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Sample records for canal wall dentine

  1. Microorganism penetration in dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal walls. In vitro SEM study

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    Saad Al-Nazhan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This in vitro study aimed to investigate the ability of Candida albicans (C. albicans and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis to penetrate dentinal tubules of instrumented and retreated root canal surface of split human teeth. Materials and Methods Sixty intact extracted human single-rooted teeth were divided into 4 groups, negative control, positive control without canal instrumentation, instrumented, and retreated. Root canals in the instrumented group were enlarged with endodontic instruments, while root canals in the retreated group were enlarged, filled, and then removed the canal filling materials. The teeth were split longitudinally after canal preparation in 3 groups except the negative control group. The teeth were inoculated with both microorganisms separately and in combination. Teeth specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the depth of penetration into the dentinal tubules was assessed using the SMILE view software (JEOL Ltd. Results Penetration of C. albicans and E. faecalis into the dentinal tubules was observed in all 3 groups, although penetration was partially restricted by dentin debris of tubules in the instrumented group and remnants of canal filling materials in the retreated group. In all 3 groups, E. faecalis penetrated deeper into the dentinal tubules by way of cell division than C. albicans which built colonies and penetrated by means of hyphae. Conclusions Microorganisms can easily penetrate dentinal tubules of root canals with different appearance based on the microorganism size and status of dentinal tubules.

  2. Effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation on root canal wall dentin with different laser initiators.

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    Zhang, C; Kimura, Y; Matsumoto, K; Harashima, T; Zhou, H

    1998-05-01

    The effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation with different laser initiators on the permeability and ultrastructure of the root canal wall dentin were investigated in vitro. Forty extracted human single-rooted teeth were randomly assigned to four groups. Group 1 teeth were not lased as a control. Group 2 specimens received four 10-s duration laser exposures for a total exposure of 40 s/canal. In group 3 specimens, the root canals were painted with black ink and then lased by the same method as group 2 teeth. In group 4 specimens, root canals were treated with 38% Ag(NH3)2F and then lased by the same method as group 2 teeth. Laser parameters were set at 2 W, 20 pps. After being placed in 0.6% rhodamine B solution for 48 h, the teeth were sectioned for study by stereoscope and scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis showed there were significant differences (p permeability in the apical areas between groups 3 and 1, 4 and 1, and 4 and 2. Scanning electron microscopic examination showed that laser treatment alone had no obvious effects on the root canal wall. The root canal surfaces prepared for by laser irradiation with black ink or 38% Ag(NH3)2F revealed melting, smear layer evaporation, and open dentinal tubules. Black ink was more effective than 38% Ag(NH3)2F as a Nd:YAG laser initiator.

  3. Influence of dentin from the root canal walls and the pulp chamber floor on the pH of intracanal medicaments.

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    Agrafioti, Anastasia; Tzimpoulas, Nestoras E; Kontakiotis, Evangelos G

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the alterations in the pH of calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel, and their combination after adding dentin powder from the root canal walls and the pulp chamber floor. Ca(OH)2 paste, 2% CHX gel, and their combination were examined. Dentin powder was obtained from the root canal walls and the pulp chamber floor of bovine teeth and added as 1.8% to the volume of the medications. The pH values of the mixtures were assessed immediately after preparation, after 24 hours, and on days 7 and 14. Data were analyzed statistically by analysis of variance and the Student's t test (P = .05). pH values of Ca(OH)2 were always above 12 in the presence or absence of dentin powder during the 14 days of the study. A significant decrease in pH values of Ca(OH)2 was observed after 14 days when dentin from the root canal wall was added (P dentin (P = .001). The t test showed a significant difference in the increase of the pH values when the different dentin types were added (P = .002). The pH of the Ca(OH)2 and CHX gel combination was not influenced by dentin powder from the root canal walls, and a reduction was observed after 14 days, exactly like in the control group. The pH values of the combination did not alter after 14 days when pulp chamber floor dentin was added. The different dentin types variably affect the pH of Ca(OH)2 paste, 2% CHX gel, and their combination in the studied periods. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. How to bond to root canal dentin

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    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  5. Ultrastructural investigation of root canal dentine surface after application of active ultrasonic method

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    Mitić Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The basic work principle of all ultrasonic techniques is the piezoelectric effect of producing high frequency ultrasounds of small length, which are transmitted over the endodontic extensions or canal instruments into the root canal. When in contact with the tissue, ultrasonic vibrations are converted into mechanical oscillations. Ultrasonic waves and the obtained oscillations along with the synergic effect of irrigation bring about the elimination of smear layer from the root canal walls. OBJECTIVE The aim of the study was to ultrastucturally examine the effect of smear layer removal from the walls of canals by the application of the active ultrasonic method without irrigation, that is by the application of ultrasound and irrigation using distilled water and 2.5% NaOCl. METHOD The investigation comprised 35 single-canal, extracted human teeth. After removal of the root canal content, experimental samples were divided into three groups. According to the procedure required, the first group was treated by ultrasound without irrigation; the second one by ultrasound with irrigation using distilled water; and the third group was treated by ultrasound and irrigation using 2.5% NaOCl solution. The control samples were treated by machine rotating instruments (Pro-File and were rinsed by distilled water. RESULTS The obtained results showed that the ultrasonic treatment of the root canal without irrigation did not remove the smear layer. The dentine canals are masked, and big dentine particles are scattered on the intertubular dentine. The ultrasonic treatment by using irrigation with distilled water provides cleaner dentine walls and open dentine tubules but with smaller particles on the intertubular dentine. The ultrasound treatment by using irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl solution provides a clean intertubular dentine surface without a smear layer and clearly open dentine tubules. CONCLUSION Instrumentation of the root canal by application of

  6. Effect of two contemporary root canal sealers on root canal dentin microhardness.

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    Khallaf, Maram E

    2017-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment depends on proper cleaning, disinfecting and shaping of the root canal space. Pulpless teeth have lower dentin microhardness value compared to that of vital teeth. A material which can cause change in dentin composition may affect the microhardness. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two root canal sealers on dentin microhardness. Forty two single rooted teeth were selected and divided into 3 equal groups; Apexit, iRootSP and control groups (n=14) Each group was then divided into 2 subgroups according to the post evaluation period; 1 week and 2 months (n=7). Root canal procedure was done in the experimental groups and obturation was made using either; Apexit, iRootSP or left unprepared and unobturated in the control group. Roots were sectioned transversely into cervical, middle and apical segments. The three sections of each root were mounted in a plastic chuck with acrylic resin. The coronal dentin surfaces of the root segments werepolished. Microhardness of each section was measured at 500 µm and 1000 µm from the canal lumen. Four way-ANOVA revealed that different tested sealer materials, canal third, measuring distance from the pulp and time as independent variables had statistically non significant effect on mean microhardness values (VHN) at p≤0.001. Among iRootSP groups there was a statistically significant difference between iRoot SP at coronal root portion (87.79±17.83) and iRoot SP at apical root portion (76.26±9.33) groups where (p=0.01). IRoot SP at coronal canal third had higher statistically significant mean microhardness value (87.79±17.83) compared to Apexit at coronal third (73.61±13.47) where (p=0.01). Root canal sealers do not affect dentin microhardness. Key words:Root canal, dentin, sealers, microhardness, bioceramic.

  7. Microtensile bond strength between adhesive cements and root canal dentin

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    Bouillaguet, Serge; Troesch, Sabra; Wataha, John C.; Krejci, Ivo; Meyer, Jean Marc; Pashley, David H

    2003-01-01

    The hypotheses tested were that the bond strength of adhesive cements to root canal dentin (1) would be reduced as a function of configuration factor, polymerization process and type of luting material and (2) would be lowered near the apex of the tooth.

  8. Interactions between root canal irrigants, sealers and dentin

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    Neelakantan, P.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to determine the interactions between root filling materials and root dentin and to investigate if root canal irrigating solutions had an impact on these interactions. The following outcomes were assessed in the studies encompassed in this thesis: (i) dislocation

  9. Dislodgement resistance of calcium silicate-based materials from root canals with varying thickness of dentine.

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    Ulusoy, Ö I; Paltun, Y N; Güven, N; Çelik, B

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the dislodgement resistance of DiaRoot BioAggregate and Biodentine from canals in roots with varying amounts of remaining dentine thickness. A total of 90 maxillary incisor teeth with similar dimensions were used. The teeth were extracted for periodontal reasons from adult subjects aged between 52 and 61 years. They were decoronated at the cemento-enamel junction. Simulated internal cavities with a depth of 3 mm were performed by widening the canals on the coronal thirds of the roots, leaving varying amounts of remaining dentine thickness. The canals were enlarged progressively using round diamond burs until the desired dentine wall thickness was obtained. The samples were divided into three main groups (n = 30 each) according to the dentine thickness as follows: group 1: dentine thickness of 0.75 mm, group 2: dentine thickness of 1.50 mm and group 3: dentine thickness of 2.25 mm. Then, these main groups were further divided into two subgroups (n = 15 each) according to the filling material (DiaRoot BioAggregate or Biodentine). Horizontal root slices of 1 mm were obtained from each specimen. Vertical loading was applied to the filling materials at a cross-head speed of 1 mm min-1 using a universal testing machine. The force that led to dislodgement of the filling was recorded in Newtons. The resistance to dislodgement was calculated in megapascals (MPa) by dividing the load in Newtons by the area of the bonded interface. The data were statistically analysed with two-way anova with Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test. Biodentine had significantly higher resistance to dislodgement than DiaRoot BioAggregate (P resistance compared to those with dentine thicknesses of 1.50 and 2.25 mm (P resistance was obtained from the DiaRoot BioAggregate group with 0.75 mm dentine thickness (2.72 ± 0.90 MPa). The dislodgement resistance of Biodentine and DiaRoot BioAggregate from root dentine was influenced by remaining dentine thickness

  10. Chemical treatment of the intra-canal dentin surface: a new approach to modify dentin hydrophobicity

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    Cesar GAITAN-FONSECA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the hydrophobicity of dentin surfaces that were modified through chemical silanization with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS. Material and Methods An in vitro experimental study was performed using 40 human permanent incisors that were divided into the following two groups: non-silanized and silanized. The specimens were pretreated and chemically modified with OTS. After the chemical modification, the dentin hydrophobicity was examined using a water contact angle measurement (WCA. The effectiveness of the modification of hydrophobicity was verified by the fluid permeability test (FPT. Results and Conclusions Statistically significant differences were found in the values of WCA and FPT between the two groups. After silanization, the hydrophobic intraradicular dentin surface exhibited in vitro properties that limit fluid penetration into the sealed root canal. This chemical treatment is a new approach for improving the sealing of the root canal system.

  11. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

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    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute for Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Brajkovic, Denis [Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Serbia); Ilic, Dragan [Department of Restorative Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael [Department of Osteology and Biomechanics (IOBM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Lottestr. 55A, 22529 Hamburg (Germany); Rakocevic, Zlatko [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute for Nuclear Science “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute for Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Busse, Björn, E-mail: b.busse@uke.uni-hamburg.de [Department of Osteology and Biomechanics (IOBM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Lottestr. 55A, 22529 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Different irrigation solutions and disinfectants were used for treatment of root canal dentine and gutta-percha points. • Materials surface characteristics were assessed using quantitative backscattered electron imaging, reference point indentation, and contact angle analyzer. • The most significant differences in mineralization, indentation, and adhesive outcomes were observed after ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid treatment. • Irrigation solutions confer to superior sealing ability of endodontic filling materials. • Micromechanical characteristics of dentine after irrigation are considerable reduced. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples’ microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  12. Vitality of Enterococcus faecalis inside dentinal tubules after five root canal disinfection methods

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    Niranjan Ashok Vatkar; Vivek Hegde; Sucheta Sathe

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the vitality of Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules after subjected to five root canal disinfection methods. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (n = 60) were colonized with E. faecalis. After 4 weeks of incubation, the dentin blocks were divided into one control and five test groups (n = 10 each). The root canals of test groups were subjected to one of the disinfection methods, namely, normal saline (NS), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine digluconate (C...

  13. Bio-reconstruction of root canal using dentin post

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    Navin Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the successful management of complicated crown fracture of left maxillary central incisor (#21 of 23-year-old male using dentin (biological post made from human tooth. Endodontic treatment was initiated and sectional obturation was done using ProTaper gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. The coronal space was modified to receive a human dentin post. A two-step procedure comprising direct and indirect technique of post fabrication was done to achieve the accuracy of biological post. A maxillary cuspid from an institutional tooth bank was taken, sectioned mesiodistally using a diamond disc simulating the length and thickness of mock post. Dentin post was first verified on the plaster model and then cemented in tooth #21. Core build up was done with composite and porcelain fused to metal (PFM crown was luted. On the follow-up visits, patient was asymptomatic and radiographic evaluation revealed normal periradicular architecture. Biological posts may be good alternatives to conventional post systems as they preserve internal dentin walls, provide excellent adhesion, and resilience similar to natural tooth structure.

  14. Influence of dowel type on push-out bond strength to regional root canal dentin.

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    Ayad, Mohamed F; Ibrahim, Lamiaa A; Rashid, Robert G

    2012-10-01

    To compare the laboratory bond strengths of three different types of fiber-reinforced composite dowel systems in three different locations of prepared root canal dentin. 60 human extracted intact upper central incisors were selected. The coronal aspect of each tooth was removed, and the remaining root received endodontic therapy. The roots were divided into three experimental groups (n = 20). Roots were restored with one of the following dowel systems according to the manufacturers' instructions: carbon fiber (C-Posts), quartz (Aestheti-Plus), glass fiber (FibreKor). A single bond adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus) was applied to the walls of the dowel spaces, excess carefully removed with paper points, and then light cured for 10 seconds. A dual-polymerizing resin luting agent (Variolink II) was mixed and then placed in the dowel spaces using a lentulo spiral instrument. The roots were placed in light-protected cylinders; then the light source was placed directly on the flat cervical tooth surfaces and the cement was polymerized. Specimens were stored in light-proof boxes for 24 hours. Each root was cut horizontally, and three 1 mm-thick root segments (one apical, one middle, and one cervical) were prepared. Using a push-out test, the bond strength between dowel and dentin was measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (alpha = 0.05). Dowel type and regional root canal dentin resulted in significant differences for push-out bond strength (P dentin, with a reduction in values from the coronal to middle and apical thirds for all experimental groups (P < 0.001).

  15. Effects of the copper vapour laser radiation in the root canal wall dentine: in vitro experiment using scanning electron microscopy and stereoscopy; Efeitos da radiacao laser de vapor de cobre na parede de dentina de canais radiculares: estudo in vitro por meio de microscopia eletronica de varredura e microscopio estereoscopico

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    Silveira, Maria Claudia Garcia da

    2001-07-01

    Ten human uniradicular teeth had their crown removed along the cement-enamel junction and right away a proper chemical-surgical preparation of the radicular canals was done; the roots were longitudinally sectioned in order to allow the irradiation of the surfaces of the root canals wall dentine. The hemi-roots were separated in two groups: group I (control), with four hemi-roots, not irradiated; and group II, with 16 hemi-roots, subdivided in four sub-groups submitted to the following exposition time: 0,02 s; 0,05 s; 0,1 s and 0,5 s. A copper vapour laser was used with a 510,6 nm wavelength, total average power of 11 W in green and yellow emissions; average power of 6,5 W in green emission; pulse repetition rate of 16.000 Hz and pulse duration of 30 ns. The pulse energy (green line) is 0,4 mJ and the peak power 13,5 W. The laser cavity is unstable type (R{sub 1}=3.900 mm and R{sub 2}-250 mm). The focusing have focal length lens f{sub 1}=250 mm and f{sub 2}=150 mm. The beam quality is of the M{sup 2}=5. The results obtained by scanning electron microscopy analysis showed the appearance of a cavity in the region of the laser beam incidence in the edges of this cavity, dentin was melt and resolidified presenting also cracks due to heat diffusion. Based on these results, we concluded that the size of the cavity formed in the dentin is directly proportional to the rate of exposure and, the more laser emission in the same area, more damage in the root canals wall dentin occurs. More studies need to be done with different exposition's time in order to obtain a safety protocol that does not cause injury in dental and support tissue. (author)

  16. Microhardness Characteristics Value of Root canal Dentin After application With Different Types of EDTA

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    drg. Ph.D, Nurhayati NatsirSp.KG

    2016-01-01

    The Result Show there arae differences in dentin microhardness decrease significantly in all treatment group EDTA solution, Amountingto 13 667kg/mm2. This study aim to determine the charactheristics of the microhardness impairment root canal dentin after application with different types of EDTA.

  17. Concurrent Effects of Bleaching Materials and the Size of Root Canal Preparation on Cervical Dentin Microhardness.

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    Kazemipoor, Maryam; Azad, Shaghayegh; Farahat, Farnaz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concurrent effect of root canal preparation size and intra coronal bleaching on dentin microhardness. Seventy-two intact anterior teeth were root canal treated and randomly divided into two groups (n=36) according to the size of coronal root canal preparation. The coronal portions of the canals were then enlarged with #2 and 4 Peeso reamers, respectively. Following root canal obturation, teeth were assigned into three groups (n=12) to be treated with bleaching agents containing 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), sodium perborate (SP) and distilled water as control group. The teeth were stored at 37(º)C and 100% humidity for 7 days. Dentinal blocks with 3 mm thickness were obtained from the cervical region and Vickers microhardness number (VHN) were measured for outer and inner dentin in each tooth sample. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests. In the outer dentin, the mean VHN in the HP and control groups showed statistically significant differences (P=0.047). The mean VHN of inner dentin for the large preparation size was statistically higher in comparison to the small preparation size (P=0.042). There was a statistically significant difference in the mean VHN of inner dentin with small preparation size between HP and SP groups (P=0.029) and HP and control groups (P=0.021). Intra coronal bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide, affects the inner and outer dentin significantly. Excessive removal of cervical dentin, following root canal preparation, alongside the adverse effect of bleaching materials on dentin could result in the tooth fracture.

  18. Uncontrolled removal of dentin during in vitro ultrasonic irrigant activation in curved root canals

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    Retsas, A.; Koursoumis, A.; Tzimpoulas, N.; Boutsioukis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of file type and activation time on the uncontrolled removal of dentin during in vitro ultrasonic irrigant activation in prepared curved root canals. Methods: Seventy-two curved mesial root canals of human mandibular molars were prepared

  19. Effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin

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    Flávia Emi Razera BALDASSO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin. Sixty root canals from mandibular incisors were instrumented and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10 according to the irrigant used: QMiX, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid (CA, 1% peracetic acid (PA, 2.5% NaOCl (solution control, and distilled water (negative control. The chelating solutions were used to irrigate the canal followed by 2.5% NaOCl as a final flush. After the irrigation protocols, all specimens were rinsed with 10 mL of distilled water to remove any residue of the chemical solutions. Before and after the final irrigation protocols, dentin microhardness was measured with a Knoop indenter. Three indentations were made at 100 µm and 500 µm from the root canal lumen. Afterwards, the specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopic analysis and the amount of dentin erosion was examined. Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the results with a significance level set at 5%. At 100 µm, all protocols significantly reduced dentin microhardness (p < .05, while at 500 µm, this effect was detected only in the EDTA and QMiX groups (p < .05. CA was the irrigant that caused more extensive erosion in dentinal tubules, followed by PA and EDTA. QMiX opened dentinal tubules, but did not cause dentin erosion. Results suggest that QMiX and 17% EDTA reduced dentin microhardness at a greater depth. Additionally, QMiX did not cause dentin erosion.

  20. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

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    Giuseppe Lo Giudice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm than the middle zone (3.74 μm and the apical zone (1.73 μm. The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2 was similar in coronal zone (46,798±10,644 and apical zone (45,192±10,888, while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940±7,651. However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system.

  1. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study.

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    Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Centofanti, Antonio; Artemisia, Alessandro; Bramanti, Ennio; Militi, Angela; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Favaloro, Angelo; Irrera, Alessia; Lo Giudice, Roberto; Cicciù, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm) than the middle zone (3.74 μm) and the apical zone (1.73 μm). The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm(2)) was similar in coronal zone (46,798 ± 10,644) and apical zone (45,192 ± 10,888), while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940 ± 7,651). However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system.

  2. Bio-reconstruction of root canal using dentin post

    OpenAIRE

    Navin Mishra; Isha Narang

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the successful management of complicated crown fracture of left maxillary central incisor (#21) of 23-year-old male using dentin (biological) post made from human tooth. Endodontic treatment was initiated and sectional obturation was done using ProTaper gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. The coronal space was modified to receive a human dentin post. A two-step procedure comprising direct and indirect technique of post fabrication was done to achieve the accuracy of bi...

  3. The effectiveness of syringe irrigation and ultrasonics to remove debris from simulated irregularities within prepared root canal walls.

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    Lee, S-J; Wu, M-K; Wesselink, P R

    2004-10-01

    To compare the ability of syringe irrigation and ultrasonic irrigation to remove artificially placed dentine debris from simulated canal irregularities within prepared root canals. After canal enlargement, twelve canines were split longitudinally into two halves. On the wall of one half of each root canal a standard groove of 4 mm in length, 0.2 mm in width and 0.5 mm in depth was cut, 2-6 mm from the apex, to simulate uninstrumented canal extensions. On the wall of the other half, three standard saucer-shaped depressions of 0.3 mm in diameter and 0.5 mm in depth were cut at 2, 4 and 6 mm from the apex to simulate uninstrumented canal irregularities. Each groove and depression were filled with dentine debris mixed with 2% NaOCl to simulate a situation when dentine debris accumulates in uninstrumented canal extensions and irregularities during canal preparation. Each tooth was re-assembled by reconnecting the two halves, using wire and an impression putty material. Two per cent NaOCl was then delivered into each canal either using syringe irrigation (n = 8) or using ultrasonic irrigation (n = 8). Before and after irrigation, images of the two halves of the canal wall were taken, using a microscope and a digital camera, after which they were scanned into a PC as TIFF images. The amount of remaining dentine debris in the grooves and depressions was evaluated by using a scoring system between 0-3: the higher the score, the more the debris. The data were analysed by means of the Mann-Whitney U-test. Both forms of irrigation reduced the debris score significantly. The debris score was statistically significantly lower after ultrasonic irrigation than after syringe irrigation (P = 0.002 for grooves, P = 0.047 for depressions). Ultrasonic irrigation ex vivo is more effective than syringe irrigation in removing artificially created dentine debris placed in simulated uninstrumented extensions and irregularities in straight, wide root canals.

  4. Decalcifying capability of irrigating solutions on root canal dentin mineral content

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    Claudio Poggio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chelating agents are believed to aid root canal irrigation and to be able to remove the inorganic smear layer. Aims: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and to compare the decalcifying capability of different irrigating solutions (Tubuliclean, Largal Ultra, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid 17%, Tetraclean, Tetraclean NA. Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary central incisors were used. Root canals were instrumented and irrigated. From each root, four comparable slices of cervical dentin were obtained. At three successive 5-min interval immersion times, the concentration of calcium extracted from root canal dentin was assessed with an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed by means of Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Significance was predetermined at P < 0.05. Results and Conclusions: For all irrigating solutions, the maximum amount of Ca 2+ extracted from root canal dentin samples was reached after 10 min contact time except for citric acid-based agents (Tetraclean and Tetraclean NA which induced a higher and still increasing calcium release even after 10 min contact time. In order to obtain an efficient decalcifying action on dentin and to facilitate the biomechanical procedures, citric acid-based irrigants can be applied.

  5. Effects of chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite on the microhardness of root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luciane Dias; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge; Nunes, Willian; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of endodontic irrigants on the microhardness of root canal dentin. Thirty extracted single-rooted human teeth were used. The crowns were sectioned at the cementoenamel junction. Each root was transversely sectioned into cervical, middle, and apical segments, resulting in 90 specimens. The 3 sections of each root were separately mounted in an individual silicon device with acrylic resin. The specimens were randomly divided into the following 3 groups (n = 30), according to the irrigant solution used: (1) group 1, control (saline solution); (2) group 2, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate solution; and (3) group 3, 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). After 15 minutes of irrigation, dentin microhardness was measured on each section at 500 microm and 1000 microm from the pulp-dentin interface with a Vickers diamond microhardness tester in Vickers hardness number (VHN). Data obtained were analyzed using analysis of variance and the Tukey test (5%). Specimens irrigated with 2% chlorhexidine (group 2) or 1% NaOCl (group 3) presented lower values of dentin microhardness, with significant difference in relation to the control group (P chlorhexidine and NaOCl solutions significantly reduced the microhardness of root canal dentin at 500 microm and 1000 microm from the pulp-dentin interface.

  6. Effect of the type of endodontic sealer on the bond strength between fiber post and root wall dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Zare, Sepideh

    2014-07-01

    An important factor that interferes with the bonding between the root canal wall and resin cement is the root canal sealer remnant. There is controversy about the effect of eugenol-containing sealers on the bond strength between resin cements and fiber post. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the type of endodontic sealer on the bond strength of FRC posts cemented with resin cement to the root canal wall. In this in vitro study, 20 extracted mandibular first premolars were endodontically treated and divided into two groups according to the endodontic sealer used (n=10): G1: AH26 (Resin based); and G2: Endofill (Eugenol-based). After preparing post space, adhesive resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) was used for cementation of the fiber post to the root canal dentin. Three 3 mm thick slices were obtained from each root. The push-out test was performed with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used for analyzing data (α=0.05). The two-way ANOVA showed that different root canal sealers (P=0.037) had significant effects on bond strength (BS), but root canal regions (P=0.811) and interaction between root canal sealers and root canal regions (P=0.258) had no significant effects on BS. Maximum and minimum mean values were observed in the AH26 group, the apical region and the Endofill group in the apical region, respectively. Post Hoc Tukey test revealed that there were no significant differences between different root canal regions in both cements (P>0.05). The region of root canal had no effect on the bond strength of cemented fiber posts to the root canal. Eugenol-based sealers (Endofill) significantly reduced the bond strength between fiber posts luted with resin cement to the root canal.

  7. Effect of the type of endodontic sealer on the bond strength between fiber post and root wall dentin.

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    Ramin Mosharraf

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An important factor that interferes with the bonding between the root canal wall and resin cement is the root canal sealer remnant. There is controversy about the effect of eugenol-containing sealers on the bond strength between resin cements and fiber post. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the type of endodontic sealer on the bond strength of FRC posts cemented with resin cement to the root canal wall.In this in vitro study, 20 extracted mandibular first premolars were endodontically treated and divided into two groups according to the endodontic sealer used (n=10: G1: AH26 (Resin based; and G2: Endofill (Eugenol-based. After preparing post space, adhesive resin cement (Panavia F 2.0 was used for cementation of the fiber post to the root canal dentin. Three 3 mm thick slices were obtained from each root. The push-out test was performed with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used for analyzing data (α=0.05.The two-way ANOVA showed that different root canal sealers (P=0.037 had significant effects on bond strength (BS, but root canal regions (P=0.811 and interaction between root canal sealers and root canal regions (P=0.258 had no significant effects on BS. Maximum and minimum mean values were observed in the AH26 group, the apical region and the Endofill group in the apical region, respectively. Post Hoc Tukey test revealed that there were no significant differences between different root canal regions in both cements (P>0.05.The region of root canal had no effect on the bond strength of cemented fiber posts to the root canal. Eugenol-based sealers (Endofill significantly reduced the bond strength between fiber posts luted with resin cement to the root canal.

  8. Effect of calcium hydroxide pastes and vehicles on root canal dentin microhardness

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    María G Pacios

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium hydroxide pastes used in the endodontic therapy may produce changes in the physical properties of the dentin. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium hydroxide pastes and their vehicles on microhardness of root canal dentin. Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary anterior teeth were used. The crowns of the teeth were removed at the cemento-enamel junction. Canals were instrumented, horizontally sectioned into 2 segments, embedded in acrylic resin, and polished. A total of 120 specimens were randomly divided into 12 groups. Specimens stayed in contact with the vehicles or the pastes prepared with the calcium hydroxide powder and the same vehicles. The vehicles are: Distilled water, chlorhexidine, carticaine in the anesthetic solution, propylene glycol, monochlorophenol and monochlorophenol - propylene glycol. The references Vickers microhardness were obtained prior the application of the medicaments. Samples were then exposed to the medicaments for 3, 7, and 14 days, and microhardness measured again. The results were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tukey test, and regression. Results: All vehicles and pastes, except distilled water, significantly decreased the microhardness of the root dentin; however, calcium hydroxide + camphorated monochlorophenol - propylene glycol and camphorated monochlorophenol - propylene glycol showed the highest decrease. Conclusion: Vehicles contribute to calcium hydroxide reduction of root canal dentin microhardness as constituent of endodontic pastes.

  9. The Impact of a 940 nm Diode Laser with Radial Firing Tip and Bare End Fiber Tip on Enterococcus faecalis in the Root Canal Wall Dentin of Bovine Teeth: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Lünzum, Ruth; Gutknecht, Norbert; Conrads, Georg; Franzen, Rene

    2017-07-01

    This in vitro study aimed to compare the bactericidal effect of two different laser delivery systems, a radial firing tip (RFT) and bare end fiber tip (BFT) used with the 940 nm diode laser on Enterococcus faecalis inoculated onto bovine radicular dentin. A total of 100 bovine dentin slices with a defined thickness of 500 and 1000 μm were prepared. They were assigned into four test groups together with untreated samples served as control for each slice thickness. The slices were inoculated on one side with 1 μL E. faecalis suspension and laser irradiation was performed indirectly on the opposite side with the 940 nm diode laser delivered with a 200 μm RFT and a BFT at 1 and 1.5 W in continuous wave mode for 8 sec per cycle and repeated four times. After irradiation, the remaining bacteria were detached and the produced suspension was diluted and plated onto blood agar plates with 5% sheep blood and incubated overnight at 37°C in a CO2-rich atmosphere. The colony-forming units of E. faecalis were counted and the bacterial reduction was analyzed. The diode laser equipped with RFT fiber design further reduced the number of vital E. faecalis cells significantly compared with BFT design, regardless of the used power and dentin thickness (p diode laser in conjugation with RFT showed a satisfactory bactericidal effect without any thermal side effect to the tooth-supporting tissues.

  10. Comparison of Dentinal Crack Formation With Reciproc, Mtwo and ProTaper Root Canal Preparation Systems

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    Nazari Moghaddam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Instrumentation with rotary instruments could potentially cause dentinal cracks possibly leading to tooth fracture. Reciproc files require a single file to finalize the root canal preparation and the effect of this procedure has not been compared with other systems. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of dentinal micro-cracks following root canal preparations with ProTaper, Mtwo and Reciproc files. Materials and Methods In an experimental in vitro trial, 80 maxillary and mandibular first molars were selected and their crowns and distal roots were cut. The roots were then examined to remove any previous cracks and defects. An impression polyether material was used to simulate teeth periodontal ligament (PDL. The teeth were divided to four experimental groups (n = 20 and prepared using Reciproc, Mtwo and ProTaper or remained unprepared as a control group. The specimens were then sectioned horizontally on 3, 5 and 9 mm from the apex and number of micro-cracks was determined by stereomicroscope. The incidence of dentinal cracks on different systems or sections were statistically analyzed by means of the chi-square test. Results Dentinal defects on 3-mm, 5-mm and 9-mm sections from the apex were noted in 10 (5.6%; 7 (3.9% and 9 (5.0% samples of all, respectively. Following canal preparation using Reciproc, ProTaper and Mtwo systems, the defects were observed in 7 (3.9%, 12 (6.7% and 7 (3.9% the sections, respectively. No significant differences were observed regarding the defect incidence on the studied instrumentation files or sections. Conclusions Regarding the study limitations, dentinal cracks were observed in all files and distances from the apex. Although there was more crack incidence in ProTaper files, no significant differences were noted regarding the studied systems and sections from the apex.

  11. Microhardness characteristics values of root canal dentin after application with different types of EDTA

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    Wahyuniwati Wahyuniwati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the characteristics of the microhardness impairment root canal dentin after application with different types of EDTA. Samples mandibular premolar teeth with one root canal, each divided into 4 groups: EDTA solution, EDTA gel, EDTA cream and negative control; and each group consisted of 6 samples. The teeth were decoronated  at cementoenamel junction (CEJ,  prepared by the crown down pressureless technique, cut along  longitudinal direction, and  each sample was attached  to selfcured acrylic and then soaked in distilled water. Samples were taken early microhardness measurement by means of Digital Vickers Microhardness Tester. The sample is then applied to the appropriate group of materials EDTA for 5 minutes, except for the negative control group, soaked in saline solution for 5 menit, then performed the final measurement of microhardness of dentin. The results of measurements taken from  the average value of measurements made at 3 points, coronal, middle and apical. Data were collected and analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s Post Hoc test. The results showed there are differences in dentin microhardness decrease significantly in all treatment groups compared to the negative control group (p 0.05 which means there is no difference in microhardness reduction in dentin significantly among the test group.

  12. Geometric factors affecting dentin bonding in root canals: a theoretical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Loushine, Robert J; Lambrechts, Paul; Weller, R Norman; Pashley, David H

    2005-08-01

    Cavity configuration factor (C-factor) is the ratio of the bonded surface area in a cavity to the unbonded surface area. In a box-like class I cavity, there may be five times more bonded surface area than the unbonded surface area. During polymerization, the volume of monomers is reduced, which creates sufficient shrinkage stresses to debond the material from dentin, thereby decreasing retention and increasing leakage. The important variables influencing bonding adhesive root-filling materials to canals was examined using a truncated inverted cone model. C-factors in bonded root canals exhibit a negative correlation with sealer thickness. For a 20 mm-long canal prepared with a size 25 file, calculated C-factors ranged from 46 to 23,461 with decreasing sealer thickness (500-1 microm), compared to a C-factor of 32 when the canal was filled only with sealer. As the thickness of the adhesive is reduced, the volummetric shrinkage is reduced, which results in a reduction in shrinkage stress (S-factor). C-factors above 954 calculated with sealer thickness smaller than 25 microm are partially compensated by increases in bonding area and decreases in shrinkage volume. However, the interaction of these two geometrically related factors (C- and S-factors) predicts that bonding of adhesive root-filling materials to root canals is highly unfavorable when compared with indirect intracoronal restorations with a similar resin film thickness.

  13. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1: 13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5 ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth.

  14. Can viscosity of acid etchant influence the adhesion of fibre posts to root canal dentine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, M M S; Bocangel, J S; Henn, S; Pereira-Cenci, T; Cenci, M S; Piva, E; Demarco, F F

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of acid viscosity, endodontic sealer and root canal region on the push-out bond strength of a glass fibre post. Seventy-eight single-rooted human teeth were selected (60 for push-out and 18 for scanning electron microscopy characterization, SEM, n = 13 per group). The root canals were prepared with a step-back technique and then filled with Endofill or AH Plus sealer. Teeth without root fillings were used as controls. The preparation of the post-space was to a length of 11 mm using standardized rotary instruments. The root dentine was treated with 37% phosphoric acid (gel or liquid). The fibre posts (Reforpost) were silanized, and resin cement (Enforce) was used for luting procedures. Each root was cross-sectioned, and samples from the cervical and apical regions were subjected to a push-out bond strength test. Specimens from each group were sectioned longitudinally and subjected to SEM characterization for the dentine/cement/post interface. Statistical analysis for push-out tests was carried out using factorial anova followed by Tukey's test (P endodontic sealer and region) and their interaction significantly influenced bond strength values (P endodontic sealers reduced bond strength values compared to the control (P Endodontic Journal.

  15. Incidence of Dentinal Cracks after Root Canal Preparation with Twisted File Adaptive Instruments Using Different Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Ertuğrul; Arslan, Hakan; Alsancak, Meltem; Kırıcı, Damla Özsu; Ersoy, İbrahim

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of root canal instrumentation using Twisted File Adaptive instruments (Axis/SybronEndo, Orange, CA) with different kinematics (adaptive motion, 90° clockwise [CW]-30° counterclockwise [CCW], 150° CW-30° CCW, 210° CW-30° CCW, and continuous rotation) on crack formation. One hundred five mandibular central incisor teeth were selected. Fifteen teeth were left unprepared (control group), and the remaining 90 teeth were assigned to the 5 root canal shaping groups as follows (n = 15): adaptive motion, 90° CW-30° CCW, 150° CW-30° CCW, 210° CW-30° CCW, continuous rotation, and hand file. All the roots were sectioned horizontally at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex with a low-speed saw under water cooling, and the slices were then viewed through a stereomicroscope at 25× magnification. Digital images of each slice were captured using a camera to determine the presence of dentinal cracks. No cracks were observed in the control group, and the continuous rotation group had more cracks than the reciprocation groups (90° CW-30° CCW, 150° CW-30° CCW, and 210° CW-30° CCW) (P < .05). Both the continuous rotation and adaptive motion groups had significantly more dentinal cracks than the hand file group (P < .05). Regarding the different sections (3, 6, and 9 mm), there was a significant difference between the experimental groups at the 9-mm level (P < .05). The incidence of dentinal cracks is less with TF Adaptive instruments working in 210° CW-30° CCW reciprocating motion compared with working in continuous rotation and adaptive motion. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Self-Adjusting File, Mtwo, and ProTaper on the root canal wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hin, E.S.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.; Shemesh, H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this ex vivo study was to observe the incidence of cracks in root dentin after root canal preparation with hand files, self-adjusting file (SAF), ProTaper, and Mtwo. Methods One hundred extracted mandibular premolars with single canals were randomly selected. Two

  17. Penetration of Sodium Hypochlorite Modified with Surfactants into Root Canal Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Flavio; Blasi, Andrea; Mohammadi, Zahed; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Estrela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of concentration, exposure time and temperature of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) added with surfactants on its penetration into dentinal tubules. Sixty-five extracted human permanent maxillary anterior teeth with single canals were prepared by ProTaper SX hand-operated instruments. The teeth were then sectioned perpendicular to the long axis. The crowns and apical thirds of all the teeth were removed. The remaining roots were processed into 4-mm-long blocks and stained overnight in crystal violet. One hundred and thirty stained blocks were further split into halves and treated by nine different types of NaOCl-based solutions. Three solutions were added with surfactants (Hypoclean, H6, Chlor-Xtra) and the others were regular hypochlorites at increasing concentrations (1%, 2%, 4%, 5.25%, dentin blocks were exposed to the solutions for 2, 5, and 20 min at 20 °C, 37 °C and 45 °C, respectively. The depth of NaOCl penetration was determined by bleaching of the stain and measured by light microscopy at 20x and 40x. Statistical comparisons were made by using a generalized linear model with Bonferroni's post-hoc correction. The shortest penetration (81±6.6 μm) was obtained after incubation in 1% NaOCl for 2 min at 20 °C; the highest penetration (376.3±3.8 μm) was obtained with Chlor-Xtra for 20 min at 45 °C. Varying NaOCl concentration produced a minimal effect while temperature and exposure time had a significant direct relationship with NaOCl penetration into dentinal tubules, especially those with lowered surface tension. The exposure time and temperature of sodium hypochlorite as well as the addition of surfactants may influence the penetration depth of irrigants into dentinal tubules.

  18. Effects of self-adjusting file, Mtwo, and ProTaper on the root canal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hin, Ellemieke S; Wu, Min-Kai; Wesselink, Paul R; Shemesh, Hagay

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this ex vivo study was to observe the incidence of cracks in root dentin after root canal preparation with hand files, self-adjusting file (SAF), ProTaper, and Mtwo. One hundred extracted mandibular premolars with single canals were randomly selected. Two angulated radiographs were taken for each tooth, and the width of the canal was measured at 9 mm from the apex. Five groups of 20 teeth each were comparable in canal width. The control group was left unprepared. Four experimental groups were instrumented with hand files, ProTaper, Mtwo, and SAF. Roots were then sectioned horizontally and observed under a microscope. The presence of dentinal cracks and their location were noted. The difference between the experimental groups was analyzed with a χ(2) test. No cracks were observed in the control group. In the experimental groups, ProTaper, Mtwo, and SAF caused cracks in 35%, 25%, and 10% of teeth, respectively. The hand-file group did not show any dentinal cracks (P cracks than hand files (P .05). Instrumentation of root canals with SAF, Mtwo, and ProTaper could cause damage to root canal dentin. SAF has a tendency to cause less dentinal cracks as compared with ProTaper or Mtwo. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrastructural analysis of the root canal walls after preparation with two rotary nickel-titanium endodontic instruments

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    Claudio Poggio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Root canal preparation may produce a large quantity of smear layer that covers canal walls. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM the root canal dentine after instrumentation with nickel-titanium rotary files, in order to evaluate the presence/absence of smear layer and the presence/absence of open tubules on the root canal walls at the coronal, middle, and apical third of each sample. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 single-rooted freshly extracted teeth were selected and divided into two groups. For each group, root canals were shaped with Mtwo and Revo-S instruments under irrigation with Sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Specimens were fractured longitudinally and SEM analyzed at standard magnification of ×1000 and ×5000. The presence/absence of smear layer and the presence/absence of open tubules at the coronal, middle, and apical third of each canal were evaluated using a three-step scale for scores. Statistical Analysis Used: Numeric data were analyzed using the Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-Statistical tests and significance was pre-determined at P < 0.05. Results and Conclusions: This study did not reveal differences among the two groups. Mtwo and Revo-S showed no significant difference between them and both presented very low smear layer scores and open tubules scores, with no significant difference among coronal, middle, and apical third. Mtwo and Revo-S rotary instruments seem to be effective in removing smear layer from canal walls.

  20. Measurement and visualization of file-to-wall contact during ultrasonically activated irrigation in simulated canals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Walmsley, A.D.; Versluis, Michel; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim (i) To quantify in a simulated root canal model the file-to-wall contact during ultrasonic activation of an irrigant and to evaluate the effect of root canal size, file insertion depth, ultrasonic power, root canal level and previous training, (ii) To investigate the effect of file-to-wall

  1. Chemical and ultramorphologic effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and sodium hypochlorite in young and old root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, H Ozgur; Buzoglu, Hatice Dogan; Calt, Semra; Cehreli, Zafer C; Varol, Elif; Temel, Abidin

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare the time-dependent chemical and ultramorphologic effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in young and old dentin. Sixty-four teeth scheduled for extraction were collected from young (60 years) patients. In 48 teeth, the dentin was reduced to a powder state and treated with EDTA or EDTA + NaOCl for 1 and 10 minutes, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the changes in the composition of dentin through dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HAp). In the remaining teeth (n = 16), the root canals were prepared, bisected, and subjected to the same time-dependent treatment regimens. The changes in the number and area of dentinal tubules were calculated by image analysis. The data were analyzed statistically by paired t test and one-way analysis of variance, followed by Tukey honestly significant difference test at P = .05. In both young and old dentin, EDTA significantly decreased the HAp intensity at 1 and 10 minutes, whereas EDTA + NaOCl only decreased that of old dentin at 10 minutes. Pair-wise comparisons revealed that in old dentin, the reduction in HAp intensity after treatment with EDTA and EDTA + NaOCl was significantly greater at 10 minutes than at 1 minute, whereas in young dentin, a significant decrease was only observed in the EDTA/10-minute subgroup. Compared with their 1-minute counterparts, 10-minute treatment with EDTA + NaOCl significantly increased the tubular diameter and tubular area of old dentin. In young dentin, the tubular area and diameter values were not affected by treatment time (P > .05). In young root dentin, 10-minute treatment with EDTA + NaOCl does not significantly alter the chemical and ultramorphologic structure and thus appears to be unnecessary. In old dentin, extended treatment time with EDTA + NaOCl should be avoided owing to excessive demineralization and erosion. In both types of dentin, EDTA was not effective in

  2. Surface debris of canal walls after post space preparation in endodontically treated teeth: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafino, Cinzia; Gallina, Giuseppe; Cumbo, Enzo; Ferrari, Marco

    2004-03-01

    To evaluate surface cleanliness of root canal walls along post space after endodontic treatment using 2 different irrigant regimens, obturation techniques, and post space preparation for adhesive bonding. Forty teeth, divided into 4 groups, were instrumented, using Ni-Ti rotary files, irrigated with NaOCl or NaOCl+EDTA and obturated with cold lateral condensation (CLC) or warm vertical condensation (WVC) of gutta-percha. After post space preparation, etching, and washing procedure, canal walls were observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Amount of debris, smear layer, sealer/gutta-percha remnants, and visibility of open tubules were rated. Higher amounts of rough debris, large sealer/gutta-percha remnants, thick smear layer, and no visibility of tubule orifices were recorded in all the groups at apical level of post space. At middle and coronal levels areas of clean dentin, alternating with areas covered by thin smear layer, smaller debris, gutta-percha remnants, and orifices of tubules partially or totally occluded by plugs were frequently observed. After endodontic treatment, obturation, and post space preparation SEM analysis of canal walls along post space shows large areas (covered by smear layer, debris, and sealer/gutta-percha remnants) not available for adhesive bonding and resin cementation of fiber posts.

  3. Influence of irrigation sequence on the adhesion of root canal sealers to dentin: a fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and push-out bond strength analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelakantan, P.; Sharma, S.; Shemesh, H.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is a lack of evidence on the chemical interaction between sealers and dentin. The influence of irrigation on the chemical interaction between root canal sealers and dentin was analyzed by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) and measurement of dislocation

  4. Uncontrolled Removal of Dentin during In Vitro Ultrasonic Irrigant Activation in Curved Root Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsas, Anastasios; Koursoumis, Anastasios; Tzimpoulas, Nestor; Boutsioukis, Christos

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of file type and activation time on the uncontrolled removal of dentin during in vitro ultrasonic irrigant activation in prepared curved root canals. Seventy-two curved mesial root canals of human mandibular molars were prepared to size 35/.04 taper. The specimens were randomly allocated to 4 groups (n = 18). Two milliliters of 2% sodium hypochlorite were delivered 3 times to each root canal, and the irrigant was ultrasonically activated every time for 10 seconds at 35% power either by a ultrasonic K-file (group A), an Irrisafe file (Acteon Satelec, Merignac, France) (group B), or a smooth wire (group C). The same specimens also received further activation continuously for another 30 seconds. No activation took place in group D. Specimens were scanned by micro-computed tomographic imaging before and after preparation and after the first and second activation period. Scans were coregistered and segmented, and the amount of dentin removed during activation was quantified by morphological operations. Results were analyzed by nonparametric statistical tests (α = 0.05). Defects with a maximum depth of 0.18 mm were identified. Both the type of file and activation time affected the removal of dentin (P ≤ .002 and P ≤ .031, respectively). K-files removed more dentin than Irrisafe files and smooth wires in the coronal and middle third. All files removed comparable amounts in the apical third. All 3 types of files may result in uncontrolled removal of dentin. A longer activation time may increase this effect. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of dentinal defect formation after root canal preparation with two reciprocating systems and hand instruments: an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Helvacioglu-Yigit, Dilek; Aydemir, Seda; Yilmaz, Ayca

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence of dentinal defects after root canal preparation with hand instruments and two different reciprocating instruments. Sixty freshly extracted mandibular incisor teeth were selected for this in vitro study. On the basis of root length, mesiodistal and buccolingual dimensions, the teeth were allocated into three identical experimental groups (n = 15) and one control group (n = 15). The teeth in the control group were left unprepared. The othe...

  6. Canal Transportation, Unprepared Areas, and Dentin Removal after Preparation with BT-RaCe and ProTaper Next Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Sabrina C; Marceliano-Alves, Marília F; Marques, Márcia L; Grillo, João P; Lacerda, Mariane F L S; Alves, Flávio R F; Siqueira, José F; Provenzano, José C

    2017-10-01

    This study compared the shaping ability of ProTaper Next (Dentsply Sirona, Tulsa, OK) and BT-RaCe (FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) instrument systems in the mesial canals of mandibular molars using micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging. A total of 17 type IV mesial roots of extracted first mandibular molars were scanned using micro-CT imaging before and after root canal preparation with the 2 instrument systems. Both systems were used in the same root but alternating the mesial canals from root to root. The following parameters were analyzed: root canal volume, surface area, unprepared surface areas, transportation, canal/root width ratio, and preparation time. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 systems for all evaluated parameters (P > .05). The unprepared surface areas for the full canal length and the apical 5-mm segment were 33% and 14% for BT-RaCe and 31% and 14% for ProTaper Next, respectively. After preparation, all root canals had a diameter that was not larger than 35% of the root diameter at the coronal and middle segments. The 2 systems showed no differences in any of the evaluated shaping parameters. None of the tested systems put the roots at risk of fracture because of excessive dentin removal. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) in Disinfection of Deeper Dentinal Tubules in a Root Canal System: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumb, Swapnil Sunil; Bhaskar, Dara John; Agali, Chandan R; Punia, Himanshu; Gupta, Vipul; Singh, Vikas; Kadtane, Safalya; Chandra, Sneha

    2014-11-01

    The success of endodontic treatment therapy depends on how well we eliminate pathogenic microflora from the root canal system as micro organism as the major cause of root canal infection. Conventional root canal treatment can fail if microorganisms cannot be removed sufficiently by thorough cleaning, shaping of root canal. Newer modalities such as photodynamic therapy are being tried now a days for disinfection of root canals. Aim & Objectives: The basic aim of this study was assessment of the antimicrobial efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy in deeper dentinal tubules for effective disinfection of root canals using microbiological and scanning electron microscopic examination in vitro. The study was conducted at Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College & Research Centre. The teeth required for study was collected from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Only freshly extracted 20 intact, non carious single rooted teeth which were indicated for orthodontic treatment were taken for this study. Statistical analysis was done using Student's Unpaired t-test were at (pPDT group as compared to control group. The results of the present study indicate that PDT can be effectively used during antimicrobial procedures along with conventional disinfection procedure for sterilization of root canals.

  8. Effect of two types of FRC posts on the root canal wall retention

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    Arash Zar Bakhsh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The zirconia coated FRC posts (Ice light is the next generation of aesthetic posts , ice light features 70% fill of zirconia enriched, parallel glass fiber for exceptional strength. Its flexibility is close to dentine so stress is distributed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of post type (FRC post and the zirconia coated FRC post on the retention to the root canal wall. Materials and Methods: 20 extracted human premolar teeth with 14 mm length were selected. After post space preparation, the teeth were randomly divided into two groups: Group1: the zirconia coated FRC post (Danville, USA Group2: FRC post (RTD DT light post, France. All posts were cemented with a dual-cure resin cement (Panavia, Kuraray, Japan. All specimens were mount in acrylic cylinders, and the push-out test was done using a universal testing machine (Instron 5500 R, USA at 1 mm/min speed. Data were analyzed using T-test. Results: The retentive strengths were in coronal (75.27+14.81 MPa, in middle (64.38+15.29 MPa and in apical (51.46+13.29 MPa for the zirconia coated FRC post, and also were in Coronal (59.16+1.91 MPa, in middle (66.83+12.32 MPa and in apical (67.88+17.47 MPa for the FRC post. There was no significant difference in mean retentive strength between two groups in each region (P=0.07. Conclusion: The FRC post and zirconia coated FRC post had similar retention to the root canal walls.

