independent BCSCs. Here, we show that BCSCs exist in distinct mesenchymal-like (epithelial-mesenchymal transition [EMT] and epithelial-like (mesenchymal-epithelial transition [MET] states. Mesenchymal-like BCSCs characterized as CD24−CD44+ are primarily quiescent and localized at the tumor invasive front, whereas epithelial-like BCSCs express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH, are proliferative, and are located more centrally. The gene-expression profiles of mesenchymal-like and epithelial-like BCSCs are remarkably similar across different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, and resemble those of distinct basal and luminal stem cells found in the normal breast. We propose that the plasticity of BCSCs that allows them to transition between EMT- and MET-like states endows these cells with the capacity for tissue invasion, dissemination, and growth at metastatic sites.

  2. [Bone metastasis of lung cancer in a mouse model with normal immune function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yue; Li, Chunyu; Hao, Song; Hu, Shaoyu; Lin, Zhen; Yuan, Liang; Li, Wei; Yan, Wenjuan; Chen, Jianting; Yang, Dehong

    2014-05-01

    To establish a model bearing human lung cancer xenograft with bone metastasis in mice with normal immune function. Forty female C57BL/6J mice were randomly allocated into 4 equal groups, including a control group and 3 immunosuppression groups treated with low, moderate, and high doses of dexamethasone (50, 100, and 150 mg, respectively). Four days after immune suppression, the mice were subjected to percutaneous injection of1.0×10(9) L(-1) A549 cells into the tibial plateau, and the bone defects were assessed radiographically 28 days after modeling. HE staining and immunohistochemical staining were used to examine the tumor tissues and bone tissue damages. In each of the 4 groups one mouse died during tumor cell injection. Only 1 mouse showed tumor formation in low-dose immunosuppression group, as compared to 7 and 4 in moderate- and high-dose immunosuppression groups. X-ray and microCT scan showed significant tibial bone destruction in moderate- and high-dose groups. The moderate- and high-dose groups showed similar ALP activities but both were significantly higher than those in the other two groups (Pdexamethasone results in longer survival time of the human lung cancer xenograft-bearing model mice as well as a higher tumor formation rate.

  3. The Biology of Progesterone Receptor in the Normal Mammary gland and in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obr, Alison; Edwards, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews work on progesterone and the progesterone receptor (PR) in the mouse mammary gland that has been used extensively as an experimental model. Studies have led to the concept that progesterone controls proliferation and morphogenesis of the luminal epithelium in a tightly orchestrated manner at distinct stages of development by paracrine signaling pathways, including receptor of activated nuclear factor κ ligand (RANKL) as a major paracrine factor. Progesterone also drives expansion of stem cells by paracrine signals to generate progenitors required for alveologenesis. During mid-to-late pregnancy, progesterone has another role to suppress secretory activation until parturition mediated in part by crosstalk between PR and prolactin/Stat5 signaling to inhibit induction of milk protein gene expression, and by inhibiting tight junction closure. In models of hormone-dependent mouse mammary tumors, the progesterone/PR signaling axis enhances pre-neoplastic progression by a switch from a paracrine to an autocrine mode of proliferation and dysregulation of the RANKL signaling pathway. Limited experiments with normal human breast show that progesterone/PR signaling also stimulates epithelial cell proliferation by a paracrine mechanism; however, the signaling pathways and whether RANKL is a major mediator remains unknown. Work with human breast cancer cell lines, patient tumor samples and clinical studies indicates that progesterone is a risk factor for breast cancer and that alteration in progesterone/PR signaling pathways contributes to early stage human breast cancer progression. However, loss of PR expression in primary tumors is associated with a less differentiated more invasive phenotype and worse prognosis, suggesting that PR may limit later stages of tumor progression. PMID:22193050

  4. Investigation of cytotoxicity of negative control peptides versus bioactive peptides on skin cancer and normal cells: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Nahlah M; Pirogova, Elena; Coloe, Peter J; Cosic, Irena; Istivan, Taghrid S

    2012-08-01

    Resonant recognition model-myxoma virus (RRM-MV), a bioactive peptide analogue for myxoma virus MV-T5 protein, was computationally designed by the RRM. In this study, the anticancer effects of RRM-MV were assessed in vitro against four negative control peptides on human skin cancer and normal cells. The effects of RRM-MV versus negative control peptides on cells were evaluated by quantitative and qualitative assays. The RRM-MV treatment was able to induce cell death in cancer cells without triggering similar effects on normal cells. However, the negative control peptides produced no toxic effects on skin cancer and normal cells. No effects on human erythrocytes were detected when treated with all peptides. It is suggested that the RRM can be applied to design therapeutic anticancer peptides.

  5. Danish Towns during Absolutism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    crisis for the Danish urban community, mainly caused by the devastating effects of the seventeenth century warfare. Some few towns, however, stood out with positive development, first and foremost Copenhagen which flourished in its function as the centre of the Absolutist regime. The book traces both...... the roots of the urban crisis as well as the regional and temporal variations. Many articles provide an overview of urbanisation in both the Kingdom of Denmark and the Duchy of Schleswig, while other articles focus on the economic, social, and cultural urban functions. The Danish Urban Studies Series......This anthology, No. 4 in the Danish Urban Studies Series, presents in English recent significant research on Denmark's urban development during the Age of Absolutism, 1660-1848, and features 13 articles written by leading Danish urban historians. The years of Absolutism were marked by a general...

  6. Cascaded discrimination of normal, abnormal, and confounder classes in histopathology: Gleason grading of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doyle Scott

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated classification of histopathology involves identification of multiple classes, including benign, cancerous, and confounder categories. The confounder tissue classes can often mimic and share attributes with both the diseased and normal tissue classes, and can be particularly difficult to identify, both manually and by automated classifiers. In the case of prostate cancer, they may be several confounding tissue types present in a biopsy sample, posing as major sources of diagnostic error for pathologists. Two common multi-class approaches are one-shot classification (OSC, where all classes are identified simultaneously, and one-versus-all (OVA, where a “target” class is distinguished from all “non-target” classes. OSC is typically unable to handle discrimination of classes of varying similarity (e.g. with images of prostate atrophy and high grade cancer, while OVA forces several heterogeneous classes into a single “non-target” class. In this work, we present a cascaded (CAS approach to classifying prostate biopsy tissue samples, where images from different classes are grouped to maximize intra-group homogeneity while maximizing inter-group heterogeneity. Results We apply the CAS approach to categorize 2000 tissue samples taken from 214 patient studies into seven classes: epithelium, stroma, atrophy, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, and prostate cancer Gleason grades 3, 4, and 5. A series of increasingly granular binary classifiers are used to split the different tissue classes until the images have been categorized into a single unique class. Our automatically-extracted image feature set includes architectural features based on location of the nuclei within the tissue sample as well as texture features extracted on a per-pixel level. The CAS strategy yields a positive predictive value (PPV of 0.86 in classifying the 2000 tissue images into one of 7 classes, compared with the OVA (0.77 PPV and OSC

  7. Intermittent Fluorescence Oscillations in Lipid Droplets in a Live Normal and Lung Cancer Cell: Time-Resolved Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Amin, Md Asif; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2015-08-27

    Intermittent structural oscillation in the lipid droplets of live lung cells is monitored using time-resolved confocal microscopy. Significant differences are observed between the lung cancer cell (A549) and normal (nonmalignant) lung cell (WI38). For this study, the lipid droplets are covalently labeled with a fluorescent dye, coumarin maleimide (7-diethylamino-3-(4-maleimido-phenyl)-4-methylcoumarin, CPM). The number of lipid droplets in the cancer cell is found to be ∼20-fold higher than that in the normal (nonmalignant) cell. The fluctuation in the fluorescence intensity of the dye (CPM) is attributed to the red-ox processes and periodic formation/rupture of the S-CPM bond. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is much higher in a cancer cell. This is manifested in faster oscillations (0.9 ± 0.3 s) in cancer cells compared to that in the normal cells (2.8 ± 0.7 s). Solvation dynamics in the lipid droplets of cancer cells is slower compared to that in the normal cell.

  8. Accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia: comparison with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Takei, Toshiki; Shiga, Tohru; Nakada, Kunihiro; Tamaki, Nagara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Kita 15, Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8638 (Japan); Kuge, Yuji; Katoh, Chietsugu [Department of Tracer Kinetics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shinohara, Nobuo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Carbon-11 acetate positron emission tomography (PET) has been reported to be of clinical value for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, no detailed analysis has yet been carried out on the physiological accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in the prostate. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the physiological accumulation of [{sup 11}C]acetate in the prostate using dynamic PET. The study included 30 subjects without prostate cancer [21 with normal prostate and nine with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)] and six patients with prostate cancer. A dynamic PET study was performed for 20 min after intravenous administration of 555 MBq of [{sup 11}C]acetate. The standardised uptake value (SUV) at 16-20 min post tracer administration and the early-to-late-activity ratio of the SUV (E/L ratio), which was determined by dividing the SUV{sub 6-10} {sub min} by the SUV {sub 16-20min}, were calculated to evaluate the accumulation of [ {sup 11}C]acetate. The prostate was clearly visualised and distinguished from adjacent organs in PET images in most of the cases. The SUV of the prostate (2.6 {+-}0.8) was significantly higher than that of the rectum (1.7 {+-}0.4) or bone marrow (1.3 {+-}0.3) (P <0.0001 in each case). The SUV of the normal prostate of subjects aged <50 years (3.4 {+-}0.7) was significantly higher than both the SUV for the normal prostate of subjects aged {>=}50 years (2.3 {+-}0.7) and that of subjects with BPH (2.1 {+-}0.6) (P <0.01 in each case). The primary prostate cancer in six cases was visualised by [ {sup 11}C]acetate PET. However, the difference in the SUV between subjects aged {>=}50 with normal prostate or with BPH and the patients with prostate cancer (1.9 {+-}0.6) was not statistically significant. There was also no significant difference in the E/L ratio between subjects aged {>=}50 with normal prostate (0.98 {+-}0.04) or BPH (0.96 {+-}0.08) and patients with prostate cancer (1.02 {+-}0.12). In conclusion, a normal prostate exhibits age

  9. Reduced IGF-I differentially protects normal and cancer cells and improves chemotherapeutic index in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Safdie, Fernando M.; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Wei, Min; Madia, Federica; Parrella, Edoardo; Hwang, David; Cohen, Pinchas; Bianchi, Giovanna; Longo, Valter D.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitors of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-IR) have been widely studied for their ability to enhance the killing of a variety of malignant cells, but the role of IGF-I and its receptor in the differential protection of host and cancer cells against chemotherapy is unknown. We previously showed that starvation protects mice but not cancer cells against high dose chemotherapy (Differential Stress Resistance, DSR). Here we provide evidence for the role of IGF-I reduction in mediating the effect of starvation in DSR. A 72-hour fast reduced circulating IGF-I by 70% and increased the level of the IGF-I inhibitor IGFBP-1 by 11-fold in mice. LID mice, with a 70–80% reduction in circulating IGF-I levels, were protected against 3 out of 4 chemotherapy drugs tested. Restoration of IGF-I during fasting was sufficient to reverse its protective effect. 60% of melanoma-bearing LID mice treated with doxorubicin reached long-term survival whereas all control mice died of either metastases or chemo toxicity. Reduction of IGF-I/IGF-I signaling protected primary glia, but not glioma cells against cyclophosphamide and protected mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage. Similarly, S. cerevisiae lacking homologues of IGF-I signaling proteins displayed protection against chemotherapy-dependent DNA damage, which was reversed by expression of an oncogene homolog. We conclude that reducing circulating IGF-I protects normal cells and mice against chemotherapy-dependent DNA damage by a mechanism that involves down-regulation of proto-oncoproteins. PMID:20145127

  10. Activity and expression of human telomerase in normal and malignant cells in gastric and colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jerzy; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Nowicka-Kujawska, Karina; Pernak, Monika; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Tomasz; Wysocki, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    The reactivation of telomerase is believed to play an important role in immortalization and carcinogenesis. To investigate the expression of three components of the telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT and TP1), along with telomerase activity in malignant and normal cells. Cells were isolated from gastric and colon cancer, and from normal mucosa from the stomach and colon of participating patients. Expression of hTERT, hTR and TP1 has been studied by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The telomerase repeat amplification protocol and PCR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for analysis of telomerase activity. All telomerase components were consistently expressed in colon and gastric cancer cells. Neoplastic RNA produced consistently very strong amplification signals either for hTR, hTERT or TP1. The expression of hTR was observed in RNA isolated from all normal mucosa samples and from peripheral blood lymphocytes. The expression of TP1 and hTERT has been found in the majority of normal cells; however, the amplification signals produced were usually much weaker than in malignant cells. The limiting dilution experiments indicated that the cancer cells have at least 100-fold higher telomerase activity and at least 25-fold higher TP1 and hTERT expression in comparison to normal cells. It can be concluded that all the cancer cells tested have higher telomerase expression and activity than normal cells. Therefore, telomerase can be a good cancer marker, provided that quantitative analysis is carried out. Copyright 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of Heavy Metals and Trace Elements in the Urinary Bladder: Comparison Between Cancerous, Adjacent Non-cancerous and Normal Cadaveric Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gawad, Mahmoud; Elsobky, Emad; Shalaby, Mahmoud M; Abd-Elhameed, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahim, Mona; Ali-El-Dein, Bedeir

    2016-12-01

    The role of heavy metals and trace elements (HMTE) in the development of some cancers has been previously reported. Bladder carcinoma is a frequent malignancy of the urinary tract. The most common risk factors for bladder cancer are exposure to industrial carcinogens, cigarette smoking, gender, and possibly diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate HTME concentrations in the cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissues and compare them with those of normal cadaveric bladder. This prospective study included 102 paired samples of full-thickness cancer and adjacent non-cancerous bladder tissues of radical cystectomy (RC) specimens that were histologically proven as invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We used 17 matched controls of non-malignant bladder tissue samples from cadavers. All samples were processed and evaluated for the concentration of 22 HMTE by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Outcome analysis was made by the Mann-Whitney U, chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. When compared with cadaveric control or cancerous, the adjacent non-cancerous tissue had higher levels of six elements (arsenic, lead, selenium, strontium, zinc, and aluminum), and when compared with the control alone, it had a higher concentration of calcium, cadmium, chromium, potassium, magnesium, and nickel. The cancerous tissue had a higher concentration of cadmium, lead, chromium, calcium, potassium, phosphorous, magnesium, nickel, selenium, strontium, and zinc than cadaveric control. Boron level was higher in cadaveric control than cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissue. Cadmium level was higher in cancerous tissue with node-positive than node-negative cases. The high concentrations of cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and zinc, in the cancerous together with arsenic in the adjacent non-cancerous tissues of RC specimens suggest a pathogenic role of these elements in BC. However, further work-up is needed to support this

  12. Effects of TiO2 nano glass ionomer cements against normal and cancer oral cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Contreras, Rene; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J; Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalia; Kanda, Yumiko; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) into the glass ionomer cements (GICs) is known to improve their mechanical and antibacterial properties. The present study aimed to investigate the possible cytotoxicity and pro-inflammation effect of three different powdered GICs (base, core build and restorative) prepared with and without titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. Each GIC was blended with TiO2 nanopowder, anatase phase, particle size <25 nm at 3% and 5% (w/w), and the GIC blocks of cements were prepared in a metal mold. The GICs/TiO2 nanoparticles cements were smashed up with a mortar and pestle to a fine powder, and then subjected to the sterilization by autoclaving. Human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HCS-2, HSC-3, HSC-4, Ca9-22) and human normal oral cells [gingival fibroblast (HGF), pulp (HPC) and periodontal ligament fibroblast (HPLF)] were incubated with different concentrations of GICs in the presence or absence of TiO2 nanoparticles, and the viable cell number was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. Prostaglandin E2 was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Changes in fine cell structure were assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Cancer cells exhibited moderate cytotoxicity after 48 h of incubation, regardless of the type of GIC and the presence or absence of TiO2 NPs. GICs induced much lower cytotoxicity against normal cells, but induced prostaglandin E2 production, in a synergistic wanner with interleukin-1β. The present study shows acceptable to moderate biocompatibility of GICs impregnated with TiO2 nanoparticles, as well as its pro-inflammatory effects at higher concentrations. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. PATE, a gene expressed in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis, identified by a functional genomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Tapan K.; Maitra, Rangan; Iavarone, Carlo; Salvatore, Giuliana; Kumar, Vasantha; Vincent, James J.; Sathyanarayana, B. K.; Duray, Paul; Lee, B. K.; Pastan, Ira

    2002-03-01

    To identify target antigens for prostate cancer therapy, we have combined computer-based screening of the human expressed sequence tag database and experimental expression analysis to identify genes that are expressed in normal prostate and prostate cancer but not in essential human tissues. Using this approach, we identified a gene that is expressed specifically in prostate cancer, normal prostate, and testis. The gene has a 1.5-kb transcript that encodes a protein of 14 kDa. We named this gene PATE (expressed in prostate and testis). In situ hybridization shows that PATE mRNA is expressed in the epithelial cells of prostate cancers and in normal prostate. Transfection of the PATE cDNA with a Myc epitope tag into NIH 3T3 cells and subsequent cell fractionation analysis shows that the PATE protein is localized in the membrane fraction of the cell. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of PATE shows that it has structural similarities to a group of proteins known as three-finger toxins, which includes the extracellular domain of the type transforming growth factor receptor. Restricted expression of PATE makes it a potential candidate for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  14. Hair keratin KRT81 is expressed in normal and breast cancer cells and contributes to their invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanashima, Naoki; Horie, Kayo; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Takeshi; Tsuchida, Shigeki

    2017-05-01

    Keratins are fibrous proteins. Hair keratins constitute hard structures such as the hair and nails, and cytokeratins have been used as markers of breast carcinoma. However, the expression and function of full-size hair keratin genes have not been previously demonstrated in breast cancer. We investigated the expression of the hair keratin, KRT81, and its function in human breast cancer and normal mammary epithelial cells. Western blotting showed full size 55-kDa KRT81 expression in the human breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231, normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), and non-neoplastic cells (MCF10A). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the full size KRT81, including its 5' region is expressed in breast cells. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses showed that KRT81 was located in the cytoplasm. To investigate the function of KRT81, we knocked down KRT81 by siRNA in MCF10A cells. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of genes related to invasion such as matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)9 was decreased. In KRT81-knockdown MDA-MB231 cells, zymography revealed a decrease in MMP9 activity, while scratch and invasion assays revealed that KRT81-knockdown decreased cell migration and invasion abilities. This is the first study showing that full size KRT81 is expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. Moreover, our results indicate that KRT81 contributes to the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells.

  15. Physiological normal levels of androgen inhibit proliferation of prostate cancer cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitao Song

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For more than 70 years, it has been believed that a severe reduction of serum androgen levels caused regression of prostate cancer (PCa and that increasing androgen levels enhanced growth of PCa. However, numerous recent studies have questioned this traditional belief. In our study, LNCaP and MDA PCa 2b PCa cells were treated with various levels of androgens for 10 or 20 days, and the cell growth was measured with crystal violet mitogenic assay. The results indicated that the effect of androgens on the proliferation of PCa cells occurs in a biphasic pattern, with the androgen levels promoting optimal cell growth at approximately 0.23 ng ml−1 for LNCaP cells and between 1 and 2 ng ml−1 for MDA PCa 2b cells. Both of the optimal androgen levels are within the adult men's physiological low range (<2.4 ng ml−1 . At lower concentrations than the optimal androgen level, increasing androgen concentration promoted the proliferation of PCa cells. However, at the higher concentrations, increasing androgen concentration resulted in a dose-dependent proliferative inhibition. We conclude that physiologically normal levels of androgen inhibit the proliferation of PCa cells in vitro. However, at very low levels androgens are essential for initial growth of PCa cells.

  16. Absolute Gravimetry in Fennoscandia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersen, B. R; TImmen, L.; Gitlein, O.

    away from this central location. An oval shaped zero uplift isoline tracks the general western and northern coastline of Norway and the Kola peninsula. It returns southwest through Russian Karelia and touches the southern tip of Sweden and northern Denmark. The uplift area (as measured by present day...... motions) has its major axis in the direction of southwest to northeast and covers a distance of about 2000 km. Absolute gravimetry was made in Finland and Norway in 1976 with a rise-and fall instrument. A decade later the number of gravity stations was expanded by JILAg-5, in Finland from 1988, in Norway...... acquired by IfE (FG5-220), FGI (FG5-221), and UMB (FG5-226). New absolute gravity stations were established by the national mapping agencies in Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. The total number of prepared sites in Fennoscandia is now about 30. Most of them are co-located with permanent GPS, for many of which...

  17. Age-associated gene expression in normal breast tissue mirrors qualitative age-at-incidence patterns for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirone, Jason R; D'Arcy, Monica; Stewart, Delisha A; Hines, William C; Johnson, Melissa; Gould, Michael N; Yaswen, Paul; Jerry, D Joseph; Smith Schneider, Sallie; Troester, Melissa A

    2012-10-01

    Age is the strongest breast cancer risk factor, with overall breast cancer risk increasing steadily beginning at approximately 30 years of age. However, while breast cancer risk is lower among younger women, young women's breast cancer may be more aggressive. Although, several genomic and epidemiologic studies have shown higher prevalence of aggressive, estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer in younger women, the age-related gene expression that predisposes to these tumors is poorly understood. Characterizing age-related patterns of gene expression in normal breast tissues may provide insights on etiology of distinct breast cancer subtypes that arise from these tissues. To identify age-related changes in normal breast tissue, 96 tissue specimens from patients with reduction mammoplasty, ages 14 to 70 years, were assayed by gene expression microarray. Significant associations between gene expression levels and age were identified for 802 probes (481 increased, 321 decreased with increasing age). Enriched functions included "aging of cells," "shape change," and "chemotaxis," and enriched pathways included Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, Ephrin receptor signaling, and JAK/Stat signaling. Applying the age-associated genes to publicly available tumor datasets, the age-associated pathways defined two groups of tumors with distinct survival. The hazard rates of young-like tumors mirrored that of high-grade tumors in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, providing a biologic link between normal aging and age-related tumor aggressiveness. These data show that studies of normal tissue gene expression can yield important insights about the pathways and biologic pressures that are relevant during tumor etiology and progression. 2012 AACR

  18. The allele combinations of three loci based on, liver, stomach cancers, hematencephalon, COPD and normal population: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Liping; Liu, Hui; Cui, Jing-Hui; Yu, Weijian; Ding, Xiao-Dong

    2017-03-20

    The purpose of this study was to examine the specific allele combinations of three loci connected with the liver cancers, stomach cancers, hematencephalon and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to explore the feasibility of the research methods. We explored different mathematical methods for statistical analyses to assess the association between the genotype and phenotype. At the same time we still analyses the statistical results of allele combinations of three loci by difference value method and ratio method. All the DNA blood samples were collected from patients with 50 liver cancers, 75 stomach cancers, 50 hematencephalon, 72 COPD and 200 normal populations. All the samples were from Chinese. Alleles from short tandem repeat (STR) loci were determined using the STR Profiler plus PCR amplification kit (15 STR loci). Previous research was based on combinations of single-locus alleles, and combinations of cross-loci (two loci) alleles. Allele combinations of three loci were obtained by computer counting and stronger genetic signal was obtained. The methods of allele combinations of three loci can help to identify the statistically significant differences of allele combinations between liver cancers, stomach cancers, patients with hematencephalon, COPD and the normal population. The probability of illness followed different rules and had apparent specificity. This method can be extended to other diseases and provide reference for early clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Cell Budding from Normal Appearing Epithelia: A Predictor of Colorectal Cancer Metastasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; Mason, Jeffrey; Jewett, Anahid; Qian, Jun; Ding, Yijiang; Cho, William CS; Zhang, Xichen; Man, Yan-gao

    2013-01-01

    Background: Colorectal carcinogenesis is believed to be a multi-stage process that originates with a localized adenoma, which linearly progresses to an intra-mucosal carcinoma, to an invasive lesion, and finally to metastatic cancer. This progression model is supported by tissue culture and animal model studies, but it is difficult to reconcile with several well-established observations, principally among these are that up to 25% of early stage (Stage I/II), node-negative colorectal cancer (CRC) develop distant metastasis, and that circulating CRC cells are undetectable in peripheral blood samples of up to 50% of patients with confirmed metastasis, but more than 30% of patients with no detectable metastasis exhibit such cells. The mechanism responsible for this diverse behavior is unknown, and there are no effective means to identify patients with pending, or who are at high risk for, developing metastatic CRC. Novel findings: Our previous studies of human breast and prostate cancer have shown that cancer invasion arises from the convergence of a tissue injury, the innate immune response to that injury, and the presence of tumor stem cells within tumor capsules at the site of the injury. Focal degeneration of a capsule due to age or disease attracts lymphocyte infiltration that degrades the degenerating capsules resulting in the formation of a focal disruption in the capsule, which selectively favors proliferating or “budding” of the underlying tumor stem cells. Our recent studies suggest that lymphocyte infiltration also triggers metastasis by disrupting the intercellular junctions and surface adhesion molecules within the proliferating cell buds causing their dissociation. Then, lymphocytes and tumor cells are conjoined through membrane fusion to form tumor-lymphocyte chimeras (TLCs) that allows the tumor stem cell to avail itself of the lymphocyte's natural ability to migrate and breach cell barriers in order to intravasate and to travel to distant organs

  20. Establishment of a normal-derived estrogen receptor-positive cell line comparable to the prevailing human breast cancer subtype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkinson, Branden Michael; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Petersen, Ole William

    2017-01-01

    Understanding human cancer increasingly relies on insight gained from subtype specific comparisons between malignant and non-malignant cells. The most frequent subtype in breast cancer is the luminal. By far the most frequently used model for luminal breast cancer is the iconic estrogen receptor......-positive (ERpos) MCF7 cell line. However, luminal specific comparisons have suffered from the lack of a relevant non-malignant counterpart. Our previous work has shown that transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβR) inhibition suffices to propagate prospectively isolated ERpos human breast luminal cells from...... propose that iHBECERpos may serve to shed light on hitherto unappreciated differences in ER regulation and function between normal breast and breast cancer....

  1. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m-1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  2. From normal response to clinical problem: definition and clinical features of fear of cancer recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebel, S.; Ozakinci, G.; Humphris, G.; Mutsaers, B.; Thewes, B.; Prins, J.B.; Dinkel, A.; Butow, P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Research to date on fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) shows that moderate to high FCR affects 22-87 % of cancer survivors and is associated with higher psychological morbidity (Simard et al J Cancer Surviv 7:300-322, 2013). Despite growing research interest in FCR, the lack of consensus on

  3. The novel BORIS + CTCF gene family is uniquely involved in the epigenetics of normal biology and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenova, Elena M; Morse, Herbert C; Ohlsson, Rolf; Lobanenkov, Victor V

    2002-10-01

    CTCF is a ubiquitous 11 zinc finger (ZF) protein with highly versatile functions: in addition to transcriptional silencing or activating in a context-dependent fashion, it organizes epigenetically controlled chromatin insulators that regulate imprinted genes in soma. Recently, we have identified a CTCF paralogue, termed BORIS for Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites, that is expressed only in the testis. BORIS has the same exons encoding the 11 ZF domain as mammalian CTCF genes, and hence interacts with similar cis elements, but encodes amino and carboxy termini distinct from those in CTCF. Normally, CTCF and BORIS are expressed in a mutually exclusive pattern that correlates with re-setting of methylation marks during male germ cell differentiation. The antagonistic features of these two gene siblings are underscored by showing that while CTCF overexpression blocks cell proliferation, expression of BORIS in normally BORIS-negative cells promotes cell growth which can lead to transformation. The suggestion that BORIS directs epigenetic reprogramming at CTCF target sites impinges on the observations that human BORIS is not only abnormally activated in a wide range of human cancers, but also maps to the cancer-associated amplification region at 20q13. The sibling rivalry occasioned by aberrant expression of BORIS in cancer may interfere with normal functions of CTCF including growth suppression, and contribute to epigenetic dysregulation which is a common feature in human cancer.

  4. On the Mean Absolute Error in Inverse Binomial Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Mendo, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A closed-form expression and an upper bound are obtained for the mean absolute error of the unbiased estimator of a probability in inverse binomial sampling. The results given permit the estimation of an arbitrary probability with a prescribed level of the normalized mean absolute error.

  5. Nuclear location of tumor suppressor protein maspin inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells without affecting proliferation of normal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Maspin, which is classified as a tumor suppressor protein, is downregulated in many types of cancer. Several studies have suggested potential anti-proliferative activity of maspin as well as sensitizing activity of maspin for therapeutic cytotoxic agents in breast cancer tissue culture and animal models. All of the experimental data gathered so far have been based on studies with maspin localized cytoplasmically, while maspin in breast cancer tumor cells may be located in the cytoplasm, nucleus or both. In this study, the effect of maspin cytoplasmic and nuclear location and expression level on breast cancer proliferation and patient survival was studied. Methods Tissue sections from 166 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer were stained by immunohistochemistry for maspin and Ki-67 protein. The localization and expression level of maspin were correlated with estimated patient overall survival and percent of Ki-67-positive cells. In further studies, we created constructs for transient transfection of maspin into breast cancer cells with targeted cytoplasmic and nuclear location. We analyzed the effect of maspin location in normal epithelial cell line MCF10A and three breast cancer cell lines - MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and SKBR-3 - by immunofluorescence and proliferation assay. Results We observed a strong positive correlation between moderate and high nuclear maspin level and survival of patients. Moreover, a statistically significant negative relationship was observed between nuclear maspin and Ki-67 expression in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Spearman’s correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between level of maspin localized in nucleus and percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. No such differences were observed in cells with cytoplasmic maspin. We found a strong correlation between nuclear maspin and loss of Ki-67 protein in breast cancer cell lines, while there was no effect in normal epithelial cells from breast. The anti

  6. Uncaria tomentosa Leaves Decoction Modulates Differently ROS Production in Cancer and Normal Cells, and Effects Cisplatin Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kośmider, Anita; Czepielewska, Edyta; Kuraś, Mieczysław; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Pietrzak, Wioleta; Nowak, Renata; Nowicka, Grażyna

    2017-04-12

    Uncaria tomentosa is a woody vine with a long history of use in traditional Peruvian medicine and nowadays supplements containing this vine as ingredient are available. Immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties of Uncaria tomentosa have been suggested and attributed mainly to the presence of tetracyclic or pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids. However, the synergic action of different compounds occurring in extracts and modulation of redox processes may significantly influence the anticancer activity of Uncaria tomentosa. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the cytotoxic effects of the tetracyclic alkaloids free aqueous extract (decoction) of dried Uncaria tomentosa leaf blades in normal and cancer cells, and to assess the effect of the tested extract on cisplatin (CDDP) cytotoxicity. Tested Uncaria tomentosa extract was not cytotoxic for NHDF cells, but demonstrated cytotoxic effect against HepG2 cells. The extract increased ROS production in HepG2 cells, which resulted in decreased GSH level, leading to apoptosis of these cells through activation of caspase-3 and caspase-7. A reduction of NF-κB active form was observed in cancer cells. In normal cells the extract did not affect ROS production, GSH level and NF-κB activity, and maintained cell viability. HepG2 cells incubation with Uncaria tomentosa decoction and simultaneously with CDDP resulted in an increase in CDPP cytotoxic activity against HepG2, while under the same conditions Uncaria tomentosa prevents NHDF cell viability reduction due to CDDP. The results indicate that Uncaria tomentosa leaves decoction modulates differently cancer and normal cells oxidative metabolism and, enhanced cytotoxicity of CDDP against cancer cells and at the same time increased normal healthy cells resistance to cisplatin. Further studies are needed to confirm our observations and to describe underlying molecular mechanism, and the potential usefulness of Uncaria tomentosa decoction

  7. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease.

  8. Normal breast physiology: the reasons hormonal contraceptives and induced abortion increase breast-cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Angela

    2014-01-01

    A woman gains protection from breast cancer by completing a full-term pregnancy. In utero, her offspring produce hormones that mature 85 percent of the mother's breast tissue into cancer-resistant breast tissue. If the pregnancy ends through an induced abortion or a premature birth before thirty-two weeks, the mother's breasts will have only partially matured, retaining even more cancer-susceptible breast tissue than when the pregnancy began. This increased amount of immature breast tissue will leave the mother with more sites for cancer initiation, thereby increasing her risk of breast cancer. Hormonal contraceptives increase breast-cancer risk by their proliferative effect on breast tissue and their direct carcinogenic effects on DNA. Hormonal contraceptives include estrogen-progestin combination drugs prescribed in any manner of delivery: orally, transdermally, vaginally, or intrauterine. This article provides the detailed physiology and data that elucidate the mechanisms through which induced abortion and hormonal contraceptives increase breast-cancer risk.

  9. [The effect of alloxan on the multiplication of different types of normal or cancerous cells, and on the transformation of chick embryo fibroblasts by Rous virus in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobon, P; Latarjet, R

    1975-05-26

    The action of alloxan was studied in vitro, on different categories of normal or cancerous cells. At concentrations of 250 and 350 gamma/ml, alloxan does not significantly inhibit the growth of normal cells, whereas it does inhibit the growth of cancerous cells. Furthermore, alloxan inhibits infection and transformation of chicken-embryo fibroblasts infected by the Rous virus.

  10. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) in the discrimination of normal and oral cancer blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    Oral cancer is the most frequent type of cancer that occurs with 75000 to 80000 new cases reported every year in India. The carcinogens from tobacco and related products are the main cause for the oral cancer. ATR-FTIR method is label free, fast and cost-effective diagnostic method would allow for rapid diagnostic results in earlier stages by the minimal chemical changes occur in the biological metabolites available in the blood plasma. The present study reports the use of ATR-FTIR data with advanced statistical model (LDA-ANN) in the diagnosis of oral cancer from normal with better accuracy. The infrared spectra were acquired on ATR-FTIR Jasco spectrophotometer at 4 cm-1 resolution, 30 scans, in the 1800-900 cm-1 spectral range. Each sample had 5 spectra recorded from each blood plasma sample. The spectral data were routed through the multilayer perception of artificial neural network to evaluate for the statistical efficacy. Among the spectral data it was found that amide II (1486 cm-1) and lipid (1526 cm-1) affords about 90 % in the discrimination between groups using LDA. These preliminary results indicate that ATR-FTIR is useful to differentiate normal subject from oral cancer patients using blood plasma.

  11. Cancer associated epigenetic transitions identified by genome-wide histone methylation binding profiles in human colorectal cancer samples and paired normal mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallerman Ola

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite their well-established functional roles, histone modifications have received less attention than DNA methylation in the cancer field. In order to evaluate their importance in colorectal cancer (CRC, we generated the first genome-wide histone modification profiles in paired normal colon mucosa and tumor samples. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation and microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip was used to identify promoters enriched for histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me3 and lysine 27 (H3K27me3 in paired normal colon mucosa and tumor samples from two CRC patients and for the CRC cell line HT29. Results By comparing histone modification patterns in normal mucosa and tumors, we found that alterations predicted to have major functional consequences were quite rare. Furthermore, when normal or tumor tissue samples were compared to HT29, high similarities were observed for H3K4me3. However, the differences found for H3K27me3, which is important in determining cellular identity, indicates that cell lines do not represent optimal tissue models. Finally, using public expression data, we uncovered previously unknown changes in CRC expression patterns. Genes positive for H3K4me3 in normal and/or tumor samples, which are typically already active in normal mucosa, became hyperactivated in tumors, while genes with H3K27me3 in normal and/or tumor samples and which are expressed at low levels in normal mucosa, became hypersilenced in tumors. Conclusions Genome wide histone modification profiles can be used to find epigenetic aberrations in genes associated with cancer. This strategy gives further insights into the epigenetic contribution to the oncogenic process and may identify new biomarkers.

  12. BRCA1 promoter methylation of normal breast epithelial cells as a possible precursor for BRCA1-methylated breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Yoko; Miyake, Tomohiro; Kagara, Naofumi; Shimoda, Masafumi; Naoi, Yasuto; Maruyama, Naomi; Shimomura, Atsuhi; Shimazu, Kenzo; Kim, Seung Jin; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) and glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) promoters are reportedly often methylated in breast cancer tissues. Their methylation status in surrounding normal breast tissues has not been examined thoroughly although this may well be important for a better understanding of breast carcinogenesis. In this study, BRCA1 and GSTP1 promoter methylation was examined by methylation-specific PCR assay. Patients with BRCA1-methylated (n = 15) or BRCA1-unmethylated (n = 15) tumors and those with GSTP1-methylated (n = 9) or GSTP1-unmethylated (n = 11) tumors were included in the present study. Methylation status of manually micro-dissected normal epithelial cells from the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of normal breast tissues adjacent to and distant from the tumors was examined at multiple sites (n = 1–5). Of the 15 patients with BRCA1-methylated tumors, 9 harbored BRCA1 promoter methylation in at least one site of the normal breast tissues. However, no BRCA1 promoter methylation was observed at any site of the normal tissues of the 15 patients with BRCA1-unmethylated tumors. No GSTP1 promoter methylation was observed in the normal tissues regardless of the methylation status of the tumors. The presence of BRCA1 promoter methylation in the normal tissues was confirmed in the epithelial cells enriched with the magnetic-activated cell sorting method. Our findings suggest that a small proportion of normal breast epithelial cells with BRCA1 promoter methylation can be precursor cells from which BRCA1-methylated breast tumors may originate. This does not apply to GSTP1 promoter methylation. PMID:25155055

  13. Comparative study of laser and lamp fluorescence of cancer and normal tissue through wavelet transform and singular value decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharekhan, Anita H.; Rath, Dhaitri; Oza, Ashok N.; Pradhan, Asima; Sureshkumar, M. B.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2009-02-01

    A systematic investigation of the fluorescence characteristics of normal and cancerous human breast tissues is carried out, using laser and lamp as excitation sources. It is found that earlier observed subtle differences between these two tissue types in the wavelet domain are absent, when lamp is used as excitation source. However, singular value decomposition of the average spectral profile in the wavelet domain yields strong correlation for the cancer tissues in the 580-750 nm regimes indicating weak fluorophore activity in this wavelength range.

  14. Early detection of colorectal cancer relapse by infrared spectroscopy in ``normal'' anastomosis tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ahmad; Sebbag, Gilbert; Argov, Shmuel; Mordechai, Shaul; Sahu, Ranjit K.

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers usually occurring in people above the age of 50 years. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer. The American Cancer Society has estimated 96,830 new cases of colon cancer and 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer in 2014 in the United States. According to the literature, up to 55% of colorectal cancer patients experience a recurrence within five years from the time of surgery. Relapse of colorectal cancer has a deep influence on the quality of patient life. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. Abnormalities in the colonic crypts, which are not detectable using standard histopathological methods, could be determined using IR spectroscopic methods. The IR measurements were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tissues from eight patients (one control, four local recurrences, three distant recurrences). A total of 128 crypts were measured. Our results showed the possibility of differentiating among control, local, and distant recurrence crypts with more than a 92% success rate using spectra measured from the crypts' middle sites.

  15. Differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue in an animal model: conventional MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemeinhardt, O; Lüdemann, L; Prochnow, D; Abramjuk, C; Taupitz, M; Hamm, B; Beyersdorff, D

    2005-07-01

    To differentiate orthotopically implanted prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Gd-DTPA-BMA-enhanced dynamic MRI in the rat model. Tumors were induced in 15 rats by orthotopic implantation of G subline Dunning rat prostatic tumor cells. MRI was performed 56 to 60 days after tumor cell implantation using T1-weighted spin-echo, T2-weighted turbo SE sequences, and a 2D FLASH sequence for the contrast medium based dynamic study. The interstitial leakage volume, normalized permeability and the permeability surface area product of tumor and healthy prostate were determined quantitatively using a pharmacokinetic model. The results were confirmed by histologic examination. Axial T2-weighted TSE images depicted low-intensity areas suspicious for tumor in all 15 animals. The mean tumor volume was 46.5 mm(3). In the dynamic study, the suspicious areas in all animals displayed faster and more pronounced signal enhancement than surrounding prostate tissue. The interstitial volume and the permeability surface area product of the tumors increased significantly by 420 % (p < 0.001) and 424 % (p < 0.001), respectively, compared to normal prostate tissue, while no significant difference was seen for normalized permeability alone. The results of the present study demonstrate that quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI data enables differentiation of small, slowly growing orthotopic prostate cancer from normal prostate tissue in the rat model.