  9. Quality of life after cholesteatoma surgery: intact-canal wall tympanoplasty versus canal wall-down tympanoplasty with mastoid obliteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Nicola; Iannuzzi, Lucia; Petrone, Paolo; D'Elia, Alessandra; Quaranta, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of the Chronic Ear Survey (CES), the quality of life of patients who had undergone either intact-canal wall tympanoplasty (ICWT) or canal wall-down tympanoplasty (CWDT) with mastoid obliteration. This was a retrospective case review study performed at a tertiary referral center. Among 379 patients affected by middle ear and mastoid cholesteatoma operated on between November 2000 and December 2009, 50 patients who underwent ICWT and 50 who underwent CWDT with mastoid obliteration were randomly selected. The CES scores were analyzed for both groups. The mean scores on the CES were 6.5 ± 2.1 in patients who underwent CWDT and 6.9 ± 2.2 in patients treated with ICWT (t = -0.93; p > 0.05). No significant differences between the two groups were found on the activity restriction, symptom, or medical resource subscales (p > 0.05). The results of this study demonstrate that CWDT with mastoid obliteration resulted in a quality of life comparable with that after ICWT. Postoperative hearing loss is the most frequently reported problem for both techniques.

  10. Vertical Root Fracture initiation in curved roots after root canal preparation: A dentinal micro-crack analysis with LED transillumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguéns-Vila, Ramón; Martín-Biedma, Benjamín; Varela-Patiño, Purificación; Ruíz-Piñón, Manuel; Castelo-Baz, Pablo

    2017-10-01

    One of the causative factors of root defects is the increased friction produced by rotary instrumentation. A high canal curvature may increase stress, making the tooth more susceptible to dentinal cracks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentinal micro-crack formation with the ProTaper NEXT and ProTaper Universal systems using LED transillumination, and to analyze the micro-crack generated at the point of maximum canal curvature. 60 human mandibular premolars with curvatures between 30-49° and radii between 2-4 mm were used. The root canals were instrumented using the Protaper Universal® and Protaper NEXT® systems, with the aid of the Proglider® system. The obtained samples were sectioned transversely before subsequent analysis with LED transillumination at 2 mm and 8 mm from the apex and at the point of maximum canal curvature. Defects were scored: 0 for no defects; and 1 for micro-cracks. Root defects were not observed in the control group. The ProTaper NEXT system caused fewer defects (16.7%) than the ProTaper Universal system (40%) ( P Rotary instrumentation systems often generate root defects, but the ProTaper NEXT system generated fewer dentinal defects than the ProTaper Universal system. A higher prevalence of defects was found at the point of maximum curvature in the ProTaper Universal group. Key words: Curved root, Micro-crack, point of maximum canal curvature, ProTaper NEXT, ProTaper Universal, Vertical root fracture.

  11. Bond strength and fracture analysis between resin cements and root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Ballarin, Andressa; Baratieri, Luiz N

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate bond strength between translucent fibre posts (White Post DC, FGM or FRC Postec Plus, Ivoclar/Vivadent) and intraradicular dentin at three different levels (cervical, middle and apical) using a dual-cure (AllCem, FGM) or self-curing (Multilink, Ivoclar/Vivadent) resin cement. Also, the fracture type after push-out test was analysed under SEM. Thirty-two extracted single-root teeth were selected. After undergoing endodontic therapy, they were randomly divided into four groups according to their post type and resin cement. Root canals were etched using 37% phosphoric acid, and Excite DSC adhesive (Ivoclar/Vivadent) was applied in all groups. The root was sectioned to obtain nine 1-mm-thick slices (three per third: coronal, middle, apical). All slices were subjected to push-out tests. Data were analysed using two-way anova. The mean bond strengths vary from 6.6 (4.6) MPa [apical] to 11.9 (5.9) MPa [cervical]. There were no significant differences between groups. Pearson χ(2)-test revealed significant differences in fracture types for all groups (P < 0.0001). The apical third had the lowest bond strengths and it was also shown to be the most critical region for luting fibre posts. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  12. [Evaluation of adaptation of FibreFill/Resilon post and Epiphany to the walls of the root canal. Scanning electron microscope study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kot, Katarzyna; Górski, Maciej; Dura, Włodzimierz; Droździk, Agnieszka; Lipski, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the adaptation of sealer to the dentine and to the components of the post, i.e. the part made of composite reinforced with glass fibre and the part made of resilon. The study was carried out on 7 extracted one-canal human teeth that were treated using Mtwo nickel-titanium instruments and an Endo IT Professional endodontic micromotor. The canals were rinsed with NaOCl, EDTA and chlorhexidine, and then filled with the Epiphany sealer and FibreFill posts. Next, tooth roots were cut along the frontal plane, to expose the entire lumen length of the filled canal, and inspected under the scanning electron microscope. SEM study demonstrated good adaptation of sealers to the walls of the root canals on their entire length, despite occasional gaps between the sealer and dentine. The results of preliminary studies suggest that FibreFill posts and Epiphany sealer are useful for canal filling. However, several-years' clinical follow-up is necessary for the complete evaluation of the system.

  13. [Influence of different ultrasonic irrigation solutions after root canal preparation with ProTaper by machine on micro-hardness of root canal dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiang-li; Zhang, Yan; Zhen, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To develope the influence of different ultrasonic irrigations after root canal preparation with nickel titanium ProTaper on micro-hardness of root canal dentin. Sixty of maxillary anterior teeth with single-canal were collected and randomly divided into 6 groups. Group A was control group, group B was prepared to F3 with nickel titanium ProTaper by machine, group C was ultrasonic irrigated with 3% hydrogen peroxide solution for 1 minute after preparation, group D was ultrasonic irrigated with koutai mouthwash for 1 minute after preparation, group E was ultrasonic irrigated with 17% EDTA solution for 1 minute after preparation, group F was ultrasonic irrigated with distilled water for 1 minute after preparation. The roots were then sectioned horizontally into 3 parts, split longitudinally into halves and examined under a micro Vickers hardness test machine. The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t test with SPSS 17.0 software package. The micro-hardness of group A was (52.66 ± 1.64) HV,(52.08 ± 1.53) HV and (51.47 ± 2.53) HV. There was no significant difference in all parts of the root canal in group A (P>0.05). The micro-hardness of the apical third of root canal was lower than that of the cervical and middle of root canal in the other groups (Phardness of group E was (44.65 ± 1.33) HV and(42.55 ± 1.12) HV, and there were statistical significances between group E and the other groups (Phardness of group E was (37.82 ± 1.60) HV, and group C was (44.14±1.73) HV, both of the comparative differences with other groups were statistically significant (P0.05). Root canal preparation to F3 with nickel titanium ProTaper by machine can make the micro-hardness of the apical third of root canal decrease. Ultrasonic irrigation with 17% EDTA solution for 1 minute can make the micro-hardness of the root canal decrease ultrasonic irrigation with. Ultrasonic irrigation with 3% hydrogen peroxide can make the micro-hardness of the apical third of root canal decrease

  14. An in-vitro evaluation of the effect of 980 nm diode laser irradiation on intra-canal dentin surface and dentinal tubule openings after biomechanical preparation: Scanning electron microscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhingan, Pulkit; Sandhu, Meera; Jindal, Garima; Goel, Deepti; Sachdev, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Context: Very recently, diode laser has been used for disinfecting the root canals in endodontic treatment and increasing its success rate and longevity utilizing the thermal effect of laser on surrounding tissues. Aims: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of 980 nm laser irradiation on intra-canal dentin surface – scanning electron microscopic (SEM) - in-vitro study. Methods: A total of 40 single-rooted freshly extracted permanent teeth were collected. Teeth were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction using diamond disc. Root canals of all samples were prepared using hand ProTaper, which were randomly assigned into two groups (n = 20 each). Group 1: Receiving no treatment after biomechanical preparation; Group 2: 980 nm diode laser-treated root canals. Teeth were prepared for SEM analysis to check the size of intra-canal dentinal tubule openings. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using SPSS V.16 software and compared using Levene's and independent t-test. Results: On statistical analysis, width of intracanal dentinal tubule openings in Group 1 (control) was significantly higher than those observed in Group 2 (diode laser-treated) (P diode laser on intra-radicular dentin resulted in ultrastructural alterations resulting in melting of dentin. PMID:26097338

  15. Effect of various intracanal medicaments on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Arslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It has been shown that the irrigating solutions and medicament used during root canal treatment may affect the bonding strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of triple antibiotic paste (TAP, double antibiotic paste (DAP and calcium hydroxide (CH on the bond strength to root dentin of self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and methods: Forty-eight single-rooted human teeth were prepared and randomly divided into one control and three experimental groups (dressing with TAP, DAP or CH. After removal of intracanal dressing, post-spaces were created and fiber posts cemented to the root canal using a self-adhesive resin cement. A push-out test was performed. The data obtained from the push-out test were analyzed using analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc tests (p = 0.05. Results: TAP decreased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement bond strength to root dentin compared to the control group (p = 0.012, while CH and DAP did not influence this (p > 0.05. The majority of specimens exhibited adhesive failures. Conclusions: TAP decreased the bond strength of self-adhesive to the root dentin compared to the control group.

  16. A scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the cleanliness of un-instrumented areas of canal walls after root canal preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah J Dohaithem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleanliness of the canal space is the ultimate goal of its preparation. Nevertheless, some portion of the canal walls are left un-instrumented during preparation. Therefore, the aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the cleanliness of un-instrumented canal walls after root canal preparation for the presence or absence of debris and smear layer. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared with the crown-down technique using Protaper universal rotary file system. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT was used to scan the specimens before and after instrumentation. The un-instrumented area was measured and localized. The roots were split longitudinally and then subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The presence of debris and smear layer in the instrumented and un-instrumented areas of the canal were evaluated by analysing the SEM images with a five-score evaluation system based on the reference photographs. Results: High levels of root canal cleanliness (≤ score 2 were found for the instrumented areas were detected (P = 0.003. Conclusions: Under the condition of this study, un-instrumented areas of the canal were less clean in comparison to instrumented portion.

  17. The effect of working length and root canal preparation technique on crack development in the apical root canal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, C G; Yoshioka, T; Suda, H

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of working length and root canal preparation technique on crack development in the apical root canal wall. Seventy extracted mandibular premolars were mounted in a resin block with simulated periodontal ligaments and divided into seven groups according to preparation technique and working length: group A, step-back preparation with stainless steel files with working length set at the apical foramen and defined as root canal length (CL); group B, same as for A, except that the working length was CL-1 mm; group C, crown-down preparation with Profile instruments followed by an apical enlargement sequence with CL as working length and group D, same as for C, except that the working length was CL-1 mm. Groups E, F and G served as controls. Groups E and F were prepared only with the crown-down sequence up to CL and CL-1 mm, respectively. Group G was left unprepared. Digital images of the apical root surface (AS) were recorded before preparation, immediately after instrumentation and after removing the apical 1 mm (AS-1 mm) and 2 mm (AS-2 mm) of the root end. Working length significantly affected crack development at AS (P crack development at AS-1 mm (P crack development on the canal wall. Root canal preparation alone, regardless of the technique used, can potentially generate cracks on the apical root canal wall as well as the apical surface. Working 1- mm short of the apical foramen might produce fewer cracks in the apical region.

  18. The influence of sodium hypochlorite and root canal sealers on post retention in different dentin regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Leonardo; Mathias, Paula

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and root canal sealers on post retention in different dentin regions. Seventy-two human incisors were decoronated at the cemento-enamel junction and randomly divided into six groups (n=12) according to irrigant and sealer technique: G1-Distilled water (DW) without sealer; G2-DW + AH Plus (Dentsply/Maillefer); G3-DW + Endofill (Dentsply/Maillefer); G4-5.251%NaOCl without sealer; G5-5.25% NaOCl + AH Plus; G6-5.25% NaOCl + Endofill. Specimens were stored in a humid environment for 30 days at 37 degrees C and were prepared with FRC Postec's drills for post insertion. The posts were cemented with Excite DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar/Vivadent). The specimens were sectioned through their long axis into three dental slices approximately 2.5 mm each, representing the cervical (C), middle (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root preparation. After calculating the adhered area of the specimens, they were submitted to the push-out test in a universal testing machine. The data were submitted to an analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a 5% significance level and to the Tukey test (p<0.05). The mean values (MPa) obtained for cervical, middle and apical areas of the root preparation, respectively, were: G1=8.6; 12.5 and 14.3, G2=13.5; 15.4 and 16.9; G3=6.9; 10.0 and 12.1; G4=13.0; 14.9 and 15.4; G5=11.3; 13.5 and 18.0; and G6=11.0; 11.8 and 11.5. Based on the results, the eugenol-based sealer (Endofill) resulted in significantly lower mean retention strength values compared with the resin-based sealer (AH Plus). The apical region showed the greatest retention. The lowest resistance to dislodgment was found in the cervical region, mainly in the groups that used distilled water for irrigating the root canal.

  19. Effect of final irrigation protocols on push-out bond strength of an epoxy resin root canal sealer to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Fernanda; Simão, Renata Antoun; Fidel, Sandra Rivera; Fidel, Rivail Antônio Sérgio; do Prado, Maíra

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different final irrigation protocols on push-out bond strength of an epoxy resin root canal sealer to dentin. Eighty single-rooted anterior teeth were used. The root canals were partially prepared using a rotary system and the final diameter was standardised using a #5 Gates-Glidden drill prior to the push-out bond test. During chemomechanical preparation, 5.25% NaOCl or 2% CHX gel was used. For smear layer removal, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or QMix 2 in 1 was applied for 3 min. As final irrigant, 1 mL of NaOCl, CHX solution or distilled water was used. On conclusion of preparation, canals were filled with gutta-percha/AH Plus sealer. Bond strength was measured by the push-out test. Data were statistically analysed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. The group NaOCl/EDTA/NaOCl showed significantly higher bond strength values than other groups. In all groups, there were mainly mixed failure patterns. It can be concluded that 5.25% NaOCl proved to be the best solution for the final irrigation when combined with EDTA. The final irrigation protocols affect the push-out bond strength of AH Plus to dentin. © 2015 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  20. Effect of Sonic Application of Self-etch Adhesives on Bonding Fiber Posts to Root Canal Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Jasmin; Schmidt, Doreen; Herzberg, Doreen; Weber, Marie-Theres; Gäbler, Stephan; Hannig, Christian

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of sonic application of 5 different self-etch adhesives on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts in root canals. In a preliminary test, 24 teeth were treated with manual and sonically assisted bonding, then a composite cylinder was built up to test the shear bond strength as a proof of principle. In the main test, 120 root canals were endodontically prepared and divided into 10 groups: 5 self-etch adhesives (Futurabond DC, Futurabond M, Futurabond U, Optibond XTR, Universalbond), each applied under manual and sonic application modes. After insertion of the fiber posts using the specific adhesive and a dual-curing composite, the teeth were sectioned and the push-out test was performed. The specimens were analyzed by light and scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using the Shapiro-Wilk test, one-way ANOVA and the Tamhane test. Sonic application of self-etch adhesive systems did not increase the bond strength of fiber posts in root canals. In general, the bond strength decreased from the coronal to the apical part of the root canal, irrespective of the applied method. The best post retention was achieved with Futurabond U and Optibond XTR. Sonic application of self-etch adhesives did not improve the fiber post retention in the root canal and can therefore not be recommended. Nevertheless, sonic application of etch-and-rinse adhesives can increase the bond strength to coronal dentin.

  1. Effect of calcium hydroxide and endodontic irrigants on fibre post bond strength to root canal dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renovato, S R; Santana, F R; Ferreira, J M; Souza, J B; Soares, C J; Estrela, C

    2013-08-01

    To analyse the effect of calcium hydroxide paste, endodontic irrigants and time of application on the bond strength of fibre posts to root canal dentine. Seventy bovine incisors were divided into 7 groups according to removal of calcium hydroxide and distilled water (CHW) (immediate - I; 21 days - 21 days; 6 months - 6 months) and endodontic irrigant (1% sodium hypochlorite - SH; 1% sodium hypochlorite + 17% EDTA - SHE). Fibre posts were cemented (RelyX U100), after which the roots were serially sectioned and submitted to a micro-push-out test. Data were analysed using two-way anova followed by the Tukey's and the Dunnett's tests (α = 0.05). The CHW groups were not significantly different from the control group in 13 of the 18 associated factors (P > 0.05). There were significant reductions in bond strength in the cervical (P = 0.0216) and middle (P = 0.0017) thirds of the root at 6 months in groups irrigated with SH. Irrigation with SHE reduced the bond strength significantly in the middle (P = 0.0488) and apical (P = 0.0252) thirds of the roots in the immediate groups and in the middle third (P = 0.0287) in the 21-day group. Bond strength was greater in the cervical than in the apical thirds of all immediate and 21-day groups (P Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A Digital Stereomicroscopic Study of the Radicular Wall Thickness of Two-Canal Mandibular Incisors

    OpenAIRE

    Sedigheh Khedmat; Sohayla Mohamadian; Fatemeh Dibaji; Mohamad Javad Kharrazifard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the radicular wall thickness in mandibular incisors with two canals and find the maximum and minimum thickness to prevent root canal treatment (RCT) procedural errors.Materials and Methods: A total of 160 extracted mandibular incisors were selected and radiographed; out of which, 55 had two canals. Three parallel transverse sections were made in each tooth at 1mm below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), mid-root and 1 millimeter to the apex. Specimens wer...

  3. Continuous chelation irrigation improves the adhesion of epoxy resin-based root canal sealer to root dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelakantan, P; Varughese, A A; Sharma, S; Subbarao, C V; Zehnder, M; De-Deus, G

    2012-12-01

    To test the impact of continuous chelation by NaOCl+ etidronic acid (HEBP) during instrumentation, and a final rinse of EDTA or NaOCl + HEBP on the dentine bond strength of an epoxy resin sealer (AH Plus). Single-rooted teeth (n = 100) were divided into five groups (n = 20) based on the irrigation protocol and their root canals instrumented using a rotary Ni-Ti system: 2.5% NaOCl during instrumentation followed by bi-distilled water (G1) or 17% EDTA (G2) as final rinse; 1 : 1 mixture of 5% NaOCl and 18% HEBP during instrumentation, and the same mixture (G3), 17% EDTA (G4) or bi-distilled water (G5) as final rinse. Canals were filled with AH Plus. Roots were sectioned, and push-out tests were performed in coronal, middle and apical root thirds. Results were analysed using analysis of variance (anova) and Bonferroni test for multiple comparisons. The alpha-type error was set at 0.05 for all the analyses. Push-out bond strength was highest in coronal and lowest in apical root thirds (P epoxy resin sealer to dentine. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  4. A Digital Stereomicroscopic Study of the Radicular Wall Thickness of Two-Canal Mandibular Incisors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Khedmat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the radicular wall thickness in mandibular incisors with two canals and find the maximum and minimum thickness to prevent root canal treatment (RCT procedural errors.Materials and Methods: A total of 160 extracted mandibular incisors were selected and radiographed; out of which, 55 had two canals. Three parallel transverse sections were made in each tooth at 1mm below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ, mid-root and 1 millimeter to the apex. Specimens were evaluated under a stereomicroscope and the thickness of radicular walls in each section was determined for the buccal, lingual and proximal surfaces. Data were statistically analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient test.Results: The thickness of radicular wall decreased from the cervical towards the apex. In all three sections (cervical, mid-root and apical, the thickness of lingual wall was significantly greater than the buccal wall. Also, the thickness of buccal and lingual walls was significantly higher than that of the proximal walls.Conclusion: The lingual radicular wall had the highest thickness in two-canal mandibular incisors. Therefore, in these teeth, the lingual canal is a better choice for post placement.Key words:

  5. Frequency of second mesiobuccal canal in permanent maxillary first molars using the operating microscope and selective dentin removal: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suroopa; Warhadpande, Manjusha M; Redij, Saurabh A; Jibhkate, N G; Sabir, Husain

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of operating microscope and selective dentin removal increased the frequency of second mesiobuccal (MB2) canal detection in permanent maxillary first molar teeth. One hundred fifty permanent maxillary first molars indicated for root canal treatment were randomly selected from patients belonging to the age group of 18-45 years irrespective of gender. After access cavity preparation and location of main canals, the MB2 canal orifice was sought in all teeth with an endodontic explorer under direct vision (Stage I), then under magnification with the aid of operating microscope (Stage II) and finally with the combined use of operating microscope and selective dentin removal (Stage III). MB2 canals were detected in 36%, 54% and 72% of the teeth in Stages I-III, respectively. This study demonstrated that dental operating microscope when used along with adjunctive aids such as selective dentin removal/troughing and good clinical knowledge will increase the ability of dental clinician to locate MB2 canals.

  6. Frequency of second mesiobuccal canal in permanent maxillary first molars using the operating microscope and selective dentin removal: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suroopa Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of operating microscope and selective dentin removal increased the frequency of second mesiobuccal (MB2 canal detection in permanent maxillary first molar teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred fifty permanent maxillary first molars indicated for root canal treatment were randomly selected from patients belonging to the age group of 18-45 years irrespective of gender. After access cavity preparation and location of main canals, the MB2 canal orifice was sought in all teeth with an endodontic explorer under direct vision (Stage I, then under magnification with the aid of operating microscope (Stage II and finally with the combined use of operating microscope and selective dentin removal (Stage III. Results: MB2 canals were detected in 36%, 54% and 72% of the teeth in Stages I-III, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that dental operating microscope when used along with adjunctive aids such as selective dentin removal/troughing and good clinical knowledge will increase the ability of dental clinician to locate MB2 canals.

  7. Frequency of second mesiobuccal canal in permanent maxillary first molars using the operating microscope and selective dentin removal: A clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suroopa; Warhadpande, Manjusha M.; Redij, Saurabh A.; Jibhkate, N. G.; Sabir, Husain

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of operating microscope and selective dentin removal increased the frequency of second mesiobuccal (MB2) canal detection in permanent maxillary first molar teeth. Materials and Methods: One hundred fifty permanent maxillary first molars indicated for root canal treatment were randomly selected from patients belonging to the age group of 18–45 years irrespective of gender. After access cavity preparation and location of main canals, the MB2 canal orifice was sought in all teeth with an endodontic explorer under direct vision (Stage I), then under magnification with the aid of operating microscope (Stage II) and finally with the combined use of operating microscope and selective dentin removal (Stage III). Results: MB2 canals were detected in 36%, 54% and 72% of the teeth in Stages I–III, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that dental operating microscope when used along with adjunctive aids such as selective dentin removal/troughing and good clinical knowledge will increase the ability of dental clinician to locate MB2 canals. PMID:25684916

  8. Demineralization of root canal dentine with EDTA and citric acid in different concentrations, pH and application times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Nexhmije Ajeti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aims of the study are: 1. Determination of the amount of extracted Ca ions from den-tine using 17% and 10% EDTA, at pH 7 and pH 9. 2. Determination of the amount of extracted Ca ions from  den-tine using citric acid 5% and 1%, at pH 7 and pH 9.  Methodology 30 extracted, single rooted, human teeth were tested. Their crowns were sectioned at CEJ using diamond disks. The root canals were manually prepared with K-files #50-60. After each instrument 2.5 ml of 5.25% NaOCl was used and 0.9 NaCl as final irrigation. All teeth were longitudinally sectioned and 8 samples of dentine taken from each sample. EDTA 10% and 17 % and citric acid 1% and 5% in neutral and alkaline pH were used.  Each sample was immersed in acid and then exposure time was evaluated after 1, 5, 10, 15 and 25 min. The release rate of calcium ions from root dentine was evaluated by atomic absorption spectrometer.  Results There were significant differences in the amount of extracted Ca by citric acid 1% and 5% or EDTA 10% and 17% in human teeth.  Conclusions It may be concluded that EDTA is a better chelating agent than citric acid. The decalcifying activity of these solutions is related to the duration of exposure, pH and their concentrations.

  9. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of root canal surfaces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-07-15

    Jul 15, 2014 ... Root canal preparation for all the teeth was carried out with. 3 different types of rotary instruments. ... which enabled removal of overlapping dentin walls. After completing the preparation of the coronal third of ... on dentine or other surfaces after instrumentation with either rotary instrument or endodontic files, ...

  10. Light-emitting Diode Assessment of Dentinal Defects after Root Canal Preparation with Profile, TRUShape, and WaveOne Gold Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Card, Steven J; Tawil, Peter Z

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to use light-emitting diode (LED) transillumination to assess the presence of dentinal defects in roots instrumented with 3 different root canal preparation systems: ProFile (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), TRUShape (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties), and WaveOne Gold (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties). Eighty mesial roots of mandibular molars presenting 2 canals were randomly divided into 4 different groups (n = 20) as follows: the control group, no root canal preparation was performed; the ProFile group, root canals were prepared with nickel-titanium ProFile sizes 20.06 and 25.06; the TRUShape group, root canals were prepared with nickel-titanium rotary TRUShape instrument sizes 20.06 and 25.06; and the WaveOne Gold group, root canals were prepared with the reciprocating WaveOne Gold instrument #25.07. The specimens were sliced at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex with a low-speed saw under water cooling. Microscopic pictures of the specimens were taken with the aid of LED; the root canal space was masked, and 2 independent evaluators assessed the images for the assessment of dentinal defects. The number of dentinal defects was recorded, and the chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (P Gold group = 10. Using the novel LED method, no difference in the visualization of dentinal defects was found among the ProFile, TRUShape, and WaveOne systems and the control group. Previous studies using the traditional sectioning method lack proper control and should be evaluated with caution. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of different root canal sealers used with coated core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz Sungur, Derya; Purali, Nuhan; Coşgun, Erdal; Calt, Semra

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the push-out bond strength and dentinal tubule penetration of root canal sealers used with coated core materials and conventional gutta-percha. A total of 72 single-rooted human mandibular incisors were instrumented with NiTi rotary files with irrigation of 2.5% NaOCl. The smear layer was removed with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Specimens were assigned into four groups according to the obturation system: Group 1, EndoRez (Ultradent Product Inc.); Group 2, Activ GP (Brasseler); Group 3, SmartSeal (DFRP Ltd. Villa Farm); Group 4, AH 26 (Dentsply de Trey)/gutta-percha (GP). For push-out bond strength measurement, two horizontal slices were obtained from each specimen (n = 20). To compare dentinal tubule penetration, remaining 32 roots assigned to 4 groups as above were obturated with 0.1% Rhodamine B labeled sealers. One horizontal slice was obtained from the middle third of each specimen (n = 8) and scanned under confocal laser scanning electron microscope. Tubule penetration area, depth, and percentage were measured. Kruskall-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. EndoRez showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than the others (p strength and sealer penetration of resin-and glass ionomer-based sealers used with coated core was not superior to resin-based sealer used with conventional GP. Dentinal tubule penetration has limited effect on bond strength. The use of conventional GP with sealer seems to be sufficient in terms of push-out bond strength.

  12. Cervical dentin changes in curved root canals after using Waveone and Reciproc files with full rotation versus reciprocation movement: An ex vivo study

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    Yazdan Shantiaee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the current study was to compare the effect of WaveOne and Reciproc files in reciprocation versus reverse full rotation movements on cervical dentin thickness by virtue of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT analysis in curved mesial canals of mandibular first molars. Methods: Mesiobuccal canals of 60 mandibular molars were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 15: Group 1; WaveOne/Reciprocation, Group 2; WaveOne/Full-Rotation, Group 3; Reciproc/Reciprocation, and Group 4; Reciproc/Full-Rotation. Pre- and post-instrumented CBCT scans were prepared for assessment of cervical dentin thickness changes (2 mm, 4 mm below the highest point of the root furcation in both groups. Data statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between four experimental groups in terms of remaining dentin thickness at 2 and 4 mm levels below the highest point of the furcation (P > 0.05. No separation of instruments occurred in any group. Conclusion: WaveOne and Reciproc files with two different motions have similar effects on cervical of root canals in terms of dentin thickness changes.

  13. Effect of intracanal irrigants on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based and methacrylate resin-based sealers to root canal walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, W V; Carvalho-Junior, J R; Alfredo, E; Sousa-Neto, M D; Silva-Sousa, Y T C

    2012-01-01

      To assess the bond strength of Epiphany and AH Plus sealers to root canal walls using a push-out test after use of several endodontic irrigants.   Roots of 100 maxillary canines were sectioned horizontally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction to provide 4-mm-thick dentine disks that were embedded in acrylic resin and had their root canals prepared with a tapered bur (larger diameter=2.70 mm; smaller diameter=2.30 mm; length = 4 mm). The specimens were randomly assigned to five groups (n=20) according to the dentine surface treatment: I - 1% NaOCl (30 min); II - 1% NaOCl (30 min) + 17% EDTA (5 min); III - 17% EDTA (30 min); IV - 24% EDTA gel (30 min); V - 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) gel (30 min). In each group, two specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy to examine the surface of root canal dentine after use of each irrigant. The other 18 specimens were filled with AH plus (n = 9) or Epiphany (n=9) and subjected to a push-out test in an Instron machine. Data (in MPa) were subjected to statistical analysis by two-way anova and post-hoc Tukey-Kramer test (P  0.05). One per cent NaOCl was associated with the lowest mean values (3.70 ± 0.86) (P Endodontic Journal.

  14. The ability of 5% Tamarindus indica extract as cleaner of the root canal wall smear layer

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    Erawati Wulandari

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tamarindus indica is one of traditional medicines. Pulpa tamaridorum consist of organic acid that is usually used as irrigant and to remove root canal wall smear layer. The aimed of this study was to elucidate the ability of 5% Tamarindus indica extract as a root canal irrigant to remove root canal wall smear layer. Eighteen tooth samples were cut on cervical line and divided into 2 then groups were prepared with K file and irrigated. Group 1 was irrigated by sterile aquabidest and group 2 was irrigated by 5% Tamarindus indica extract. Samples were cut longitudinally and formed 7 × 2× 2 mm specimen. Each specimen was photographed by scanning electron microscope, scored and summed. The total score obtained is used as the hygiene value of root canal wall. The collected data were statistically analyzed by using independent t test at 0.05 level. The result of the study showed there was a significant difference between 5% Tamarindus indica extract and sterile aquabidest (p < 0.05, the hygiene value of 5% Tamarindus indica extract was higher than sterile aquabidest. The conclusion of this investigation showed that 5% Tamarindus indica extract remove root canal wall smear layer.

  15. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin

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    Parnian Alizadeh Oskoee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05. Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55‒60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments.

  16. Stress distribution on dentin-cement-post interface varying root canal and glass fiber post diameters. A three-dimensional finite element analysis based on micro-CT data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lazari, Priscilla Cardoso; Oliveira, Rodrigo Caldeira Nunes de; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Almeida, Erika Oliveira de; Freitas Junior, Amilcar Chagas; Kina, Sidney; Rocha, Eduardo Passos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of root canal and glass fiber post diameters on the biomechanical behavior of the dentin/cement/post interface of a root-filled tooth using 3D...

  17. Antimicrobial activity and substantivity of Uncaria tomentosa in infected root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rodrigo HERRERA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial activity and substantivity of Uncaria tomentosa Willd DC (cat’s claw, CC in root dentin contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. Forty-eight human premolars were contaminated with E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 and randomly divided into four groups according to the irrigant used during chemomechanical preparation (CMP: CC group: 2% CC gel; CHX group: 2% chlorhexidine digluconate gel (CHX; NaOCl group: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl; and SS group: sterile saline (SS. Microbiological samples were collected before (S1 and after (S2 CMP and after 7 days (S3. Colony-forming units (CFU/mL at the different sampling times and comparisons among the groups were statistically analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p 0.05 in the CC and CHX groups. Bacterial load was higher in S3 than in S2 samples (p < 0.05 in the NaOCl and SS groups. Our results suggest antibacterial effect of 2% CC gel against E. faecalis in infected dentin, in addition to antibacterial substantivity of 2% CC and 2% CHX up to 7 days.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of canal cleaning after canal preparation with nickel titanium files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Root canal preparation is the most important phase of endodontic procedure and it consists of adequate canal space cleaning and shaping. In recent years, rotary instruments and techniques have gained importance because of the great efficacy, speed and safety of the preparation procedure. Objective. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of different NiTi files on the canal wall cleaning quality, residual dentine debris and smear layer. Methods. The research was conducted on extracted human teeth in vitro conditions. Teeth were divided in 7 main groups depending on the kind of instruments used for root canal preparation: ProTaper, GT, ProFile, K-3, FlexMaster, hand ProTaper and hand GT. Root canal preparation was accomplished by crown-down technique. Prepared samples were assessed on scanning electron microscopy JEOL, JSM-6460 LV. The evaluation of dentine debris was done with 500x magnification, and the evaluation of smear layer with 1,000 times magnification. Quantitive assessment of dentine debris and smear layer was done according to the criteria of Hulsmann. Results. The least amount of debris and smear layer has been found in canals shaped with ProFile instruments, and the largest amount in canals shaped with FlexMaster instruments. Canal cleaning efficacy of hand GT and ProTaper files has been similar to cleaning efficacy of rotary NiTi files. Statistic analysis has shown a significant difference in amount of dentine debris and smear layer on the canal walls between sample groups shaped with different instruments. Conclusion. Completely clean canals have not been found in any tested group of instruments. The largest amount of debris and smear layer has been found in the apical third of all canals. The design and the type of endodontic instruments influence the efficacy of the canal cleaning.

  19. Effect of calcium hydroxide and double and triple antibiotic pastes on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealer to root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Merve; Arslan, Hakan; Topcuoglu, Hüseyin Sinan; Tuncay, Oznur

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of calcium hydroxide (CH) and triple (TAP) and double (DAP) antibiotic pastes on the bond strength of an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus Jet; Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) to the root canal dentin. Sixty-four single-rooted human mandibular premolars were decoronated and prepared using the rotary system to size 40. The specimens were randomly divided into a control group (without intracanal dressing) and 3 experimental groups that received an intracanal dressing with either CH, DAP, or TAP (n = 16). The intracanal dressing was removed by rinsing with 10 mL 17% EDTA followed by 10 mL 2.5% sodium hypochlorite. The root canals were then obturated with gutta-percha and AH Plus Jet sealer. A push-out test was used to measure the bond strength between the root canal dentin and the sealer. The data were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests to detect the effect of the independent variables (intracanal medicaments and root canal thirds) and their interactions on the push-out bond strength of the root canal filling material to the root dentin (P = .05). The push-out bond strength values were significantly affected by the intracanal medicaments (P .05). In the middle and apical third, the bond strength of the TAP group was higher than those of the CH and DAP groups (P epoxy resin-based sealer. Additionally, the TAP improved the bond strength of the epoxy resin-based sealer in the middle and apical thirds. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation in vitro of effects of Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers irradiation on root canal wall, by stereoscopy, scanning electron micrography and thermographic camera; Avaliacao in vitro dos efeitos da irradiacao laser de Er:YAG e Nd:YAG na parede dentinaria do canal radicular, sob observacao do estereoscopio, da micrografia eletronica e da camera termografica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goya, Claudia

    2001-07-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate in vitro the effects of Nd:YAG laser and Er:YAG laser irradiation in the root canal wall by SEM, evaluating the apical leakage and the temperature changes during the laser irradiation. Seventy four extracted human teeth were used, they were instrumented and divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each. The teeth were evaluated through stereoscopy, by SEM, and with the thermographic camera. The Nd:YAG laser irradiation parameters were 100 mJ/p, 15 Hz, and Er:YAG laser were 160 mJ/p and 10 Hz, the irradiation was 4 times at 2 mm/sec speed, with 20 sec interval. The apical leakage was not observed in the teeth irradiated by Nd:YAG laser alone or in association with Er:YAG laser. However in the teeth irradiated only by the Er:YAG laser we observed a little leakage. By SEM observation the Nd:YAG laser irradiation showed melting and recrystallization in the dentin surface closing dentinal tubules, and in the samples irradiated by Er:Y AG laser a clean surface, opened dentinal tubules, and the combination by two lasers, showed melting covering some dentinal tubules The thermographic study found the temperature increase was not more than 6 deg C. This study showed the safety parameters applications of Er:YAG laser in association with Nd:YAG laser in root canal treatment, in order to not cause thermal damages to the periodontal tissues. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the efect of EDTA, EGTA and CDTA on dentin adhesiveness and microleakage with different root canal sealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa-Neto Manoel D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chelating solutions EDTA, EGTA and CDTA on human dentin adhesiveness and microleakage with 4 sealers (Sealer 26, Sealapex, N-Rickert and Endofill was evaluated in vitro. Whether or not there was a mathematical correlation between the tests of adhesiveness and microleakage was also evaluated. A total of eighty maxillary and mandibular molars were used to test adhesiveness. After wearing of the occlusal surface to obtain a flat surface, the sealer was placed with an aluminum cylinder (10 mm x 6 mm. Adhesiveness was evaluated with a 4444 Instron universal testing machine. Microleakage was evaluated in 160 maxillary canines after root canal instrumentation, obturation and clearing. The penetration of India ink in the apical region was measured with a measurescope. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: group 1, distilled water; group 2, EDTA; group 3, EGTA; group 4, CDTA. Sealer 26 and EDTA had the best results (p<0.01 for adhesiveness and microleakage. There was no correlation between the test for adhesiveness and microleakage.

  2. Ultrastructural analysis of the root canal walls after simultaneous irrigation of different sodium hypochlorite concentration and 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasic, Jovanka; Popovic, Jelena; Zivković, Slavoljub; Petrovic, Aleksandar; Barac, Radomir; Nikolic, Marija

    2012-08-01

    To determine whether sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) leads to colour change and precipitate formation, and to ultrastructurally analyse the dentine surface after simultaneous irrigation with 0.5% NaOCl and 0.2% CHX. Four tubes in which 5ml of different NaOCl concentrations and 5ml 0,2% CHX were placed, were observed every 15 minutes in the first two hours and after 7 days. Mixture solutions were centrifuged at 800 rpm/4 min. A precipitate is observed under light-microscopy. Thirty-five single-rooted teeth were instrumented using crown-down technique with irrigation: Positive control: distilled water, Negative control: 0,5% NaOCl+15% EDTA, Experimental group: identical to the negative control, then canals were treated with 0.5% NaOCl+0.2% CHX. The longitudinal root sections were observed under scanning-electron-microscopy. The amount of debris was assessed with 5/score-system, and the results were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U test (p < 0.001). Change in colour was noticed immediately after the merger and it did not change with time. Mixture solutions showed considerable turbidity, but precipitate was observed only after centrifugation. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the dentinal wall purity when comparing the cervical and middle root canal thirds between the experimental and negative control group. The difference was also observed between the cervical and middle thirds compared to the apical third of the root canal within these groups. Interaction between NaOCl and CHX, as well as the creation of precipitates, depends not only on the concentration of NaOCl, but also on the concentration of CHX. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Meatoplasty in Canal wall down Surgery: Our Experience and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memari, Faramarz; Maleki Delarestaghi, Mojtaba; Mir, Parisa; GolMohammadi, Mohammad; Shams Koushki, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Meatoplasty is the final and essential step in performing effective canal wall down surgery for chronic otitis media. In this article we review some previous techniques and discuss our preferred method. In this observational case series study, we used this technique in 53 patients (28 male and 25 female) between January 2005 and January 2008. Our survey was completed in 31 patients. Twenty-six patients (83.9%) said their ear appeared normal after the procedure, but five patients (16.1%) complained of some minor change in the shape of their ear. Twenty-nine patients (93.5%) had a completely wide ear canal. The ear canal had some degree of stenosis in two patients (6.5%) post-operatively. This technique offers good functional and cosmetic results with minimal manipulation and minimal anatomic disruption.

  4. Meatoplasty in Canal wall down Surgery: Our Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Memari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Meatoplasty is the final and essential step in performing effective canal wall down surgery for chronic otitis media. In this article we review some previous techniques and discuss our preferred method. Materials and Methods: In this observational case series study, we used this technique in 53 patients (28 male and 25 female between January 2005 and January 2008. Our survey was completed in 31 patients. Results: Twenty-six patients (83.9% said their ear appeared normal after the procedure, but five patients (16.1% complained of some minor change in the shape of their ear. Twenty-nine patients (93.5% had a completely wide ear canal. The ear canal had some degree of stenosis in two patients (6.5% post-operatively. Conclusion: This technique offers good functional and cosmetic results with minimal manipulation and minimal anatomic disruption.

  5. Bond strength of three types of fiber posts to three regions of root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nokar S.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Debonding is the most common failure type of fiber posts. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the bond strength of 3 different fiber posts cemented with a resin luting agent in three regions of prepared post spaces after being subjected to termocycling. "nMaterials and Methods Thirty six mandibular first premolars were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction and were treated endodontically. After one week the post spaces were prepared and roots were divided into 3 groups of 12 specimens according to the post types (D.T.Composipost, D.T.White, D.T.Light. Sealbond Cement Dual II was used in all groups. One day after cementation, specimens were subjected to 3500 thermal cycles (5oC/55oC. Each root was then embedded in acrylic resin and sectioned perpendicular to long axis. Three 1-mm tick segments from apical, middle and cervical thirds were prepared. Push out test was performed. Data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA (P<0.05. All root segments and dislodged posts were observed with stereomicroscope to figure out their failure modes. "nResults: The post type had no significant effect on bond strength (p=0.08. However bond strength at the coronl segment was higher than the other segments (p=0.005. Mixed mode was the mostly occurred failure mode with D.T.Composipost and D.T.Light but with D.T.White, the mostly occurred failure mode was adhesive between the post and cement. "nConclusion: Different fiber posts have relatively similar bond strength to root dentin, bond strength at the coronl segment was higher than the other segments.

  6. Hearing aid tolerance after revision and obliteration of canal wall down mastoidectomy cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluth, Michael B; Friedman, Adva B; Atcherson, Samuel R; Dornhoffer, John L

    2013-06-01

    To review the tolerance of hearing aid use after revision and obliteration of a previously unstable canal wall down mastoidectomy cavity. Retrospective case series. Academic tertiary referral center. Adults and children who underwent the described surgical procedure followed by attempted hearing aid use. Surgical revision and obliteration of a chronically unstable canal wall down mastoidectomy cavity and subsequent attempted use of a conventional, ear-level hearing aid. Stability of mastoid cavity after starting conventional hearing aid usage. From a review of 87 consecutive mastoid obliteration procedures performed on previously unstable open cavities, 20 ears in 19 subjects were identified for study inclusion. The indication for hearing aid use was mixed hearing loss in the majority of subjects (85%). Among included ears, 7 (35%) had at least one documented temporary period of hearing aid nonuse because of otorrhea; however, permanent discontinuation of hearing aid use in favor of bone-anchored hearing implant placement only occurred in 3 ears (15%). The mean follow-up from the start of hearing aid use was 49 months. Although failures do exist, attempted use of a hearing aid after revision of an unstable canal wall down mastoidectomy cavity seems feasible and generally well tolerated. However, the exact likelihood of achieving this result is yet uncertain, and hearing performance was not assessed in this study.

  7. Evaluation of antimicrobial and thermal effects of diode laser on root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kıvanc, B H; Arısu, H D; Sağlam, B C; Akça, G; Gürel, M A; Görgül, G

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of diode laser and temperature rise on the root surface during application. Thirty-six teeth were chemomechanically prepared and irrigated with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and then autoclaved and incubated with a suspension of Enterococcus faecalis. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups (n = 12): Group 1, irradiated by diode laser at 1.2 W; Group 2, irradiated by diode laser at 2 W; and Group 3, irradiated by diode laser at 3 W. The grown bacteria were counted and the mean numbers of the each test tube were determined. The temperature was measured on the external apical third of the root during laser application. The mean values of results for each group were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test. No significant difference was obtained among the test groups in terms of the colony counts (P > 0.05). According to the temperature changes, there was a significant difference between groups (P Diode laser irradiation with 1.2 W demonstrated comparable performance with 2 W and 3 W power sets for elimination of E. faecalis from root canal with less temperature rise.

  8. Prospective cohort comparison of bioactive glass implants and conchal cartilage in reconstruction of the posterior canal wall during tympanomastoidectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramovich, S.; Hannan, S. A.; Huins, C. T.; Georgalas, C.; McGuinness, J.; Vats, A.; Thompson, I.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of bioactive glass implants and conchal cartilage in reconstructing the posterior canal wall during tympanomastoidectomy. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort clinical study. SETTING: Teaching hospital. PATIENTS: Patients with clinically diagnosed chronic

  9. Effectiveness of final decontamination protocols against Enterococcus faecalis and its influence on bond strength of filling material to root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino Souza, Matheus; Dalla Lana, Daniel; Gabrielli, Ezequiel; Barbosa Ribeiro, Marlos; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; Cecchin, Doglas

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of final decontamination protocols against Enterococcus faecalis and their influence on bond strength of filling material to root canal dentin. Ninety root canals were enlarged with ProTaper system and inoculated with E. faecalis for 15days. Sixty samples were randomly divided into six groups (n=10) and subjected to following protocols: G1-distilled water(control), G2-2% chlorhexidine, G3-QMix, G4-6.5% grape seed extract, G5-photodynamic therapy with optical fiber and G6-photodynamic therapy without optical fiber. The percentage of bacterial reduction was checked by counting of CFUs. The remaining 30 samples were subjected to the same decontamination protocols (n=5) and filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer in order to perform the push-out test. Data from both tests were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc procedure (α=0.05). The greatest bacterial reduction was observed for 2% chlorhexidine, QMix and 6.5% grape seed extract, with no statistically significant difference between them. Photodynamic therapy, with and without optical fiber, demonstrated a significantly higher reduction than distilled water, with no statistically significant difference between them (pfinal decontamination protocols showed similar bond strength values (pfinal decontamination protocols showed effectiveness against E. faecalis and did not interfere with the bond strength of filling material to root canal dentin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Stem/Progenitor Cell–Mediated De Novo Regeneration of Dental Pulp with Newly Deposited Continuous Layer of Dentin in an In Vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaza, Takayoshi; Shea, Lonnie D.; Djouad, Farida; Kuhn, Nastaran Z.; Tuan, Rocky S.; Shi, Songtao

    2010-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this study is to regenerate lost dental pulp and dentin via stem/progenitor cell–based approaches and tissue engineering technologies. In this study, we tested the possibility of regenerating vascularized human dental pulp in emptied root canal space and producing new dentin on existing dentinal walls using a stem/progenitor cell–mediated approach with a human root fragment and an immunocompromised mouse model. Stem/progenitor cells from apical papilla and dental pulp stem cells were isolated, characterized, seeded onto synthetic scaffolds consisting of poly-D,L-lactide/glycolide, inserted into the tooth fragments, and transplanted into mice. Our results showed that the root canal space was filled entirely by a pulp-like tissue with well-established vascularity. In addition, a continuous layer of dentin-like tissue was deposited onto the canal dentinal wall. This dentin-like structure appeared to be produced by a layer of newly formed odontoblast-like cells expressing dentin sialophosphoprotein, bone sialoprotein, alkaline phosphatase, and CD105. The cells in regenerated pulp-like tissue reacted positively to anti-human mitochondria antibodies, indicating their human origin. This study provides the first evidence showing that pulp-like tissue can be regenerated de novo in emptied root canal space by stem cells from apical papilla and dental pulp stem cells that give rise to odontoblast-like cells producing dentin-like tissue on existing dentinal walls. PMID:19737072

  11. Cross-sectional morphology and minimum canal wall widths in C-shaped roots of mandibular molars

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, W. L.; Thong, Y. L.

    2017-01-01

    The cross-sectional canal morphology and minimum widths of buccal and lingual canal walls were studied in 20 mandibular molars with C-shaped roots and canal orifices. The roots were mounted in clear resin blocks and sectioned transversely at 1-mm intervals. A total of 154 cross-sections were evaluated with an image analyzer. Twelve different longitudinal canal configurations were identified. The most prevalent were types 1-2 and 1-2-1 with each type occurring in four roots. Evaluation of the ...

  12. Effect of Carbamide Peroxide on the Push-out Bond Strength of Different Composition Glass-Ionomer Cement to Root Canal Dentin when used as Cervical Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Suellen Nogueira Linares; Venção, Ana Carolina; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Magro, Miriam Graziele; Guiotti, Aimeé Maria; Segalla, José Claudio Martins; Jordão-Basso, Keren Crisitina Fagundes; Ricci, Weber Adad; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bandéca, Matheus Coelho

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of 37% carbamide peroxide on the bond strength of conventional or resin-modified glass-ionomer cements when used as a cervical barrier in endodontically-treated teeth. After root canal instrumentation and obturation, 40 specimens of the cement-enamel junction were obtained after transversal root canal sectioning from human extracted canines. The root canal specimens were standardized and filled with the following materials (n = 10, each group): G1: zinc phosphate (control), G2: Ketac glass-ionomer, G3: vitrebond glass-ionomer or G4: GC GL glass-ionomer. After 24 hours, the specimens were subjected to an application of 37% carbamide peroxide for 21 days, changed each 7 days and stored in an artificial pulp chamber. The specimens were then submitted to push-out bond strength testing with an electromechanical test machine (EMIC) and the failure mode in each specimen was analyzed with confocal microscopy (LEXT). G3 and G4 showed higher bond strengths values than the other groups (p 0.05). G1 showed the lowest bond strength value (p Glass-ionomer cements showed higher bond strength values than the zinc phosphate cement, and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements presented the highest push-out values to root canal dentin (GC, GL and Vitrebond). Glass ionomer cements are recommended to use as cervical barrier materials before the internal dental bleaching, but its efficiency is questionable.

  13. Dentinal crack formation during root canal preparations by the twisted file adaptive, ProTaper Next, ProTaper Universal, and WaveOne instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, Ertuğrul; Gündüz, Hicran Ateş; Kırıcı, Damla Özsu; Arslan, Hakan; Topçu, Meltem Çolak; Yeter, Kübra Yeşildal

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of root cracks after root canal instrumentation with the TF Adaptive, WaveOne, ProTaper Next, and ProTaper Universal systems. Seventy-five extracted mandibular central incisors with mature apices and straight root canals (magnification. The samples were photographed with a camera to determine the presence of dentinal cracks. The control group had no cracks, and the difference between the control group and the experimental groups was statistically significant (P < .001). The ProTaper Next and TF Adaptive systems produced significantly less cracks than the ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems in the apical section (3 mm) (P < .05). Under the study conditions and within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the ProTaper Universal, ProTaper Next, WaveOne, and TF Adaptive instruments can result in dentinal cracks. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative evaluation of dentinal defects induced by hand files, hyflex, protaper next and one shape during canal preparation: A stereomicroscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekta Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to evaluate and compare the incidence of dentinal defects induced by Hand Files, HyFlex CM, ProTaper Next (PTN, and One Shape during canal preparation. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty extracted mandibular premolar teeth with single root canal were selected. Specimens were then divided into five groups with thirty specimens each. Group I: Specimens were prepared with hand instruments. Group II: Specimens were prepared with HyFlex CM rotary files (Coltene using a crown-down technique according to the manufacturer's instructions. Group III: Specimens were prepared with PTN rotary files (Dentsply using a crown-down technique according to the manufacturer's instructions. Group IV: Specimens were prepared with One Shape Single file rotary system (MicroMega using a crown-down technique according to the manufacturer's instructions. Group V: Specimens were used as a control and left unprepared. All roots were cut horizontally at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex. Sections were then viewed under stereomicroscope and dentinal defects were registered as “no defect,” “fracture,” and “other defects.” Statistical Analysis: Results of the study were subjected to Chi-square test. Results: Results were expressed as the number and percentage of defected, partially defected and roots with no defects in each groups. Conclusion: Hand files and One Shape file system caused less root defects compared to PTN and HyFlex file systems.

  15. The effect of 17% EDTA and MTAD on smear layer removal and on erosion of root canal dentin when used as final rinse: An in vitro SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal A Mahajan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the ability of a mixture of tetracycline isomer, citric acid and detergent (MTAD and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA in removing the smear layer along with their effects on peritubular and intertubular dentinal structures by scanning electron microscopic (SEM examination. Materials and Methods: Thirty recently extracted maxillary and mandibular single-rooted human teeth were divided into 3 groups and prepared to an apical size of 30. In Group 1, 2, and 3, MTAD, EDTA, and distilled water were used, respectively, as a final rinse solution to remove the smear layer. The specimens were subjected to SEM evaluation for the presence or absence of the smear layer and degree of erosion using a scoring system. Results: The result showed that MTAD shows better smear layer removing ability and does not significantly change the structure of dentinal tubules. Conclusion: MTAD is an efficient solution for the removal of the smear layer, especially in the apical third of root canals, and does not significantly change the structure of the dentinal tubules.

  16. Retentive strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts with composite resin cores: Effect of remaining coronal structure and root canal dentin conditioning protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Özcan, Mutlu

    2015-12-01

    The prognosis of a fixed dental prosthesis cemented to endodontically treated teeth is primarily determined by the presence of a ferrule on the tooth. Adhesion of the post in the root canal, conditioning methods for the canal and the amount of coronal structure could also be decisive on survival of reconstructions cemented on endodontically treated teeth. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the effect of remaining coronal structure on the retention of airborne-particle abraded fiber-reinforced composite resin posts built up with composite resin cores after the treatment of root canal dentin with different conditioning protocols. One hundred and fifty extracted human teeth with single root canal space were endodontically treated and divided into 3 groups as follows: group CEJ: the teeth were sectioned at the level of cementoenamel junction (CEJ); group CEJ1: the teeth were sectioned 1 mm above the CEJ; group CEJ2: the teeth were sectioned 2 mm above the CEJ. Each group was further divided into 5 subgroups (n=10 per group) according to the root canal treatments as follows: group C: no conditioning (control); group PH: conditioning with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 15 seconds; group E: conditioning with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) for 60 seconds; group CHX: conditioning with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) for 60 seconds; group Q: conditioning with combination of 2% CHX with 17% EDTA and a surfactant solution for 60 seconds. Glass fiber-reinforced composite resin posts were airborne-particle abraded and luted to the root canal dentin with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem). The retentive force was tested by applying a tensile load parallel to the long axis of these posts at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD post hoc test were used to analyze the data. The highest retention (N) was obtained with the CHX-EDTA conditioned group (374.7 ±29.8) followed by 17% EDTA (367.9 ±33.3) conditioning when 2 mm remaining

  17. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide hybrid and nanohydroxyapatite composite: A novel coating to prevent dentin erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahorny, Sídnei; Zanin, Hudson; Christino, Vinie Abreu; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Lobo, Anderson Oliveira; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva

    2017-10-01

    To date is emergent the development of novel coatings to protect erosion, especially to preventive dentistry and restorative dentistry. Here, for the first time we report the effectiveness of multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide hybrid carbon-base material (MWCNTO-GO) combined with nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) as a protective coating for dentin erosion. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), scanning electron (SEM), and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy were used to investigated the coatings and the effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (APF) treatment on bovine teeth root dentin before and after erosion. The electrochemical corrosion performance of the coating was evaluated. Raman spectra identified that: (i) the phosphate (ν 1 PO 4 3- ) content of dentin was not significantly affected by the treatments and (ii) the carbonate (ν 1 CO 3 2- ) content in dentin increased when nHAp was used. However, the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO composite exposited lower levels of organic matrix (CH bonds) after erosion compared to other treatments. Interesting, SEM micrographs identified that the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO formed layers after erosive cycling when associate with APF treatment, indicating a possible chemical bond among them. Treatments of root dentin with nHAp, MWCNTO-GO, APF_MWCNTO-GO, and APF_nHAp/MWCNTO-GO increased the carbonate content, carbonate/phosphate ratio, and organic matrix band area after erosion. The potentiodynamic polarization curves and Nyquist plot showed that nHAp, MWCNT-GO and nHAp/MWCNT-GO composites acted as protective agents against corrosion process. Clearly, the nHAp/MWCNTO-GO composite was stable after erosive cycling and a thin and acid-resistant film was formed when associated to APF treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of refreshment/activation cycles and temperature rise on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macedo, R.G.; Verhaagen, B.; Wesselink, P.R.; Versluis, Michel; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effect of multiple refreshment/activation cycles and temperature on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation (UAI) under laboratory conditions. Methodology The root canal walls of 24 standardized root canals in

  19. Photo elastic analysis of stresses in the root canal walls around double taper and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Mahdavi Ezadi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : According to the common application of non-metal prefabricated posts in dentistry and lack of enough information about the stress distribution in the root canal walls by these posts, this study was performed to compare the effect of two simple taper and double taper posts on the stress distribution on root canal walls by photo elastic method .   Materials and Methods: The design of this study was experimental in photoelastic system. The posts, used in this investigation, were double taper and simple taper fiber posts with 0.9 mm diameter and 20 mm length and epoxy resin. First two photo elastic models with tooth dimensions were fabricated and the posts were placed inside the model. Then the core of the each post was fabricated on the model. Each models were loaded in polariscope and the formed fringe order colored ring were photographed.   Results: In 100 N, 90 degree angle loading in cervical and apical fringe order showed 2.50 and 1.39 in simple taper posts and 1.39 and 2.35 in double taper post. In 150 N, 30 degree angle loading in cervical and apical fringe order showed 4 and 2.65 in simple taper posts, and 4 and 2.5 in double taper post.   Conclusion: In the vertical and oblique loads, double taper fiber post showed better stress distribution than that of simple tapered posts.

  20. [The use of ultrasonic files in canal preparation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calas, P; Terrie, B

    1990-01-01

    The continuous high volume of irrigating solution delivered by the ultrasonic system facilitates the root canal debridement. An excellent cleaning of dentin wall is obtained even on surfaces unreached by the mechanical instrumentation. In order to obtain an efficacious preparation, the use of ultrasonic files were combined with instrumentation. This new technique is described in this article.

  1. Effect of polymerization mode of two adhesive systems on push-out bond strength of fiber post to different regions of root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Farzin Ebrahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A few studies have investigated the effect of the activation mode of adhesive systems on bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin. This study investigated the push-out bond strengths of a glass fiber post to different root canal regions with the use of two adhesives with light- and dual-cure polymerization modes. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 40 maxillary central incisors were decoronated at cement-enamel junction with 15 ± 1 mm root length. After root canal therapy and post space preparations, they were randomly divided into four groups. Post spaces were treated with four different adhesives: Excite, Excite Dual cure Single Component (DSC, self-etch adhesive (AdheSE, and AdheSE dual-cure. Then the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC post, Postec Plus, was cemented with dual-cure resin cement, Variolink II. The roots were cut into three 2-mm-thick slices. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mode of failures was determined under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey test was conducted to compare post hoc with P < 0.05 as the level of significance. Results: The highest bond strength was obtained for AdheSE dual-cure (15.54 ± 6.90 MPa and the lowest was obtained for Excite light-cure (10.07 ± 7.45 MPa and only the bond strength between these two adhesives had significant difference (P = 0.02. Bond strength decreased from the coronal to the apical in all groups and this was significant in Excite (group 1 and AdheSE (group 3 (P < 0.001. In apical regions, bond strength of dual-cure adhesives was significantly higher than light-cure adhesives (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Push-out bond strength of fiber post to different regions of root canal dentin was affected by both adhesive systems and their polymerization modes.

  2. The influence of the Q-switched and free-running Er:YAG laser beam characteristics on the ablation of root canal dentine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios N.; Khabbaz, Marouan G.; Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A

    2004-06-30

    Laser based dental treatment is attractive to many researchers. Lasers in the 3 {mu}m region, as the Er:YAG, are suitable especially for endodontic applications. In this study a pulsed free-running and Q-switched laser was used for the ablation experiments of root canal dentine. The laser beam was either directly focused on the dental tissue or delivered to it through an infrared fiber. For different spatial beam distributions, energies, number of pulses and both laser operations the quality characteristics (crater's shape formation, ablation efficiency and surface characteristics modification) were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The craters produced, generally, reflect the relevant beam profile. Inhomogeneous spatial beam profiles and short pulse duration result in cracks formation and lower tissue removal efficiency, while longer pulse durations cause hard dentine fusion. Any beam profile modification, due to laser characteristics variations and the specific delivering system properties, is directly reflected in the ablation crater shape and the tissue removal efficiency. Therefore, the laser parameters, as fluence, pulse repetition rate and number of pulses, have to be carefully adjusted in relation to the desirable result.

  3. Effect of chlorhexidine on bond strength between glass-fiber post and root canal dentine after six month of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, M; Toksavul, S; Tamaç, E; Sarikanat, M; Karagözoğlu, I

    2014-03-01

    Aim of this study was to assess the influence of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) application on bond strength of glass fibre reinforced composite (FRC) posts to root dentine using adhesive luting systems. Forty extracted human mandibular premolars were endodontically treated and root canals were prepared. Teeth were divided into 2 groups according to luting system as SuperBond C&B (etch-and-rinse/chemical cure) and FuturaBond DC (self-etch/ dual cure). Each group was further divided in 2 subgroups (n=10) according to whether CHX was applied or not. Group Futura/CHX: FuturaBond DC + CHX; group Futura: FuturaBond DC; group Super/CHX: Super Bond C&B + CHX; group Super: SuperBond C&B + CHX. Mean and standard deviation (in parenthesis) values of bond strength in MPa were: group Futura/CHX: 8.86 (1.96), group Futura: 7.65 (1.01), group Super/CHX: 17.47(2.93), group Super: 12.41 (3.83). Bond strength values were affected by the type of luting agent and CHX irrigation (p=0.001, two-way ANOVA). There were statistically significant differences among the groups according to one-way ANOVA (ppost improved long-term bond strength between glass FRC and root dentine.

  4. Effect of Dentin Moisture and Application Mode of Universal Adhesives on the Adhesion of Glass Fiber Posts to Root Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Yançanã Luizy; Bakaus, Thaís Emanuelle; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Reis, Alessandra; Gomes, Giovana Mongruel

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dentin moisture and application mode of universal adhesives on bond strength (BS) and nanoleakage (NL) of fiber posts bonded to root dentin. The roots of 96 extracted human canines were treated endodontically, and the fiber posts were cemented according to the combination of the following factors: dentin moisture (dry and wet), cementation system [Single Bond Universal/RelyX ARC (SBU) and Prime&Bond elect/Enforce (PBE)], and adhesive application [active (A) and passive (P)] in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. After one week, the specimens were transversely sectioned into six 1-mm-thick disks. From each group, 8 specimens were subjected to the push-out BS test and the other 4 specimens underwent NL analysis. For both tests, the data were subjected to 3-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). For BS and NL, the cross-product interaction of all factors was significant (p fiber post cementation, independent of dentin moisture condition.

  5. Research of seal materials adhesion to walls of cavity in enamel and dentin formation by Er laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory B.; Belikov, Andrei V.; Vlasova, Svetlana N.; Erofeev, Andrew V.

    1994-12-01

    The present work represents the results of research of mechanical strength formed by submillisecond pulses of Er-laser at the border of enamel-seal and dentine-seal in a cavity. Comparative research of an adhesion of three of the most widespread types of modern seal materials (cement, amalgam, polymer) to walls of the laser cavity are conducted. The comparison of `laser adhesion' with adhesion of these materials to the walls of the cavity has been made by the usual mechanical tools. The dependence of free adhesion energy from the geometry of the cavity and energy density of laser radiation is considered. This work informs the reader about the results of research removal efficiency of some modern seal materials. The influence of water-spray on the efficiency of seal materials laser treatment process is considered.

  6. Bacterial Efficacy of Ca(oH)2 Against E.faecalis Compared with three Dental Lasers on Root Canal Dentin- An Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanumuru, Narasimha Reddy; Subbaiah, Rama

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate bactericidal effect of Ca(OH)2 compared with 810 nm diode, 980 nm diode, and Nd:YAG lasers on root canal dentin against E.faecalis. Sixty five freshly extracted human mandibular single rooted teeth were selected for the study. The apical third of these roots was gradually enlarged until reaching the ISO 40- K file. The samples were divided into 4 groups, each containing 15 teeth and 5 teeth for control group. Group-1: 810 nm Diode; Group-2: 980 nm Diode; Group-3: Nd:YAG; Group-4: Ca(OH)2. 50μL of the E.faecalis ATCC 29212 strand was incubated in 1 mL of Brain Heart Infusion Broth (BHI) culture medium in37(o)C incubator for 4h. The concentration of the inoculation was then adjusted for a degree of turbidity which was adjusted to 0.5 McFarland scale. Later from the incubated broth, 10μL of E.faecalis culture was inoculated into the main canal and were sealed. The incubated plates were checked for growth and the colony was counted using colony counter and the results are interpreted. There was statistically significant difference (plaser groups. The teeth irradiated with the Nd:YAG laser had significantly higher bacterial reduction than all the other groups and the respective control groups.

  7. Effect of polymerization mode of two adhesive systems on push-out bond strength of fiber post to different regions of root canal dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shahram Farzin; Shadman, Niloofar; Nasery, Ehsan Baradaran; Sadeghian, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Background: A few studies have investigated the effect of the activation mode of adhesive systems on bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin. This study investigated the push-out bond strengths of a glass fiber post to different root canal regions with the use of two adhesives with light- and dual-cure polymerization modes. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 40 maxillary central incisors were decoronated at cement-enamel junction with 15 ± 1 mm root length. After root canal therapy and post space preparations, they were randomly divided into four groups. Post spaces were treated with four different adhesives: Excite, Excite Dual cure Single Component (DSC), self-etch adhesive (AdheSE), and AdheSE dual-cure. Then the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post, Postec Plus, was cemented with dual-cure resin cement, Variolink II. The roots were cut into three 2-mm-thick slices. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mode of failures was determined under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey test was conducted to compare post hoc with P AdheSE dual-cure (15.54 ± 6.90 MPa) and the lowest was obtained for Excite light-cure (10.07 ± 7.45 MPa) and only the bond strength between these two adhesives had significant difference (P = 0.02). Bond strength decreased from the coronal to the apical in all groups and this was significant in Excite (group 1) and AdheSE (group 3) (P adhesives was significantly higher than light-cure adhesives (P adhesive systems and their polymerization modes. PMID:24688557

  8. Reaction rate of NaOCl in contact with bovine dentine: effect of activation, exposure time, concentration and pH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Macedo, R.G.; Wesselink, P.R.; Zaccheo, F.; Fanali, D.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To determine the influence of activation method (ultrasound or laser), concentration, pH and exposure time on the reaction rate (RR) of NaOCl when in contact with dentinal walls. Methodology  The walls from standardized root canals in bovine incisors were exposed to a standardized volume of

  9. Modified Revascularization in Human Teeth Using an Intracanal Formation of Treated Dentin Matrix: A Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Abbott, Paul V.; Akhavan, Hengameh; Savadkouhi, Sohrab Tour

    2017-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-treated dentin matrix (TDM) is an enriched source of bioactive molecules. Therefore, it was hypothesized that fabrication of autogenous TDM on root dentinal walls of necrotic immature permanent teeth may allow more predictable outcome of revascularization treatments. Two young patients with permanent nonvital immature teeth were chosen for revascularization treatment. After appropriate disinfection of root canal system, TDM was fabricated on root dentina...

  10. Dentin ablation-rate measurements in endodontics witj HF and CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makropoulou, Mersini I.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Khabbaz, Marouan; Sykaras, Sotirios; Tsikrikas, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the ability of the laser light to enlarge the root canal during the endodontic therapy. The aim of this research is the experimental and theoretical study of the ablation rate of two infrared laser wavelengths on dentin. Thirty freshly extracted human teeth were longitudinally sectioned at thicknesses ranged from 0.5 to 2 mm, and irradiated on the root canal dentin. The measured ablation rates in dentinal wall of the root canal showed that the HF laser at 2.9 micrometer can more effectively penetrate into the tissue, whereas the carbon dioxide laser at 10.6 micrometer leads to high thermal damage of the ablation crater surroundings.

  11. Parallel post-space preparation in different tooth types ex vivo : deviation from the canal centre and remaining dentine thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; Klein, M. H. J.; Kok, G. F.; Whitworth, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine the deviation of parallel-sided twist-drills during post-channel preparation and relate this to tooth type and position. Methodology Human teeth with single root canals were selected: maxillary second premolars (group i); maxillary lateral incisors (group ii); mandibular canines

  12. Stress distribution on dentin-cement-post interface varying root canal and glass fiber post diameters. A three-dimensional finite element analysis based on micro-CT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAZARI, Priscilla Cardoso; de OLIVEIRA, Rodrigo Caldeira Nunes; ANCHIETA, Rodolfo Bruniera; de ALMEIDA, Erika Oliveira; FREITAS JUNIOR, Amilcar Chagas; KINA, Sidney; ROCHA, Eduardo Passos

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of root canal and glass fiber post diameters on the biomechanical behavior of the dentin/cement/post interface of a root-filled tooth using 3D finite element analysis. Material and Methods Six models were built using micro-CT imaging data and SolidWorks 2007 software, varying the root canal (C) and the glass fiber post (P) diameters: C1P1-C=1 mm and P=1 mm; C2P1-C=2 mm and P=1 mm; C2P2-C=2 mm and P=2 mm; C3P1-C=3 mm and P=1 mm; C3P2-C=3 mm and P=2 mm; and C3P3-C=3 mm and P=3 mm. The numerical analysis was conducted with ANSYS Workbench 10.0. An oblique force (180 N at 45º) was applied to the palatal surface of the central incisor. The periodontal ligament surface was constrained on the three axes (x=y=z=0). Maximum principal stress (σmax) values were evaluated for the root dentin, cement layer, and glass fiber post. Results: The most evident stress was observed in the glass fiber post at C3P1 (323 MPa), and the maximum stress in the cement layer occurred at C1P1 (43.2 MPa). The stress on the root dentin was almost constant in all models with a peak in tension at C2P1 (64.5 MPa). Conclusion The greatest discrepancy between root canal and post diameters is favorable for stress concentration at the post surface. The dentin remaining after the various root canal preparations did not increase the stress levels on the root. PMID:24473716

  13. Stress distribution on dentin-cement-post interface varying root canal and glass fiber post diameters. A three-dimensional finite element analysis based on micro-CT data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazari, Priscilla Cardoso; Oliveira, Rodrigo Caldeira Nunes de; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Almeida, Erika Oliveira de; Freitas Junior, Amilcar Chagas; Kina, Sidney; Rocha, Eduardo Passos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of root canal and glass fiber post diameters on the biomechanical behavior of the dentin/cement/post interface of a root-filled tooth using 3D finite element analysis. Six models were built using micro-CT imaging data and SolidWorks 2007 software, varying the root canal (C) and the glass fiber post (P) diameters: C1P1-C=1 mm and P=1 mm; C2P1-C=2 mm and P=1 mm; C2P2-C=2 mm and P=2 mm; C3P1-C=3 mm and P=1 mm; C3P2-C=3 mm and P=2 mm; and C3P3-C=3 mm and P=3 mm. The numerical analysis was conducted with ANSYS Workbench 10.0. An oblique force (180 N at 45º) was applied to the palatal surface of the central incisor. The periodontal ligament surface was constrained on the three axes (x=y=z=0). Maximum principal stress (σ(max)) values were evaluated for the root dentin, cement layer, and glass fiber post. The most evident stress was observed in the glass fiber post at C3P1 (323 MPa), and the maximum stress in the cement layer occurred at C1P1 (43.2 MPa). The stress on the root dentin was almost constant in all models with a peak in tension at C2P1 (64.5 MPa). The greatest discrepancy between root canal and post diameters is favorable for stress concentration at the post surface. The dentin remaining after the various root canal preparations did not increase the stress levels on the root.

  14. Stress distribution on dentin-cement-post interface varying root canal and glass fiber post diameters. A three-dimensional finite element analysis based on micro-CT data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Cardoso LAZARI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of root canal and glass fiber post diameters on the biomechanical behavior of the dentin/cement/post interface of a root-filled tooth using 3D finite element analysis. Material and Methods: Six models were built using micro-CT imaging data and SolidWorks 2007 software, varying the root canal (C and the glass fiber post (P diameters: C1P1-C=1 mm and P=1 mm; C2P1-C=2 mm and P=1 mm; C2P2-C=2 mm and P=2 mm; C3P1-C=3 mm and P=1 mm; C3P2-C=3 mm and P=2 mm; and C3P3-C=3 mm and P=3 mm. The numerical analysis was conducted with ANSYS Workbench 10.0. An oblique force (180 N at 45º was applied to the palatal surface of the central incisor. The periodontal ligament surface was constrained on the three axes (x=y=z=0. Maximum principal stress (σmax values were evaluated for the root dentin, cement layer, and glass fiber post. Results: The most evident stress was observed in the glass fiber post at C3P1 (323 MPa, and the maximum stress in the cement layer occurred at C1P1 (43.2 MPa. The stress on the root dentin was almost constant in all models with a peak in tension at C2P1 (64.5 MPa. CONCLUSION: The greatest discrepancy between root canal and post diameters is favorable for stress concentration at the post surface. The dentin remaining after the various root canal preparations did not increase the stress levels on the root.

  15. Influence of ultrasound and irrigant solutions on the bond strength of glass fiber posts to root canal dentine

    OpenAIRE

    Lacerda, Ana Júlia Farias; FOSJC/UNESP; Gullo, Marina Augusto; FOSJC/UNESP; Xavier, Ana Claudia Carvalho; FOSJC/UNESP; Pucci, César Rogério; FOSJC/UNESP; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge; FOSJC/UNESP; Huhtala, Maria Filomena Rocha Lima; FOSJC/UNESP

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of the influence of theultrasound and irrigant solutions on the bondstrength (BS) of glass fiber posts. Material andMethods: Sixty-six roots of bovine teeth standardizedat 16 mm were used. The roots were submitted to abiomechanical preparation up to size #80 Kerr file,with irrigation of 5ml of saline solution at everyfile change and then filled. The canals underwentpartial desobturation and were divided into 6 groupsaccording to the irrigant solution and the use ofultras...

  16. Topical application of Mitomycin C in the treatment of granulation tissue after Canal Wall Down mastoidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Karimi-Yazdi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Otorrhea and granulation tissue in Canal Wall Down mastoidectomy (CWD is the common problem in cholesteatoma removal and leads to many discomfort for both the patient and the physician. The main objective in CWD is creating the dry cavity, so the topical antibiotic and acetic acid in variable saturations are used for this purpose. In this study we evaluate the effectiveness of topical MMC and chemical cautery by acetic acid.   Materials and Methods: Study population consists of 50 patients with cholesteatoma whom underwent CWD. All patient allocated randomly in two study groups, MMC and acetic acid. After 3 weeks, the first visit is planned, extension of granulation tissue and dryness of cavity are evaluated and topical drugs are used in blind fashion. MMC in 4% and acetic acid in 12.5% saturation are applied. Other visits are completed at next month and 3 months later.   Results: Both methods are effective in treatment of granulation tissue. In each group both treatment were effective too but MMC was more effective than acid acetic in the treatment of granulation tissue after 4 weeks.   Conclusion: Based on our findings, it is clear that topical MMC is very effective in the treatment of granulation tissue and in CWD. It results in dry cavity much better than acetic acid without any complication. 

  17. Hearing results using titanium ossicular replacement prosthesis in intact canal wall tympanoplasty for cholesteatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Nicola; Zizzi, Stefania; Quaranta, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Titanium proved to be a valuable alternative to ossicles in ossiculoplasty procedures. Complication rates are comparable to those obtained by other authors with titanium and nontitanium prostheses. Hearing results were worse compared with other reports; however, no conclusion can be drawn on the basis of the literature because of the heterogeneity of the populations studied. To evaluate the results and complications of total (TORP) and partial (PORP) titanium ossicular replacement prostheses in middle ear cholesteatoma. Fifty-seven patients affected by acquired cholesteatoma of the middle ear undergoing titanium ossiculoplasty during second stage intact canal wall tympanoplasty were evaluated. Postoperative hearing gain, complication rate, and revision rate were analyzed. Average postoperative gain was 13.6 dB HL for PORP and 17.9 dB HL for TORP. After ossicular reconstruction the mean postoperative ABG was 24.1 dB HL in PORPs and 27.2 dB HL in TORPs. The difference in air-bone gap (ABG) between the two groups after ossiculoplasty was not significant. The number of patients with an ABG > 30 dB was higher in the TORP group compared with the PORP group (p = 0.024) after ossicular reconstruction. The total extrusion rate was 5.2% and the total revision rate was 10.5%.

  18. Effects of cavity reconstruction on morbidity and quality of life after canal wall down tympanomastoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluyol, Sinan; Ugur, Omer; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Yagiz, Ozlem; Gumussoy, Murat; Cukurova, Ibrahim

    2017-08-19

    Canal wall down (CWD) tympanomastoidectomy is commonly used to treat advanced chronic otitis media or cholesteatoma. The advantages of CWD mastoidectomy are excellent exposure for disease eradication and postoperative control of residual disease; its disadvantages include the accumulation of debris requiring life-long otological maintenance and cleaning, continuous ear drainage, fungal cavity infections, and the occurrence of dizziness and vertigo by changing temperature or pressure. To evaluate whether cavity-induced problems can be eliminated and patient comfort can be increased with mastoid cavity reconstruction. In total, 11 patients who underwent mastoid cavity reconstruction between March 2013 and June 2013 comprised the study group, and 11 patients who had dry, epithelialized CWD cavities were recruited as the control group. The study examined three parameters: epithelial migration, air caloric testing, and the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI). Epithelial migration, air caloric testing, and the GBI were evaluated in the study and control groups. The epithelial migration rate was significantly faster in study group (1.63±0.5mm/week) than control group (0.94±0.37mm/week) (p=0.003, psocial health scores were -9.71, -21.09, and +20.35, respectively in the control group. These were +33.93, +35.59, +33.31, and +29.61, respectively in the study group. All but the social health score improved significantly (0.007, 0.008, 0.018, and 0.181, respectively). Cavity reconstruction improves epithelial migration, normalizes caloric responses and increases the quality of life. Thus, cavity rehabilitation eliminates open-cavity-induced problems by restoring the functional anatomy of the ear. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 3. The role of irrigants during root canal treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, L W M

    2015-10-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm) and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root canal system and their chemical dissolution or disruption. Each of the endodontic irrigation systems has its own irrigant flow characteristics, which should fulfill these aims. Without flow (convection), the irrigant would have to be distributed through diffusion. This process is slow and depends on temperature and concentration gradients. On the other hand, convection is a faster and more efficient transport mechanism. During irrigant flow, frictional forces will occur, for example between the irrigant and the root canal wall (wall shear stress). These frictional forces have a mechanical cleaning effect on the root canal wall. These frictional forces are the result of the flow characteristics related to the different irrigation systems.

  20. Scanning electron microscope evaluation of chlorhexidine gel and liquid associated with sodium hypochlorite cleaning on the root canal walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Chung, Adriana; Menezes, Márcia Maciel; Fernandes, Carlos Eduardo Fernandes; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge; Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), the cleaning of the root canal walls after instrumentation and irrigation with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) associated with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel or liquid, combined or not with 17% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA). Sixty single-root human teeth were subjected to standardized root canal instrumentation with different irrigants (n = 10): G1) NaOCl + CHX liquid; G2) NaOCl + CHX liquid + EDTA + saline solution; G3) NaOCl + CHX gel; G4) NaOCl + CHX gel + EDTA + saline solution; G5) saline solution; G6) saline solution + EDTA. After instrumentation, the teeth were prepared for SEM analysis (×500 and ×2,000) to evaluate the cleaning of the cervical, middle, and apical thirds. The area analyzed was quantified according to the percentage of open and closed tubules, and data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey tests (P = .05). The number of open tubules was highest in G4 in all root thirds, showing statistically significant difference from G1, G2, and G5 (P < .05). G1 presented higher quantity of closed tubules significant than G2. Irrigation with NaOCl and CHX gel followed by EDTA and saline solution produced greater cleaning of the root canal walls. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modified Revascularization in Human Teeth Using an Intracanal Formation of Treated Dentin Matrix: A Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Abbott, Paul V; Akhavan, Hengameh; Savadkouhi, Sohrab Tour

    2017-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-treated dentin matrix (TDM) is an enriched source of bioactive molecules. Therefore, it was hypothesized that fabrication of autogenous TDM on root dentinal walls of necrotic immature permanent teeth may allow more predictable outcome of revascularization treatments. Two young patients with permanent nonvital immature teeth were chosen for revascularization treatment. After appropriate disinfection of root canal system, TDM was fabricated on root dentinal walls using different dilutions of EDTA. Then, bleeding was induced in canals and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed over the blood clots. In all follow-up periods, both cases were asymptomatic and radiographic findings have shown a continued root development. Revascularization is a valuable treatment for nonvital immature teeth, allows continuation of root development. Modification of root regeneration through a TDM protocol may seem more predictable treatment and improve maturogenesis than traditional therapy.

  2. In vitro bond strength of an epoxy resin-based root canal sealer to root dentin irradiated with high-power lasers and adhesive interface analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Vanessa Lessa C; Cruvinel, Pedro Basto; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Gariba-Silva, Ricardo

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of high-power lasers (Nd:YAG and diode 980 nm) associated with mineral coal as fotopotencializer on bond strength of an epoxy resin-based root canal sealer to root dentin, using the pushout test, and on the dentin/filling material interface, using confocal laser microscopy. For this purposes, 50 canines were instrumented with Mtwo rotary system up to #50.04 instrument and randomly assigned to five groups (n = 10): group I-control EDTAC; group II-EDTAC and Nd:YAG laser; group III-EDTAC and diode laser 980 nm; group IV-EDTAC, Nd:YAG laser and mineral coal 5 g/100 mL; and group V-EDTAC, diode laser 980 nm and mineral coal 5 g/100 mL. All data were analyzed by ANOVA (at 5% significance level) following the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn and Tukey tests. The group I increased more bond strength of the sealer to root dentin that treated with only EDTAC 17% (17.21 ± 21.75 MPa), similar to the group II (12.21 ± 18.20 MPa) and group IV (14.92 ± 28.06 MPa), both treated with Nd:YAG laser, with the exception of group IV, which was added to mineral coal. The group V (8.75 ± 13.42 MPa) had similar results to the groups II and IV, but the same similarity were found when compared with group III (7.11 + 11.28 MPa), with lower results. Regarding the root thirds, the apical third (23.27 ± 29.21 MPa) presented a statistically higher value on bond strength than the cervical third (5.92 ± 5.33 MPa) and middle third (6.93 ± 7, 11 MPa) (p > 0.05). Group II (86.27 μm) showed the highest tags penetration values, with a statistically difference to the group III (51.57 μm), IV (36.77 μm) and V (32.37 μm) (p  0.05). Group IV had the lowest values and was statistically similarity to groups III and V (p > 0.05). It was concluded that the treatment with Nd:YAG laser provides better results than the diode 980 nm laser, except when was added mineral coal. The control and diode 980 nm laser

  3. Effect of solvent evaporation strategies on regional bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives to root canal dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitthaweerat, S; Nakajima, M; Foxton, R M; Tagami, J

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of different solvent evaporation strategies on bonding of one-step self-etch adhesives to root canal dentine. Two dual-cure resin core systems (Clearfil DC Bond/Clearfil DC Core Automix and Clearfil Tri-S Bond Plus/Clearfil DC Core Plus; Kuraray Noritake Dental, Tokyo, Japan) were equally applied in 24 post spaces from extracted human mandibular premolars. After the adhesive application, specimens were randomly assigned into four water/solvent evaporation strategies as follows (I) insertion of absorbent paper point for 10 s: P, (II) 10 s air-blowing: A, (III) as (II) followed by insertion of absorbent paper point: AP, (IV) as (III) followed by 10 s additional air-blowing: APA. Then, the adhesives were light cured, and resin core materials were placed into the post space, followed by light curing for 60 s. After water storage for 24 h, 0.6 × 0.6 mm-thick beams were prepared to measure the regional μTBS. The mode of failure was also observed. The μTBS values were statistically analysed using three-way anova and Duncan HSD test (α = 0.05). In the coronal region, there were no significant differences in μTBS between each evaporation strategy (P > 0.05), except P group. However, in the apical region, APA and AP groups significantly increased in μTBS compared with A and P groups (P  0.05). The use of paper points with additional air-blowing for removing excessive adhesive and evaporating residual water/solvent would be effective in producing higher bond strength for the tested one-step self-etch adhesives and fewer blister formations in deeper regions of the post space. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin using a one-step self-etching adhesive: the effect of solvent removal and light-curing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Tarek M; Anwar, Mohammed N; El-Askary, Farid S

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of solvent removal and light-curing methods on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin using a one-step self-etching adhesive. Eighty single-rooted, single-canal human mandibular premolars were used in this study. After removal of the crown, the pulp was extirpated and the post space was prepared. The teeth were divided into two main groups according to the solvent removal method, either using the paper point or the air-drying method. Each of the above main groups was further subdivided into 4 subgroups according to the light-curing method: group 1: both adhesive and resin cement were cured from the top of the post in the same step (cocuring) for 40 s; group 2: the adhesive was light cured for 20 s and the resin cement for 40 s; group 3: the adhesive was light cured for 40 s as was the resin cement; group 4: an intracanal tip was used to cure the adhesive inside the post space for 20 s. In groups 1 to 4, the solvent was evaporated using oil-free compressed air for 5 s from the root surface and excess adhesive was removed from inside the canal using a paper point. In groups 5 to 8, the adhesive and cement were applied and light cured as in groups 1 to 4, except the solvent was evaporated (air dried) from inside the post space using an intra-canal disposable plastic tip attached to the tip of a 3-way syringe. After 24 hours, three 2-mm-thick root slices were obtained from each root. Each slice was subjected to the push-out bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Factorial analysis (two-way ANOVA) was run to test the effect of solvent evaporation method, light-curing method, and their interactions on bond strength. One-way ANOVA followed by Duncan's Multiple Range Test were used to test the effect of lightcuring method on bond strength within each solvent evaporation method. Student's t-test was performed to compare the effect of solvent evaporation method on bond strength within each light-curing method

  5. Effect of light-curing units on push-out fiber post bond strength in root canal dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, L. R.; Bandéca, M. C.; Silva, F. B.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different light-curing units on the bond strength (push-out) of glass fiber posts in the different thirds of the root (cervical, middle and apical) with different adhesive luting resin systems (dual-cure total-etch; dual-cured and self-etch bonding system; and dual-cure self-adhesive cements), Disks of the samples ( n = 144) were used, with approximately 1 mm of thickness of 48 bovine roots restored with glass fiber posts, that were luted with resin cements photo-activated by halogen LCU (QTH, Optilux 501) and blue LED (Ultraled), with power densities of 600 and 550 mW/cm2, respectively. A universal testing machine (MTS 810 Material Test System) was used with a 1 mm diameter steel rod at cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until post extrusion, with load cell of 50 kg, for evaluation of the push-out strength in the different thirds of each sample. The push-out strength values in kgf were converted to MPa and analyzed through Analysis of Variance and Tukey’s test, at significance level of 5%. The results showed that there were no statistical differences between the QTH and LED LCUs. The self-adhesive resin cement had lower values of retention. The total-etch and self-adhesive system resin cements seem to be a possible alternative for glass fiber posts cementation into the radicular canal and the LED LCU can be applied as an alternative to halogen light on photo-activation of dual-cured resin cements.

  6. Effectiveness of EDTA as the irrigation solution to remove smear layer in root canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniasri Amas Achiar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the objectives of successful endodontic treatment is the hermetic obturation of the root canal system. To achieve this, the root canal filling must seal the canal space both apically and coronally to prevent the ingress of microorganisms or tissue fluids into the canal space. Apical leakage is reported a common reason for the clinical failure of endodontic therapy. Leakage through an obturated root canal is expected to take place at interfaces between sealer and dentin or sealer and gutta-percha, or through voids within the sealer. Hence, the sealing quality of root canal filling depends much on the sealing ability of the sealer. Therefore, anything that may influence the adaptation of the root filling to the canal wall is can determine the degree and the extent of leakage, and ultimately the prognosis of the endodontic therapy. In endodontic therapy, the smear layer formation results from root canal preparation and may influence the effective seal of the root canal system. The smear layer formation is mainly composed of inorganic components (dentin debris and organic materials, such as pulp tissue remnant, bacteria, and blood cells. Removal of the smear layer from the root canal walls before the obturation can reduce the leakage of root canal sealer. To remove the smear layer use 10 ml 17% EDTA followed by 10 ml of 5.25% NaOCl as irrigating solution. This paper discribe about how the effectivity of EDTA as irigating solution to remove the smear layer especially in the apical root canal with many lateral canal to reduce the apical leakage.

  7. The cleanliness differences of root canal walls after irrigated with East Java propolis extract and sodium hypoclorite solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Yuanita

    2017-03-01

    (n=10. The specimens were prepared with ProTaper. During instrumentation, the root canals were irrigated with different solutions: Control Group irrigated with aquadest; Group 1 irrigated with 8% East Java propolis extract; Group 2 irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl and Group 3 irrigated with 5% NaOCl. The root canals were cut at apical third and SEM scores were tested by using Mann-Whitney test at the significance level of p=0.05 and Median Control test. Result: The results of Mann-Whitney Test, there were significant differences between control group with Group 1, 2 and 3 (p<0.05. Based on the Median Control test, the value of 8% East Java propolis extracts was 1,000, which was the best value compared to 2.5% NaOCl, 5% NaOCl and aquadest. Conclusion: It can be concluded that 8% East Java propolis extract is the most effective solution for cleaning root canal walls compared with 2.5% NaOCl and 5% NaOCl.

  8. Effects of nanosilver and nanozinc incorporated mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles on the mechanical properties of dentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    Full Text Available Mesoporous calcium-silicate nanoparticles (MCSNs are advanced biomaterials for drug delivery and mineralization induction. They can load silver and exhibit significantly antibacterial effects. However, the effects of MCSNs and silver-loaded MCSNs on dentin are unknown. The silver (Ag and/or zinc (Zn incorporated MCSNs (Ag-Zn-MCSNs were prepared by a template method, and their characterizations were tested. Then the nanoparticles were filled into root canals and their effects on the dentin were investigated. Ag-Zn-MCSNs showed characteristics of mesoporous materials and sustained release of ions over time. Ag-Zn-MCSNs adhered well to the root canal walls and infiltrated into the dentinal tubules after ultrasound activation. Ag-Zn-MCSNs showed no significantly negative effects on either the flexural strength or the modulus of elasticity of dentin, while CH decreased the flexural strength of dentin significantly (P<0.05. These findings suggested that Ag and Zn can be incorporated into MCSNs using a template method, and the Ag-Zn-MCSNs may be developed into a new disinfectant for the root canal and dentinal tubules.

  9. Dentin-like versus Rigid Endodontic Post: 11-year Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial on No-wall to 2-wall Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Michael; Sterzenbach, Guido; Dietrich, Thomas; Bitter, Kerstin; Frankenberger, Roland; von Stein-Lausnitz, Manja

    2017-11-01

    This is the first long-term randomized controlled trial to evaluate dentin-like glass fiber posts (GFPs) compared with rather rigid titanium posts (TPs) for post-endodontic restoration of severely damaged endodontically treated teeth with 2 or fewer remaining cavity walls. Ninety-one subjects in need of post-endodontic restorations were randomly assigned to receive either a tapered GFP (n = 45) or TP (n = 46). Posts were adhesively luted by using self-adhesive resin cement, followed by composite core build-up and preparation of 2-mm ferrule design. Primary end point was loss of restoration for any reason. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed, and log-rank test was calculated (P endodontic failure (n = 2), extraction because of tooth mobility grade III associated with insufficient design of removable partial denture (n = 1), tooth fracture (n = 1), and changes in treatment plan (n = 2); failure modes for TP were endodontic failure (n = 5), root fracture (n = 1), and 1 extraction for other reasons. Cumulative survival probability was 58.7% for GFP and 74.2% for TP. When using self-adhesively luted prefabricated posts, resin composite core build-up, and 2-mm ferrule to reconstruct severely damaged endodontically treated teeth, tooth survival is not influenced by post rigidity. Survival decreased rapidly after 8 years of observation in both groups. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dimension, anatomy and morphology of the mesiobuccal root canal system in maxillary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degerness, Randy A; Bowles, Walter R

    2010-06-01

    To increase our understanding of the root canal system, we examined the mesiobuccal (MB) roots of maxillary first and second molars, which are considered to be one of the most complex root canal systems. Uninstrumented MB roots from 153 teeth were imbedded, sectioned, and observed at 8x using a stereomicroscope for main canal numbers, isthmus presence, and dimensional size of canals and dentin walls. The number of canals observed in maxillary first and second molars was 20% and 38.1% for one canal, 79.8% and 60.3% for two canals, and 1.1% and 1.6% for three canals, respectively. The buccal canal was larger than lingual or middle canals at all levels of the root. The average distance between the two main canals was 1.2 +/- 0.6 mm in first molars and 1.78 +/- 0.6 mm in second molars. Isthmus tissue increased greatly at 3.6 mm from the apex, suggesting optimal root resection at this level. Little differences in thickness between mesial and distal canal walls were seen until reaching the coronal sections of the root where the average canal wall thickness was found to be thinner (33%) on the distal, suggesting a "danger zone" for maxillary molars at a level where the root joins the crown of the tooth. The observations made here provide a more precise understanding of the maxillary MB root system. Orthograde and retrograde root canal therapy might be improved with a comprehensive understanding of pulpal morphology throughout the entire MB root. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of solvents on the bond strength of resin sealer to intraradicular dentin after retreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo PALHAIS

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the removal of filling material with ProTaper Universal Rotary Retreatment system (PTR combined with solvents and the influence of solvents on the bond strength (PBS of sealer to intraradicular dentin after canal reobturation. Roots were endodontically treated and distributed to five groups (n = 12. The control group was not retreated. In the four experimental groups, canals were retreated with PTR alone or in combination with xylol, orange oil, and eucalyptol. After filling material removal, two specimens of each group were analysed by SEM and µCT to verify the presence of filling remnants on root canal walls. The other roots were reobturated and sectioned in 1-mm-thick dentin slices that were subjected to the push-out test. Data were analysed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05. SEM and µCT analysis revealed that all retreatment techniques left filling remnants on canal walls. The control group (3.47 ± 1.21 presented significantly higher (p 0.05, and differed significantly from the group with eucalyptol (1.89 ± 0.63. The solvents reduced the PBS of the sealer to dentin and no retreatment technique promoted complete removal of filling material.

  12. Comparison of two canal preparation techniques using mtwo rotary instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamze, Faeze; Honardar, Kiamars; Nazarimoghadam, Kiumars

    2011-01-01

    Root canal preparation is an important process in endodontic therapy. Nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary file system can be used in single length technique (simultaneous technique) without early coronal enlargement, as well as in crown-down method. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare single length with crown-down methods' shaping ability using Mtwo NiTi files. Fifteen acrylic-resin blocks containing simulated canals were divided into two experimental groups. In group A, single length technique was used and in group B root canals were prepared by crown-down technique. Pre- and post-preparation canals were photographed in a standardized manner and were superimposed. The inner and outer walls of canal curvature were evaluated at three points (apical, middle and coronal) to determine the greatest change. The data was statistically analyzed using the Student t-test by Statistical Analysis System (SAS) software. Statistical analysis revealed that in group B, dentine was equally removed within the canal coronal to the curvature, whereas in group A, the inner wall was predominantly removed (Plength method and crown-down technique using Mtwo for preparation of apical and middle portion of canal curvature.

  13. Efficacy of NiTi rotary instruments in removing calcium hydroxide dressing residues from root canal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Carlos Kuga

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three rotary instrument systems (K3, ProTaper and Twisted File in removing calcium hydroxide residues from root canal walls. Thirty-four human mandibular incisors were instrumented with the ProTaper System up to the F2 instrument, irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl followed by 17% EDTA, and filled with a calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing. After 7 days, the calcium hydroxide dressing was removed using the following rotary instruments: G1 - NiTi size 25, 0.06 taper, of the K3 System; G2 - NiTi F2, of the ProTaper System; or G3 - NiTi size 25, 0.06 taper, of the Twisted File System. The teeth were longitudinally grooved on the buccal and lingual root surfaces, split along their long axis, and their apical and cervical canal thirds were evaluated by SEM (×1000. The images were scored and the data were statistically analyzed using the Kruskall Wallis test. None of the instruments removed the calcium hydroxide dressing completely, either in the apical or cervical thirds, and no significant differences were observed among the rotary instruments tested (p > 0.05.

  14. Axisymmetric versus three-dimensional finite element models for predicting the attenuation of earplugs in rigid walled ear canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallet, Guilhem; Sgard, Franck; Laville, Frédéric; Boutin, Jérôme

    2013-12-01

    The axisymmetric hypothesis of the earplug-ear canal system geometry is commonly used. The validity of this hypothesis is investigated numerically in the case of a simplified configuration where the system is embedded in a rigid baffle and for fixed boundary conditions on the earplug lateral walls. This investigation is discussed for both individual and averaged insertion loss predictions of molded silicon earplugs. The insertion losses of 15 earplug-ear canal systems with realistic geometries are calculated using three-dimensional (3D) finite element models and compared with the insertion losses provided by two-dimensional equivalent axisymmetric finite element models using 6 different geometry reconstruction methods [all the models are solved using COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL, Sweden)]. These methods are then compared in order to find the most reliable ones in terms of insertion loss predictions in this simplified configuration. Two methods have emerged: The usage of a variable cross section (with the same area values as the 3D case) or the usage of a constant cross section (with the same length and volume as the 3D case).

  15. Effect of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer liner on dentin adhesive interface of Class I cavity walls after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, P C P; de Almeida Júnior, A A; Francisconi, L F; Casas-Apayco, L C; Pereira, J C; Wang, L; Atta, M T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the effect of glass-ionomer cement as a liner on the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations after thermocycling. Occlusal cavities were prepared in 60 human molars, divided into six groups: no liner (1 and 4); glass-ionomer cement (GIC, Ketac Molar Easymix, 3M ESPE) (2 and 5); and resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC, Vitrebond, 3M ESPE) (3 and 6). Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE) that was mixed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B) to allow confocal microscopy analysis. Specimens of groups 4, 5 and 6 were thermocycled (5°C-55°C) with a dwell time of 30 seconds for 5000 cycles. After this period, teeth were sectioned in approximately 0.8-mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for confocal microscopy analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm × 0.8 mm beams, which were submitted to microtensile testing (MPa). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). There was no detectedstatistical difference on bond strength among groups (α<0.05). Confocal microscopy analysis showed a higher mean gap size in group 4 (12.5 μm) and a higher percentage of marginal gaps in the thermocycled groups. The RMGIC liner groups showed the lowest percentage of marginal gaps. Lining with RMGIC resulted in less gap formation at the dentin/resin adhesive interface after artificial aging. RMGIC or GIC liners did not alter the microtensile bond strength of adhesive system/resin composite to dentin on the lateral walls of Class I restorations.

  16. Assessment of Root Canal Enlargement Using Mtwo and BioRace Rotary Files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Cumbo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate root canal enlargement following mechanical shaping using 2 nickel titanium rotary systems. Material and Methods. Forty single-rooted teeth were immersed in resin and sectioned perpendicular to the long axis at 4, 8, and 12 mm from the apex. Digital capture of sections was performed before and after canal instrumentation using Mtwo and BioRace instruments. The area increase of endodontic space was calculated by subtraction. Results. The use of both instruments has allowed the removal of great amounts of dentin from the canal walls, even when the endodontic morphology is characterized by awkwardness to reach recesses. Conclusions. Both procedures seem to be valid and no differences were found between Mtwo and BioRaCe considering the amount of dentin removed at different distances from the apex.

  17. A Miniature Swine Model for Stem Cell-Based De Novo Regeneration of Dental Pulp and Dentin-Like Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Liu, Jie; Yu, Zongdong; Chen, Chao-An; Aksel, Hacer; Azim, Adham A; Huang, George T-J

    2018-01-03

    The goal of this study was to establish mini-swine as a large animal model for stem cell-based pulp regeneration studies. Swine dental pulp stem cells (sDPSCs) were isolated from mini-swine and characterized in vitro. For in vivo studies, we first employed both ectopic and semi-orthotopic study models using severe combined immunodeficiency mice. One is hydroxyapatite-tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) model for pulp-dentin complex formation, and the other is tooth fragment model for complete pulp regeneration with new dentin depositing along the canal walls. We found that sDPSCs are similar to their human counterparts exhibiting mesenchymal stem cell characteristics with ability to form colony forming unit-fibroblastic and odontogenic differentiation potential. sDPSCs formed pulp-dentin complex in the HA/TCP model and showed pulp regeneration capacity in the tooth fragment model. We then tested orthotopic pulp regeneration on mini-swine including the use of multi-rooted teeth. Using autologous sDPSCs carried by hydrogel and transplanted into the mini-swine root canal space, we observed regeneration of vascularized pulp-like tissue with a layer of newly deposited dentin-like (rD) tissue or osteodentin along the canal walls. In some cases, dentin bridge-like structure was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis detected the expression of nestin, dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, and bone sialoprotein in odontoblast-like cells lining against the produced rD. We also tested the use of allogeneic sDPSCs for the same procedures. Similar findings were observed in allogeneic transplantation. This study is the first to show an establishment of mini-swine as a suitable large animal model utilizing multi-rooted teeth for further cell-based pulp regeneration studies.