  16. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-02-09

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment.

  17. The rectal cancer microRNAome - microRNA expression in rectal cancer and matched normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaedcke, Jochen; Grade, Marian; Camps, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: miRNAs play a prominent role in a variety of physiologic and pathologic biologic processes, including cancer. For rectal cancers, only limited data are available on miRNA expression profiles, whereas the underlying genomic and transcriptomic aberrations have been firmly established. We...... mucosa. The predicted targets for these miRNAs were enriched for the following pathways: Wnt, TGF-beta, mTOR, insulin, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and ErbB signaling. Thirteen of these 49 miRNAs seem to be rectal cancer-specific, and have not been previously reported for colon cancers: miR-492, mi...

  18. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Effect of capping agents on the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in human normal and cancer skin cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netchareonsirisuk, Ponsawan [Chulalongkorn University, Program in Biotechnology, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Puthong, Songchan [Chulalongkorn University, Antibody Production Research Unit, Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (Thailand); Dubas, Stephan [Chulalongkorn University, Petroleum and Petrochemical College (Thailand); Palaga, Tanapat [Chulalongkorn University, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Komolpis, Kittinan, E-mail: kittinan.k@chula.ac.th [Chulalongkorn University, Antibody Production Research Unit, Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (Thailand)

    2016-11-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are among the most widely used nanomaterials in medical and consumer products. However, safety in the uses of AgNPs is still controversial. The toxicity of AgNPs toward various cell types has been reported to depend on the surface properties of the nanoparticles. In this study, the effect of AgNPs with the average size of 5–15 nm on the viability of the CCD-986SK human normal skin fibroblast cell line and A375 human malignant melanoma cell line was evaluated. Comparative toxicity studies, based on MTT assay, were performed by using either sodium alginate or poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid) sodium salt (PSSMA) as capping agent in the nanoparticle preparation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that AgNO{sub 3} alone was highly toxic to both cell types while both alginate and PSSMA alone were not toxic. AgNPs capped with alginate were selectively toxic to the cancer cell line but not to the normal cell line while AgNPs capped with PSSMA were toxic to both cancer and normal cell lines. Judging from the 50 % inhibition concentration (IC{sub 50}), it was found that the cancer cell line was more sensitive to AgNPs than the normal cell line. Study on the mode of cell death by annexin V and propidium iodide staining revealed that AgNPs induced more apoptotic cell death (84–90 %) than necrosis (8–12 %) in the skin cancer cell line. These results suggest that the toxicity of AgNPs depended on the type of capping agent and the type of cell line.

  20. Enhanced effect of geldanamycin nanocomposite against breast cancer cells growing in vitro and as xenograft with vanquished normal cell toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Suma; Ananthanarayanan, Preeta; Aziz, Sajida Kannangar; Rai, Sharada; Mutalik, Srinivas; Sadashiva, Satish Rao Bola

    2017-04-01

    Despite enormous advances in remedies developed for breast cancer, an effective therapeutic strategy by targeting malignant cells with the least normal tissue toxicity is yet to be developed. Hsp90 is considered to be an important therapeutic target to inhibit cell proliferation. Geldanamycin (GDM), a potent inhibitor of Hsp90 was withdrawn from clinical trials due to its undesirable hepatotoxicity. We report a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPION) based polymeric nanocomposite of GDM augmenting anticancer competence with decreased hepatic toxicity. The particle size of nanocomposite was ascertained to be 76±10nm with acceptable stability. A comparative dose dependent in vitro validation of cytotoxicity showed an enhanced cellular damage and necrosis in breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line at a low dose of 5.49nM (in GDM nanocomposite) in contrast to 20nM of pure GDM, while normal breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) were least affected. Besides, in vivo study (in breast cancer xenografts) substantiated 2.7 fold delay in tumor progression mediated by redundancy in the downstream functions of p-Akt and MAPK-Erk leading to apoptosis with negligible hepatotoxicity. Pure GDM disrupted the function and morphology of liver with lesser therapeutic efficacy than the GDM nanocomposite. These findings deduce that GDM based polymeric magnetite nanocomposite play a vital role in efficacious therapy while vanquishing normal cells and hepatic toxicity and thereby promising it to be reinstated in clinics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Comparative Evaluation of Normal Tissue Doses for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma on the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and Recent Children's Oncology Group Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Rachel; Ng, Angela [Department of Radiation Therapy, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Armstrong, Gregory T. [Epidemiology/Cancer Control Department, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Friedman, Debra L. [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Kelly, Kara [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); FitzGerald, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, and Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are recognized to have an increased risk of delayed adverse health outcomes related to radiation therapy (RT). However, the necessary latency required to observe these late effects means that the estimated risks apply to outdated treatments. We sought to compare the normal tissue dose received by children treated for HL and enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) (diagnosed 1970-1986) with that of patients treated in recent Children's Oncology Group (COG) trials (enrolled 2002-2012). Methods and Materials: RT planning data were obtained for 50 HL survivors randomly sampled from the CCSS cohort and applied to computed tomography planning data sets to reconstruct the normal tissue dosimetry. For comparison, the normal tissue dosimetry data were obtained for all 191 patients with full computed tomography–based volumetric RT planning on COG protocols AHOD0031 and AHOD0831. Results: For early-stage patients, the mean female breast dose in the COG patients was on average 83.5% lower than that for CCSS patients, with an absolute reduction of 15.5 Gy. For advanced-stage patients, the mean breast dose was decreased on average by 70% (11.6 Gy average absolute dose reduction). The mean heart dose decreased on average by 22.9 Gy (68.6%) and 17.6 Gy (56.8%) for early- and advanced-stage patients, respectively. All dose comparisons for breast, heart, lung, and thyroid were significantly lower for patients in the COG trials than for the CCSS participants. Reductions in the prescribed dose were a major contributor to these dose reductions. Conclusions: These are the first data quantifying the significant reduction in the normal tissue dose using actual, rather than hypothetical, treatment plans for children with HL. These findings provide useful information when counseling families regarding the risks of contemporary RT.

  2. Distinguishing normal cells from cancer cells via lysosome-targetable pH biomarkers with benzo[a]phenoxazine skeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Yan-Hua [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Material Science, State and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for Novel Functional Polymeric Materials, Soochow University, 199 Ren’Ai Road, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Li, Xiao-Jun [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medicine College of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Sun, Ru, E-mail: sunru924@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Material Science, State and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for Novel Functional Polymeric Materials, Soochow University, 199 Ren’Ai Road, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Xu, Yu-Jie [School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Medicine College of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Ge, Jian-Feng, E-mail: ge_jianfeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Material Science, State and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for Novel Functional Polymeric Materials, Soochow University, 199 Ren’Ai Road, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Medical Optics, Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, 215163 (China)

    2016-08-24

    In this paper, the design of a lysosome-targetable pH probe that has a fluorescent OFF (pH = 4) to ON (pH = 5–6) response is described to identify lysosomes in normal cells. The mechanism of photoinduced electron transfer with a fluorophore-based reaction (FBR-PET) was proposed. Benzo[a]phenoxazines with electro-donating aryl groups were selected, its (2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)imino-, (2-hydroxyphenyl)imino- and (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)- imino-derivatives (probes 1a−c) were prepared and their optical responses towards pH were evaluated; their fluorescence pH titration experiments gave regularly changes with the increasing electro-donating abilities at the linked aryl groups, the (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)iminobenzo[a]phenoxazine (probe 1c) exhibited a nearly OFF−ON response at 580–800 nm. All probes were reversible, and they showed excellent selectivity toward the proton over other competitive species. Fluorescence confocal images were performed with HeLa, KB cancer cells and V79 normal cells, probes 1a−c are all lysosome-targetable pH probes, and benzo[a]phenoxazine with (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)imino-group (probe 1c) has potential applications in selective differentiation of normal cells from cancer cells. - Highlights: • pH probes for lysosome detection in normal cells. • Differentiation of normal cells from cancer cells by lysosome-biomarker. • The PET mechanism promoted by fluorophore based reactions (FBR-PET).

  3. Finding Your New Normal: Outcomes of a Wellness-Oriented Psychoeducational Support Group for Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Myers, Jane; Barden, Sejal; Clarke, Philip; Weimann, Rochelle; Forti, Allison; Moore-Painter, Terry; Knutson, Tami; Porter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Group interventions have been useful for survivors to overcome the challenges of cancer. This study employed a pre/post, mixed-methods design to explore the influence of an 8-week support group on the holistic wellness of 14 breast cancer survivors. Pairing experiential activities with wellness-centered psychoeducation was viewed positively by…

  4. Multimodal non-linear optical imaging for label-free differentiation of lung cancerous lesions from normal and desmoplastic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Jie; Thrall, Michael J; Liu, Zhengfan; Wang, Xi; Wong, Stephen T C

    2013-01-01

    Lung carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, and non-small cell carcinoma accounts for 85% of all lung cancer cases. One major characteristic of non-small cell carcinoma is the appearance of desmoplasia and deposition of dense extracellular collagen around the tumor. The desmoplastic response provides a radiologic target but may impair sampling during traditional image-guided needle biopsy and is difficult to differentiate from normal tissues using single label free imaging modality; for translational purposes, label-free techniques provide a more promising route to clinics. We thus investigated the potential of using multimodal, label free optical microscopy that incorporates Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS), Two-Photon Excited AutoFluorescence (TPEAF), and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) techniques for differentiating lung cancer from normal and desmoplastic tissues. Lung tissue samples from patients were imaged using CARS, TPEAF, and SHG for comparison and showed that the combination of the three non-linear optics techniques is essential for attaining reliable differentiation. These images also illustrated good pathological correlation with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections from the same tissue samples. Automated image analysis algorithms were developed for quantitative segmentation and feature extraction to enable lung tissue differentiation. Our results indicate that coupled with automated morphology analysis, the proposed tri-modal nonlinear optical imaging technique potentially offers a powerful translational strategy to differentiate cancer lesions reliably from surrounding non-tumor and desmoplastic tissues.

  5. Mutation Detection in Patients With Advanced Cancer by Universal Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes in Tumor and Normal DNA vs Guideline-Based Germline Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Zhang, Liying; Kemel, Yelena; Stadler, Zsofia K; Joseph, Vijai; Zehir, Ahmet; Pradhan, Nisha; Arnold, Angela; Walsh, Michael F; Li, Yirong; Balakrishnan, Anoop R; Syed, Aijazuddin; Prasad, Meera; Nafa, Khedoudja; Carlo, Maria I; Cadoo, Karen A; Sheehan, Meg; Fleischut, Megan H; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Trottier, Magan; Lipkin, Steven M; Lincoln, Anne; Mukherjee, Semanti; Ravichandran, Vignesh; Cambria, Roy; Galle, Jesse; Abida, Wassim; Arcila, Marcia E; Benayed, Ryma; Shah, Ronak; Yu, Kenneth; Bajorin, Dean F; Coleman, Jonathan A; Leach, Steven D; Lowery, Maeve A; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Kantoff, Philip W; Sawyers, Charles L; Dickler, Maura N; Saltz, Leonard; Motzer, Robert J; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Scher, Howard I; Baselga, Jose; Klimstra, David S; Solit, David B; Hyman, David M; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth

    2017-09-05

    Guidelines for cancer genetic testing based on family history may miss clinically actionable genetic changes with established implications for cancer screening or prevention. To determine the proportion and potential clinical implications of inherited variants detected using simultaneous sequencing of the tumor and normal tissue ("tumor-normal sequencing") compared with genetic test results based on current guidelines. From January 2014 until May 2016 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 10 336 patients consented to tumor DNA sequencing. Since May 2015, 1040 of these patients with advanced cancer were referred by their oncologists for germline analysis of 76 cancer predisposition genes. Patients with clinically actionable inherited mutations whose genetic test results would not have been predicted by published decision rules were identified. Follow-up for potential clinical implications of mutation detection was through May 2017. Tumor and germline sequencing compared with the predicted yield of targeted germline sequencing based on clinical guidelines. Proportion of clinically actionable germline mutations detected by universal tumor-normal sequencing that would not have been detected by guideline-directed testing. Of 1040 patients, the median age was 58 years (interquartile range, 50.5-66 years), 65.3% were male, and 81.3% had stage IV disease at the time of genomic analysis, with prostate, renal, pancreatic, breast, and colon cancer as the most common diagnoses. Of the 1040 patients, 182 (17.5%; 95% CI, 15.3%-19.9%) had clinically actionable mutations conferring cancer susceptibility, including 149 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations; 101 patients tested (9.7%; 95% CI, 8.1%-11.7%) would not have had these mutations detected using clinical guidelines, including 65 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations. Frequency of inherited mutations was related to case mix, stage, and founder mutations. Germline findings led to discussion or initiation of

  6. Base excision repair activities differ in human lung cancer cells and corresponding normal controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karahalil, Bensu; Bohr, Vilhelm A; De Souza-Pinto, Nadja C

    2010-01-01

    for the repair of oxidized modifications both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. In order to ascertain whether diminished BER capacity might account for increased levels of oxidative DNA damage in cancer cells, the activities of BER enzymes in three different lung cancer cell lines and their non......-cancerous counterparts were measured using oligonucleotide substrates with single DNA lesions to assess specific BER enzymes. The activities of four BER enzymes, OGG1, NTH1, UDG and APE1, were compared in mitochondrial and nuclear extracts. For each specific lesion, the repair activities were similar among the three...... cell lines used. However, the specific activities and cancer versus control comparison differed significantly between the nuclear and mitochondrial compartments. OGG1 activity, as measured by 8-oxodA incision, was up-regulated in cancer cell mitochondria but down-regulated in the nucleus when compared...

  7. dbEM: A database of epigenetic modifiers curated from cancerous and normal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Nanda, Jagpreet; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-18

    We have developed a database called dbEM (database of Epigenetic Modifiers) to maintain the genomic information of about 167 epigenetic modifiers/proteins, which are considered as potential cancer targets. In dbEM, modifiers are classified on functional basis and comprise of 48 histone methyl transferases, 33 chromatin remodelers and 31 histone demethylases. dbEM maintains the genomic information like mutations, copy number variation and gene expression in thousands of tumor samples, cancer cell lines and healthy samples. This information is obtained from public resources viz. COSMIC, CCLE and 1000-genome project. Gene essentiality data retrieved from COLT database further highlights the importance of various epigenetic proteins for cancer survival. We have also reported the sequence profiles, tertiary structures and post-translational modifications of these epigenetic proteins in cancer. It also contains information of 54 drug molecules against different epigenetic proteins. A wide range of tools have been integrated in dbEM e.g. Search, BLAST, Alignment and Profile based prediction. In our analysis, we found that epigenetic proteins DNMT3A, HDAC2, KDM6A, and TET2 are highly mutated in variety of cancers. We are confident that dbEM will be very useful in cancer research particularly in the field of epigenetic proteins based cancer therapeutics. This database is available for public at URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/dbem.

  8. dbEM: A database of epigenetic modifiers curated from cancerous and normal genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Nanda, Jagpreet; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a database called dbEM (database of Epigenetic Modifiers) to maintain the genomic information of about 167 epigenetic modifiers/proteins, which are considered as potential cancer targets. In dbEM, modifiers are classified on functional basis and comprise of 48 histone methyl transferases, 33 chromatin remodelers and 31 histone demethylases. dbEM maintains the genomic information like mutations, copy number variation and gene expression in thousands of tumor samples, cancer cell lines and healthy samples. This information is obtained from public resources viz. COSMIC, CCLE and 1000-genome project. Gene essentiality data retrieved from COLT database further highlights the importance of various epigenetic proteins for cancer survival. We have also reported the sequence profiles, tertiary structures and post-translational modifications of these epigenetic proteins in cancer. It also contains information of 54 drug molecules against different epigenetic proteins. A wide range of tools have been integrated in dbEM e.g. Search, BLAST, Alignment and Profile based prediction. In our analysis, we found that epigenetic proteins DNMT3A, HDAC2, KDM6A, and TET2 are highly mutated in variety of cancers. We are confident that dbEM will be very useful in cancer research particularly in the field of epigenetic proteins based cancer therapeutics. This database is available for public at URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/dbem.

  9. Normal physiologic and Benign foci with F-18 FDG avidity on PET/CT in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ah; Lee, Kwang Man; Choi, Un Jong; Kim, Hun Soo; Kim, Hye Won; Song, Jeong Hoon [College of Medicine, Wonkwnag University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiologic and benign F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avid foci in patients with breast cancer. On 309 F-18 FDG PET/CT scans of 241 women with breast cancer, the hypermetabolic lesions compared with the surrounding normal region were evaluated retrospectively. Available reports of other relevant radiological imaging medical records, and follow-up PET/CT were reviewed for explanations of the abnormal uptake. Among the 70 physiologic foci, muscular uptake of the lower neck following the surgical and/or radiation therapy of ipsilateral breast (29%), hypermetabolic ovaries (16%) and uterine (10%) uptake during the ovulatory and menstrual phases during the normal menstrual cycle were identified, and also hypermetabolic brown fat in cold-induced thermogenesis (7%), non-specific bowel uptake (35%) were observed. Among the 147 benign lesions, sequelae of the chest wall and breasts following surgical and/or radiation therapy, were often observed (27%). Hypermetabolic thyroid glands were noted as adenomas and chronic thyroiditis (18%). Reactive hyperplasia of cervical or mediastinal lymph nodes (32%), degenerative osteoarthritis and healed fractures (15%), hypermetabolic benign lung lesions (6%) were observed. Altered physiologic and benign F-18 FDG uptake in the cervical muscle and chest wall following ipsilateral breast surgery or radiotherapy were common, and also normal physiologic uptake in ovary and uterus, brown fat, thyroid were considered as predominant findings in women patients with breast cancer. Knowledge of these findings might aid in the interpretation of FDG PET/CT in patients with breast cancer

  10. The struggle towards 'the New Normal': a qualitative insight into psychosexual adjustment to prostate cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanly, Narelle; Mireskandari, Shab; Juraskova, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    .... The aim of this qualitative study was to explore factors influencing psychosexual adjustment, self-perception, and unmet information and support needs of prostate cancer patients and their partners...

  11. Dual effects of radiation bystander signaling in urothelial cancer: purinergic-activation of apoptosis attenuates survival of urothelial cancer and normal urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Malgorzata A; Srivastava, Kirtiman; Breen, Conor; Butterworth, Karl T; McMahon, Stephen J; Prise, Kevin M; McCloskey, Karen D

    2017-11-14

    Radiation therapy (RT) delivers tumour kill, directly and often via bystander mechanisms. Bladder toxicity is a dose limiting constraint in pelvic RT, manifested as radiation cystitis and urinary symptoms. We aimed to investigate the impact of radiation-induced bystander signaling on normal/cancer urothelial cells. Human urothelial cancer cells T24, HT1376 and normal urothelial cells HUC, SV-HUC were used. Cells were irradiated and studied directly, or conditioned medium from irradiated cells (CM) was transferred to naïve, cells. T24 or SV-HUC cells in the shielded half of irradiated flasks had increased numbers of DNA damage foci vs non-irradiated cells. A physical barrier blocked this response, indicating release of transmitters from irradiated cells. Clonogenic survival of shielded T24 or SV-HUC was also reduced; a physical barrier prevented this phenomenon. CM-transfer increased pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activity, increased cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP expression and reduced survival protein XIAP expression. This effect was mimicked by ATP. ATP or CM evoked suramin-sensitive Ca 2+ -signals. Irradiation increased [ATP] in CM from T24. The CM-inhibitory effect on T24 clonogenic survival was blocked by apyrase, or mimicked by ATP. We conclude that radiation-induced bystander signaling enhances urothelial cancer cell killing via activation of purinergic pro-apoptotic pathways. This benefit is accompanied by normal urothelial damage indicating RT bladder toxicity is also bystander-mediated.

  12. Dual effects of radiation bystander signaling in urothelial cancer: purinergic-activation of apoptosis attenuates survival of urothelial cancer and normal urothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Malgorzata A.; Srivastava, Kirtiman; Breen, Conor; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Prise, Kevin M.; McCloskey, Karen D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) delivers tumour kill, directly and often via bystander mechanisms. Bladder toxicity is a dose limiting constraint in pelvic RT, manifested as radiation cystitis and urinary symptoms. We aimed to investigate the impact of radiation-induced bystander signaling on normal/cancer urothelial cells. Human urothelial cancer cells T24, HT1376 and normal urothelial cells HUC, SV-HUC were used. Cells were irradiated and studied directly, or conditioned medium from irradiated cells (CM) was transferred to naïve, cells. T24 or SV-HUC cells in the shielded half of irradiated flasks had increased numbers of DNA damage foci vs non-irradiated cells. A physical barrier blocked this response, indicating release of transmitters from irradiated cells. Clonogenic survival of shielded T24 or SV-HUC was also reduced; a physical barrier prevented this phenomenon. CM-transfer increased pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activity, increased cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP expression and reduced survival protein XIAP expression. This effect was mimicked by ATP. ATP or CM evoked suramin-sensitive Ca2+-signals. Irradiation increased [ATP] in CM from T24. The CM-inhibitory effect on T24 clonogenic survival was blocked by apyrase, or mimicked by ATP. We conclude that radiation-induced bystander signaling enhances urothelial cancer cell killing via activation of purinergic pro-apoptotic pathways. This benefit is accompanied by normal urothelial damage indicating RT bladder toxicity is also bystander-mediated. PMID:29228614

  13. In vitro assessment of Macleaya cordata crude extract bioactivity and anticancer properties in normal and cancerous human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Lin, Yu-ling; Chen, Xuan-Ren; Liao, Chi-Cheng; Poo, Wak-Kim

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the bioactivity and anticancer properties of Macleaya cordata crude extract in vitro using normal fetal lung fibroblast MRC5 and adenocarcinomic epithelial cell A549 as model systems,. Treatment of extract induced cell detachment, rounding, and irregularity in shape, in both normal and adenocarcinomic human lung cells, in accompanied of significant reduction in cell proliferation. The data indicated that necrosis appeared to be involved in compromising cell growth in both types of lung cells since membrane permeability and cell granularity were elevated. Although apoptosis was evident, the responses were differential in normal and diseased lung cells. Viability of treated MRC5 cells was reduced in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating that the normal lung cells are sensitive to the extract. Surprisingly, A549 viability was slightly elevated in response to extract exposure at low concentration, implying that cells survived were metabolically active; the viability was reduced accordingly to treatment at higher concentrations. The present findings demonstrate that the crude extract of M. cordata contains agents affecting the functioning of normal and diseased lung cells in vitro. The observed cytotoxic effects against adenocarcinomic lung cells validate the potential of using M. cordata as herbal intervention in combined with conventional chemotherapy for lung cancer treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  15. EFFECT OF THE C60 FULLERENE, DOXORUBICIN AND THEIR COMPLEX ON CANCER AND NORMAL CELLS OF BALB/c MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prylutska S. V.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main strategies in anticancer therapy is inhibition of the proliferative activity of cancer cells. However, antitumor action of conventional chemotherapy is always associated with numerous side effects, in particular it is toxic with respect to normal organs and in many cases promotes the progression of tumors. In this regard, there is a need to develop alternative therapies of tumors and the search of new non/low toxic (relative to normal cells tumoritropic substances, which cause their degradation. Toxic effects of these substances on cancer cells can be realized by stimulating their death due to necrosis or apoptosis. To controlling these processes the use of pristine C60 fullerenes, which are capable in combination therapy to improve the antitumor activity of traditional antitumor drugs, preventing their toxic effect on the organ level by inhibiting reactions of peroxidation, is proposed. The toxic effect of the created pristine C60 fullerene with an antibiotic anthracyclines doxorubicin (Dox complex on tumor (Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and immune (lymphocytes and macrophages cells and hepatocytes was evaluated. It demonstrates the potential for high efficiency of C60+Dox complex use in cancer therapy.

  16. Rhamnolipids elicit the same cytotoxic sensitivity between cancer cell and normal cell by reducing surface tension of culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lifang; Shen, Chong; Long, Xuwei; Zhang, Guoliang; Meng, Qin

    2014-12-01

    Biosurfactant rhamnolipids have been claimed to show biological activities of inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. In this study, the cytotoxicity of rhamnolipids was examined on four cancer cells (HepG2, Caco-2, Hela, MCF-7 cells) and two normal cells (HK-2 cell, primary hepatocyte). Interestingly, both cancer cells and normal cells exhibited similar sensitivities to the addition of rhamnolipids in culture medium, and the cytotoxicity was largely attenuated by the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in culture medium. In correlation of the mono-/di-rhamnolipid cytotoxicity with the surface tension of culture medium, it was found that rhamnolipids triggered cytotoxicity whenever the surface tension of culture medium decreased below 41 mN/m irrespective of the FBS content in culture medium, cell line, or rhamnolipid congener. Similarly, each chemical surfactant (Tween-80, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) could cause cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells whenever its addition made the surface tension under 41 mN/m in culture medium with or without the presence of FBS. It seems that rhamnolipids, like chemical surfactants, exhibited cytotoxicity by reducing the surface tension of culture medium rather than by changing its specific molecular structure, which had no selection on tumor cells. This study could offer helps to correct the misleading biological activity of rhamnolipids and to avoid the possible large wastes of time and expenses on developing the applications in antitumor drugs.

  17. Effects of radiation on T regulatory cells in normal states and cancer: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Sun, Xiangdong; Luo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Guo, Qing; Song, Yaqi; Sun, Xinchen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation remains an important component of cancer treatment. In addition to inducing tumor cell death through direct cytotoxic effects, radiation can also promote the regression of tumor via augment of immune response. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a unique subpopulation of CD4 positive cells, which are characterized by expression of the forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) transcription factor and high levels of CD25. Mounting evidence has shown that Tregs are implicated in the development and progression of various types of cancer, which makes Tregs an important target in cancer therapeutics. Generally, lymphocytes are regarded as radiosensitive. However, Tregs have been demonstrated to be relatively resistant to radiotherapy, which is partly mediated by downregulation of pro-apoptotic proteins and upregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins. Moreover, radiotherapy can increase the production of Tregs and the recruitment of Tregs to local tumor microenvironment. Tregs can attenuate radiation-induced tumor death, which cause the resistance of tumor to radiotherapy. Recent experimental studies and clinical trails have demonstrated that the combination of radiation with medications that target Tregs is promising in the treatment of several types of neoplasms. In this review, we discussed the effect of radiation on Tregs in physiological states and cancer. Further, we presented an overview of therapies that target Tregs to enhance the efficacy of radiation in cancer therapeutics.

  18. A comparative study of normal inspection, autofluorescence and 5-ALA-induced PPIX fluorescence for oral cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Christian S; Stepp, Herbert; Janda, Philip; Arbogast, Susanne; Grevers, Gerhard; Baumgartner, Reinhold; Leunig, Andreas

    2002-01-10

    Fluorescence diagnosis aims to improve the management of oral cancer via early detection of the malignant lesions and better delimitation of the tumor margins. This paper presents a comparative study of normal inspection, combined fluorescence diagnosis (CFD) and its 2 main components, autofluorescence and 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) fluorescence. Biopsy-controlled fluorescence imaging and spectral analysis were performed on a total of 85 patients with suspected or histologically proven oral carcinoma both before and after topical administration of 5-ALA (200 mg 5-ALA dissolved in 50 ml of H(2)0). Fluorescence excitation was accomplished using filtered light of a xenon short arc lamp (lambda = 375-440 nm). As for CFD, a "streetlight" contrast (red to green) was readily found between malignant and healthy tissue on the acquired images. In terms of tumor localization and delimitation properties, CFD was clearly favorable over either normal inspection or its 2 components in fluorescence imaging. The performance of CFD was found to be impeded by tumor keratinization but to be independent of either tumor staging, grading or localization. In spectral analysis, cancerous tissue showed significantly higher PPIX fluorescence intensities and lower autofluorescence intensities than normal mucosa. There is a great potential for CFD in early detection of oral neoplasms and exact delimitation of the tumors' superficial margins and an advantage over white light inspection and each of its 2 main components. The method is noninvasive, safe and easily reproducible. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Cervical cancer incidence after normal cytological sample in routine screening using SurePath, ThinPrep, and conventional cytology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozemeijer, Kirsten; Naber, Steffie K; Penning, Corine

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the cumulative incidence of cervical cancer diagnosed within 72 months after a normal screening sample between conventional cytology and liquid based cytology tests SurePath and ThinPrep.Design Retrospective population based cohort study.Setting Nationwide network and registry...... of histo- and cytopathology in the Netherlands (PALGA), January 2000 to March 2013.Population Women with 5 924 474 normal screening samples (23 833 123 person years).Exposure Use of SurePath or ThinPrep versus conventional cytology as screening test.Main outcome measure 72 month cumulative incidence...... was 58.5 (95% confidence interval 54.6 to 62.7) per 100 000 normal conventional cytology samples, compared with 66.8 (56.7 to 78.7) for ThinPrep and 44.6 (37.8 to 52.6) for SurePath. Compared with conventional cytology, the hazard of invasive cancer was 19% lower (hazard ratio 0.81, 95% confidence...

  20. Absolute Quantification of C-Reactive Protein in Human Plasma Derived from Patients with Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Utilizing Protein Cleavage Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. Keith; Muddiman, David C.

    2009-01-01

    A method employing protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry (PC-IDMS) was developed for quantification of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human plasma. This method was completed without the use of immuno-affinity chromatography or size exclusion chromatography, as previous mass spectrometric methods for the quantification of CRP have employed. A total of 110 human plasma samples were analyzed with PC-IDMS via 1-D nano LC-MS/MS using a 30 minute gradient with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The results from this newly developed method were compared to results generated from an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed by an independent CLIA certified laboratory. The comparison of these results generated a R2 = 0.9708 which indicates successful quantification of CRP from human plasma utilizing the methodology described herein. Interestingly, the PC-IDMS method provided concentration values that were ~10X the concentration reported by the ELISA method, which demonstrated that the method of detection is an important consideration when determining reference ranges of a particular analyte. In addition, data is shown that illustrates that as epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progresses from stage I to stage IV, mean levels of CRP increase. PMID:19196186

  1. Oral epithelial stem cells - implications in normal development and cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagerakis, Silvana; Pannone, Giuseppe; Zheng, Li; About, Imad; Taqi, Nawar; Nguyen, Nghia P T; Matossian, Margarite; McAlpin, Blake; Santoro, Angela; McHugh, Jonathan; Prince, Mark E; Papagerakis, Petros

    2014-07-15

    Oral mucosa is continuously exposed to environmental forces and has to be constantly renewed. Accordingly, the oral mucosa epithelium contains a large reservoir of epithelial stem cells necessary for tissue homeostasis. Despite considerable scientific advances in stem cell behavior in a number of tissues, fewer studies have been devoted to the stem cells in the oral epithelium. Most of oral mucosa stem cells studies are focused on identifying cancer stem cells (CSC) in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) among other head and neck cancers. OSCCs are the most prevalent epithelial tumors of the head and neck region, marked by their aggressiveness and invasiveness. Due to their highly tumorigenic properties, it has been suggested that CSC may be the critical population of cancer cells in the development of OSCC metastasis. This review presents a brief overview of epithelium stem cells with implications in oral health, and the clinical implications of the CSC concept in OSCC metastatic dissemination. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Oral epithelial stem cells – implications in normal development and cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagerakis, Silvana; Pannone, Giuseppe; Zheng, Li; About, Imad; Taqi, Nawar; Nguyen, Nghia P.T.; Matossian, Margarite; McAlpin, Blake; Santoro, Angela; McHugh, Jonathan; Prince, Mark E.; Papagerakis, Petros

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucosa is continuously exposed to environmental forces and has to be constantly renewed. Accordingly, the oral mucosa epithelium contains a large reservoir of epithelial stem cells necessary for tissue homeostasis. Despite considerable scientific advances in stem cell behavior in a number of tissues, fewer studies have been devoted to the stem cells in the oral epithelium. Most of oral mucosa stem cells studies are focused on identifying cancer stem cells (CSC) in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) among other head and neck cancers. OSCCs are the most prevalent epithelial tumors of the head and neck region, marked by their aggressiveness and invasiveness. Due to their highly tumorigenic properties, it has been suggested that CSC may be the critical population of cancer cells in the development of OSCC metastasis. This review presents a brief overview of epithelium stem cells with implications in oral health, and the clinical implications of the CSC concept in OSCC metastatic dissemination. PMID:24803391

  3. Mapping absolute tissue endogenous fluorophore concentrations with chemometric wide-field fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhang; Reilley, Michael; Li, Run; Xu, Min

    2017-06-01

    We report chemometric wide-field fluorescence microscopy for imaging the spatial distribution and concentration of endogenous fluorophores in thin tissue sections. Nonnegative factorization aided by spatial diversity is used to learn both the spectral signature and the spatial distribution of endogenous fluorophores from microscopic fluorescence color images obtained under broadband excitation and detection. The absolute concentration map of individual fluorophores is derived by comparing the fluorescence from "pure" fluorophores under the identical imaging condition following the identification of the fluorescence species by its spectral signature. This method is then demonstrated by characterizing the concentration map of endogenous fluorophores (including tryptophan, elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin adenine dinucleotide) for lung tissue specimens. The absolute concentrations of these fluorophores are all found to decrease significantly from normal, perilesional, to cancerous (squamous cell carcinoma) tissue. Discriminating tissue types using the absolute fluorophore concentration is found to be significantly more accurate than that achievable with the relative fluorescence strength. Quantification of fluorophores in terms of the absolute concentration map is also advantageous in eliminating the uncertainties due to system responses or measurement details, yielding more biologically relevant data, and simplifying the assessment of competing imaging approaches.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of eribulin mesylate in cancer patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Antoinette R; Sarantopoulos, John; Lee, Lucy; Reyderman, Larisa; He, Yi; Olivo, Martin; Goel, Sanjay

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of renal impairment on eribulin mesylate pharmacokinetics following a single dose in adults with advanced solid tumors. Patients were grouped by renal function: moderate impairment (creatinine clearance [CrCl] 30-50 mL/min), severe impairment (CrCl 15-29 mL/min), or normal (CrCl ≥80 mL/min). During each 21-day cycle, eribulin mesylate doses (days 1 and 8) were administered intravenously: moderate, 1.1 mg/m(2) (except cycle 1 day 1, 1.4 mg/m(2)); severe, 0.7 mg/m(2); normal, 1.4 mg/m(2). Nineteen patients were enrolled (normal, n = 6; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 6). Renal impairment was associated with an increased mean dose-normalized area under the concentration-time curve (ratios for moderate/normal and severe/normal: 1.49; 90 % confidence interval [CI] 0.9, 2.45). CrCl and renal function correlated positively, with a numerically small slope (0.0184; 90 % CI -0.00254, 0.0394). A simulated dose reduction to eribulin 1.1 mg/m(2) in patients with moderate or severe renal impairment achieved the same exposure as 1.4 mg/m(2) in those with normal renal function. All groups had similar toxicity profiles, with no unexpected adverse events. Renal impairment decreased eribulin clearance and increased exposure. Pharmacokinetic evaluation supports an eribulin dose reduction to 1.1 mg/m(2) in patients with moderate or severe renal impairment. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT01418677.

  5. Taxonomy of breast cancer based on normal cell phenotype predicts outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, Sandro; Thakkar, Ankita; Ergonul, Ayse; Wang, Bin; Woo, Terri; Hu, Rong; Harrell, J. Chuck; McNamara, George; Schwede, Matthew; Culhane, Aedin C.; Kindelberger, David; Rodig, Scott; Richardson, Andrea; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Ince, Tan A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate classification is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of a disease and can inform therapeutic choices. For hematopoietic malignancies, a classification scheme based on the phenotypic similarity between tumor cells and normal cells has been successfully used to define tumor subtypes; however, use of normal cell types as a reference by which to classify solid tumors has not been widely emulated, in part due to more limited understanding of epithelial cell differentiation compared with hematopoiesis. To provide a better definition of the subtypes of epithelial cells comprising the breast epithelium, we performed a systematic analysis of a large set of breast epithelial markers in more than 15,000 normal breast cells, which identified 11 differentiation states for normal luminal cells. We then applied information from this analysis to classify human breast tumors based on normal cell types into 4 major subtypes, HR0–HR3, which were differentiated by vitamin D, androgen, and estrogen hormone receptor (HR) expression. Examination of 3,157 human breast tumors revealed that these HR subtypes were distinct from the current classification scheme, which is based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Patient outcomes were best when tumors expressed all 3 hormone receptors (subtype HR3) and worst when they expressed none of the receptors (subtype HR0). Together, these data provide an ontological classification scheme associated with patient survival differences and provides actionable insights for treating breast tumors. PMID:24463450

  6. Human dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase form a complex in vitro and co-localize in normal and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Anna; Jarmuła, Adam; Przybylska, Dorota; Mosieniak, Grażyna; Szczepanowska, Joanna; Kowalkowska, Anna; Rode, Wojciech; Cieśla, Joanna

    2017-05-01

    Enzymes involved in thymidylate biosynthesis, thymidylate synthase (TS), and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) are well-known targets in cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time, that human TS and DHFR form a strong complex in vitro and co-localize in human normal and colon cancer cell cytoplasm and nucleus. Treatment of cancer cells with methotrexate or 5-fluorouracil did not affect the distribution of either enzyme within the cells. However, 5-FU, but not MTX, lowered the presence of DHFR-TS complex in the nucleus by 2.5-fold. The results may suggest the sequestering of TS by FdUMP in the cytoplasm and thereby affecting the translocation of DHFR-TS complex to the nucleus. Providing a strong likelihood of DHFR-TS complex formation in vivo, the latter complex is a potential new drug target in cancer therapy. In this paper, known 3D structures of human TS and human DHFR, and some protozoan bifunctional DHFR-TS structures as templates, are used to build an in silico model of human DHFR-TS complex structure, consisting of one TS dimer and two DHFR monomers. This complex structure may serve as an initial 3D drug target model for prospective inhibitors targeting interfaces between the DHFR and TS enzymes.

  7. Significance of differential expression of thymidylate synthase in normal and primary tumor tissues from patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yawei

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of thymidylate synthase (TS is essential as a key rate-limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. It is the primary target of fluorouracil and its derivates in colorectal cancer. In this study, TS mRNA expression was examined in primary tumor and normal tissues from 76 patients with high- risk stage II/III colorectal cancer by laser capture microdissection and polymerase chain reaction. Thirty (39.47% patients were found to have higher TS expression in primary tumors with earlier stage (P = 0.018, lower histological grades (P = 0.001 and high frequency microsatellite instability (P = 0.000. Multivariate analysis showed that microsatellite instability, histological grade and number of lymph nodes examined are independent prognostic markers.

  8. Cervical cancer incidence after normal cytological sample in routine screening using SurePath, ThinPrep, and conventional cytology: population based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Rozemeijer (Kirsten); S.K. Naber (Steffie); C. Penning (Corine); L.I.H. Overbeek (Lucy); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); I.M.C.M. de Kok (Inge); S.M. Matthijsse (Suzette); M. Rebolj (Matejka); F.J. van Kemenade (Folkert); M. van Ballegooijen (Marjolein)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract#### Objective To compare the cumulative incidence of cervical cancer diagnosed within 72 months after a normal screening sample between conventional cytology and liquid based cytology tests SurePath and ThinPrep. #### Design Retrospective population based cohort

  9. Exosome in Tumour Microenvironment: Overview of the Crosstalk between Normal and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Roma-Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer development is a multistep process in which exosomes play important roles. Exosomes are small vesicles formed in vesicular bodies in the endosomal network. The major role of exosomes seems to be the transport of bioactive molecules between cells. Depending on the cell of origin, exosomes are implicated in the regulation of several cellular events, with phenotypic consequences in recipient cells. Cancer derived exosomes (CCEs are important players in the formation of the tumour microenvironment by (i enabling the escape of tumour cells to immunological system and help initiating the inflammatory response; (ii acting in the differentiation of fibroblasts and mesenchymal cells into myofibroblasts; (iii triggering the angiogenic process; and (iv enhancing the metastatic evolution of the tumour by promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transformation of tumour cells and by preparing the tumour niche in the new anatomical location. Since the finding that exosomes content resembles that of the cell of origin, they may be regarded as suitable biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, allowing for diagnosis and prognosis via a minimal invasive procedure. Exosome involvement in cancer may open new avenues regarding therapeutics, such as vectors for targeted drug delivery.