  18. Dentin Sialophophoprotein (DSPP) and Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Yamakoshi, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    The revolution in genetics disclosed the types of malformations that occur when expression of a particular gene is lost. In the case of tooth dentin, mutations in the two genes encoding type I collagen cause osteogenesis imperfecta, a bone condition that often includes dentin malformations. Besides collagen, there are a number of non-collagenous proteins in dentin. Among the genes encoding the dentin non-collagenous proteins, only mutations in DSPP (dentin sialophosphoprotein) cause inherited...

  19. Antimicrobial efficacy of chloroxylenol and chlorhexidine in the treatment of infected root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, E; Bossmann, K

    2001-08-01

    To investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of a chlorhexidine gluconate (2.0%) and of an ethanolic chloroxylenol solution (10%) as a temporary root canal dressing against selected test microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans). Extracted single-rooted human teeth were instrumented up to size 40. After removal of the smear layer suspensions of the test microorganisms were inserted into the root canals. After incubation for 48 hrs each suspension of the test organisms was removed and the root canals were filled with one of the two different disinfectants. The teeth were then incubated for 48 hrs. Twelve teeth and three controls were used for each of the four test organisms and each of the two regimens. After incubation, each root canal was instrumented and the removed canal wall dentin was examined microbiologically. With a contact time of 48 hrs between the two disinfectants and the four bacterial suspensions the medications led to a total killing of microorganisms in 82% of a total of 96 contaminated teeth. In the dentin layer situated 50 microm from the root canal, both medications achieved bacterial killing in a range from 99.9% to 99.99%, depending on the test organism. There were no significant differences (P> 0.1) between the relative antimicrobial activity of the two root canal dressings.

  20. Evaluation of dentin cleansing by a detergent derived from castor oil (Ricinus communis) used as root canal irrigant: a scanning electron miscroscopy study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Letícia Molteni Aguiar; Lilian Eiko Maekawa; Adriana Chung; Maria Renata Giazzi Nassri

    2010-01-01

    ...% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Material and methods: Fifteen maxillary incisors were subjected to standardized root canal instrumentation with different irrigants (n = 5): G1 - Endoquil; G2 - 0.5% NaOCl...

  1. Comparative evaluation of debris removal from root canal wall by using EndoVac and conventional needle irrigation: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Vandana J; Sedani, Shweta K; Lokade, Jyoti S; Belsare, Leena D; Gade, Jaykumar R

    2013-10-01

    Microbial control is of paramount importance in Clinical Endodontics. Therefore, cleaning and disinfection of root canals are essential to achieve endodontic success. The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of EndoVac irrigation system and conventional needle (30 gauges side venting needle) irrigation for removal of debris from the root canal walls at coronal, middle and apical third by using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An in vitro randomized control trial study. A total of 20 mandibular premolars with completely formed roots were selected and randomly divided into two groups - Group 1: Irrigation with the Conventional system and Group 2: EndoVac irrigation. After access opening and working length determination biomechanical preparation completed up to a rotary protaper F4 file. Groupwise irrigation with sodium hypochlorite and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was done with each canal in between instrumentation. Then, the teeth were sectioned in buccolingual direction and the halves were sputter-coated with gold palladium and coronal, middle and apical third were examined by SEM at x2000 magnification. Mann-Whitney test for comparison between methods, Kruskal-Wallis test for comparison among thirds and Miller test for individual comparisons. The apical, middle and cervical root canal thirds were evaluated and the results were analyzed statistically by the Mann-Whitney test for comparison between methods, Kruskal-Wallis test for comparison among thirds and Miller test for individual comparisons. EndoVac group resulted in significantly less debris at apical third compared with the conventional needle irrigation group. There was no statistical significant difference found in debris removal at coronal and middle third of root canal wall between the EndoVac group and conventional needle irrigation group.

  2. Comparative evaluation of debris removal from root canal wall by using EndoVac and conventional needle irrigation: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana J Gade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Microbial control is of paramount importance in Clinical Endodontics. Therefore, cleaning and disinfection of root canals are essential to achieve endodontic success. Aims: The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of EndoVac irrigation system and conventional needle (30 gauges side venting needle irrigation for removal of debris from the root canal walls at coronal, middle and apical third by using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Settings and Design: An in vitro randomized control trial study. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 mandibular premolars with completely formed roots were selected and randomly divided into two groups - Group 1: Irrigation with the Conventional system and Group 2: EndoVac irrigation. After access opening and working length determination biomechanical preparation completed up to a rotary protaper F4 file. Groupwise irrigation with sodium hypochlorite and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was done with each canal in between instrumentation. Then, the teeth were sectioned in buccolingual direction and the halves were sputter-coated with gold palladium and coronal, middle and apical third were examined by SEM at x2000 magnification. Statistical Analysis: Mann-Whitney test for comparison between methods, Kruskal-Wallis test for comparison among thirds and Miller test for individual comparisons. Results: The apical, middle and cervical root canal thirds were evaluated and the results were analyzed statistically by the Mann-Whitney test for comparison between methods, Kruskal-Wallis test for comparison among thirds and Miller test for individual comparisons. Conclusions: EndoVac group resulted in significantly less debris at apical third compared with the conventional needle irrigation group. There was no statistical significant difference found in debris removal at coronal and middle third of root canal wall between the EndoVac group and conventional needle irrigation group.

  3. Comparison of the effects of TripleGates and Gates-Glidden burs on cervical dentin thickness and root canal area by using cone beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    SOUSA,Kássio; ANDRADE-JUNIOR,Carlos Vieira; SILVA,Juliana Melo da; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; De-Deus, Gustavo; SILVA,Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal da

    2015-01-01

    The search for new instruments to promote an appropriate cervical preparation has led to the development of new rotary instruments such as TripleGates. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there is no study evaluating TripleGates effect on the “risk zone” of mandibular molars.Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a crown-down sequence of Gates-Glidden and TripleGates burs on the remaining cervical dentin thickness and the total amount of denti...

  4. Histologic characterization of regenerated tissues in canal space after the revitalization/revascularization procedure of immature dog teeth with apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Thibodeau, Blayne; Trope, Martin; Lin, Louis M; Huang, George T-J

    2010-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to treat an immature tooth with an infected pulp space and apical periodontitis in such a way as to heal and promote the ingrown of new vital tissue into the pulp space. However, the type of new-grown tissue is unclear. Based on the samples of a previously reported study, we further investigated histologically the types of tissues that had grown into the canal space. The canal dentinal walls were thickened by the apposition of newly generated cementum-like tissue termed herein "intracanal cementum (IC)." One case showed partial survival of pulp tissue juxtaposed with fibrous connective tissue that formed IC on canal dentin walls. The IC may also form a bridge at the apex, in the apical third or midthird of the canal. The root length in many cases was increased by the growth of cementum. The generation of apical cementum or IC may occur despite the presence of inflammatory infiltration at the apex or in the canal. These cementum or cementum-like tissues were similar to cellular cementum. Bone or bone-like tissue was observed in the canal space in many cases and is termed intracanal bone (IB). Connective tissue similar to periodontal ligament was also present in the canal space surrounding the IC and/or IB. Our findings explained in part why many clinical cases of immature teeth with apical periodontitis or abscess may gain root thickness and apical length after conservative treatment with the revitalization procedure.

  5. Effect of Intracanal Post Space Treatments on Push-Out Bond Strength of Fiber Posts to Root Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanshah, Hamid; Bolhari, Behnam; Sedaghat, Faraz; Omrani, Ladan Ranjbar

    2017-01-01

    The main disadvantage of fiber posts is their low bond strength to root canal wall. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of different root canal post space treatments on push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root canal dentin. After post space preparation in 40 endodontically treated human premolars, the teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups: Group 1: control group, group 2: Endsolv R, group 3: ultrasonic cleaning, group 4: Clearfil Repair. Afterwards, the posts were bonded with Panavia F 2.0 bonding cement. The bond strength of fiber posts to root canal wall in the middle part of canal was evaluated following thermocycling using push-out test. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane's multiple comparisons test. The failure mode of each group was determined under a stereomicroscope. There was a significant difference in the mean push-out bond strength among the groups (P0.05). It seems that ultrasonic cleaning and Clearfil Repair can modify the root canal wall and significantly increase the bond strength of fiber posts.

  6. The effect of final irrigation on the penetrability of an epoxy resin-based sealer into dentinal tubules: a confocal microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Alexander Pompermayer; Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Wagner, Márcia; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Kopper, Patrícia Maria Poli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of QMix, BioPure MTAD, 17 % EDTA, and saline on the penetrability of a resin-based sealer into dentinal tubules using a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and to describe the cleaning of root canal walls by SEM. Eighty distobuccal roots from upper molars were selected and randomly divided into four groups (n = 20) before root canal preparation according to the solution used in the final rinse protocol (FRP): QG (QMix), MG (BioPure MTAD), EG (17 % EDTA), and CG (control group: saline). Ten roots of each group were prepared for SEM, and images (×2000) from the canal walls were acquired. The remaining canals were filled with a single gutta-percha cone and AH Plus with 0.1 % Rhodamine B. The specimens were horizontally sectioned at 4 mm from the apex, and the slices were analyzed in CLSM (×10). Sealer penetration was analyzed with Adobe Photoshop software. QG and EG presented similar amounts of sealer penetration (P > .05). MG and CG presented the lowest penetrability values (P < .05). The best results for smear layer removal of the apical third of the root canal were achieved by the QG and EG groups when compared with MG and CG (P < .05). Seventeen percent EDTA and QMix promoted sealer penetration superior to that achieved by BioPure MTAD and saline. Despite studies have not confirmed the relationship between sealing ability of endodontic sealers and their penetration in dentinal tubules, sealer penetration assumes importance, since endodontic sealers, unlike gutta-percha, are able to penetrate in dentinal tubules, isthmus, and accessory canals, filling the root canal system.

  7. Evaluation of inactivation of intracanal antiseptics by dentin, demineralized dentin, dentin matrix and mineral component of dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmi H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Many studies have shown that microorganisms are the main cause of pulpal diseases and the main purpose of root canal therapy is their elimination from the root canal system. Antiseptic agents are used to reduce bacteria but their antibacterial activities differ from in vivo to in vitro studies and might be inactivated by dentin and its components in root canal space. This study was designed to investigate the effect of dentin on antibacterial activity of different antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two antibacterial agents (sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine with different concentrations were used in four experimental groups: Group 1: dentin, Group 2: demineralized dentin with EDTA, Group 3: dentin matrix and Group 4: dentin mineral component. The species used in this study was Entrococcus faecalis. Different concentration of agents were added to mixture of each experimental group and bacteria. At the baseline and after one and 24 hours, samples were collected and cultured. After incubation period, colonies were counted. Data were analyzed by Tukey test with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: 2% and 0.2% chlorhexidine, and 5% sodium hypochlorite solutions at the three studied times eliminated Entrococcus faecalis completely. 1% sodium hypochlorite eliminated all bacteria in 1h and 24 hs. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between experimental and control groups (P<0.05. Sodium 1% hypochlorite at time 0, could reduce bacteria significantly (P<0.05 but didn’t eliminate them completely. Conclusion: Inactivation of intracanal antiseptics was not observed in this study. As elimination of bacteria occurred, application of these antibacterial agents are recommended in endodontic treatment. Further investigations on other antibacterial agents, other concentrations and shorter time intervals are recommended.

  8. Comparisons of the Retreatment Efficacy of Calcium Silicate and Epoxy Resin-based Sealers and Residual Sealer in Dentinal Tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsuk; Kim, Euiseong; Lee, Seung-Jong; Shin, Su-Jung

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the retreatment efficacy and amount of residual sealer in a single canal filled with either EndoSequence BC (Brasseler, Savannah, GA) or AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany). Canal obturation with gutta-percha and sealer was performed in 28 human teeth using the continuous wave technique. Group 1 (n = 13) used AH Plus sealer, and group 2 (n = 15) used EndoSequence BC sealer. After 7 days, the root fillings were removed using Gates Glidden drills and a nickel-titanium rotary system. Retreatment time was measured in seconds. Canal cleanliness was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The remaining debris in the canal space and penetration into dentinal tubules were evaluated by confocal microscopy. Retreatment time was compared using the Student t test, and differences in sealer penetration and remaining debris between the groups were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test (P < .05). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the amount of dentin penetration, amount of debris, or retreatment time. With respect to penetration depth, the AH Plus group showed a slightly higher percentage than the BC group, with a significant difference only in the portion 6 mm from the apex (P < .05). Scanning electron microscopic images showed significant debris remaining on canal walls in both groups, whereas canal patency in retreatment was achieved in every specimen. The present study shows that EndoSequence BC sealer and AH Plus sealer have similar efficacy in dentin penetration and retreatment efficacy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of a manual instrumentation technique on five types of premolar root canal geometry assessed by microcomputed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Together with diagnosis and treatment planning, a good knowledge of the root canal system and its frequent variations is a necessity for successful root canal therapy. The selection of instrumentation techniques for variants in internal anatomy of teeth has significant effects on the shaping ability and cleaning effectiveness. The aim of this study was to reveal the differences made by including variations in the internal anatomy of premolars into the study protocol for investigation of a single instrumentation technique (hand ProTaper instruments) assessed by microcomputed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction. Methods Five single-root premolars, whose root canal systems were classified into one of five types, were scanned with micro-CT before and after preparation with a hand ProTaper instrument. Instrumentation characteristics were measured quantitatively in 3-D using a customized application framework based on MeVisLab. Numeric values were obtained for canal surface area, volume, volume changes, percentage of untouched surface, dentin wall thickness, and the thickness of dentin removed. Preparation errors were also evaluated using a color-coded reconstruction. Results Canal volumes and surface areas were increased after instrumentation. Prepared canals of all five types were straightened, with transportation toward the inner aspects of S-shaped or multiple curves. However, a ledge was formed at the apical third curve of the type II canal system and a wide range in the percentage of unchanged canal surfaces (27.4-83.0%) was recorded. The dentin walls were more than 0.3 mm thick except in a 1 mm zone from the apical surface and the hazardous area of the type II canal system after preparation with an F3 instrument. Conclusions The 3-D color-coded images showed different morphological changes in the five types of root canal systems shaped with the same hand instrumentation technique. Premolars are among the most complex teeth for root canal

  10. The effect of a manual instrumentation technique on five types of premolar root canal geometry assessed by microcomputed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Tao

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Together with diagnosis and treatment planning, a good knowledge of the root canal system and its frequent variations is a necessity for successful root canal therapy. The selection of instrumentation techniques for variants in internal anatomy of teeth has significant effects on the shaping ability and cleaning effectiveness. The aim of this study was to reveal the differences made by including variations in the internal anatomy of premolars into the study protocol for investigation of a single instrumentation technique (hand ProTaper instruments assessed by microcomputed tomography and three-dimensional reconstruction. Methods Five single-root premolars, whose root canal systems were classified into one of five types, were scanned with micro-CT before and after preparation with a hand ProTaper instrument. Instrumentation characteristics were measured quantitatively in 3-D using a customized application framework based on MeVisLab. Numeric values were obtained for canal surface area, volume, volume changes, percentage of untouched surface, dentin wall thickness, and the thickness of dentin removed. Preparation errors were also evaluated using a color-coded reconstruction. Results Canal volumes and surface areas were increased after instrumentation. Prepared canals of all five types were straightened, with transportation toward the inner aspects of S-shaped or multiple curves. However, a ledge was formed at the apical third curve of the type II canal system and a wide range in the percentage of unchanged canal surfaces (27.4-83.0% was recorded. The dentin walls were more than 0.3 mm thick except in a 1 mm zone from the apical surface and the hazardous area of the type II canal system after preparation with an F3 instrument. Conclusions The 3-D color-coded images showed different morphological changes in the five types of root canal systems shaped with the same hand instrumentation technique. Premolars are among the most

  11. Effects of dentin surface treatments including Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation with different intensities on the push-out bond strength of the glass fiber posts to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Kustarci, Alper; Kapdan, Alper; Er, Kursat

    2015-07-01

    Intra-canal post systems are commonly used to restore root-filled teeth. Bond strengths of the posts can be affected by various surface treatments of the post or the dentin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of dentin surface treatments including erbium-chromium; yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation with different intensities on the push-out bond strength of the glass fiber posts to root dentin. Forty single-rooted human maxillary incisors were filled and post spaces were prepared. After these procedures, the specimens were divided randomly into four groups according to the dentin surface treatments, as follows: (i) untreated surface (control), (ii) 1W Er,Cr:YSGG laser application, (iii) 2W Er,Cr:YSGG laser application and (iv) 3W Er,Cr:YSGG laser application. Then the posts were cemented into the root canals using dual-cured resin cement. Bonded specimens were cut into 1-mm-thick slices and push-out tests were performed using a universal testing device. All specimens were loaded until fracture and the failure modes were evaluated with a stereomicroscope at 32× magnification. Representative specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Wilcoxon tests. The bond strength values ranged from 3.22-4.68 MPa. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups, regardless of the different levels. The coronal and middle levels of the post space had significantly higher bond strength values compared with the apical level (p fiber posts to the root canal dentin walls.

  12. The effect of passive ultrasonic activation of 2% chlorhexidine or 3% sodium hypochlorite in canal wall cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llena, Carmen; Cuesta, Carla; Forner, Leopoldo; Mozo, Sandra; Segura, Juan-Jose

    2015-02-01

    the purpose of this study was to compare debris removal and open tubules effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX) applied as final irrigation in different protocols Study Design: sixty extracted premolars were divided into six groups according to the final irrigation technique: A and B 3 % NaOCl or 2 % CHX with the Miraject needle and no agitation; C and D, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) with Irrisafe 20 tips and 3 % NaOCl or 2 % CHX; E and F, PUI with Irrisafe 25 tips and 3 % NaOCl or 2% CHX. The remaining dentine debris and opened tubules were evaluated by SEM at three root levels by two blinded investigators. The Kruskal Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare groups and levels, with a significance of psodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine.

  13. In vitro evaluation of root canal preparation with two rotary instrument systems - Pro Taper and Hero Shaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentelescu, Carola; Colceriu, Loredana; Pastrav, Ovidiu; Culic, Carina; Chisnoiu, Radu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare several parameters of root canal preparation using two different rotary Nickel-Titanium instruments: Pro-Taper (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballagigues, Switzerland) and Hero-Shaper (Micro Mega, Besancon, France). Twelve extracted maxillary premolars were randomly divided into two groups and embedded into a muffle system. All root canals were prepared to size 25 using Pro-Taper or Hero-Shaper rotary instruments. The following parameters were evaluated: root canal form, centering capacity of the instrument, the presence of residual dentinal debris and smear layer on the root canal walls, working time and the occurrence of intraoperative accidents. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi(2) test (p=0.05). The majority of the root canals prepared with Hero Shaper (88.89%) and ProTaper (77.78%) showed a round or oval cross-section postoperatively. Superposition of pre- and postoperative photographs of the cross-sections showed that for the coronal third of the root canals the Hero Shaper performed in a superior manner, while for the apical third better results were obtained with the Pro Taper system. Cleanliness of the root canal walls was investigated under the SEM, in the middle third of the canal, using a five-score system for debris and smear layer. For debris Hero Shaper and Pro Taper rotary systems achieved 66.67% and 50% scores of 1 or 2, respectively. The results for the smear layer were similar: cleaner root canal walls were found after preparation with Hero Shaper (66.67% scores 1, 2), followed by Pro Taper (50%). Mean working time was shorter for Hero Shaper (124s) than for Pro Taper (184s); the difference was not significant. Within the limits of this study, both systems had almost the same cleaning ability and excellent centering capacity.

  14. Assessment of radicular dentin permeability after irradiation with CO2 laser and endodontic irrigation treatments with thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heajin; Lee, Robert C.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the permeability changes due to the surface modification of dentin can be quantified via thermal imaging during dehydration. The CO2 laser has been shown to remove the smear layer and disinfect root canals. Moreover, thermal modification via CO2 laser irradiation can be used to convert dentin into a highly mineralized enamel-like mineral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radicular dentin surface modification after CO2 laser irradiation by measuring the permeability with thermal imaging. Human molar specimens (n=12) were sectioned into 4 axial walls of the pulp chamber and treated with either 10% NaClO for 1 minute, 5% EDTA for 1 minute, CO2 laser or none. The CO2 laser was operated at 9.4 μm with a pulse duration of 26 μs, pulse repetition rate of 300 Hz and a fluence of 13 J/cm2. The samples were dehydrated using an air spray for 60 seconds and imaged using a thermal camera. The resulting surface morphological changes were assessed using 3D digital microscopy. The images from digital microscopy confirmed melting of the mineral phase of dentin. The area enclosed by the time-temperature curve during dehydration, ▵Q, measured with thermal imaging increased significantly with treatments with EDTA and the CO2 laser (P<0.05). These results indicate that the surface modification due to CO2 laser treatment increases permeability of radicular dentin.

  15. Efficiency of final irrigation of root canal in removal of smear layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A smear layer forms on the root canal walls as the consequence of root instrumentation. The smear layer formed in such a way considerably influences the quality of root obturation and endodontic treatment outcome. Objective The aim of this study was to ultrastructurally analyze the surface of intracanal dentine after removal of the smear layer by the solution of doxycycline, citric acid and detergent Tween-80 (MTAD. Methods The study involved 60 single-rooted, extracted, human teeth divided into four groups. All samples were instrumented by a step-back technique and manual K-files, and rinsed during instrumentation by 2% CHX and H2O2. The first group of samples was exclusively rinsed by CHX and H2O2; in the second group, besides using CHX and H2O2, MTAD solution was used for the final irrigation. The samples which were rinsed by distilled water (+ control and the samples rinsed by 5.25% NaOCl and 17% Na EDTA (-control served as control groups. All samples were observed under the scanning electronic microscope JEOL-JSM-5300. The coronary, middle and apex thirds of the radix region were analyzed. Results The obtained results of the SEM analysis showed that the application of 2% chlorhexidine and hydrogen peroxide did not give clear dentine walls, and the smear layer could not be removed completely. The application of the same combination (CHX and H2O2, added by the final MTAD irrigation solution, led to the efficient removal of the smear layer, while the morphological structure of dentine surface remained unchanged. Statistical analysis showed that canal walls in the experimental group with MTAD as the final irrigation were significantly clearer compared to the control group (p<0.001. Conclusion Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that MTAD is an efficient solution for the final irrigation of the canal system.

  16. A comparison between the occluding effects of the Nd:YAG laser and the desensitising agent sensodyne on permeation through exposed dentinal tubules of endodontically treated teeth: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzawi, Lehadh M; Dayem, Raad N

    2006-07-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity may occur due to loss of covering enamel and/or loss of cementum after gingival recession, resulting in exposure of cervical dentine and patency of dentinal tubules. The effect of thermally cooled pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser on the permeability and structural appearance of the root canal wall was investigated in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the occluding effect of Nd:YAG laser with that of sensodyne on exposed dentine. Forty freshly extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were collected at random. Root canal obturations were performed using master apical file no. 60 k-type for obturated teeth. All teeth were stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for 48h to allow time for the sealer to set. Dentine of 35 teeth was exposed by removing the cementum, and the remaining five teeth represented a negative control group. Specimens were examined using stereomicroscopy to show the surface topography of the dentine substrate before and after treatment with Nd:YAG laser or sensodyne. A double-blind technique was used when taking measurements of ink penetration (in mm) for each group. Teeth treated by Nd:YAG laser showed the least ink penetration, followed by teeth treated by sensodyne. The positive control group demonstrated complete ink penetration and the negative control group showed no ink penetration. Stereomicroscopic examination of specimens treated with Nd:YAG laser showed deposition on the dentinal surface, and specimens treated with sensodyne showed partial deposition. Untreated specimens were free of deposition and the tubules remained patent. There is no significant difference in the occluding effect of Nd:YAG laser and sensodyne toothpaste. Both treatments have a promising effect on the reduction of permeation through exposed dentinal tubules. However, the occluding effect of Nd:YAG laser occurs within seconds whereas that of sensodyne takes at least 3 weeks.

  17. Antimicrobial Effect of Citrus Aurantifolia Extract on Enterococcus Faecalis Within the Dentinal Tubules in The Presence of Smear Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifian MR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Instrumentation of the root canals results in formation of smear layer which covers the dentinal tubules. In infected teeth, it is ideal to achieve a material that has the ability to remove the smear layer besides antimicrobial activity. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of Citrus aurantifolia extracts (lime juice and rind extract on Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules in the presence of smear layer.Materials and Methods: One-hundred and forty dentin tubes were prepared from bovine incisors. After removal the smear layer, the specimens were infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Then, the smear layer was reformed. Test solutions were used as the irrigants in study roups as follows: group 1: 5.25% NaOCl; group 2: 17% EDTA; group 3: NaOCl+EDTA; group 4: Lime juice; group 5: ethanolic rind extract of C.aurantifolia; group 6: 96% ethanol. Dentin chips were collected from inner and outer layers of dentinal walls and optical density was measured. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane tests.Results: In outer layer of dentin, the efficacy of rind extract was less than that of NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. Also Lime juice was less effective than EDTA, NaOCl and NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. In inner layer of dentin, Lime juice was significantly less effective than NaOCl and NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. The efficacy of rind extract was less than that of NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05.Conclusion: In the presence of smear layer, the antimicrobial activity of Lime juice was less than that of NaOCl but the efficacy of rind extract was similar to that of NaOCl.

  18. Comparative evaluation of canal cleaning ability of various rotary endodontic filesin apical third: A scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Ganesh Ranganath; Mittal, Priya; Kulkarni, Anish; Syed, Shibli; Bagul, Ravikiran; Elahi, Saina; Kalra, Dheeraj

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the canal cleaning ability of three novel endodontic rotary instruments and compare with ProTaper files as a control in apical third of root canals under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Eighty freshly extracted mandibular premolars were selected according to inclusion criteria. Buccal cusp tips were ground to ensure having a flat coronal reference point with a total tooth length of 16 mm for all samples. Teeth were divided equally into four groups: Group I (ProTaper group), Group II (ProTaper next group), Group III (variable taper group), and Group IV (self-adjusting file [SAF] group). Using SEM, the dentinal surfaces were observed and rated at apical thirds with a magnification of ×1000 for the presence/absence of smear layer and debris. Descriptive analysis was performed, and analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc test was carried out for comparison between the groups, at a significance level of 0.05. There was statistically significant difference between Group II and Group IV for debris (P = 0.047) and smear layer (P = 0.037). In apical third of root canal, SAF showed statistically significant canal cleaning ability due to combined effect of continuous streaming irrigation with effectively replacing the irrigant from the apical portion of the root canal, irrigants activation through the creation of turbulence, and its self-adapting design to root canal anatomy with a scrubbing motion on the canal walls.

  19. Cleanliness of Canal Walls following Gutta-Percha Removal with Hand Files, RaCe and RaCe plus XP-Endo Finisher Instruments: A Photographic in Vitro Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamifar, Kasra; Mehrasa, Neda; Pardis, Pouyan; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Gutta-percha must be removed from the root canal space during retreatment to ensure a more favorable outcome. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of hand instruments, RaCe and RaCe plus XP-endo finisher instruments in removal of gutta-percha from root canal walls during retreatment. Thirty single-rooted premolars were prepared, obturated, and divided into three groups according to retreatment method; in group 1, retreatment was carried out by hand instruments, while in groups 2 and 3 retreatment was done using RaCe rotary files alone or accompanied by XP-endo finisher instruments, respectively. After retreatment, teeth were sectioned longitudinally and photographic images were taken. The amount of remaining gutta-percha in coronal, middle and apical thirds was quantified using Image J software. The two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's tests were used to analyze data. The level of significance was set at 0.05. RaCe cleaned the apical third significantly better than hand instrumentation. In the coronal third, RaCe+XP-endo finisher was more effective than RaCe. RaCe+XP-endo finisher was more effective than hand instrumentation in the entire root canal. The amount of remaining gutta-percha was the least in the apical part and increased toward the coronal part with the use of XP-endo finisher (P<0.05). Rotary instrumentation was more effective in removing gutta-percha from the canal walls. Furthermore, use of XP-endo finisher file resulted in cleaner canal walls and was more effective in removing gutta-percha from the coronal toward the apical part of the canal.

  20. Influence of NiTi alloy on the root canal shaping capabilities of the ProTaper Universal and ProTaper Gold rotary instrument systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussaro Alves DUQUE

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the NiTi wire in Conventional NiTi (ProTaper Universal PTU and Controlled Memory NiTi (ProTaper Gold PTG instrument systems on the quality of root canal preparation. Material and Methods Twelve mandibular molars with separate mesial canals were scanned using a high-definition microcomputed tomography system. The PTU and PTG instruments were used to shape twelve mesial canals each. The canals were scanned after preparation with F2 and F3 instruments of the PTU and PTG systems. The analyzed parameters included the remaining dentin thickness at the apical and cervical levels, root canal volume and untouched canal walls. Data was analyzed for statistical significance by the Friedman and Dunn’s tests. For the comparison of data between groups, the Mann-Whitney test was used. Results In the pre-operative analysis, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of the area and volume of root canals (P>.05. There was also no statistically significant difference between the systems with respect to root canal volume after use of the F2 and F3 instruments. There was no statistical difference in the dentin thickness at the first apical level between, before and after instrumentation for both systems. At the 3 cervical levels, the PTG maintained centralization of the preparation on the transition between the F2 and F3 instruments, which did not occur with the PTU. Conclusion The Conventional NiTi (PTU and Controlled Memory NiTi (PTG instruments displayed comparable capabilities for shaping the straight mesial root canals of mandibular molars, although the PTG was better than the PTU at maintaining the centralization of the shape in the cervical portion.

  1. Efficacy of endodontic applications of ozone and low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma on root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üreyen Kaya, B; Kececi, A D; Güldaş, H E; Çetin, E S; Öztürk, T; Öksuz, L; Bozduman, F

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the antimicrobial efficacy of low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma (LTAPP) design and gaseous ozone delivery system with 2.5% NaOCl on Enterococcus faecalis in root canal walls and dentine tubules. The samples were divided into LTAPP (n = 12), ozone (n = 12), NaOCl (positive control, n = 12) and saline (negative control, n = 6) groups. Microbial samples were collected using paper points and dentin chips from root canals. Antimicrobial efficacy was assessed by counting the colony-forming units of Ent. faecalis before and after each irrigation protocol. Data were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon signed-rank, Friedman and Bonferroni t (Dunn's test)-tests (P = 0.05). The microbial sampling with paper points showed antibacterial efficacy of NaOCl, LTAPP, ozone and saline in descending order, respectively (P 0.05). NaOCl and LTAPP were better than ozone at the coronal and middle parts of the root canals (P endodontic treatment. The present study handles different perspectives on chemomechanical preparation of root canals. Ozone and low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma (LTAPP) were investigated to determine whether they could be an alternative for NaOCl. Up to now, chemical solutions (NaOCl, chlorhexidine digluconate, etc...) have been used to disinfect the root canals. When the reported effects of LTAPP on biological and chemical decontamination were taken into consideration, a question rose whether it has antimicrobial efficacy in root canals infected with E. faecalis. According to the findings of the present study, LTAPP may constitute a promising aid in endodontics in disinfection of root canals. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Investigation of dentin hardness in roots exhibiting the butterfly effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Assil A; Chris He, Li Hong; Chandler, Nicholas P

    2014-06-01

    Most vertical root fractures occur in root canal treated teeth, and they usually run in a buccolingual direction. The butterfly effect is an optical phenomenon seen in some sections of tooth roots. The aim was to investigate the microhardness of dentin in mesiodistal and buccolingual cross sections of roots exhibiting the effect. Thirty extracted single-rooted teeth were allocated according to patient age: group 1, 15-24 years; group 2, 25-44 years; and group 3, 45 years and older. Roots were embedded in acrylic and cut into ten 1-mm-thick cross sections. Sections were viewed under a light microscope and coded (1 or 2) according to presence or absence of the butterfly effect. A root scored 20 when all levels featured the butterfly appearance. The 2 teeth with the highest score from each group and 2 control teeth with the minimum score (10) were selected. Two adjacent, consecutive cross sections were chosen from the middle of the roots. Vickers microhardness testing was carried out on the dentin walls. Mean hardness scores were highest mesiodistally (83.7 kgf/mm(2)) and lowest buccolingually (56.4 kgf/mm(2)), a significant difference (P = .028). This trend was found across all age groups. Root sections with the butterfly effect are harder mesiodistally. This might explain the high prevalence of vertical root fractures that run buccolingually. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibacterial effect of genetically-engineered bacteriophage ϕEf11/ϕFL1C(Δ36)P(nisA) on dentin infected with antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Justine Monnerat; Liss, Nadia; Zhang, Hongming; Nissan, Roni; Gordon, Wanda; Tinoco, Eduardo; Sassone, Luciana; Stevens, Roy

    2017-10-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, which is present in 30-89% of teeth with postendodontic treatment failures. E. faecalis is capable of penetrating dentinal tubules and surviving as a monoculture after conventional endodontic therapy, indicating that it is resistant to commonly used endodontic disinfection protocols. Different E. faecalis strains have shown resistance to several antibiotics, and have been associated with both dental pathology and systemic infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a genetically engineered bacteriophage to disinfect dentin infected with antibiotic resistant strains of E. faecalis. Extracted human dentin root segments were cemented into sealable two-chamber devices, fabricated from syringe needle caps to form in vitro infected-dentin models. The models were inoculated with an overnight suspension of either E. faecalis V583 (vancomycin resistant strain) or E. faecalis JH2-2 (fusidic acid and rifampin resistant, vancomycin sensitive strain). After 7days of incubation at 37°C, a suspension of a genetically engineered phage, ϕEf11/ϕFL1C(Δ36)P(nisA), was added to the root canal of each infected dentin segment, and the incubation was continued for an additional 72-h. Dentin was harvested from the walls of each root canal and assayed for the residual titer of E. faecalis cells. The recovered E. faecalis titer was reduced by 18% for the JH2-2 infected models, and by 99% for the V583 infected models. Treatment: of E. faecalis-infected dentin with bacteriophage ϕEf11/ϕFL1C(Δ36)P(nisA) consistently resulted in a decrease in the residual bacterial population of both vancomycin-sensitive and resistant strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Different Irrigation Systems on Sealer Penetration into Dentinal Tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Luigi; Cavani, Francesco; Serena, Valentina; Pettenati, Corinne; Righi, Elena; Bertoldi, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    Different irrigation systems have been developed to improve the efficacy and distribution of the irrigants. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of conventional endodontic needle irrigation with other irrigant delivery and/or agitation systems on sealer penetration into dentinal tubules. Fifty single-rooted teeth with round-shaped root canals were distributed in 5 homogeneous groups characterized by the different cleansing system used: conventional endodontic needle irrigation, EndoActivator, Irrisafe, Self-Adjusting File, and EndoVac. After instrumentation, all teeth were filled by Thermafil obturators and rhodamine B dye labeled TopSeal sealer. Teeth were transversally sectioned at 2-, 5-, and 7-mm levels from the apex and observed under confocal laser scanning microscope. Maximum, mean, and percentage of sealer penetration inside tubules around the root canal were measured. Moreover, the integrity of the sealer layer perimeter was evaluated. No significant differences both in mean (p > .05) and in maximum penetration depth (p > .05) were observed among groups, whereas both parameters showed an increased trend within each group from the 2- to the 7-mm level from apex. Similarly, the percentage of penetration around the root canal wall did not differ among groups (p > .05) and showed an increasing trend within each group from the apical to the coronal portion of the canal. Sealer penetration into dentinal tubules is not affected by the irrigant delivery and/or agitation systems studied. Thermafil with TopSeal technique achieves complete sealer perimeter integrity in all groups. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of acid etchant type and dentin location on tubular density and dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiado, Ana Carolina Rocha Lima; de Goes, Mario Fernando; de Souza-Filho, Francisco José; Rueggeberg, Frederick A

    2010-06-01

    Coronal and radicular dentin may react differently to the type of acid treatment used when bonding to these substrates. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare dentin morphology, tubular density, and cross-sectional area in deep coronal (around an exposed pulp horn) and root canal dentin at the cervical third in the intact state and after acid etching with phosphoric acid or self-etching dentin primer. Extracted, human, caries-free premolars were fixed. Smear layer-free sections (control) were obtained and divided into 3 groups: left intact, etched with phosphoric acid, or etched with a self-etching primer from a dentin bonding system. Specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Tubular density and cross-sectional area were determined from the images using software. Values were submitted to multifactorial ANOVA (alpha=.05). Tubular density was not significantly affected by acid type or by dentin location. Acid type significantly (P self-etching resin > intact dentin, irrespective of dentin location. All acid-treated specimens showed demineralization, and irregular surface morphology was not affected by either acid treatment. Tubular density was not significantly different between deep coronal and root canal dentin nor affected by acid treatment type. Tubular cross-sectional area did not differ between deep coronal or root canal dentin, regardless of acid treatment. Both acid types significantly increased tubular cross-sectional area at both dentin locations, phosphoric acid to a greater degree than the self-etching primer. Root canal dentin did not display peritubular dentin. Copyright 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of the time required to create secondary fracture of separated file fragments by using ultrasonic vibration under various canal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Yoshitsugu; O'Leary, Le; Yoshioka, Takatomo; Suda, Hideaki

    2013-10-01

    Nickel-titanium files often separate because of mechanical fatigue. The purpose of this study was to determine safe preparation techniques for separated file removal by using ultrasonics. Fifty nickel-titanium file fragments were divided into 5 groups. An ultrasonic tip was activated on a file fragment positioned between dentin blocks simulating several canal conditions: Group 1 consisted of the fragment protruding from a pair of straight dentin blocks. For group 2, the fragment was also positioned between 2 straight dentin blocks except one block was positioned 1 mm more apically than the other block, simulating a troughed area that is often created during file removal attempts. For groups 3-5, the fragment was positioned similarly as group 2 but between blocks with 30°, 45°, and 60° curvatures, respectively. The time it took for secondary fracture to occur was recorded, and the data were statistically analyzed. Fragments with dentin wall supporting on the opposite side of ultrasonic activation site resisted fracture significantly longer than those without it. Fragments in 30° and 45° curved blocks took significantly longer to fracture than the other groups (Fisher protected least significant difference, P ultrasonic tip was applied to the inner curvature of the canal. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of chlorhexidine and ethanol-wet bonding with a hydrophobic adhesive to intraradicular dentine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ekambaram, Manikandan; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Chang, Jeffrey Wen Wei; Tay, Franklin Russell; King, Nigel Martyn

    2014-01-01

    ...) with a hydrophobic adhesive on bond durability of fibre posts to intraradicular dentine. Ninety-six extracted human teeth with a single root and root canal were prepared for post placement after endodontic treatment...

  8. [Effect of different irrigating solutions on bonding strength of fiber post to root canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Song

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to find some appropriate treatments on the dentin of root canal wall to obtain better bonding strength of fiber posts. 36 new extracted non-caries single root canal anterior teeth were collected and post spaces were prepared. The teeth were divided into six groups randomly and processed by different post-space treatments: Sodium chloride irrigation (group I , control group); irrigation with 2% chlorhexidine solution followed by 17% EDTA solution (group II ); irrigation with 3% hydrogen peroxide followed by 17% EDTA solution (group II); irrigation with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) followed by 17% EDTA solution (group IV); etching with 35% phosphoric acid-gel for 30 s (group V); 17% EDTA-gel for 1 min (group VI). After each post-space treatment, sodium chloride irrigation was applied in II-VI group. Fiber posts were then luted in the treated roots using 3M ESPE RelyX Unicem and the thin-slice push-out test was performed. The dentin surfaces and bonding interface were examined under scanning electron microscope. Fracture mode of fiber posts were observed by stereo microscope. Group II-VI were effective in getting rid of smear layer. Resin rags of dentin bonding interface were observed in group II and group V. The majority fracture mode of specimens in each group were mixed mode which contained dentin destruction. Compared with control group, the bonding strength of group II, V increased obviously (P chlorhexidine solution followed by 17% EDTA solution and 35% phosphoric acid-gel etching improved the bonding strength of fiber posts. The depth of post space has no influence of bond strength.

  9. Clinical and histologic observations of opalescent dentin associated with enamel defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Nakata, M; Eto, K

    1977-11-01

    The rare variant of opalescent dentin associated with enamel defect was found in a 1 1/2-year-old boy. The pulp chambers and root canals of the affected deciduous teeth were very large, with no sign of obliteration. The enamel layer of those teeth was markedly reduced in thickness, and the enamel prisms were not recognized even by scanning electron microscopy. The mantle dentin was abnormal, as were other portions of dentin.

  10. Mechanical or cold lateral compaction: The incidence of dentinal defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Hasheminia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of dentinal defects may influence the outcome of root canal treatment. The aims of this study were to evaluate and compare the incidence of dentinal defects following root canal obturation with two different techniques. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 mesial roots of human mandibular first molars were selected. Twenty-seven roots were left unprepared as negative controls (NCs. The mesiobuccal canals of 83 roots were prepared using rotary instruments. Twenty-seven roots were left unobturated as positive controls (PCs. Twenty-eight roots were obturated with cold lateral compaction (CLC technique and the others were obturated with mechanical lateral compaction (MLC technique. In the CLC and MLC groups, spreader penetration depth was measured by an electromechanical testing machine in canals containing master Gutta-percha cones. After root canal obturation, all the roots were sectioned horizontally at four levels from the apex and evaluated under a stereomicroscope at a magnification of ×40. The presence of dentinal defects was noted. Data were analyzed using the Chi-square and t-tests. Results: The number of defects was not significantly different between the CLC, MLC, and PC groups. The CLC, MLC, and PC groups had significantly more defects compared to the NC group. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the MLC and CLC techniques were the same in producing dentinal defects.

  11. Evaluation of the Self-Adjusting File system (SAF) for the instrumentation of primary molar root canals: a micro-computed tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, E; Elbay, M; Yiğit, D

    2017-06-01

    instrumentation in primary molars because it removed less dentin than other systems, which is especially important for the relatively thin-walled canals of primary teeth, and because it involves less clinical time, which is particularly important in the treatment of paediatric patients.

  12. Irrigant flow beyond the insertion depth of an ultrasonically oscillating file in straight and curved root canals: visualization and cleaning efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Maher; Verhaagen, Bram; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Nehme, Walid; Naaman, Alfred; Versluis, Michel; Wesselink, Paul; van der Sluis, Lucas

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the insertion depth of an ultrasonically oscillating file on the ability to remove dentin debris from simulated canal irregularities in an extracted tooth model of a straight root canal and its influence on the flow of irrigant in both straight and curved canals. A tooth model with artificial depressions in 1 canal wall at 0.5, 2, 4, and 6 mm from the working length was used. Ultrasonic-activated irrigation was performed with the file inserted 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm short of the working length. Dye penetration and high-speed recordings of the flow in straight and curved canals showed the static and dynamic behavior of the flow during ultrasonic activation. The overall cleaning efficacy decreased with increasing distance between the file and the apex, with the depressions next to the file and within 3 mm in front of the file being the cleanest. The flow observed from the visualization experiments matched this distance, suggesting a direct relation between flow and cleaning. The observed flow depth increased with increasing power setting; the curvature of the root canal had no influence on the flow depth. High-speed imaging showed a start-up phase with deeper fluid activation than in the steady phase afterward. The ultrasonically oscillating file could remove dentin debris up to 3 mm in front of the file tip, coinciding with the extent of the observed flow. The root canal curvature had no influence on the irrigant flow. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High speed imaging of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a model of a root canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdaasdonk, Rudolf; Blanken, Jan; van Heeswijk, Hans; de Roode, Rowland; Klaessens, John

    2007-02-01

    Laser systems of various wavelengths and pulse characteristics have been introduced in dentistry. At present, the range of applications for the different systems is being investigated mainly differentiating between soft and hard tissue applications. For the preparation of root canals both hard and soft tissues are involved. Ideally, one would like to use one laser system for the whole treatment. In this study, we studied the characteristics of the pulsed 2,78 Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase, Waterlase Millenium), in view of root canal cleaning and desinfection. The laser energy was fiber delivered with fiber tip diameters from 400 μm down to 200 μm. Special thermal and high speed imaging techniques were applied in a transparent model of a tapered root canal and slices cut from human teeth. High speed imaging revealed the dynamics of an explosive vapor bubble at the tip of the Er laser in water and the root canal model. Typically for Erbium lasers, within a time span of several hundred μs, a longitudinal bubble expanded to maximum size of 5 mm length and 2 mm diameter at 100 mJ and imploded afterwards. In the root canal, the explosive bubble created turbulent high speed water streaming which resects soft tissue from the hard tissue. Thermal imaging showed the dynamics of all lasers heating of the canal wall up to several mm depending on the wavelength and energy settings. The mechanism of smear layer removal and sterilization in the root canal, is attributed to cavitation effects induced by the pulsed laser. The heat generation into the dentine wall was minimal.

  14. Influence of refreshment/activation cycles and temperature rise on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, R G; Verhaagen, B; Wesselink, P R; Versluis, M; van der Sluis, L W M

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of multiple refreshment/activation cycles and temperature on the reaction rate of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with bovine dentine during ultrasonic activated irrigation (UAI) under laboratory conditions. The root canal walls of 24 standardized root canals in bovine incisors were exposed to a standardized volume of NaOCl at different temperatures (24 °C and 38 °C) and exposure times (20, 60 and 180 s). The irrigant was refreshed and ultrasonically activated four times for 20 s followed by a 40 s rest interval, with no refreshment and no activation as the controls. The reaction rate was determined by measuring the amount of active chlorine in the NaOCl solution before and after being exposed to dentine during the specific experimental conditions. Calorimetry was used to measure the electrical-to-sonochemical conversion efficiency during ultrasonic activation. Refreshment, activation and exposure time all increased the reaction rate of NaOCl (P reaction rate of NaOCl (P > 0.125). The reaction rate of NaOCl with dentine is enhanced by refreshment, ultrasonic activation and exposure time. Temperature rise of irrigant during ultrasonic activation was not sufficient to alter the reaction rate. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  16. Disorders of Human Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, P Suzanne; Hart, Thomas C.

    2007-01-01

    Dentin, the most abundant tissue in teeth, is produced by odontoblasts, which differentiate from mesenchymal cells of the dental papilla. Dentinogenesis is a highly controlled process that results in the conversion of unmineralized predentin to mineralized dentin. By weight, 70% of the dentin matrix is mineralized, while the organic phase accounts for 20% and water constitutes the remaining 10%. Type I collagen is the primary component (>85%) of the organic portion of dentin. The non-collagen...

  17. Study of the areas and thicknesses of mesiobucal root canals prepared by three endodontic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constante, Isa Geralda Teixeira; Davidowicz, Harry; Barletta, Fernando Branco; de Moura, Abilio Albuquerque Maranhão

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, in vitro, by means of computerized analysis of digital radiographic images, the anatomic alterations produced in the mandibular molar tooth dentinal walls of mesiobucal canals with severe curvature by three different endodontic techniques: Progressive Preparation, Staged and Serial Preparation. A selection was made of 45 extracted, human, mandibular molars, with root curvatures greater than 25 degrees. They were divided into three groups for every technique studied, which were then sub-divided into three sub-groups in accordance with the position of the curvature along the root: cervical, median or apical. After access surgery and tooth length determination, the canals were filled with 100% Barium Sulphate radiological contrast and the teeth were then radiographed with a direct digital radiography system, using a special apparatus capable of keeping the samples in the same spatial position during the different radiographic takes. After the above-mentioned endodontic techniques had been performed, the teeth were again filled with Barium sulphate and were also radiographed under the same previously mentioned conditions. The pre- and post-operative digital images were then analyzed in two computerized programs, AutoCAD 2004 and CorelDraw 10, to assess, respectively, the areas and the horizontal alterations which occurred in the internal and external walls of the root canals. The results indicated that although no significant differences among the techniques were shown in the statistical analysis, in a descriptive analysis the Progressive Preparation technique was shown to be more regular, uniform and effective.

  18. Cervical shaping in curved root canals: comparison of the efficiency of two endodontic instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busquim Sandra Soares Kühne

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the removal of dentin produced by number 25 (0.08 Flare files (Quantec Flare Series, Analytic Endodontics, Glendora, California, USA and number 1 e 2 Gates-Glidden burs (Dentsply - Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland, in the mesio-buccal and mesio-lingual root canals, respectively, of extracted human permanent inferior molars, by means of measuring the width of dentinal walls prior and after instrumentation. The obtained values were compared. Due to the multiple analyses of data, a nonparametric test was used, and the Kruskal-Wallis test was chosen. There was no significant difference between the instruments as to the removal of dentin in the 1st and 2nd millimeters. However, when comparing the performances of the instruments in the 3rd millimeter, Flare files promoted a greater removal than Gates-Glidden drills (p > 0.05. The analysis revealed no significant differences as to mesial wear, which demonstrates the similar behavior of both instruments. Gates-Glidden drills produced an expressive mesial detour in the 2nd and 3rd millimeters, which was detected trough a statistically significant difference in the wear of this region (p > 0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between mesial and lateral wear when Flare instruments were employed.

  19. Debris Evaluation after Root Canal Shaping with Rotating and Reciprocating Single-File Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Dagna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the root canal dentine surface by scanning electron microscope (SEM after shaping with two reciprocating single-file NiTi systems and two rotating single-file NiTi systems, in order to verify the presence/absence of the smear layer and the presence/absence of open tubules along the walls of each sample; Forty-eight single-rooted teeth were divided into four groups and shaped with OneShape (OS, F6 SkyTaper (F6, WaveOne (WO and Reciproc and irrigated using 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA. Root canal walls were analyzed by SEM at a standard magnification of 2500×. The presence/absence of the smear layer and the presence/absence of open tubules at the coronal, middle, and apical third of each canal were estimated using a five-step scale for scores. Numeric data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U statistical tests and significance was predetermined at P < 0.05; The Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA for debris score showed significant differences among the NiTi systems (P < 0.05. The Mann-Whitney test confirmed that reciprocating systems presented significantly higher score values than rotating files. The same results were assessed considering the smear layer scores. ANOVA confirmed that the apical third of the canal maintained a higher quantity of debris and smear layer after preparation of all the samples; Single-use NiTi systems used in continuous rotation appeared to be more effective than reciprocating instruments in leaving clean walls. The reciprocating systems produced more debris and smear layer than rotating instruments.

  20. canal24

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Canal system center lines in the Central Valley of California and adjacent areas captured from 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic maps. Updates and modifications made...

  1. The evalution of the effects of different irrigating solutions and laser systems on adhesion of resin-based root canal sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrancı, L Benan; Köseoğlu, Mustafa

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different laser systems and different irrigating solutions on the adhesion of AH Plus and EndoREZ root canal sealers to human root canal dentin. Laser irradiation can be used to obtain morphological changes in dentin walls that could influence the adhesion values of endodontic sealers. One hundred canine root canals were cleaned and shaped. The specimens were assigned to four groups (n=24). In group I 5% NaOCl (control), in group II 15% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) followed by 5% NaOCl, in group III Er:YAG laser with 2940 nm wavelength, and in group IV Nd:YAG laser with 1064 nm were used as a final procedure in root canals. In each group, half of the specimens were filled with AH Plus sealer and half with EndoREZ with gutta-percha, using cold lateral compaction. Specimens were sectioned to obtain three slices from each third using a precission saw. The first slice of 1 mm thick dentin disks from each third was subjected to the pushout test (MPa). Results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (p<0.05). A statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was reported between dentin surface treatments (Er:YAG and control groups). Control (1.60±0.99), EDTA (2.05±1.35), Er:YAG (2.25±1.64), and Nd:YAG (2.13±1.38). AH Plus adhesion values were increased significantly (p<0.05) when the root canal was irradiated with the Er:YAG laser. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased EndoREZ adhesion values significantly when compared with Er:YAG laser irradiation (p<0.05). In the apical and coronal thirds, AH Plus showed better adhesion than did EndoREZ sealer (p<0.005). In the middle third, there was no statistical difference between AH Plus and EndoREZ. The use of EDTA and different laser systems influenced the bond strength of resin-based root canal sealers.

  2. SEM study on the dentin and cementum of oreodont teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Y; Iwai-Liao, Y; Tada, I; Okumura, A; Fujita, K; Takagi, M

    1989-04-01

    An SEM study on the dental hard tissue was conducted on the canines and molars removed from a fossil oreodont. The orthodentin was densely distributed with dentinal tubules measuring 2.2 microns in diameter; the tubules were filled with their related odontoblastic processes. They coursed in a parabolic fashion from the pulpal aspect towards the tooth surface. There were many fine lateral offshoots that branched from the tubules, such that the mantle dentin measuring 50 microns in thickness was mostly distributed with these terminal branches measuring 0.7 micron in diameter. However, they did not intrude into the enamel to form spindles and rods. SEM study indicated that the uneven surface of the tubular wall was due to a crisscross of the underneath dentinal matricial fibers, and the peritubular dentin was not observed. The superficial circumpulpal dentin was distributed with interglobular dentin, while the radicular dentin beneath the cementum was additionally distributed with a granular layer. We also observed concentric lamellae corresponding to incremental lines in the dentin, as well as a flat wavy dentinoenamel junction. We noticed the radicular dentin was covered with an acellular cementum except at the apical portion, where it was paved with cellular cementum.

  3. Mesenchymal Dental Pulp Cells Attenuate Dentin Resorption in Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Chen, M.; He, L.; Marão, H.F.; Sun, D.M.; Zhou, J.; Kim, S.G.; Song, S.; Wang, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin in permanent teeth rarely undergoes resorption in development, homeostasis, or aging, in contrast to bone that undergoes periodic resorption/remodeling. The authors hypothesized that cells in the mesenchymal compartment of dental pulp attenuate osteoclastogenesis. Mononucleated and adherent cells from donor-matched rat dental pulp (dental pulp cells [DPCs]) and alveolar bone (alveolar bone cells [ABCs]) were isolated and separately cocultured with primary rat splenocytes. Primary splenocytes readily aggregated and formed osteoclast-like cells in chemically defined osteoclastogenesis medium with 20 ng/mL of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and 50 ng/mL of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Strikingly, DPCs attenuated osteoclastogenesis when cocultured with primary splenocytes, whereas ABCs slightly but significantly promoted osteoclastogenesis. DPCs yielded ~20-fold lower RANKL expression but >2-fold higher osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression than donor-matched ABCs, yielding a RANKL/OPG ratio of 41:1 (ABCs:DPCs). Vitamin D3 significantly promoted RANKL expression in ABCs and OPG in DPCs. In vivo, rat maxillary incisors were atraumatically extracted (without any tooth fractures), followed by retrograde pulpectomy to remove DPCs and immediate replantation into the extraction sockets to allow repopulation of the surgically treated root canal with periodontal and alveolar bone–derived cells. After 8 wk, multiple dentin/root resorption lacunae were present in root dentin with robust RANKL and OPG expression. There were areas of dentin resoprtion alternating with areas of osteodentin formation in root dentin surface in the observed 8 wk. These findings suggest that DPCs of the mesenchymal compartment have an innate ability to attenuate osteoclastogenesis and that this innate ability may be responsible for the absence of dentin resorption in homeostasis. Mesenchymal attenuation of dentin resorption may have implications in internal

  4. Mesenchymal dental pulp cells attenuate dentin resorption in homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Chen, M; He, L; Marão, H F; Sun, D M; Zhou, J; Kim, S G; Song, S; Wang, S L; Mao, J J

    2015-06-01

    Dentin in permanent teeth rarely undergoes resorption in development, homeostasis, or aging, in contrast to bone that undergoes periodic resorption/remodeling. The authors hypothesized that cells in the mesenchymal compartment of dental pulp attenuate osteoclastogenesis. Mononucleated and adherent cells from donor-matched rat dental pulp (dental pulp cells [DPCs]) and alveolar bone (alveolar bone cells [ABCs]) were isolated and separately cocultured with primary rat splenocytes. Primary splenocytes readily aggregated and formed osteoclast-like cells in chemically defined osteoclastogenesis medium with 20 ng/mL of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and 50 ng/mL of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Strikingly, DPCs attenuated osteoclastogenesis when cocultured with primary splenocytes, whereas ABCs slightly but significantly promoted osteoclastogenesis. DPCs yielded ~20-fold lower RANKL expression but >2-fold higher osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression than donor-matched ABCs, yielding a RANKL/OPG ratio of 41:1 (ABCs:DPCs). Vitamin D3 significantly promoted RANKL expression in ABCs and OPG in DPCs. In vivo, rat maxillary incisors were atraumatically extracted (without any tooth fractures), followed by retrograde pulpectomy to remove DPCs and immediate replantation into the extraction sockets to allow repopulation of the surgically treated root canal with periodontal and alveolar bone-derived cells. After 8 wk, multiple dentin/root resorption lacunae were present in root dentin with robust RANKL and OPG expression. There were areas of dentin resoprtion alternating with areas of osteodentin formation in root dentin surface in the observed 8 wk. These findings suggest that DPCs of the mesenchymal compartment have an innate ability to attenuate osteoclastogenesis and that this innate ability may be responsible for the absence of dentin resorption in homeostasis. Mesenchymal attenuation of dentin resorption may have implications in internal

  5. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Novel bioactive root canal sealer to inhibit endodontic multispecies biofilms with remineralizing calcium phosphate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Xie, Xianju; Li, Chunyan; Liu, Huaibing; Zhang, Ke; Zhou, Yanmin; Chang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a bioactive endodontic sealer via dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) for the first time; and (2) evaluate inhibition of early-stage and mature multispecies endodontic biofilm, bond strength to root canal dentine, and calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion release. A series of bioactive endodontic sealers were formulated with DMAHDM, MPC, and NACP. Root dentine bond strength was measured via a push-out test. Three endodontic strains, Enterococcus faecalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum, were grown on endodontic sealer disks to form multispecies biofilms. Biofilms were grown for 3 days (early) and 14 days (mature). Colony-forming units (CFU), live/dead assay, metabolic activity and polysaccharide were determined. Ca and P ion release from endodontic sealer was measured. Incorporating DMAHDM, MPC and NACP did not decrease the push-out bond strength (p>0.1). Adding DMAHDM and MPC reduced endodontic biofilm CFU by 3 log. DMAHDM or MPC each greatly decreased the biofilm CFU (pEndodontic sealer with DMAHDM+MPC had much greater killing efficacy than DMAHDM or MPC alone (pEndodontic sealer with DMAHDM+MPC had slightly lower, but not significantly lower, Ca and P ion release compared to that without DMAHDM+MPC (p>0.1). A novel bioactive endodontic sealer was developed with potent inhibition of multispecies endodontic biofilms, reducing biofilm CFU by 3 log, while containing NACP for remineralization and possessing good bond strength to root canal dentine walls. The new bioactive endodontic sealer is promising for endodontic applications to eradicate endodontic biofilms and strengthen root structures. The combination of DMAHDM, MPC and NACP may be applicable to other preventive and restoration resins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modified revascularization in human teeth using an intracanal formation of treated dentin matrix: A report of two cases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Payman Mehrvarzfar; Paul Abbott; Hengameh Akhavan; Sohrab Savadkouhi

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore, it was hypothesized that fabrication of autogenous TDM on root dentinal walls of necrotic immature permanent teeth may allow more predictable outcome of revascularization treatments...

  8. Biomimetic remineralization of dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Na; Zhang, Wei; Pashley, David H; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mao, Jing; Chen, Ji-Hua; Tay, Franklin R

    2014-01-01

    Remineralization of demineralized dentin is important for improving dentin bonding stability and controlling primary and secondary caries. Nevertheless, conventional dentin remineralization strategy is not suitable for remineralizing completely demineralized dentin within hybrid layers created by etch-and-rinse and moderately aggressive self-etch adhesive systems, or the superficial part of a caries-affected dentin lesion left behind after minimally invasive caries removal. Biomimetic remineralization represents a different approach to this problem by attempting to backfill the demineralized dentin collagen with liquid-like amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursor particles that are stabilized by biomimetic analogs of noncollagenous proteins. This paper reviewed the changing concepts in calcium phosphate mineralization of fibrillar collagen, including the recently discovered, non-classical particle-based crystallization concept, formation of polymer-induced liquid-precursors (PILP), experimental collagen models for mineralization, and the need for using phosphate-containing biomimetic analogs for biomimetic mineralization of collagen. Published work on the remineralization of resin-dentin bonds and artificial caries-like lesions by various research groups was then reviewed. Finally, the problems and progress associated with the translation of a scientifically sound concept into a clinically applicable approach are discussed. The particle-based biomimetic remineralization strategy based on the PILP process demonstrates great potential in remineralizing faulty hybrid layers or caries-like dentin. Based on this concept, research in the development of more clinically feasible dentin remineralization strategy, such as incorporating poly(anionic) acid-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursor-containing mesoporous silica nanofillers in dentin adhesives, may provide a promising strategy for increasing of the durability of resin-dentin bonding and

  9. The effective concentration of red betel leaf (Piper crocatum infusion as root canal irrigant solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fani Pangabdian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Smear layer is a debris consisting of organic and inorganic particles of calcified tissue, necrotic tissue, pulp tissue, and dentinoblast and microorganism processes that can close the entrance to the dentin tubuli. Smear layer, will not only inhibit the penetration of disinfection materials and sealers to the dentin tubuli, but will also reduce the attachment of root canal filling material so that root canal irrigation solution is needed to dissolve the smear layer. Red betel leaf (Piper crocatum infusion, on the other hand, contains saponin characterized as “surfactants” which can dissolve smear layer. Nevertheless, the effective concentration of the red betel leaf infusion has still not been known clearly. Purpose: This study is aimed to determine the effective concentration of the red betel leaf infusion for cleaning root canal walls from smear layer. Methods: Fiveteen extracted human teeth with straight single roots were randomized into 5 groups (n=3. The specimens were then shaped by using rotary instruments up to a size of 25/.07. During instrumentation, each canal was irrigated with 10, 20, 30 and, 40% red betel leaf infusion for treatment groups, while another was irrigated with aquadest for the control group. Root canal cleanliness was observed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results: There were significant differences among treatment groups (p<0.05, except in the treatment groups irrigated with red betel leaf infusion with concentrations of 30% and 40% (p>0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that red betel leaf infusion with a concentration of 30% is effective for cleaning the root canal walls from the smear layer.Latar belakang: Smear layer adalah suatu debris yang mengandung partikel organik dan anorganik dari jaringan terkalsifikasi, jaringan nekrotik, proses dentinoblas, jaringan pulpa dan mikroorganisme yang dapat menutup jalan masuk ke tubuli dentin. Smear layer akan menghalangi penetrasi dari bahan

  10. Dentine tubule infection and endodontic therapy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntebi, B R

    1994-07-01

    A critical review of the literature suggests that the microenvironment of dentinal tubules appears to favour the selection of relatively few bacterial types irrespective of the aetiology of the infection process; coronal dental caries or pulpar necrosis. These bacteria may constitute an important reservoir from which root canal infection and reinfection may occur following pulp necrosis or during and after endodontic treatment. Previous studies of this microflora have utilized microbiological culture techniques which need to be supplemented by those that allow in situ demonstration as well as identification of the bacteria. Newer treatment strategies that are designed to eliminate this microflora must include agents that can penetrate the dentinal tubules and destroy these microorganisms, since they are located in an area beyond the host defence mechanisms where they cannot be reached by systemically administered antimicrobial agents.

  11. Uncontrolled Removal of Dentin during In Vitro Ultrasonic Irrigant Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutsioukis, Christos; Tzimpoulas, Nestor

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate uncontrolled removal of dentin during in vitro ultrasonic irrigant activation in prepared root canals using 2 different files. Fifty-four human single-rooted teeth with straight root canals were prepared to size 35/.06 taper. The specimens were randomly allocated to 3 groups (n = 18). Two milliliters of 2% sodium hypochlorite was delivered 3 times to each root canal by a syringe and an open-ended needle. After each delivery, the irrigant was ultrasonically activated for 10 seconds at 35% power either by a size 15 ultrasonic K-file (group A) or a size 20 Irrisafe file (Acteon Satelec, Merignac, France) (group B) placed at 2 mm short of the working length. The irrigant in the control specimens (group C) was not activated. Specimens were scanned by micro-computed tomographic imaging at 10-μm voxel size before preparation, after preparation, and after the final irrigation/activation sequence. Scans were coregistered and segmented, and the amount of dentin removed during the final step was quantified by morphologic operations. Results were analyzed by nonparametric statistical tests. The level of significance was set to P ultrasonic files removed significantly more dentin than irrigant delivery in the control group (P ≤ .005). K-files removed significantly more dentin than Irrisafe files in the apical third (P = .001). Ultrasonic irrigant activation may result in uncontrolled removal of dentin in straight root canals and at manufacturer-recommended power settings. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-07-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas.

  13. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane L. BRITTAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF. DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0 to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine.

  14. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan-based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Baek, Seung-Ho; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Shon, Won-Jun; Woo, Kyung-Mi; Lee, WooCheol

    2016-01-01

    The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan-based (Pz-) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta-percha (GP) and Pz-MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz-MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin-material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz-MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45-1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350-400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre-crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra- and/or inter-tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. © The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Micro-computed Tomographic Evaluation of Dentinal Microcrack Formation after Using New Heat-treated Nickel-titanium Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, H Melike; Bayram, Emre; Ocak, Mert; Uzuner, M Bora; Geneci, Ferhat; Celik, Hakan Hamdi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of dentinal microcracks observed after root canal preparation with HyFlex CM (Coltène/Whaledent, Altstätten, Switzerland), HyFlex EDM (Coltène/Whaledent), Vortex Blue (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), and TRUShape (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties) systems using micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) analysis. Forty human mandibular incisors with 1 and straight root canals were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups (n = 10) and 1 control group for root canal preparation: group 1, HyFlex CM; group 2, HyFlex EDM; group 3, Vortex Blue; and group 4, TRUShape. The specimens were scanned using high-resolution micro-CT imaging before and after root canal preparation. Afterward, preoperative and postoperative cross-sectional images of the teeth were screened to identify the presence of dentinal defects. The number of microcracks was determined as a percentage for each group. Before and after canal preparation, 36,152 cross-sectional images were examined. Four thousand four hundred fifty-two (12.31%) dentinal defects were observed. No new microcracks were observed after root canal instrumentation with the tested systems. Root canal preparation with the HyFlex CM, HyFlex EDM, Vortex Blue, and TRUShape systems did not induce the formation of new dentinal microcracks on straight root canals of mandibular incisors. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative evaluation of canal cleaning ability of various rotary endodontic filesin apical third: A scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Ranganath Jadhav

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In apical third of root canal, SAF showed statistically significant canal cleaning ability due to combined effect of continuous streaming irrigation with effectively replacing the irrigant from the apical portion of the root canal, irrigants activation through the creation of turbulence, and its self-adapting design to root canal anatomy with a scrubbing motion on the canal walls.

  17. Dentin hypersensitive: Ethiology and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryanni Dihin Utami

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentin hypersensitivity is a response in exposed dentine with a symptom of clinically sharp and short pain. This condition may occur to exposed dentine due to gingival recession or enamel loss. Dentin hypersensitivity treatment aimed to either occlude the open dentinal tubules or block the neural response of the pulp. Invasive treatment are pulpectomy, restoration or surgery, while non invasive treatment are usually done by using tooth paste or mouthwash which is added by desensitizing agent

  18. Semiconductor laser irradiation improves root canal sealing during routine root canal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dandan; Hu, Xingxue; Wang, Dashan; Cui, Ting; Yao, Ruyong; Sun, Huibin

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of semiconductor laser irradiation on root canal sealing after routine root canal therapy (RCT). Sixty freshly extracted single-rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). The anatomic crowns were sectioned at the cementoenamel junction and the remaining roots were prepared endodontically with conventional RCT methods. Groups A and B were irradiated with semiconductor laser at 1W for 20 seconds; Groups C and D were ultrasonically rinsed for 60 seconds as positive control groups; Groups E and F without treatment of root canal prior to RCT as negative control groups. Root canal sealing of Groups A, C and E were evaluated by measurements of apical microleakage. The teeth from Groups B, D and F were sectioned, and the micro-structures were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). One way ANOVA and LSD-t test were used for statistical analysis (α = .05). The apical sealing of both the laser irradiated group and the ultrasonic irrigated group were significantly different from the control group (p0.5). SEM observation showed that most of the dentinal tubules in the laser irradiation group melted, narrowed or closed, while most of the dentinal tubules in the ultrasonic irrigation group were filled with tooth paste. The application of semiconductor laser prior to root canal obturation increases the apical sealing of the roots treated.

  19. Semiconductor laser irradiation improves root canal sealing during routine root canal therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Su

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of semiconductor laser irradiation on root canal sealing after routine root canal therapy (RCT.Sixty freshly extracted single-rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 10. The anatomic crowns were sectioned at the cementoenamel junction and the remaining roots were prepared endodontically with conventional RCT methods. Groups A and B were irradiated with semiconductor laser at 1W for 20 seconds; Groups C and D were ultrasonically rinsed for 60 seconds as positive control groups; Groups E and F without treatment of root canal prior to RCT as negative control groups. Root canal sealing of Groups A, C and E were evaluated by measurements of apical microleakage. The teeth from Groups B, D and F were sectioned, and the micro-structures were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. One way ANOVA and LSD-t test were used for statistical analysis (α = .05.The apical sealing of both the laser irradiated group and the ultrasonic irrigated group were significantly different from the control group (p0.5. SEM observation showed that most of the dentinal tubules in the laser irradiation group melted, narrowed or closed, while most of the dentinal tubules in the ultrasonic irrigation group were filled with tooth paste.The application of semiconductor laser prior to root canal obturation increases the apical sealing of the roots treated.

  20. Smear layer production by 3 rotary reamers with different cutting blade designs in straight root canals: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, In-Soo; Spångberg, Larz S W; Yoon, Tai-Cheol; Kazemi, Reza B; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2003-11-01

    The design of the cutting blade of rotary instruments may affect the outcome of root canal instrumentation in terms of cleanliness. The aim of this scanning electron microscopic study was to compare the quality and amount of smear layer generated in the apical third of straight root canals by 2 rotary nickel-titanium reamers and 1 rotary steel reamer with different cutting blade designs. Seventy intact, single-rooted human mandibular premolars with straight, fully developed roots were selected for this study. Before instrumentation, the cervical portion of all teeth was removed by using a microtome (Isomet), leaving 13-mm-long roots. Automated preparation was performed with ProFile (n = 20) and Hero 642 (n = 20) reamers by using the crown-down technique and with a stainless steel engine reamer (Mani; n = 20) by using a reaming motion. All root canals were instrumented to No. 40. A control group (pulp extirpation with barbed broaches; n = 10) was also included. Irrigation with 3 mL of a 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution was performed after each instrumentation. After the instrumentation, each root was split longitudinally, and a scanning electron microscope was used to examine the selected areas of the canal walls at the apical third from 2 different perspectives. A 4-category scoring system for smear layer was used, and the resulting scores were statistically analyzed. The least smear layer remained in the Hero 642 group at the selected apical third of straight root canals (P < .05). However, all instruments left a smear layer. The surface texture of the smear layer, in addition to the depth and the frequency of packed materials into the dentinal tubules, varied with instrument type. These data revealed that the design of the cutting blade of rotary instruments can affect root canal cleanliness in straight root canals. This information may be useful in the selection of nickel-titanium rotary reamers.

  1. The cleanliness differences of root canal irrigated with 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract and 2.5% NaOCl

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    Anis Sakinah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Root canal treatment consists of preparation, sterilization, and obturation. During root canal preparation, debris is smeared over the dentinal surface forming a smear layer. Smear layer will reduce the attachment of root canal filling materials. Organic material in smear layer can be substrated for microorganism. Preparation of root canal should be followed by irrigation. NaOCl is common irrigation solution in endodontics. It has been very effective for their disinfecting and tissue-dissolving properties, but it is incapable of removing the smear layer. On the other hand, saponin of mangosteen peel extract has an ability as a surfactant to lower the surface tension, and it can dissolve debris containing of anorganic and organic materials. Purpose: This study aims to know the differences between 2.5% NaOCl and 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract in removing the debris in the root canal after the preparation procedure. Method: Three groups of teeth (7 teeth in each were instrumented with K-file and irrigated as follow: group 1 (control with aquadest; group 2 with 2.5% NaOCl; and group 3 with 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract. Furthermore, those teeth were split horizontally and longitudinally 4mm above the apical. The apical third of root canal walls was observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM. Result: There were significant differences between each group (p<0.05. Median value of the group 3 was score 1 considered as the smallest value. It indicates that Group 3 with 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract was the cleanest group. Conclusion:It can be concluded that 0.002% saponin of mangosteen peel extract can clean the smear layer of the root canal better than 2.5% NaOCl.

  2. Ab interno Schlemm's Canal Surgery.

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    Francis, Brian A; Akil, Handan; Bert, Benjamin B

    2017-01-01

    In primary open-angle glaucoma, the site of greatest resistance to aqueous outflow is thought to be the trabecular meshwork (TM) and inner wall of Schlemm's canal. Augmentation of the conventional (trabecular) outflow pathway can facilitate physiologic outflow and subsequently lower intraocular pressure. The most recent approach to enhancing the conventional outflow pathway is via an internal approach to the TM and Schlemm's canal. Ab interno Schlemm's canal surgery includes 4 novel surgical approaches: (1) removal of the TM and inner wall of Schlemm's canal by an internal approach (ab interno trabeculectomy), (2) implantation of a microstent to bypass the TM, (3) disruption of the TM and inner wall of Schlemm's canal via an internal approach (ab interno trabeculotomy), and (4) dilation of Schlemm's canal via an internal approach (ab interno canaloplasty). The first category includes the Trabectome (Neomedix, Tustin, CA, USA), and Kahook Dual Blade (New World Medical, Rancho Cucamonga, CA, USA). The second category includes the iStent (Glaukos, Laguna Hills, CA, USA), as well as the investigational Hydrus Microstent implant (Ivantis, Irvine, CA, USA). The third category includes gonioscopic-assisted transluminal trabeculotomy (iSciences catheter; Ellex, Adelaide, Australia), and 360° suture trabeculotomy (TRAB360, Sight Sciences, Menlo Park, CA, USA). The fourth category includes ab interno canaloplasty or AbiC (Ellex), and Visco360 (Sight Sciences). In contrast to external filtration surgeries, such as trabeculectomy and aqueous tube shunt, these procedures are categorized as internal filtration surgeries and are performed from an internal approach via gonioscopic guidance. Published results suggest that these surgical procedures are both safe and efficacious for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Assessment of three root canal preparation techniques on root canal geometry using micro-computed tomography: In vitro study

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    Shaikha M Al-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the effects of three root canal preparation techniques on canal volume and surface area using three-dimensionally reconstructed root canals in extracted human maxillary molars. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted Human Maxillary Molars having three separate roots and similar root shape were randomly selected from a pool of extracted teeth for this study and stored in normal saline solution until used. A computed tomography scanner (Philips Brilliance CT 64-slice was used to analyze root canals in extracted maxillary molars. Specimens were scanned before and after canals were prepared using stainless steel K-Files, Ni-Ti rotary ProTaper and rotary SafeSiders instruments. Differences in dentin volume removed, the surface area, the proportion of unchanged area and canal transportation were calculated using specially developed software. Results: Instrumentation of canals increased volume and surface area. Statistical analysis found a statistically significant difference among the 3 groups in total change in volume (P = 0.001 and total change in surface area (P = 0.13. Significant differences were found when testing both groups with group III (SafeSiders. Significant differences in change of volume were noted when grouping was made with respect to canal type (in MB and DB (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The current study used computed tomography, an innovative and non destructive technique, to illustrate changes in canal geometry. Overall, there were few statistically significant differences between the three instrumentation techniques used. SafeSiders stainless steel 40/0.02 instruments exhibit a greater cutting efficiency on dentin than K-Files and ProTaper. CT is a new and valuable tool to study root canal geometry and changes after preparation in great details. Further studies with 3D-techniques are required to fully understand the biomechanical aspects of root canal preparation.

  4. Clinical, radiographic, and histological manifestations of dentin dysplasia, type I: Report of case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneise, C V; Dwornik, R M; Brenneise, E E

    1989-12-01

    Dentin dysplasia, type I, is a rare dental anomaly characterized by abnormal dentin formation affecting the roots of both primary and permanent teeth. Short, conical roots with occlusion of the pulp chamber and canal are produced. Periapical radiolucent areas are common, although no evidence of caries or trauma to the tooth may be seen. Coronal mantle dentin is unaffected, resulting in an apparently normal clinical crown. An abnormality may not be suspected until radiographs reveal pulp and root changes. Orthodontic treatment can be a successful variation of the usual treatment offered to patients, and is discussed in this case report.

  5. The use of traditional and novel techniques to determine the hardness and indentation properties of immature radicular dentin treated with antibiotic medicaments followed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Yassen, Ghaeth H.; Al-Angari, Sarah S.; Platt,Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of intracanal antibiotic medicaments followed by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the indentation properties and hardness of radicular dentin using a BioDent reference point indenter and a traditional microhardness technique, respectively. Materials and Methods: Specimens with intact root canal dentin surfaces and polished radicular dentin specimens were obtained from immature human premolars. Each type of specimen was randomly a...

  6. Epidemiology of dentin hypersensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Splieth, Christian H.; Tachou, Aikaterini

    2012-01-01

    Objective In contrast to the well-established caries epidemiology, data on dentin hypersensitivity seem to be scarce and contradictory. This review evaluates the available literature on dentin hypersensitivity and assesses its prevalence, distribution, and potential changes. Materials and methods The systematic search was performed to identify and select relevant publications with several key words in electronic databases. In addition, the articles? bibliographies were consulted. Results Prev...

  7. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan‐based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yeon‐Jee; Baek, Seung‐Ho; Kum, Kee‐Yeon; Shon, Won‐Jun; Woo, Kyung‐Mi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan‐based (Pz‐) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta‐percha (GP) and Pz‐MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz‐MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin‐material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz‐MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45–1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350–400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre‐crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra‐ and/or inter‐tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50–56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  8. Regulation of Reactionary Dentine Formation.

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    Neves, V C M; Sharpe, P T

    2017-11-01

    During the treatment of dental caries that has not penetrated the tooth pulp, maintenance of as much unaffected dentine as possible is a major goal during the physical removal of decayed mineral. Damage to dentine leads to release of fossilized factors (transforming growth factor-β [TGF-β] and bone morphogenic protein [BMP]) in the dentine that are believed to stimulate odontoblasts to secrete new "tertiary" dentine (reactionary dentine). This is formed on the pulpal surface of existing dentine and rethickens the dentine. We have previously shown that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is pivotal for tooth repair in exposed pulp injury, and the pathway can be activated by small-molecule GSK-3 antagonists, resulting in enhanced reparative dentine formation. Here, we use a nonexposed pulp injury model to investigate the mechanisms of reactionary dentine formation in vivo, using small molecules to modulate the Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, and BMP pathways. We found that a local increase of Wnt activation at the injury site enhances reactionary dentine secretion. In addition, inhibition of TGF-β, BMP, or Wnt pathways does not impede reactionary dentine formation, although inhibition of TGF-β and/or BMP signaling does result in more disorganized, nontubular reactionary dentine. This suggests that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays no major role in the formation of reactionary dentine, but in common with reparative dentine formation, exogenous elevation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling can enhance tertiary dentine formation. Release of latent TGF-β or BMPs from dentine is not required for the deposition of mineral to form reactionary dentine but does play a role in its organization.

  9. Fiber-post bond strength in canals obturated with a cross-linked gutta-percha core obturator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Nicola; Coero Borga, Francesco A; Alovisi, Mario; Bergantin, Emanuele; Marchionni, Silvia; Pasqualini, Damiano; Berutti, Elio

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of fiber posts cemented in a root canal filled using various root-canal obturation techniques. A total of 33 monoradicular samples, treated endodontically, were randomly assigned to three groups according to the root-canal obturation technique: group 1, continuous-wave technique; group 2, plastic-obturator-core technique; and group 3, cross-linked gutta-percha obturator-core technique. Fiber posts were luted in each sample and each was sectioned perpendicular to the post axis. The push-out test was performed using a universal machine and the maximum failure load was recorded in MPa mm(-2) . Several samples were randomly chosen for scanning electron microscopy evaluation. The mean debris and dentinal tubule-opening scores were calculated separately in the coronal and apical portions. Bond strength was significantly higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Debris scores were significantly higher in the apical portion of groups 2 and 3 than in group 1. Within the limitations of this study it can be affirmed that thermoplasticized alpha gutta-percha seemed to worsen the cleaning of post-space walls and hence reduced fiber-post bond strength. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  10. Diffusion of calcitonin through the wall of the root canal Avaliação da difusão da calcitonina através da dentina radicular

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    Selma Cristina Cury Camargo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro diffusion of synthetic salmon calcitonin (CT, used as an intracanal medication, to the external root surface, with or without the presence of intact root cementum. Fifty-four human central incisors were used in the experiment, and were divided into two groups of 21 (test groups and two groups of 6 teeth (control groups. After root canal preparation, 10 ml of calcitonin was inserted within the root canal chamber. The root was sealed and made externally impermeable. Specimens were then placed in tubes with saline solution buffered with phosphates and stored at 37°C. The diffusion of calcitonin was measured after 1, 4 and 7 days. To count calcitonin present at the external media (PBS, ELISA test (an antigen-antibody reaction was used. Results showed that there was calcitonin diffusion through dentin in all of the test samples. The absence of cementum increased the diffusion of calcitonin (p=0.05. The highest counts of CT were obtained on day 7 for groups with or without cementum - showing a direct relation between time and diffusion of the medication.O presente estudo determinou in vitro a difusão da calcitonina sintética de salmão, como medicação intracanal, até a superfície externa radicular, com e sem a presença de cemento radicular. Foram utilizados cinqüenta e quatro incisivos centrais humanos, divididos em dois grupos com 21 dentes cada e dois grupos com 6 dentes cada (controle negativo. Após o preparo endodôntico, os dentes receberam 10 ml de calcitonina como medicação intracanal. Feitos o selamento e a impermeabilização externa da raiz, os espécimes foram acondicionados em tubos com solução salina tamponada com fosfatos e incubados em estufa a 37°C. Foram colhidas amostras da solução salina nos períodos de 1, 4 e 7 dias. Para a análise das soluções teste, utilizou-se teste ELISA. Os resultados mostram que existe a difusão da medicação testada até a superf

  11. A scanning electron microscopic evaluation of different root canal irrigation regimens Avaliação por microscopia eletrônica de varredura de diferentes regimes irrigantes no canal radicular

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    Chaves Medici Mônika

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of endodontic irrigants in removing the smear layer from instrumented root canal walls using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The endodontic irrigants used were: 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl; 1% NaOCl mixed to 17% EDTAC; 2% chlorhexidine gel; and Ricinus communis gel. Photomicrographs of the middle and apical thirds were evaluated with the aid of the Fotoscore - v. 2.0 software. The results indicated that the mixture of sodium hypochlorite and EDTAC completely removed the smear layer from dentinal walls. The other endodontic irrigants were not as efficient in cleansing the root canals.A proposta deste estudo foi avaliar, por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV, a efetividade dos irrigantes endodônticos na remoção da "smear layer" das paredes dos canais radiculares instrumentados. Os irrigantes endodônticos utilizados foram: solução de hipoclorito de sódio a 1%; solução de hipoclorito de sódio a 1% misturado ao EDTAC a 17%, gel de clorexidina a 2% e gel de Ricinus communis. Fotomicrografias dos terços médio e apical foram avaliadas com o auxílio do software Fotoscore - versão 2.0. Os resultados indicaram que a mistura da solução de hipoclorito de sódio e EDTAC removeu eficientemente a "smear layer" das paredes dentinárias. Os demais irrigantes endodônticos não foram tão eficientes na limpeza dos canais.

  12. Effect of dentin powder on the antimicrobial properties of hyperpure chlorine-dioxide and its comparison to conventional endodontic disinfecting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herczegh, Anna; Gyurkovics, Milán; Ghidan, Ágoston; Megyesi, Marianna; Lohinai, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    Previously we found that the high purity chlorine-dioxide(ClO2) has a very potent disinfectant efficacy on oral pathogenic microorganisms and as a root canal irrigant it is able to eliminate the experimental Enterococcus faecalis(E. faecalis) infection from the root canal system. This study examines whether the presence of dentin powder influences the antibacterial efficacy of ClO 2. In an in vitro dentin powder model the following irrigants were tested against planktonic E. faecalis: 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 0.12%ClO2 (Solumium) and one local root canal medicament: saturated Ca(OH)2. Survival of bacteria exposed to agents without and with human dentin powder or preincubated with dentin powder was investigated. The effect of the dentin powder on ClO2 concentration was investigated by titrations. Without dentin powder ClO 2 killed all E. faecalis and delivered the best result already after 1 minute; however, after longer contact time with dentin the difference between the disinfectants disappeared. The presence of dentin powder decreased the concentration of ClO 2 and attenuated the antibacterial efficiency of ClO2 and Ca(OH)2, but did not decrease of CHX and NaOCl.Preincubation with dentin powder caused significant loss of antibacterial activity of all investigated agents, ClO2 and Ca(OH)2 having the highest reduction. As the presence of dentin powder had a negative effect on the efficacy of disinfectants, the importance of elimination of dentin scrapings and smear layer from the root canal system during endodontic treatments is highly recommended. ClO 2 can be effective for a final rinse.

  13. Assessment of morphological changes and permeability of apical dentin surfaces induced by Nd:Yag laser irradiation through retrograde cavity surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Bala, Oya; Alimzhanova, Goulnara; Türköz, Emin

    2004-05-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to observe the morphological changes and apical dye penetration at apical dentin surfaces induced by Nd:YAG laser irradiation at different power settings with and without a laser initiator. Seventy five single rooted human maxillary anterior teeth were used. Following the establishment of the working lengths, the root canals were enlarged with step-back technique. The apex of each root was resected 3 mm perpendicular to its long axis. Standard Class I cavities of 2 mm depth and 2 mm width were prepared. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups with fifteen teeth in each. In Group 1, the retrograde cavity preparations were lased with Nd:YAG laser at 2 W and those in Group 2 preparations were lased with Nd:YAG laser at 3.2 W. In Group 3, the retrograde cavity surfaces were lased with Nd:YAG laser at 2 W following the application of India ink. Group 4 was lased with the same settings of Group 2 after an absorbent cotton point soaked with India ink was inserted into the cut dentinal surfaces and the inner walls of the apical preparations. Group 5 served as control. Five teeth from each group were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The amounts of smear layer, debris, and recrystalized dentin present were assessed and scored. Retrograde cavities of ten teeth from each group were filled with amalgam to examine apical dye penetration. The teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuscin and kept for 48 hours. Dye penetration was evaluated by stereomicroscope at a magnification of X10. The results showed the usage of India ink with Nd:YAG laser enhanced the amount of melting and recrystalization of dentin and the radiation and initiator increased the leakage.

  14. Effect of dentin surface modification using carbon nanotubes on dental bonding and antibacterial ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Lai; Li, Zhongjie; Luo, Feng; Chen, Junyu; Jia, Lingling; Wang, Tong; Pei, Xibo; Wan, Qianbing

    2017-11-03

    This study developed carbon nanotube coatings for the dentin surface and investigated the bonding strength and the in vitro antibacterial properties of carbon nanotube-coated dentin. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes were first modified and then characterized using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. Second, dentin samples were coated using either single-walled carbon nanotubes or multi-walled carbon nanotubes and observed under a scanning electron microscope. Then, the shear bonding strength and antibacterial properties of the dentin samples were tested. The results showed that both modified single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes formed a stable coating on the dentin surface without affecting the shear bonding strength. Moreover, the antibacterial properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube-coated samples was obviously superior to those of the multi-walled carbon nanotubecoated samples. Consequently, single-walled carbon nanotube coating may be an antibacterial agent for potential application in the dental bonding field.

  15. Presence of matrix vesicles in the body of odontoblasts and in the inner third of dentinal tissue: A scanning electron microscopyc study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela; Reyes-Gasga, José

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this report is to present the results of a scanning electron microscopic study on the presence of matrix vesicles (MVs) found in human dentine. Study Design: Dentin tissue from 20 human bicuspids was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy. Results: MVs were found as outgrowths of the cellular membrane of the odontoblastic body, the more proximal portion of the odontoblastic process before entering the dentinal tubule and in the odontoblastic process within the inner third of the dentin. Size of MVs varied depending on location. In the inner third of dentin, they were seen in diverse positions; as membranal outgrowths, deriving from the odontoblastic process, lying free in the intratubular space and attached to the dentinal wall. Sometimes, they were seen organized forming groups of different sizes and shapes or as multivesicular chains running from the surface of the odontoblastic process to the tubular wall. MVs were present in places never considered: 1) the body of odontoblasts; 2) the most proximal part of the odontoblastic processes before entering the circumpulpal dentine and also: 3) in the inner third of dentinal tissue. Conclusions: According to our results, MVs not only participate during mantle dentin mineralization during early dentinogenesis, they also contribute during the mineralization process of the inner dentin. Key words:Dentin, microvesicles, secretory vesicles, dentin formation, dentin secretion. PMID:23385510

  16. Evaluation of the antimicrobial effect of super-oxidized water (Sterilox® and sodium hypochlorite against Enterococcus faecalis in a bovine root canal model

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    Giampiero Rossi-Fedele

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ideally root canal irrigants should have, amongst other properties, antimicrobial action associated with a lack of toxicity against periapical tissues. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl is a widely used root canal irrigant, however it has been shown to have a cytotoxic effect on vital tissue and therefore it is prudent to investigate alternative irrigants. Sterilox's Aquatine Alpha Electrolyte® belongs to the group of the super-oxidized waters; it consists of a mixture of oxidizing substances, and has been suggested to be used as root canal irrigant. Super-oxidized waters have been shown to provide efficient cleaning of root canal walls, and have been proposed to be used for the disinfection of medical equipment. OBJECTIVE: To compare the antimicrobial action against Enterococcus faecalis of NaOCl, Optident Sterilox Electrolyte Solution® and Sterilox's Aquatine Alpha Electrolyte® when used as irrigating solutions in a bovine root canal model. METHODOLOGY: Root sections were prepared and inoculated with E. faecalis JH2-2. After 10 days of incubation the root canals were irrigated using one of three solutions (NaOCl, Optident Sterilox Electrolyte Solution®and Sterilox's Aquatine Alpha Electrolyte® and subsequently sampled by grinding dentin using drills. The debris was placed in BHI broth and dilutions were plated onto fresh agar plates to quantify growth. RESULTS: Sodium hypochlorite was the only irrigant to eliminate all bacteria. When the dilutions were made, although NaOCl was still statistically superior, Sterilox's Aquatine Alpha Electrolyte® solution was superior to Optident Sterilox Electrolyte Solution®. CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of this study Sterilox's Aquatine Alpha Electrolyte® appeared to have significantly more antimicrobial action compared to the Optident Sterilox Electrolyte Solution® alone, however NaOCl was the only solution able to consistently eradicate E. faecalis in the model.

  17. Differences in the pattern of lanthanum diffusion into predentine and dentine in mouse incisors and molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Quintana, M A; Septier, D; Goldberg, M

    1999-04-01

    Lanthanum nitrate was either perfused intravascularly or segments of mouse tooth were immersed in a fixative solution containing the tracer. The tracer deposits were examined in young (8-day-old) and older (8-week-old) mouse incisors and molars, demineralized or undemineralized. Lanthanum passed the distal junctional complex of odontoblasts and appeared in the predentine of incisors as large electron-dense stellate aggregates, 40-70 nm in diameter, and in molars as round, 20-40 nm dots. In dentine, tracer deposits were detected at three locations. Near the predentine dentine junction, the tracer densely stained a band 0.5-2.5 microm in width, also termed metadentine; in the inner circumpulpal dentine, the staining was weaker or lacking in an area extending 5-7 microm from the predentine-dentine junction; in outer circumpulpal dentine, lateral diffusion had occurred in porosities of intertubular dentine. Lanthanum impregnated the walls of dentine tubules and a peritubular-like dentine. In contrast, the mantle dentine was never stained. These differences in the pattern of diffusion prove that lanthanum staining is age-dependent and varies between mouse incisors and molars, independently of tissue processing. Architectural properties and driving flux are involved in the transport and localization of lanthanum in predentine and dentine.

  18. In vitro study of caries detection through sound dentin using a laser fluorescence device, DIAGNOdent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Yukiteru; Shimizu, Ayako; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeshige, Fumio; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of proximal surface caries detection using a laser fluorescence device, DIAGNOdent, through the sound dentin surrounding the cavity wall after removal of occlusal caries. Extracted sound human molars were ground to prepare horizontal and vertical dentin plates 1.4 mm thick. Extracted carious human molars were reduced in thickness horizontally from the occlusal surfaces until exposure of the dentin caries. The dentin plate was placed on the carious tooth. Before and after gradual thinning of the dentin plate from approximately 1.4 mm to 0.2 mm thick, the dentin caries was measured 10 times through the plate by the laser fluorescence device with a cone-shaped tip or a broad tip. When the dentin plate was reduced to less than 0.3 mm thick (using a combination of a horizontal plate and cone-shaped tip) or 0.2 mm thick (using the other combinations), the values measured with the laser fluorescence device were significantly larger than the values before reducing the thickness of the dentin. Based on these results, the device offers potential use as one of the screening tests for proximal surface caries detection through sound dentin when the sound dentin between tip and caries is thin.

  19. Effect of dentin on the antimicrobial efficacy of 3% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 18% etidronic acid on Candida albicans: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karale, Rupali; Odedra, Kamal Maldebhai; Srirekha, A; Champa, C; Shetty, Ashwija; Pushpalatha, S; Sharma, Rini

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentin on the antimicrobial efficacy of 3% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine, 17% EDTA and 18% etidronic acid against C. albicans. Dentin powder was prepared from mandibular first premolar using electrical grinder and sterilized. 3% NaOCl, 2%CHX, 17% EDTA and 18% etidronic acid were tested against C. albicans in the presence and absence of dentin, in eppendorf tubes. Group 1 (presence of dentin):- 100ul dentin powder + 100ul C. albicans suspension + 100ul irrigating solution. Group 2 (absence of dentin):- 100ul C. albicans suspension+ 100ul irrigating solution. - 100ul C. albicans suspension.+ 100ul sterile saline Suspension was thoroughly mixed, submitted for serial dilution upto10-5 after 1 min and colony forming units were counted. In group 2 (without dentin powder), 3% NaOCl and 2% CHX showed the lowest bacterial count compared to group 1 (with dentin powder). Dentin had a significant inhibitory effect on 3% NaOCl (P < 0.001) and 2% CHX (P<0.001). 17% EDTA showed lowest bacterial count in group 1 (with dentin powder) compared to group 2 (without dentin powder). 18% Etidronic acid showed similar bacterial counts in the both the groups. No reduction was observed in the control group. NaOCl & EDTA showed measurable antimicrobial effect even in the presence of dentin which can be promising in the reduction of C. albicans in root canal therapy.

  20. The effect of endodontic regeneration medicaments on mechanical properties of radicular dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassen, Ghaeth H.

    Endodontic regeneration treatment of necrotic immature teeth has gained popularity in recent years. The approach suggests a biological alternative to induce a continuous root development. In this project, three in vitro experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of three medicaments used in endodontic regeneration on mechanical properties and chemical structure of radicular dentin. In the first experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on the indentation properties of the root canal surface of immature teeth using a novel BioDent reference point indenter. A significant difference in the majority of indentation parameters between all groups was found after one-week and one-month application of medicaments (p double antibiotic paste (DAP) > control > calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2]. The four-week exposure of dentin to TAP and DAP caused 43% and 31% increase in total indentation distance outcome, respectively. In the second experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on the chemical structure of immature radicular dentin by measuring the phosphate/amide I ratios of dentin using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Phosphate/amide I ratios were significantly different between the four groups after one week, two weeks and four week application of medicaments (p untreated dentin > DAP-treated dentin > TAP-treated dentin. In the third experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on root fracture resistance and microhardness of radicular dentin. For the microhardness, the two-way interaction between group and time was significant (pendodontic regeneration caused significant change in the chemical integrity of the superficial radicular dentin and significantly affected the indentation properties of the root canal surface. Furthermore, the three month intracanal application of medicaments significantly reduced the fracture resistance of roots.

  1. Sodium hypochlorite solution penetration into human dentine: a histochemical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, L; Cavani, F; Generali, L

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate ex vivo the penetration depth of sodium hypochlorite solutions, with and without surfactants, into human dentine using a histochemical stain and the bleaching ability of NaOCl. Extracted maxillary central incisors were decoronated and their root canals were shaped to a size 30, .07 taper. Dentinal tubules were stained with 10% copper sulphate solution followed by a 1% rubeanic acid alcohol solution under vacuum. Specimens were irrigated with 5 mL of Niclor 5 (5.25% NaOCl solution) or 5 mL of Hypoclean (5.25% NaOCl solution + surfactants) according to the corresponding treatment group, for 2 min. A transverse section was obtained in the middle portion of the apical, middle and coronal thirds of each tooth. Under microscopic examination, irrigant penetration was evaluated by measuring the following: the bleached circumference of the root canal with respect to the stained circumference; bleached areas, mean and maximum penetration depth. For statistical analysis, Pearson's chi-squared test and one-way anova were used. Only 30% of dentine tubules in the apical portions were stained; therefore, these were excluded from further comparisons. In the middle and coronal thirds, the average bleached circumference of the root canal was 80-99% of the stained circumference and the bleached area was 73757-135107 μm(2) . The average penetration depth ranged from 39 to 62 μm and maximum penetration from 74 to 131 μm. For all reported results, no differences within and between groups were observed (P = 1). No differences in penetration of irrigants with and without surfactants into dentinal tubules were observed in the middle and coronal thirds of incisor teeth. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dentin: structure, composition and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Michel; Kulkarni, Askok B; Young, Marian; Boskey, Adele

    2011-01-01

    We review firstly the specificities of the different types of dentin present in mammalian teeth. The outer layers include the mantle dentin, the Tomes' granular and the hyaline Hopewell-Smith's layers. Circumpulpal dentin forming the bulk of the tooth, comprises intertubular and peritubular dentin. In addition to physiological primary and secondary dentin formation, reactionary dentin is produced in response to pathological events. Secondly, we evaluate the role of odontoblasts in dentin formation, their implication in the synthesis and secretion of type I collagen fibrils and non-collagenous molecules. Thirdly, we study the composition and functions of dentin extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules implicated in dentinogenesis. As structural proteins they are mineralization promoters or inhibitors. They are also signaling molecules. Three different forms of dentinogenesis are identified: i) matrix vesicles are implicated in early dentin formation, ii) collagen and some proteoglycans are involved in the formation of predentin, further transformed into intertubular dentin, iii) the distal secretion of some non-collagenous ECM molecules and some serum proteins contribute to the formation of peritubular dentin.

  3. X-ray microanalysis of dentin: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hals, E.; Tveit, A.B.; Totdal, B.

    1988-03-01

    The aim of this review was to present a condensed summary of the literature on X-ray microanalysis of dentin, including both energy-dispersive (EDS) and wavelength-dispersive (WDS) analysis. Estimations of concentrations by XMA of dentin should be regarded as semiquantitative values. The Ca level in rat odontoblasts was elevated in the secreting end of the cell body. In predentin Ca accumulated at a concentration of 2% that of mineralized dentin. In coronal dentin the peritubular areas were hypermineralized (Ca, P, Mg). Primary caries lesions showed a decrease of Ca, P, Mg and Cl, and usually an increase of S and Zn. The mineralized surface often present contained especially high concentrations of F and K. Considerable uptake of various ions in cavity walls exposed to filling materials was assessed: from silver amalgam, Zn and Sn, from silicate cement and glassionomer cement F, Al and Zn, and from zinc oxide-eugenol cement, Zn. The highest F concentrations following topical application were found with solutions of TiF4 and with the varnishes Duraphat and Fluor Protector. Dentin wall lesions adjacent to amalgam fillings exhibited considerably reduced Ca and P values, but concomitantly considerable amounts of Zn and Sn, that explained the increased radiopacity seen in some microradiographs. 84 references.