  10. Excess mortality from breast cancer 20 years after diagnosis when life expectancy is normal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.J. Louwman (Marieke); W.J. Klokman (Willem); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractIn a population-based study, causes of death were traced of 418 deceased breast cancer patients diagnosed in 1960-1979 who survived at least 10 years after diagnosis. The pattern of causes of death in these patients was compared with the general female population using standardized

  11. Role of ART-27, a Novel Androgen Receptor Coactivator, in Normal Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    07$15.00/0 Printed m U 8 .A. Molecular Endocrino logy 21 (12):2864- 2876 Copyright C’l 2007 by The Endocrine Society d ol: 10.121G/ me.2007-0094...mutations identified in prostate cancer and androgen insensitivity syndrome display aberrant ART -27 coacti- vator function. Mol Endocrino l 19

  12. Artichoke compound cynarin differentially affects the survival, growth and stress response of normal, immortalized and cancerous human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gezer, Ceren; Yücecan, Sevinç; Rattan, Suresh Inder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Cynarin (CYN) is the main derivative of caffeoylquinic acid, found in leaves and heads of artichoke. Potential health-beneficial effects of CYN include as being choloretic-cholesterol lowering, hepatoprotective, anti-atherosclerotic, and antioxidative. We have tested the effects of various doses...... of CYN on the proliferative potential, survival, morphology, and stress response (SR) markers haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heat shock protein-70 (HSP70) in normal human skin fibroblasts (FSF-1), telomerase-immortalized mesenchymal stem cells (hTERT-MSC) and cervical cancer cells, HeLa. Effects of CYN...

  13. From normal response to clinical problem: definition and clinical features of fear of cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Sophie; Ozakinci, Gozde; Humphris, Gerald; Mutsaers, Brittany; Thewes, Belinda; Prins, Judith; Dinkel, Andreas; Butow, Phyllis

    2016-08-01

    Research to date on fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) shows that moderate to high FCR affects 22-87 % of cancer survivors and is associated with higher psychological morbidity (Simard et al J Cancer Surviv 7:300-322, 2013). Despite growing research interest in FCR, the lack of consensus on its definition and characteristics when it reaches a clinical level has impeded knowledge transfer into patient services. In order to address these gaps, expert researchers, policy makers, trainees, and patient advocates attended a 2-day colloquium at the University of Ottawa in August 2015. A Delphi method was used to identify the most relevant definition of FCR, and the attendees generated possible diagnostic characteristics of clinical FCR. After three rounds of discussion and voting, the attendees reached consensus on a new definition of FCR: "Fear, worry, or concern relating to the possibility that cancer will come back or progress." Regarding clinical FCR, five possible characteristics were proposed: (1) high levels of preoccupation, worry, rumination, or intrusive thoughts; (2) maladaptive coping; (3) functional impairments; (4) excessive distress; and (5) difficulties making plans for the future. The new proposed definition of FCR reflects the broad spectrum in which patients experience FCR. A consensual definition of FCR and the identification of the essential characteristics of clinical FCR are necessary to accurately and consistently measure FCR severity and to develop effective interventions to treat FCR. We hope this broad definition can encourage further research and the development of inclusive policies for all cancer patients and survivors who are struggling with this issue.

  14. Association between the Absolute Baseline Lymphocyte Count and Response to Neoadjuvant Platinum-based Chemotherapy in Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz-Amit, R; Israel, A; Gal, M; Atenafu, E A; Symon, Z; Portnoy, O; Laufer, M; Dotan, Z; Ramon, J; Avni, D; Fridman, E; Berger, R

    2016-12-01

    Platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) improves overall survival in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). A pathological complete response (pCR) at radical cystectomy after NAC is associated with better overall survival, but there are no established predictive biomarkers of response to NAC in MIBC. The aim of this study was to find laboratory variables associated with pCR following NAC. We carried out a retrospective review of MIBC patients treated with NAC followed by radical cystectomy at the Sheba Medical Center between 2005 and 2015. Overall survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method and compared between patients who achieved or did not achieve pCR using the Log-rank test. Baseline and pre-surgery laboratory values were collected and compared between patients who subsequently achieved pCR and those who did not using logistic regression. Fifty-eight patients underwent radical cystectomy after NAC, with a median follow-up of 32 (range 4.8-111.4) months from diagnosis. Of 55 patients with documented pathological outcome on radical cystectomy, 17 (31%) achieved pCR (complete responders). Of the 15 complete responders with follow-up data, 13 (87%) were still alive at time of last follow-up for this study (July 2015). Patients who did not achieve pCR had a significantly worse overall survival than complete responders (P = 0.0007). The baseline lymphocyte count, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) were significantly associated with response (P = 0.037, P = 0.045, P = 0.042, respectively) on univariate analysis, whereas baseline albumin, haemoglobin, neutrophils, platelets and the total white blood count were not significantly associated with response. Lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in responders than non-responders throughout three time points (P = 0.003 using a generalised linear mixed model). A high baseline level of lymphocytes is associated with the achievement of pCR at

  15. Immunohistochemical analysis of epithelial cell proliferation in normal-appearing rectal mucosa of patients with colorectal adenoma and cancer using an in vitro labeling method with bromodeoxyuridine.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Nobumasa; Mizuno,Motowo; Okada, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Jun; Tsuji,Takao

    1994-01-01

    To identify diffuse mucosal changes which may precede the development of colorectal cancer and a possible indicator for detecting high-risk populations, we immunohistochemically studied cell-cycle events in crypts of normal-appearing rectal mucosa of patients with colorectal adenoma and cancer using an in vitro labeling method with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Biopsy specimens of endoscopically normal-appearing rectal mucosa were obtained during colonoscopy from 20 patients with colorectal adeno...

  16. Assessing advantages of sequential boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in an oral cancer model with normalized blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Ana J; Thorp, Silvia I; Portu, Agustina M; Saint Martin, Gisela; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Heber, Elisa M; Bortolussi, Silva; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Garabalino, Marcela A; Altieri, Saverio; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the therapeutic success of sequential boron neutron capture therapy (Seq-BNCT) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. It consists of BPA-BNCT followed by GB-10-BNCT 24 or 48 hours later. Additionally, we proved that tumor blood vessel normalization with thalidomide prior to BPA-BNCT improves tumor control. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and explore potential boron microdistribution changes in Seq-BNCT preceded by tumor blood vessel normalization. Tumor bearing animals were treated with thalidomide for tumor blood vessel normalization, followed by Seq-BNCT (Th+ Seq-BNCT) or Seq-Beam Only (Th+ Seq-BO) in the window of normalization. Boron microdistribution was assessed by neutron autoradiography. Th+ Seq-BNCT induced overall tumor response of 100%, with 87 (4)% complete tumor response. No cases of severe mucositis in dose-limiting precancerous tissue were observed. Differences in boron homogeneity between tumors pre-treated and not pre-treated with thalidomide were observed. Th+ Seq-BNCT achieved, for the first time, response in all treated tumors. Increased homogeneity in tumor boron microdistribution is associated to an improvement in tumor control.

  17. Genome-wide tracking of unmethylated DNA Alu repeats in normal and cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Jairo; Vives, Laura; Jordà, Mireia

    2008-01-01

    . Normal colon epithelial cells contain in average 25 486 +/- 10 157 unmethylated Alu's per haploid genome, while in tumor cells this figure is 41 995 +/- 17 187 (P = 0.004). There is an inverse relationship in Alu families with respect to their age and methylation status: the youngest elements exhibit...

  18. Epidermal stem cells - role in normal, wounded and pathological psoriatic and cancer skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstrup, M.; Faurschou, A.; Gniadecki, R.

    2008-01-01

    in the basal layer of the interfollicular epidermis and in the bulge region of the hair follicle play a critical role for normal tissue maintenance. In wound healing, multipotent epidermal stem cells contribute to re-epithelization. It is possible that defects in growth control of either epidermal stem cells...

  19. DNA demethylation in normal colon tissue predicts predisposition to multiple cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, H; Suzuki, K; Maeda, T; Koizumi, K; Miyaki, Y; Okada, S; Kawamura, YJ; Samuelsson, JK; Alonso, S; Konishi, F; Perucho, M

    2014-01-01

    Some colon cancer (CC) patients present synchronous cancers at diagnosis and others develop metachronous neoplasms, but the risk factors are unclear for non-hereditary CC. We showed previously that global DNA demethylation increased with aging and correlated with genomic damage in CC, and we show now that preferentially associates to CCs with wild-type p53. This study aimed to elucidate the extent of DNA hypomethylation in patients with single and multiple CC, its relationship with aging, and its potential as predictive tool. We compared by real-time methylation-specific PCR the relative demethylation level (RDL) of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) sequences in matched cancer tissues and non-cancerous colonic mucosa (NCM) from patients with single and multiple right-sided CCs. Although no RDL difference was found in NCM from single CC patients and healthy volunteers (P =0.5), there was more demethylation (higher RDL) in NCM from synchronous cancer patients (P =1.1 × 10−5) multiple CCs also were more demethylated than single CCs (P =0.0014). High NCM demethylation was predictive for metachronous neoplasms (P =0.003). In multivariate logistic regression analyses RDL was the only independent predictor for metachronous (P =0.02) and multiple (P =4.9 × 10−5) tumors. The higher LINE-1 demethylation in NCM from patients with multiple (synchronous and metachronous) tumors (P =9.6 × 10−7) was also very significant in patients with tumors without (P =3.8 × 10−6), but not with (P =0.16) microsatellite instability. NCM demethylation increased with aging in patients with single tumors, but decreased in those with multiple tumors. Moreover, the demethylation difference between patients with single vs multiple tumors appeared higher in younger (P =3.6 × 10−4) than in older (P =0.0016) patients. These results predict that LINE-1 hypomethylation in NCM can be used as an epigenetic predictive biomarker for multiple CC risk. The stronger association of

  20. Pursuing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Louise Sofia; Handberg, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    semistructured interviews with 9 lymphoma survivors. Interpretive description methodology and social practice theory guided the analytical framework. RESULTS: "Pursuing normality" was an overall finding and was comprised of 2 overarching patterns, "future prospects" and "survivorship care perceptions," both......BACKGROUND: The present study explored the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors in active treatment. Lymphoma survivors have survivorship care needs, yet their participation in cancer survivorship care programs is still reported as low. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study...... was to understand the reflections on cancer survivorship care of lymphoma survivors to aid the future planning of cancer survivorship care and overcome barriers to participation. METHODS: Data were generated in a hematological ward during 4 months of ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation and 46...

  1. Assessment of Correlation between Chromosomal Radiosensitivity of Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes after In vitro Irradiation and Normal Tissue Side Effects for Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guogytė, Kamilė; Plieskienė, Aista; Ladygienė, Rima; Vaisiūnas, Žygimantas; Sevriukova, Olga; Janušonis, Vinsas; Žiliukas, Julius

    2017-01-01

    Patients receiving identical radiation treatments experience different effects, from undetectable to severe, on normal tissues. A crucial factor of radiotherapy related side effects is individual radiosensitivity. It is difficult to spare surrounding normal tissues delivering radiation to cancer cells during radiotherapy. Therefore, it may be useful to develop a simple routine cytogenetic assay which would allow the screening of a large number of individuals for radiosensitivity optimizing tumor control rates and minimizing severe radiotherapy effects with possibility to predict risk level for developing more severe early normal tissue adverse events after irradiation. This study was conducted to assess the correlation between in vitro radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from cancer patients who are undergoing radiotherapy using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN), G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assays, and normal tissue acute side effects. The CBMN and G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity assays were performed on blood samples taken from cancer patients before radiotherapy, after first fractionation, and after radiotherapy. Acute normal tissue reactions were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer. This study suggests that there is a correlation between higher frequency of micronuclei after in vitro irradiation of blood samples and higher degree of normal tissue reactions. In addition, higher number of chromatid breaks was observed in patients with more severe normal tissue reactions. This pilot study included only 5 cancer patients, and therefore, further studies with a bigger cohort are required to identify radiosensitive patients.

  2. Progression from normal breast pathology to breast cancer is associated with increasing prevalence of mouse mammary tumor virus-like sequences in men and women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ford, Caroline E; Faedo, Margaret; Crouch, Roger; Lawson, James S; Rawlinson, William D

    2004-01-01

    ...% of normal breast tissue samples from Australian women studied by our group. Screening of a larger and more diverse cohort of female breast cancer samples has now shown a correlation of MMTV-like sequences with the severity (grade) of breast cancer...

  3. Effects of Environmental Estrogens on Apoptosis in Normal and Cancerous Breast Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    5325-5328, 1996. Gamen, S., Marzo, I., Anel , A., Pineiro, A., and Naval, J. CPP32 inhibition prevents Fas-induced ceramide generation and apoptosis...Herbst linked the occurrence of rare cervical and vaginal can- cers in a small group of young women who were treated by him at the Massachusetts General...circulation, across the placenta, into the fetal circulation and causes a change in the developing vaginal cell, resulting in cancer after the developing

  4. Identification of metabolites in the normal ovary and their transformation in primary and metastatic ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Miranda Y; McDunn, Jonathan; Kakar, Sham S

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the metabolome of the human ovary and identified metabolic alternations that coincide with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and metastatic tumors resulting from primary ovarian cancer (MOC) using three analytical platforms: gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) using buffer systems and instrument settings to catalog positive or negative ions. The human ovarian metabolome was found to contain 364 biochemicals and upon transformation of the ovary caused changes in energy utilization, altering metabolites associated with glycolysis and β-oxidation of fatty acids--such as carnitine (1.79 fold in EOC, pcancer also displayed an enhanced oxidative stress response as indicated by increases in 2-aminobutyrate in EOC (1.46 fold, p = 0.0316) and in MOC (2.25 fold, povary, specifically N-acetylasparate and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate, whose role in ovarian physiology has yet to be determined. These data enhance our understanding of the diverse biochemistry of the human ovary and demonstrate metabolic alterations upon transformation. Furthermore, metabolites with significant changes between groups provide insight into biochemical consequences of transformation and are candidate biomarkers of ovarian oncogenesis. Validation studies are warranted to determine whether these compounds have clinical utility in the diagnosis or clinical management of ovarian cancer patients.

  5. A systematic review to establish the frequency of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in normal breast epithelium, ductal carcinoma in situ, microinvasive carcinoma of the breast and invasive breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Glover, J A; Hughes, C M; Cantwell, M M; Murray, L J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have suggested a protective effect of cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in breast cancer risk and disease progression. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the frequency of COX-2 expression in normal breast epithelium, ductal carcinoma in situ of breast (DCIS), DCIS-adjoining invasive breast cancer, microinvasive carcinoma of the breast (MICB) and invasive breast cancer. Methods: Literature searches were carried o...

  6. Delving Deeper: MCL-1's Contributions to Normal and Cancer Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Perciavalle, Rhonda M.; Opferman, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    BCL-2 molecules are regulators of programmed cell death and defects in this pathway contribute to human diseases. One family member, MCL-1, is unique as its expression is tightly regulated and it is essential for promoting the survival of myriad cellular lineages. Additionally, MCL-1 promotes the maintenance of normal mitochondrial morphology and energy production. Dissection of these functions revealed recently that they depend on separate mitochondrial sub-localizations. MCL-1's anti-apopto...

  7. In vivo study for the discrimination of cancerous and normal skin using fibre probe-based Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleusener, Johannes; Gluszczynska, Patrycja; Reble, Carina; Gersonde, Ingo; Helfmann, Jürgen; Fluhr, Joachim W; Lademann, Jürgen; Röwert-Huber, Joachim; Patzelt, Alexa; Meinke, Martina C

    2015-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proved its capability as an objective, non-invasive tool for the detection of various melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) in a number of studies. Most publications are based on a Raman microspectroscopic ex vivo approach. In this in vivo clinical evaluation, we apply Raman spectroscopy using a fibre-coupled probe that allows access to a multitude of affected body sites. The probe design is optimized for epithelial sensitivity, whereby a large part of the detected signal originates from within the epidermal layer's depth down to the basal membrane where early stages of skin cancer develop. Data analysis was performed on measurements of 104 subjects scheduled for excision of lesions suspected of being malignant melanoma (MM) (n = 36), basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (n = 39) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (n = 29). NMSC were discriminated from normal skin with a balanced accuracy of 73% (BCC) and 85% (SCC) using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Discriminating MM and pigmented nevi (PN) resulted in a balanced accuracy of 91%. These results lie within the range of comparable in vivo studies and the accuracies achieved by trained dermatologists using dermoscopy. Discrimination proved to be unsuccessful between cancerous lesions and suspicious lesions that had been histopathologically verified as benign by dermoscopy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Nullomer derived anticancer peptides (NulloPs): differential lethal effects on normal and cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alileche, Abdelkrim; Goswami, Jayita; Bourland, William; Davis, Michael; Hampikian, Greg

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the first use of the nullomer (absent sequences) approach to drug discovery and development. Nullomers are the shortest absent sequences determined in a species, or group of species. By identifying the shortest absent peptide sequences from the NCBI databases, we screened several potential anti-cancer peptides. In order to improve cell penetration and solubility we added short poly arginine tails (5Rs), and initially solubilized the peptides in 1M trehalose. The results for one of the absent sequences 9R (RRRRRNWMWC), and its scrambled version 9S1R (RRRRRWCMNW) are reported here. We refer to these peptides derived from nullomers as PolyArgNulloPs. A control PolyArgNulloP, 124R (RRRRRWFMHW), was also included. The lethal effects of 9R and 9S1R are mediated by mitochondrial impairment as demonstrated by increased ROS production, ATP depletion, cell growth inhibition, and ultimately cell death. These effects increase over time for cancer cells with a concomitant drop in IC-50 for breast and prostate cancer cells. This is in sharp contrast to the effects in normal cells, which show a decreased sensitivity to the NulloPs over time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Robot-assisted surgery in cervical cancer patients reduces the time to normal activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asciutto, Katrin C; Kalapotharakos, Grigorios; Löfgren, Mats; Högberg, Thomas; Borgfeldt, Christer

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate current surgical cervical cancer treatment in Sweden 2008-12. Analysis of data in the Swedish National Quality Register for Gynecological Surgery (GynOP). A total of 249 cervical cancer patients undergoing surgery. Analysis of prospectively gathered preoperative and postoperative data including patient-reported information. Mean operating time, blood loss/transfusion, length of hospital stay, return to activities of daily living. The patients undergoing laparoscopic robot-assisted surgery (n = 64) or laparotomy (n = 185) did not differ in age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage or mean operating time. Blood loss was higher in the laparotomy group (p activities of daily living was longer in the laparotomy than the robot group (13.4 days vs. 9.7 days, p = 0.04). Laparoscopic robotic-assisted surgery is preferable to laparotomy for cervical cancer patients because it entails a significantly shorter hospital stay, less blood loss, fewer intraoperative complications and shorter time to normal daily activities. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. RELATIONSHIP OF MAMMOGRAPHIC DENSITY AND GENE EXPRESSION: ANALYSIS OF NORMAL BREAST TISSUE SURROUNDING BREAST CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Williams, Tyisha; Midkiff, Bentley R.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Wesolowska, Ewa; Boyd, Norman F.; Johnson, Nicole B.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Sherman, Mark E.; Troester, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies of breast tissue gene expression have demonstrated that the extratumoral microenvironment has substantial variability across individuals, some of which can be attributed to epidemiologic factors. To evaluate how mammographic density (MD) and breast tissue composition relate to extratumoral microenvironment gene expression, we used data on 121 breast cancer patients from the population-based Polish Women's Breast Cancer Study. Design Breast cancer cases were classified based on a previously reported, biologically-defined extratumoral gene expression signature with two subtypes: an Active subtype, which is associated with high expression of genes related to fibrosis and wound response, and an Inactive subtype, which has high expression of cellular adhesion genes. MD of the contralateral breast was assessed using pre-treatment mammograms and a quantitative, reliable computer-assisted thresholding method. Breast tissue composition was evaluated based on digital image analysis of tissue sections. Results The Inactive extratumoral subtype was associated with significantly higher percentage mammographic density (PD) and dense area (DA) in univariate analysis (PD: p=0.001; DA: p=0.049) and in multivariable analyses adjusted for age and body mass index (PD: p=0.004; DA: p=0.049). Inactive/higher MD tissue was characterized by a significantly higher percentage of stroma and a significantly lower percentage of adipose tissue, with no significant change in epithelial content. Analysis of published gene expression signatures suggested that Inactive/higher MD tissue expressed increased estrogen response and decreased TGF-β signaling. Conclusions By linking novel molecular phenotypes with MD, our results indicate that MD reflects broad transcriptional changes, including changes in both epithelia- and stroma-derived signaling. PMID:23918601

  11. Protons offer reduced normal-tissue exposure for patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for resected pancreatic head cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Romaine C; Huh, Soon N; Prado, Karl L; Yi, Byong Y; Sharma, Navesh K; Ho, Meng W; Hoppe, Bradford S; Mendenhall, Nancy P; Li, Zuofeng; Regine, William F

    2012-05-01

    To determine the potential role for adjuvant proton-based radiotherapy (PT) for resected pancreatic head cancer. Between June 2008 and November 2008, 8 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic head cancers underwent optimized intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. IMRT plans used between 10 and 18 fields and delivered 45 Gy to the initial planning target volume (PTV) and a 5.4 Gy boost to a reduced PTV. PTVs were defined according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 radiotherapy guidelines. Ninety-five percent of PTVs received 100% of the target dose and 100% of the PTVs received 95% of the target dose. Normal tissue constraints were as follows: right kidney V18 Gy to proton plans were retrospectively generated on the same patients. The team generating the proton plans was blinded to the dose distributions achieved by the IMRT plans. The IMRT and proton plans were then compared. A Wilcoxon paired t-test was performed to compare various dosimetric points between the two plans for each patient. All proton plans met all normal tissue constraints and were isoeffective with the corresponding IMRT plans in terms of PTV coverage. The proton plans offered significantly reduced normal-tissue exposure over the IMRT plans with respect to the following: median small bowel V20 Gy, 15.4% with protons versus 47.0% with IMRT (p = 0.0156); median gastric V20 Gy, 2.3% with protons versus 20.0% with IMRT (p = 0.0313); and median right kidney V18 Gy, 27.3% with protons versus 50.5% with IMRT (p = 0.0156). By reducing small bowel and stomach exposure, protons have the potential to reduce the acute and late toxicities of postoperative chemoradiation in this setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Glucose diffusion in colorectal mucosa—a comparative study between normal and cancer tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sónia; Gueiral, Nuno; Nogueira, Elisabete; Henrique, Rui; Oliveira, Luís; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a major health concern worldwide and its high incidence and mortality require accurate screening methods. Following endoscopic examination, polyps must be removed for histopathological characterization. Aiming to contribute to the improvement of current endoscopy methods of colorectal carcinoma screening or even for future development of laser treatment procedures, we studied the diffusion properties of glucose and water in colorectal healthy and pathological mucosa. These parameters characterize the tissue dehydration and the refractive index matching mechanisms of optical clearing (OC). We used ex vivo tissues to measure the collimated transmittance spectra and thickness during treatments with OC solutions containing glucose in different concentrations. These time dependencies allowed for estimating the diffusion time and diffusion coefficient values of glucose and water in both types of tissues. The measured diffusion times for glucose in healthy and pathological mucosa samples were 299.2±4.7 s and 320.6±10.6 s for 40% and 35% glucose concentrations, respectively. Such a difference indicates a slower glucose diffusion in cancer tissues, which originate from their ability to trap far more glucose than healthy tissues. We have also found a higher free water content in cancerous tissue that is estimated as 64.4% instead of 59.4% for healthy mucosa.

  13. Synthesis of nanostructured oxides based on AlOOH and MgO and study of their cytotoxicity to normal and cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.; Kazantsev, S. O.

    2017-12-01

    In the present work, toxicity of nanostructures based on aluminum hydroxide, magnesium oxide, and the influence of their combinations on morphofunctional characteristics of the normal and cancer cell lines was evaluated. Nanostructures were characterized by transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), low temperature nitrogen adsorption, and dynamic light scattering method. It was found that low-dimensional aluminum oxide structures affect cancer cells rather than normal cells. It was established that magnesium oxide nanoparticles and nanostructured aluminum oxyhydroxide are more toxic for cancer cells than these nanostructures in combination in the same concentration. Probably, differences in the proliferative activity for both normal and cancer cells after contacting with synthesized nanostructures are provided by the changed cell microenvironment.

  14. Color Swapping to Enhance Breast Cancer Digital Images Qualities Using Stain Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhimmah, Izzati; Puspasari Wijaya, Dhina; Indrayanti

    2017-03-01

    Histopathology is the disease diagnosis by means of the visual examination of tissues under the microscope. The virtually transparent tissue sections were prepared using a number of colored histochemical stains bound selectively to the cellular components. A variation of colors comes to be a problem in histopathology based upon the microscope lighting for the range of factors. This research aimed to investigate an image enhancement by applying a nonlinear mapping approach to stain normalization and histogram equalization for contrast enhancement. Validation was carried out in 59 datasets with 96.6% accordance and expert justification.

  15. Absoluteness or relativity of morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kadievskaya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Article is dedicated to the case study of absoluteness or relativity of morals. The questions are in a new way comprehended: Can exist absolute morals? Is how its content? Is necessary it for humanity? Is moral personality absolute value? Does justify the purpose of means? It is substantiated, that reflecting about the problem of absoluteness or relativity of morals, one ought not to be abstracted from the religion ­ billions of people find in it the basis of their morals. Accumulated ethical experience is infinitely rich and diverse in humanity: it includes and the proclaimed prophets godly revelations, and the brilliant enlightenment of secular philosophers. Are analyzed such concepts, as morals, absolute morals, relativity, moral rigorizm, moral personality, formal ethics. The specific character of the moral relativity, which proclaims historicity and changeability of standards and standards of human behavior, is established. Moral rigorizm is understood as the principle, according to which the man must act only from the considerations of moral debt, whereas all other external motivations (interest, happiness, friendship, etc have no moral value. Is shown the priority significance of the nerigoristskoy formal ethics, in which strong idealizations and abstractions of the ethics of moral rigorizma are substituted by the weaker ­ more realistic and more humane. In the nerigoristskoy formal ethics, as in the life, moral estimations completely can be and in the overwhelming majority of the cases are relative.

  16. Liver X receptor ligand cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells and not in normal colon epithelial cells depends on LXRβ subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtaut, Flavie; Derangère, Valentin; Chevriaux, Angélique; Ladoire, Sylvain; Cotte, Alexia K; Arnould, Laurent; Boidot, Romain; Rialland, Mickaël; Ghiringhelli, François; Rébé, Cédric

    2015-09-29

    Increasing evidence indicates that Liver X Receptors (LXRs) have some anticancer properties. We recently demonstrated that LXR ligands induce colon cancer cell pyroptosis through an LXRβ-dependent pathway. In the present study, we showed that human colon cancer cell lines presented differential cytoplasmic localizations of LXRβ. This localization correlated with caspase-1 activation and cell death induction under treatment with LXR ligand. The association of LXRβ with the truncated form of RXRα (t-RXRα) was responsible for the sequestration of LXRβ in the cytoplasm in colon cancer cells. Moreover t-RXRα was not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. These cells presented a predominantly nuclear localization of LXRβ and were resistant to LXR ligand cytotoxicity. Our results showed that predominant cytoplasmic localization of LXRβ, which occurs in colon cancer cells but not in normal colon epithelial cells, allowed LXR ligand-induced pyroptosis. This study strengthens the hypothesis that LXRβ could be a promising target in cancer therapy.

  17. Markers of fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition demonstrate field cancerization in histologically normal tissue adjacent to breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Kristina A.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Mai, Minh; Vargas, Keith M.; Jones, Anna C.; Vo, Phung; Butler, Kimberly S.; Joste, Nancy E.; Bisoffi, Marco; Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a field of genetically altered but histologically normal tissue extends 1 cm or more from the margins of human breast tumors. The extent, composition and biological significance of this field are only partially understood, but the molecular alterations in affected cells could provide mechanisms for limitless replicative capacity, genomic instability and a microenvironment that supports tumor initiation and progression. We demonstrate by microarray, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry a signature of differential gene expression that discriminates between patient-matched, tumor-adjacent histologically normal breast tissues located 1 cm and 5 cm from the margins of breast adenocarcinomas (TAHN-1 and TAHN-5, respectively). The signature includes genes involved in extracellular matrix remodeling, wound healing, fibrosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Myofibroblasts, which are mediators of wound healing and fibrosis, and intra-lobular fibroblasts expressing MMP2, SPARC, TGF-β3, which are inducers of EMT, were both prevalent in TAHN-1 tissues, sparse in TAHN-5 tissues, and absent in normal tissues from reduction mammoplasty. Accordingly, EMT markers S100A4 and vimentin were elevated in both luminal and myoepithelial cells, and EMT markers α-smooth muscle actin and SNAIL were elevated in luminal epithelial cells of TAHN-1 tissues. These results identify cellular processes that are differentially activated between TAHN-1 and TAHN-5 breast tissues, implicate myofibroblasts as likely mediators of these processes, provide evidence that EMT is occurring in histologically normal tissues within the affected field and identify candidate biomarkers to investigate whether or how field cancerization contributes to the development of primary or recurrent breast tumors. PMID:21105047

  18. Identification of novel breast cancer-associated transcripts by UniGene database mining and gene expression analysis in normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laversin, Stéphanie A-S; Phatak, Vinaya M; Powe, Des G; Li, Geng; Miles, Amanda K; Hughes, David C; Ball, Graham R; Ellis, Ian O; Gritzapis, Angelos D; Missitzis, Ioannis; McArdle, Stéphanie E B; Rees, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous and complex disease. Although the use of tumor biomarkers has improved individualized breast cancer care, i.e., assessment of risk, diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatment outcome, new markers are required to further improve patient clinical management. In the present study, a search for novel breast cancer-associated genes was performed by mining the UniGene database for expressed sequence tags (ESTs) originating from human normal breast, breast cancer tissue, or breast cancer cell lines. Two hundred and twenty-eight distinct breast-associated UniGene Clusters (BUC1-228) matched the search criteria. Four BUC ESTs (BUC6, BUC9, BUC10, and BUC11) were subsequently selected for extensive in silico database searches, and in vitro analyses through sequencing and RT-PCR based assays on well-characterized cell lines and tissues of normal and cancerous origin. BUC6, BUC9, BUC10, and BUC11 are clustered on 10p11.21-12.1 and showed no homology to any known RNAs. Overall, expression of the four BUC transcripts was high in normal breast and testis tissue, and in some breast cancers; in contrast, BUC was low in other normal tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and other cancer cell lines. Results to-date suggest that BUC11 and BUC9 translate to protein and BUC11 cytoplasmic and nuclear protein expression was detected in a large cohort of breast cancer samples using immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates the discovery and expression analysis of a tissue-restricted novel transcript set which is strongly expressed in breast tissue and their application as clinical cancer biomarkers clearly warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A human cancer xenograft model utilizing normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells conditionally transformed with defined oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagawa, Yuki; Yamada, Kenji; Yugawa, Takashi; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Esaki, Minoru; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Aoki, Kazunori; Saya, Hideyuki; Kiyono, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are considered to arise through neoplastic transformation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDECs). In order to evaluate the biological significance of genetic and epigenetic alterations in PDACs, we isolated primary HPDECs and established an in vitro carcinogenesis model. Firstly, lentivirus-mediated transduction of KRAS(G12V), MYC and human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 under the control of a tetracyclin-inducible promoter efficiently immortalized and transformed primary HPDECs, which gave rise to adenocarcinomas subcutaneously in an immune-deficient mouse xenograft model, depending on expression of the four genes. The tumors regressed promptly upon shutting-off the oncogenes, and the remaining tissues showed histological features corresponding to normal ductal structures with simple columnar epithelium. Reexpression of the oncogenes resulted in development of multiple PDACs through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like structures. We also succeeded in efficient immortalization of primary HPDECs with transduction of mutant CDK4, cyclin D1 and TERT. The cells maintained a normal diploid status and formed duct-like structures in a three-dimensional culture. In combination with p53 silencing, KRAS(G12V) alone was sufficient to fully transform the immortalized HPDECs, and MYC markedly accelerated the development of tumors. Our PDAC model supports critical roles of KRAS mutations, inactivation of the p53 and p16-pRB pathways, active telomerase and MYC expression in pancreatic carcinogenesis and thus recapitulates many features of human PDAC development. The present system with reversible control of oncogene expression enabled de novo development of PDAC from quasinormal human tissues preformed subcutaneously in mice and might be applicable to carcinogenesis models in many organ sites. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Variability of Target and Normal Structure Delineation Using Multimodality Imaging for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalah, Entesar; Moraru, Ion [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Paulson, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Erickson, Beth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To explore the potential of multimodality imaging (dynamic contrast–enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [DCE-MRI], apparent diffusion-coefficient diffusion-weighted imaging [ADC-DWI], fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], and computed tomography) to define the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk in radiation therapy planning for pancreatic cancer. Delineated volumetric changes of DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET were assessed in comparison with the finding on 3-dimensional/4-dimensional CT with and without intravenous contrast, and with pathology specimens for resectable and borderline resectable cases of pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We studied a total of 19 representative patients, whose DCE-MRI, ADC-DWI, and FDG-PET data were reviewed. Gross tumor volume and tumor burden/active region inside pancreatic head/neck or body were delineated on MRI (denoted GTV{sub DCE}, and GTV{sub ADC}), a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax on FDG-PET (GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}). Volumes of the pancreas, duodenum, stomach, liver, and kidneys were contoured according to CT (V{sub CT}), T1-weighted MRI (V{sub T1}), and T2-weighted MRI (V{sub T2}) for 7 patients. Results: Significant statistical differences were found between the GTVs from DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, and FDG-PET, with a mean and range of 4.73 (1.00-9.79), 14.52 (3.21-25.49), 22.04 (1.00-45.69), 19.10 (4.84-45.59), and 9.80 (0.32-35.21) cm{sup 3} for GTV{sub DCE}, GTV{sub ADC}, GTV2.5, GTV{sub 40%}, and GTV{sub 50%}, respectively. The mean difference and range in the measurements of maximum dimension of tumor on DCE-MRI, ADC-DW, SUV2.5, 40%SUVmax, and 50%SUVmax compared with pathologic specimens were −0.84 (−2.24 to 0.9), 0.41 (−0.15 to 2.3), 0.58 (−1.41 to 3.69), 0.66 (−0.67 to 1.32), and 0.15 (−1.53 to 2.38) cm, respectively. The T1- and T2-based volumes for pancreas, duodenum, stomach, and liver were generally smaller

  1. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Heber, Elisa M; Garabalino, Marcela A; Thorp, Silvia I; Miller, Marcelo; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Blood vessel normalization was induced by two doses of thalidomide in tumor-bearing hamsters on 2 consecutive days. All studies in thalidomide-treated animals were performed 48 h after the first dose of thalidomide, previously established as the window of normalization. Biodistribution studies were performed with BPA at a dose of 15.5 mg (10)B/kg in thalidomide-treated (Th+) and untreated (Th-) tumor-bearing hamsters. The effect of blood vessel normalization prior to BPA administration on the efficacy of BNCT was assessed in in vivo BNCT studies at the RA-3 Nuclear Reactor in tumor-bearing hamsters. Group I was treated with BPA-BNCT after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BPA-BNCT). Group II was treated with BPA-BNCT alone (Th- BPA-BNCT). Group III was treated with the beam only after treatment with thalidomide (Th+ BO), and Group IV was treated with the beam only (Th- BO). Groups I and II were given the same dose of BPA (15.5 mg (10)B/kg), and all groups (I-IV) were exposed to the same neutron fluence. Two additional groups were treated with the beam only at a higher dose to exacerbate mucositis in precancerous tissue and to explore the potential direct protective effect of thalidomide on radiation-induced mucositis in a scenario of more severe toxicity, i.e. Group V (Th+ hdBO) and Group

  2. High wavenumber Raman spectroscopic characterization of normal and oral cancer using blood plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Suresh Kumar, Murugesan; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    Blood plasma possesses the biomolecules released from cells/tissues after metabolism and reflects the pathological conditions of the subjects. The analysis of biofluids for disease diagnosis becomes very attractive in the diagnosis of cancers due to the ease in the collection of samples, easy to transport, multiple sampling for regular screening of the disease and being less invasive to the patients. Hence, the intention of this study was to apply near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy in the high wavenumber (HW) region (2500-3400 cm-1) for the diagnosis of oral malignancy using blood plasma. From the Raman spectra it is observed that the biomolecules protein and lipid played a major role in the discrimination between groups. The diagnostic algorithms based on principal components analysis coupled with linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) with the leave-one-patient-out cross-validation method on HW Raman spectra yielded a promising results in the identification of oral malignancy. The details of results will be discussed.

  3. A comparison of body image, marital satisfaction, and public health among breast cancer patients with breast evacuation, breast keeping and normal people in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Esfandiari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose and background: despite outstanding breakthroughs in medical sciences, breast cancer is still considered one of the most important disease and the most prevalent women cancer and the second reason of death among them. The present study was conducted aiming to compare public health and marital satisfaction among breast cancer patients with breast evacuation, breast keeping and normal women in Tehran. Material and methods: the method of the present study, due to the lack of interference to alter the research variables, was causal comparative. The statistical population included all women with breast cancer and normal women in the city of Tehran. From these people in each group (breast cancer patients with breast evacuation, breast keeping and normal people 80 individuals were selected through available sampling from clients of medical centers and special hospitals in Tehran during October 2012 to December 2013. The applied instruments were the questionnaires of public health, body image, and marital satisfaction. The achieved data were analyzed via one-way ANOVA and Tukey test by SPSS software. Findings: the results of the analysis showed that there is a significant difference between the mean scores of marital satisfaction, body image and public health in three groups (women with cancer who evacuated their breast, those who didn't and normal ones(p<0.01. Conclusion: according to the findings of the present study the women with breast cancer are in more different state in variables of marital satisfaction, mental health and body image comparing to normal group. So it seems necessary for cancer treatment centers to consider psychological treatment courses for these people.

  4. Wheat bran decreases aberrant crypt foci, preserves normal proliferation, and increases intraluminal butyrate levels in experimental colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compher, C W; Frankel, W L; Tazelaar, J; Lawson, J A; McKinney, S; Segall, S; Kinosian, B P; Williams, N N; Rombeau, J L

    1999-01-01

    Dietary wheat bran protects against colon cancer, but the mechanism(s) of this effect is not known. Butyrate, produced by colonic bacterial fermentation of dietary polysaccharides, such as wheat bran, induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation in colon cancer cell lines. Whether similar effects occur in vivo is not well defined. We hypothesized that wheat bran's antineoplastic effects in vivo may be mediated in part by butyrate's modulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Male F344 rats were fed wheat bran-supplemented or an isocaloric, isonitrogenous fiber-free diet. Rats were treated with one dose of the carcinogen azoxymethane or vehicle with sacrifice after 5 days (tumor initiation); or two doses (days O and 7) with sacrifice after 56 days (tumor promotion). Study variables included fecal butyrate levels and the intermediate biomarkers of colon carcinogenesis, aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and changes in crypt cell proliferation and apoptosis. During tumor initiation, wheat bran produced greater apoptosis (p = .01), a trend toward less proliferation, and preserved the normal zone of proliferation (p = .01). At tumor promotion, wheat bran decreased the number of ACF (proximal colon, p = .005; distal colon, p = .047) and maintained the normal proliferative zone. The fiber-free diet shifted the zone of proliferation into the premalignant pattern in both studies. Wheat bran produced significantly higher fecal butyrate (p = .01; .004, .00001) levels than the fiber-free diet throughout the tumor promotion study. Wheat bran increased apoptosis and controlled proliferation during tumor initiation and resulted in decreased ACF. Wheat bran's antineoplastic effects occurred early after carcinogen exposure, and were associated with increased fecal butyrate levels.