  4. EFFECTS OF LASER TREATMENT ON INTRACANAL DENTINE AND CEMENTUM AT THE ROOT APEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Mitić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser irradiation during root canal treatment is efficient but in order to prevent irreversible thermal damage to dentine, cementum and other periapical structures continuous water cooling is required. The aim of this study was to ultrastructurally analyze the surface of intracanal dentine and cementum at the root apex after Er:YAG laser irradiation with and without sterile saline solution irrigation. The study involved 70 intact maxillary and mandibular single-rooted and tworooted human teeth, divided into two experimental groups and one control group. In all teeth access cavity was created. For root canal irradiation, Er:YAG laser with the wavelength of 2940 nm, energy output of 140 mJ per pulse, pulse duration of 125-160 ms, pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz and power of 15 W was used. Total irradiation time for each root canal was 10 seconds. The ultrastructural analysis of intracanal dentine and the cementum of the root apex was done by using scanning electron microscope (JEOL JSM-5300 Tokyo Japan. Intracanal Er:YAG laser irradiation without water cooling showed melted circumpulpal dentine with large cracks in it, whereas cementum at the root apex was thermally modified in the form of plates and cracks. Intracanal Er:YAG laser irradiation with continuous water cooling resulted in clean intracanal dentine surface without morphological changes of the cementum. The canal system irradiation is acceptable and possible only when using constant water cooling; otherwise, irreversible thermal damage to intracanal dentine and cementum at the root apex occur.

  5. Exploiting the potential of free software to evaluate root canal biomechanical preparation outcomes through micro-CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, A A; Silva, E J; Roter, J M; Belladona, F G; Alves, H D; Lopes, R T; Paciornik, S; De-Deus, G A

    2015-11-01

    To propose an automated image processing routine based on free software to quantify root canal preparation outcomes in pairs of sound and instrumented roots after micro-CT scanning procedures. Seven mesial roots of human mandibular molars with different canal configuration systems were studied: (i) Vertucci's type 1, (ii) Vertucci's type 2, (iii) two individual canals, (iv) Vertucci's type 6, canals (v) with and (vi) without debris, and (vii) canal with visible pulp calcification. All teeth were instrumented with the BioRaCe system and scanned in a Skyscan 1173 micro-CT before and after canal preparation. After reconstruction, the instrumented stack of images (IS) was registered against the preoperative sound stack of images (SS). Image processing included contrast equalization and noise filtering. Sound canal volumes were obtained by a minimum threshold. For the IS, a fixed conservative threshold was chosen as the best compromise between instrumented canal and dentine whilst avoiding debris, resulting in instrumented canal plus empty spaces. Arithmetic and logical operations between sound and instrumented stacks were used to identify debris. Noninstrumented dentine was calculated using a minimum threshold in the IS and subtracting from the SS and total debris. Removed dentine volume was obtained by subtracting SS from IS. Quantitative data on total debris present in the root canal space after instrumentation, noninstrumented areas and removed dentine volume were obtained for each test case, as well as three-dimensional volume renderings. After standardization of acquisition, reconstruction and image processing micro-CT images, a quantitative approach for calculation of root canal biomechanical outcomes was achieved using free software. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Holmium:YAG laser in dentistry: photoconditioning of dentinal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine energy levels necessary to produce tubule closure and surface smoothing on dentinal surfaces of human teeth and their resultant temperature increases within the pulpal canals with the Holmium:YAG laser. An optimal working spot size and even absorption pattern were produced by defocusing the laser beam and evaluated by images produced on light exposed and developed photographic paper. The surface effects on dentin were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A thermocouple was positioned in the canals of fresh dissected dog jaws and attached to a recorder which produced a graph of the temperature changes. The in vitro research model for intrapulpal temperatures changes was verified by comparing premortem and postmortem temperature readings. The same protocol was used to evaluate temperature changes in fresh human extracted teeth. In vivo histological studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of HO:YAG laser energy on pulpal tissues. The results of these studies indicate the HO:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.12 microns can be safely and effectively used for photoconditioning of the dentinal surfaces of teeth in clinical conditions.

  7. EDTA conditioning of dentine promotes adhesion, migration and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, K M; Widbiller, M; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Hoffer, P C; Schmalz, G

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of dentine conditioning on migration, adhesion and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells. Dentine discs prepared from extracted human molars were pre-treated with EDTA (10%), NaOCl (5.25%) or H2 O. Migration of dental pulp stem cells towards pre-treated dentine after 24 and 48 h was assessed in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Cell adhesion was evaluated indirectly by measuring cell viability. Expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, BSP, DSPP, RUNX2) in cells cultured on pre-treated dentine for 7 days was determined by RT-qPCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis was performed for cell migration and cell viability data to compare different groups and time-points (Mann-Whitney U-test, α = 0.05). Treatment of dentine with H2 O or EDTA allowed for cell attachment, which was prohibited by NaOCl with statistical significance (P = 0.000). Furthermore, EDTA conditioning induced cell migration towards dentine. The expression of mineralization-associated genes was increased in dental pulp cells cultured on dentine after EDTA conditioning compared to H2 O-pre-treated dentine discs. EDTA conditioning of dentine promoted the adhesion, migration and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells towards or onto dentine. A pre-treatment with EDTA as the final step of an irrigation protocol for regenerative endodontic procedures has the potential to act favourably on new tissue formation within the root canal. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Bio-modification approach for novel dentine caries management by Galla chinesis extract and microbial transglutaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Deng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries still remains one of the most prevalent diseases worldwide. Unlike enamel caries which can be restored mainly by modulating mineral balance, the dentine caries are characterized with irreversible proteolytic disintegration of organic matrices, highlighting an urgent need to seek novel management strategies. Bio-modification of dentine matrix has been proposed as a novel and alternative approach to enhancing its biochemical and biomechanical properties. The resultant chemical stability and mechanic durability are specifically desirable for prevention and restoration of dentine caries. However, conventional cross linking agents, e.g. glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde,are unsuitable for clinical use due to marked cytotoxicity or instability over time. The Hypothesis: Previous studies revealed that Galla chinesis extract (GCE could inhibit cariogenic microbes and positively modulate enamel de/remineralization balance, and the mechanism was directed to the polyphenols-organic matrix interaction involving hydrogen, covalent, ionic bonding and hydrophobic processes. Microbial transglutaminase (mTGase could induce crosslinks between peptide chains and improve functional properties of food proteins by catalyzing an acyl transfer reaction through ε - (γ-glutamyl lysine (GL bonds. Given the high organic content in dentine and universal reaction nature of GCE and mTGase, we put forward a hypothesis that these two natural products may serve as novel biocompatible bio-modifiers to improve biochemical and biomechanical properties of dentine matrices. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The validation of our hypothesis will provide profound insights updating current therapeutic strategies against dentine caries, and pioneer novel approaches for biocompatible bio-modification of dentine matrices. Specifically, GCE and mTGase can be integrated into the root canal irrigating and dentine boding procedures, where they may generate beneficial

  9. Visualization Enhancement of Dentinal Defects by Using Light-Emitting Diode Transillumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Card, Steven J; Tawil, Peter Z

    2016-07-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated the presence of dentinal defects after root canal preparation in extracted human teeth by using the root sectioning methodology. The objective of this research was to investigate whether light-emitting diode (LED) transillumination enhances the visualization of dentinal defects by using a root sectioning methodology. Forty mesial roots of mandibular molars were sectioned at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex with a low-speed saw under water cooling. Microscopic pictures of the specimens were taken by using ×19.2 magnification for the 3-mm slice and ×12.8 magnification for the 6- and 9-mm slices. The LED transillumination was done by positioning an LED probe at 4 different locations (mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual). The root canal lumen was masked, and 2 independent evaluators assessed the presence of dentinal defects on the non-LED and LED images. The number of dentinal defects was recorded, and χ(2) test was used for statistical analysis (P < .05). The number of slices presenting dentinal defects at 3, 6, and 9 mm were 2 (5%), 1 (2.5%), and 1 (2.5%), respectively, for the non-LED assessment and 8 (20%), 10 (25%), and 9 (22.5%), respectively, for the LED assessment. Overall, 4 of the specimens (10%) presented dentinal defects without LED evaluation, and 19 of the specimens (47.5%) presented dentinal defects with LED evaluation. This difference was statistically significant (P < .05). LED transillumination enhanced the visualization of dentinal defects in uninstrumented roots. The results from previous studies that used the traditional non-LED sectioning methodology should be evaluated with caution. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dental Pulp and Dentin Tissue Engineering and Regeneration – Advancement and Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Hard tissue is difficult to repair especially dental structures. Tooth enamel is incapable of self-repairing whereas dentin and cememtum can regenerate with limited capacity. Enamel and dentin are commonly under the attack by caries. Extensive forms of caries destroy enamel and dentin and can lead to dental pulp infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by the pulp space disinfection and filled with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection --commonly known as root canal or endodontic therapy. Regeneration of dentin relies on having vital pulps; however, regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. With the advent of modern tissue engineering concept and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the recent endeavor on pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement and challenge in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:21196351

  11. Effect of tissue fluids on hydrophobicity and adherence of Enterococcus faecalis to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Saji; Kishen, Anil

    2007-12-01

    This in vitro study was carried out to determine (1) the hydrophobicity of selected oral bacteria, (2) the influence of growth media (saliva and serum) and mode of growth (planktonic or biofilm) on the hydrophobicity of Enterococcus faecalis, and (3) the influence of growth media and conditioning fluids on the adherence of E. faecalis to dentin. The ability to bind to a hydrocarbon phase (xylene) was used as an index of relative hydrophobicity of cells. Fluorescent microscopy-based technique was used to assay the bacterial adherence to dentin. Results showed that bacteria involved in the primary stage of oral biofilm formation such as Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis are relatively more hydrophobic than E. faecalis. The hydrophobicity of E. faecalis was significantly increased during starvation and biofilm mode of growth (p faecalis to dentin was appreciably increased after starvation and when dentin was conditioned with saliva. It was observed that surface conditioning of dentin with saliva and starvation can enhance the adherence of E. faecalis to dentin. The findings from this study indicated that the coronal leakage of saliva and the physiologic state of microbes might play an important role in the adherence and biofilm formation of bacteria to root canal dentin.

  12. Bonding to caries-affected dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Nakajima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentin adhesive systems have dramatically developed during the past decades. In a prepared cavity for an adhesive composite restoration, large areas of the cavity floor are composed of caries-affected dentin after removal of caries-infected dentin, not normal dentin. Caries-affected dentin is different in morphological, chemical and physical characteristics from normal dentin. Therefore, caries-affected dentin has still problems as bonding substrate compared with normal dentin. That is, caries-affected dentin produces lower bond strength and poor quality of the hybrid layer than normal dentin. In addition, when exposed the adhesive interface of caries-affected dentin in oral environment, the poor quality of the hybrid layer would compromise the longevity of the composite restoration due to hydrolysis of the resin and collagen fibrils. The improvement of bonding potential to caries-affected dentin could lead to reinforcement of tooth-composite restoration complex, protecting secondary caries and tooth fracture.

  13. The effect of glass fiber posts and ribbons on the fracture strength of teeth with flared root canals restored using composite resin post and cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Mariko; Komada, Wataru; Otake, Shiho; Inagaki, Tasuku; Omori, Satoshi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-23

    This study evaluated the fracture strength and mode of failure of structurally compromised teeth with flared root canals restored using composite resin with four different systems. Sixty endodontically treated bovine teeth were uniformly shaped to simulate human mandibular premolars with flared root canals. The roots were divided into four groups of 15 specimens each based on the type of restoration: composite resin core only (control), glass fiber post, cylindroid glass fiber ribbons, and glass fiber post and ribbons. All specimens were loaded until fracture occurred using a universal testing machine. Average fracture loads were compared with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The modes of failure were observed and the Fisher exact test and Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analysis. The fiber post and ribbon group (1035.70N) and the fiber ribbon group (881.77N) showed significantly higher fracture strength than the controls (567.97N) (pfiber post and ribbon group also showed significantly higher fracture strength than the fiber post group (769.40N). Almost all specimens showed unrestorable root fractures (pfiber ribbons significantly increased the fracture strength of the composite resin post and cores in the case of the dentin within the thin root canal wall. Based on the results, this study recommends the combined use of glass fiber post and ribbons. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. [Tomography of the pterygoid canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazantsev, S V; Kalenov, V E; Russkikh, N A

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an X-ray scheme for calculating the depth of pterygoid canals required for accurate tomography. The scheme includes three lines: line A corresponds to the physiological horizontal line, line B is drawn, normally to line A through the tip of the nose, and line C is the perpendicular from line B to the upper third of the posterior wall of the pterygopalatine fossa. The length of line B plus 1 cm (thickness of external nose soft tissues) is the value to be determined. Twenty-six patients underwent X-ray examinations by an EDK-750B unit (70 kV, 150 mA, 1.65 s). In all cases 1-3 images were sufficient to obtain good visualization of the pterygoid canals.

  15. In vitro comparison of the antibacterial effect of three intracanal irrigants and diode laser on root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashofteh, Kazem; Sohrabi, Khosrow; Iranparvar, Kaveh; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria are the primary etiology of pulpal and periradicular pathosis. In endodontically treated teeth with persistent infections only one or a few bacterial species are present of which the most important is Enterococcus faecalis. The aim of this study was to compare antibacterial efficacy of canal disinfectants including 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% chlorhexidine, MTAD (a mixture of doxycycline, citric acid and a detergent (Tween 80) and 830 nm diode laser. The canals of 135 extracted single rooted human teeth were prepared using rotary instruments. The canals were contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis for 4 weeks and then were divided into 4 groups of 30 teeth in each, a positive control group containing 10 teeth and a negative control group of 5 teeth. After using the disinfectants, samples obtained from canals by paper points and also shaving the canal walls were cultured. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to analyze the results. The results showed the bacterial reduction as follows: 99.97±0.14 for sodium hypochlorite, 99.65±1.13 for chlorhexidine, 97.56±6.36 for laser and 96.91±5.60 for MTAD. The count of CFU obtained from dentin shavings was: 16/96±91/23 for sodium hypochlorite, 82/73±186/63 .for chlorhexidine, 47/26±112/21 for laser and 341/34±1139/83 for MTAD. According to the results, sodium hypochlorite was the most effective agent against Enterococcus faecalis.

  16. Effectiveness of root canal debris removal using passive ultrasound irrigation with chlorhexidine digluconate or sodium hypochlorite individually or in combination as irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rafael Brandao; Marchesan, Melissa Andreia; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha; Sousa-Neto, Manoel

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the cleaning capacity of different auxiliary chemical substances energized with ultrasound in radicular dentin using morphologic analysis. Twenty-eight single-canal, mandibular incisors were prepared with the Hero 642 canal preparation system following the sequence: 25/12, 30/06, 35/02, and 40/02, 1 mm from the apex. The specimens were then divided into four groups of seven teeth. During biomechanical preparation the teeth were irrigated with 2 ml of distilled water between files. Each group of specimens (n=7) received a final irrigation with 100 ml of the following irrigants that were activated with ultrasound for 3 minutes: Group 1- distilled water; Group 2- 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX); Group 3- 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); and Group 4-the filtrate obtained after combining 0.2% CHX and 2.5% NaOCl. The apical portions of the root canals from each group were then submitted to histological processing and analyzed using optical microscopy. Results showed statistical differences between the groups (p<0.01). Groups 1 and 2 (distilled water and 0.2% CHX respectively) were statistically similar in terms of a greater amount of debris, whereas 2.5% NaOCl and the filtrate were more efficient in removal of debris. There is no additional benefit in terms of debris removal from root canal walls by irrigating with the filtrate obtained from the combination of NaOCl and CHX when compared to using NaOCl alone. The findings of this study suggest the time and expense of preparing and using a combination of NaOCl and CHX is not warranted compared to using NaOCl alone for root canal irrigation.

  17. Photodynamic therapy: An adjunct to conventional root canal disinfection strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shipra; Nagpal, Rajni; Manuja, Naveen; Tyagi, Sashi Prabha

    2015-08-01

    Although chemical-based root canal disinfectants are important to reduce microbial loads and remove infected smear layer from root dentin, they have only a limited ability to eliminate biofilm bacteria, especially from root complexities. This paper explores the novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) for antimicrobial disinfection of root canals. The combination of an effective photosensitizer, the appropriate wavelength of light and ambient oxygen is the key factor in PDT. PDT uses a specific wavelength of light to activate a non-toxic dye (photosensitizer), leading to the formation of reactive oxygen species. These reactive oxygen molecules can damage bacterial proteins, membrane lipids and nucleic acids, which promote bacterial cell death. In, addition PDT may enhance cross-linking of collagen fibrils in the dentin matrix and thereby improving dentin stability. The concept of PDT is plausible and could foster new therapy concepts for endodontics. The available knowledge should enable and encourage steps forward into more clinical-oriented research and development. This article discusses PDT as related to root canal disinfection, including its components, mechanism of action, reviews the current endodontic literature and also highlights the shortcomings and advancements in PDT techniques. © 2014 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  18. Atrioventricular Canal Defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tract infections. Atrioventricular canal defect can cause recurrent bouts of lung infections. Heart failure. Untreated, atrioventricular canal ... Leaky heart valves Narrowing of the heart valves Abnormal heart rhythm Breathing difficulties associated with lung damage ...

  19. Resin adhesion to carious dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, Masahiro; Tay, Franklin R; Torii, Yasuhiro; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Doi, Junichi; Itou, Kousuke; Ciucchi, Bernard; Pashley, David H

    2003-02-01

    To investigate the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of a self-etching priming adhesive system to normal, caries-affected and caries-infected dentin, and to observe the ultrastructure of the resin-dentin interface by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Twelve extracted human molar teeth with deep occlusal caries were stained with caries detector solution and ground flat occlusally. The red-stained soft dentin was classified as caries-infected. The surrounding discolored dentin was classified as caries-affected dentin. The surrounding normal dentin served as a control. The entire flat surface was bonded with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V (CV) and covered with resin composite to form a composite crown 5 mm high. One day later the specimens were serially sectioned vertically into multiple slabs 0.8 mm thick. Under microscopic observation, the specimens were divided into normal or caries-infected or caries-affected dentin. These regions were isolated by cutting away the remaining dentin to form hour-glass shapes with the smallest surface area at the test site. After measuring the areas, the specimens were fixed to a microtensile tester and pulled under tension to failure. Additional slabs that were not used for bond strength tests were processed for TEM. Bond strength data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons. The microTBS of CV to normal, caries-affected and caries-infected dentin were 45 +/- 10 MPa, 30 +/- 10 MPa, 10 +/- 5 MPa, respectively. TEM images showed that CV formed thin hybrid layers that were less than 1 microm thick in normal dentin, but that were between 6-8 microm thick in caries-affected dentin. Bacteria were only sparsely observed in the dentin tubules of bonded caries-affected dentin. However, in caries-infected dentin, an unusual interface was seen in which carious bacteria within disorganized non-banded collagen fibrils could be seen embedded by the adhesive. The hybrid layer in caries

  20. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronzato, Juliana Delatorre; Cecchin, Doglas; Miyagaki, Daniela Cristina; de Almeida, José Flávio Affonso; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone) on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control); G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl); G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05). G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05). A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently.

  1. Assessment of dentinal tubule invasion capacity of Enterococcus faecalis under stress conditions ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, S; Wang, J; Jiang, W; Zhu, C; Liang, J

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the dentinal tubule invasion capacity of Enterococcus faecalis under alkaline and energy starvation stress conditions. The root canals from human single-rooted teeth (n = 40) were infected with E. faecalis under alkaline (pH 9, 10, 11 and 12) and energy starvation (no glucose, 0.05% glucose and 0.15% glucose) stress conditions. The root canals were prepared in a standard manner and treated to remove the smear layer before incubation. After 4 weeks of cultivation, the roots were split vertically into two halves: one half was processed for biofilm formation analysis using a scanning electron microscope; the other half was stained with fluorescent DNA-binding reagents, washed thoroughly and sectioned (100 μm thick), and the depth of tubule invasion by the microorganism was examined by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The extent of dentine tubule invasion was analysed statistically. The E. faecalis strain resulted in biofilm formation and dentine tubules invasion under all of the stress conditions, except for pH 11 and 12 conditions. However, the tubule penetration distance was markedly reduced in these stress conditions (P faecalis formed biofilms and colonized dentine under alkaline and glucose starvation stress conditions, but its ability to invade dentine tubules was significantly decreased. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effect of EDTA, sodium hypochlorite, and chlorhexidine gluconate with or without surface modifiers on dentin microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslantas, Eda E; Buzoglu, Hatice Dogan; Altundasar, Emre; Serper, Ahmet

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of root canal irrigants on the microhardness of root canal dentin in the presence and absence of surface-modifying agents. Forty-eight root halves were prepared by longitudinal splitting of the distal roots of 24 freshly extracted mandibular human third molars and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, leaving the dentin surface exposed. After polishing, the microhardness values of the untreated dentin surfaces were recorded by using Vickers tester at the mid-root level. The root halves were randomly assigned to 6 groups composed of 8 samples each and treated for 5 minutes with one of the following irrigants: 17% EDTA, REDTA, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), 2% CHX with surface modifiers (CHX-Plus), 6% NaOCl, or 6% NaOCl with surface modifiers (Chlor-XTRA). After surface treatment, dentin microhardness values were recorded at close proximity to the initial indentation areas. Experimental data were statistically analyzed by using the t test and one-way analysis of variance, followed by Tukey honestly significant difference test at α = 0.05. EDTA, REDTA, NaOCl, and Chlor-XTRA significantly decreased the microhardness of root dentin compared with intact controls (P < .05). The addition of surface modifiers to the irrigants did not affect the microhardness of the samples. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Is it really penetration? Locomotion of devitalized Enterococcus faecalis cells within dentinal tubules of bovine teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Jasmin; Basche, Sabine; Neunzehn, Jörg; Dede, Maria; Dannemann, Martin; Hannig, Christian; Weber, Marie-Theres

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the penetration characteristics of devitalized and vital E. faecalis cells into root dentinal tubules. Thirteen root canals were incubated with devitalized (4days, 7days, 14days, 28days) and vital (28days) E. faecalis strains (streptomycin-resistant strains) after root canal enlargement (size 80, taper 0.02) with 3 % NaOCl solution. The smear layer was intentionally removed with 20 % EDTA before inoculation. Samples were processed for analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining. DAPI was conducted for fluorescence microscopic visualization of the bacterial penetration into dentinal tubules. The penetration depth was calculated with the measurement tool of the Axio Vision program (Zeiss, Jena, Germany). Devitalized E. faecalis strains were able to penetrate into dentinal tubules of the root canal. Apikal penetration depths of the devitalized cells were 100.67μm±26.54μm after 7days, 230.67μm±111.5μm after 14days and 266.5μm±92.63μm after 28days of incubation. The total number and penetration depth of E. faecalis cells was lower compared to a vital suspension of E. faecalis (1002.45μm) after 28days. It was noted that bacterial penetration was not common to all of the dentinal tubules in the vital E. faecalis control and especially in the devitalized control. Increased exposure times of devitalized bacteria into root canals lead to an increased number of penetrated dentinal tubules as well as to a deeper penetration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Meatal obstruction following canal wall down mastoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozan, Nazim; Duzenli, Ufuk; Kundi, Pinar; Turan, Mahfuz; Kiroglu, Ahmet Faruk

    2017-09-01

    Chronic otitis media (COM) is completely treated with a single procedure in most patients but may require multiple surgeries in some cases. The main goals of open cavity mastoidectomy are to completely eradicate the disease, create a large enough meatus for examination and mastoid air cells, and provide a self-cleaning epithelized dry cavity, and achieve maximum hearing. In this report, we present a very rare case of COM who underwent revision mastoidectomy in our clinic due to meatal obstruction in the right ear, total sensorineural hearing loss, and pain and tenderness in the postauricular region.

  5. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN MONKEY DENTIN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN Cebus apella DENTIN

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    João Humberto Antoniazzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.
    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.

  6. Evaluation of a Sonic Device Designed to Activate Irrigant in the Root Canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Lei-Meng; Verhaagen, Bram; Versluis, Michel; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to evaluate the removal of dentin debris from the root canal by sonic or ultrasonic activation of the irrigant and the physical mechanisms of sonic activation by visualizing the oscillations of the sonic tip, both inside and outside the confinement of the

  7. Evaluation of a sonic device designed to activate irrigant in the root canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, L.M.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to evaluate the removal of dentin debris from the root canal by sonic or ultrasonic activation of the irrigant and the physical mechanisms of sonic activation by visualizing the oscillations of the sonic tip, both inside and outside the confinement of the

  8. Evaluation of a Sonic Device Designed to Activate Irrigant in the Root Canal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Lei-Meng; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, Michel; van der Sluis, Lucas W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to evaluate the removal of dentin debris from the root canal by sonic or ultrasonic activation of the irrigant and the physical mechanisms of sonic activation by visualizing the oscillations of the sonic tip, both inside and outside the confinement of the

  9. Hydrogen bonds of a novel resin cement contribute to high adhesion strength to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Che; Wang, Da-Ming; Lin, Yu-Chen; Dai, Chi-An; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Hu, Mei-Shan; Lee, Bor-Shiunn

    2016-01-01

    The detachment of fiber posts from root canals is primarily caused by the loss of adhesion between dentin and cement; therefore, the purpose of this study was to formulate a novel resin cement that improves the bond strength of fiber posts to the dentin-cement interface. Three concentrations (30, 35, and 40wt.%) of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl] phosphate (2MP) were prepared as dentin bonding agent components. Isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) and ethylhexylacrylate (EHA) were used as key components to fabricate the resin cement (named IE cement). The adhesive strengths of IE cement to coronal and root canal dentin were tested after placement of specimens in a water bath at 100% humidity and 37°C for either 24h or 5 months. The microtensile bond test, the push-out bond test, and the fracture toughness test were performed. Four commercially available resin cements (Nexus(®) third generation (NX3), Variolink II, RelyX Unicem, and Panavia F 2.0) were used for comparisons. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the interaction of collagen extracted from human dentin and 2MP as well as the fracture surfaces of the specimens submitted to the microtensile bond test. The 35% concentration of 2MP, in combination with IBOA and EHA, was the most effective for improving the IE cement's bond strength to dentin. The XPS results revealed that the phosphate groups of 2MP formed hydrogen bonds with the collagen and that such bonds prominently decreased in number in the specimens that were stored for 5 months. The combination of 2MP, IBOA, and EHA can effectively increase the adhesive strength of IE cement to dentin via hydrogen bond formation. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hard tissue deposition in dental pulp canal by {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate cement

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    Yoshikawa, M.; Toda, T. [Osaka Dental Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Endodontics; Mandai, Y. [Bio-Chemical Lab. of Nitta Gelatin Inc., Yao (Japan); Oonishi, H. [Osaka Minami National Hospital, Kawachi (Japan). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Canal closure by hard tissue proliferation in the pulp canal and/or apical foramen is the most ideal healing after pulp removal. Generally, Ca(OH){sub 2} may induce secondary dentine or dentine-bridge on the amputated pulp surface. However, Ca(OH){sub 2} shows strong alkalinity and may cause severe inflammatory responses in the residual pulp. Moreover, completely formed dentine-bridge at the orifice will disturb further treatment of residual pulp because of the difficulty in localizing the pathway. The purpose of this study was to see hard tissue induction using newly developed {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate cement and to recognize the morphological difference of hard tissue from that of Ca(OH){sub 2}. (orig.)

  11. [Effects of radicular dentin treatments and luting materials on the bond of quartz fiber posts: scanning electron microscope study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hai-yan; Yan, Bin; Feng, Li-jun; Chen, Ya-ming

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the effects of radicular dentin treatments of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the regional root canal bonding interface of quartz fiber posts using 2 luting materials with SEM analysis. Nine intact maxillary central incisors were sectioned and endodontically treated. Standardized post space preparations and acid etch were performed. All specimens were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 3). D.T.LIGHT posts were placed into the root canal using one of three radicular dentin treatments (0.9% NaCl for 60 s, 10% NaOCl for 60 s, 17% EDTA for 60 s followed by 5.25% NaOCl for 60 s) in combination of one of two luting materials (DuoLink, LuxaCore) respectively (factorial design). Cervical, middle, apical sections of each teeth are used for SEM study and spectroscopy of dispersion energy (EDS) microanalysis. With the radicular dentin treatment with 10% NaOCl alone or with 17% EDTA followed by 5.25% NaOCl, longer and increased number of penetration of resin tags into the dentinal tubules were observed at the resin-dentin interfaces, and adhesive lateral branches could be found easily. EDS microanalysis showed increase in the infiltration behavior of the luting cement. Radicular dentin treatments provide good resin infiltration, which can produce a three-dimensional interlocking micronetwork of resin tags in the dentin tubules with multiple lateral branches that penetrate the intertubular dentin, thus positively influence the adhesion between dentin and the luting materials.

  12. Does the thickness of the resin cement affect the bond strength of a fiber post to the root dentin?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Bianca E. M.; Barbosa, Silvia H.; Melo, Renata M.; Zamboni, Sandra C.; Oezcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco A.

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of cement thickness on the bond strength of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post system to the root dentin. Eighteen single-rooted human teeth were decoronated (length: 16 mm), the canals were prepared, and the specimens were randomly allocated to 2

  13. Shear strength of dentin and dentin bonded composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragon, E; Söderholm, K J

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the shear strength of dentin with the shear strength of dentin bonded composites, and to determine how variables such as composite strength and blade width used during shear testing influence shear strength values. Dentin test samples (n = 36) were made by milling the anatomical molar crowns to a shape similar to a composite rod bonded to a flat dentin surface. Dentin bonding was accomplished by bonding composites to flat dentin surfaces (n = 72) using Scotchbond MP and Z100 (n = 36) or Silux Plus (n = 36) composites. Shear testing was conducted using a guillotine-like device with a flat blade embracing half the dentin or composite cylinders. The blade thickness was either 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.25, or 1.50 mm. Six samples per material and blade thickness were tested. In addition to the above study, the bond strength of Z100 (n = 6) and Silux (n = 6) bonded with Scotchbond MP and tested with an orthodontic edgewire loop were also tested and compared with the bond strength of the Z100 and Silux samples tested with the 0.5 thick blade. All shear testing was done at a load rate of 0.5 mm/min. The results were analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range test. The shear strength values when tested with the blades were: dentin = 39.7 +/- 13.0 MPa, Z100 = 29.3 +/- 7.2 MPa, and Silux = 21.1 +/- 4.9 MPa; each group had significantly different values (p bonding agent is significantly lower than the shear strength of dentin. The shear strength depends on testing method (blade vs loop) and composite material.

  14. Demineralization of dentin with EDTA in organic solvent: immunofluorescence of collagen in osteogenesis imperfecta and normal teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinmaa, P L; Ranta, H; Ranta, K; Peltonen, L; Hietanen, J

    1985-12-01

    The immunofluorescence of dentin collagen(s) after demineralization with ethanolic trimethylammonium ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EtOH-TMA-EDTA) was studied using normal deciduous teeth, and deciduous and permanent teeth from three patients with Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Sections of the demineralized teeth were immunostained with anti type I, III and IV collagen sera. Preservation of the antigenicity of the collagens after treatment with EtOH-TMA-EDTA was confirmed by staining of the soft tissue controls. Anti type I collagen sera stained the normal dentin matrix peritubularly only. In OI, a homogeneous fluorescence of the mantle dentin and the dentin zone surrounding the abnormal canal-like structures was observed. With anti type III collagen serum, the normal dentin matrix failed to stain. In OI, the staining pattern was a narrow halo surrounding the canal-like structures. Alteration in the collagen or the noncollagenous components of the dentin matrix may explain the staining reactions of the various collagens in OI.

  15. Accuracy of Cone-beam Computed Tomography in Measuring Dentin Thickness and Its Potential of Predicting the Remaining Dentin Thickness after Removing Fractured Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jialei; He, Jingzhi; Yang, Qian; Huang, Dingming; Zhou, Xuedong; Peters, Ove A; Gao, Yuan

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) to measure dentin thickness and its potential of predicting the remaining dentin thickness after the removal of fractured instrument fragments. Twenty-three human mandibular molars were selected, and 4-mm portions of #25/.06 taper K3 files (SybronEndo, Orange, CA) were fractured in mesial canals. The teeth were then scanned using a micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) system and a CBCT unit. Dentin thickness was measured and compared between both micro-CT and CBCT images to study the accuracy of CBCT readings. Then, the process of removing the fragments was simulated in CBCT images using the MeVisLab package (MeVis Research, Bremen, Germany); the predicted minimal remaining dentin thickness after removal was measured in different layers using VGStudio MAX software (Volume Graphics, Heidelberg, Germany). Data were compared with the actual minimal remaining dentin thickness acquired from micro-CT images, which were scanned after removing fractured instruments using the microtrepan technique. The results were analyzed statistically using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and a forecasting regression model analysis. The ICC for the dentin thickness was 0.988. The forecasting regression model of CBCT imaging estimating dentin thickness was micro-CT imaging = 15.835 + 1.080*CBCT, R2 = 0.963. The ICC for the remaining dentin thickness was 0.975 (P < .001). The forecasting regression model of CBCT imaging forecasting remaining dentin thickness was micro-CT imaging = 147.999 + 0.879*adjusted CBCT, R2 = 0.906. The study showed that CBCT imaging could measure dentin thickness accurately. Furthermore, using CBCT images, it is reliable and feasible to forecast the remaining dentin thickness after simulated instrument removal. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An assessment of techniques for dehydrating root canals using infrared laser radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyra, T; Walsh, L T; Walsh, L J

    2000-08-01

    Infrared lasers have been used for debridement and sterilisation of both soft and hard tissues, but there have been few studies of such laser applications in endodontics. The present laboratory study was undertaken to examine the feasibility of using pulsed infrared laser radiation to remove moisture from root canals (with an adjunctive sterilising effect). Canals were prepared in extracted teeth and a standardised technique used to fill the apical half of the root canal with saline. Pulses of CO2 or Nd:YAG laser energy were delivered into the root canal system via miniature applicators and residual fluid determined, as well as temperature changes on the root surface. With the CO2 laser, long pulse durations were effective at dehydrating the canals, but elicited deleterious thermal changes both locally within the canal as well as on the root surface. With Nd:YAG laser treatment, large temperature increases on the root surface occurred even with low powers and low pulse frequencies, and extended times were necessary for dehydration. With higher powers and pulse frequencies, complete dehydration could be achieved in less than 60 seconds, however root surface temperatures increased approximately 25 degrees, and the radicular dentine was damaged by the production of plasma. Dehydration of root canals could not be achieved safely with these two infrared lasers, and damage to both radicular dentine and the periodontal ligament would occur if these techniques were to be applied clinically. Alternative methods which do not exert significant thermal effects should be investigated.

  17. Application of microcomputed tomography for quantitative analysis of dental root canal obturations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Jaworska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the study was to apply microcomputed tomography to quantitative evaluation of voids and to test any specific location of voids in tooth’s root canal obturations. Materials and Methods: Twenty root canals were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and Tubli-Seal sealer using the thermoplastic compaction method (System B + Obtura II. Roots were scanned and three-dimensional visualization was obtained. The volume and Feret’s diameter of I-voids (at the filling/dentine interface and S-voids (surrounded by filling material were measured. Results: The results revealed that none of the scanned root canal fillings were void-free. For I-voids, the volume fraction was significantly larger, but their number was lower (P = 0.0007, than for S-voids. Both types of voids occurred in characteristic regions (P < 0.001. I-voids occurred mainly in the apical third, while S-voids in the coronal third of the canal filling. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, our results indicate that microtomography, with proposed semi-automatic algorithm, is a useful tools for three-dimensional quantitative evaluation of dental root canal fillings. In canals filled with thermoplastic gutta-percha and Tubli-Seal, voids at the interface between the filling and canal dentine deserve special attention due to of their periapical location, which might promote apical microleakage. Further studies might help to elucidate the clinical relevance of these results.

  18. Application of microcomputed tomography for quantitative analysis of dental root canal obturations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kierklo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the study was to apply microcomputed tomography to quantitative evaluation of voids and to test any specific location of voids in tooth’s root canal obturations. Materials and Methods: Twenty root canals were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and Tubli-Seal sealer using the thermoplastic compaction method (System B + Obtura II. Roots were scanned and three-dimensional visualization was obtained. The volume and Feret’s diameter of I-voids (at the filling/dentine interface and S-voids (surrounded by filling material were measured.Results: The results revealed that none of the scanned root canal fillings were void-free. For I-voids, the volume fraction was significantly larger, but their number was lower (P = 0.0007, than for S-voids. Both types of voids occurred in characteristic regions (P < 0.001. I-voids occurred mainly in the apical third, while S-voids in the coronal third of the canal filling.Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, our results indicate that microtomography, with proposed semi-automatic algorithm, is a useful tools for three-dimensional quantitative evaluation of dental root canal fillings. In canals filled with thermoplastic gutta-percha and Tubli-Seal, voids at the interface between the filling and canal dentine deserve special attention due to of their periapical location, which might promote apical microleakage. Further studies might help to elucidate the clinical relevance of these results.

  19. A novel anatomical ceramic root canal simulator for endodontic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robberecht, L; Chai, F; Dehurtevent, M; Marchandise, P; Bécavin, T; Hornez, J-C; Deveaux, E

    2017-11-01

    Endodontic therapy is often complicated and technically demanding. The aim of this study was to develop a reproducible biomimetic root canal model for pre-clinical and postgraduate endodontic training. A specific ceramic shaping technique (3D printing and slip casting of a root canal mould) was developed to reproduce canal systems with the desired shape and complexity using a microporous hydroxyapatite (HAp)-based matrix. The microstructural morphology, pore size and porosity, as well as the Vickers microhardness of the ceramic simulators (CS) were assessed and were compared with natural dentin and commercial resin blocks. The reproducibility of the root canal shapes was assessed using the Dice-Sørensen similarity index. Endodontic treatments, from refitting the access cavity to obturation, were performed on the CS. Each step was controlled by radiography. Many properties of the CS were similar to those of natural dental roots, including the mineral component (HAp), porosity (20%, porous CS), pore size (3.4 ± 2.6 μm) and hardness (120.3 ± 18.4 HV). We showed that it is possible to reproduce the radio-opacity of a tooth and variations in root canal morphology. The endodontic treatments confirmed that the CS provided good tactile sensation during instrumentation and displayed suitable radiological behaviour. This novel anatomic root canal simulator is well suited for training undergraduate and postgraduate students in endodontic procedures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  1. The effects of various irrigating solutions on intra-radicular dentinal surface: An SEM analysis

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    J V Karunakaran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The action of irrigant solutions on intra- radicular dentinal surface were evaluated in an in vitro setting using a scanning electron microscope (SEM and it was observed that sodium hypochlorite and MTAD produced the cleanest surface and that none of the irrigants were able to produce an ideal preparation of the dentinal surface when used individually. The primary objective of endodontic therapy is to achieve a clean, optimal environment in root canals to avoid unsuccessful treatment outcomes. The complexities of the root canal system necessitate the use of irrigating solutions which act on radicular dentin surface, modifying it. The action of irrigants can be beneficial, and yet at the same time, as they modify the surface structure of dentin, they can have an adverse impact on the properties of dentin. The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of various irrigants on the dentinal surface using an SEM. Materials and Methods: Forty-five roots were randomly divided into nine groups (n=5 and prepared by sectioning at the level of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ and 10 mm from the CEJ and split longitudinally. The dentin surface was prepared and the cemental surfaces were coated with double layer of varnish. The irrigants tested were normal saline, de-ionized water, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 5% NaOCl with ultrasonic agitation, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX, MTAD, and MTAD with ultrasonic agitation. The prepared samples were placed in the irrigant solution for 3 min, subsequently dehydrated, sputter coated, and observed under SEM. The images were subsequently analyzed for dentinal surface changes. Results: 17% EDTA and MTAD produced the cleanest dentinal surface. Ultrasonic agitation enhanced the effect of irrigants. 5% NaOCl and 3% hydrogen peroxide were efficient at removal of organic debris, but were unable to remove the smear layer. De-ionized water, normal saline, and 2

  2. Retrieval of a metallic obstruction from the root canal of a premolar using Masserann technique

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    A R Vivekananda Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A metallic obstruction in the root canal blocks canal cleaning and shaping procedures and requires either bypassing or retrieval. Many methods have been recommended to retrieve a metallic obstruction from the root canal. This article describes the retrieval of a metallic obstruction from the root canal of a premolar using Masserann technique to facilitate endodontic retreatment. Masserann technique is said to have limited application in posteriors. However, in this case, the obstruction was successfully retrieved by employing Masserann technique which consisted of using a trephan to cut the dentine and extractor tube to retrieve the obstruction. The retrieved obstruction was found to be a separated H-file. Endodontic retreatment was completed following the detection and negotiation of an extra canal in the same tooth.

  3. Retrieval of a metallic obstruction from the root canal of a premolar using Masserann technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekananda Pai, A R; Mir, Shugufta; Jain, Rachit

    2013-10-01

    A metallic obstruction in the root canal blocks canal cleaning and shaping procedures and requires either bypassing or retrieval. Many methods have been recommended to retrieve a metallic obstruction from the root canal. This article describes the retrieval of a metallic obstruction from the root canal of a premolar using Masserann technique to facilitate endodontic retreatment. Masserann technique is said to have limited application in posteriors. However, in this case, the obstruction was successfully retrieved by employing Masserann technique which consisted of using a trephan to cut the dentine and extractor tube to retrieve the obstruction. The retrieved obstruction was found to be a separated H-file. Endodontic retreatment was completed following the detection and negotiation of an extra canal in the same tooth.

  4. Presence of matrix vesicles in the body of odontoblasts and in the inner third of dentinal tissue: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela; Ledesma-Montes, Constantino; Reyes-Gasga, José

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this report is to present the results of a scanning electron microscopic study on the presence of matrix vesicles (MVs) found in human dentine. Dentin tissue from 20 human bicuspids was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy. MVs were found as outgrowths of the cellular membrane of the odontoblastic body, the more proximal portion of the odontoblastic process before entering the dentinal tubule and in the odontoblastic process within the inner third of the dentin. Size of MVs varied depending on location. In the inner third of dentin, they were seen in diverse positions; as membranal outgrowths, deriving from the odontoblastic process, lying free in the intratubular space and attached to the dentinal wall. Sometimes, they were seen organized forming groups of different sizes and shapes or as multivesicular chains running from the surface of the odontoblastic process to the tubular wall. MVs were present in places never considered: 1) the body of odontoblasts; 2) the most proximal part of the odontoblastic processes before entering the circumpulpal dentine and also: 3) in the inner third of dentinal tissue. According to our results, MVs not only participate during mantle dentin mineralization during early dentinogenesis, they also contribute during the mineralization process of the inner dentin.

  5. Influence of a glide path on the dentinal crack formation of ProTaper Next system

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    Sevinç Aktemur Türker

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim was to evaluate dentinal crack formation after root canal preparation with ProTaper Next system (PTN with and without a glide path. Materials and Methods Forty-five mesial roots of mandibular first molars were selected. Fifteen teeth were left unprepared and served as controls. The experimental groups consist of mesiobuccal and mesiolingual root canals of remaining 30 teeth, which were divided into 2 groups (n = 15: Group PG/PTN, glide path was created with ProGlider (PG and then canals were shaped with PTN system; Group PTN, glide path was not prepared and canals were shaped with PTN system only. All roots were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 mm from the apex, and the sections were observed under a stereomicroscope. The presence/absence of cracks was recorded. Data were analyzed with chi-square tests with Yates correction. Results There were no significant differences in crack formation between the PTN with and without glide path preparation. The incidence of cracks observed in PG/PTN and PTN groups was 17.8% and 28.9%, respectively. Conclusions The creation of a glide path with ProGlider before ProTaper Next rotary system did not influence dentinal crack formation in root canals.

  6. Biodentine-a novel dentinal substitute for single visit apexification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudutt Nayak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Use of an apical plug in management of cases with open apices has gained popularity in recent years. Biodentine, a new calcium silicate-based material has recently been introduced as a dentine substitute, whenever original dentine is damaged. This case report describes single visit apexification in a maxillary central incisor with necrotic pulp and open apex using Biodentine as an apical barrier, and a synthetic collagen material as an internal matrix. Following canal cleaning and shaping, calcium hydroxide was placed as an intracanal medicament for 1 mon. This was followed by placement of small piece of absorbable collagen membrane beyond the root apex to serve as matrix. An apical plug of Biodentine of 5 mm thickness was placed against the matrix using pre-fitted hand pluggers. The remainder of canal was back-filled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha and access cavity was restored with composite resin followed by all-ceramic crown. One year follow-up revealed restored aesthetics and function, absence of clinical signs and symptoms, resolution of periapical rarefaction, and a thin layer of calcific tissue formed apical to the Biodentine barrier. The positive clinical outcome in this case is encouraging for the use of Biodentine as an apical plug in single visit apexification procedures.

  7. Biodentine-a novel dentinal substitute for single visit apexification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad Faiz

    2014-01-01

    Use of an apical plug in management of cases with open apices has gained popularity in recent years. Biodentine, a new calcium silicate-based material has recently been introduced as a dentine substitute, whenever original dentine is damaged. This case report describes single visit apexification in a maxillary central incisor with necrotic pulp and open apex using Biodentine as an apical barrier, and a synthetic collagen material as an internal matrix. Following canal cleaning and shaping, calcium hydroxide was placed as an intracanal medicament for 1 mon. This was followed by placement of small piece of absorbable collagen membrane beyond the root apex to serve as matrix. An apical plug of Biodentine of 5 mm thickness was placed against the matrix using pre-fitted hand pluggers. The remainder of canal was back-filled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha and access cavity was restored with composite resin followed by all-ceramic crown. One year follow-up revealed restored aesthetics and function, absence of clinical signs and symptoms, resolution of periapical rarefaction, and a thin layer of calcific tissue formed apical to the Biodentine barrier. The positive clinical outcome in this case is encouraging for the use of Biodentine as an apical plug in single visit apexification procedures. PMID:24790925

  8. Antibacterial effect of bioactive glass in combination with powdered enamel and dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In endodontics, various intracanal medications have been advocated to eliminate bacteria after root canal instrumentation. A recent study has revealed that addition of powdered dentin to bioactive glass (BAG led to increased glass dissolution, and an increased antibacterial efficacy. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to compare the effect of enamel and dentin powder on the antibacterial efficacy of a commercially available BAG. Materials and Methods: Dentin blocks (dbs were prepared from single rooted human teeth. These dbs were infected with Enterococcus faecalis for two weeks in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB, while negative controls were kept in sterile TSB. In group I, the infected dbs were filled with BAG, in group II with BAG + Enamel powder and group III with BAG + Dentin powder. Dentin samples were harvested from the dbs and cultured. Statistical Analysis: Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA was used for multiple group comparison followed by Scheffe′s post hoc test for pair-wise comparisons. Results: All the combinations of BAG evaluated significantly reduced the bacterial counts compared to the control group. However, at the end of 24 hours, three days, and five days BAG + Dentin powder showed significant reduction ( P < 0.01 in bacterial counts compared to the other experimental groups. Conclusion: Among the various materials evaluated, it appeared that though BAG exhibits antimicrobial efficacy, the addition of powdered enamel and dentin in aqueous suspension definitely enhanced this property. However, the addition of enamel powder BAG did not significantly alter its antimicrobial efficacy compared to BAG + dentin powder.

  9. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate increased the push out bond strength of an epoxy resin sealer to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pheenithicharoenkul, Suthida; Panichuttra, Anchana

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea extract on the push out bond strength of an epoxy resin sealer to root dentin. Seventy single root canal premolars were decoronated and instrumented. The roots were randomly irrigated with different final irrigation protocols (n=16): 17%EDTA (EDTA), 17%EDTA followed by 2.5%NaOCl (EDTA+NaOCl), 17%EDTA followed by 1 mg/mL EGCG (EDTA+EGCG) and 1 mg/mL EGCG (EGCG). Other six root canals were received only 2.5%NaOCl as a control group. One root from each group (n=1) was excluded and prepared for SEM investigation. All root canals were then obturated and horizontally sectioned to perform the push out test. EDTA+EGCG group had the highest bond strength (pepoxy resin sealer to root dentin.

  10. A quantitative analysis of rotary, ultrasonic and manual techniques to treat proximally flattened root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Soares Grecca

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The efficiency of rotary, manual and ultrasonic root canal instrumentation techniques was investigated in proximally flattened root canals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty human mandibular left and right central incisors, lateral incisors and premolars were used. The pulp tissue was removed and the root canals were filled with red die. Teeth were instrumented using three techniques: (i K3 and ProTaper rotary systems; (ii ultrasonic crown-down technique; and (iii progressive manual technique. Roots were bisected longitudinally in a buccolingual direction. The instrumented canal walls were digitally captured and the images obtained were analyzed using the Sigma Scan software. Canal walls were evaluated for total canal wall area versus non-instrumented area on which dye remained. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found between the instrumentation techniques studied (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study showed that no instrumentation technique was 100% efficient to remove the dye.

  11. Influence of dental restorations and mastication loadings on dentine fatigue behaviour: Image-based modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukicevic, Arso M; Zelic, Ksenija; Jovicic, Gordana; Djuric, Marija; Filipovic, Nenad

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to estimate the influence of various mastication loads and different tooth treatments (composite restoration and endodontic treatment) on dentine fatigue. The analysis of fatigue behaviour of human dentine in intact and composite restored teeth with root-canal-treatment using FEA and fatigue theory was performed. Dentine fatigue behaviour was analysed in three virtual models: intact, composite-restored and endodontically-treated tooth. Volumetric change during the polymerization of composite was modelled by thermal expansion in a heat transfer analysis. Low and high shrinkage stresses were obtained by varying the linear shrinkage of composite. Mastication forces were applied occlusally with the load of 100, 150 and 200N. Assuming one million cycles, Fatigue Failure Index (FFI) was determined using Goodman's criterion while residual fatigue lifetime assessment was performed using Paris-power law. The analysis of the Goodman diagram gave both maximal allowed crack size and maximal number of cycles for the given stress ratio. The size of cracks was measured on virtual models. For the given conditions, fatigue-failure is not likely to happen neither in the intact tooth nor in treated teeth with low shrinkage stress. In the cases of high shrinkage stress, crack length was much larger than the maximal allowed crack and failure occurred with 150 and 200N loads. The maximal allowed crack size was slightly lower in the tooth with root canal treatment which induced somewhat higher FFI than in the case of tooth with only composite restoration. Main factors that lead to dentine fatigue are levels of occlusal load and polymerization stress. However, root canal treatment has small influence on dentine fatigue. The methodology proposed in this study provides a new insight into the fatigue behaviour of teeth after dental treatments. Furthermore, it estimates maximal allowed crack size and maximal number of cycles for a

  12. Effect of hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate on biomechanical properties of human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Hui Kheng; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2002-02-01

    This study compared the ultimate tensile strength, micropunch shear strength, and microhardness of bleached and unbleached human dentin. Forty-four intact premolars were root canal treated and randomly divided into four groups. Bleaching agents were sealed in pulp chambers, as in clinical use. Group 1 (control) was treated with water, group 2 with 30% hydrogen peroxide, group 3 with sodium perborate mixed with water, and group 4 with sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide. The teeth were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 7 days. The teeth were then sectioned and biomechanical tests were carried out on dentin specimens that were obtained from all teeth. Intracoronal bleaching with 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate used either alone or in combination weakened dentin. Hydrogen peroxide alone tended to be more damaging than sodium perborate used alone or sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Comparison the Effects of Different Root Canal Irrigants on the Retention of Quarts Fiber Posts Cemented by Resin Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Shirinzad; Zahed Mohammadi; Loghman Rezaei-Soufi; Mehdi Rasekh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Root canal irrigants could change the structure of root dentin and affect the posts retention the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of three different endodontic irrigants on the retention of quarts fiber posts cemented by different resin cements. Materials & Methods: In this in-vitro study, 10 mm long post spaces were prepared in root canals of 120 premolars after endodontic therapy and cutting the crowns at the cementoenamel junction. The teeth were randomly div...

  14. Functional remineralization of carious dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, Megan Kardon

    A primary goal of dental tissue engineering is the biological reconstruction of tooth substrate destroyed by caries or other diseases affecting tooth mineralization. Traditionally, dentists treat caries by using invasive techniques to remove the diseased dental tissue and restore the lesion, ideally preventing further progression of decay. Success in strategies associated with remineralization of enamel and root caries have contributed to the less invasive prospect of remineralization of dentinal carious lesions. The central hypothesis of this dissertation is that carious dentin lesions can be remineralized if the lesions contain residual mineral. Caries Detector (CD) stained zones (pink, light pink, transparent and normal) of arrested carious dentin lesions were characterized according to microstructure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, mineral content by digital transverse microradiography, and nanomechanical properties by AFM-based nanoindentation. CD-stained and unstained zones had significantly different microstructure, mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Furthermore, the most demineralized carious zone contained residual mineral. To obtain reproducible, standardized dentin caries lesions, we characterized the lesions from an artificial carious dentin lesion model using a 0.05M acetate demineralization buffer. The artificial caries-like lesions produced by the buffer had similar mineral content and nanomechanical properties in the stained and unstained zones as natural dentin lesions. Both natural and artificial lesions had significant correlations between mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Mineral crystallite size and shape was examined by small angle x-ray scattering. Both natural and artificial carious dentin had different mineral sizes than normal dentin. Collagen in natural and artificial carious dentin lesions was examined by trichrome stain, AFM high-resolution imaging, and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy, to determine if

  15. Avaliação da capacidade seladora apical de um adesivo dentinário, acrescido ou não de hidróxido de cálcio, comparada à de um cimento endodôntico à base de hidróxido de cálcio, na obturação de canais radiculares

    OpenAIRE

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro [UNESP

    1998-01-01

    The sealing afforded by endodontic obturations using a dentin bonding agent with and without calcium hydroxide was compared to the sealing of a calcium hydroxide - based sealer (Sealer 26). The root canals of sixty extracted human teeth were prepared biomecanichally and filled by the lateral condensation technique with gutta-percha points and the sealer (Sealer 26) as the control group, or a dentin bonding agent with calcium hidroxide or dentin bonding agent without calcium hydroxide. The roo...

  16. Root Dentin Strain and Temperature Rise During Endodontic Treatment and Post Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Amade, Euridsse Sulemane; Novais,Veridiana Resende; Roscoe,Marina Guimaraes; Azevedo,Fabiane Maria Ferreira; Bicalho, Aline Aredes; Soares,Carlos Jose

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of endodontic treatment procedures and different post systems rehabilitation steps on the strain and temperature rise on apical and cervical root dentin regions. Twenty-one extracted human canine teeth had two strain gages attached to the distal root surface and two thermocouples attached to the mesial root surface (cervical and apical). The strain and temperature rise were recorded during the following procedures: root canal preparation, final rinse and dr...

  17. Push-out bond strengths of two fiber post types bonded with different dentin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Fulya Toksoy; Erdemir, Ugur; Sahinkesen, Gunes; Mumcu, Emre; Yildiz, Esra; Uslan, Ibrahim

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the regional push-out bond strengths for two fiber-reinforced post types using three different dentin bonding agents. Sixty single-rooted extracted human first premolar teeth were sectioned below the cemento-enamel junction, and the roots were endodontically treated. Following standardized post space preparations, the roots were divided into two fiber-post groups (Glassix and Carbopost), and further divided into three subgroups of 10 specimens each for the bonding systems self-etching dentin bonding agents (Clearfil SE Bond and Optibond all-in-one), and total-etching dentin bonding agent (XP Bond). A dual-cure resin luting cement (Maxcem) was then placed in the post spaces and posts were then seated into the root canals polymerized through the cervical portion. The roots were then cut into 3-mm thick sections. Push-out tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with multivariate ANOVA (alpha = 0.05). The morphology of interface between different dentin bonding agents from the cervical sections were analyzed with SEM. Glass fiber-reinforced posts demonstrated significantly higher push-out bond strengths than carbon fiber-reinforced posts (p dentin adhesive Clearfil SE Bond and total-etching dentin adhesive XP Bond demonstrated similar bond strengths values and this was significantly higher compared with the Optibond all-in-one in cervical root canal region. In conclusion, in all root segments, the glass fiber-reinforced posts provided significantly increased post retention than the carbon fiber-reinforced posts, regardless of the adhesive used. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of rewetting solutions on micropush-out dentin bond strength of new bioceramic endodontic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Giovana Cunha; Cavalcante, Salma Ivanna Araújo; Maia-Filho, Etevaldo Matos; Bauer, José; Bandéca, Matheus Coêlho; Gavini, Giulio; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes

    2017-08-31

    To evaluate the influence of rewetting solutions on bond strength to root dentin of conventional gutta-percha (GP) or niobium phosphate glass-based gutta-percha (GNb) associated with a bioceramic sealer. The root canals of 80 human mandibular premolars were prepared using nickel-titanium instruments and irrigation with sodium hypochlorite and EDTA. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups according to the gutta-percha used: GNb or GP associated with EndoSequence BC Sealer (BC) and the solution for rewetting dentin before filling (distilled water; phosphate buffer saline solution - PBS; simulated body fluid - SBF; or no solution). The root canals were filled with a single cone using warm vertical condensation. Micropush-out bond strengths associated with the filling materials in slices from middle root thirds was determined 30 days after root filling. The failure mode was analyzed with stereoscopic lens. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Holm-Sidak test (p types of gutta-percha (p dentin rewetting solution increased bond strength in the groups studied. Association of GNb with bioceramic sealer was beneficial, increasing the bond strength to dentin when compared with the association with GP.

  19. Effect of photon-initiated photoacoustic streaming on removal of apically placed dentinal debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, H; Capar, I D; Saygili, G; Gok, T; Akcay, M

    2014-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS) technique with conventional, sonic and ultrasonic irrigation on the removal of apically placed dentinal debris from an artificial groove created in a root canal. Root canal preparation was performed up to size 40 on 48 extracted single-rooted teeth using ProTaper rotary instruments. The specimens were then split longitudinally, and a standardized groove was prepared in the apical part of each segment. Each groove was filled with dentinal debris mixed with 5% NaOCl. Each tooth was reassembled and irrigated as follows: (i) conventional irrigation with 1% NaOCl, (ii) sonic, (iii) ultrasonic irrigation, and (iv) PIPS. The root segments were disassembled, and the amount of remaining dentinal debris was evaluated under a stereomicroscope at 20× magnification, using a four-grade scoring system. The data were evaluated statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests with a 95% confidence level (P = 0.05). Photon-induced photoacoustic streaming removed significantly more dentinal debris than conventional irrigation (P Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Assessment of ion diffusion from a calcium hydroxide-propolis paste through dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Janaina Corazza; Mori, Graziela Garrido

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of ions from a non-alcoholic calcium hydroxide-propolis paste to diffuse through dentinal tubules. Thirty-six single-rooted bovine teeth were used. The tooth crowns were removed, and the root canals were instrumented and divided into 3 groups: Group 1 - calcium hydroxide-propylene glycol paste; Group 2 - calcium hydroxide-saline solution paste; Group 3 - calcium hydroxide-propolis paste. After the root canal dressings were applied, the teeth were sealed and placed in containers with deionized water. The pH of the water was measured after 3, 24, 72 and 168 hours to determine the diffusion of calcium hydroxide ions through the dentinal tubules. All of the pastes studied promoted the diffusion of calcium hydroxide ions through the dentinal tubules. Associating propolis to calcium hydroxide resulted in a pH increase, which occurred with greater intensity after 72 hours. The calcium hydroxide-propolis paste was able to diffuse in dentin.

  1. Assessment of ion diffusion from a calcium hydroxide-propolis paste through dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Corazza Montero

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the ability of ions from a non-alcoholic calcium hydroxide-propolis paste to diffuse through dentinal tubules. Thirty-six single-rooted bovine teeth were used. The tooth crowns were removed, and the root canals were instrumented and divided into 3 groups: Group 1 - calcium hydroxide-propylene glycol paste; Group 2 - calcium hydroxide-saline solution paste; Group 3 - calcium hydroxide-propolis paste. After the root canal dressings were applied, the teeth were sealed and placed in containers with deionized water. The pH of the water was measured after 3, 24, 72 and 168 hours to determine the diffusion of calcium hydroxide ions through the dentinal tubules. All of the pastes studied promoted the diffusion of calcium hydroxide ions through the dentinal tubules. Associating propolis to calcium hydroxide resulted in a pH increase, which occurred with greater intensity after 72 hours. The calcium hydroxide-propolis paste was able to diffuse in dentin.

  2. Detection of a second mesiobuccal canal in the mesiobuccal roots of maxillary first molar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Leena; Khraisat, Ameen

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the MB2 canal in the mesiobuccal root (MBR) of maxillary first molars could be identified through a clinical access cavity preparation, with and without magnification. One hundred extracted maxillary first molar teeth were collected. After a clinical access cavity preparation with careful use of bur to locate any additional canal (dentine troughing), the MB2 canals were located in 2 stages. Stage I was located with unaided vision and stage II was located under moderate magnification with x3.5 magnifying dental loupes. All specimens were stained, rendered transparent, and then classified. The number of canals detected by stage was analyzed statistically by a chi-square test. Statistical significance was considered to be P magnification, the number of detected MB2 canals was increased from 55 (56.7%) to 61 (62.9%) teeth. Cleared teeth showed 77.32% of MB2 canals. The effectiveness of MB2 location was 73.3% and 82.7% in stage I and stage II, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 methods of detecting the MB2 canal (P = .3). The use of magnification enhanced the ability to detect the MB2 canals, although the difference was not statistically significant. The MB2 canals could not be detected in 16.5% of the teeth, mainly because of pulpal calcification.

  3. Midinfrared ablation of dentin with the Vanderbilt FEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M.; Reinisch, Lou; Edwards, Glenn S.; Yessik, Michael J.; Ashrafi, Shahid; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    1996-04-01

    Absorption spectra of 0.1 - 0.2 mm thick, dehydrated sections of human teeth were measured in the transmission mode with a Bruker FT-IR spectrometer from 2.5 - 20 micrometers . Absorption peaks for amide I, II and III, carbonate and phosphate were identified. Craters were ablated in dentin and enamel using a tunable FEL at 6.45 micrometers at various fluences. Pulse duration: 3 microsecond(s) ; spot size (Gaussian, FWHM): 300 micrometers ; repetition rate: 10 Hz. Crater depth and width were measured from digitized optical images. Ablation rates were computed from crater depth and volume data. Selected specimens were examined with scanning electron microscopy to determine ablation surface characteristics. Depth of thermal damage and dentinal tubule morphology were estimated from SEM examination of fractures through ablation sites. Functions describing crater depth vs. number of pulses (quadratic function) were not the same as crater volume vs. number of pulses (linear function). Crater depth decreases with successive pulses, concurrently, the crater width increases. Thus, each pulse removes approximately a constant volume. Material was observed to flow through the dentinal tubules during and after ablation. Patent tubules on crater walls and floor were observed with SEM. Ablation rates in dentin were approximately 3X those in enamel at 6.45 micrometers . Ablation rates and surface characteristics varied across wavelengths from 5.8 to 8.0 micrometers .

  4. Assessment of the bacteria reduction in the infected root canal irradiated with diode laser; Avaliacao da reducao bacteriana em conduto radicular infectado e irradiado com laser de diodo. Estudo in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radaelli, Claudia Amaral Rabello de Mello

    2002-07-01

    the periapical point which width measured 1 mm, approximately. The maximum temperature variation was 7.45 deg C. Under electron microscope scanning, the control groups showed areas with smear layer covering the dentinal walls. The laser irradiated groups showed a smooth, uniform, clean appearance, with small areas of closed dentinal tubules without cracking alternately with areas of exposed open dentinal tubules. Some parts showed fusion of the dentinal mass (groups irradiated with 3 W). In groups where calcium hydroxide was associated with laser irradiation remains were found over the irradiated surface and, in many parts, the dentinal tubules could not be observed. The use of high intensity diode laser at 830 nm proved to be efficient and able to promote reduction in the Enterococcus faecalis population in the infected root canals. (author)

  5. Mesiodens within the nasopalatine canal: an exceptional entity

    OpenAIRE

    Georges Aoun; Ibrahim Nasseh

    2016-01-01

    A supernumerary tooth is one that is supplementary to the normal dentition. It can be found anywhere at the dental arch. A mesiodens is a supernumerary tooth located between the two maxillary central incisors usually palatally or within the alveolar process. Less frequently, the mesiodens is in relation with the nasal floor and the nasopalatine canal walls. This paper presents a very rare case of an impacted inverted mesiodens located inside the nasopalatine canal and found incidentally with ...

  6. CT findings of the osteoma of the external auditory canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ha Young; Song, Chang Joon; Yoon, Chung Dae; Park, Mi Hyun; Shin, Byung Seok [Chungnam National University, School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    We wanted to report the CT image findings of the osteoma of the external auditory canal. Temporal bone CT scanning was performed on eight patients (4 males and 4 females aged between 8 and 41 years) with pathologically proven osteoma of the external auditory canal after operation, and the findings of the CT scanning were retrospectively reviewed. Not only did we analyze the size, shape, distribution and location of the osteomas, we also analyzed the relationship between the lesion and the tympanosqumaous or tympanomastoid suture line, and the changes seen on the CT scan images for the patients who were able to undergo follow-up. All the lesions of the osteoma of the external auditory canal were unilateral, solitary, pedunculated bony masses. In five patients, the osteomas occurred on the left side and for the other three patients, the osteomas occurred on the right side. The average size of the osteoma was 0.6 cm with the smallest being 0.5 cm and the largest being 1.2 cm. Each of the lesions was located at the osteochondral junction in the terminal part of the osseous external ear canal. The stalk of the osteoma of the external auditory canal was found to have occurred in the anteroinferior wall in five cases (63%), in the anterosuperior wall (the tympanosqumaous suture line) in two cases (25%), and in the anterior wall in one case. The osteoma of the external auditory canal was a compact form in five cases and it was a cancellous form in three cases. One case of the cancellous form was changed into a compact form 35 months later due to the advanced ossification. Osteoma of the external auditory canal developed in a unilateral and solitary fashion. The characteristic image findings show that it is attached to the external auditory canal by its stalk. Unlike our common knowledge about its occurrence, osteoma mostly occurred in the tympanic wall, and this is regardless of the tympanosquamous or tympanomastoid suture line.

  7. Marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to root dentin surface with orthograde/retrograde application techniques: A microcomputed tomographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Fouzan, Khalid; Awadh, Mohammed; Badwelan, Moahmmed; Gamal, Abeer; Geevarghese, Amrita; Babhair, Samar; Al-Rejaie, Mansour; Al Hezaimi, Khalid; Rotstein, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Achieving a good apical seal for root canals is known to be associated with good mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) adaptation to dentin. This study aims to compare the marginal adaptation of MTA with root dentin between orthograde and retrograde application techniques using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis. Fifty-two single-rooted human teeth were divided into four equal groups: (Group 1) Retrograde MTA (RMTA), (Group 2) Orthograde MTA (OMTA), (Group 3) Etched RMTA (ERMTA), and (Group 4) Etched OMTA (EOMTA). For Group 1, 3-mm retrograde cavities were prepared and filled with MTA. For Group 2, the apical 6 mm of the canals were filled with MTA and sealed with sealer cement and warm gutta-percha. In Groups 3 and 4, canals were treated the same as Groups 1 and 2, respectively, except that before placing the MTA, canals were irrigated with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After 48 hours, all the teeth were analyzed using a micro-CT scanner. Mean dentin-MTA contact and the mean length and width of each gap was analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Statistical significance was set at an α level of 5%. No significant difference in gap volumes was observed in the dentin-MTA adaptation in both orthograde and retrograde application techniques. However, significant difference in the gap volumes was observed between RMTA and ERMTA (P = 0.045). Etching significantly improved the MTA-Dentin adaptation (P MTA adaptation, instead with the use of 17% EDTA, a significant improvement could be achieved. Within the limitations of the present study, it concludes that MTA adaptation to dentin tooth structure is not significantly different between an orthograde and retrograde approach. However, the use of EDTA significantly improved the MTA-Dentin adaptation.

  8. Reaction rate of NaOCl in contact with bovine dentine: effect of activation, exposure time, concentration and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, R G; Wesselink, P R; Zaccheo, F; Fanali, D; Van Der Sluis, L W M

    2010-12-01

    To determine the influence of activation method (ultrasound or laser), concentration, pH and exposure time on the reaction rate (RR) of NaOCl when in contact with dentinal walls. The walls from standardized root canals in bovine incisors were exposed to a standardized volume of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with different concentrations (2% and 10%), pH (5 and 12) and exposure times (1 and 4min). Two irrigation protocols were tested: passive ultrasonic irrigation or laser activated irrigation with no activation as the control. The activation interval lasted 1min followed by a rest interval of 3 min with no activation. The RR was determined by measuring the iodine concentration using an iodine/thiosulfate titration method. Exposure time, concentration and activation method influenced the reaction rate of NaOCl whereas pH did not. Activation is a strong modulator of the reaction rate of NaOCl. During the rest interval of 3min, the consumption of available chlorine increased significantly. This effect seems to be more pronounced after irrigant activation by laser. pH did not affect the reaction rate of 2% NaOCl. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  9. Rootless teeth: Dentin dysplasia type I

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fulari, Sangamesh G; Tambake, Deepti P

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of hereditary disturbance of dentine, Dentin dysplasia type I is presented, which is characterized by short or total absence of roots, obliterated pulp chambers, and peri-apical radiolucencies...

  10. Influence of endodontic sealer composition and time of fiber post cementation on sealer adhesiveness to bovine root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Moraes, Rafael do Amaral; Broch, Juliana; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of the type of endodontic sealer (salicylate resin-based sealer vs. two endodontic sealers) and the time of fiber post cementation after root filling on the post adhesion to bovine root dentin. Sixty bovine roots were assigned to six groups (n=10), considering an experimental design with two factors (factorial 3x2): endodontic sealer factor in three levels [epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), eugenol-based sealer (Endofill), and salicylate resin-based sealer plus mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (MTA Fillapex)] and time for post cementation factor in two levels (immediate post cementation or 15 days after root canal filling). After post cementation, 2-mm-thick slices were produced and submitted to push-out test. The failure modes were analyzed under a 40× stereomicroscope and scored as: adhesive at cement/dentin interface; adhesive at cement/post interface; cement cohesive; post cohesive; dentin cohesive; or mixed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). When the fiber posts were cemented immediately after the root canal filling, the bond strengths were similar, independent of the endodontic sealer type. However, after 15 days, the epoxy resin-based sealer presented higher bond strength than the other sealers (ppost cementation has no influence on post/root dentin adhesion. On the contrary, the type of endodontic sealer can influence the adhesion between fiber posts and root dentin.

  11. A comparison of the shaping ability of reciprocating NiTi instruments in simulated curved canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sil Yoo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The study was to compare the shaping ability of Reciproc (VDW and WaveOne (Dentsply Maillefer instruments compared with ProTaper, Profile and hand instrument during the preparation of simulated root canals. Materials and Methods Five groups (n = 5 were established. Reciproc, WaveOne, ProTaper, Profile and K file (K-flexo file were used to prepare the resin simulated canals. A series of preoperative and postoperative images were taken by a microscope and superimposed in 2 different layers. The amount of resin removed from both the inner and the outer sides of the canal was measured to the level of 10 mm from the apical tip, with a 1 mm increment. Results The mean of resin removal from the inner canal wall was not different from the outer canal wall for Reciproc and WaveOne groups at apical third (1 - 3 mm level. There was no difference in the change of working length and maintenance of canal curvature. NiTi instruments are superior to stainless-steel K file in their shaping ability. Conclusions Within the limitation of this present study, Reciproc and WaveOne instruments maintained the original canal curvature in curved canals better than ProTaper and Profile, which tend to transport towards the outer canal wall of the curve in the apical part of the canal.

  12. Wntless Regulates Dentin Apposition and Root Elongation in the Mandibular Molar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, C.H.; Kim, T.H.; Ko, S.O.; Lee, J.C.; Yang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays an essential role in the dental epithelium and mesenchyme during tooth morphogenesis. However, it remains unclear if Wnt ligands, produced from dental mesenchyme, are necessary for odontoblast differentiation and dentin formation. Here, we show that odontoblast-specific disruption of Wntless (Wls), a chaperon protein that regulates Wnt sorting and secretion, leads to severe defects in dentin formation and root elongation. Dentin thickness decreased remarkably and pulp chambers enlarged in the mandibular molars of OC-Cre;WlsCO/CO mice. Although the initial odontoblast differentiation was normal in the mutant crown, odontoblasts became cuboidal and dentin thickness was reduced. In immunohistochemistry, Wnt10a, β-catenin, type I collagen, and dentin sialoprotein were significantly down-regulated in the odontoblasts of mutant crown. In addition, roots were short and root canals were widened. Cell proliferation was reduced in the developing root apex of mutant molars. Furthermore, Wnt10a and Axin2 expression was remarkably decreased in the odontoblasts of mutant roots. Deletion of the Wls gene in odontoblasts appears to reduce canonical Wnt activity, leading to inhibition of odontoblast maturation and root elongation. PMID:25595365

  13. Antibacterial Efficacy of Pastes Against E Faecalis in Primary Root Dentin: A Confocal Microscope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, R; Sharma, D S; Pathak, A K

    2015-01-01

    Management of abscessed primary teeth often present endodontic failure owing to questioned efficiency of dressings or obturating pastes to eliminate Enterococcus faecalis, a resistant bacterium, residing in depth of dentinal tubules. The present study evaluates the antimicrobial efficacy of two antibacterial and two obturating pastes in dentinal tubules of primary teeth infected with Enterococcus faecalis using viability stain and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Total 28 samples were prepared.Four groups with 6 samples each were made according to antibacterial pastes i.e. 1% or 2%Chlorhexidine (CHX) + calcium hydroxide (CH), CH + iodoform (Metapex) and Zinc Oxide Eugenol (ZOE). Dentinal tubules from the root canal side were infected with E. faecalis by centrifugation of the bacterial suspension. Two specimens from each group were subjected to 1, 7 and 15 days antibacterial pastes exposure. Viability staining followed by CLSM were used to quantitatively analyze the dead cell count directly inside dentin. Univariate analysis showed that all medicaments were significantly effective (p ZOE(15)> Metapex(15)> 2%CHX+CH(15)> 2%CHX+CH(7)> 2%CHX+CH(1)> 1%CHX+CH(7)> 2%CHX+CH(15)> Metapex(1)> ZOE(1)> ZOE(7). All medicaments were effective against E. faecalis in dentine of primary teeth and their efficacy increased with longer contact with 1%CHX+CH being most effective at day 15. Inclusion of 1% CHX in dressings or obturating pastes might minimize the endodontic relapse and maximize the tooth retention in functional state in pediatric dentistry.

  14. Antibacterial Properties Associated with Chitosan Nanoparticle Treatment on Root Dentin and 2 Types of Endodontic Sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carpio-Perochena, Aldo; Kishen, Anil; Shrestha, Annie; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) and chitosan nanoparticles (CNps) to inactivate bacteria and prevent biofilm formation at sealer-dentin interfaces. The study was divided into 3 stages: first stage, the experiment was conducted to analyze the antibacterial properties of CMCS in different formulations against biofilms; second stage, direct-contact and membrane-restricted methods were used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of an epoxy resin (ThermaSeal Plus; Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK) and calcium silicate (MTA Fillapex; Angelus SA, Londrina, PR, Brazil) based-sealers with or without CNps; and third stage, biofilm formation at the sealer dentin interfaces of root dentin treated with CMCS and filled with gutta-percha and CNp incorporated sealer were analyzed after 1- and 4-week aging periods. The samples were treated and filled as follows: (1) distilled water: unaltered sealer (control group), (2) CMCS: sealer+CNps (CMCS group), and (3) CMCS/rose bengal: sealer+CNps (CMCS/RB group). Enterococcus faecalis was used to infect all the samples. Microbiological and microscopic analyses were used to assess the antibacterial characteristics. CMCS-based treatments effectively killed bacteria adherent on root dentin (P dentin and inhibit bacterial adhesion. CNps in root canal sealers are capable of maintaining their antibacterial activity even after prolonged aging. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of chloroform, eucalyptol and orange oil solvents on the microhardness of human root dentin.

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    Sedigheh Khedmat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the effect of chloroform, eucalyptol and orange oil solvents on the microhardness of human root dentin.Sixty-eight single-rooted single-canal extracted human premolar teeth were used. Tooth crowns were separated from the roots at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ. Roots were buccolingually sectioned into mesial and distal halves. Specimens were randomly divided into 5 groups, with 20 teeth in each solvent group and 4 teeth in each control group. Primary microhardness of specimens was measured using Vickers microhardness tester. Specimens were exposed to solvents for 15 minutes and were subjected to microhardness testing again. Data were recorded and analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA.No significant difference was found in dentin microhardness before and after exposure to solvents in any of the orange oil, eucalyptol, chloroform or saline groups (P=0.727. None of the experimental groups showed any significant difference in terms of dentin microhardness reduction (P=0.99 and had no significant difference with the negative control group.This study showed that chloroform, eucalyptol and orange oil as gutta percha solvents did not decrease the microhardness of root dentin. Thus, none of the mentioned solvents has any superiority over the others in terms of affecting dentin properties.

  16. Comparison of resin push-out strength to root dentin of bovine- and human-teeth

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    Galhano Graziela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To compare the push-out strength of bovine- and human-root dentin and, thus, evaluate the suitability of bovine-root dentin to substitute human-root dentin for bond strength testing. Materials and Methods : Ten single-rooted human-teeth and ten bovine incisors were prepared using a #3 bur of a fiber post system (12 mm long. The posts were duplicated with resin cement (Duolink. The root canals were treated with All Bond 2 adhesive system and the resin posts were cemented using Duolink. The specimens were cut perpendicular to their long axis, yielding disc-specimens with 1.5 mm thickness, which were submitted to a push-out test (1 mm/min. Ten bond strength values per group (n = 10 were used for statistical analysis (Student t test, a =.05. Results : Statistically significant differences were found for the bond strength values between bovine- (4.1 ± 1.3 MPa and human-root dentin (8.6 ± 5.7 MPa (P =.0001. Conclusion : The push-out strengths of bovine- and human-root dentin were statistically different.

  17. Dehydration Induces Cracking in Root Dentin Irrespective of Instrumentation: A Two-dimensional and Three-dimensional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Hagay; Lindtner, Tom; Portoles, Carlos Aznar; Zaslansky, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Water loss strongly affects the mechanical behavior of dentin. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) studies exploring the influence of endodontic procedures on root cracking often lack information on the hydration state of the scanned samples. This study explores the relationship between dehydration and crack formation in root dentin with and without endodontic instrumentation. Fifty-three extracted teeth were used. Thirty canals were not instrumented, and 23 canals were instrumented with ProTaper files until F3. All teeth were imaged with visible light or x-rays, both moist (100% relative humidity) and after dehydration, thus allowing every tooth to serve as its own control. The presence of cracks was determined both before and after dehydration by microscopy on two-dimensional (2D) slices and in by μCT in three dimensions (3D). The μCT data were used to determine the total surface area of newly formed cracks after dehydration, which was correlated with dentin cross section. Both 2D and 3D data revealed cracking with increasing dehydration. Drying led to damage in >50% of roots, with a significant number of cracks appearing within 24 hours of ambient air-drying at 35%-55% relative humidity. Some cracking was occasionally observed even within minutes. More cracks were identified in 3D by μCT as compared with 2D microscopy. A correlation was found between dentin cross section and the total newly formed crack areas. Dehydration may induce cracks in dentin regardless of canal instrumentation. The in vitro observed correlation between root dentin mass and newly formed cracks implies that dehydration engenders stresses that may significantly damage roots. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Design of canals

    CERN Document Server

    Swamee, P K

    2015-01-01

    The book presents firsthand material from the authors on design of hydraulic canals. The book discusses elements of design based on principles of hydraulic flow through canals. It covers optimization of design based on usage requirements and economic constraints. The book includes explicit design equations and design procedures along with design examples for varied cases. With its comprehensive coverage of the principles of hydraulic canal design, this book will prove useful to students, researchers, and practicing engineers. End-of-chapter pedagogical elements make it ideal for use in graduate courses on hydraulic structures offered by most civil engineering departments across the world.

  19. Challenges of stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration: a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T-J; Al-Habib, Mey; Gauthier, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    There are two types of approaches to regenerate tissues: cell-based and cell-free. The former approach is to introduce exogenous cells into the host to regenerate tissues, and the latter is to use materials other than cells in an attempt to regenerate tissues. There has been a significant advancement in stem cell-based pulp and dentin regeneration research in the past few years. Studies in small and large animals have demonstrated that pulp/dentin-like tissues can be regenerated partially or completely in the root canal space with apical openings of 0.7-3.0 mm using dental pulp stem cells, including stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP) and subpopulations of pulp stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and adipose tissue-derived MSCs (ADMSCs) have also been shown to regenerate pulp-like tissue. In contrast, the cell-free approach has not produced convincing evidence on pulp regeneration. However, one crucial concept has not been considered nor defined in the field of pulp/dentin regeneration and that is the critical size defect of dentin and pulp. Without such consideration and definition, it is difficult to predict or anticipate the extent of cell-free pulp regeneration that would occur. By reasoning, cell-free therapy is unlikely to regenerate an organ/tissue after total loss. Similarly, after a total loss of pulp, it is unlikely to regenerate without using exogenously introduced cells. A cell homing approach may provide a limited amount of tissue regeneration. Although stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration has shown great promise, clinical trials are difficult to launch at present. This article will address several issues that challenge and hinder the clinical applications of pulp/dentin regeneration which need to be overcome before stem cell-based pulp/dentin regeneration can occur in the clinic.

  20. [Bond strengths of absorbable polylactic acid root canal post with three different adhesives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Cheng, Can; Hu, Jia; Liu, He; Sun, Zhi-hui

    2015-12-18

    To find absorbable adhesives with suitable bonding properties for the absorbable polylactic acid root canal post. To test and compare the bond strengths of absorbable polylactic acid root canal post with three different adhesives. The absorbable polylactic acid root canal posts were used to restore the extracted teeth, using 3 different adhesives: cyanoacrylates, fibrin sealant and glass ionomer cement. The teeth were prepared into slices for micro-push-out test. The bond strength was statistically analyzed using ANOVA. The specimens were examined using microscope and the failure mode was divided into four categories: cohesive failure between absorbable polylactic acid root canal posts and adhesives, cohesive failure between dentin and adhesives, failure within the adhesives and failure within the absorbable polylactic acid root canal posts. The bond strength of cyanoacrylates [(16.83 ± 6.97) MPa] and glass ionomer cement [(12.10 ± 5.09) MPa] were significantly higher than fibrin sealant [(1.17 ± 0.50) MPa], Ppolylactic acid root canal posts and the adhesives was 25.0%, the cohesive failure between the dentin and the adhesives was 16.7%, the failure within the adhesives was 33.3%, and the failure within the absorbable polylactic acid root canal posts was 25.0%. In the group of fibrin sealant, the cohesive failure between the absorbable polylactic acid root canal posts and the adhesives was 66.7%, the cohesive failure between the dentin and the adhesives was 22.2%, the failure within the adhesives was 11.1%. In the group of glass ionomer cement, the cohesive failure between the absorbable polylactic acid root canal posts and the adhesives was 87.5%, the failure within the adhesives was 12.5%. The major failure mode in fibrin sealant and glass ionomer cement was the cohesive failure between the absorbable polylactic acid root canal posts and the adhesives. No major failure modes were found in the group of cyanoacrylates. The bond strength of fibrin sealant is low

  1. Ultrastructural organization of dentin in mice lacking dentin sialo-phosphoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ping-An; Verdelis, Kostas; Yang, Xu; Lukashova, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Beniash, Elia

    2014-08-01

    Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is the major non-collagenous protein of dentin and plays a significant role in dentin mineralization. Recently, animal models lacking DSPP have been developed and the DSPP KO phenotype has been characterized at the histological level. Little is known, however, about the DSPP KO dentin at nano- and meso-scale. Dentin is a hierarchical material spanning from nano- to macroscale, hence information on the effects of DSPP deficiency at the submicron scale is essential for understanding of its role in dentin biomineralization. To bridge this gap, we have conducted ultrastructural studies of dentin from DSPP KO animals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of DSPP KO dentin revealed that although the overall ultrastructural organization was similar to the WT, the mineral particles were less organized. Scanning electron microscopy in the back-scattered mode (BS-SEM) of the DSPP KO dentin revealed that circumpulpal dentin comprises large areas of non-mineralized matrix, with numerous spherulitic mineralized inclusions, while the mantle dentin appeared largely unaffected. Analysis of the mineral distribution in the circumpulpal dentin of the DSPP KO mice suggests a reduction in the number of mineral nucleation sites and an increase in the nucleation barrier in DSPP KO dentin. These preliminary results indicate that in addition to the reduction of mineralized and total dentin volume in DSPP KO animals significant changes in the ultrastructural organization exist. These changes are likely related to the role of DSPP in the regulation of mineral formation and organization in dentin.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, S.; Oliveira, V.; Vilar, R.

    2012-06-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm-2) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm-2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm-2. The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material.

  3. Influence of root dentin treatment on the push-out bond strength of fibre-reinforced posts

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    Altair Soares MOURA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluates the influence of root dentin treatment with NaOCl alone and combined with EDTA, with and without ultrasound activation, on the push-out bond strength (BS of fiber-reinforced posts in weakened roots, cemented with RelyX or Panavia. The root canals of 42 maxillary canines were instrumented with Reciproc and 2.5% NaOCl. In the coronal 12mm of all canals, experimental weakening of the roots was produced by reducing dentin thickness with 2.44mm diameter diamond burs. The roots were assigned to 3 groups (n = 14 according to root dentin treatment: 2.5% NaOCl; 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA; and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, with solutions agitated using passive ultrasonic irrigation. After cementation of the fiber-reinforced posts the roots were divided in thirds. The first slice of each third was used for the push-out BS test, the second slice for confocal laser scanning microscopy and dentin microhardness (Knoop analysis. Data were analysed by a two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (a = 0.05. NaOCl + EDTA provided highest BS values than NaOCl (p < 0.0001. Specimens cemented with Panavia presented significantly higher BS than those with RelyX in the three root thirds (p < 0.0001. The highest BS values occurred in the cervical third (p < 0.001. Ultrasound-activated NaOCl + EDTA promoted the greatest reduction in dentin microhardness, followed by NaOCl/EDTA and NaOCl. Ultrasonic activation of NaOCl and EDTA reduced root dentin microhardness, but did not improve the push-out BS of resin-based cements. Panavia presented higher BS than RelyX. RelyX was not influenced by the root dentin treatment protocols.

  4. HIGH RISK IN ROOT CANAL NEGOCIATION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS: CLINICAL CASE SERIES

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    Paula PERLEA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several clinical cases outline the difficulties of root canal treatment, due to the morphological changes of the endodontic space in elderly patients. The changes in the shape of pulp chamber and root canal make the treatment more difficult. It is also shown that the pulp chamber diminishes, due to reparative dentin. Calcification of the pulp space makes more difficult the access to the cavity. The obliterated canals lead to a challenging negotiation of the root canals. To avoid errors in the appreciation of the general health condition of the patient, the specialists should have an accurate preoperative radiograph or cone beam computing tomography (CBCT, use magnification (dental operative microscope, safe-ended burs, consider carefully any morphological changes, and apply the most proper techniques.

  5. Mineral trioxide aggregate root canal filling of traumatized immature tooth

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    Maha A Kanfar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old female patient reported to the dental clinic seeking a help to save her traumatized maxillary left central incisor. The tooth had been treated with a temporary filling by a general dentist. The coronal tooth structure was intact, discolored, and a temporary filling was placed on the access opening. She gave a history of trauma about 3 years back. An intraoral periapical radiograph revealed an open apex and dentin bridge in the middle of the root canal. The root canal and the access opening were filled with very poor filling. The tooth was managed successfully by conservative means using intracanal calcium hydroxide as an intracanal medicament, followed by mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA filling. The access opening was filled with glass ionomer and composite resin restoration. One year and 6-month follow-up demonstrated a clinically asymptomatic and adequately functional tooth, with radiological signs of apical regeneration.

  6. Ex vivo evaluation of three instrumentation techniques on E. faecalis biofilm within oval shaped root canals

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    Vitor Cesar NAKAMURA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of reciprocating instrumentation in disinfecting oval-shaped root canals infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Forty-five human lower premolars were infected with a culture of E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 for 28 days. Five other teeth that were neither contaminated nor instrumented were used as controls. The 45 specimens were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 based on the root canal preparation technique used: manual (K-type, Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland; rotary (MTwo, VDW GmbH, Munich, Germany; and reciprocating (Reciproc R50, VDW GmbH, Munich, Germany instruments. During chemomechanical preparation, 21 mL of 2.5% NaOCl was used as the irrigating solution. Microbiological sampling was performed before (S1 and immediately after (S2 the chemomechanical preparation using sterilized paper points. Specimens were then cleaved, and 0.02 g of dentine chips was collected from the root thirds to verify the presence of microorganisms in dentinal tubules. All three preparation techniques reduced the number of microorganisms in the root canal lumen and dentine chips from the root thirds, but no significant differences were observed between the three groups (p > 0.05. Reciprocating instrumentation with Reciproc R50 was effective in reducing the number of microorganisms within the root canal system. Although this technique involves the use of only one file to perform the root canal therapy, it is as effective as conventional rotary instrumentation in reducing theE. faecalis biofilm from the root canal system. However, further clinical investigations are warranted in order to ratify these results.

  7. Interfacial characteristics of Biodentine and MTA with dentine in simulated body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Ryul; Nosrat, Ali; Fouad, Ashraf F

    2015-02-01

    Newer tricalcium silicate cements (TSC) may offer biocompatibility with improved working properties. This study aimed to evaluate: (1) the occurrence of mineral deposition at the interface between dentine and two TSC (ProRoot(®) MTA and Biodentine(®)) in simulated body fluid, and (2) to investigate the nature of interfacial layer. Six root dentine segments of 1.5mm thickness were obtained from extracted human teeth and were instrumented with Gates-Glidden drills. The specimens were then randomly filled with either MTA or Biodentine. The specimens were placed in the simulated body fluid containing the same phosphate concentration as blood plasma. After 4 weeks, the specimens were examined with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Disperse X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to measure the thickness of the interfacial layer and Ca/P ratio. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Selective Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) were conducted to examine the interface ultramicroscopically and to determine the nature of the crystalline structure within interfacial layer. The thickness of interfacial layer was significantly higher in the MTA group (14.5 μm vs 4.8 μm) (pBiodentine in Ca/P ratio of interfacial layer (4.1 vs 2.7) (p>0.05). From TEM examination, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was observed in the interface along with the surface of dentine. As an alternative to MTA, Biodentine displayed bioactivity by producing an interfacial layer on the root canal dentine even though its thickness was significantly lower than MTA. ACP was observed in the interfacial layer of both biomaterials. Biodentine could be considered as an alternative to MTA due to comparable bioactivity which creates interfacial layer between root canal dentin and Biodentine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of desensitizing toothpastes on dentin

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    Shelon Cristina Souza Pinto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of toothbrushing with desensitizing toothpastes on dentin permeability and dentinal tubule occlusion. Fifty rats provided two hundred incisor teeth divided into five groups: DW, brushed with distilled water (control; FT, brushed with fluoride toothpaste; SCT, brushed with strontium chloride toothpaste; PCT, brushed with potassium citrate toothpaste; and PNT, brushed with potassium nitrate toothpaste. Cavities were prepared to expose the dentinal tubules, and the incisor teeth were brushed using the experimental agents. After each treatment, Evans blue dye solution was applied to the teeth. Dentin permeability was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-rays (EDX. There were significant differences (p < 0.0001, ANOVA among the groups regarding dentin permeability, number of dentinal tubules, diameter of dentinal tubules, and opened tubular area. In the SCT, PCT and PNT groups, opened and partially occluded tubules, deposits, and a few smear layers were observed. In the DW and FT groups, most of the dentinal tubules were open, with no deposits or smear layers on the dentin. EDX revealed peaks of calcium and phosphorus in all of the groups, as well as traces of strontium in the SCT group and of potassium in the PCT and PNT groups. Desensitizing toothpaste decreased dentin permeability, although it produced only partial dentin tubule occlusion.

  9. Adhesion to bovine dentin: Surface characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruse, N.D.; Smith, D.C. (Centre for Biomaterials, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1991-06-01

    x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (xPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the dentin surface, to determine the effects of different pre-conditioning procedures on the elemental composition of the dentin surface, and to investigate the interaction between dentin and a dentin bonding agent (ScotchBond) by studying the changes in the elemental composition of dentin as a result of the interaction. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize sample surface morphology, which was then correlated with surface elemental composition. The results showed that: (a) the elemental composition of the smear layer was similar to that of the underlying dentin; (b) cleaning with hydrogen-peroxide did not produce any modification in the elemental composition of the dentin surface; and (c) acid-etching led to an almost complete demineralization of the dentin, leaving behind an organic-rich surface. The results suggest that bonding systems that use acid-etching as a pre-conditioning procedure should be based on agents able to interact with the organic components of dentin, since bonding agents that rely on a chelation-to-calcium reaction are unlikely to be successful. The investigation of the interaction between the bonding agent and dentin led to a postulated adhesive-bonding reaction mechanism and suggested a partially cohesive failure in the bonding agent during fracturing of a dentin-bonding-agent-bonded assembly.

  10. First Branchial Cleft Fistula Associated with External Auditory Canal Stenosis and Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

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    shahin abdollahi fakhim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: First branchial cleft anomalies manifest with duplication of the external auditory canal.   Case Report: This report features a rare case of microtia and congenital middle ear and canal cholesteatoma with first branchial fistula. External auditory canal stenosis was complicated by middle ear and external canal cholesteatoma, but branchial fistula, opening in the zygomatic root and a sinus in the helical root, may explain this feature. A canal wall down mastoidectomy with canaloplasty and wide meatoplasty was performed. The branchial cleft was excised through parotidectomy and facial nerve dissection.   Conclusion:  It should be considered that canal stenosis in such cases can induce cholesteatoma formation in the auditory canal and middle ear.

  11. Substantivity of Ag-Ca-Si mesoporous nanoparticles on dentin and its ability to inhibit Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Wu, Yujie; Ma, Tengjiao; Li, Yanyun; Fan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the substantivity of Ag-Ca-Si mesoporous nanoparticles (Ag-MCSNs) on dentin and its residual antibacterial effects against Enterococcus faecalis. Ag-MCSNs were fabricated and characterized, ion release profile and pH were tested, and the ability to inhibit planktonic E. faecalis as well as the cytotoxicity was evaluated. Dentin slices were medicated with Ca(OH)2 paste, 2 % chlorhexidine gel and Ag-MCSNs paste for 7 days and then irrigated. Dentin slices were then immersed in E. faecalis suspension for 6 days and then transferred to fresh brain heart infusion solution. The optical density value within 10 h after immersing and transferring were measured and compared among groups. Results indicated that Ag-MCSNs showed high pH, sustained Ag(+)-Ca(2+)-SiO3 (2-) ion release, and high substantivity on dentin. The Ag-MCSNs exhibited strong antibacterial effects against planktonic E. faecalis and much better residual inhibition effects against E. faecalis growth on dentin than Ca(OH)2 paste (P faecalis and high substantivity on dentin, which might be developed to a new effective intra-canal medicament for human teeth.

  12. The Effect of Ascorbic Acid on the Substantivity of Tetraclean in Sodium Hypochlorite-Treated Bovine Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mohammadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro effect of ascorbic acid on the antibacterial substantivity of Tetraclean in bovine root dentin pretreated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl.Materials and Methods: Eighty dentin tubes prepared from bovine incisor teeth were infected with Enterococcus faecalis for 14 days. The specimens were divided into five groups as follows: Tetraclean; 5.25% NaOCl/Tetraclean; 5.25% NaOCl/ascorbic acid/Tetraclean; infected dentin tubes (positive control; and sterile dentin tubes (negative control. At experimental times of 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, dentin chips were removed from the canals by sequential sterile low-speed round burs with increasing diameters of 025, 027, 029, 031 and 033 ISO sizes, respectively. After culturing, the number of colony-forming units (CFU was counted.Results: In all experimental groups, the number of CFU was minimum in the first cultures and the results obtained were significantly different at any time period (p 0.05.Conclusion: Ascorbic acid prevents the decrease of residual antibacterial activity of Tetraclean in dentin samples pretreated with NaOCl.Keywords: Ascorbic Acid; Enterococcus Faecalis; Pretreatment; Sodium Hypochlorite; Substantivity; Tetraclean

  13. Ex Vivo Evaluation of the Root Form and Root Canal Morphology of the Mandibular First Molar Using CBCT Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Farhad-Mollashahi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aims to evaluate the root canal system and its curvature and the relationship between the root concavity and the dentin thickness of danger zone in the mandibular first molar using the cone beam CT method. Materials and Methods: A sum of 101 fresh extracted mandibular first molar were gathered and scanned by CBCT (planmeca romexis 3D machine. The root canal configuration was evaluated according to Vertucci’s classification. Then, the canal curvature was evaluated according to schneider's method in clinical and proximal views. Finally, the relationship between the root concavity and the dentin thickness of danger zone was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The most common canal configuration of the mesial roots was vertucci type IV (49.5%, followed by type II (46.5%. Root canal configuration of the distal root revealed type I in 50.5% and type II in 29.7%. The average angles in proximal dimension for MB, ML, DB and DL canals were 18.80, 18.77, 8.22 and 16.86, respectively. These values in clinical dimension were 22.50, 21.90, 13.83 and 12.04, respectively. No meaningful relationship was found between the dentin thickness and the root concavity of danger zone. Conclusion: The clinician's awareness of the anatomy of the root canal system and the canal curvatures and the internal and external anatomy of the root is helpful and necessary in diagnosis and treatment of the endodontic cases.

  14. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  15. Novel methodology to evaluate the effect of residual moisture on epoxy resin sealer/dentine interface: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibby, S G; Wong, Y; Kulild, J C; Williams, K B; Yao, X; Walker, M P

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the sealer/dentine interface associated with an epoxy resin sealer using the combination of Goldner's trichrome stain (GTS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to verify the use of the experimental methodology. Extracted human maxillary incisors (6) were subjected to root canal treatment. Subsequent to pulp removal, canal instrumentation and smear layer removal using EDTA and NaOCl, teeth were randomly and equally assigned to a 'wet' or 'dry' group. The 'dry' group was desiccated (95% ethanol/suction/paper points/air-drying), whilst the 'wet' group was treated with a saline rinse/suction/single paper point. Canals were then filled with an epoxy-based resin sealer and warm vertical gutta-percha compaction. After 7-day storage at 37°C, roots from each group were sectioned into apical, middle and coronal horizontal subsections that were cut and split into paired halves and evaluated with GTS or SEM. With GTS sections, hybrid layer and sealer tubular penetration were measured (n=15 measurements/intracanal location/condition) and evaluated using a two-factor repeated measures analysis of variance. The SEM qualitative analysis of paired sections was included as a complementary confirmation of GTS analyses. In dry and wet groups, there was no conspicuous sealer/dentine interface hybrid layer, irrespective of canal location. However, dry specimens exhibited more uniform sealer distribution with deeper tubular penetration in the coronal and middle third (Presin sealer/dentine interface. The pilot data indicated that thorough drying of the root canal system may result in improved epoxy resin sealer distribution and deeper resin sealer tubular penetration, especially in the coronal and middle thirds of root canals. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  16. Bonding over Dentin Replacement Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraji, Naghmeh; Camilleri, Josette

    2017-08-01

    Dentin replacement materials are necessary in large cavities to protect the pulp and reduce the bulk of filling material. These materials are layered with a composite resin restorative material. Microleakage caused by poor bonding of composite resin to underlying dentin replacement material will result in pulp damage. The aim of this study was to characterize the interface between dentin replacement materials and composite resin and to measure the shear bond strength after dynamic aging. Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur-des-Fosses, France), Theracal LC (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL), and Fuji IX (GC, Tokyo, Japan) were used as dentin replacement materials. They were then overlaid with a total-etch and bonding agent or a self-etch primer and composite resin or a glass ionomer cement. All combinations were thermocycled for 3000 cycles. The interface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and elemental mapping. Furthermore, the shear bond strength was assessed. The Biodentine surface was modified by etching. The Theracal LC and Fuji IX microstructure was unchanged upon the application of acid etch. The Biodentine and glass ionomer interface showed an evident wide open space, and glass particles from the glass ionomer adhered to the Biodentine surface. Elemental migration was shown with aluminum, barium, fluorine, and ytterbium present in Biodentine from the overlying composite resin. Calcium was more stable. The bond strength between Theracal LC and composite using a total-etch technique followed by self-etch primer achieved the best bond strength values. Biodentine exhibited the weakest bond with complete failure of bonding shown after demolding and thermocycling. Dynamic aging is necessary to have clinically valid data. Bonding composite resin to water-based dentin replacement materials is still challenging, and further alternatives for restoration of teeth using such materials need to be developed. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists

  17. Slope restoration for a 100-year old canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, R.L.; Lewis, S.W. [Condor Earth Technologies, Inc., Sonora, CA (United States); Liebersbach, D.C. [Turlock Irrigation District, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Turlock Irrigation District (TID) is located in the northern portion of the fertile San Joaquin Valley of California. TID`s primary water supply is conveyed from the 100-year-old LaGrange Diversion Dam via their historic Upper Main Canal. The original canal was constructed by excavating into slate bedrock for the uphill (cut) bank, and constructing unmortared rock walls and rock fill for the downhill (fill) embankment; the excavation was then lined with concrete. Soil fill raises of the downhill embankment over the last 30 years have reduced the slope stability to unacceptable levels in the steepest embankment areas. In March of 1994, two surficial slides prompted investigation of the long term embankment stability in the Warehouse Slide Area. Based on results of analysis for various stabilization scenarios, TID chose a stabilization method which included: (1) excavation of an access bench below the existing canal, (2) installation of steel pipe piles through the existing rock fill and into the bedrock, (3) construction of a mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) retaining wall and (4) construction of a soil-cement canal roadway pavement. The design was chosen by the owner because of cost competitiveness compared to other design alternatives and because the construction sequence allowed uninterrupted use of the canal. By using local river cobble for the MSE wall facing material, TID met the desired 50-year design life of the repair while maintaining the area`s historic visual features.