  5. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  6. Absolute MR thermometry using nanocarriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, Roel; Sprinkhuizen, Sara M; Crielaard, Bart J; Ippel, Johannes H; Boelens, Rolf; Bakker, Chris J G; Storm, Gert; Lammers, Twan; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2014-01-01

    Accurate time-resolved temperature mapping is crucial for the safe use of hyperthermia-mediated drug delivery. We here propose a magnetic resonance imaging temperature mapping method in which drug delivery systems serve not only to improve tumor targeting, but also as an accurate and absolute

  7. ABSOLUTE STANDARDS FOR CLIMATE MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leckey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material’s melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  8. Normal mammary fibroblasts induce reversion of the malignant phenotype in human primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römer, Anna-Maria; Lühr, Inke; Klein, Andreas; Friedl, Andreas; Sebens, Susanne; Rösel, Frank; Arnold, Norbert; Strauss, Alexander; Jonat, Walter; Bauer, Maret

    2013-04-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a major role in tumor growth and progression. Its manipulation can lead to a reversion of the malignant phenotype. Here we explored the ability of normal mammary fibroblasts (HMFs) to induce reversion of the malignant phenotype of primary breast carcinoma cells (PBCs) in a three-dimensional (3D) context. PBCs were isolated from 13 primary breast carcinomas and cultured in 3D collagen-I gels as mono- or co-culture with HMFs. In five co-cultures, PBCs exhibited reversion of their malignant phenotype, whereas PBCs in matched monocultures exhibited disorganized growth. Reversion, defined as the restoration of the complete baso-apical polarity axis, was confirmed with established polarity markers. Secretion of the tissue-specific glycoprotein MAM-6 into the acinar lumens and deposition of basement membrane indicated functional differentiation. Gene expression analysis revealed a set of differentially regulated genes which possibly affect the reversion process. These included MAL, ELF5, MAP6, ZMYND11 and SQLE. These findings highlight the significant role of fibroblasts in regulating the carcinoma phenotype.

  9. FOXP3+regulatory T cells in normal prostate tissue, postatrophic hyperplasia, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and tumor histological lesions in men with and without prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Sabina; Andren, Ove; Ohlson, Anna-Lena; Carlsson, Jessica; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Giunchi, Francesca; Rider, Jennifer R; Fiorentino, Michelangelo

    2018-01-01

    The tumor promoting or counteracting effects of the immune response to cancer development are thought to be mediated to some extent by the infiltration of regulatory T cells (T regs ). In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of T reg populations in stromal and epithelial compartments of normal, post atrophic hyperplasia (PAH), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and tumor lesions in men with and without prostate cancer. Study subjects were 102 men consecutively diagnosed with localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy and 38 men diagnosed with bladder cancer undergoing cystoprostatectomy without prostate cancer at the pathological examination. Whole mount sections from all patients were evaluated for the epithelial and stromal expression of CD4 + T regs and CD8 + T regs in normal, PAH, PIN, and tumor lesions. A Friedmańs test was used to investigate differences in the mean number of T regs across histological lesions. Logistic regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) for prostate cancer for each histological area. In men with prostate cancer, similarly high numbers of stromal CD4 + T regs were identified in PAH and tumor, but CD4 + T regs were less common in PIN. Greater numbers of epithelial CD4+ T regs in normal prostatic tissue were positively associated with both Gleason score and pT-stage. We observed a fourfold increased risk of prostate cancer in men with epithelial CD4 + T regs in the normal prostatic tissue counterpart. Our results may suggest a possible pathway through which PAH develops directly into prostate cancer in the presence of CD4 + T regs and indicate that transformation of the anti-tumor immune response may be initiated even before the primary tumor is established. © 2017 The Authors. The Prostate Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  10. Gamma-Normal-Gamma Mixture Model for Detecting Differentially Methylated Loci in Three Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Gray

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available With state-of-the-art microarray technologies now available for whole genome CpG island (CGI methylation profiling, there is a need to develop statistical models that are specifically geared toward the analysis of such data. In this article, we propose a Gamma-Normal-Gamma (GNG mixture model for describing three groups of CGI loci: hypomethylated, undifferentiated, and hypermethylated, from a single methylation microarray. This model was applied to study the methylation signatures of three breast cancer cell lines: MCF7, T47D, and MDAMB361. Biologically interesting and interpretable results are obtained, which highlights the heterogeneity nature of the three cell lines. This underlies the premise for the need of analyzing each of the microarray slides individually as opposed to pooling them together for a single analysis. Our comparisons with the fitted densities from the Normal-Uniform (NU mixture model in the literature proposed for gene expression analysis show an improved goodness of fit of the GNG model over the NU model. Although the GNG model was proposed in the context of single-slide methylation analysis, it can be readily adapted to analyze multi-slide methylation data as well as other types of microarray data.

  11. Screening between normal and cancer human thyroid cells through comparative adhesion studies using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Chronaki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D was used to distinguish the dynamic cell adhesion behavior of human normal (Nthy thyroid epithelial cells from poorly differentiated anaplastic carcinoma cells (ARO. The surfaces used to facilitate cell adhesion were bare titanium (Ti, gold (Au and fibrinogen-coated gold (Fg-Au. The pattern of cell adhesion for both cell lines was that the largest acoustic signals were observed on Ti, followed by Au and last by Fg-Au; in addition, ARO cells always produced smaller acoustic signals than Nthy cells on the same surface and for the same number of cells in suspension. Moreover, the calculated acoustic ratio of energy dissipation over frequency change suggests a higher ability of Nthy cells to spread and potentially form more attachment points on the surface than the ARO cells, something observed in SEM images. Finally, we demonstrated that the application of two surfaces for cell adhesion experiments, one of which is Au and the other either Ti or Fg-Au, can discriminate with accuracy between the two particular cell types and potentially form a platform for differentiation between normal and cancer thyroid cell types.

  12. A new plan-scoring method using normal tissue complication probability for personalized treatment plan decisions in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Suk; Shim, Jang Bo; Yang, Dae Sik; Yoon, Won Sup; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong; Cao, Yuan Jie; Chang, Kyung Hwan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to derive a new plan-scoring index using normal tissue complication probabilities to verify different plans in the selection of personalized treatment. Plans for 12 patients treated with tomotherapy were used to compare scoring for ranking. Dosimetric and biological indexes were analyzed for the plans for a clearly distinguishable group ( n = 7) and a similar group ( n = 12), using treatment plan verification software that we developed. The quality factor ( QF) of our support software for treatment decisions was consistent with the final treatment plan for the clearly distinguishable group (average QF = 1.202, 100% match rate, n = 7) and the similar group (average QF = 1.058, 33% match rate, n = 12). Therefore, we propose a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) based on the plan scoring index for verification of different plans for personalized treatment-plan selection. Scoring using the new QF showed a 100% match rate (average NTCP QF = 1.0420). The NTCP-based new QF scoring method was adequate for obtaining biological verification quality and organ risk saving using the treatment-planning decision-support software we developed for prostate cancer.

  13. Volume effects of late term normal tissue toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonta, Dacian Viorel

    Modeling of volume effects for treatment toxicity is paramount for optimization of radiation therapy. This thesis proposes a new model for calculating volume effects in gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. The radiobiological and the pathological basis for this model and its relationship to other models are detailed. A review of the radiobiological experiments and published clinical data identified salient features and specific properties a biologically adequate model has to conform to. The new model was fit to a set of actual clinical data. In order to verify the goodness of fit, two established NTCP models and a non-NTCP measure for complication risk were fitted to the same clinical data. The method of fit for the model parameters was maximum likelihood estimation. Within the framework of the maximum likelihood approach I estimated the parameter uncertainties for each complication prediction model. The quality-of-fit was determined using the Aikaike Information Criterion. Based on the model that provided the best fit, I identified the volume effects for both types of toxicities. Computer-based bootstrap resampling of the original dataset was used to estimate the bias and variance for the fitted parameter values. Computer simulation was also used to estimate the population size that generates a specific uncertainty level (3%) in the value of predicted complication probability. The same method was used to estimate the size of the patient population needed for accurate choice of the model underlying the NTCP. The results indicate that, depending on the number of parameters of a specific NTCP model, 100 (for two parameter models) and 500 patients (for three parameter models) are needed for accurate parameter fit. Correlation of complication occurrence in patients was also investigated. The results suggest that complication outcomes are correlated in a patient, although

  14. Galectin-8 expression decreases in cancer compared with normal and dysplastic human colon tissue and acts significantly on human colon cancer cell migration as a suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, N; Bronckart, Y; Camby, I; Legendre, H; Lahm, H; Kaltner, H; Hadari, Y; Van Ham, P; Yeaton, P; Pector, J-C; Zick, Y; Salmon, I; Danguy, A; Kiss, R; Gabius, H-J

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: Galectins are β-galactoside binding proteins. This ability may have a bearing on cell adhesion and migration/proliferation in human colon cancer cells. In addition to galectins-1 and -3 studied to date, other members of this family not investigated in detail may contribute to modulation of tumour cell features. This evident gap has prompted us to extend galectin analysis beyond the two prototypes. The present study deals with the quantitative determination of immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 in normal, benign, and malignant human colon tissue samples and in four human colon cancer models (HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1) maintained both in vitro as permanent cell lines and in vivo as nude mice xenografts. The role of galectin-8 (and its neutralising antibody) in cell migration was investigated in HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1 cell lines. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 and its overall ability to bind to sugar ligands (revealed glycohistochemically by means of biotinylated histochemically inert carrier bovine serum albumin with α- and β-d-galactose, α-d-glucose, and lactose derivatives as ligands) were quantitatively determined using computer assisted microscopy. The presence of galectin-8 mRNA in the four human colon cancer cell lines was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In vitro, cellular localisation of exogenously added galectin-8 in the culture media of these colon cancer cells was visualised by fluorescence microscopy. In vitro galectin-8 mediated effects (and the influence of its neutralising antibody) on migration levels of living HCT-15, LoVo, CoLo201, and DLD-1 cells were quantitatively determined by computer assisted phase contrast microscopy. Results: A marked decrease in immunohistochemical expression of galectin-8 occurred with malignancy development in human colon tissue. Malignant colon tissue exhibited a significantly lower galectin-8 level than normal or

  15. Discrimination of bladder cancer cells from normal urothelial cells with high specificity and sensitivity: combined application of atomic force microscopy and modulated Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Riches, Andrew; Borger, Eva; Herrington, Simon; Dholakia, Kishan; Adya, Ashok K

    2014-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modulated Raman spectroscopy (MRS) were used to discriminate between living normal human urothelial cells (SV-HUC-1) and bladder tumour cells (MGH-U1) with high specificity and sensitivity. MGH-U1 cells were 1.5-fold smaller, 1.7-fold thicker and 1.4-fold rougher than normal SV-HUC-1 cells. The adhesion energy was 2.6-fold higher in the MGH-U1 cells compared to normal SV-HUC-1 cells, which possibly indicates that bladder tumour cells are more deformable than normal cells. The elastic modulus of MGH-U1 cells was 12-fold lower than SV-HUC-1 cells, suggesting a higher elasticity of the bladder cancer cell membranes. The biochemical fingerprints of cancer cells displayed a higher DNA and lipid content, probably due to an increase in the nuclear to cytoplasm ratio. Normal cells were characterized by higher protein contents. AFM studies revealed a decrease in the lateral dimensions and an increase in thickness of cancer cells compared to normal cells; these studies authenticate the observations from MRS. Nanostructural, nanomechanical and biochemical profiles of bladder cells provide qualitative and quantitative markers to differentiate between normal and cancerous cells at the single cellular level. AFM and MRS allow discrimination between adhesion energy, elasticity and Raman spectra of SV-HUC-1 and MGH-U1 cells with high specificity (83, 98 and 95%) and sensitivity (97, 93 and 98%). Such single-cell-level studies could have a pivotal impact on the development of AFM-Raman combined methodologies for cancer profiling and screening with translational significance. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in normal and breast tumor tissues and their link with breast cancer prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Daniela; Lemieux, Julie; Côté, Marc-André; Provencher, Louise; Laflamme, Christian; Barabé, Frédéric; Jacob, Simon; Michaud, Annick; Diorio, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene is associated with worse prognosis and decreased overall survival in breast cancer patients. The HER2 gene contains several polymorphisms; two of the best-characterized HER2 polymorphisms are Ile655Val and Ala1170Pro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between these two HER2 polymorphisms in normal breast and breast cancer tissues and known breast cancer prognostic factors in a retrospective cohort study of 73 women with non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. HER2 polymorphisms were assessed in breast cancer tissue and normal breast tissue using TaqMan assay. Ala1170Pro polymorphism in normal breast tissue was associated with age at diagnosis (p = 0.007), tumor size (p = 0.004) and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.06). Similar significant associations in cancer tissues were observed. No association between the Ile655Val polymorphism and prognostic factors were observed. However, we found significant differences in the distribution of Ile655Val (p = 0.03) and Ala1170Pro (p = 0.01) genotypes between normal breast and breast tumor tissues. This study demonstrates that only the Ala1170Pro polymorphism is associated with prognostic factors in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Moreover, our results suggest that both HER2 polymorphisms could play a significant role in carcinogenesis in non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sclerotium rolfsii lectin induces stronger inhibition of proliferation in human breast cancer cells than normal human mammary epithelial cells by induction of cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Azharuddin Savanur

    Full Text Available Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii has exquisite binding specificity towards O-linked, Thomsen-Freidenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr, TF associated glycans. This study investigated the influence of SRL on proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and ZR-75, non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A and normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs. SRL caused marked, dose-dependent, inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells but only weak inhibition of proliferation of non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and HMEC cells. The inhibitory effect of SRL on cancer cell proliferation was shown to be a consequence of SRL cell surface binding and subsequent induction of cellular apoptosis, an effect that was largely prevented by the presence of inhibitors against caspases -3, -8, or -9. Lectin histochemistry using biotin-labelled SRL showed little binding of SRL to normal human breast tissue but intense binding to cancerous tissues. In conclusion, SRL inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis but has substantially less effect on normal epithelial cells. As a lectin that binds specifically to a cancer-associated glycan, has potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent.

  18. Sclerotium rolfsii lectin induces stronger inhibition of proliferation in human breast cancer cells than normal human mammary epithelial cells by induction of cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanur, Mohammed Azharuddin; Eligar, Sachin M; Pujari, Radha; Chen, Chen; Mahajan, Pravin; Borges, Anita; Shastry, Padma; Ingle, Arvind; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Yu, Lu-Gang; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2014-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) isolated from the phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii has exquisite binding specificity towards O-linked, Thomsen-Freidenreich (Galβ1-3GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr, TF) associated glycans. This study investigated the influence of SRL on proliferation of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and ZR-75), non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and normal mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). SRL caused marked, dose-dependent, inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 and ZR-75 cells but only weak inhibition of proliferation of non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and HMEC cells. The inhibitory effect of SRL on cancer cell proliferation was shown to be a consequence of SRL cell surface binding and subsequent induction of cellular apoptosis, an effect that was largely prevented by the presence of inhibitors against caspases -3, -8, or -9. Lectin histochemistry using biotin-labelled SRL showed little binding of SRL to normal human breast tissue but intense binding to cancerous tissues. In conclusion, SRL inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis but has substantially less effect on normal epithelial cells. As a lectin that binds specifically to a cancer-associated glycan, has potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent.

  19. Absolute-Gravity Workshop planned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilham, Roger; Sasagawa, Glenn

    The new FG5 absolute gravimeter has a design goal accuracy of 1 μGal and represents the most recent of a series of gravimeters inspired by advances in gravimeter design by J. Faller at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) in Boulder, Colo. A 2-day workshop will be held in Boulder from March 22 to 23 to discuss current and future applications of absolute gravity (g). Details of the workshop appear at the end of this article. The instrument is based on the principle of interferometrically measuring the time and position of a weight falling in a vacuum, using a stabilized laser and an atomic clock [cf. Cook, 1967; Faller, 1963; Hammond, 1970; Zumberge, 1981; Niebauer, 1986].

  20. Comparison of microarray platforms for measuring differential microRNA expression in paired normal/cancer colon tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Callari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microarray technology applied to microRNA (miRNA profiling is a promising tool in many research fields; nevertheless, independent studies characterizing the same pathology have often reported poorly overlapping results. miRNA analysis methods have only recently been systematically compared but only in few cases using clinical samples. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the inter-platform reproducibility of four miRNA microarray platforms (Agilent, Exiqon, Illumina, and Miltenyi, comparing nine paired tumor/normal colon tissues. The most concordant and selected discordant miRNAs were further studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Globally, a poor overlap among differentially expressed miRNAs identified by each platform was found. Nevertheless, for eight miRNAs high agreement in differential expression among the four platforms and comparability to qRT-PCR was observed. Furthermore, most of the miRNA sets identified by each platform are coherently enriched in data from the other platforms and the great majority of colon cancer associated miRNA sets derived from the literature were validated in our data, independently from the platform. Computational integration of miRNA and gene expression profiles suggested that anti-correlated predicted target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs are commonly enriched in cancer-related pathways and in genes involved in glycolysis and nutrient transport. CONCLUSIONS: Technical and analytical challenges in measuring miRNAs still remain and further research is required in order to increase consistency between different microarray-based methodologies. However, a better inter-platform agreement was found by looking at miRNA sets instead of single miRNAs and through a miRNAs - gene expression integration approach.

  1. Immune cells in the normal ovary and spontaneous ovarian tumors in the laying hen (Gallus domesticus) model of human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradaric, Michael J; Penumatsa, Krishna; Barua, Animesh; Edassery, Seby L; Yu, Yi; Abramowicz, Jacques S; Bahr, Janice M; Luborsky, Judith L

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous ovarian cancer in chickens resembles human tumors both histologically and biochemically. The goal was to determine if there are differences in lymphocyte content between normal ovaries and ovarian tumors in chickens as a basis for further studies to understand the role of immunity in human ovarian cancer progression. Hens were selected using grey scale and color Doppler ultrasound to determine if they had normal or tumor morphology. Cells were isolated from ovaries (n = 6 hens) and lymphocyte numbers were determined by flow cytometry using antibodies to avian CD4 and CD8 T and B (Bu1a) cells. Ovarian sections from another set of hens (n = 26) were assessed to verify tumor type and stage and to count CD4, CD8 and Bu1a immunostained cells by morphometric analysis. T and B cells were more numerous in ovarian tumors than in normal ovaries by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. There were less CD4+ cells than CD8+ and Bu1a+ cells in normal ovaries or ovarian tumors. CD8+ cells were the dominant T cell sub-type in both ovarian stroma and in ovarian follicles compared to CD4+ cells. Bu1a+ cells were consistently found in the stroma of normal ovaries and ovarian tumors but were not associated with follicles. The number of immune cells was highest in late stage serous tumors compared to endometrioid and mucinous tumors. The results suggest that similar to human ovarian cancer there are comparatively more immune cells in chicken ovarian tumors than in normal ovaries, and the highest immune cell content occurs in serous tumors. Thus, this study establishes a foundation for further study of tumor immune responses in a spontaneous model of ovarian cancer which will facilitate studies of the role of immunity in early ovarian cancer progression and use of the hen in pre-clinical vaccine trials.

  2. Immune cells in the normal ovary and spontaneous ovarian tumors in the laying hen (Gallus domesticus model of human ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Bradaric

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous ovarian cancer in chickens resembles human tumors both histologically and biochemically. The goal was to determine if there are differences in lymphocyte content between normal ovaries and ovarian tumors in chickens as a basis for further studies to understand the role of immunity in human ovarian cancer progression. METHODS: Hens were selected using grey scale and color Doppler ultrasound to determine if they had normal or tumor morphology. Cells were isolated from ovaries (n = 6 hens and lymphocyte numbers were determined by flow cytometry using antibodies to avian CD4 and CD8 T and B (Bu1a cells. Ovarian sections from another set of hens (n = 26 were assessed to verify tumor type and stage and to count CD4, CD8 and Bu1a immunostained cells by morphometric analysis. RESULTS: T and B cells were more numerous in ovarian tumors than in normal ovaries by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. There were less CD4+ cells than CD8+ and Bu1a+ cells in normal ovaries or ovarian tumors. CD8+ cells were the dominant T cell sub-type in both ovarian stroma and in ovarian follicles compared to CD4+ cells. Bu1a+ cells were consistently found in the stroma of normal ovaries and ovarian tumors but were not associated with follicles. The number of immune cells was highest in late stage serous tumors compared to endometrioid and mucinous tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that similar to human ovarian cancer there are comparatively more immune cells in chicken ovarian tumors than in normal ovaries, and the highest immune cell content occurs in serous tumors. Thus, this study establishes a foundation for further study of tumor immune responses in a spontaneous model of ovarian cancer which will facilitate studies of the role of immunity in early ovarian cancer progression and use of the hen in pre-clinical vaccine trials.

  3. A Comparative Study of Personality Traits and Brain Behavioral activation Systems and Inhibition in Women with Cancer, Cardiovascular Diseases and Normal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Amiri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Chronic diseases are among the most important causes of mortality. The aim of the current study was to compare the Brain/behavioral systems and Dark personality traits of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy in cancer, cardiovascular female patients and normal women. Methods: In this study, 60 individuals were selected using available sampling in three groups of 20 cancer patients, cardiovascular patients, and normal subjects. Finally, in order to test the goals and hypotheses of the research, the participants were studied based on Behavioral Activation System and Behavioral Inhibition System, and Dark Triad traits. Data analysis was performed using multivariate ANOVA, univariate ANOVA and post-hoc tests. Results: In this study, there was a significant difference among the three groups in Brain/behavioral systems and traits of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy, so that the cancer and cardiovascular patients had higher score in dark triad traits compared to normal individuals. Also, the cancer patients had a higher score in Machiavellianism trait compared to the cardiovascular patients. In the brain/behavioral systems, cardiovascular and cancer patients had higher score in behavioral inhibition system (BIS component compared to the normal individuals in the of behavioral inhibition system (BIS. Also, in the reward seeking subscale of behavioral activation system (BAS-f, cancer patients had a higher score compared to cardiovascular patients, which was significantly different. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that cancer and cardiovascular patients, have greater extent of social disgusting personality traits as well as behavioral inhibition system as anxiety-predisposing factor.

  4. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    format. The NGS absolute system is located in Corbin, Virginia, and uses field measurements and actual GNSS satellite signals to quantitatively determine the carrier phase advance/delay introduced by the antenna element. NGS is interested in providing calibrations for a wide variety of dual-frequency, geodetic-grade antennas, from types in use at IGS and CORS reference stations to rover antennas not normally seen in those networks. In this presentation, we describe the NGS absolute calibration facility, and discuss the observation models and strategy used to generate NGS absolute calibrations. We also demonstrate that NGS absolute phase center variation (PCV) patterns are consistent with published values determined by other absolute antenna calibration facilities.

  5. Paciente oncológico con incapacidad laboral absoluta: características epidemiológicas, supervivencia y seguimiento de su incapacidad laboral Cancer patients with absolut permanent incapacity: epidemiology, survival and monitoring work disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Jesús Regal Ramos

    2011-06-01

    formación oncológica y aumentando las revisiones. Estas revisiones podrán establecerse en el momento de la calificación de la invalidez o a posteriori, tras seleccionar aquellos casos que, con una supervivencia y edad razonables, no presenten otras limitaciones constitutivas de IPA.Each year the incidence of cancer in Spain increases, as well as the survival, and at the same time the economic cost due to Absolute Permanent Disability (APD caused by these diseases. Objective: Know the epidemiological characteristics of cancer patients with APD and what variables are associated to survival beyond 5 years, in order to establish criteria for the review of the working capacity of these patients. Method: We analyzed all patients evaluated in the Medical Unit of The National Institute of Social Security in Madrid in 2005, under 55 years of age, with the diagnosis of neoplasic disease and whose final evaluation was APD. We analyzed the following variables: age, sex, marital status, occupation, type of Social Security affiliation, type of cancer (distinguishing whether it was widespread and / or had had relapses, the presence of other associated diseases, the presence of other conditions which in themselves were constitutive of APD and finally the survival beyond 5 years. Among the patients who were alive in November 2010 we studied the relationship of variables with the survival and evolution of the degree of disability. Results: The total number of patients studied was 212. The most frequent type of tumors in women were breast and lung cancer and in men lung and colon-rectum. The 5-year survival was 30 %.This survival decreases with age, depending on the type of tumor, the presence of metastasis and / or relapses and the presence of comorbidity. Tumors that cause most number of deaths are lung cancer in men and breast cancer in women. Regarding the followup of disability, 54 % (35 of 64 of the survivors had not been reviewed and had no sequels or other conditions

  6. Quantitative comparison of cancer and normal cell adhesion using organosilane monolayer templates: an experimental study on the anti-adhesion effect of green-tea catechins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Rumi; Kakinuma, Eisuke; Masuda, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ito, Kosaku; Iketaki, Kentaro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Sato, Yuko; Tanii, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    The main constituent of green tea, (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), is known to have cancer-specific chemopreventive effects. In the present work, we investigated how EGCG suppresses cell adhesion by comparing the adhesion of human pancreatic cancer cells (AsPC-1 and BxPC-3) and their counterpart, normal human embryonic pancreas-derived cells (1C3D3), in catechin-containing media using organosilane monolayer templates (OMTs). The purpose of this work is (1) to evaluate the quantitativeness in the measurement of cell adhesion with the OMT and (2) to show how green-tea catechins suppress cell adhesion in a cancer-specific manner. For the first purpose, the adhesion of cancer and normal cells was compared using the OMT. The cell adhesion in different type of catechins such as EGCG, (-)-Epicatechin-3-O-gallate (ECG) and (-)-Epicatechin (EC) was also evaluated. The measurements revealed that the anti-adhesion effect of green-tea catechins is cancer-specific, and the order is EGCG≫ECG>EC. The results agree well with the data reported to date, showing the quantitativeness of the new method. For the second purpose, the contact area of cells on the OMT was measured by reflection interference contrast microscopy. The cell-OMT contact area of cancer cells decreases with increasing EGCG concentration, whereas that of normal cells remains constant. The results reveal a twofold action of EGCG on cancer cell adhesion-suppressing cell attachment to a candidate adhesion site and decreasing the contact area of the cells-and validates the use of OMT as a tool for screening cancer cell adhesion.

  7. Cervical cancer incidence after normal cytological sample in routine screening using SurePath, ThinPrep, and conventional cytology: population based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozemeijer, K.; Naber, S.K.; Penning, C.; Overbeek, L.I.H.; Looman, C.W.; Kok, I.M. de; Matthijsse, S.M.; Rebolj, M.; Kemenade, F.J. van; Ballegooijen, M. van

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the cumulative incidence of cervical cancer diagnosed within 72 months after a normal screening sample between conventional cytology and liquid based cytology tests SurePath and ThinPrep.Design Retrospective population based cohort study.Setting Nationwide network and registry

  8. Differential prooxidative effects of the green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, in normal and oral cancer cells are related to differences in sirtuin 3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ling; Park, Jong-Yung; Lambert, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    We have previously reported that the green tea catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), can induce oxidative stress in oral cancer cells but exerts antioxidant effects in normal cells. Here, we report that these differential prooxidative effects are associated with sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), an important mitochondrial redox modulator. EGCG rapidly induced mitochondria-localized reactive oxygen species in human oral squamous carcinoma cells (SCC-25, SCC-9) and premalignant leukoplakia cells (MSK-Leuk1), but not in normal human gingival fibroblast cells (HGF-1). EGCG suppressed SIRT3 mRNA and protein expression, as well as, SIRT3 activity in SCC-25 cells, whereas it increased SIRT3 activity in HGF-1 cells. EGCG selectively decreased the nuclear localization of the estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), the transcription factor regulating SIRT3 expression, in SCC-25 cells. This indicates that EGCG may regulate SIRT3 transcription in oral cancer cells via ERRα. EGCG also differentially modulated the mRNA expressions of SIRT3-associated downstream targets including glutathione peroxidase 1 and superoxide dismutase 2 in normal and oral cancer cells. SIRT3 represents a novel potential target through which EGCG exerts differential prooxidant effects in cancer and normal cells. Our results provide new biomarkers to be further explored in animal studies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Transfection efficiency of normal and cancer cell lines and monitoring of promoter activity by single-cell bioluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibe, Tomohisa; Torisawa, Aya; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Kawakami, Koji

    2014-02-01

    The bioluminescence system (luciferase reporter assay system) is widely used to study gene expression, signal transduction and other cellular activities. Although transfection of reporter plasmid DNA to mammalian cell lines is an indispensable experimental step, the transfection efficiency of DNA varies among cell lines, and several cell lines are not suitable for this type of assay because of the low transfection efficiency. In this study, we confirm the transfection efficiency of reporter DNA to several cancer and normal cell lines after transient transfection by single-cell imaging. Luminescence images could be obtained from living single cells after transient transfection, and the calculated transfection efficiency of this method was similar to that of the conventional reporter assay using a luminometer. We attempted to measure the activity of the Bip promoter under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions using both high and low transfection efficiency cells for plasmid DNA at the single-cell level, and observed activation of this promoter even in cells with the lowest transfection efficiency. These results show that bioluminescence imaging of single cells is a powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression based on a reporter assay using limited samples such as clinical specimens or cells from primary culture, and could provide additional information compared with the conventional assay. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Absolute metrology for space interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadé, Yves; Courteville, Alain; Dändliker, René

    2017-11-01

    The crucial issue of space-based interferometers is the laser interferometric metrology systems to monitor with very high accuracy optical path differences. Although classical high-resolution laser interferometers using a single wavelength are well developed, this type of incremental interferometer has a severe drawback: any interruption of the interferometer signal results in the loss of the zero reference, which requires a new calibration, starting at zero optical path difference. We propose in this paper an absolute metrology system based on multiplewavelength interferometry.

  11. Myofibroblast presence in apparently normal mucosa adjacent to oral squamous cell carcinoma associated with chronic tobacco/areca nut use: evidence for field cancerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angadi, Punnya V; Patil, Prakash V; Kale, Alka D; Hallikerimath, Seema; Babji, Deepa

    2014-10-01

    Myofibroblasts are primary cellular components of activated tumor stroma, associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, their role in field cancerization has not been addressed. This study aims to evaluate the presence of myofibroblasts in patient-matched histologically normal mucosa adjacent to oral squamous cell carcinoma (HNMAOSCC) and OSCC tissues. Fifty patient-matched tissues of OSCC and HNMAOSCC associated with chronic areca nut/tobacco use were subjected to immunohistochemistry using α-SMA for detection of myofibroblasts. Normal oral mucosa (n = 15) were stained as controls. The number of α-SMA stained myofibroblasts in OSCC and HNMAOSCC were significantly increased as compared to that of the normal controls (p cancerization and their potential use as a field effect marker.

  12. Constitutive and inducible expression of cytochromes P4501A (CYP1A1 and CYP1A2) in normal prostate and prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Kenneth M; Cutroneo, Kenneth R

    2004-02-01

    Constitutive and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) inducible expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in prostate cancer and normal prostate epithelial cells were examined by immunoblotting. Androgen independent prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 have constitutive expression of CYP1A and CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, respectively. Four micromolar B[a]P did not appear to induce CYP1A1 or CYP1A2 expression in DU145 or PC3 cells. The androgen dependent prostate cancer cell line, LnCap, also has constitutive expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2. However, both CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 are induced by treatment of LnCap cells with 4 microM B[a]P. Untreated normal prostate and primary prostate tumor cells have no detectable CYP1A1 expression. Treatment with 4 microM B[a]P induced CYP1A1 expression in both normal and primary tumor prostate cells. Constitutive CYP1A2 expression was detected in normal prostate cells with little or no induction by exposure to 4 microM B[a]P. Primary prostate tumor cells did not show constitutive expression of CYP1A2. However, CYP1A2 was induced by 4 microM B[a]P in primary prostate tumor cells. These observations indicate that hormonal and cancer specific factors affect the expression and induction of the phase I metabolic enzymes, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in prostate cells. These observations may be related to the potential smoking-linked higher risk of prostate cancer development and morbidity of prostate cancer patients who smoke. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Measurements of absolute long distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollinger, Florian; Doloca, Nicolae Radu; Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Wedde, Martin; Abou-Zeid, Ahmed

    2010-08-01

    The production of large components, e. g. in aerospace industries, requires flexible and yet highly precise measurement techniques to determine absolute lengths of up to one hundred metres. Two different approaches are presented in this paper. One is based on a time-of-flight measurement, using a femtosecond frequency comb as an advanced modulator. By the combined phase analysis of lines of different distinct frequencies in the Mega- and Gigahertz frequency range, a measurement distance of one hundred metres with a relative measurement uncertainty of 1x10-7 was achieved in laboratory conditions. In a second approach to long distance measurements, two standard interferometric measurement techniques, i.e. variable synthetic and fixed synthetic wavelength interferometry, were combined. The two interferometry techniques were realised within a single set-up, using two external cavity diode lasers as sources. Experimentally, lengths of up to twenty metres could thus be determined with relative uncertainties below 1x10-6, in good agreement with theoretical analysis. Both techniques, femtosecond fibre laser-based time-of-flight and diode laser-based multiwavelength interferometry, are therefore capable of absolute, guidance-free long distance measurements and have achieved demonstrated relative measurement uncertainties below 1x10-6 for distances over ten metres.

  14. Absolutely \\gamma-Summing Multilinear Operators

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano-Rodríguez, Diana Marcela

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an abstract approach to the notion of absolutely summing multilinear operators. We show that several previous results on different contexts (absolutely summing, almost summing, Cohen summing) are particular cases of our general results.

  15. Role for DNA methylation in the regulation of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in normal and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, Lukas; Jensen, Taylor J.; Garbe, James C.; Heimark, Ronald L.; Cress, Anne E.; Dickinson, Sally; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-23

    BACKGROUND: The microRNA-200 family participates in the maintenance of an epithelial phenotype and loss of its expression can result in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Furthermore, the loss of expression of miR-200 family members is linked to an aggressive cancer phenotype. Regulation of the miR-200 family expression in normal and cancer cells is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epigenetic mechanisms participate in the control of miR-200c and miR-141 expression in both normal and cancer cells. A CpG island near the predicted mir-200c/mir-141 transcription start site shows a striking correlation between miR-200c and miR-141 expression and DNA methylation in both normal and cancer cells, as determined by MassARRAY technology. The CpG island is unmethylated in human miR-200/miR-141 expressing epithelial cells and in miR-200c/miR-141 positive tumor cells. The CpG island is heavily methylated in human miR-200c/miR-141 negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative tumor cells. Mouse cells show a similar inverse correlation between DNA methylation and miR-200c expression. Enrichment of permissive histone modifications, H3 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation, is seen in normal miR-200c/miR-141-positive epithelial cells, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to real-time PCR. In contrast, repressive H3K9 dimethylation marks are present in normal miR-200c/miR-141-negative fibroblasts and miR-200c/miR-141 negative cancer cells and the permissive histone modifications are absent. The epigenetic modifier drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, reactivates miR-200c/miR-141 expression showing that epigenetic mechanisms play a functional role in their transcriptional control. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: We report that DNA methylation plays a role in the normal cell type-specific expression of miR-200c and miR-141 and this role appears evolutionarily conserved, since similar results were obtained in mouse. Aberrant DNA methylation

  16. HER1-4 protein concentrations in normal breast tissue from breast cancer patients are expressed by the same profile as in the malignant tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dorte Aa; Ostergaard, Birthe; Bokmand, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: The epidermal growth factor receptor HER2 is overexpressed or amplified in 25%-30% of patients with breast cancer. The mechanism behind HER2 amplification is unknown, but may be a patho-physiological phenomenon caused by continuous stimulation and activation of the HER1......-4 system. We have mapped the protein concentrations of HER1-4 in breast cancer tissue, autologous reference tissue, normal breast tissue and serum samples, to see whether non-cancer cells from these patients express a protein profile indicating general activation. Methods: Tissue samples from malignant...... and the proteins extracted. The tissue and serum concentrations of HER1-4 were determined quantitatively using a commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results: HER1 was down regulated in cancer tissue when compared to autologous reference tissue (p=8x10(-6)), while HER2 (p

  17. Long range epigenetic silencing is a trans-species mechanism that results in cancer specific deregulation by overriding the chromatin domains of normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forn, Marta; Muñoz, Mar; Tauriello, Daniele V F; Merlos-Suárez, Anna; Rodilla, Verónica; Bigas, Anna; Batlle, Eduard; Jordà, Mireia; Peinado, Miguel A

    2013-12-01

    DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling are frequently implicated in the silencing of genes involved in carcinogenesis. Long Range Epigenetic Silencing (LRES) is a mechanism of gene inactivation that affects multiple contiguous CpG islands and has been described in different human cancer types. However, it is unknown whether there is a coordinated regulation of the genes embedded in these regions in normal cells and in early stages of tumor progression. To better characterize the molecular events associated with the regulation and remodeling of these regions we analyzed two regions undergoing LRES in human colon cancer in the mouse model. We demonstrate that LRES also occurs in murine cancer in vivo and mimics the molecular features of the human phenomenon, namely, downregulation of gene expression, acquisition of inactive histone marks, and DNA hypermethylation of specific CpG islands. The genes embedded in these regions showed a dynamic and autonomous regulation during mouse intestinal cell differentiation, indicating that, in the framework considered here, the coordinated regulation in LRES is restricted to cancer. Unexpectedly, benign adenomas in Apc(Min/+) mice showed overexpression of most of the genes affected by LRES in cancer, which suggests that the repressive remodeling of the region is a late event. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of the transcriptional insulator CTCF in mouse colon cancer cells revealed disrupted chromatin domain boundaries as compared with normal cells. Malignant regression of cancer cells by in vitro differentiation resulted in partial reversion of LRES and gain of CTCF binding. We conclude that genes in LRES regions are plastically regulated in cell differentiation and hyperproliferation, but are constrained to a coordinated repression by abolishing boundaries and the autonomous regulation of chromatin domains in cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  18. Proton MR spectroscopy of normal breasts: Association of risk factors for breast cancer with water and lipid composition of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jane; Wang, Ming-Yang; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chen, Kuan-Lin; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the water and lipid composition of normal women breasts on proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), and the association of breast cancer risk factors with (1)H-MRS parameters. Three groups of participants were included: group 1, women without a family history of breast cancer (n=49); group 2, women with at least one affected first-degree relative (n=77); group 3, contralateral normal breasts of women with newly diagnosed unilateral breast cancer (n=84). (1)H-MRS parameters were shown below: water fraction 1 (WF1)=(water integral)/(water integral+integral for methylene peak); lipid line width for methylene resonance (LW1) and lipid line width for methyl peaks (LW2) were measured. The association of breast cancer risk factors - age, breast density, body mass index (BMI), menopausal status, group with (1)H-MRS parameters - was analyzed by multiple linear regression. In age-adjusted multiple linear regression, breast density was positively associated with WF1 (P=0.009, 0.001, and associated with LW1 in groups 1 (P=0.040) and 3 (P=0.005). In group 3, premenopausal breasts had lower LW2 than their postmenopausal counterparts (P=0.033). Group 3 had narrower LW2 than group 2 (P=0.007). The risk factors for breast cancer were associated with (1)H-MRS parameters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expansion of Sphingosine Kinase and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Function in Normal and Cancer Cells: From Membrane Restructuring to Mediation of Estrogen Signaling and Stem Cell Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukocheva, Olga A

    2018-01-31

    Sphingolipids, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes, and their receptors network are being recognized as part of the signaling mechanisms, which govern breast cancer cell growth, migration, and survival during chemotherapy treatment. Approximately 70% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor (ER) positive and, thus, rely on estrogen signaling. Estrogen activates an intracellular network composed of many cytoplasmic and nuclear mediators. Some estrogen effects can be mediated by sphingolipids. Estrogen activates sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and amplifies the intracellular concentration of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in breast cancer cells during stimulation of proliferation and survival. Specifically, Estrogen activates S1P receptors (S1PR) and induces growth factor receptor transactivation. SphK, S1P, and S1PR expression are causally associated with endocrine resistance and progression to advanced tumor stages in ER-positive breast cancers in vivo . Recently, the network of SphK/S1PR was shown to promote the development of ER-negative cancers and breast cancer stem cells, as well as stimulating angiogenesis. Novel findings confirm and broaden our knowledge about the cross-talk between sphingolipids and estrogen network in normal and malignant cells. Current S1PRs therapeutic inhibition was indicated as a promising chemotherapy approach in non-responsive and advanced malignancies. Considering that sphingolipid signaling has a prominent role in terminally differentiated cells, the impact should be considered when designing specific SphK/S1PR inhibitors. This study analyzes the dynamic of the transformation of sphingolipid axis during a transition from normal to pathological condition on the level of the whole organism. The sphingolipid-based mediation and facilitation of global effects of estrogen were critically accented as a bridging mechanism that should be explored in cancer prevention.

  20. Expansion of Sphingosine Kinase and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Function in Normal and Cancer Cells: From Membrane Restructuring to Mediation of Estrogen Signaling and Stem Cell Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Sukocheva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes, and their receptors network are being recognized as part of the signaling mechanisms, which govern breast cancer cell growth, migration, and survival during chemotherapy treatment. Approximately 70% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor (ER positive and, thus, rely on estrogen signaling. Estrogen activates an intracellular network composed of many cytoplasmic and nuclear mediators. Some estrogen effects can be mediated by sphingolipids. Estrogen activates sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1 and amplifies the intracellular concentration of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P in breast cancer cells during stimulation of proliferation and survival. Specifically, Estrogen activates S1P receptors (S1PR and induces growth factor receptor transactivation. SphK, S1P, and S1PR expression are causally associated with endocrine resistance and progression to advanced tumor stages in ER-positive breast cancers in vivo. Recently, the network of SphK/S1PR was shown to promote the development of ER-negative cancers and breast cancer stem cells, as well as stimulating angiogenesis. Novel findings confirm and broaden our knowledge about the cross-talk between sphingolipids and estrogen network in normal and malignant cells. Current S1PRs therapeutic inhibition was indicated as a promising chemotherapy approach in non-responsive and advanced malignancies. Considering that sphingolipid signaling has a prominent role in terminally differentiated cells, the impact should be considered when designing specific SphK/S1PR inhibitors. This study analyzes the dynamic of the transformation of sphingolipid axis during a transition from normal to pathological condition on the level of the whole organism. The sphingolipid-based mediation and facilitation of global effects of estrogen were critically accented as a bridging mechanism that should be explored in cancer prevention.

  1. Effects of radiation on levels of DNA damage in normal non-adjacent mucosa from colorectal cancer cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, Juliette

    2013-03-01

    Defects in DNA repair pathways have been linked with colorectal cancer (CRC). Adjuvant radiotherapy has become commonplace in the treatment of rectal cancer however it is associated with a higher rate of second cancer formation. It is known that radiation results in DNA damage directly or indirectly by radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) by causing double-strand breaks (DSBs). The majority of work in RIBE has been performed in cell lines and limited studies have been in or ex vivo.

  2. Cancer-associated fibroblasts in a human HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not derived from cancer cells through epithelial-mesenchymal transition, phenotypically activated but karyotypically normal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Wang

    Full Text Available Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs play a crucial role in cancer progression and even initiation. However, the origins of CAFs in various cancer types remain controversial, and one of the important hypothesized origins is through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT from cancer cells. In this study, we investigated whether the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells are able to generate CAFs via EMT during tumor formation, which is now still unknown. The laryngeal xenografted tumor model was established by inoculating the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line in nude mice. Primary cultured CAFs from the tumor nodules and matched normal fibroblasts (NFs from the adjacent connective tissues were subcultured, purified, and verified by immunofluorescence. Migration, invasion, and proliferation potentials were compared between the CAFs and NFs. A co-culture of CAFs with HEp-2 cells and a co-injection of CAFs with HEp-2 cells in nude mice were performed to examine the cancer-promoting potential of CAFs to further verify their identity. Karyotypic analyses of the CAFs, NFs, and HEp-2 cells were conducted. A co-culture of NFs with HEp-2 cells was also performed to examine the expression of activated markers of CAFs. A pathological examination confirmed that the laryngeal xenografted tumor model was successfully established, containing abundant CAFs. Immunocytochemical staining verified the purities and identities of the CAFs and NFs. Although the CAFs manifested higher migration, invasion, proliferation, and cancer-promoting capacities compared with the NFs, an analysis of chromosomes revealed that both the CAFs and NFs showed typical normal mouse karyotypes. In addition, the NFs co-cultured with HEp-2 cells did not show induced expressions of activated markers of CAFs. Our findings reveal that the CAFs in the HEp-2 established laryngeal xenografted tumor are not of laryngeal cancer origin but of mouse origin, indicating that the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cells cannot

  3. Localization of the stem cell markers LGR5 and Nanog in the normal and the cancerous human ovary and their inter-relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Freyhan, Ora; Schechtman, Lea; Givol, David

    2013-05-01

    LGR5 and Nanog were recently characterized as stem cell markers in various embryonic, adult and cancer stem cells. However, there are no data on their precise localization in the normal adult ovary, which may be important for the initial steps of development of ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecological cancer. We analyzed by immunocytochemistry the precise localization of these markers in normal ovary (11 specimens, age range 43-76), in borderline specimens (12 specimens), and in serous ovarian cancer (12 specimens of stage II) which comprises the vast majority (80%) of all ovarian cancer. Surprisingly, we revealed that both Nanog and LGR5 are clearly localized in the epithelial cells of the normal ovary. However, in 5 of 12 ovaries there was no labeling at all, while in 3 ovaries staining of Nanog was more prominent with only weak labeling of LGR5. In addition, we found in 3 of 11 ovaries clear labeling in foci of both LGR5 and Nanog antibodies, with partial overlapping. Occasionally, we also found in the stroma foci labeled by either Nanog or LGR5 antibodies. In general, the stroma area of tissue sections labeled with LGR5 was much greater than that labeled with Nanog. In borderline tumors a significant portion of the specimens (7 of 12) was labeled exclusively with Nanog and not with LGR5. In ovarian carcinomas almost 100% of the cells were exclusively labeled only with Nanog (6 of 12 of the specimens) with no labeling of LGR5. These data may suggest the potential of ovaries from postmenopausal women, which express Nanog, to undergo transformation, since Nanog was shown to be oncogenic. We conclude that Nanog, which probably plays an important role in ovarian embryonic development, may be partially silenced in fertile and post-menopausal women, but is re-expressed in ovarian cancer, probably by epigenetic activation of Nanog gene expression. Expression of Nanog and LGR5 in normal ovaries and in borderline tumors may assist in the early detection and improved

  4. Identification of valid reference genes for the normalization of RT-qPCR expression studies in human breast cancer cell lines treated with and without transient transfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Lin Liu

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is a powerful technique for examining gene expression changes during tumorigenesis. Target gene expression is generally normalized by a stably expressed endogenous reference gene; however, reference gene expression may differ among tissues under various circumstances. Because no valid reference genes have been documented for human breast cancer cell lines containing different cancer subtypes treated with transient transfection, we identified appropriate and reliable reference genes from thirteen candidates in a panel of 10 normal and cancerous human breast cell lines under experimental conditions with/without transfection treatments with two transfection reagents. Reference gene expression stability was calculated using four algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and comparative delta Ct, and the recommended comprehensive ranking was provided using geometric means of the ranking values using the RefFinder tool. GeNorm analysis revealed that two reference genes should be sufficient for all cases in this study. A stability analysis suggests that 18S rRNA-ACTB is the best reference gene combination across all cell lines; ACTB-GAPDH is best for basal breast cancer cell lines; and HSPCB-ACTB is best for ER+ breast cancer cells. After transfection, the stability ranking of the reference gene fluctuated, especially with Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent in two subtypes of basal and ER+ breast cell lines. Comparisons of relative target gene (HER2 expression revealed different expressional patterns depending on the reference genes used for normalization. We suggest that identifying the most stable and suitable reference genes is critical for studying specific cell lines under certain circumstances.

  5. Absolutely separating quantum maps and channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, S. N.; Magadov, K. Yu; Jivulescu, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Absolutely separable states ϱ remain separable under arbitrary unitary transformations U\\varrho {U}\\dagger . By example of a three qubit system we show that in a multipartite scenario neither full separability implies bipartite absolute separability nor the reverse statement holds. The main goal of the paper is to analyze quantum maps resulting in absolutely separable output states. Such absolutely separating maps affect the states in a way, when no Hamiltonian dynamics can make them entangled afterwards. We study the general properties of absolutely separating maps and channels with respect to bipartitions and multipartitions and show that absolutely separating maps are not necessarily entanglement breaking. We examine the stability of absolutely separating maps under a tensor product and show that {{{Φ }}}\\otimes N is absolutely separating for any N if and only if Φ is the tracing map. Particular results are obtained for families of local unital multiqubit channels, global generalized Pauli channels, and combination of identity, transposition, and tracing maps acting on states of arbitrary dimension. We also study the interplay between local and global noise components in absolutely separating bipartite depolarizing maps and discuss the input states with high resistance to absolute separability.

  6. Methods for Reducing Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Dose Reduction or Planning Target Volume Elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuels, Stuart E.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Vineberg, Karen; Lee, Jae; Lee, Choonik; Matuszak, Martha M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Brock, Kristy K., E-mail: kbrock@med.umich.edu

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Strategies to reduce the toxicities of head and neck radiation (ie, dysphagia [difficulty swallowing] and xerostomia [dry mouth]) are currently underway. However, the predicted benefit of dose and planning target volume (PTV) reduction strategies is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to compare the normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) for swallowing and salivary structures in standard plans (70 Gy [P70]), dose-reduced plans (60 Gy [P60]), and plans eliminating the PTV margin. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) plans were analyzed. Standard organ-sparing volumetric modulated arc therapy plans (P70) were created and then modified by eliminating the PTVs and treating the clinical tumor volumes (CTVs) only (C70) or maintaining the PTV but reducing the dose to 60 Gy (P60). NTCP dose models for the pharyngeal constrictors, glottis/supraglottic larynx, parotid glands (PGs), and submandibular glands (SMGs) were analyzed. The minimal clinically important benefit was defined as a mean change in NTCP of >5%. The P70 NTCP thresholds and overlap percentages of the organs at risk with the PTVs (56-59 Gy, vPTV{sub 56}) were evaluated to identify the predictors for NTCP improvement. Results: With the P60 plans, only the ipsilateral PG (iPG) benefited (23.9% vs 16.2%; P<.01). With the C70 plans, only the iPG (23.9% vs 17.5%; P<.01) and contralateral SMG (cSMG) (NTCP 32.1% vs 22.9%; P<.01) benefited. An iPG NTCP threshold of 20% and 30% predicted NTCP benefits for the P60 and C70 plans, respectively (P<.001). A cSMG NTCP threshold of 30% predicted for an NTCP benefit with the C70 plans (P<.001). Furthermore, for the iPG, a vPTV{sub 56} >13% predicted benefit with P60 (P<.001) and C70 (P=.002). For the cSMG, a vPTV{sub 56} >22% predicted benefit with C70 (P<.01). Conclusions: PTV elimination and dose-reduction lowered the NTCP of the iPG, and PTV elimination lowered the NTCP of the cSMG. NTCP thresholds and the

  7. In vitro comparative cytotoxic effect of Nimbolide: A limonoid from Azadirachta indica (Neem tree) on cancer cell lines and normal cell lines through MTT assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Muhammad; Hwang, Yawon; Hong, Gyeongmi; Kim, Gonhyung

    2017-05-01

    The present study was conducted to find the cytotoxicity in vitro of nimbolide, limonoids derivative of flowers and leaves from Azadirachta indica (neem tree) on the selected cell lines of cancer (Du-145, PC-3, A-549) and normal fibroblast cell lines (NIH3T3, CCD-18Co) using MTT assay. The cells were seeded in 96 multi-well tissue plate using different concentrations of nimbolide for 24hrs and 48hrs. The percentage of viability of cell lines was calculated by optical density obtained by micro plate reader and cytotoxic effect in term of IC50 value was determined by using linear regression analysis. The percentages of viability of cells treated with different concentrations of nimbolide were significantly lower (P0.05) between treated and the non-treated cells was observed. Nimbolide exerted time and dose dependent cytotoxic effect on the cancer lines and mild effect on the normal cell lines. It was further confirmed through PKH 26. Results of the present study suggested nimbolide as a potent chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agent as it exerted a more cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines as compared with the normal cell lines. Nimbolide may be a new hope as an anticancer drug in future.

  8. Risk of gastrointestinal cancer in patients with unexplained chest/epigastric pain and normal upper endoscopy: a Danish 10-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Estrid Muff; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    patients with chest/epigastric pain, normal upper endoscopy, and no prior discharge diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (N = 386), compared with population controls (N = 3860). The overall 10-year risk of gastrointestinal cancer (stomach, colorectal, liver, and pancreas) was 2.9% for patients...... with unexplained chest/epigastric pain vs. 1.5% for controls. The adjusted relative risks or =1 year after upper endoscopy were 8.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6-27.5) and 1.2 (95% CI, 0.5-2.9), respectively. We found that patients with unexplained chest/epigastric pain have an increased risk...... of gastrointestinal cancer within the first year after upper endoscopy. Consequently, unexplained chest/epigastric pain might be an early gastrointestinal cancer symptom....

  9. Expression patterns of DLK1 and INSL3 identify stages of Leydig cell differentiation during normal development and in testicular pathologies, including testicular cancer and Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, G; Nielsen, J E; Maroun, L L

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the differentiation stage of human testicular interstitial cells, in particular Leydig cells (LC), within micronodules found in patients with infertility, testicular cancer and Klinefelter syndrome? SUMMARY ANSWER: The Leydig- and peritubular-cell populations in testes......, and in the majority of LCs, it was mutually exclusive of DLK1. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The number of samples was relatively small and no true normal adult controls were available. True stereology was not used for LC counting, instead LCs were counted in three fields of 0.5 µm(2) surface for each sample...... in adult men with testicular pathologies including testis cancer and Klinefelter syndrome. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS: This work was funded by Rigshospitalet's research funds, the Danish Cancer Society and Kirsten and Freddy Johansen's foundation. The authors have no conflicts of interest....

  10. Assessment of Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging in the Diagnosis of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer and Benign Lesions Versus Normal Skin:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Nürnberg, Birgit Meincke

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical imaging technique that may be useful in diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). OBJECTIVES To describe OCT features in NMSC such as actinic keratosis (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and in benign lesions and to assess...... the diagnostic accuracy of OCT in differentiating NMSC from benign lesions and normal skin. METHODS AND MATERIALS OCT and polarization-sensitive (PS) OCT from 104 patients were studied. Observer-blinded evaluation of OCT images from 64 BCCs, 1 baso-squamous carcinoma, 39 AKs, two malignant melanomas, nine benign...... lesions, and 105 OCT images from perilesional skin was performed; 50 OCT images of NMSC and 50 PS-OCT images of normal skin were evaluated twice. RESULTS Sensitivity was 79% to 94% and specificity 85% to 96% in differentiating normal skin from lesions. Important features were absence of well...

  11. The Potential Benefit of Radiotherapy with Protons in Head and Neck Cancer with Respect to Normal Tissue Sparing: A Systematic Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Clinical studies concerning head and neck cancer patients treated with protons reporting on radiation-induced side effects are scarce. Therefore, we reviewed the literature regarding the potential benefits of protons compared with the currently used photons in terms of lower doses to normal tissue and the potential for fewer subsequent radiation-induced side effects, with the main focus on in silico planning comparative (ISPC) studies. Materials and Methods. A literature search was performed by two independent researchers on ISPC studies that included proton-based and photon-based irradiation techniques. Results. Initially, 877 papers were retrieved and 14 relevant and eligible ISPC studies were identified and included in this review. Four studies included paranasal sinus cancer cases, three included nasopharyngeal cancer cases, and seven included oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, and/or laryngeal cancer cases. Seven studies compared the most sophisticated photon and proton techniques: intensity-modulated photon therapy versus intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Four studies compared different proton techniques. All studies showed that protons had a lower normal tissue dose, while keeping similar or better target coverage. Two studies found that these lower doses theoretically translated into a significantly lower incidence of salivary dysfunction. Conclusion. The results of ISPC studies indicate that protons have the potential for a significantly lower normal tissue dose, while keeping similar or better target coverage. Scanned IMPT probably offers the most advantage and will allow for a substantially lower probability of radiation-induced side effects. The results of these ISPC studies should be confirmed in properly designed clinical trials. PMID:21349950

  12. Pilot Comparison of Stromal Gene Expression among Normal Prostate Tissues and Primary Prostate Cancer Tissues in White and Black Men

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bova, G. S

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in prostate biology suggest that stromal cells surrounding prostate epithelia may play a key role in permitting or stimulating epithelial cells to lose control and form precancerous and cancerous lesions...

  13. Population-based absolute risk estimation with survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchik, Stephanie A; Pfeiffer, Ruth M

    2014-04-01

    Absolute risk is the probability that a cause-specific event occurs in a given time interval in the presence of competing events. We present methods to estimate population-based absolute risk from a complex survey cohort that can accommodate multiple exposure-specific competing risks. The hazard function for each event type consists of an individualized relative risk multiplied by a baseline hazard function, which is modeled nonparametrically or parametrically with a piecewise exponential model. An influence method is used to derive a Taylor-linearized variance estimate for the absolute risk estimates. We introduce novel measures of the cause-specific influences that can guide modeling choices for the competing event components of the model. To illustrate our methodology, we build and validate cause-specific absolute risk models for cardiovascular and cancer deaths using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Our applications demonstrate the usefulness of survey-based risk prediction models for predicting health outcomes and quantifying the potential impact of disease prevention programs at the population level.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  15. Molecular decoy to the Y-box binding protein-1 suppresses the growth of breast and prostate cancer cells whilst sparing normal cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Law

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1 is an oncogenic transcription/translation factor that is activated by phosphorylation at S102 whereby it induces the expression of growth promoting genes such as EGFR and HER-2. We recently illustrated by an in vitro kinase assay that a novel peptide to YB-1 was highly phosphorylated by the serine/threonine p90 S6 kinases RSK-1 and RSK-2, and to a lesser degree PKCα and AKT. Herein, we sought to develop this decoy cell permeable peptide (CPP as a cancer therapeutic. This 9-mer was designed as an interference peptide that would prevent endogenous YB-1(S102 phosphorylation based on molecular docking. In cancer cells, the CPP blocked P-YB-1(S102 and down-regulated both HER-2 and EGFR transcript level and protein expression. Further, the CPP prevented YB-1 from binding to the EGFR promoter in a gel shift assay. Notably, the growth of breast (SUM149, MDA-MB-453, AU565 and prostate (PC3, LNCap cancer cells was inhibited by ∼90% with the CPP. Further, treatment with this peptide enhanced sensitivity and overcame resistance to trastuzumab in cells expressing amplified HER-2. By contrast, the CPP had no inhibitory effect on the growth of normal immortalized breast epithelial (184htert cells, primary breast epithelial cells, nor did it inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. These data collectively suggest that the CPP is a novel approach to suppressing the growth of cancer cells while sparing normal cells and thereby establishes a proof-of-concept that blocking YB-1 activation is a new course of cancer therapeutics.

  16. EGFR signaling pathways are wired differently in normal 184A1L5 human mammary epithelial and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Zachary; Islam, Tanzila; Banerjee, Kasturi; Resat, Haluk

    2017-03-29

    Because of differences in the downstream signaling patterns of its pathways, the role of the human epidermal growth factor family of receptors (HER) in promoting cell growth and survival is cell line and context dependent. Using two model cell lines, we have studied how the regulatory interaction network among the key proteins of HER signaling pathways may be rewired upon normal to cancerous transformation. We in particular investigated how the transcription factor STAT3 and several key kinases' involvement in cancer-related signaling processes differ between normal 184A1L5 human mammary epithelial (HME) and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer epithelial cells. Comparison of the responses in these cells showed that normal-to-cancerous cellular transformation causes a major re-wiring of the growth factor initiated signaling. In particular, we found that: i) regulatory interactions between Erk, p38, JNK and STAT3 are triangulated and tightly coupled in 184A1L5 HME cells, and ii) STAT3 is only weakly associated with the Erk-p38-JNK pathway in MDA-MB-231 cells. Utilizing the concept of pathway substitution, we predicted how the observed differences in the regulatory interactions may affect the proliferation/survival and motility responses of the 184A1L5 and MDA-MB-231 cells when exposed to various inhibitors. We then validated our predictions experimentally to complete the experiment-computation-experiment iteration loop. Validated differences in the regulatory interactions of the 184A1L5 and MDA-MB-231 cells indicated that instead of inhibiting STAT3, which has severe toxic side effects, simultaneous inhibition of JNK together with Erk or p38 could be a more effective strategy to impose cell death selectively to MDA-MB-231 cancer cells while considerably lowering the side effects to normal epithelial cells. Presented analysis establishes a framework with examples that would enable cell signaling researchers to identify the signaling network structures which can be used to

  17. The Role and Regulation of TNF-Alpha in Normal Rat Mammary Gland During Development and in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Varela, Linda

    1998-01-01

    The pleiotropic cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) has previously been shown to regulate both the proliferation and differentiation of normal rat mammary epithelial cells (MEC) in primary culture...

  18. Effect of ginger root on cyclooxygenase-1 and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase expression in colonic mucosa of humans at normal and increased risk of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Turgeon, D. Kim; Wright, Benjamin D.; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Ruffin, Mack T.; Brenner, Dean E.; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Elevated tissue levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), produced by cyclooxygenase (COX) are an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC). Data suggest the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) drugs, which inhibit COX activity, as cancer preventives; however, side effects of NSAIDs indicate unacceptable limitations. Ginger has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities with significant CRC preventive potential. We investigated if consumption of 2.0 g ginger daily regulated the level of two key enzymes, which control PGE2 production, COX-1 and NAD+- dependent 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Methods Thirty participants at normal and twenty participants at increased risk of CRC were randomized and given 2.0 g/day ginger or placebo for 28 days. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was used to obtain colon biopsies at baseline and end of the study. Tissue level of COX-1 and 15-PGDH were assessed using Western Blotting. Results After ginger consumption participants at increased risk of CRC, had significantly reduced colonic COX-1 protein level (23.8%± 41) compared to the placebo group (18.9%± 52; p=0.03). Protein levels of 15-PGDH in the colon were unchanged. In normal risk for CRC participants, neither protein levels of COX-1 nor 15-PGDH in the colon were altered by ginger consumption. Conclusion Ginger significantly lowered COX-1 protein expression in increased risk participants, but not in normal risk participants at normal for CRC. Ginger did not alter 15-PGDH protein expression in either increased or normal risk participants. Further investigation, in larger studies with a longer ginger intervention is needed to examine the ability of ginger to impact tissue level of prostaglandin. PMID:23222413

  19. Absolutely summing multilinear operators: a Panorama | Pellegrino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper has a twofold purpose: to present an overview of the theory of absolutely summing operators and its different generalizations for the multilinear setting, and to sketch the beginning of a research project related to an objective search of “perfect” multilinear extensions of the ideal of absolutely summing operators.

  20. Absolute $F_{\\sigma\\delta}$ spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kovařík, Vojtěch; Kalenda, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    We prove that hereditarily Lindel\\"of space which is $F_{\\sigma\\delta}$ in some compactification is absolutely $F_{\\sigma\\delta}$. In particular, this implies that any separable Banach space is absolutely $F_{\\sigma\\delta}$ when equipped with the weak topology.

  1. Protein networking in bladder cancer: immunoreactivity for FGFR3, EGFR, ERBB2, KAI1, PTEN, and RAS in normal and malignant urothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røtterud, R; Fosså, S D; Nesland, J M

    2007-04-01

    A panel of markers, selected for the suspected bladder cancer relevance of their corresponding genes, were explored for their expression and subcellular location in urinary bladder tissue. The expression in normal urothelium, in non-metastasised transitional cell carcinomas (TCC), and in primary metastasised TCC with corresponding metastases was mapped. Potential associations between the proteins were identified. The observations were then combined in a set of hypotheses aimed at further hypothesis testing. Membranous ERBB4 and cytoplasmic p21RAS were downregulated in carcinoma cells compared with normal urothelium cells. FGFR3 was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. ERBB2 was translocated to the membrane and seemingly upregulated in one subgroup and conversely downregulated in another. EGFR, KAI1 and possibly PTEN revealed increased membranous immunoreactivity in non-metastasised tumours. The metastases showed decreased nuclear FGFR3 and membranous PTEN staining compared with corresponding primary tumours. EGFR expression was positively correlated with the expression of PTEN and FGFR3. The expression of ERBB2 was negatively correlated with p21RAS expression. According to our results, bladder carcinogenesis comprises FGFR3 translocation to the nucleus, upregulation of EGFR, ERBB2, KAI1 and PTEN; downregulation of p21RAS; and translocation of EGFR, ERBB2, and possibly PTEN to the membrane. Our results support the hypotheses regarding PTEN and KAI1 functioning as tumour suppressors in bladder cancer. EGFR and KAI1 may discriminate between non-metastasised and metastasised cancers. A complex network of associations between the factors is suggested.

  2. The Amaryllidaceae Isocarbostyril Narciclasine Induces Apoptosis By Activation of the Death Receptor and/or Mitochondrial Pathways in Cancer Cells But Not in Normal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Dumont

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Our study has shown that the Amaryllidaceae isocarbostyril narciclasine induces marked apoptosismediated cytotoxic effects in human cancer cells but not in normal fibroblasts by triggering the activation of the initiator caspases of the death receptor pathway (caspase-8 and caspase-10 at least in human MCF-7 breast and PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells. The formation of the Fas and death receptor 4 (DR4 death-inducing signaling complex was clearly evidenced in MCF-7 and PC-3 cancer cells. Caspase-8 was found to interact with Fas and DR4 receptors on narciclasine treatment. However, narciclasine-induced downstream apoptotic pathways in MCF-7 cells diverged from those in PC-3 cells, where caspase-8 directly activated effector caspases such as caspase-3 in the absence of any further release of mitochondrial proapoptotic effectors. In contrast, in MCF-7 cells, the apoptotic process was found to require an amplification step that is mitochondria-dependent, with Bid processing, release of cytochrome c, caspase-9 activation. It is postulated that the high selectivity of narciclasine to cancer cells might be linked, at least in part, to this activation of the death receptor pathway. Normal human fibroblasts appear approximately 250-fold less sensitive to narciclasine, which does not induce apoptosis in these cells probably due to the absence of death receptor pathway activation.

  3. Methylation of MGMT and ADAMTS14 in normal colon mucosa: biomarkers of a field defect for cancerization preferentially targeting elder African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Sergio; Dai, Yuichi; Yamashita, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Shina; Dai, Tomoko; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Sánchez-Muñoz, Rosa; Bilbao-Sieyro, Cristina; Díaz-Chico, Juan Carlos; Chernov, Andrei V; Strongin, Alex Y; Perucho, Manuel

    2015-02-20

    Somatic hypermethylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene (MGMT) was previously associated with G > A transition mutations in KRAS and TP53 in colorectal cancer (CRC). We tested the association of MGMT methylation with G > A mutations in KRAS and TP53 in 261 CRCs. Sixteen cases, with and without MGMT hypermethylation, were further analyzed by exome sequencing. No significant association of MGMT methylation with G > A mutations in KRAS, TP53 or in the whole exome was found (p > 0.5 in all comparisons). The result was validated by in silico comparison with 302 CRCs from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium dataset. Transcriptional silencing associated with hypermethylation and stratified into monoallelic and biallelic. We also found a significant clustering (p = 0.001) of aberrant hypermethylation of MGMT and the matrix metalloproteinase gene ADAMTS14 in normal colonic mucosa of CRC patients. This suggested the existence of an epigenetic field defect for cancerization disrupting the methylation patterns of several loci, including MGMT or ADAMTS14, that may lead to predictive biomarkers for CRC. Methylation of these loci in normal mucosa was more frequent in elder (p = 0.001) patients, and particularly in African Americans (p = 1 × 10-5), thus providing a possible mechanistic link between somatic epigenetic alterations and CRC racial disparities in North America.

  4. Expression of IL-18, IL-18 Binding Protein, and IL-18 Receptor by Normal and Cancerous Human Ovarian Tissues: Possible Implication of IL-18 in the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liat Medina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proinflammatory cytokine IL-18 has been shown to be elevated in the sera of ovarian carcinoma patients. The aim of the study was to examine the levels and cellular origin of IL-18, IL-18 binding protein, and IL-18 receptor in normal and cancerous ovarian tissues. Ovarian tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemical staining for IL-18, IL-18BP, and IL-18R and mRNA of these cytokines was analyzed with semiquantitative PT-PCR. IL-18 levels were significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues (P=0.0007, IL-18BP levels were significantly higher in normal ovarian tissues (P=0.04, and the ratio of IL-18/IL-18BP was significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues (P=0.036. Cancerous ovarian tissues expressed significantly higher IL-18 mRNA levels (P=0.025, while there was no difference in the expression of IL-18BP mRNA and IL-18R mRNA between cancerous and normal ovarian tissues. IL-18 and IL-18BP were expressed dominantly in the epithelial cells of both cancerous and normal ovarian tissues, while IL-18R was expressed dominantly in the epithelial cells of cancerous ovarian tissues but expressed similarly in the epithelial and stromal cells of normal cancerous tissues. This study indicates a possible role of IL-18, IL-18BP, and IL-18R in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

  5. TRPM8 ion channels differentially modulate proliferation and cell cycle distribution of normal and cancer prostate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ll Valero

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells.

  6. TRPM8 ion channels differentially modulate proliferation and cell cycle distribution of normal and cancer prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, María Ll; Mello de Queiroz, Fernanda; Stühmer, Walter; Viana, Félix; Pardo, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of the cation-permeable channel TRPM8 in prostate cancers might represent a novel opportunity for their treatment. Inhibitors of TRPM8 reduce the growth of prostate cancer cells. We have used two recently described and highly specific blockers, AMTB and JNJ41876666, and RNAi to determine the relevance of TRPM8 expression in the proliferation of non-tumor and tumor cells. Inhibition of the expression or function of the channel reduces proliferation rates and proliferative fraction in all tumor cells tested, but not of non-tumor prostate cells. We observed no consistent acceleration of growth after stimulation of the channel with menthol or icilin, indicating that basal TRPM8 expression is enough to sustain growth of prostate cancer cells.

  7. The effect of nanoparticle size and NLS density on nuclear targeting in cancer and normal cells; impaired nuclear import and aberrant nanoparticle intracellular trafficking in glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Lamprecht, Alf

    2017-05-10

    The cell nucleus is an interesting target in many diseases with particular interest in cancer. Previously, nuclear targeted small and large chitosan nanoparticles (S-NPs≈25nm, and L-NPs≈150nm respectively), modified with low, intermediate and high densities of NLS (L-NLS, I-NLS and H-NLS) were developed and assessed in L929 fibroblasts. However, to evade apoptosis and stimulate tumor growth cancer cells are capable of manipulating the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport on many levels, making NPs that are capable of nuclear targeting in normal cells incapable of doing so in cancer. For such reason, here, the nuclear delivery efficiency of S-NPs and L-NPs was assessed as a function of their NLS density in cancer and non-cancer cells. For S-NPs, in all cells tested, NLS was unnecessary for nuclear delivery; unmodified S-NPs showed higher nuclear delivery than NLS-S-NPs due to their ability to gain nuclear entry in a passive manner. For L-NPs, L-NLS-L-NPs showed ≈ 8.5, 33, 1.8 and 7.2 fold higher nuclear deliveries than H-NLS-L-NPs in L929 fibroblasts, primary human fibroblasts, HEK 293 and lung cancer cells, respectively. In glioma however, unmodified L-NPs showed highest nuclear delivery, whereas NLS-L-NPs were retained in the cytoplasm. Experiments conducted in the presence of inhibitors of the classical nuclear import pathway indicated that due to overexpression of importin α, classical nuclear import in glioma is impaired leading to aberrant NP intracellular trafficking and nuclear import. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. How reassuring is a normal breast ultrasound in assessment of a screen-detected mammographic abnormality? A review of interval cancers after assessment that included ultrasound evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, M.L. [Breastscreen WA, Perth (Australia); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Welman, C.J. [Breastscreen WA, Perth (Australia); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Department of Radiology, Fremantle Hospital and Health Service, Fremantle (Australia); Celliers, L.M., E-mail: liesl.celliers@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia); Department of Radiology, Fremantle Hospital and Health Service, Fremantle (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Aim: To review factors resulting in a false-negative outcome or delayed cancer diagnosis in women recalled for further evaluation, including ultrasound, after an abnormal screening mammogram. Materials and methods: Of 646,692 screening mammograms performed between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2004, 34,533 women were recalled for further assessment. Nine hundred and sixty-four interval cancers were reported in this period. Forty-six of these women had been recalled for further assessment, which specifically included ultrasound evaluation in the preceding 24 months, and therefore, met the inclusion criteria for this study. Screening mammograms, further mammographic views, ultrasound scans, clinical findings, and histopathology results were retrospectively reviewed by two consultant breast radiologists. Results: The interval cancer developed in the contralateral breast (n = 9), ipsilateral breast, but different site (n = 6), and ipsilateral breast at the same site (n = 31) as the abnormality for which they had recently been recalled. In the latter group, 10 were retrospectively classified as a false-negative outcome, nine had a delay in obtaining a biopsy, and 12 had a delay due to a non-diagnostic initial biopsy. Various factors relating to these outcomes are discussed. Conclusion: Out of 34,533 women who attended for an assessment visit and the 46 women who subsequently developed an interval breast cancer, 15 were true interval cancers, 10 had a false-negative assessment outcome, and 21 had a delay to cancer diagnosis on the basis of a number of factors. When there is discrepancy between the imaging and histopathology results, a repeat biopsy rather than early follow-up would have avoided a delay in some cases. A normal ultrasound examination should not deter the radiologist from proceeding to stereotactic biopsy, if the index mammographic lesion is suspicious of malignancy.

  9. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  10. High-resolution image cytometry on smears of normal oral mucosa: a possible approach for the early detection of laryngopharyngeal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Andreas; Ofner, Günter; Appenroth, Elisabeth; Gschwendtner, Andreas

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of identifying laryngopharyngeal cancers by nuclear chromatin texture feature analysis of cell nuclei from mucosal scrapings obtained from clinically and cytologically noncancerous areas of the soft palate in patients with cancer. The collective consisted of 68 controls and 77 cases of laryngopharyngeal carcinomas. After Feulgen staining, 3000 cell nuclei were automatically measured using a high-resolution image analyser (CytoSavant Oncometrics, Vancouver, BC, Canada). Texture features were extracted for calculation of a discriminant function, which allows the two groups to be distinguished. Two parameters allowed the two populations to be distinguished. The classifier reached an overall performance of 72.7% sensitivity, 82.4% specificity, a positive predictive value of 80.5%, a negative predictive value of 75.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.7754. Our work shows that subtle changes in the chromatin distribution in cell nuclei from ostensibly normal cells in the vicinity of carcinomas are demonstrable in the oral cavity of patients suffering from laryngopharyngeal cancers. It may be possible to develop this method into a valuable clinical tool to reduce the high rate of delayed diagnosis of oral and laryngopharyngeal cancers. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Differential Expression of Aqueous Soluble Proteins in Breast Normal and Cancerous Tissues in Relation to Stage and Grade of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seng Liang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a leading cause of female deaths worldwide. In Malaysia, it is the most common form of female cancer while Infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC is the most common form of breast cancer. A proteomic approach was used to identify changes in the protein profile of breast cancerous and normal tissues. The patients were divided into different cohorts according to tumour stage and grade. We identified twenty-four differentially expressed hydrophilic proteins. A few proteins were found significantly related to various stages and grades of IDC, amongst which were SEC13-like 1 (isoform b, calreticulin, 14-3-3 protein zeta, and 14-3-3 protein eta. In this study, we found that by defining the expression of the proteins according to stages and grades of IDC, a significant relationship between the expression of the proteins with the stage or grade of IDC can be established, which increases the usefulness of these proteins as biomarkers for IDC.

  12. Study on discrimination of oral cancer from normal using blood plasma based on fluorescence steady and excited state at excitation wavelength 280 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Pachaiappan; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Many research works based on fluorescence spectroscopy have proven its potential in the diagnosis of various diseases using the spectral signatures of the native key fluorophores such as tryptophan, tyrosine, collagen, NADH, FAD and porphyrin. These fluorophores distribution, concentration and their conformation may be changed depending upon the pathological and metabolic conditions of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt to characterize the blood plasma of normal subject and oral cancer patients by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed by employing the multivariate statistical method - linear discriminant analyses (LDA) using leaves one out cross validation method. The results illustrate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy technique in the diagnosis of oral cancer using blood plasma.

  13. Multiplication of Chromosome 17 Centromere Is Associated with Prognosis in Patients with Invasive Breast Cancers Exhibiting Normal HER2 and TOP2A Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aeri; Shin, Hyung Chan; Bae, Young Kyung; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kang, Su Hwan; Lee, Soo Jung; Lee, Eun Hee

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of chromosome 17 centromere (CEP17) multiplication (increased copy number of CEP17) related to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) status in patients with invasive breast cancer. We constructed tissue microarrays using 594 invasive breast cancer samples and performed single-color silver-enhanced in situ hybridization (SISH) assay for HER2, TOP2A, and CEP17 to assess for copy number aberrations. The association of CEP17 multiplication with patient survival was analyzed according to HER2 and TOP2A status. Among 567 informative cases, HER2 amplification was noted in 22.8%, TOP2A amplification in 8.3% and TOP2A deletion in 11.1%. CEP17 multiplication was identified in 33.2% and was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS) (p=0.02) and disease-free survival (DFS) (p=0.02). CEP17 multiplication correlated with patient survival in patients with normal TOP2A or non-amplified HER2 status, but the prognostic significance was lost in those with altered TOP2A or amplified HER2. On multivariate analyses, CEP17 multiplication was an independent prognostic factor for poorer OS (p=0.02) and DFS (p=0.01) in patients with normal TOP2A and non-amplified HER2. CEP17 multiplication was identified as a promising prognostic marker in patients with invasive breast cancer exhibiting either non-amplified HER2 or normal TOP2A status.

  14. DNA damage enhanced by the attenuation of SLD5 delays cell cycle restoration in normal cells but not in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yuan Gong

    Full Text Available SLD5 is a member of the GINS complex composed of PSF1, PSF2, PSF3 and SLD5, playing a critical role in the formation of the DNA replication fork with CDC45 in yeast. Previously, we had isolated a PSF1 orthologue from a murine hematopoietic stem cell DNA library and were then able to identify orthologues of all the other GINS members by the yeast two hybrid approach using PSF1 as the bait. These GINS orthologues may also function in DNA replication in mammalian cells because they form tetrameric complexes as observed in yeast, and gene deletion mutants of both PSF1 and SLD5 result in a lack of epiblast proliferation and early embryonic lethality. However, we found that PSF1 is also involved in chromosomal segregation in M phase, consistent with recent suggestions that homologues of genes associated with DNA replication in lower organisms also regulate cellular events other than DNA replication in mammalian cells. Here we analyzed the function of SLD5 other than DNA replication and found that it is active in DNA damage and repair. Attenuation of SLD5 expression results in marked DNA damage in both normal cells and cancer cells, suggesting that it protects against DNA damage. Attenuation of SLD5 delays the DNA repair response and cell cycle restoration in normal cells but not in cancer cells. These findings suggest that SLD5 might represent a therapeutic target molecule acting at the level of tumor stromal cells rather than the cancerous cells themselves, because development of the tumor microenvironment could be delayed or disrupted by the suppression of its expression in the normal cell types within the tumor.

  15. Cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic effects of naringenin-oxime relative to naringenin on normal and cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahim Kocyigit

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that both NG-Ox and NG possess cytotoxic, genotoxic and apoptotic activities through the production of ROS on cells, NG-Ox being the more effective one. Therefore, derived compound of NG might be used as antiproliferative agents for the treatment of cancer.

  16. The Use of Normal Colon Cell Culture to Assess Toxicities and Cancer Molecular Pathway Alterations Induced by Disinfection Byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of disinfected surface waters to an increased risk of colorectal cancer (Bove, GE, Jr et al., Int. J. Health Geogr., 6:18, 2007). Approximately 600 disinfection byproducts (DBP) have been identified. Because it would be...

  17. Differential expression and distribution of epithelial adhesion molecules in non-small cell lung cancer and normal bronchus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, M. C.; van den Berg, Anke; Vogelzang, I.; Wesseling, J.; Postma, D. S.; Timens, W.; Groen, H. J. M.

    Background: Changes in epithelial cell interactions have been implicated in carcinogenesis, tumour invasion and metastasis. Aim: To screen for altered expression of epithelial adhesion genes in lung cancer development. Methods: Gene expression profiles were assessed with cDNA expression arrays in

  18. Optimal Interval for Repeated Gastric Cancer Screening in Normal-Risk Healthy Korean Adults: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong-Myon; Shin, Sang Yop; Kim, Eun Hee

    2015-10-01

    This retrospective cohort study was conducted to estimate the optimal interval for gastric cancer screening in Korean adults with initial negative screening results. This study consisted of voluntary Korean screenees aged 40 to 69 years who underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies after testing negative in the baseline screening performed between January 2007 and December 2011. A new case was defined as the presence of gastric cancer cells in biopsy specimens obtained upon gastroscopy. The follow-up periods were calculated during the months between the date of baseline screening gastroscopy and positive findings upon subsequent screenings, stratified by sex and age group. The mean sojourn time (MST) for determining the screening interval was estimated using the prevalence/incidence ratio. Of the 293,520 voluntary screenees for the gastric cancer screening program, 91,850 (31.29%) underwent subsequent screening gastroscopies between January 2007 and December 2011. The MSTs in men and women were 21.67 months (95% confidence intervals [CI], 17.64 to 26.88 months) and 15.14 months (95% CI, 9.44 to 25.85 months), respectively. These findings suggest that the optimal interval for subsequent gastric screening in both men and women is 24 months, supporting the 2-year interval recommended by the nationwide gastric cancer screening program.

  19. Intermediate cells in normal and malignant prostate epithelium express c-MET: implications for prostate cancer invasion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Balken, B. van; Aalders, M.W.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Ruiter, D.J.; Schalken, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of keratin (K) expression discriminates luminal (K18) and intermediate (K5/18) cells in prostate carcinoma, while basal (K5/14) cells are absent. Intermediate cells have been proposed as targets of malignant transformation in prostate cancer and precursors of

  20. Palliative care for patients with head and neck cancer: "I would like a quick return to a normal lifestyle".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Nathan E; Genden, Eric; Morrison, R Sean

    2008-04-16

    Head and neck cancers constitute a diverse group of diseases including malignancies of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, sinuses, and skull base. Treatment of these cancers includes a combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation. Due to both the patterns of disease recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments, patients with head and neck cancer often have a complex and prolonged course of illness that is marked by periods of freedom from disease and symptoms interspersed with bouts of serious illness, debility, and numerous physical and psychological symptoms including pain, dysphagia, weight loss, disfigurement, depression, and xerostomia. Thus, management of this disease is best provided by an interdisciplinary team that includes individuals from the disciplines of otolaryngology, palliative care, radiation oncology, oncology, nutrition, speech, and physical and occupational therapy. Using the case of Mr K, we describe the symptoms encountered by patients with head and neck cancer and suggest options for management. We discuss the psychological aspects that affect these patients, including issues such as changes in body image, quality of life, anxiety, and guilt. Finally, we discuss the importance of the interdisciplinary team in the care of these patients and outline the roles of each team member. By providing comprehensive care to patients with malignancies of the head and neck, clinicians can increase the likelihood that patients and their families will be able to obtain the best possible outcomes and quality of life.

  1. Combined cytotoxic effect of UV-irradiation and TiO2 microbeads in normal urothelial cells, low-grade and high-grade urothelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Roghayeh; Veranič, Peter; Iglič, Aleš; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Pazoki, Meysam; Hudoklin, Samo

    2015-03-01

    The differentiation of urothelial cells results in normal terminally differentiated cells or by alternative pathways in low-grade or high-grade urothelial carcinomas. Treatments with traditional surgical and chemotherapeutical approaches are still inadequate and expensive, as bladder tumours are generally highly recurrent. In such situations, alternative approaches, using irradiation of the cells and nanoparticles, are promising. The ways in which urothelial cells, at different differentiation levels, respond to UV-irradiation (photolytic treatment) or to the combination of UV-irradiation and nanoparticles (photocatalytic treatment), are unknown. Here we tested cytotoxicity of UV-irradiation on (i) normal porcine urothelial cells (NPU), (ii) human low-grade urothelial cancer cells (RT4), and (iii) human high-grade urothelial cancer cells (T24). The results have shown that 1 minute of UV-irradiation is enough to kill 90% of the cells in NPU and RT4 cultures, as determined by the live/dead viability assay. On the other hand, the majority of T24 cells survived 1 minute of UV-irradiation. Moreover, even a prolonged UV-irradiation for 30 minutes killed cells. When T24 cells were pre-supplemented with mesoporous TiO2 microbeads and then UV-irradiated, the viability of these high-grade urothelial cancer cells was reduced to cells, and that the cell's ultrastructure was heavily compromised after UV-irradiation. In conclusion, our results show major differences in the sensitivity to UV-irradiation among the urothelial cells with respect to cell differentiation. To achieve an increased cytotoxicity of urothelial cancer cells, the photocatalytic approach is recommended.

  2. Could Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Reduce Rates of Cancer in Obese, Overweight, and Normal-Weight Subjects? A Summary of Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvie, Michelle N; Howell, Tony

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies and human observational data link energy restriction (ER) to reduced rates of carcinogenesis. Most of these studies have involved continuous energy restriction (CER), but there is increasing public and scientific interest in the potential health and anticancer effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) or intermittent fasting (IF), which comprise periods of marked ER or total fasting interspersed with periods of normal eating. This review summarizes animal studies that assessed tumor rates with IER and IF compared with CER or ad libitum feed consumption. The relevance of these animal data to human cancer is also considered by summarizing available human studies of the effects of IER or IF compared with CER on cancer biomarkers in obese, overweight, and normal-weight subjects. IER regimens that include periods of ER alternating with ad libitum feed consumption for 1, 2, or 3 wk have been reported to be superior to CER in reducing tumor rates in most spontaneous mice tumor models. Limited human data from short-term studies (≤6 mo) in overweight and obese subjects have shown that IER can lead to greater improvements in insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment) than can CER, with comparable reductions in adipokines and inflammatory markers and minor changes in the insulin-like growth factor axis. There are currently no data comparing IER or IF with CER in normal-weight subjects. The benefits of IER in these short-term trials are of interest, but not sufficient evidence to recommend the use of IER above CER. Longer-term human studies of adherence to and efficacy and safety of IER are required in obese and overweight subjects, as well as normal-weight subjects. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Could Intermittent Energy Restriction and Intermittent Fasting Reduce Rates of Cancer in Obese, Overweight, and Normal-Weight Subjects? A Summary of Evidence12

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies and human observational data link energy restriction (ER) to reduced rates of carcinogenesis. Most of these studies have involved continuous energy restriction (CER), but there is increasing public and scientific interest in the potential health and anticancer effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) or intermittent fasting (IF), which comprise periods of marked ER or total fasting interspersed with periods of normal eating. This review summarizes animal studies that assessed tumor rates with IER and IF compared with CER or ad libitum feed consumption. The relevance of these animal data to human cancer is also considered by summarizing available human studies of the effects of IER or IF compared with CER on cancer biomarkers in obese, overweight, and normal-weight subjects. IER regimens that include periods of ER alternating with ad libitum feed consumption for 1, 2, or 3 wk have been reported to be superior to CER in reducing tumor rates in most spontaneous mice tumor models. Limited human data from short-term studies (≤6 mo) in overweight and obese subjects have shown that IER can lead to greater improvements in insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment) than can CER, with comparable reductions in adipokines and inflammatory markers and minor changes in the insulin-like growth factor axis. There are currently no data comparing IER or IF with CER in normal-weight subjects. The benefits of IER in these short-term trials are of interest, but not sufficient evidence to recommend the use of IER above CER. Longer-term human studies of adherence to and efficacy and safety of IER are required in obese and overweight subjects, as well as normal-weight subjects. PMID:27422504

  4. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast luminal cells in BRCA carriers with or without history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; El-Halaby, Amber A; Zhang, Hengwei; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2017-10-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA genes have been shown to predispose patients to breast cancer. Studies have suggested that p53 alteration is a necessary step in tumorigenesis in BRCA carriers. Our previous study showed p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast luminal cells in sporadic breast cancer patients, the so-called breast p53 signature. Here, we studied p53 status in 66 BRCA1/2 carriers' breasts: 29 patients with breast carcinoma (2 patients with bilateral breast carcinomas) and 37 without. Seven of the 12 (58%) triple-negative breast carcinomas in BRCA carriers were positive for p53 alteration (immunohistochemical stain and/or sequencing), the same frequency as in sporadic triple-negative breast carcinomas. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign luminal cells was identified in 4 of the 7 cases with p53-positive carcinomas but not in breasts with p53-negative carcinomas, indicating that p53 positivity in normal/benign breast luminal cells is not a random event. Furthermore, in BRCA carriers' prophylactic mastectomies, 12 of the 94 (12.77%) breasts had focal p53 positivity in normal/benign luminal cells, with 2 cases in bilateral breasts, significantly higher than in previously studied mammoplasty specimens (0%). Our study suggests that germline BRCA gene mutations could result in genomic instability and an elevated gene mutation rate (such as the p53 gene) in breast luminal cells compared with the general population, predisposing BRCA carriers to develop p53-positive/triple-negative breast carcinomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Discrimination of prostate cancer from normal peripheral zone and central gland tissue by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbrecht, M.R.W.; Huisman, H.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jager, G.J.; Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la; Blickman, J.G.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate which parameters of dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T2 relaxation rate would result in optimal discrimination of prostatic carcinoma from normal peripheral zone (PZ) and central gland (CG) tissues and to correlate these parameters with tumor stage, Gleason score,

  6. A phase I pharmacokinetic and safety study of cabazitaxel in adult cancer patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaro, Analía; Rodón, Jordi; Machiels, Jean-Pascal; Rottey, Sylvie; Damian, Silvia; Baird, Richard; Garcia-Corbacho, Javier; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Clot, Pierre-François; Wack, Claudine; Shen, Liji; de Jonge, Maja J A

    2016-12-01

    Limited data are available on cabazitaxel pharmacokinetics in patients with renal impairment. This open-label, multicenter study assessed cabazitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumors and normal or impaired renal function. Cohorts A (normal renal function: creatinine clearance [CrCL] >80 mL/min/1.73 m2), B (moderate renal impairment: CrCL 30 to renal impairment: 40 and 15 mL/min/1.73 m2) versus a control (90 mL/min/1.73 m2). Overall, 25 patients received cabazitaxel (median cycles: 3 [range 1-20]; Cohort A: 5 [2-13]; Cohort B: 3 [1-15]; and Cohort C: 5 [1-20]), of which 24 were eligible for pharmacokinetic analysis (eight in each cohort). For moderate and severe renal impairment versus normal renal function, GMR estimates were: clearance normalized to body surface area (CL/BSA) 0.95 (90% CI 0.80-1.13) and 0.89 (0.61-1.32); area under the curve normalized to dose (AUC/dose) 1.06 (0.88-1.27) and 1.14 (0.76-1.71); and F U 0.99 (0.94-1.04) and 0.97 (0.87-1.09), respectively. Estimated slopes of linear regression of log parameters versus log CrCL (renal impairment) were: CL/BSA 0.06 (-0.15 to 0.28); AUC/dose -0.07 (-0.30 to 0.16); and F U 0.02 (-0.05 to 0.08). Cabazitaxel safety profile was consistent with previous reports. Renal impairment had no clinically meaningful effect on cabazitaxel pharmacokinetics.

  7. Micronuclei and other nuclear anomalies in normal human buccal mucosa cells of oral cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: a field effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, A; Metgud, R; Astekar, M; Tak, M

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated micronuclei and other nuclear anomalies in exfoliated epithelial cells of the oral cavity on the side opposite the lesion targeted by radiotherapy and correlated them with radiation doses. Buccal smears were obtained from oral cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy with a cumulative dose of at least 1000 rad for 3 weeks and from controls matched for age, gender and habits. The exfoliated cells from the mucosa were collected using a cytobrush; smears were prepared, fixed in 80% methanol and stained using the Feulgen plus fast green method. The mean number of micronuclei and other nuclear anomalies/1000 cells was significantly greater in patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment, but the differences were not significant compared to radiation doses. It appears that radiotherapy has a potent clastogenic effect on buccal mucosal cells of oral cancer patients.

  8. Elucidating the role of 17β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 14 in normal physiology and in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sivik, Tove

    2012-01-01

    Oestrogens play key roles in the development of the majority of breast tumours, a fact that has been exploited successfully in treating breast cancer with tamoxifen, which is a selective oestrogen receptor modulator. In post-menopausal women, oestrogens are synthesised in peripheral hormone-target tissues from adrenally derived precursors. Important in the peripheral fine-tuning of sex hormone levels are the 17β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17βHSDs). These enzymes catalyse the oxidation/red...

  9. Biological characteristics and genetic heterogeneity between carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and their paired normal fibroblasts in human breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongle Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The extensional signals in cross-talk between stromal cells and tumor cells generated from extracellular matrix molecules, soluble factor, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level in the tumor microenvironment. CAFs are the primary type of stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment and play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and development. Hitherto, there is hardly any systematic analysis of the intrinsic relationship between CAFs function and its abnormal signaling pathway. The extreme complexity of CAFs' features and their role in tumor development are needed to be further investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We primary cultured CAFs and NFs from early stages of breast cancer tissue and identified them using their biomarker by immunohistochemistry for Fibronectin, α-SMA and FAP. Microarray was applied to analyze gene expression profiles of human breast CAFs and the paired NFs. The Up-regulated genes classified by Gene Ontology, signal pathways enriched by DAVID pathway analysis. Abnormal signaling pathways in breast cancer CAFs are involved in cell cycle, cell adhesion, signal transduction and protein transport being reported in CAFs derived from other tumors. Significantly, the altered ATM signaling pathway, a set of cell cycle regulated signaling, and immune associated signaling are identified to be changed in CAFs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CAFs have the vigorous ability of proliferation and potential of invasion and migration comparing with NFs. CAFs could promote breast cancer cell invasion under co-culture conditions through up-regulated CCL18 and CXCL12. Consistently with its biologic behavior, the gene expression profiling analyzed by microarray shows that some of key signaling pathways, such as cell cycle, cell adhesion, and secreting factors play an important role in CAFs. The altered ATM signaling pathway is abnormally active in the early stage of breast cancer. The set

  10. A dielectrophoretic method of discrimination between normal oral epithelium, and oral and oropharyngeal cancer in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, K A; Mulhall, H J; Labeed, F H; Lewis, M P; Hoettges, K F; Kalavrezos, N; McCaul, J; Liew, C; Porter, S; Fedele, S; Hughes, M P

    2015-08-07

    Despite the accessibility of the oral cavity to clinical examination, delays in diagnosis of oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma (OOPC) are observed in a large majority of patients, with negative impact on prognosis. Diagnostic aids might help detection and improve early diagnosis, but there remains little robust evidence supporting the use of any particular diagnostic technology at the moment. The aim of the present feasibility first-in-human study was to evaluate the preliminary diagnostic validity of a novel technology platform based on dielectrophoresis (DEP). DEP does not require labeling with antibodies or stains and it is an ideal tool for rapid analysis of cell properties. Cells from OOPC/dysplasia tissue and healthy oral mucosa were collected from 57 study participants via minimally-invasive brush biopsies and tested with a prototype DEP platform using median membrane midpoint frequency as main analysis parameter. Results indicate that the current DEP platform can discriminate between brush biopsy samples from cancerous and healthy oral tissue with a diagnostic sensitivity of 81.6% and a specificity of 81.0%. The present ex vivo results support the potential application of DEP testing for identification of OOPC. This result indicates that DEP has the potential to be developed into a low-cost, rapid platform as an assistive tool for the early identification of oral cancer in primary care; given the rapid, minimally-invasive and non-expensive nature of the test, dielectric characterization represents a promising platform for cost-effective early cancer detection.

  11. Absolute Pitch Twin Study and Segregation Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Theusch, Elizabeth; Gitschier, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Absolute pitch is a rare pitch-naming ability with unknown etiology. Some scientists maintain that its manifestation depends solely on environmental factors, while others suggest that genetic factors contribute...

  12. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  13. No mutations of FGFR3 in normal urothelium in the vicinity of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder harbouring activating FGFR3 mutations in patients with bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Wolfgang; Denzinger, Stefan; Bertz, Simone; Gaumann, Andreas; Wild, Peter J; Hartmann, Arndt; Stoehr, Robert

    2009-11-01

    Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene causing constitutive oncogenic protein activation have been shown to be frequent in papillary noninvasive bladder tumours and are associated with a low risk of progression and a favourable outcome. FGFR3 alterations have also been found in benign urothelial papilloma and flat urothelial hyperplasia suggesting FGFR3 alterations as an early event in bladder tumorigenesis. To date there is no data available on FGFR3 mutations in normal urothelium from patients with bladder cancer. We therefore analysed 64 samples of histopathological unsuspicious normal urothelium from 38 patients with FGFR3 mutated bladder tumours and 15 samples of urothelium from patients (n = 15) without any urothelial malignancy as a control group. Urothelial cells were microdissected from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material. After DNA isolation whole genome amplification was done by I-PEP-PCR. FGFR3 mutations were detected using SNaPshot analysis. All samples could successfully be investigated. FGFR3 analyses did not reveal any mutation in the urothelium from neither the control group nor the bladder cancer group. All urothelial samples showed a wildtype sequence for FGFR3. These data suggest that mutations in the FGFR3 gene are not the earliest genetic alterations in bladder carcinogenesis and are associated with a hyperproliferative (hyperplastic) phenotype in the urothelium. Chromosomal alterations like deletions on chromosome 9q or aberrant promoter hypermethylation could play more important roles in early urothelial transformation than mutational FGFR3 activation. (c) 2009 UICC.

  14. [Damage effect of Polygonum multiflorum fractions on human normal liver cells L02 and liver cancer cells HepG2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruichen; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Zhenxiao; Deng, Qiaohong

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the damage effect of different fractions from Polygonum multiflorum on normal human liver and liver cancer cells, in order to seek for fractions that can obviously kill cancer cells but have less impact on normal liver cells, and make a preliminary study on different mechanism of the two kinds of cells. P. multiflorum water-eluted fraction (RW), 50% ethanol-eluted fraction (R50) and 95% ethanol-eluted fraction (R95) were successively obtained from 70% ethanol extracts of P. multiflorum, after being eluted by water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol and then absorbed by AB-8 macroporous resin. Normal human liver L02 cells and liver cancer HepG2 cells were incubated with cell supernatants from different fractions and cells. MTT method and inverted microscope were adopted to observe the impact of L02 on growth of HepG2 cells, screening fractions with damage effect and detect their doses and time effect. Giemsa stain showed changes in cell nucleus after administration and flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cycle and apoptosis of L02 cells. MTT method and inverted microscope showed that R50 had significant growth inhibition effects on L02 and HepG2 cells. According to giemsa stain and flow cytometry analysis, R50 showed different effect on inducing the two cells: there are much more apoptotic HepG2 cells than apoptotic L02 cells in each time phase (the proportion of the apoptosis cells in HepG2 group were 83.62%, 60.52% and 74.49%, and ID2 31.02%, 20.57% and 25.32% after treated with R50 for 24, 48, 72 h. Both cells showed less than 5% of apoptotic cells in the negative control group in each time phase). However, there is no significant impact on cycle of both cells. R50 from P. multiflorum extracts had different damage effects on human liver L02 cells and liver cancer HepG2 cells, which was caused by different degree of induction on apoptosis of the two cells in nature.

  15. Impact of Co-Culturing with Fractionated Carbon-Ion-Irradiated Cancer Cells on Bystander Normal Cells and Their Progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Liu, Cuihua; Konishi, Teruaki

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biological effects of fractionated doses versus a single dose of high-LET carbon ions in bystander normal cells, and determine the effect on their progeny using the layered tissue co-culture system. Briefly, confluent human glioblastoma (T98G) cells received a single dose of 6 Gy or three daily doses of 2 Gy carbon ions, which were then seeded on top of an insert with bystander normal skin fibroblasts (NB1RGB) growing underneath. Cells were co-cultured for 6 h or allowed to grow for 20 population doublings, then harvested and assayed for different end points. A single dose of carbon ions resulted in less damage in bystander normal NB1RGB cells than the fractionated doses. In contrast, the progeny of bystander NB1RGB cells co-cultured with T98G cells exposed to fractionated doses showed less damage than progeny from bystander cells co-cultured with single dose glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, inhibition of gap junction communication demonstrated its involvement in the stressful effects in bystander cells and their progeny. These results indicate that dose fractionation reduced the late effect of carbon-ion exposure in the progeny of bystander cells compared to the effect in the initial bystander cells.

  16. Conditionally reprogrammed normal and primary tumor prostate epithelial cells: a novel patient-derived cell model for studies of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, Olga A; Palechor-Ceron, Nancy; Li, Guanglei; Yuan, Hang; Krawczyk, Ewa; Zhong, Xiaogang; Liu, Geng; Upadhyay, Geeta; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Fang, Shuang; Choudhury, Sujata; Zhang, Xueping; Ju, Andrew; Lee, Myeong-Seon; Dan, Han C; Ji, Youngmi; Hou, Yong; Zheng, Yun-Ling; Albanese, Chris; Rhim, Johng; Schlegel, Richard; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Liu, Xuefeng

    2017-04-04

    Our previous study demonstrated that conditional reprogramming (CR) allows the establishment of patient-derived normal and tumor epithelial cell cultures from a variety of tissue types including breast, lung, colon and prostate. Using CR, we have established matched normal and tumor cultures, GUMC-29 and GUMC-30 respectively, from a patient's prostatectomy specimen. These CR cells proliferate indefinitely in vitro and retain stable karyotypes. Most importantly, only tumor-derived CR cells (GUMC-30) produced tumors in xenografted SCID mice, demonstrating maintenance of the critical tumor phenotype. Characterization of cells with DNA fingerprinting demonstrated identical patterns in normal and tumor CR cells as well as in xenografted tumors. By flow cytometry, both normal and tumor CR cells expressed basal, luminal, and stem cell markers, with the majority of the normal and tumor CR cells expressing prostate basal cell markers, CD44 and Trop2, as well as luminal marker, CD13, suggesting a transit-amplifying phenotype. Consistent with this phenotype, real time RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that CR cells predominantly expressed high levels of basal cell markers (KRT5, KRT14 and p63), and low levels of luminal markers. When the CR tumor cells were injected into SCID mice, the expression of luminal markers (AR, NKX3.1) increased significantly, while basal cell markers dramatically decreased. These data suggest that CR cells maintain high levels of proliferation and low levels of differentiation in the presence of feeder cells and ROCK inhibitor, but undergo differentiation once injected into SCID mice. Genomic analyses, including SNP and INDEL, identified genes mutated in tumor cells, including components of apoptosis, cell attachment, and hypoxia pathways. The use of matched patient-derived cells provides a unique in vitro model for studies of early prostate cancer.

  17. PI-RADS version 2: Preoperative role in the detection of normal-sized pelvic lymph node metastasis in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Yoon; Shin, Su-Jin; Jung, Dae Chul; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Oh, Young Taik

    2017-06-01

    To analyze whether Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADSv2) scores are associated with a risk of normal-sized pelvic lymph node metastasis (PLNM) in prostate cancer (PCa). A consecutive series of 221 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and radical prostatectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) for PCa were retrospectively analyzed under the approval of institutional review board in our institution. No patients had enlarged (≥0.8cm in short-axis diameter) lymph nodes. Clinical parameters [prostate-specific antigen (PSA), greatest percentage of biopsy core, and percentage of positive cores], and PI-RADSv2 score from two independent readers were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression and receiver operating-characteristic curve for PLNM. Diagnostic performance of PI-RADSv2 and Briganti nomogram was compared. Weighted kappa was investigated regarding PI-RADSv2 scoring. Normal-sized PLNM was found in 9.5% (21/221) of patients. In multivariate analysis, PI-RADSv2 (reader 1, p=0.009; reader 2, p=0.026) and PSA (reader 1, p=0.008; reader 2, p=0.037) were predictive of normal-sized PLNM. Threshold of PI-RADSv2 was a score of 5, where PI-RADSv2 was associated with high sensitivity (reader 1, 95.2% [20/21]; reader 2, 90.5% [19/21]) and negative predictive value (reader 1, 99.2% [124/125]; reader 2, 98.6% [136/138]). However, diagnostic performance of PI-RADSv2 (AUC=0.786-0.788) was significantly lower than that of Briganti nomogram (AUC=0.890) for normal-sized PLNM (pPI-RADSv2 of 5 or not (weighted kappa=0.804). PI-RADSv2 scores may be associated with the risk of normal-sized PLNM in PCa. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Replication and virus-induced transcriptome of HAdV-5 in normal host cells versus cancer cells--differences of relevance for adenoviral oncolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik E Dorer

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads, especially HAdV-5, have been genetically equipped with tumor-restricted replication potential to enable applications in oncolytic cancer therapy. Such oncolytic adenoviruses have been well tolerated in cancer patients, but their anti-tumor efficacy needs to be enhanced. In this regard, it should be considered that cancer cells, dependent on their tissue of origin, can differ substantially from the normal host cells to which Ads are adapted by complex virus-host interactions. Consequently, viral replication efficiency, a key determinant of oncolytic activity, might be suboptimal in cancer cells. Therefore, we have analyzed both the replication kinetics of HAdV-5 and the virus-induced transcriptome in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC in comparison to cancer cells. This is the first report on genome-wide expression profiling of Ads in their native host cells. We found that E1A expression and onset of viral genome replication are most rapid in HBEC and considerably delayed in melanoma cells. In squamous cell lung carcinoma cells, we observed intermediate HAdV-5 replication kinetics. Infectious particle production, viral spread and lytic activity of HAdV-5 were attenuated in melanoma cells versus HBEC. Expression profiling at the onset of viral genome replication revealed that HAdV-5 induced the strongest changes in the cellular transcriptome in HBEC, followed by lung cancer and melanoma cells. We identified prominent regulation of genes involved in cell cycle and DNA metabolism, replication and packaging in HBEC, which is in accord with the necessity to induce S phase for viral replication. Strikingly, in melanoma cells HAdV-5 triggered opposing regulation of said genes and, in contrast to lung cancer cells, no weak S phase induction was detected when using the E2F promoter as reporter. Our results provide a rationale for improving oncolytic adenoviruses either by adaptation of viral infection to target tumor cells or by

  19. High grade intraepithelial neoplasia of prostate is associated with values of prostate specific antigen related parameters intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obralic, Nermina; Kulovac, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is widely regarded as the precancerous. The aim of this study was to determine PSA related parameters in patients with initial PSA values 2-10 ng/mL and diagnosis of HGPIN without finding carcinoma at the time of their first needle biopsy. Study groups consisted of 100 men who were diagnosed HGPIN, 84 with cancer and 183 with benign hyperplasia on first biopsy of prostate. Total PSA and free PSA were measured and ratio free/total PSA and PSA density calculated. Mean values of these parameters were compared, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used for comparison of PSA related parameters to discriminate groups of patients.Total PSA, free PSA level and PSA density in patients with HGPIN (6.388 ng/mL) did not differ significantly compared to prostate carcinoma (6.976 ng/mL) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (6.07 ng/mL) patients. Patients with HGPIN had significantly higher ratio free/total PSA than those with prostate carcinoma (0.168 vs 0.133), but significantly lower than patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (0.168 vs 0.185). Ratio of free/total PSA significantly discriminate HGPIN from prostate carcinoma with sensitivity 84.52 and specify 45.00 at cut-off point of ≤ 0.18. Values of PSA, free PSA and ratio free/total PSA in cases of HGPIN appear to be intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels. Ratio of free/total PSA may help in decision to repeat biopsies in the presence of HGPIN on biopsy, without concomitant prostate cancer, in patients suitable for curative treatment, with normal digito-rectal examination and trans-rectal sonography.

  20. High grade intraepithelial neoplasia of prostate is associated with values of prostate specific antigen related parameters intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermina Obralic

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN is widely regarded as the precancerous. The aim of this study was to determine PSA related parameters in patients with initial PSA values 2-10 ng/mL and diagnosis of HGPIN without finding carcinoma at the time of their first needle biopsy. Study groups consisted of 100 men who were diagnosed HGPIN, 84 with cancer and 183 with benign hyperplasia on first biopsy of prostate. Total PSA and free PSA were measured and ratio free/total PSA and PSA density calculated. Mean values of these parameters were compared, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used for comparison of PSA related parameters to discriminate groups of patients. Total PSA, free PSA level and PSA density in patients with HGPIN (6.388 ng/mL did not differ significantly compared to prostate carcinoma (6.976 ng/mL or benign prostatic hyperplasia (6.07 ng/mL patients. Patients with HGPIN had significantly higher ratio free/total PSA than those with prostate carcinoma (0.168 vs 0.133, but significantly lower than patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (0.168 vs 0.185. Ratio of free/total PSA significantly discriminate HGPIN from prostate carcinoma with sensitivity 84.52 and specify 45.00 at cut-off point of ≤ 0.18. Values of PSA, free PSA and ratio free/total PSA in cases of HGPIN appear to be intermediate between prostate cancer and normal levels. Ratio of free/total PSA may help in decision to repeat biopsies in the presence of HGPIN on biopsy, without concomitant prostate cancer, in patients suitable for curative treatment, with normal digito-rectal examination and trans-rectal sonography.

  1. Hidden treasures in "ancient" microarrays: gene-expression portrays biology and potential resistance pathways of major lung cancer subtypes and normal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkentzes, Konstantinos; Lagani, Vincenzo; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Vyberg, Mogens; Røe, Oluf Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    Novel statistical methods and increasingly more accurate gene annotations can transform "old" biological data into a renewed source of knowledge with potential clinical relevance. Here, we provide an in silico proof-of-concept by extracting novel information from a high-quality mRNA expression dataset, originally published in 2001, using state-of-the-art bioinformatics approaches. The dataset consists of histologically defined cases of lung adenocarcinoma (AD), squamous (SQ) cell carcinoma, small-cell lung cancer, carcinoid, metastasis (breast and colon AD), and normal lung specimens (203 samples in total). A battery of statistical tests was used for identifying differential gene expressions, diagnostic and prognostic genes, enriched gene ontologies, and signaling pathways. Our results showed that gene expressions faithfully recapitulate immunohistochemical subtype markers, as chromogranin A in carcinoids, cytokeratin 5, p63 in SQ, and TTF1 in non-squamous types. Moreover, biological information with putative clinical relevance was revealed as potentially novel diagnostic genes for each subtype with specificity 93-100% (AUC = 0.93-1.00). Cancer subtypes were characterized by (a) differential expression of treatment target genes as TYMS, HER2, and HER3 and (b) overrepresentation of treatment-related pathways like cell cycle, DNA repair, and ERBB pathways. The vascular smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, and actin cytoskeleton pathways were overexpressed in normal tissue. Reanalysis of this public dataset displayed the known biological features of lung cancer subtypes and revealed novel pathways of potentially clinical importance. The findings also support our hypothesis that even old omics data of high quality can be a source of significant biological information when appropriate bioinformatics methods are used.

  2. Hidden Treasures in “Ancient” Microarrays: Gene-Expression Portrays Biology and Potential Resistance Pathways of Major Lung Cancer Subtypes and Normal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkentzes, Konstantinos; Lagani, Vincenzo; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Vyberg, Mogens; Røe, Oluf Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Novel statistical methods and increasingly more accurate gene annotations can transform “old” biological data into a renewed source of knowledge with potential clinical relevance. Here, we provide an in silico proof-of-concept by extracting novel information from a high-quality mRNA expression dataset, originally published in 2001, using state-of-the-art bioinformatics approaches. Methods: The dataset consists of histologically defined cases of lung adenocarcinoma (AD), squamous (SQ) cell carcinoma, small-cell lung cancer, carcinoid, metastasis (breast and colon AD), and normal lung specimens (203 samples in total). A battery of statistical tests was used for identifying differential gene expressions, diagnostic and prognostic genes, enriched gene ontologies, and signaling pathways. Results: Our results showed that gene expressions faithfully recapitulate immunohistochemical subtype markers, as chromogranin A in carcinoids, cytokeratin 5, p63 in SQ, and TTF1 in non-squamous types. Moreover, biological information with putative clinical relevance was revealed as potentially novel diagnostic genes for each subtype with specificity 93–100% (AUC = 0.93–1.00). Cancer subtypes were characterized by (a) differential expression of treatment target genes as TYMS, HER2, and HER3 and (b) overrepresentation of treatment-related pathways like cell cycle, DNA repair, and ERBB pathways. The vascular smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, and actin cytoskeleton pathways were overexpressed in normal tissue. Conclusion: Reanalysis of this public dataset displayed the known biological features of lung cancer subtypes and revealed novel pathways of potentially clinical importance. The findings also support our hypothesis that even old omics data of high quality can be a source of significant biological information when appropriate bioinformatics methods are used. PMID:25325012

  3. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Ma, M; Nan, X; Sheng, B

    2016-07-11

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC)] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on self-report including demographics, weight, height, and WC (>90 cm=obese). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and prostate volume (PV) were assessed clinically. Patients were grouped by BMI (normal=22.9, overweight=23-27.4, obese≥27.5 kg/m2). PSA parameters of density (PSAD), PSA serum level, and PSA increasing rate per year (PSAR) were calculated per BMI and age groups (30-40, 41-59, 60-85 years). Obesity indicators (BMI and WC) and PSA parameter relationships were modeled by age-stratified linear regression. Of 35,632 Chinese men surveyed, 13,084 were analyzed, including 13.44% obese, 57.44% overweight, and 29.12% normal weight, according to BMI; 25.84% were centrally (abdominally) obese according to WC. BMI and WC were negatively associated with all PSA parameters, except PSAD and PSAR [Pobesity was associated with lower PSA in Chinese men. Therefore, an individual's BMI and WC should be considered when PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer.

  4. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (WC] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on self-report including demographics, weight, height, and WC (>90 cm=obese. Fasting blood glucose (FBG and prostate volume (PV were assessed clinically. Patients were grouped by BMI (normal=22.9, overweight=23-27.4, obese≥27.5 kg/m2. PSA parameters of density (PSAD, PSA serum level, and PSA increasing rate per year (PSAR were calculated per BMI and age groups (30-40, 41-59, 60-85 years. Obesity indicators (BMI and WC and PSA parameter relationships were modeled by age-stratified linear regression. Of 35,632 Chinese men surveyed, 13,084 were analyzed, including 13.44% obese, 57.44% overweight, and 29.12% normal weight, according to BMI; 25.84% were centrally (abdominally obese according to WC. BMI and WC were negatively associated with all PSA parameters, except PSAD and PSAR [P<0.05, BMI: β=-0.081 (95%CI=-0.055 to -0.036, WC: β=-0.101 (-0.021 to -0.015], and independent of FBG and PV (P<0.05 in an age-adjusted model. In conclusion, obesity was associated with lower PSA in Chinese men. Therefore, an individual's BMI and WC should be considered when PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer.

  5. To clip or not to clip the breast tumor bed? A retrospective look at the geographic miss index and normal tissue index of 110 patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Florian; de Gregorio, Nikolaus; Rempen, Andreas; Mohr, Peter; de Gregorio, Amelie; Wöckel, Achim; Janni, Wolfgang; Witucki, Gerlo

    2017-06-01

    Planning of breast radiation for patients with breast conserving surgery often relies on clinical markers such as scars. Lately, surgical clips have been used to identify the tumor location. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the geographic miss index (GMI) and the normal tissue index (NTI) for the electron boost in breast cancer treatment plans with and without surgical clips. A retrospective descriptive study of 110 consecutive post-surgical patients who underwent breast-conserving treatment in early breast cancer, in which the clinical treatment field with the radiologic (clipped) field were compared and GMI/NTI for the electron boost were calculated respectively. The average clinical field was 100 mm (range, 100-120 mm) and the clipped field was 90 mm (range, 80-100 mm). The average GMI was 11.3% (range, 0-44%), and the average NTI was 27.5% (range, 0-54%). The GMI and NTI were reduced through the use of intra-surgically placed clips. The impact of local tumor control on the survival of patients with breast cancer is also influenced by the precision of radiotherapy. Additionally, patients demand an appealing cosmetic result. This makes "clinical" markers such as scars unreliable for radiotherapy planning. A simple way of identifying the tissue at risk is by intra-surgical clipping of the tumor bed. Our results show that the use of surgical clips can reduce the diameter of the radiotherapy field and increase the accuracy of radiotherapy planning. With the placement of surgical clips, more tissue at risk is included in the radiotherapy field. Less normal tissue receives radiotherapy with the use of surgical clips.

  6. Evaluations of thyme extract effects in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cell lines and in human lung cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Marinelli; Romilde, Iannarelli; Beatrice, Morelli Maria; Matteo, Valisi; Giovanna, Nicotra; Consuelo, Amantini; Claudio, Cardinali; Giorgio, Santoni; Filippo, Maggi; Massimo, Nabissi

    2016-08-25

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is used traditionally to prepare herbal remedies possessing expectorant, mucolytic, antitussive and antispasmodic properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a standardized hydroalcoholic extract of thyme on primary human airway (bronchial/tracheal) epithelial cell lines in a model of lung inflammation induced by LPS. In addition, the effects of thyme extract on human lung cancer cell line (H460) were analysed. Thyme extract showed significant anti-inflammatory properties by reducing the NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 transcription factors protein levels followed by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta and IL-8), and Muc5ac secretion in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cells. Moreover, the extract showed cytotoxic effects on H460 cancer cells, modulated the release of IL-1 beta, IL-8 and down-regulated NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 proteins. Taken together, these results substantiated the traditional uses of thyme in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Thyme extract might be an effective treatment of chronic diseases based on inflammatory processes when hypersecretion of mucus overwhelms the ciliary clearance and obstructs airways, causing morbidity and mortality. Moreover thyme extract, evaluated in H460 lung cancer cell line, demonstrated to induce cell cytotoxicity in addition to reduce inflammatory cell signals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Normalizing GDNF expression in the spinal cord alleviates cutaneous hyperalgesia but not ongoing pain in a rat model of bone cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhuofeng; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Zou, Wangyuan; Guo, Qulian; Huang, Changsheng; Liu, Chang; Zhong, Tao; Zhang, Jun-Ming; Song, Zongbin

    2017-01-15

    Bone cancer pain (BCP) is the most common complication in patients with bone cancer. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is believed to be involved in chronic pain conditions. In this article, the expression and roles of GDNF were studied in a rat model of BCP induced by tibia injection of Walker 256 rat mammary gland carcinoma cells. Significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and ongoing pain were observed beginning as early as day 5 post injection. The expression level of GDNF protein examined on day 16 after tibia injection was decreased in the L3 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and lumbar spinal cord, but not in other spinal levels or the anterior cingulate cortex. Phosphorylation of Ret, the receptor for GDNF family ligands, was also decreased. Furthermore, normalizing GDNF expression with lentiviral vector constructs in the spinal cord significantly reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, spinal glial activation, and pERK induction induced by tibia injection, but did not affect ongoing pain. Together these findings provide new evidence for the use of GDNF as a therapeutic treatment for bone cancer pain states. © 2016 UICC.

  8. Therapeutic Nanoparticles Based on Curcumin and Bamboo Charcoal Nanoparticles for Chemo-Photothermal Synergistic Treatment of Cancer and Radioprotection of Normal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiani; Yong, Yuan; Dong, Xinghua; Du, Jiangfeng; Guo, Zhao; Gong, Linji; Zhu, Shuang; Tian, Gan; Yu, Shicang; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2017-04-26

    Low water solubility, extensive metabolism, and drug resistance are the existing unavoidable disadvantages of the insoluble drug curcumin in biomedical applications. Herein, we employed d-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS)-functionalized near-infrared (NIR)-triggered photothermal mesoporous nanocarriers with bamboo charcoal nanoparticles (TPGS-BCNPs) to load and deliver curcumin for improving its bioavailability. This system could considerably increase the accumulation of curcumin in cancer cells for enhanced curcumin bioavailability via simultaneously promoting the cellular internalization of the as-synthesized composite (TPGS-BCNPs@curcumin) by the size effect of NPs and considerably triggering controlled curcumin release from TPGS-BCNPs@curcumin by NIR stimulation and reducing efflux of curcumin by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibition of TPGS, so as to enhance the therapeutic effect of curcumin and realize a better chemo-photothermal synergetic therapy in vitro and in vivo. Besides cancer therapy, studies indicated that curcumin and some carbon materials could be used as radical scavengers that play an important role in the radioprotection of normal cells. Hence, we also investigated the free-radical-scavenging ability of the TPGS-BCNPs@curcumin composite in vitro to preliminarily evaluate its radioprotection ability for healthy tissues. Therefore, our work provides a multifunctional delivery system for curcumin bioavailability enhancement, chemo-photothermal synergetic therapy of cancer, and radioprotection of healthy tissues.

  9. Current insights into functions of phospholipase A2 receptor in normal and cancer cells: More questions than answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukocheva, Olga; Menschikowski, Mario; Hagelgans, Albert; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Siegert, Gabriele; Reddanna, Pallu; Bishayee, Anupam

    2017-11-02

    Lipid signaling network was proposed as a potential target for cancer prevention and treatment. Several recent studies revealed that phospholipid metabolising enzyme, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), is a critical regulator of cancer accelerating pathologies and apoptosis in several types of cancers. In addition to functioning as an enzyme, PLA2 can activate a phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1) in plasma membrane. While the list of PLA2 targets extends to glucose homeostasis, intracellular energy balance, adipocyte development, and hepatic lipogenesis, the PLA2R1 downstream effectors are few and scarcely investigated. Among the most addressed PLA2R1 effects are regulation of pro-inflammatory signaling, autoimmunity, apoptosis, and senescence. Localized in glomeruli podocytes, the receptor can be identified by circulating anti-PLA2R1 autoantibodies leading to development of membranous nephropathy, a strong autoimmune inflammatory cascade. PLA2R1 was shown to induce activation of Janus-kinase 2 (JAK2) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα)-controlled mitochondrial proteins, as well as increasing the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, thus leading to apoptosis and senescence. These findings indicate the potential role of PLA2R1 as tumor suppressor. Epigenetic investigations addressed the role of DNA methylation, histone modifications, and specific microRNAs in the regulation of PLA2R1 expression. However, involvement of PLA2R1 in suppression of malignant growth and metastasis remains controversial. In this review, we summarize the recent findings that highlight the role of PLA2R1 in the regulation of carcinogenesis-related intracellular signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Normalizing microbiota-induced retinoic acid deficiency stimulates protective CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunity in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R.; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A.; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E.; Krois, Charles R.; Kenkel, Justin A.; Pham, Tho D.; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Although all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA...

  11. Relative versus absolute risk of comorbidities in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammed D; Kesty, Chelsea; Feldman, Steven R

    2017-03-01

    Psoriasis is associated with numerous comorbidities, often reported in terms of relative risk. Both doctors and the general population tend to overestimate the effects of exposures when presented in relative terms, leading to anxiety and potentially poor treatment decisions. Absolute risks might provide a better basis for risk assessment. To characterize and compare relative and absolute risks of comorbidities in patients with psoriasis. A systematic review using Medline identified comorbidities associated with psoriasis, their relative risks, and information for calculating absolute risks. The comorbidities associated with psoriasis with the highest relative risk were nonmelanoma skin cancer, melanoma, and lymphoma, with relative risks of 7.5, 6.12, and 3.61, respectively; the attributable risk for these 3 conditions were 0.64, 0.05, and 0.17 per 1000 person-years, respectively. To attribute 1 event of these conditions to psoriasis would require seeing 1551; 20,135; and 5823 patients, respectively. Database studies might not fully account for confounders, resulting in overestimates of the risk impact of comorbidities. Presenting attributable risk in the form of the number needed to harm provides a clearer picture of the magnitude of risk and a basis for wiser medical decision making and patient education. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Keratin 8/18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal versus cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulation of hexokinase status and insulin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Jasmin; Loranger, Anne; Gilbert, Stéphane [Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l' Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec), 9 McMahon, Québec, Qc, Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada); Faure, Robert [Département de Pédiatrie, Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (Centre Mère-Enfant), Québec, Qc, Canada G1V 4G2 (Canada); Marceau, Normand, E-mail: normand.marceau@crhdq.ulaval.ca [Centre de recherche en cancérologie de l' Université Laval and Centre de recherche du CHUQ (L' Hôtel-Dieu de Québec), 9 McMahon, Québec, Qc, Canada G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2013-02-15

    As differentiated cells, hepatocytes primarily metabolize glucose for ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation of glycolytic pyruvate, whereas proliferative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells undergo a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis despite oxygen availability. Keratins, the intermediate filament (IF) proteins of epithelial cells, are expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatocyte and HCC (hepatoma) cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18), thus providing models of choice to address K8/K18 IF functions in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. Here, we demonstrate distinctive increases in glucose uptake, glucose-6-phosphate formation, lactate release, and glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatocytes and/or hepatoma cells versus their respective IF-containing counterparts. We also show that the K8/K18-dependent glucose uptake/G6P formation is linked to alterations in hexokinase I/II/IV content and localization at mitochondria, with little effect on GLUT1 status. In addition, we find that the insulin-stimulated glycogen formation in normal hepatocytes involves the main PI-3 kinase-dependent signaling pathway and that the K8/K18 IF loss makes them more efficient glycogen producers. In comparison, the higher insulin-dependent glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatoma cells is associated with a signaling occurring through a mTOR-dependent pathway, along with an augmentation in cell proliferative activity. Together, the results uncover a key K8/K18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal and cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulations of mitochondrial HK status and insulin-mediated signaling.

  13. Clarifying Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Confusion exists among database textbooks as to the goal of normalization as well as to which normal form a designer should aspire. This article discusses such discrepancies with the intention of simplifying normalization for both teacher and student. This author's industry and classroom experiences indicate such simplification yields quicker…

  14. Expression and effects of modulation of the K2P potassium channels TREK-1 (KCNK2) and TREK-2 (KCNK10) in the normal human ovary and epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innamaa, A; Jackson, L; Asher, V; van Schalkwyk, G; Warren, A; Keightley, A; Hay, D; Bali, A; Sowter, H; Khan, R

    2013-11-01

    Aberrant expression of potassium (K(+)) channels contributes to cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis, and K(+) channel blockers can inhibit cell proliferation. TREK-1 and -2 belong to the two-pore domain (K2P) superfamily. We report TREK-1 and -2 expression in ovarian cancer and normal ovaries, and the effects of TREK-1 modulators on cell proliferation and apoptosis. The cellular localisation of TREK-1 and -2 was investigated by immunofluorescence in SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cell lines and in cultured ovarian surface epithelium and cancer. Channel expression in normal ovaries and cancer was quantified by western blotting. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the association between channel expression and disease prognosis, stage, and grade. TREK-1 modulation of cell proliferation in the cell lines was investigated with the MTS-assay and the effect on apoptosis determined using flow cytometry. Expression was identified in both cell lines, ovarian cancer (n = 22) and normal ovaries (n = 6). IHC demonstrated positive staining for TREK-1 and -2 in 95.7 % of tumours (n = 69) and 100 % of normal ovaries (n = 9). A reduction in cell proliferation (P TREK-1 modulating agents. Curcumin caused a significant reduction in early apoptosis in SKOV-3 (P TREK-1 and -2 are expressed in normal ovaries and ovarian cancer. TREK-1 modulators have a significant effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. We propose investigation of the therapeutic potential of TREK-1 blockers is warranted.

  15. Diatom-derived polyunsaturated aldehydes activate cell death in human cancer cell lines but not normal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementina Sansone

    Full Text Available Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD, 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1 and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP. The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms.

  16. A global algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. McDougall

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater – 2010 has defined the thermodynamic properties of seawater in terms of a new salinity variable, Absolute Salinity, which takes into account the spatial variation of the composition of seawater. Absolute Salinity more accurately reflects the effects of the dissolved material in seawater on the thermodynamic properties (particularly density than does Practical Salinity.

    When a seawater sample has standard composition (i.e. the ratios of the constituents of sea salt are the same as those of surface water of the North Atlantic, Practical Salinity can be used to accurately evaluate the thermodynamic properties of seawater. When seawater is not of standard composition, Practical Salinity alone is not sufficient and the Absolute Salinity Anomaly needs to be estimated; this anomaly is as large as 0.025 g kg−1 in the northernmost North Pacific. Here we provide an algorithm for estimating Absolute Salinity Anomaly for any location (x, y, p in the world ocean.

    To develop this algorithm, we used the Absolute Salinity Anomaly that is found by comparing the density calculated from Practical Salinity to the density measured in the laboratory. These estimates of Absolute Salinity Anomaly however are limited to the number of available observations (namely 811. In order to provide a practical method that can be used at any location in the world ocean, we take advantage of approximate relationships between Absolute Salinity Anomaly and silicate concentrations (which are available globally.

  17. A comparison of mantle versus involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: reduction in normal tissue dose and second cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tony

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL survivors who undergo radiotherapy experience increased risks of second cancers (SC and cardiac sequelae. To reduce such risks, extended-field radiotherapy (RT for HL has largely been replaced by involved field radiotherapy (IFRT. While it has generally been assumed that IFRT will reduce SC risks, there are few data that quantify the reduction in dose to normal tissues associated with modern RT practice for patients with mediastinal HL, and no estimates of the expected reduction in SC risk. Methods Organ-specific dose-volume histograms (DVH were generated for 41 patients receiving 35 Gy mantle RT, 35 Gy IFRT, or 20 Gy IFRT, and integrated organ mean doses were compared for the three protocols. Organ-specific SC risk estimates were estimated using a dosimetric risk-modeling approach, analyzing DVH data with quantitative, mechanistic models of radiation-induced cancer. Results Dose reductions resulted in corresponding reductions in predicted excess relative risks (ERR for SC induction. Moving from 35 Gy mantle RT to 35 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERR for female breast and lung cancer by approximately 65%, and for male lung cancer by approximately 35%; moving from 35 Gy IFRT to 20 Gy IFRT reduces predicted ERRs approximately 40% more. The median reduction in integral dose to the whole heart with the transition to 35 Gy IFRT was 35%, with a smaller (2% reduction in dose to proximal coronary arteries. There was no significant reduction in thyroid dose. Conclusion The significant decreases estimated for radiation-induced SC risks associated with modern IFRT provide strong support for the use of IFRT to reduce the late effects of treatment. The approach employed here can provide new insight into the risks associated with contemporary IFRT for HL, and may facilitate the counseling of patients regarding the risks associated with this treatment.

  18. Normalized lmQCM: An Algorithm for Detecting Weak Quasi-Cliques in Weighted Graph with Applications in Gene Co-Expression Module Discovery in Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Huang, Kun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for mining weighted networks to identify densely connected modules such as quasi-cliques. Quasi-cliques are densely connected subnetworks in a network. Detecting quasi-cliques is an important topic in data mining, with applications such as social network study and biomedicine. Our approach has two major improvements upon previous work. The first is the use of local maximum edges to initialize the search in order to avoid excessive overlaps among the modules, thereby greatly reducing the computing time. The second is the inclusion of a weight normalization procedure to enable discovery of "subtle" modules with more balanced sizes. We carried out careful tests on multiple parameters and settings using two large cancer datasets. This approach allowed us to identify a large number of gene modules enriched in both biological functions and chromosomal bands in cancer data, suggesting potential roles of copy number variations (CNVs) involved in the cancer development. We then tested the genes in selected modules with enriched chromosomal bands using The Cancer Genome Atlas data, and the results strongly support our hypothesis that the coexpression in these modules are associated with CNVs. While gene coexpression network analyses have been widely adopted in disease studies, most of them focus on the functional relationships of coexpressed genes. The relationship between coexpression gene modules and CNVs are much less investigated despite the potential advantage that we can infer from such relationship without genotyping data. Our new approach thus provides a means to carry out deep mining of the gene coexpression network to obtain both functional and genetic information from the expression data.

  19. Maytenus ilicifolia dry extract protects normal cells, induces apoptosis and regulates Bcl-2 in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes de; Oliveira, Ana Luiza Cabral de Sá Leitão; Pessoa, Jonas Bispo; Garcia, Vinícios Barreto; Guerra, Gerlane Coelho Bernardo; Soares, Luiz Alberto Lira; Souza, Tatiane Pereira de; Petrovick, Pedro Ros; Araújo, Aurigena Antunes de

    2013-11-01

    Maytenus is the largest genus of the family Celastraceae and the species Maytenus ilicifolia (popularly known as 'Espinheira Santa'). It is widely used in traditional Brazilian medicine to treat stomach conditions including nausea, gastritis, and ulcers. In this study, the apoptotic effects of a spray-dried extract of M. ilicifolia (SDEMI) was evaluated using human hepatocellular cells (HepG2), colorectal carcinoma cells (HT-29), and normal keratinocytes (HaCaT). Cells were treated with SDEMI for 4 and 24 h, then were assayed for levels of apoptosis, caspase-3, and Bcl-2 by flow cytometry, immunostaining, and Western blot, respectively. Significant differences between groups were determined using analysis of variance (P < 0.05). For HepG2 and HT-29 cells treated with SDEMI, various cytotoxic effects were observed compared with control cells at all timepoints assayed (P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive caspase-3 staining and down-regulation of Bcl-2 were observed, consistent with the induction of cell death detected in these cell lines. In contrast, treatment of HaCaT cells with SDEMI was associated with a protective effect compared with control cells at both timepoints (P < 0.001). For example, increased expression of Bcl-2 and negative caspase-3 staining were detected. Taken together, these results suggest that SDEMI protects normal cells, while SDEMI mediates induction of apoptosis via down-regulation of Bcl-2 and involvement of caspase-3 in human carcinoma cells.

  20. 3D-conformal-intensity modulated radiotherapy with compensators for head and neck cancer: clinical results of normal tissue sparing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koscielny Sven

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the potential of parotic gland sparing of intensity modulated radiotherapy (3D-c-IMRT performed with metallic compensators for head and neck cancer in a clinical series by analysis of dose distributions and clinical measures. Materials and methods 39 patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck irradiated using 3D-c-IMRT were evaluable for dose distribution within PTVs and at one parotid gland and 38 patients for toxicity analysis. 10 patients were treated primarily, 29 postoperatively, 19 received concomittant cis-platin based chemotherapy, 20 3D-c-IMRT alone. Initially the dose distribution was calculated with Helax ® and photon fluence was modulated using metallic compensators made of tin-granulate (n = 22. Later the dose distribution was calculated with KonRad ® and fluence was modified by MCP 96 alloy compensators (n = 17. Gross tumor/tumor bed (PTV 1 was irradiated up to 60–70 Gy, [5 fractions/week, single fraction dose: 2.0–2.2 (simultaneously integrated boost], adjuvantly irradiated bilateral cervical lymph nodes (PTV 2 with 48–54 Gy [single dose: 1.5–1.8]. Toxicity was scored according the RTOG scale and patient-reported xerostomia questionnaire (XQ. Results Mean of the median doses at the parotid glands to be spared was 25.9 (16.3–46.8 Gy, for tin graulate 26 Gy, for MCP alloy 24.2 Gy. Tin-granulate compensators resulted in a median parotid dose above 26 Gy in 10/22, MCP 96 alloy in 0/17 patients. Following acute toxicities were seen (°0–2/3: xerostomia: 87%/13%, dysphagia: 84%/16%, mucositis: 89%/11%, dermatitis: 100%/0%. No grade 4 reaction was encountered. During therapy the XQ forms showed °0–2/3: 88%/12%. 6 months postRT chronic xerostomia °0–2/3 was observed in 85%/15% of patients, none with °4 xerostomia. Conclusion 3D-c-IMRT using metallic compensators along with inverse calculation algorithm achieves sufficient parotid gland sparing in virtually all advanced

  1. Background Parenchymal Enhancement of the Contralateral Normal Breast: Association with Tumor Response in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Hor Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study investigated the association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE and pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC. METHODS: A total of 46 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer were analyzed. Each patient had three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies, one pre-treatment and two follow-up (F/U MRI studies. BPE was measured as the averaged enhancement of the whole fibroglandular tissues. The pre-treatment BPE and the changes in the F/U MRI were compared between patients achieving pathologic complete response (pCR versus those not. Subgroup analyses based on age, estrogen receptor (ER, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 status of their cancers were also performed. RESULTS: The pre-treatment BPE was higher in the pCR group than that in the non-pCR group. Compared to baseline, BPE at F/U-1 was significantly decreased in the pCR group but not in the non-pCR group. In subgroup analysis based on age, these results were seen only in the younger group (<55 years old, not in the older group (≥55 years old. Older patients had a significantly lower pre-treatment BPE than younger patients. In analysis based on molecular biomarkers, a significantly decreased BPE at F/U-1 was only found in the ER-negative pCR group but not in the non-pCR, nor in the ER-positive groups. CONCLUSIONS: A higher pre-treatment BPE showing a significant decrease early after starting NAC was related to pCR in pre/peri-menopausal patients.

  2. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 02: Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, J [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Unit, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; El Naqa, I [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Unit, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC Canada (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability has recently been shown to have a genetic component. This genetic component may play a key role in explaining the fluctuating rates of radiation-induced toxicities (RITs). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have thus far yielded inconsistent results in delineating RITs while copy number variations (CNVs) have not yet been investigated for such purposes. We explore a radiogenomic modeling approach to investigate the association of CNVs and SNPs, along with clinical and dosimetric variables, in radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) in prostate cancer patients treated with curative hypofractionated irradiation. A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) between 2002 to 2010 were retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs5489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Late toxicity rates for RB grade 2 and 3 and grade 3 alone were 29.0% and 12.9%, respectively. ED toxicity was found to be 62.9%. Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) and resampling by cross-validation. Binary variables were evaluated using Chi-squared contingency table analysis and multivariate models by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ{sup 2}=14.6, p<0.001 and ED: χ{sup 2}=4.88, p=0.0272) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ{sup 2}=0.278, p=0.599 and ED: χ{sup 2}=0.112, p=0.732). Radiogenomic modeling yielded significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (AUC=0.665) and ED (AUC=0.754). These results indicate that CNVs may be potential predictive biomarkers of both late ED and RB.

  3. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  4. Absolute Humidity and Pandemic Versus Epidemic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Goldstein, Edward; Lipsitch, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiologic evidence indicates that variations of absolute humidity account for the onset and seasonal cycle of epidemic influenza in temperate regions. A role for absolute humidity in the transmission of pandemic influenza, such as 2009 A/H1N1, has yet to be demonstrated and, indeed, outbreaks of pandemic influenza during more humid spring, summer, and autumn months might appear to constitute evidence against an effect of humidity. However, here the authors show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions, as well as wintertime transmission of epidemic influenza. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility, and changes in population-mixing and contact rates. PMID:21081646

  5. The differences in ultrasound and clinicopathological features between basal-like and normal-like subtypes of triple negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyao Li

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the ultrasound features and clinicopathological characteristics of basal-like subtype of triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs.This study was approved by the ethical board of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University. The patients' clinicopathological information was available. The ultrasound features of 62 tumors from 62 TNBC patients were interpreted. The immunohistochemical results of cytokertain5/6 (CK5/6 and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR were used to classify the tumor into basal-like and normal-like groups. The association of the ultrasound features interpreted by experienced ultrasound doctors with the immunohistochemical classification was studied.Of the 62 TNBC cases, 42 (67.7% exhibited the basal-like phenotype and 20 (32.3% exhibited the normal-like phenotype based on the immunohistochemical CK5/6 and EGFR markers. Of all the tumors, 90.3% were invasive carcinomas. The basal-like tumors were significantly associated with a maximum diameter on ultrasound of more than 20 mm (36, 85.7% (P = 0.0014. The normal-like tumors usually exhibited lateral shadows (15, 75% (P = 0.0115 as well as microlobulated margins (12, 60% (P = 0.0204 compared to the basal-like subtype. Other ultrasound features showed no significant differences between the two groups.Although ultrasound cannot yet be used to differentiate between the basal-like subtype and normal-like subtype of TNBC, ultrasound can be used to provide some useful information to the clinicians.

  6. [Radiolabelling of a lung cancer-targeting small molecule polypeptide with (131)I and its radioactivity distribution in normal rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenli; Li, Guiping; Huang, Baodan; DU, Li; Huang, Kai

    2014-08-01

    To establish a labeling method for a specific lung cancer-targeting small molecule peptide cNGQGEQc with ¹³¹I and observe the radioactivity distribution of the labeled peptide in rabbits using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Chloramine-T method was used for ¹³¹I labeling of the tyrosine amino group on cNGQGEQc, and the labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity of ¹³¹I-cNGQGEQc were determined with paper chromatography. The stability of ¹³¹I-cNGQGEQc in saline and human serum was assessed after incubation in water bath at 37 degrees celsius; for 24 h. The octanol-water partition coefficient lg P (the radioactivity counting ratio of ¹³¹I-cNGQGEQc dissolved in 100 µl octanol or in 100 µl saline) was calculated. SPECT was performed in 3 male New Zealand white rabbits after intravenous injection of ¹³¹I-cNGQGEQc to observe the dynamic distribution of the peptide with the time-radioactivity curve (T-A curve) of the region of interest (ROI). With a labeling efficiency of 90%, ¹³¹I-cNGQGEQc showed a radiochemical purity of was 95% after purification with HPLC. The radiochemical purity of ¹³¹I-cNGQGEQc was (93.12 ± 1.18)% and (88.34 ± 5.43)% after intubation in saline and human serum for 24 h, respectively. The octanol-water partition coefficient lg P of ¹³¹I-cNGQGEQc was -1.75, suggesting its hydrosolubility. In rabbits with intravenous injection of ¹³¹I-cNGQGEQc, SPECT visualized the kidneys at 1 min after the injection; the imaging of the heart and liver became attenuated at 5 min when the bladder was visualized with an increasing radioactivity. The radioactivity of the soft tissues began to fade at 30 min. No gallbladder visualization was detected, and the radioactivity of the abdomen remained low. No obvious radioactivity concentration was observed in the thyroid and stomach. The T-A curves of the ROI of all the tissues and organs descended over time. Radiolabeling of cNGQGEQc with ¹³¹I is simple and highly

  7. Normalizing Microbiota-Induced Retinoic Acid Deficiency Stimulates Protective CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Immunity in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Nupur; Yuan, Robert; Prestwood, Tyler R; Penny, Hweixian Leong; DiMaio, Michael A; Reticker-Flynn, Nathan E; Krois, Charles R; Kenkel, Justin A; Pham, Tho D; Carmi, Yaron; Tolentino, Lorna; Choi, Okmi; Hulett, Reyna; Wang, Jinshan; Winer, Daniel A; Napoli, Joseph L; Engleman, Edgar G

    2016-09-20

    Although all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is a key regulator of intestinal immunity, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. We found that mice with colitis-associated CRC had a marked deficiency in colonic atRA due to alterations in atRA metabolism mediated by microbiota-induced intestinal inflammation. Human ulcerative colitis (UC), UC-associated CRC, and sporadic CRC specimens have similar alterations in atRA metabolic enzymes, consistent with reduced colonic atRA. Inhibition of atRA signaling promoted tumorigenesis, whereas atRA supplementation reduced tumor burden. The benefit of atRA treatment was mediated by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which were activated due to MHCI upregulation on tumor cells. Consistent with these findings, increased colonic expression of the atRA-catabolizing enzyme, CYP26A1, correlated with reduced frequencies of tumoral cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and with worse disease prognosis in human CRC. These results reveal a mechanism by which microbiota drive colon carcinogenesis and highlight atRA metabolism as a therapeutic target for CRC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Absolute Stability And Hyperstability In Hilbert Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, John Ting-Yung

    1989-01-01

    Theorems on stabilities of feedback control systems proved. Paper presents recent developments regarding theorems of absolute stability and hyperstability of feedforward-and-feedback control system. Theorems applied in analysis of nonlinear, adaptive, and robust control. Extended to provide sufficient conditions for stability in system including nonlinear feedback subsystem and linear time-invariant (LTI) feedforward subsystem, state space of which is Hilbert space, and input and output spaces having finite numbers of dimensions. (In case of absolute stability, feedback subsystem memoryless and possibly time varying. For hyperstability, feedback system dynamical system.)

  9. TFF3 is a normal breast epithelial protein and is associated with differentiated phenotype in early breast cancer but predisposes to invasion and metastasis in advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmed R H; Griffiths, Andrew B; Tilby, Michael T; Westley, Bruce R; May, Felicity E B

    2012-03-01

    The trefoil protein TFF3 stimulates invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. To determine whether it has a role in breast tumor metastasis and angiogenesis, its levels were measured by immunohistochemistry in breast tissue with a specific monoclonal antibody raised against human TFF3. TFF3 is expressed in normal breast lobules and ducts, at higher levels in areas of fibrocystic change and papillomas, in all benign breast disease lesions, and in 89% of in situ and in 83% of invasive carcinomas. In well-differentiated tumor cells, TFF3 is concentrated at the luminal edge, whereas in poorly differentiated cells polarity is inverted and expression is directed toward the stroma. Expression was high in well-differentiated tumors and was associated significantly with low histological grade and with estrogen and progesterone receptor expression, accordant with induction of TFF3 mRNA by estrogen in breast cancer cells. Paradoxically, TFF3 expression was associated with muscle, neural, and lymphovascular invasion and the presence and number of involved lymph nodes, and it was an independent predictive marker of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement. Consistent with an angiogenic function, TFF3 expression correlated strongly with microvessel density evaluated with CD31 and CD34. In conclusion, TFF3 is expressed in both the normal and diseased breast. Although associated with features of good prognosis, its profile of expression in invasive cancer is consistent with a role in breast tumor progression and tumor cell dissemination. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Birkhoff normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Birkhoff normal form procedure is a widely used tool for approximating a Hamiltonian systems by a simpler one. This chapter starts out with an introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics, followed by an explanation of the Birkhoff normal form procedure. Finally we discuss several algorithms for

  11. Non-invasive characterization of normal and pathological tissues through dynamic infrared imaging in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, María. S.; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Salva, Natalia; Padra, Claudio; Schwint, Amanda; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.

    2017-05-01

    Biomedical infrared thermography, a non-invasive and functional imaging method, provides information on the normal and abnormal status and response of tissues in terms of spatial and temporal variations in body infrared radiance. It is especially attractive in cancer research due to the hypervascular and hypermetabolic activity of solid tumors. Moreover, healthy tissues like skin or mucosa exposed to radiation can be examined since inflammation, changes in water content, exudation, desquamation, erosion and necrosis, between others, are factors that modify their thermal properties. In this work we performed Dynamic Infrared Imaging (DIRI) to contribute to the understanding and evaluation of normal tissue, tumor and precancerous tissue response and radiotoxicity in an in vivo model, the hamster cheek pouch, exposed to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. In this study, we particularly focused on the observation of temperature changes under forced transient conditions associated with mass moisture transfer in the tissue-air interface, in each tissue with or without treatment. We proposed a simple mathematical procedure that considerers the heat transfer from tissue to ambient through convection and evaporation to model the transient (exponential decay o recover) thermal study. The data was fitted to determined the characteristic decay and recovery time constants of the temperature as a function of time. Also this model allowed to explore the mass flux of moisture, as a degree of evaporation occurring on the tissue surface. Tissue thermal responses under provocation tests could be used as a non-invasive method to characterize tissue physiology.

  12. Bystander normal human fibroblasts reduce damage response in radiation targeted cancer cells through intercellular ROS level modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widel, Maria, E-mail: maria.widel@polsl.pl [Biosystem Group, Department of Automatics, Electronics and Informatics, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Przybyszewski, Waldemar M., E-mail: wmp@io.gliwice.pl [Center for Translational Research and Molecular Biology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Branch Gliwice, 15 Wybrzeze Armii Krajowej, 44-101 Gliwice (Poland); Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur [Biosystem Group, Department of Automatics, Electronics and Informatics, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Saenko, Yuri V. [Department of Pharmacology and Biochemistry, Center of Nanotechnology and Materials, Ulyanovsk State University (Russian Federation); Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna [Biosystem Group, Department of Automatics, Electronics and Informatics, Silesian University of Technology, 16 Akademicka Street, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2012-03-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect is a well-established phenomenon which results in damage in non-irradiated cells in response to signaling from irradiated cells. Since communication between irradiated and bystander cells could be reciprocal, we examined the mutual bystander response between irradiated cells and co-cultured with them non-irradiated recipients. Using a transwell culture system, irradiated human melanoma (Me45) cells were co-cultured with non-irradiated Me45 cells or normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and vice versa. The frequency of micronuclei and of apoptosis, ROS level, and mitochondrial membrane potential were used as the endpoints. Irradiated Me45 and NHDF cells induced conventional bystander effects detected as modest increases of the frequency of micronuclei and apoptosis in both recipient neighbors; the increase of apoptosis was especially high in NHDF cells co-cultured with irradiated Me45 cells. However, the frequencies of micronuclei and apoptosis in irradiated Me45 cells co-cultured with NHDF cells were significantly reduced in comparison with those cultured alone. This protective effect was not observed when irradiated melanomas were co-cultured with non-irradiated cells of the same line, or when irradiated NHDF fibroblasts were co-cultured with bystander melanomas. The increase of micronuclei and apoptosis in irradiated Me45 cells was paralleled by an increase in the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was reduced significantly when they were co-cultured for 24 h with NHDF cells. A small but significant elevation of ROS level in NHDF cells shortly after irradiation was also reduced by co-culture with non-irradiated NHDF cells. We propose that in response to signals from irradiated cells, non-irradiated NHDF cells trigger rescue signals, whose nature remains to be elucidated, which modify the redox status in irradiated cells. This inverse bystander effect may potentially have implications in clinical

  13. DNA condensation by copper(II) complexes and their anti-proliferative effect on cancerous and normal fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, Subramaniyam; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2014-06-10

    In our search towards copper(II) based anticancer compounds, copper(II) complexes [Cu(bitpy)2](ClO4)21, [Cu(bitpy)(phen)](NO3)22 and [Cu(bitpy)(NO3)](NO3) 3 were synthesized and characterized. All the three complexes contain the tridentate ligand bitpy, which bears biologically relevant benzimidazolyl head group, as one of the ligands. Because of the presence of the planar benzimidazolyl group in the bitpy ligand, the complexes exhibited intercalative mode of binding with DNA. The DNA binding constant, K(b), for complexes 1, 2 and 3 were determined to be (1.84 ± 0.32) × 10(4), (1.83 ± 0.57) × 10(4) and (1.87 ± 0.21) × 10(4) M(-1) respectively. All the three complexes possessed DNA condensing ability. The DNA condensing ability of the complexes was in the order 2 > 1 > 3. The DNA condensation induced by these three complexes was found to be reversed in the presence of 1 M NaCl. In vitro cytotoxicity of three complexes was tested against osteosarcoma MG63 cell line as well as normal fibroblast NIH3T3 cell line by MTT reduction assay. Complexes 1 and 2 were found to be highly toxic towards MG63 than NIH3T3 cell line and both these complexes brought about cell death in the MG-63 cell line due to apoptosis. Whereas, complex 3 exhibited almost equal toxic effect towards both MG63 and NIH3T3 cell lines. Based on the fact that both complexes 1 and 2 brought about reversible condensation of DNA and induced apoptosis in osteosarcoma MG-63 cell line, it is hypothesized that they might possess potential pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. On Relative and Absolute Conviction in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Keith; Mejia-Ramos, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Conviction is a central construct in mathematics education research on justification and proof. In this paper, we claim that it is important to distinguish between absolute conviction and relative conviction. We argue that researchers in mathematics education frequently have not done so and this has lead to researchers making unwarranted claims…

  15. Det demokratiske argument for absolut ytringsfrihed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    Artiklen diskuterer den påstand, at absolut ytringsfrihed er en nødvendig forudsætning for demokratisk legitimitet med udgangspunkt i en rekonstruktion af et argument fremsat af Ronald Dworkin. Spørgsmålet er, hvorfor ytringsfrihed skulle være en forudsætning for demokratisk legitimitet, og hvorf...

  16. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  17. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  18. Absolute rates of hole transfer in DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senthilkumar, K.; Grozema, F.C.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Lewis, F.D.; Berlin, Y.A.; Ratner, M.A.; Siebbeles, L.D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Absolute rates of hole transfer between guanine nucleobases separated by one or two A:T base pairs in stilbenedicarboxamide-linked DNA hairpins were obtained by improved kinetic analysis of experimental data. The charge-transfer rates in four different DNA sequences were calculated using a

  19. ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE GANIL BEAM ENERGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CASANDJIAN, JM; MITTIG, W; BEUNARD, R; GAUDARD, L; LEPINESZILY, A; VILLARI, ACC; AUGER, G; BIANCHI, L; CUNSOLO, A; FOTI, A; LICHTENTHALER, R; PLAGNOL, E; SCHUTZ, Y; SIEMSSEN, RH; WIELECZKO, JP

    1993-01-01

    The energy of the GANIL cyclotron beam was measured on-line during the Pb-208 + Pb-208 elastic scattering experiment ''Search for Color van der Waals Force in the Pb-208 + Pb-208 Mott scattering'' with an absolute precision of 7 x 10(-5) at approximately 1.0 GeV, which represents an improvement of

  20. A note on absolute summability factors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. In this paper, by using an almost increasing and δ-quasi-monotone sequence, a general theorem on ϕ −|C, α|k summability factors, which generalizes a result of Bor. [3] on ϕ− |C, 1|k summability factors, has been proved under weaker and more general conditions. Keywords. Absolute summability; almost ...

  1. The Theory of Absolute Reaction Rates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 7. The Theory of Absolute Reaction Rates. Henry Eyring. Classics Volume 17 Issue 7 July 2012 pp 704-711. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/07/0704-0711. Author Affiliations.

  2. Thin-film magnetoresistive absolute position detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenland, J.P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of a digital absolute posi- tion-detection system, which is based on a position-information carrier (i.e. a magnetic tape) with one single code track on the one hand, and an array of magnetoresistive sensors for the detection of the information on the

  3. systemic complications following absolute alcohol embolisation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    due to the unique property of absolute alcohol to cause complete ablation and prevention of revascularisation. However, this technique is associated with multiple complications which may lead to .... of alcohol on the sodium channels of cardiac cells is one of the proposed mechanisms of arrhythmia.16. A study in healthy ...

  4. Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prostate cancer Lung cancer Colorectal cancer In US women, other than skin cancer the three most common cancers are: Breast cancer Lung cancer Colorectal cancer Some cancers are more common in certain parts of the world. For example, in Japan, there are many cases of stomach cancer . But ...

  5. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defraene, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.defraene@uzleuven.be [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Van den Bergh, Laura [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Haustermans, Karin [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Heemsbergen, Wilma [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Radiation Oncology Department, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Lebesque, Joos V. [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints

  6. Exploring the spatial dimension of estrogen and progesterone signaling: detection of nuclear labeling in lobular epithelial cells in normal mammary glands adjacent to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, Anne; Abbas, Mahmoud; Linder, Nina; Kreipe, Hans H; Lundin, Johan; Feuerhake, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive spatial assessment of hormone receptor immunohistochemistry staining in digital whole slide images of breast cancer requires accurate detection of positive nuclei within biologically relevant regions of interest. Herein, we propose a combination of automated region labeling at low resolution and subsequent detailed tissue evaluation of subcellular structures in lobular structures adjacent to breast cancer, as a proof of concept for the approach to analyze estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in the spatial context of surrounding tissue. Routinely processed paraffin sections of hormone receptor-negative ductal invasive breast cancer were stained for estrogen and progesterone receptor by immunohistochemistry. Digital whole slides were analyzed using commercially available image analysis software for advanced object-based analysis, applying textural, relational, and geometrical features. Mammary gland lobules were targeted as regions of interest for analysis at subcellular level in relation to their distance from coherent tumor as neighboring relevant tissue compartment. Lobule detection quality was evaluated visually by a pathologist. After rule set optimization in an estrogen receptor-stained training set, independent test sets (progesterone and estrogen receptor) showed acceptable detection quality in 33% of cases. Presence of disrupted lobular structures, either by brisk inflammatory infiltrate, or diffuse tumor infiltration, was common in cases with lower detection accuracy. Hormone receptor detection tended towards higher percentage of positively stained nuclei in lobules distant from the tumor border as compared to areas adjacent to the tumor. After adaptations of image analysis, corresponding evaluations were also feasible in hormone receptor positive breast cancer, with some limitations of automated separation of mammary epithelial cells from hormone receptor-positive tumor cells. As a proof of concept for object-oriented detection of

  7. Metabolomic Profiling of Extracellular Vesicles and Alternative Normalization Methods Reveal Enriched Metabolites and Strategies to Study Prostate Cancer-Related Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhka, Maija; Takatalo, Maarit; Nordberg, Maria-Elisa; Valkonen, Sami; Nandania, Jatin; Aatonen, Maria; Yliperttula, Marjo; Laitinen, Saara; Velagapudi, Vidya; Mirtti, Tuomas; Kallioniemi, Olli; Rannikko, Antti; Siljander, Pia R-M; Af Hällström, Taija Maria

    2017-01-01

    Body fluids are a rich source of extracellular vesicles (EVs), which carry cargo derived from the secreting cells. So far, biomarkers for pathological conditions have been mainly searched from their protein, (mi)RNA, DNA and lipid cargo. Here, we explored the small molecule metabolites from urinary and platelet EVs relative to their matched source samples. As a proof-of-concept study of intra-EV metabolites, we compared alternative normalization methods to profile urinary EVs from prostate cancer patients before and after prostatectomy and from healthy controls. We employed targeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to profile over 100 metabolites in the isolated EVs, original urine samples and platelets. We determined the enrichment of the metabolites in the EVs and analyzed their subcellular origin, pathways and relevant enzymes or transporters through data base searches. EV- and urine-derived factors and ratios between metabolites were tested for normalization of the metabolomics data. Approximately 1 x 1010 EVs were sufficient for detection of metabolite profiles from EVs. The profiles of the urinary and platelet EVs overlapped with each other and with those of the source materials, but they also contained unique metabolites. The EVs enriched a selection of cytosolic metabolites including members from the nucleotide and spermidine pathways, which linked to a number of EV-resident enzymes or transporters. Analysis of the urinary EVs from the patients indicated that the levels of glucuronate, D-ribose 5-phosphate and isobutyryl-L-carnitine were 2-26-fold lower in all pre-prostatectomy samples compared to the healthy control and post-prostatectomy samples (p < 0.05). These changes were only detected from EVs by normalization to EV-derived factors or with metabolite ratios, and not from the original urine samples. Our results suggest that metabolite analysis of EVs from different samples is feasible using a high-throughput platform

  8. Unexpected distribution of CA19.9 and other type 1 chain Lewis antigens in normal and cancer tissues of colon and pancreas: Importance of the detection method and role of glycosyltransferase regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Adele; Avagliano, Laura; Caretti, Anna; Tosi, Delfina; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Trinchera, Marco

    2017-01-01

    CA19.9 antigen has been assumed as an abundant product of cancer cells, due to the reactivity found by immunohistochemical staining of cancer tissues with anti-CA19.9 antibody. Expression and biosynthesis of type 1 chain Lewis antigens in the colon and the pancreas were studied by immunodetection in tissue sections and lysates, quantification of glycosyltransferase transcripts, bisulfite sequencing, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CA19.9 was poorly detectable in normal colon mucosa and almost undetectable in colon cancer, while it was easily detected in the pancreatic ducts, together with Lewis b antigen, under both normal and cancer conditions. B3GALT5 transcripts were down-regulated in colon cancer, while they remained expressed in pancreatic cancer. Even ST3GAL3 transcript appeared well expressed in the pancreas but poorly in the colon, irrespective of normal or cancer conditions. CpG islands flanking B3GALT5 native promoter presented an extremely low degree of methylation in pancreatic cancer with respect to colon cancer. In a DNA region about 1kb away from the B3GALT5 retroviral promoter, a stretch of CG dinucleotides presented a methylation pattern potentially associated with transcription. Such a DNA region and the transcription factor binding site provided overlapping results by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, corroborating the hypothesis. CA19.9 appears as a physiological product whose synthesis strongly depends on the tissue specific and epigenetically-regulated expression of B3GALT5 and ST3GAL3. CA19.9 and other Lewis antigens acquire tumor marker properties in the pancreas due to mechanisms giving rise to reabsorption into vessels and elevation in circulating levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Trapped individual ion at absolute zero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Dehmelt, Hans; Nagourney, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Laser cooling and ion trapping have progressed to such an extent that one can now speak of realizing a confined atom at absolute zero temperature. In this short publication, we analyze an experiment toward such realization using a single Ba+ ion in a miniature rf trap. The Ba+ ion is first laser-cooled to the limit where the ion spends most of its time in the zero-point energy state. Then a test sequence allows one to verify whether or not the ion is actually in its zero-point state. The test sequence may also serve as a device for state selection of an atom at absolute zero temperature. PMID:16594054

  10. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Institute of Physics Czech Academy of Science, ELI-Beamlines project, Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic); Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Romano, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN Sezione di Cagliari, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N. [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and INFN-Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Tramontana, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy); Cirio, R.; Sacchi, R.; Monaco, V. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino, Italy and Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy); Marchetto, F.; Giordanengo, S. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  11. Absolute zero and the conquest of cold

    CERN Document Server

    Shachtman, Tom

    2000-01-01

    In a sweeping yet marvelously concise history, Tom Shachtman ushers us into a world in which scientists tease apart the all-important secrets of cold. Readers take an extraordinary trip, starting in the 1600s with an alchemist's air conditioning of Westminster Abbey and scientists' creation of thermometers. Later, while entrepreneurs sold Walden Pond ice to tropical countries -- packed in "high-tech" sawdust -- researchers pursued absolute zero and interpreted their work as romantically as did adventurers to remote regions. Today, playing with ultracold temperatures is one of the hottest frontiers in physics, with scientists creating useful particles Einstein only dreamed of. Tom Shachtman shares a great scientific adventure story and its characters' rich lives in a book that has won a grant from the prestigious Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Absolute Zero is for everyone who loves history and science history stories, who's eager to explore Nobel Prize-winning physics today, or who has ever sighed with pleasure ...

  12. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  13. Least Squares Problems with Absolute Quadratic Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schöne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes linear least squares problems with absolute quadratic constraints. We develop a generalized theory following Bookstein's conic-fitting and Fitzgibbon's direct ellipse-specific fitting. Under simple preconditions, it can be shown that a minimum always exists and can be determined by a generalized eigenvalue problem. This problem is numerically reduced to an eigenvalue problem by multiplications of Givens' rotations. Finally, four applications of this approach are presented.

  14. Cytotoxic evaluation of medicinal smoke \\"Anbar Nasara\\" against cancer cells (Hela & KB and a normal cell line (L929, using MTT assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hojat Sadeghi-aliabadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicinal smoke has been in natural health products by many nations all over the worlds. Dung's smoke called "Anbar Nasara" is one of the most used medicinal smokes in Iranian traditional medicine. Anber Nasara has been administered as inhalation in the treatment of viral or bacterial infections as well as for tumors and cysts in vaginal diseases in women. Its cytotoxic effects have been proposed in these studies. Materials and Methods: Dung's of female donkey have been collected from Shahreza, Isfahan province in summer 2011. The samples were burned in a specially designed apparatus and its smoke was collected in n-hexane solvent over ice-cold water. Solvent was evaporated in the air and dried residue was dissolved in DMSO and diluted in RPMI So that the final concentrations of 0.4, 0.3, 0.25, 0.2, 0.125, 0.1, 0.0625, 0.0312 mg/ml were obtained for MTT assay as a cytotoxic evaluation method against two cancer cells (KB and Hela and a normal one (L929. After 48h incubation percent cell survival and IC50 values were obtained using ELISA plate reader at 540nm. Results: Results showed that dung's smoke were cytotoxic in tested concentrations against cancer cell lines in a dose dependent manner. The IC50 was calculated ≥ 0.2 mg/ml. Conclusion: Dung's smoke consists of too many constituents and its cytotoxic effect may belong to one or complexes of constituents. More researches are under way to clarify these aspects of the study.

  15. Reduced levels of IGF-I mediate differential protection of normal and cancer cells in response to fasting and improve chemotherapeutic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhan; Safdie, Fernando M; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Wei, Min; Madia, Federica; Parrella, Edoardo; Hwang, David; Cohen, Pinchas; Bianchi, Giovanna; Longo, Valter D

    2010-02-15

    Inhibitors of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptor have been widely studied for their ability to enhance the killing of a variety of malignant cells, but whether IGF-I signaling differentially protects the host and cancer cells against chemotherapy is unknown. Starvation can protect mice, but not cancer cells, against high-dose chemotherapy [differential stress resistance (DSR)]. Here, we offer evidence that IGF-I reduction mediates part of the starvation-dependent DSR. A 72-hour fast in mice reduced circulating IGF-I by 70% and increased the level of the IGF-I inhibitor IGFBP-1 by 11-fold. LID mice, with a 70% to 80% reduction in circulating IGF-I levels, were protected against three of four chemotherapy drugs tested. Restoration of IGF-I was sufficient to reverse the protective effect of fasting. Sixty percent of melanoma-bearing LID mice treated with doxorubicin achieved long-term survival whereas all control mice died of either metastases or chemotherapy toxicity. Reducing IGF-I/IGF-I signaling protected primary glia, but not glioma cells, against cyclophosphamide and protected mouse embryonic fibroblasts against doxorubicin. Further, S. cerevisiae lacking homologs of IGF-I signaling proteins were protected against chemotherapy-dependent DNA damage in a manner that could be reversed by expressing a constitutively active form of Ras. We conclude that normal cells and mice can be protected against chemotherapy-dependent damage by reducing circulating IGF-I levels and by a mechanism that involves downregulation of proto-oncogene signals.

  16. On the Perceptual Subprocess of Absolute Pitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Goo Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Absolute pitch (AP is the rare ability of musicians to identify the pitch of tonal sound without external reference. While there have been behavioral and neuroimaging studies on the characteristics of AP, how the AP is implemented in human brains remains largely unknown. AP can be viewed as comprising of two subprocesses: perceptual (processing auditory input to extract a pitch chroma and associative (linking an auditory representation of pitch chroma with a verbal/non-verbal label. In this review, we focus on the nature of the perceptual subprocess of AP. Two different models on how the perceptual subprocess works have been proposed: either via absolute pitch categorization (APC or based on absolute pitch memory (APM. A major distinction between the two views is that whether the AP uses unique auditory processing (i.e., APC that exists only in musicians with AP or it is rooted in a common phenomenon (i.e., APM, only with heightened efficiency. We review relevant behavioral and neuroimaging evidence that supports each notion. Lastly, we list open questions and potential ideas to address them.

  17. The application of normal, SV40 T-antigen-immortalised and tumour-derived oral keratinocytes, under serum-free conditions, to the study of the probability of cancer progression as a result of environmental exposure to chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceder, Rebecca; Merne, Marina; Staab, Claudia A; Nilsson, Jan Anders; Höög, Jan-Olov; Dressler, Dirk; Engelhart, Karin; Grafström, Roland C

    2007-12-01

    In vitro models are currently not considered to be suitable replacements for animals in experiments to assess the multiple factors that underlie the development of cancer as a result of environmental exposure to chemicals. An evaluation was conducted on the potential use of normal keratinocytes, the SV40 T-antigen-immortalised keratinocyte cell line, SVpgC2a, and the carcinoma cell line, SqCC/Y1, alone and in combination, and under standardised serum-free culture conditions, to study oral cancer progression. In addition, features considered to be central to cancer development as a result of environmental exposure to chemicals, were analysed. Genomic expression, and enzymatic and functional data from the cell lines reflected many aspects of the transition of normal tissue epithelium, via dysplasia, to full malignancy. The composite cell line model develops aberrances in proliferation, terminal differentiation and apoptosis, in a similar manner to oral cancer progression in vivo. Transcript and protein profiling links aberrations in multiple gene ontologies, molecular networks and tumour biomarker genes (some proposed previously, and some new) in oral carcinoma development. Typical specific changes include the loss of tumour-suppressor p53 function and of sensitivity to retinoids. Environmental agents associated with the aetiology of oral cancer differ in their requirements for metabolic activation, and cause toxic effects to cells in both the normal and the transformed states. The results suggest that the model might be useful for studies on the sensitivity of cells to chemicals at different stages of cancer progression, including many aspects of the integrated roles of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Overall, the properties of the SVpgC2a and SqCC/Y1 cell lines, relative to normal epithelial cells in monolayer or organotypic culture, support their potential applicability to mechanistic studies on cancer risk factors, including, in particular, the definition of

  18. CCN5/WISP-2 restores ER-∝ in normal and neoplastic breast cells and sensitizes triple negative breast cancer cells to tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S; Ghosh, A; Banerjee, S; Maity, G; Das, A; Larson, M A; Gupta, V; Haque, I; Tawfik, O; Banerjee, S K

    2017-05-22

    CCN5/WISP-2 is an anti-invasive molecule and prevents breast cancer (BC) progression. However, it is not well understood how CCN5 prevents invasive phenotypes of BC cells. CCN5 protein expression is detected in estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) -positive normal breast epithelial cells as well as BC cells, which are weakly invasive and rarely metastasize depending on the functional status of ER-α. A unique molecular relation between CCN5 and ER-α has been established as the components of the same signaling pathway that coordinate some essential signals associated with the proliferation as well as delaying the disease progression from a non-invasive to invasive phenotypes. Given the importance of this connection, we determined the role of CCN5 in regulation of ER-α in different cellular settings and their functional relationship. In a genetically engineered mouse model, induced expression of CCN5 in the mammary ductal epithelial cells by doxycycline promotes ER-α expression. Similarly, CCN5 regulates ER-α expression and activity in normal and neoplastic breast cells, as documented in various in vitro settings such as mouse mammary gland culture, human mammary epithelial cell and different BC cell cultures in the presence or absence of human recombinant CCN5 (hrCCN5) protein. Mechanistically, at least in the BC cells, CCN5 is sufficient to induce ER-α expression at the transcription level via interacting with integrins-α6β1 and suppressing Akt followed by activation of FOXO3a. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo functional assays indicate that CCN5 treatment promotes response to tamoxifen in triple-negative BC (TNBC) cells possibly via restoring ER-α. Collectively, these studies implicates that the combination treatments of CCN5 (via activation of CCN5 or hrCCN5 treatment) and tamoxifen as potential therapies for TNBC.

  19. Modified Gray-Level Coding Method for Absolute Phase Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangcheng; Chen, Shunping; Luo, Jie; Wang, Yuwei; Wang, Yajun; Chen, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Fringe projection systems have been widely applied in three-dimensional (3D) shape measurements. One of the important issues is how to retrieve the absolute phase. This paper presents a modified gray-level coding method for absolute phase retrieval. Specifically, two groups of fringe patterns are projected onto the measured objects, including three phase-shift patterns for the wrapped phase, and three n-ary gray-level (nGL) patterns for the fringe order. Compared with the binary gray-level (bGL) method which just uses two intensity values, the nGL method can generate many more unique codewords with multiple intensity values. With assistance from the average intensity and modulation of phase-shift patterns, the intensities of nGL patterns are normalized to deal with ambient light and surface contrast. To reduce the codeword detection errors caused by camera/projector defocus, nGL patterns are designed as n-ary gray-code (nGC) patterns to ensure that at most, one code changes at each point. Experiments verify the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed method to measure isolated objects with complex surfaces. PMID:29048341

  20. Infinitary normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Klop (Jan Willem); R. de Vrijer

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn infinitary orthogonal first-order term rewriting the properties confluence (CR), Uniqueness of Normal forms (UN), Parallel Moves Lemma (PML) have been generalized to their infinitary versions CR-inf, UN-inf, PML-inf, and so on. Several relations between these properties have been

  1. A combined approach of endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided needle aspiration in the radiologically normal mediastinum in non-small-cell lung cancer staging--a prospective trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szlubowski, Artur; Zieliński, Marcin; Soja, Jerzy; Annema, Jouke T.; Sośnicki, Witold; Jakubiak, Magdalena; Pankowski, Juliusz; Cmiel, Adam

    2010-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to assess the diagnostic yield of the combined approach - endobronchial (EBUS) and endoscopic (EUS) ultrasound-guided needle aspiration (combined ultrasound-needle aspiration (CUS-NA)) in the radiologically normal mediastinum in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

  2. Direct use of multivariable normal tissue complication probability models in treatment plan optimisation for individualised head and neck cancer radiotherapy produces clinically acceptable treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkels, Roel G J; Korevaar, Erik W; Steenbakkers, Roel J H M; Janssen, Tomas; van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Schilstra, Cornelis; van der Schaaf, Arjen

    2014-09-01

    Recently, clinically validated multivariable normal tissue complication probability models (NTCP) for head and neck cancer (HNC) patients have become available. We test the feasibility of using multivariable NTCP-models directly in the optimiser for inverse treatment planning of radiotherapy to improve the dose distributions and corresponding NTCP-estimates in HNC patients. For 10 HNC cases, intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were optimised either using objective functions based on the 'generalised equivalent uniform dose' (OFgEUD) or based on multivariable NTCP-models (OFNTCP). NTCP-models for patient-rated xerostomia, physician-rated RTOG grade II-IV dysphagia, and various patient-rated aspects of swallowing dysfunction were incorporated. The NTCP-models included dose-volume parameters as well as clinical factors contributing to a personalised optimisation process. Both optimisation techniques were compared by means of 'pseudo Pareto fronts' (target dose conformity vs. the sum of the NTCPs). Both optimisation techniques resulted in clinically realistic treatment plans with only small differences. For nine patients the sum-NTCP was lower for the OFNTCP optimised plans (on average 5.7% (95%CI 1.7-9.9%, poptimisation parameters and an intrinsic mechanism of individualisation. Treatment plan optimisation using multivariable NTCP-models directly in the OF is feasible as has been demonstrated for HNC radiotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Side-to-side symmetry of radioprotein transfer from tissue space to systemic vasculature following subcutaneous injection in normal subjects and patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pain, Simon J.; O' Mahony, Susan; Purushotham, Arnie [Cambridge Breast Unit, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Barber, Robert W.; Ballinger, James R.; Solanki, Chandra K.; Peters, A.Michael [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Box 170, CB2 2QQ, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mortimer, Peter S. [Department of Physiological Medicine, St George' s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    2003-05-01

    Quantitative lymphoscintigraphy can be used for investigation of unilateral lymphatic disease of the limbs, such as breast cancer-related lymphoedema (BCRL). Previous studies have compared lymphatic function in the affected limb with that in the unaffected contralateral limb. This study aims to confirm that the assumption of pre-morbid symmetry, never previously demonstrated, is valid. A dual-isotope technique, with bilateral subcutaneous hand injection of polyclonal human immunoglobulin G (HIgG) labelled with either technetium-99m or indium-111, was performed on a total of 37 subjects. The use of two different labels, one for each limb, enabled comparison not only of the rate of clearance from the injection depot, but also of the rate of appearance in venous blood. Results demonstrate clear symmetry between the two arms with respect to both depot clearance and blood appearance rates, as well as the coupling between these two variables. In unilateral lymphatic disease, results of quantitative lymphoscintigraphy should be expressed in relation to the normal arm rather than to an independent control population. (orig.)

  4. Microelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Human Urothelial Cell Lines: Real-Time Electrical Impedance Measurement at an Optimal Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangkyu Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To distinguish between normal (SV-HUC-1 and cancerous (TCCSUP human urothelial cell lines using microelectrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS. Materials and Methods. Two types of μEIS devices were designed and used in combination to measure the impedance of SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells flowing through the channels of the devices. The first device (μEIS-OF was designed to determine the optimal frequency at which the impedance of two cell lines is most distinguishable. The μEIS-OF trapped the flowing cells and measured their impedance at a frequency ranging from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The second device (μEIS-RT was designed for real-time impedance measurement of the cells at the optimal frequency. The impedance was measured instantaneously as the cells passed the sensing electrodes of μEIS-RT. Results. The optimal frequency, which maximized the average difference of the amplitude and phase angle between the two cell lines (p<0.001, was determined to be 119 kHz. The real-time impedance of the cell lines was measured at 119 kHz; the two cell lines differed significantly in terms of amplitude and phase angle (p<0.001. Conclusion. The μEIS-RT can discriminate SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells by measuring the impedance at the optimal frequency determined by the μEIS-OF.

  5. The Aging Prostate Is Never "Normal"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlomm, Thorsten; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We argue against the recently published statement that tumor-specific molecular alterations found in "normal" prostate tissue from cancer patients challenge focal therapy approaches that only target a visible cancer lesion and not the adjacent molecular field....

  6. Statistical Validation of Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Chengjian, E-mail: c.j.xu@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der; Veld, Aart A. van' t; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Radiotherapy Institute Friesland, Leeuwarden (Netherlands)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability and value of double cross-validation and permutation tests as established statistical approaches in the validation of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. Methods and Materials: A penalized regression method, LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator), was used to build NTCP models for xerostomia after radiation therapy treatment of head-and-neck cancer. Model assessment was based on the likelihood function and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: Repeated double cross-validation showed the uncertainty and instability of the NTCP models and indicated that the statistical significance of model performance can be obtained by permutation testing. Conclusion: Repeated double cross-validation and permutation tests are recommended to validate NTCP models before clinical use.

  7. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  8. Malware Normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Christodorescu, Mihai; Kinder, Johannes; Jha, Somesh; Katzenbeisser, Stefan; Veith, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Malware is code designed for a malicious purpose, such as obtaining root privilege on a host. A malware detector identifies malware and thus prevents it from adversely affecting a host. In order to evade detection by malware detectors, malware writers use various obfuscation techniques to transform their malware. There is strong evidence that commercial malware detectors are susceptible to these evasion tactics. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a malware normalizer ...

  9. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  10. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  11. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  12. VAR Portfolio Optimal: Perbandingan Antara Metode Markowitz dan Mean Absolute Deviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Agus Sartono

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Portfolio selection method which have been introduced by Harry Markowitz (1952 used variance or deviation standard as a measure of risk. Kanno and Yamazaki (1991 introduced another method and used mean absolute deviation as a measure of risk instead of variance. The Value-at Risk (VaR is a relatively new method to capitalized risk that been used by financial institutions. The aim of this research is compare between mean variance and mean absolute deviation of two portfolios. Next, we attempt to assess the VaR of two portfolios using delta normal method and historical simulation. We use the secondary data from the Jakarta Stock Exchange – LQ45 during 2003. We find that there is a weak-positive correlation between deviation standard and return in both portfolios. The VaR nolmal delta based on mean absolute deviation method eventually is higher than the VaR normal delta based on mean variance method. However, based on the historical simulation the VaR of two methods is statistically insignificant. Thus, the deviation standard is sufficient measures of portfolio risk.Keywords: optimalisasi portofolio, mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, value-at-risk, metode delta normal, metode simulasi historis

  13. Normalizing Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Vicki S; Zerwic, Julie; Jefferson, Urmeka; Anderson, Cindy M; Killion, Cheryl M; Smith, Carol E; Cohen, Marlene Z; Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Herrick, Linda; Topp, Robert; Benefield, Lazelle E; Loya, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Getting turned down for grant funding or having a manuscript rejected is an uncomfortable but not unusual occurrence during the course of a nurse researcher's professional life. Rejection can evoke an emotional response akin to the grieving process that can slow or even undermine productivity. Only by "normalizing" rejection, that is, by accepting it as an integral part of the scientific process, can researchers more quickly overcome negative emotions and instead use rejection to refine and advance their scientific programs. This article provides practical advice for coming to emotional terms with rejection and delineates methods for working constructively to address reviewer comments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Clinical significance of preoperative serum albumin level for prognosis in surgically resected patients with non-small cell lung cancer: Comparative study of normal lung, emphysema, and pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Kentaro; Hamanaka, Kazutoshi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Kitaguchi, Yoshiaki; Terada, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Daisuke; Kumeda, Hirotaka; Agatsuma, Hiroyuki; Hyogotani, Akira; Kawakami, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Asaka, Shiho; Ito, Ken-Ichi

    2017-09-01

    This study was performed to clarify whether preoperative serum albumin level is related to the prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing surgical resection, and the relationships between serum albumin level and clinicopathological characteristics of lung cancer patients with emphysema or pulmonary fibrosis. We retrospectively evaluated 556 patients that underwent surgical resection for non-small cell lung cancer. The correlation between preoperative serum albumin level and survival was evaluated. Patients were divided into three groups according to the findings on chest high-resolution computed tomography (normal lung, emphysema, and pulmonary fibrosis), and the relationships between serum albumin level and clinicopathological characteristics, including prognosis, were evaluated. The cut-off value of serum albumin level was set at 4.2g/dL. Patients with low albumin levels (albumin pulmonary fibrosis group (n=45) were significantly lower than that in the normal lung group (n=463) (p=0.009 and pulmonary fibrosis groups, but not in the emphysema group. Preoperative serum albumin level was an important prognostic factor for overall survival and recurrence-free survival in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer. Divided into normal lung, emphysema, and pulmonary fibrosis groups, serum albumin level showed no influence only in patients in the emphysema group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Using, Seeing, Feeling, and Doing Absolute Value for Deeper Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Gregorio A.

    2008-01-01

    Using sticky notes and number lines, a hands-on activity is shared that anchors initial student thinking about absolute value. The initial point of reference should help students successfully evaluate numeric problems involving absolute value. They should also be able to solve absolute value equations and inequalities that are typically found in…

  16. Invariant and Absolute Invariant Means of Double Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alotaibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine some properties of the invariant mean, define the concepts of strong σ-convergence and absolute σ-convergence for double sequences, and determine the associated sublinear functionals. We also define the absolute invariant mean through which the space of absolutely σ-convergent double sequences is characterized.

  17. Multipliers for the absolute Euler summability of Fourier series

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    Multipliers; absolute summability; summability of factored Fourier series; absolute Euler summability. 1. ... In 1968, Mohanty and Mohapatra [12] began the study of absolute Euler summability of. Fourier series by proving the ..... (q > 0) summable. In the case when δ is non-zero real number, we define f (t ) =.. log δ k.

  18. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  19. Reconstructing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Fristed, Peter Billeskov

    2012-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is an area of priority for the Danish Government. As the field expands, this calls for increased knowledge about mental health nursing practice, as this is part of the forensic psychiatry treatment offered. However, only sparse research exists in this area. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the characteristics of forensic mental health nursing staff interaction with forensic mental health inpatients and to explore how staff give meaning to these interactions. The project included 32 forensic mental health staff members, with over 307 hours of participant observations, 48 informal...... interviews, and seven semistructured interviews. The findings show that staff interaction is typified by the use of trust and relationship-enabling care, which is characterized by the establishment and maintenance of an informal, trusting relationship through a repeated reconstruction of normality...

  20. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  1. Absolute ion hydration enthalpies from absolute hardness and some VBT relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Savaş; Fernandes de Farias, Robson

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, absolute hydration enthalpies are calculated from ion absolute hardness for a series of +1 and -1 ions. The calculated values are compared with those previously reported (Housecroft, 2017) [2] and relationships between Vm-1/3 and absolute hardness are stablished. The following empirical equations have been derived, for cations and anions, respectively: ΔhydHo = -(9.645 η+ + 245.930) and ΔhydHo = -(64.601 η- + 12.321). In such equations, η+ and η- are the absolute hardness. It is shown that for d block monocations (Cu+, Ag+ and Au+), hydration enthalpy is closely related with Clementi effective nuclear charge by the equation: ΔhydHo = -(9.645 η+ + 245.930) (Zeff/(n - 1)), where n is the main quantum number. Furthermore, is shown that a typical VBT parameter (Vm-1/3) is related with η+ and η- values and so, with the energies of the frontier orbitals, that is, is stablished a direct relationship between a structural parameter available by X-ray data and the energy of atomic/molecular orbitals.

  2. Gold nanoparticles as absolute nano-thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carattino, Aquiles; Caldarola, Martín; Orrit, Michel

    2017-12-22

    Nano-thermometry is a challenging field that can open the door to intriguing questions ranging from biology and medicine to material sciences. Gold nanorods are excellent candidates to act as nanoprobes because they are reasonably bright emitters upon excitation with a monochromatic source. Gold nanoparticles are commonly used in photothermal therapy as efficient transducers of electromagnetic radiation into heat. In this work we use the spectrum of the anti-Stokes emission from gold nanorods irradiated in resonance to measure the absolute temperature of the nanoparticles and their surrounding medium without the need for a previous calibration. We show a 4 K accuracy in the determination of the temperature of the medium with spectral measurements of 180 s integration time. This procedure can be easily implemented in any microscope capable of acquiring emission spectra and it is not limited to any specific shape of nanoparticles.

  3. How is an absolute democracy possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Bednarek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last part of the Empire trilogy, Commonwealth, Negri and Hardt ask about the possibility of the self-governance of the multitude. When answering, they argue that absolute democracy, understood as the political articulation of the multitude that does not entail its unification (construction of the people is possible. As Negri states, this way of thinking about political articulation is rooted in the tradition of democratic materialism and constitutes the alternative to the dominant current of modern political philosophy that identifies political power with sovereignty. The multitude organizes itself politically by means of the constitutive power, identical with the ontological creativity or productivity of the multitude. To state the problem of political organization means to state the problem of class composition: political democracy is at the same time economic democracy.

  4. Musical Activity Tunes Up Absolute Pitch Ability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Anders; Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A.; Ribe, Lars Riisgaard

    2014-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify or produce pitches of musical tones without an external reference. Active AP (i.e., pitch production or pitch adjustment) and passive AP (i.e., pitch identification) are considered to not necessarily coincide, although no study has properly compared...... these abilities. Using a novel computerized pitch adjustment test, we investigated active AP ability in musicians with and without AP (ages 18-43). We found a significant correlation between active and passive AP indicating that AP possessors (APs) identify and produce pitch equally well. Furthermore, we found...... that APs generally undershoot when adjusting musical pitch, a tendency that decreases when musical activity increases. Finally, APs are less accurate when adjusting the pitch to black key targets than to white key targets. Hence, AP ability may be partly practice-dependent and we speculate that APs may...

  5. Antiausterity activity of arctigenin enantiomers: importance of (2R,3R)-absolute configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awale, Suresh; Kato, Mamoru; Dibwe, Dya Fita; Li, Feng; Miyoshi, Chika; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    From a MeOH extract of powdered roots of Wikstroemia indica, six dibenzyl-gamma-butyrolactone-type lignans with (2S,3S)-absolute configuration [(+)-arctigenin (1), (+)-matairesinol (2), (+)-trachelogenin (3), (+)-nortrachelogenin (4), (+)-hinokinin (5), and (+)-kusunokinin (6)] were isolated, whereas three dibenzyl-gamma-butyrolactone-type lignans with (2R,3R)-absolute configuration [(-)-arctigenin (1*), (-)-matairesinol (2*), (-)-trachelogenin (3*)] were isolated from Trachelospermum asiaticum. The in vitro preferential cytotoxic activity of the nine compounds was evaluated against human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM), but none of the six lignans (1-6) with (2S,3S)-absolute configuration showed preferential cytotoxicity. On the other hand, three lignans (1*-3*) with (2R,3R)-absolute configuration exhibited preferential cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner with PC50 values of 0.54, 6.82, and 5.85 microM, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of (-)- and (+)-arctigenin was evaluated against the activation of Akt, which is a key process in the tolerance to nutrition starvation. Interestingly, only (-)-arctigenin (1*) strongly suppressed the activation of Akt. These results indicate that the (2R,3R)-absolute configuration of (-)-enantiomers should be required for the preferential cytotoxicity through the inhibition of Akt activation.

  6. Recommendations for bone mineral density reporting in Canada: a shift to absolute fracture risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminoski, Kerry; Leslie, William D; Frame, Heather; Hodsman, Anthony; Josse, Robert G; Khan, Aliya; Lentle, Brian C; Levesque, Jacques; Lyons, David J; Tarulli, Giuseppe; Brown, Jacques P

    2007-01-01

    In June 2005, new Canadian recommendations for bone mineral density (BMD) reporting in postmenopausal women and older men were published by Osteoporosis Canada (formerly the Osteoporosis Society of Canada) and the Canadian Association of Radiologists. The recommendations were developed by a multidisciplinary working group that included the Canadian Panel of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry and were reviewed and endorsed by multiple stakeholders. Previous Canadian osteoporosis guidelines advised intervention based on an individual's World Health Organization category (normal, osteopenia, or osteoporosis) as a marker of relative fracture risk. In the new approach, an individual's 10-yr absolute fracture risk, rather than BMD alone, is used for fracture risk categorization. Absolute fracture risk is determined using not only BMD results, but also age, sex, fragility fracture history, and glucocorticoid use. A procedure is presented for estimating absolute 10-yr fracture risk in untreated individuals, leading to assigning an individual to 1 of 3 absolute fracture risk categories: low risk (20%). We propose that an individual's absolute fracture risk category should be the basis for deciding on treatment and frequency of BMD monitoring.

  7. G-Protein Coupled Receptor Family C, Group 5, Member A (GPRC5A) Expression Is Decreased in the Adjacent Field and Normal Bronchial Epithelia of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Junya; Kadara, Humam; Garcia, Melinda M.; Kabbout, Mohamed; Behrens, Carmen; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Solis, Luisa M.; Kim, Edward S.; Kalhor, Neda; Moran, Cesar; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Lotan, Reuben; Wistuba, Ignacio I.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Understanding oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes expression patterns is essential for characterizing lung cancer pathogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that mGprc5a/hGPRC5A is a lung-specific tumor suppressor evidenced by inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis in Gprc5a-knockout mice. The implication of GPRC5A in human lung cancer pathogenesis, including that associated with inflammatory chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a risk factor for the malignancy, remains elusive. Methods We sought to examine GPRC5A immunohistochemical expression in histologically normal bronchial epithelia (NBE) from lung disease-free never- and ever-smokers (n = 13 and n = 18, respectively), from COPD patients with (n = 26) and without cancer (n = 24) and in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) (n = 474). Quantitative assessment of GPRC5A transcript expression in airways (n = 6), adjacent NBEs (n = 29) and corresponding tumors (n = 6) from 6 NSCLC patients was also performed. Results GPRC5A immunohistochemical expression was significantly lower in tumors compared to uninvolved NBE (p cancer-free COPD patients (p = 0.004) and further attenuated and lowest in epithelia of COPD patients with adenocarcinoma and SCC (p cancerization of NSCLC, including that associated with lung inflammation. Assessment of the use of GPRC5A expression as a risk factor for NSCLC development in COPD patients is warranted. PMID:23154545

  8. Calibration and absolute normalization procedure of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Palomino, L.A.; Blostein, J.J. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Dawidowski, J., E-mail: javier@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-08-01

    We describe the calibration process of a new Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering (DINS) spectrometer, recently implemented at the Bariloche Electron LINAC (Argentina), consisting in the determination of the incident neutron spectrum, dead-time and electronic delay of the data acquisition line, and detector bank efficiency. For this purpose, samples of lead, polyethylene and graphite of different sizes were employed. Their measured spectra were corrected by multiple scattering, attenuation and detector efficiency effects, by means of an ad hoc Monte Carlo code. We show that the corrected spectra are correctly scaled with respect to the scattering power of the tested materials within a 2% of experimental error, thus allowing us to define an experimental constant that links the arbitrary experimental scale (number of recorded counts per monitor counts) with the involved cross-sections. The present work also serves to analyze the existence of possible sources of systematic errors.

  9. Prevention of normal tissue complications in radiation therapy of head and neck cancer : the role of 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.B. Wijers (Oda)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn The Netherlands. head and neck cancer (3.9%) ranks the eighth most frequemly diagnoscd malignant tumor. Radiation therapy (IIT) plays an important role in the treatmem of patients with head and neck cancer, as they constitute approximately 6% of those treated in a routine radiation

  10. Maintaining a Normal Life: Proceedings of the National Conference for Parents of Children with Cancer (1st, Arlington, Virginia, June 23-25, 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Inst. (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    Twenty presentations from a 1978 conference for parents of children with cancer focus on the teenager and cancer, long term survival of children, the parents and treatment, and practical problems involved. The following papers and authors are represented: "The Role of the Patient Family" (Clark, Fox-Kolenda); "How the Child Perceives Illness and…

  11. Absolute proton affinity of some polyguanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksic; Kovacevic

    2000-06-02

    The problem of the absolute proton affinity (APA) of some polyguanides is addressed by the MP2(fc)/6-311+G//HF/6-31G theoretical model. It is shown that the linear chain polyguanides exhibit increased basicity as a function of the number of guanide subunits. However, the saturation effect yields an asymptotic APA value of 254 kcal/mol. Branched polyguanides on the other hand have higher APAs than their linear counterparts. The largest proton affinity is found in a doubly bifurcated heptaguanide, being as high as 285 kcal/mol, thus potentially representing one of the strongest organic bases. Finally, it is found that all polyguanides protonate at imino nitrogen atoms, since they are apparently susceptible the most to the proton attack. The origin of their very high intrinsic basicity is traced down to a dramatic increase in the resonance interaction of the corresponding conjugate bases. For instance, the increase in the resonance energy in the protonated guanidine is estimated to be in a range of 24-27 kcal/mol, which is higher than the aromatic stabilization in benzene. The proton affinity of some polycyclic guanides including Schwesinger proton sponge and porphine is briefly discussed.

  12. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  13. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  14. Absolute luminosity determination for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2076571; Pauly, Thilo

    ATLAS is one of the four big experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In order to accurately measure cross sections, the precise knowledge of the integrated luminosity is a prerequisite. The relative luminosity is measured with various detectors and algorithms. The purpose of the algorithms is to convert raw rates measured by a detector into a quantity which is proportional to the luminosity. In this work, three algorithms linked to the two main ATLAS luminosity detectors are absolutely calibrated: BCMH_EventOR, BCMV_EventOR, and LUCID_EventOR. The determination of the calibration constants is based on Van der Meer (VdM) scans, which were carried out in July and November 2012. The statistical errors of this method are negligible and the precision is limited by systematic uncertainties. The different uncertainty sources are quantitatively estimated. The overall uncertainty on the calibration constants is estimated to be 5.40% for the July VdM scans and 2.50% for the November VdM scans. The November cali...

  15. Identification of TMEM208 and PQLC2 as reference genes for normalizing mRNA expression in colorectal cancer treated with aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Chao; Weng, Mingjiao; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Chunhui; Jin, Yinji; Yang, Weiwei; He, Yan; Wu, Yiqi; Zhang, Yuhua; Wang, Guangyu; RajkumarEzakiel Redpath, Riju James; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Xiaoming; Liu, Ying; Sun, Yuchun; Ning, Ning; Qiao, Yu; Zhang, Fengmin; Li, Zhiwei; Wang, Tianzhen; Zhang, Yanqiao; Li, Xiaobo

    2017-04-04

    Numerous evidences indicate that aspirin usage causes a significant reduction in colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms about aspirin preventing colon cancer are largely unknown. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a most frequently used method to identify the target molecules regulated by certain compound. However, this method needs stable internal reference genes to analyze the expression change of the targets. In this study, the transcriptional stabilities of several traditional reference genes were evaluated in colon cancer cells treated with aspirin, and also, the suitable internal reference genes were screened by using a microarray and were further identified by using the geNorm and NormFinder softwares, and then were validated in more cell lines and xenografts. We have showed that three traditional internal reference genes, β-actin, GAPDH and α-tubulin, are not suitable for studying gene transcription in colon cancer cells treated with aspirin, and we have identified and validated TMEM208 and PQLC2 as the ideal internal reference genes for detecting the molecular targets of aspirin in colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. This study reveals stable internal reference genes for studying the target genes of aspirin in colon cancer, which will contribute to identify the molecular mechanism behind aspirin preventing colon cancer.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal acute myeloid leukemia Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  17. The accumulation of DNA demethylation in Sat α in normal gastric tissues with Helicobacter pylori infection renders susceptibility to gastric cancer in some individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masaaki; Suzuki, Koichi; Maeda, Takafumi; Kato, Takaharu; Kamiyama, Hidenori; Koizumi, Kei; Miyaki, Yuichiro; Okada, Shinichiro; Kiyozaki, Hirokazu; Konishi, Fumio

    2012-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is widely recognized as a risk factor for gastric cancer, but only a minority of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether DNA demethylation in non-cancerous gastric mucosa (NGM) significantly enhances susceptibility to gastric cancer. A total of 165 healthy volunteers, including 83 HP-positive and 82-negative individuals, as well as 83 patients with single and 18 with synchronous double gastric cancer (GC) were enrolled in this study. The relative demethylation levels (RDLs) of repetitive sequences, including Alu, LINE-1 and Sat α, were quantified by real-time methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The Alu RDL did not exhibit any differences within each respective group, whereas LINE-1 RDL was significantly elevated in cancer tissues compared with the NGM in the other groups (PSat α RDL correlated with HP infection and cancer development. Sat α RDL was significantly elevated in the NGM in HP-positive compared with HP-negative (PSat α RDL of the NGM in the total population increased in an age-dependent manner, it was significantly increased in a fraction of younger GC patients (Sat α RDL in the NGM compared with single GC (P=0.0014). In these two fractions, Sat α RDL in the NGM exhibited an inverse correlation with age. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the accumulation of DNA demethylation in Sat α RDL in the NGM with HP infection potentially renders susceptibility to gastric cancer in a fraction of GC patients younger than 45 years or in patients with multiple cancers.

  18. Localization and in situ absolute quantification of chlordecone in the mouse liver by MALDI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarrigue, Mélanie; Lavigne, Régis; Tabet, Elise; Genet, Valentine; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Rondel, Karine; Guével, Blandine; Multigner, Luc; Samson, Michel; Pineau, Charles

    2014-06-17

    Chlordecone is an organochlorine pesticide that was extensively used in the French West Indies to fight weevils in banana plantations from 1973 to 1993. This has led to a persistent pollution of the environment and to the contamination of the local population for several decades with effects demonstrated on human health. Chlordecone accumulates mainly in the liver where it is known to potentiate the action of hepatotoxic agents. However, there is currently no information on its in situ localization in the liver. We have thus evaluated a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging quantification method based on labeled normalization for the in situ localization and quantification of chlordecone. After validating the linearity and the reproducibility of this method, quantitative MALDI imaging was used to study the accumulation of chlordecone in the mouse liver. Our results revealed that normalized intensities measured by MALDI imaging could be first converted in quantitative units. These quantities appeared to be different from absolute quantities of chlordecone determined by gas chromatography (GC), but they were perfectly correlated (R(2) = 0.995). The equation of the corresponding correlation curve was thus efficiently used to convert quantities measured by MALDI imaging into absolute quantities. Our method combining labeled normalization and calibration with an orthogonal technique allowed the in situ absolute quantification of chlordecone by MALDI imaging. Finally, our results obtained on the pathological mouse liver illustrate the advantages of quantitative MALDI imaging which preserves information on in situ localization without radioactive labeling and with a simple sample preparation.

  19. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  20. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  1. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Ahn

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1 A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2 To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4. Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  2. Absolute parameters of young stars: QZ Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, W. S. G.; Blackford, M.; Butland, R.; Budding, E.

    2017-09-01

    New high-resolution spectroscopy and BVR photometry together with literature data on the complex massive quaternary star QZ Car are collected and analysed. Absolute parameters are found as follows. System A: M1 = 43 (±3), M2 = 19 (+3 -7), R1 = 28 (±2), R2 = 6 (±2), (⊙); T1 ˜ 28 000, T2 ˜ 33 000 K; System B: M1 = 30 (±3), M2 = 20 (±3), R1 = 10 (±0.5), R2 = 20 (±1), (⊙); T1 ˜ 36 000, T2 ˜ 30 000 K (model dependent temperatures). The wide system AB: Period = 49.5 (±1) yr, Epochs, conjunction = 1984.8 (±1), periastron = 2005.3 (±3) yr, mean separation = 65 (±3), (au); orbital inclination = 85 (+5 -15) deg, photometric distance ˜2700 (±300) pc, age = 4 (±1) Myr. Other new contributions concern: (a) analysis of the timing of minima differences (O - C)s for the eclipsing binary (System B); (b) the width of the eclipses, pointing to relatively large effects of radiation pressure; (c) inferences from the rotational widths of lines for both Systems A and B; and (d) implications for theoretical models of early-type stars. While feeling greater confidence on the quaternary's general parametrization, observational complications arising from strong wind interactions or other, unclear, causes still inhibit precision and call for continued multiwavelength observations. Our high-inclination value for the AB system helps to explain failures to resolve the wide binary in the previous years. The derived young age independently confirms membership of QZ Car to the open cluster Collinder 228.