  18. Stress analysis of human tooth root using various root canal instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, J T; Eleazer, P D; Hnat, W P

    2000-09-01

    This study compared external root stresses from instrumentation by several motor-driven nickel-titanium instruments to stresses developed by hand files. Twelve curved first molar mesial roots were invested in PLM-9 photoelastic material to disclose net stress transmitted from the canal through the dentin. Minimal fringe patterns were observed during instrumentation with all techniques. Light-speed yielded the least change. In no case was a complete 60 psi fringe change noted.

  19. Evaluation of the interaction between sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine gluconate and its effect on root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Tung B; Baumgartner, J Craig; Mitchell, John C

    2008-02-01

    The combination of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX) forms a precipitate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of irrigating root canals with a combination of NaOCl and CHX on root dentin and dentinal tubules by using the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and a computer program (Photoshop CS2). Forty-four extracted single-rooted human teeth were instrumented and irrigated with both NaOCl and CHX to produce a precipitate. Root canal surfaces were analyzed with the ESEM. The amount of remaining debris and number of patent tubules were determined. There were no significant differences in remaining debris between the negative control group and the experimental groups. There were significantly fewer patent tubules in the experimental groups when compared with the negative control group. The NaOCl/CHX precipitate tends to occlude the dentinal tubules. Until this precipitate is studied further, caution should be exercised when irrigating with NaOCl and CHX.

  20. Root Canal Filling after Revascularization/Revitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia, Hugo; Cruz, Álvaro; Díaz, Mariana; Jiménez, Ana Laura; Solís, Rodrigo; Bernal, Cesar

    Revascularization/revitalization therapy is considered an alternative procedure for management of teeth with an immature apex and necrotic pulp, mainly when root development is interrupted in the early phases of formation. However, this clinical treatment protocol should be considered a permanent procedure? A maxillary central incisor with a previous and successful RR treatment was intentionally filled with a biocompatible material with the periapical tissues due to the patient's lack of adherence to the follow-up protocol. The 20-month follow-up showed absence of clinical, radiological and tomographic signs and symptoms of an endodontic re-infection. This case demonstrates that once the increased thickening of the canal walls, incrementing the root length, apical closure and the total resolution of the apical lesion are observed, the main canal of a previously treated tooth with an RR procedure can be filled.

  1. In vitro study of the penetration of Streptococcus sanguis and Prevotella intermedia strains into human dentinal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkiten, M; Okar, I; Berkiten, R

    2000-04-01

    The persistent presence of bacteria in the root canal system often leads to the failure of treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine in vitro penetration of Streptococcus sanguis and Prevotella intermedia into dentinal tubules. Samples obtained from human teeth were inoculated with a strain of S. sanguis (NCTC 7853) and P. intermedia (NCTC 93336) for 20 days. Bacterial penetration into tubules was investigated at scanning electron microscopy and light microscopic level. The results showed that S. sanguis could penetrate into dentinal tubules 382.3 microns, whereas P. intermedia could penetrate 25.9 microns. It was observed that P. intermedia had not penetrated into all dentinal tubules. If penetration occurred the depth was quite limited.

  2. [The dentinal smear layer. Characteristics and interactions. 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, P L; Eramo, S; Lotito, M; De Pino, C

    1991-03-15

    The Authors, after the presentation (in the first part of the Dossier) of a large literature review about the physical, chemical and clinical characteristics of formation, interaction, remotion of "smear layer" during cavity preparation in hard tooth tissue, describe the results of a scanning microelectronic research about the action as cleanser (for the dentinal cavity wall) of the CK101 (Caridex) versus wather, Tubulicid and phosphoric acid. The experimental results obtained "in vitro" show that the substance has relative action, without removing the tubular portion of "smear layer".

  3. Comparison of Hero 642 and K3 rotary nickel-titanium files in curved canals of molars and a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hua-Xiong; Cheng, Hui-Ling; Song, Jie-Wen; Chen, Su-Ya

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the root canal preparation ability of rotary nickel-titanium (NiTi) Hero 642 and K3 files in curved mandibular or maxillary molars. A total of 40 extracted mandibular molars with two separate mesial canals, an apical width of approximately size ≤15 and a root canal curvature of 15-30° were randomly divided into two groups and instrumented using Hero 642 (n=20) or K3 files (n=20). Canal straightening, working length, transportation, cross-sectional area, minimum dentin thickness and the canal angle curvature degree were examined, and a systematic review of the literature was conducted. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups with regard to the mean degree of straightening, mean change in working length, mean transportation, amount of dentin removed or remaining minimum dentin thickness (P>0.05). The canal angle curvature decreased in the two groups postoperatively. The systematic review identified six studies, and overall the two files performed similarly in the majority of categories examined. Therefore, the rotary NiTi Hero 642 and K3 files demonstrated comparable shaping abilities and maintenance of working length.

  4. Influence of flexion angle of files on the decentralization of oval canals during instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonieta Veloso Carvalho de OLIVEIRA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the flexion angle of files on the decentralization of root canals during instrumentation. Fifteen lower incisors were instrumented with Protaper Universal files and radiographed in two directions (mesiodistal and buccolingual before and after instrumentation with a #15 K-file in position for evaluating the flexion angle of files. The specimens were also scanned before and after instrumentation using micro-computed tomography to obtain the canal area and the distance from the center position of the file to the canal walls. Sections located 1.0 mm (end of the canal, 3.0 mm (apical third, 9.0 mm (middle third, and 15.0 mm (cervical third from the apex were verified. After instrumentation, the flexion angles of files decreased by an average of 0.76º in the buccolingual direction and 1.92º in the mesiodistal direction (p < 0.001; the canal area increased by an average of 0.58, 0.37, 0.23 and 0.13 mm2 from the cervical to the end of the root canal (p < 0.001. Non-instrumented areas were observed on the buccal and lingual walls, and effective action of files was determined on the mesial and distal walls. The sections from the end of the canal showed canal deviation toward the lingual wall, whereas the other sections showed deviation toward the buccal wall. The flexion angles of files influence the final shape of the root canal, resulting in file decentralization along the pathway of the canal.

  5. Management of foreign object in the root canal of central incisor tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothanna Alrahabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several reports describing the impaction of foreign objects into the exposed pulp chambers and canals by patients, especially children as they often have the habit of inserting foreign objects in the oral cavity. These objects will become a potent source of infection.This case report describes the retrieval of a foreign object impacted into the root canal of a 12-year-old male patient who was referred to the endodontic specialty clinic at Taibah University College of Dentistry. The patient′s chief complaint was a pain in the upper left central tooth. Clinical examination revealed a complicated enamel-dentin fracture with a large caries cavity. A periapical radiographic image showed a radiopaque object in the root canal system. Stainless steel Hedstrom files were used to retrieve the object from the canal. Following a proper cleaning and shaping of the root canal system, an intra-canal calcium hydroxide dressing was placed for 1 week. The root canal system was then filled with sealer and gutta-percha using the lateral compaction technique and the tooth received an aesthetic restoration.

  6. Effect of dentinal tubule orientation on the modulus of elasticity of resin-infiltrated demineralized dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongprueksa, Pong; Senawongse, Pisol; Vongphan, Nataya

    2014-01-01

    The effect of tubule orientation of dentin on the elastic modulus of resin-infiltrated dentin was evaluated. Rectangular cylindricalshaped dentin specimens with their long axis parallel to and perpendicular to dentinal tubules were prepared from extracted premolars. Twenty-five mineralized specimens of each orientation were evaluated. The remaining specimens were then demineralized. The demineralized specimens and the demineralized following by infiltration with one of these adhesives; Optibond Solo Plus, Single Bond 2 or Prime & Bond NT, from each orientation were evaluated (25 specimens per group). The tubular orientation only affected the elastic modulus of mineralized dentin. The highest elastic modulus was observed for the mineralized dentin when the tensile force was applied parallel to the direction of tubules. The elastic modulus of demineralized dentin was the lowest. The adhesive resins increased the elastic modulus of demineralized dentin, but the differences among the three were insignificant.

  7. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,Jefferson Ricardo; Ricardo Abreu da ROSA; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis; AFONSO,Daniele; Kuga, Milton Carlos [UNESP; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; Valle,Accácio Lins do; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resinmodified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to t...

  8. The effect of four different irrigation systems in the removal of a root canal sealer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grischke, J; Müller-Heine, A; Hülsmann, M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of sonic, ultrasonic, and hydrodynamic devices in the removal of a root canal sealer from the surface and from simulated irregularities of root canals. Fifty-three root canals with two standardized grooves in the apical and coronal parts of longitudinally split roots were covered with AH Plus root canal sealer. Compared were the effects of (control) syringe irrigation, (1) CanalBrush, (2) passive ultrasonic irrigation, (3) EndoActivator, and (4) RinsEndo on the removal of the sealer. The specimens were divided into four groups (N = 12) and one control group (N = 5) via randomization. The amount of remaining sealer in the root canal irregularities was evaluated under a microscope using a 4-grade scoring system, whereas the remaining sealer on the root canal surface was evaluated with a 7-grade scoring system. Passive ultrasonic irrigation is more effective than the other tested irrigation systems or syringe irrigation in removing sealer from root canal walls (p irrigation shows a superior effect on sealer removal from the root canal surface during endodontic retreatment. Cleaning of lateral grooves seems not to be possible with one of the techniques investigated. Incomplete removal of root canal sealer during re-treatment may cause treatment failure. Passive Ultrasonic irrigation seems to be the most effective system to remove sealer from a root canal.

  9. Reciprocating vs Rotary Instrumentation in Pediatric Endodontics: Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Analysis of Deciduous Root Canals using Two Single-file Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Attiguppe R; Yavagal, Chandrashekar; Dixit, Kratika; Naik, Saraswathi V

    2016-01-01

    Primary root canals are considered to be most challenging due to their complex anatomy. "Wave one" and "one shape" are single-file systems with reciprocating and rotary motion respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare dentin thickness, centering ability, canal transportation, and instrumentation time of wave one and one shape files in primary root canals using a cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) analysis. This is an experimental, in vitro study comparing the two groups. A total of 24 extracted human primary teeth with minimum 7 mm root length were included in the study. Cone beam computed tomographic images were taken before and after the instrumentation for each group. Dentin thickness, centering ability, canal transportation, and instrumentation times were evaluated for each group. A significant difference was found in instrumentation time and canal transportation measures between the two groups. Wave one showed less canal transportation as compared with one shape, and the mean instrumentation time of wave one was significantly less than one shape. Reciprocating single-file systems was found to be faster with much less procedural errors and can hence be recommended for shaping the root canals of primary teeth. How to cite this article: Prabhakar AR, Yavagal C, Dixit K, Naik SV. Reciprocating vs Rotary Instrumentation in Pediatric Endodontics: Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Analysis of Deciduous Root Canals using Two Single-File Systems. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):45-49.

  10. Effects of increased apical enlargement on the amount of unprepared areas and coronal dentine removal: a micro-computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, A R; Alves, F R F; Marceliano-Alves, M F; Provenzano, J C; Gonçalves, L S; Neves, A A; Siqueira, J F

    2017-11-07

    To evaluate the effects of progressive apical enlargement on the amount of unprepared root canal surface area and remaining dentine thickness. The root canals of 30 extracted mandibular incisors with Vertucci's type I configuration were instrumented with rotary HyFlex CM instruments (Coltene-Whaledent, Altstätten, Switzerland) up to 4 instruments larger than the first one that bound at the working length (WL). Teeth were scanned in a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) device before canal preparation and after instrumentation with the 2nd, 3rd and 4th larger instruments. The amount of unprepared surface area in the full canal or in the apical 4 mm as well as the remaining dentine thickness at 10 mm from the WL were calculated and compared. The general linear model for repeated measures adjusted by Bonferroni's post hoc test was used for statistic analysis. There was a significant reduction in the amount of unprepared areas after each increase in preparation size (P < 0.01). This was observed for both the full canal length and the 4-mm apical segment. The amount of remaining dentine was also significantly reduced after each file size (P < 0.01). However, dentine thickness always remained greater than 1 mm, even after using the largest instrument. Apical preparations up to 4 instruments larger than the first one to bind at the WL caused a significant progressive reduction in the unprepared canal area. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of dentine conditioners on the bonding efficacy of one-bottle adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J-T; Itoh, K; Kusunoki, M; Hasegawa, T; Wakumoto, S; Hisamitsu, H

    2005-01-01

    The bonding efficacy of four one-bottle adhesives (OptiBond Solo Plus, Gluma Comfort Bond, One Step and Prime & Bond NT) and a multi-step adhesive (Clearfil Photo Bond) as a control was evaluated. The dentine cavity wall was conditioned with phosphoric acid or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and the marginal integrity was estimated by measuring the wall-to-wall contraction gap width between the composite and the dentine cavity surface. In the positive control group, the adhesive was applied following glyceryl methacrylate (GM) priming. The analyses were performed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. One-bottle adhesives were clearly inferior to the multi-step bonding system in marginal integrity when dentine was conditioned with EDTA. The present findings also suggested that the marginal sealing ability of ethanol-based one-bottle systems was better than acetone-based one-bottle systems when dentine surfaces were conditioned with EDTA. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed on the function of fillers in one-bottle adhesives for the prevention of contraction gaps.

  12. Evaluation of the dentin changes in teeth subjected to endodontic treatment and photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Floriano Lopes Santos LACERDA

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT is an efficient adjuvant technique to promote disinfection of the root canal system. Therefore, it is important to investigate changes to dentin morphology and permeability induced by the use of diode laser on the root dentin. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate morphological changes and the percentage of apical leakage after the use of laser. Material and method Forty single-rooted teeth were instrumented using rotary system and irrigated. Teeth were randomly divided in two groups: G1 - not exposed to PDT (control, and G2 - pretreated with toluidine blue photosensitizer and irradiated with AsGaAl laser diode. Ten teeth in each group were evaluated by SEM for morphological changes. The other ten teeth were filled and stained with Rhodamine B to evaluate the apical leakage. Result The results showed significant difference between G1 and G2 (p 0.001. The apical leakage was significantly higher in G2 than in G1 (p <0.001 - Student's t-test. Conclusion It was concluded that the use of low-level laser reduced the smear layer and opened the dentinal tubules. Use of laser increased the permeability of the apical dentin.

  13. Physicochemical Properties and Dentin Bond Strength of a Tricalcium Silicate-Based Retrograde Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Camila de Paula Telles Pires; Viapiana, Raqueli; Bosso-Martelo, Roberta; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Camilleri, Josette; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties and the apical dentin bond strength of the tricalcium silicate-based Biodentine in comparison to white MTA and zinc oxide eugenol-based cement (ZOE). Setting time and radiopacity were evaluated according to ISO 6876:2012 specification. Final setting time, compressive strength and pH were also assessed. Material's bond strength to the apical root canal dentin was measured by the push-out assay. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey-Krammer post-hoc test. Biodentine presented the shortest initial (16.2±1.48 min) and final setting time (35.4±5.55 min). Radiopacity of Biodentine (2.79±0.27 mmAl) does not agree with ISO 6876:2012 specifications. On the other hand, Biodentine showed higher compressive strength after 21 days (37.22±5.27 MPa) and higher dentin bond strength (11.2±2.16 MPa) in comparison to white MTA (27.68±3.56 MPa for compressive strength and 2.98±0.64 MPa for bond strength) (pBiodentine produced an alkaline environment (approximately pH 10) (p>0.05) compared to ZOE (pH 7). It may be concluded that Biodentine exhibited faster setting, higher long-term compressive strength and bond strength to the apical dentin than MTA and ZOE.

  14. Impact of chemical agents for surface treatments on microhardness and flexural strength of root dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Marcheto MARCELINO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the cross-sectional Knoop microhardness and flexural strength of root dentin exposed to different surface treatments with chemical agents after biomechanical preparation. Root canals from human canines were biomechanically treated and divided into eight groups (n=10 to receive one of the following dentin treatments: I. Deionized water (control; II. 5.25% Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl; III. NaOCl + 10% Sodium ascorbate (SA; IV. SA; V. 2% Chlorhexidine gel (CHX; VI. 37% Phosphoric acid gel (PA + CHX; VII. PA; and VIII. PA + NaOCl. The roots were sectioned to obtain specimens that were evaluated for cross-sectional Knoop microhardness and flexural strength using a three-point bending test. ANOVA and Tukey’s test were performed. The microhardness in the control group was significantly higher (p 0.05 to each other. Regarding flexural strength, PA+NaOCl provided statistical higher values than PA+CHX and CHX. However, there was no significant difference between the control group and those groups subjected to surface treatment (p > 0.05. Dentin microhardness was reduced after exposure to NaOCl, CHX, PA, SA and their associations and the flexural strength of radicular dentin was not affected by the chemical agents.

  15. Geometric analysis of root canals prepared by four rotary NiTi shaping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Ahmed Abdel Rahman; Ghoneim, Angie Galal; Lutfy, Reem Ahmed; Foda, Manar Yehia; Omar, Gihan Abdel Fatah

    2012-07-01

    A great number of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems with noncutting tips, different cross-sections, superior resistance to torsional fracture, varying tapers, and manufacturing method have been introduced to the market. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of 4 rotary NiTi preparation systems, Revo-S (RS; Micro-Mega, Besancon Cedex, France), Twisted file (TF; SybronEndo, Amersfoort, The Netherlands), ProFile GT Series X (GTX; Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), and ProTaper (PT; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), on volumetric changes and transportation of curved root canals. Forty mesiobuccal canals of mandibular molars with an angle of curvature ranging from 25° to 40° were divided according to the instrument used in canal preparation into 4 groups of 10 samples each: group RS, group TF, group GTX, and group PT. Canals were scanned using an i-CAT CBCT scanner (Imaging Science International, Hatfield, PA) before and after preparation to evaluate the volumetric changes. Root canal transportation and centering ratio were evaluated at 1.3, 2.6, 5.2, and 7.8 mm from the apex. The significance level was set at P ≤ .05. The PT system removed a significantly higher amount of dentin than the other systems (P = .025). At the 1.3-mm level, there was no significant difference in canal transportation and centering ratio among the groups. However, at the other levels, TF maintained the original canal curvature recording significantly the least degree of canal transportation as well as the highest mean centering ratio. The TF system showed superior shaping ability in curved canals. Revo-S and GTX were better than ProTaper regarding both canal transportation and centering ability. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Measurements of mechanical properties and morphology of root canal in maxillary primary anterior teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hu; He, Liu; Qing, Cai; Xuliang, Deng

    2017-08-01

    Objective This study aimed to measure the taper and diameter of root canal, as well as the elastic modulus and hardness in the root dentin of maxillary primary anterior teeth. Methods Patients under general anesthesia who needed root canal therapy in the maxillary primary anterior teeth were selected. Silicone impression material was used to take impressions. The impressions were scanned, and the taper and diameter of root canal were measured. Maxillary primary anterior teeth were collected in vitro. The elastic modulus and hardness of root dentin was tested. Results A total of 74 silicone impressions were obtained. The mean tapers of primary incisor teeth, primary lateral incisor teeth, and primary canine teeth were 0.106, 0.185, and 0.098, respectively. The mean diameters of the root canal 5 mm below the cementum-enamel junction (CEJ) were 1.267, 0.860, and 1.429 mm, respectively. The elastic modulus and hardness of root dentin were measured in 10 primary anterior teeth in vitro. The range of elastic modulus was 19.919-25.017 GPa. The range of hardness was 0.867-1.082 GPa. Conclusion The root canal post used in primary anterior teeth can be produced by the following data: taper of primary incisor teeth and primary canine teeth, 0.1; diameters of their tips, 1.2 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively; taper of primary lateral incisor teeth, 0.2; diameter of their tips, 0.8 mm; range of elastic modulus, 20-25 GPa; and range of hardness, 0.87-1.08 GPa.

  17. Hereditary dentine disorders: dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentine dysplasia

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    MacKie Iain

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary dentine disorders, dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI and dentine dysplasia (DD, comprise a group of autosomal dominant genetic conditions characterised by abnormal dentine structure affecting either the primary or both the primary and secondary dentitions. DGI is reported to have an incidence of 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 8,000, whereas that of DD type 1 is 1 in 100,000. Clinically, the teeth are discoloured and show structural defects such as bulbous crowns and small pulp chambers radiographically. The underlying defect of mineralisation often results in shearing of the overlying enamel leaving exposed weakened dentine which is prone to wear. Currently, three sub-types of DGI and two sub-types of DD are recognised but this categorisation may change when other causative mutations are found. DGI type I is inherited with osteogenesis imperfecta and recent genetic studies have shown that mutations in the genes encoding collagen type 1, COL1A1 and COL1A2, underlie this condition. All other forms of DGI and DD, except DD-1, appear to result from mutations in the gene encoding dentine sialophosphoprotein (DSPP, suggesting that these conditions are allelic. Diagnosis is based on family history, pedigree construction and detailed clinical examination, while genetic diagnosis may become useful in the future once sufficient disease-causing mutations have been discovered. Differential diagnoses include hypocalcified forms of amelogenesis imperfecta, congenital erythropoietic porphyria, conditions leading to early tooth loss (Kostmann's disease, cyclic neutropenia, Chediak-Hegashi syndrome, histiocytosis X, Papillon-Lefevre syndrome, permanent teeth discolouration due to tetracyclines, Vitamin D-dependent and vitamin D-resistant rickets. Treatment involves removal of sources of infection or pain, improvement of aesthetics and protection of the posterior teeth from wear. Beginning in infancy, treatment usually continues into adulthood with a

  18. In vitro study of the effect of Er: YAG laser irradiation on the apical sealing of different root canal sealers Estudo "in vitro" do efeito da irradiação do laser Er: YAG no selamento apical de diferentes tipos de cimentos obturadores

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    Fernanda Vieira Medina

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation used to clean dentinal walls on the apical sealing of root canals filled with different types of sealers. Background Data: Laser application to the dentinal walls removed debris, rendering the root canals free of smear layers and leaving the dentinal canaliculi open. METHODS: Sixty-four maxillary canines obtained from laboratory files were instrumented with K-files (Dentsply, Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland using the crown-down technique, and irrigated with a 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution. The specimens were divided into two groups of 32 teeth each. In group I, the teeth were instrumented and irrigated with sodium hypochlorite solution, and divided into four subgroups to be sealed with the different materials (Endofill, N-Rickert, Sealapex and Sealer 26. In group II, the root canals were subjected to Er:YAG laser irradiation (200 mJ, 7 Hz and 60 J total energy, followed by root canal sealing as in group I. RESULTS: The data showed lower levels of apical microleakage in the teeth filled with N-Rickert, Sealapex and Sealer 26 cements than in those sealed with Endofill (p 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The Er:YAG laser irradiation applied to the root canal walls was not able to prevent apical microleakage.OBJETIVOS: Avaliou-se a infiltração marginal apical em caninos superiores, obturados com quatro tipos diferentes de cimento, os quais foram imersos em tinta nanquim e mantidos a uma temperatura de 37º C por 96 horas, descalcificados em solução de ácido clorídrico a 5%, desidratados em série crescente de álcoois e diafanizados em salicilato de metila. MÉTODOS: Para isto, 64 dentes de estoque foram instrumentados pela técnica "crown-down", irrigados com solução de hipoclorito de sódio a 0,5% e divididos em dois grupos experimentais. Os dentes do Grupo I foram subdivididos em quatro sub-grupos de oito elementos e obturados cada um deles com os cimentos

  19. Multi-factoriality of dentine hypersensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Stojšin Ivana; Petrović Ljubomir; Stojanac Igor; Drobac Milan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity has been defined as a sharp, short pain arising from exposed dentin in response to stimuli typically thermal, evaporative tactile, osmoticor, chemical and which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or pathology. Prevalence. The most affected patients range in age from 20 to 40. The following teeth tend to be most sensitive: cuspids, premolars and incisors, location-concentrated on the facial surface. Morphological bases of dentine hypers...

  20. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovec, J.; Filipič, C.; Levstik, A.

    2005-07-01

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters ɛ and σv, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  1. Dielectric response of the human tooth dentine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovec, J. [Dental Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Hrvatski trg 6, 1104 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Filipic, C. [Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Levstik, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia)]. E-mail: adrijan.levstik@ijs.si

    2005-07-15

    Dielectric properties of tooth dentine can be well described by the model which was developed for the dielectric response to hydrating porous cement paste. It is shown that the normalized dielectric constant and the normalized specific conductivity are proportional to the model parameters -bar {sub v0} and {sigma}{sub v}, indicating the deposition of AgCl in the dentine tubules during the duration of the precipitation. The fractal dimension of the tooth dentine was determined by dielectric spectroscopy.

  2. Bilateral bifid mandibular canal

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    Mahnaz Sheikhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the normal interesting variations that we may encounter in the mandible is bifid mandibular canal. This condition can lead to difficulties when performing mandibular anesthesia or during extraction of lower third molar, placement of implants, and surgery in the mandible. Therefore diagnosis of this variation is sometimes very important and necessary.

  3. COHESIVE STRENGTH OF DENTIN RESISTÊNCIA COESIVA DA DENTINA

    OpenAIRE

    DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando; TURBINO Miriam Lacalle; MATSON Edmir

    1997-01-01

    The bond strength of dentin adhesives to dentin has increased after each generation. Although dentin substratum is part of the bonding process, little importance has been given to measure dentin cohesive strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cohesive strength of dentin in human canines. Seventeen non carious canines were selected. All of them had been extracted for more than one year. The teeth were ground until dentin square samples with approximately 2 X 2 mm were obtained. Th...

  4. Biomechanical Effects of Bonding Pericervical Dentin in Maxillary Premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nghia; Li, Fang-Chi; Friedman, Shimon; Kishen, Anil

    2018-02-16

    Pericervical dentin (PCD) loss may increase root fracture propensity in root-filled teeth. This study evaluated the impacts of bonding PCD with composite resin (CR) on radicular microstrain distribution and load at failure of root-filled maxillary premolars. Ten single-canal maxillary premolars decoronated 2 mm coronal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) had canals enlarged with ProTaper Universal instruments (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) to F3. They were root filled with gutta-percha (GP) to the CEJ and restored with Cavit (3M Deutschland GmbH, Neuss, Germany) (GP group, n = 5) or 6 mm apical to the CEJ and restored with bonded CR to simulate bonding of PCD (bonded PCD group, n = 5). Digital moiré interferometry was used to evaluate pre- and postoperative whole-field microstrain distribution in the root dentin under physiologically relevant loads (10-50 N). Another 30 premolars, similarly treated as groups 1 and 2 or left untreated as controls (n = 10/group), were subjected to cyclic loads (1.2 million cycles, 45 N, 4 Hz) followed by uniaxial compressive load to failure. Mechanical data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Tukey test at a 5% level of significance. Microstrain distribution showed bending and compressive patterns at the coronal and apical root dentin, respectively. In the GP group, microstrain distribution was unaltered. In the bonded-PCD group, different microstrain distribution suggested stiffening at the PCD. The load at failure did not differ significantly for the GP, bonded PCD, and control groups (P > .05). CR bonding of PCD might impact the biomechanical responses in maxillary premolar roots at low-level continuous loads. The effect of this impact on root fracture loads when subjected to cyclic load warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incidence of Dentinal Defects and Vertical Root Fractures after Endodontic Retreatment and Mechanical Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo Bello, Mariana; Pillar, Rafael; Mastella Lang, Pauline; Michelon, Carina; Abreu da Rosa, Ricardo; Souza Bier, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of dentinal defects and vertical root fractures (VRFs) after endodontic retreatment and mechanical cycling (MC). Two hundred mandibular premolars were selected. Forty teeth were left unprepared (control group). The remaining 160 root canals were prepared with ProTaper instruments and filled by using two different techniques [eighty with lateral compaction (LC) and eighty with single-cone (SC)]. Forty canals from each group (LC and SC) received no further treatment. The remaining eighty teeth were divided into two groups (LCR and SCR) ( n =40) in order to undergo the removal of the root filling, re-preparation and refilling with lateral compaction and single-cone, respectively. All of the teeth were subjected to MC (1000000 cycles, 130 N, 2.2 Hz and 37 ° C). The roots were sectioned at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the apex and observed under 20× magnification. The defects were classified as: no defect, VRF and other defects . Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's Exact test and the Chi -Squared tests ( α =0.05). MC alone did not promote any other defects or VRFs. Experimental groups presented higher dentinal defects than the control group ( P =0.021). Retreatment groups did not present a higher amount of dentinal defects than the groups that were subjected to the first treatment ( P >0.05). Endodontic treatment and retreatment, regardless of the filling technique and MC, did not influence the occurrence of dentinal defects or VRFs in the human premolars.

  6. Temperature changes accompanying near infrared diode laser endodontic treatment of wet canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmud, Raghad; Kahler, William A; Walsh, Laurence J

    2010-05-01

    Diode laser endodontic treatments such as disinfection or the generation of cavitations should not cause deleterious thermal changes in radicular dentin. This study assessed thermal changes in the root canal and on the root surface when using 940 and 980 nm lasers at settings of 4 W/10 Hz and 2.5 W/25 Hz, respectively, delivered into 2000-mum fibers to generate cavitations in water. The root surface temperature in the apical third was recorded, as was the water temperature in coronal, middle, and apical third regions, by using thermocouples placed inside the canal. Lasing was undertaken with either rest periods or rinsing between 5-second laser exposures. Both diode lasers induced only modest temperature changes on the external root surface at the settings used. Even though the temperature of the water within the canal increased during lasing by as much as 30 degrees C, the external root surface temperature increased by only a maximum of 4 degrees C. Irrigation between laser exposures was highly effective in minimizing thermal changes within the root canal and on the root surface. Diode laser parameters that induce cavitation do not result in adverse thermal changes in radicular dentin. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of different retreatment techniques and root canal sealers: a scanning electron microscopic study

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    Neslihan Simsek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two retreatment techniques, in terms of the operating time and scanning electron microscopy (SEM results, in removing three different root canal sealers from root canals that were previously filled with gutta-percha. Sixty extracted single-rooted human premolars were divided into three groups and filled with iRoot SP, MM Seal, and AH Plus sealers, along with gutta-percha, through a lateral compaction technique. Root canal fillings of the samples were removed by ESI ultrasonic tips or R-Endo files. The time to reach the working length was recorded. Longitudinally sectioned samples were examined under SEM magnification. Each picture was evaluated in terms of the residual debris. Data were statistically analyzed with the Kruskall-Wallis test. No statistically significant differences were found in terms of operating time (p>0.05. Significant differences in the number of debris-free dentinal tubules were found among the root canal thirds, but this finding was not influenced by the experimental group (p < 0.05. Resin sealer tags were observed inside the dentinal tubules in the MM Seal group. Under the conditions of this study, it may be established that there was no difference among the sealers and retreatment techniques.

  8. Evaluation of Dentin Defect Formation during Retreatment with Hand and Rotary Instruments: A Micro-CT Study

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    Ayca Yilmaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence and longitudinal propagation of dentin defects after gutta-percha removal with hand and rotary instruments using microcomputed tomography. Twenty mandibular incisors were prepared using the balanced-force technique and scanned in a 19.9 μm resolution. Following filling with the lateral compaction technique, gutta-percha was removed with ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTUR or hand instruments. After rescanning, a total of 24,120 cross-sectional images were analyzed. The numbers, types, and longitudinal length changes of defects were recorded. Defects were observed in 36.90% of the cross sections. A total of 73 defects were comprised of 87.67% craze lines, 2.73% partial cracks, and 9.58% fractures. No significant difference in terms of new defect formation was detected between the retreatment groups. The apical and middle portions of the roots had more dentin defects than the coronal portions. Defects in three roots of the PTUR instrument group increased in length. Under the conditions of this in vitro study, gutta-percha removal seemed to not increase the incidence of dentin defect formation, but the longitudinal defect propagation finding suggests possible cumulative dentinal damage due to additional endodontic procedures. Hand and rotary instrumentation techniques caused similar dentin defect formation during root canal retreatment.

  9. Penetration Depth of Sodium Hypochlorite in Dentinal Tubules after Conventional Irrigation, Passive Ultrasonic Agitation and Nd:YAG Laser Activated Irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Sohrabi, Khosro; Chiniforush, Nasim; Ghafari, Sarvenaz; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Noroozi, Niusha

    2016-01-01

    The penetration depth of irrigating solutions in dentinal tubules is limited; consequently, bacteria can remain inside dentinal tubules after the cleaning and shaping of the root canal system. Therefore, new irrigation systems are required to increase the penetration depth of irrigating solutions in dentinal tubules. A comparative study regarding the penetration depth of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution in dentinal tubules using four methods, (1) conventional irrigation (CI), (2) smear layer removal plus conventional irrigation (gold standard), (3) passive ultrasonic agitation (PUA) and (4) Nd:YAG laser activated irrigation (LAI), took place on 144 extracted mandibular teeth with a single root canal. After decoronation with a diamond disc and working length determination, the apical foramen was sealed with wax. The canals were prepared up to #35 Mtwo rotary file and 5.25% NaOCl was used for irrigation during preparation. To study the penetration depth of NaOCl, smear layer was eliminated in all samples. Dentinal tubules were stained with crystal violet and after longitudinal sectioning of teeth, the two halves were reassembled and root canal preparation was performed up to #40 Mtwo rotary file. Then the samples were distributed into four experimental groups. Depth of the bleached zone was evaluated by stereomicroscope (20X). Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. The highest and lowest average for NaOCl penetration depth in all three coronal, middle and apical sections belonged to CI + smear layer removal and CI. A statistically significant difference was seen when comparing the penetration depth of CI + smear layer removal group to CI and PUA groups in coronal and middle third, in which the average NaOCl penetration depth of the gold standard group was higher (P penetration depth in the gold standard group was higher (P penetration depth of irrigation solutions. PUA and LAI groups exhibited less smear layer elimination and penetration depth of irrigation

  10. Clinical effect of photodynamic therapy on primary carious dentin after partial caries removal

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    Pierre Adriano Moreno NEVES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted to assess the clinical effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT in the decontamination of the deep dentin of deciduous molars submitted to partial removal of carious tissue. After cavity preparation, dentin samples were taken from the pulp wall of nineteen deciduous molars before and after PDT application. Remaining dentin was treated with 0.01% methylene blue dye followed by irradiation with an InGaAlP diode laser (λ – 660 nm; 40 mW; 120 J/cm2; 120 s. Dentin samples were microbiologically assessed for the enumeration of total microorganisms, Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci. There was no significant difference in the number of colony-forming units (CFU for any of the microorganisms assessed (p > 0.05. Photodynamic therapy, using 0.01% methylene blue dye at a dosimetry of 120 J/cm2 would not be a viable clinical alternative to reduce bacterial contamination in deep dentin.

  11. Managing curved canals

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    Iram Ansari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dilaceration is the result of a developmental anomaly in which there has been an abrupt change in the axial inclination between the crown and the root of a tooth. Dilaceration can be seen in both the permanent and deciduous dentitions, and is more commonly found in posterior teeth and in maxilla. Periapical radiographs are the most appropriate way to diagnose the presence of root dilacerations. The controlled regularly tapered preparation of the curved canals is the ultimate challenge in endodontics. Careful and meticulous technique will yield a safe and sufficient enlargement of the curved canals. This article gives a review of the literature and three interesting case reports of root dilacerations.

  12. Differences in cytotoxicity between 5% tetracycline hydrochloride and 15% EDTA as root canal irrigant

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    Devi Eka Juniarti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available 5% tetracycline hydrochloride and 15% EDTA as a root canal irrigant have been proven to be able to remove smear layer, open dentinal tubules and have antimicrobial activity. An effective root canal irrigation solution must be able to dissolve organic and anorganic debris, lubricate endodontic instruments, disinfect microorganism and non toxic. The purpose of this laboratory experimental study was to determine cytotoxicity differences between 5% tetracycline hydrochloride and 15% EDTA. 21 samples were used and classified into 3 groups: control, 5% tetracycline hydrochloride and 15% EDTA groups. Cytotoxicity test was done using BHK21 cells. The data was analyzed using Bird and Forrester formula. It concluded that 5% tetracycline hydrochloride more toxic than 15% EDTA as a root canal irrigant.

  13. Effect of dentine depth on the fracture toughness of dentine-composite adhesive interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, L E; Yim, D

    1997-01-01

    The fracture toughness test was recently introduced as a clinically relevant method for assessing the fracture resistance of the dentine-composite interface. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentine depth on the interfacial fracture toughness test of several dentine-composite interfaces using some new proprietary dentine bonding agents. Miniature short rod fracture toughness specimens containing a chevron-shaped dentine-composite-bonded interface were prepared for each group (n = 12). Six different dentine bonding agents and two dentine depths were the variables assessed at the dentine-composite interfaces. After 24 h at 37 degrees C in water, the specimens were tested by loading at 0.5 mm/min in the Instron Universal Testing Machine. The interfacial KIC results were analysed by ANOVA, unpaired Student's t-tests and Fisher's LSD test (P dentine, respectively, were: All-Bond 2, 0.80 (0.21), 0.44 (0.13); Bond-lt, 0.75 (0.20), 0.38 (0.19); Prime and Bond, 0.56 (0.11), 0.28 (0.10); Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 0.45 (0.23), 0.26 (0.15); One-Step and OptiBond, insufficient results due to premature specimen failures. The results from this study should contribute to the development of the fracture toughness test as a method for assessing the integrity of the dentine-composite interface. The interfacial fracture toughness test determined significant differences among the different dentine bonding agents and between the superficial and deep dentine substrates. The dentine bonding agents showed significantly reduced interfacial fracture toughness results when bonding to deep versus superficial dentine.

  14. Comparison of the Effects of Various Irrigating Solutions on Dentine Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    endodontic treatments on permeability of root dentine. Oral Surg 13(2): 208-223, 1960. 12. Cohen, S.; Stewart, G.G.; and Laster, L.L. The effects of...Endod 4(2):60-64, 1978. 16. Cunningham, W.I., and Balekjian, A.Y. Effect of temperature on collagen-dissolving ability of sodium hypochlorite endodontic ...each treatment in subsequent parts of this study, the results were expressed as the percentage radioactivity remaining in each canal, with 100% being

  15. Influence of adhesive cementation systems on the bond strength of relined fiber posts to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Raquel Viana; Sampaio, Camila Sobral; Pacheco, Rafael Rocha; Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-10-01

    Glass fiber post cementation procedures have undergone significant development. Relining the post with composite resin is a technique that aims to reduce resin cement thickness and consequently problems inherent to polymerization. Evidence is sparse regarding the efficacy of bonding procedures at increasing depths (from cervical to apical) using different adhesive cementation techniques. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the push-out bond strength (PBS) of composite resin relined glass fiber posts cemented to bovine root dentin using different adhesive cementation protocols. Eighteen bovine teeth (n=6) were embedded in polystyrene resin blocks, and the crowns were sectioned leaving a root portion of 20 mm in length. Root canals were prepared using rotary instruments provided by the post manufacturer (Whitepost DC #1), resulting in a uniform root canal preparation. The root canals were lubricated with a water-soluble glycerin gel. Silane (Prosil) was applied and the posts relined with a microhybrid composite resin (Filtek Z100) to conform to the root canal anatomy. Three adhesive cementation protocols were evaluated: a 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose) in combination with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC); a universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) associated with a dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Ultimate); and a self-adhesive dual polymerizing resin cement (RelyX Unicem 2). The roots were sectioned, resulting in four 2-mm segments at 4 different depths (cervical to apical) and evaluated by the PBS test, using a universal testing machine (Instron 4411) at 0.5 mm/min, until failure. Interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, and failures were classified as cohesive failure in composite resin, cohesive failure in cement, cohesive failure in root dentin, adhesive failure, or mixed. Data were analyzed by 2-way split-plot ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). No

  16. Influence of Irrigating Solutions on Push-Out Bond Strenght of Intraradicular Posts to Dentine

    OpenAIRE

    Kaif DDS, Mohammad; Bis DDS, MSc, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of irrigating solutions commonly used during endodontic treatment on the push-out bond strength of intrarradicular fiber posts to dentin. Thirty single rooted teeth were divided into 3 groups according to the solution used during instrumentation: G1, NaOCL 5.25%; G2, 2% chlorhexidine; G3, distilled water. The root canals were prepared and obturated, and the glass fiber posts were cemented with RelyX ARC®. The specimens were submitted to push...

  17. Influence of Ultrasonic Irrigation and Chloroform on Cleanliness of Dentinal Tubules During Endodontic Retreatment-An Invitro SEM Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Anurag; Gurtu, Anuraag; Vinayak, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic irrigation has been proved for its remarkable cleaning efficiency in the field of endodontics. But its role in endodontic re-treatment has been understated. There is not much data available to understand the effect of ultrasonic irrigation for the evaluation of cleanliness of dentinal tubules when it is used with or without chloroform, a gutta percha solvent during endodontic retreatment. Aim To compare the influence of ultrasonic irrigation with syringe irrigation on cleanliness of dentinal tubules after gutta perch removal for endodontic retreatment with or without the use of chloroform a gutta percha solvent using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods Freshly extracted 45 human mandibular premolar teeth for periodontal and orthodontic reasons were taken and were occlusally adjusted to a working length of 19 mm. The root canals of all teeth were prepared chemo mechanically to a master apical file size 40 and were divided in various groups. In Group 1 (n = 5; control group), the canals remained unfilled. In Groups 2 and 3 (n = 20 each), the canals were filled using lateral compaction with gutta-percha and AH plus sealer, removal of root fillings was undertaken after 2 weeks using Gates Glidden drills and H files without chloroform in Group 2 and with chloroform in group 3. The specimen of Group 2 and 3 were further divided into two subgroups I and II (n=10). In subgroup I, irrigation was done using side vented needles and sodium hypochlorite. In subgroup II irrigation was done using passive ultrasonic irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. Thereafter, the roots were split and the sections were observed under SEM. The number of occluded dentinal tubules /total number of dentinal tubules were calculated for the coronal, middle and apical third of each root half. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test using standardized technique. Result Results indicated that the cleanest dentinal

  18. Bond strength between root dentin and three glass-fiber post systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Mustafa; Usumez, Aslihan; Ozturk, A Nilgun; Belli, Sema; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2006-07-01

    Glass-fiber posts were introduced for use after endodontic therapy instead of metal alloy and ceramic posts. There are several new types of glass-fiber post systems available, but little is known about how well these posts bond to the root surface. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the bond strengths of 3 different types of glass-fiber post systems-opaque, translucent, and electrical glass-in 3 different locations of prepared post spaces. Sixty human intact single-rooted extracted teeth were used. The root canals were prepared using a step-back technique and obturated with gutta-percha using lateral condensation. The roots were divided into 3 experimental groups and further divided into 2 subgroups according to testing time (n=10). Roots were restored with 1 of the following post systems according to the manufacturer's instructions: opaque glass-fiber posts (Snowpost), translucent glass-fiber posts (FiberMaster), and electrical glass-fiber posts (Everstick). A self-etching primer (Clearfil Liner Bond) was applied to the walls of the post spaces, allowed to etch for 30 seconds, and gently air dried. A dual-polymerized bonding agent (Clearfil Liner Bond, Bond A and B) was then applied to the same walls. A dual-polymerizing resin luting agent (Panavia F) was mixed for 20 seconds and then placed in the post spaces using a lentulo spiral instrument. The roots were placed in light-protected cylinders; then the light source was placed directly on the flat cervical tooth surfaces and the cement was polymerized. Specimens were stored in light-proof boxes for 24 hours or 1 week after the polymerization procedure. Each root was cut horizontally, and six 1-mm-thick root segments (2 apical, 2 middle, and 2 cervical) were prepared. Using a push-out test, the bond strength between post and dentin was measured after 24 hours or 1 week using a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with 3-way ANOVA followed by independent t tests (alpha=.05

  19. Maturational changes in dentin mineral properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelis, K; Lukashova, L; Wright, J T; Mendelsohn, R; Peterson, M G E; Doty, S; Boskey, A L

    2007-05-01

    In this study the changes in properties of the maturing mantle and circumpulpal dentin were quantitatively analyzed. Sections from six fetal bovine undecalcified incisors were used. Regions of mantle and circumpulpal dentin of sequential maturation stages were identified on spectroscopic images acquired by Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging. Spectroscopic parameters corresponding to mineral properties at these stages were analyzed and reported as a function of distance from the cervix of the incisor, the latter representing tissue age. Mineral parameters were correlated with distance from the cervix. Values of these parameters in mantle and circumpulpal dentin were compared. A multi-phasic pattern of changes was found for all the parameters examined, with most of the alterations occurring in the initial maturation period. The patterns of temporal variation in mantle and circumpulpal dentin mineral properties show distinct developmental stages and were not identical for the two dentin compartments. The study showed that mineral maturation in dentin is not a linear process and that mantle dentin is developmentally distinct from circumpulpal dentin, presenting at certain stages different physicochemical events during the maturation of the tissue.

  20. [Enamel and dentin under the ultrasonic microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gente, M; Matthaei, E; Mayr, P; Schwarzmann, V

    1989-01-01

    Ultrasonic reflection scanning microscopy is a new method for imaging the known structures of dental hard tissues on the basis of a simple specimen preparation. The specimens are scanned in a physiologic humid environment. Particularly high-contrast images are obtained from enamel tufts and lamellae, dentin tubules and interglobular dentin.

  1. Interaction between bioactive glasses and human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efflandt, S E; Magne, P; Douglas, W H; Francis, L F

    2002-06-01

    This study explores the interaction between bioactive glasses and dentin from extracted human teeth in simulated oral conditions. Bioactive glasses in the Na(2)O-CaO-P(2)O(5)-SiO(2) and MgO-CaO-P(2)O(5)-SiO(2) systems were prepared as polished disks. Teeth were prepared by grinding to expose dentin and etching with phosphoric acid. A layer of saliva was placed between the two, and the pair was secured with an elastic band and immersed in saliva at 37 degrees C for 5, 21 or 42 days. The bioactive glasses adhered to dentin, while controls showed no such interaction. A continuous interface between the bioactive glass and dentin was imaged using cryogenic-scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, after alcohol dehydration and critical point drying, fracture occurred due to stresses from dentin shrinkage. SEM investigations showed a microstructurally different material at the fractured interface. Chemical analyses revealed that ions from the glass penetrated into the dentin and that the surface of the glass in contact with the dentin was modified. Microdiffractometry showed the presence of apatite at the interface. Bonding appears to be due to an affinity of collagen for the glass surface and chemical interaction between the dentin and glass, leading to apatite formation at the interface.

  2. Microshear bonding effectiveness of different dentin regions

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    Anelise F Montagner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of dentin surfaces with different tubule orientation on bond strength of a multimode adhesive system. Materials and Methods: Twenty human molars were selected and prepared in different ways in order to produce different dentin regions. The teeth were randomized (n = 5 according to the application modes of a multimode adhesive system (etch-and-rinse and self-etching and to the dentin region (occlusal and proximal - 1.5 mm depth from dentinoenamel junction. Cylindrical restorations were performed on dentin with a starch tube. The samples remained immersed in distilled water for 24 h and the microshear bond strength (μSBS test was performed. The μSBS values were expressed in MPa and analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey′s test (P < 0.05. Results: There was no significant difference in the bond strength values between the application modes of the adhesive system (P = 0.19; however, the dentin regions (P < 0.05 significantly affected the μSBS. The proximal dentin presented higher bond strength values than occlusal dentin. Conclusion: The dentin surfaces with different tubule orientation influenced the bonding effectiveness of the adhesive system tested.

  3. Dentin hypersensitivity: prevalence, etiology, pathogenesis, and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Schmidlin, P.R.; Martens, L.C.; Amaechi, B.T.; Amaechi, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is simply defined as a short sharply painful reaction of the exposed and innervated pulp-dentin complex in response to stimuli being typically thermal, evaporative, tactile, osmotic, or chemical and which reaction cannot be attributed to any dental defect or pathology. To be

  4. Root Canal Morphology of Permanent Maxillary and Mandibular Canines in Indian Population Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

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    Nikhita Somalinga Amardeep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the root canal anatomy of single-rooted permanent maxillary and mandibular canines in an Indian population using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT. Methodology. A total of 250 permanent maxillary canines and 250 permanent mandibular canines were selected and scanned using CBCT. The root anatomy of each tooth was evaluated for the following parameters: the pattern of the root canals, anatomic length of the crown and the root, the presence of accessory canals, the shape of the access cavity, the position of the apical foramina, root diameter, and dentin thickness of the root. Results. Majority of the teeth had a Type I canal configuration in both maxillary canines (81.6% and mandibular canines (79.6%. In maxillary canine the other canal patterns found were Type III (11.6%, Type II (2.8%, Type V (2%, Type XIX (1.2%, and Type IV (0.8%. In mandibular canines the various other canal patterns found were Type III (13.6%, Type II (3.2%, Type V (2%, and Type XIX (1.6%. Apical foramina were laterally positioned in the majority of the teeth, 70.4% and 65.6% in maxillary and mandibular canines, respectively. 12% of the maxillary canines and 12.8% of the mandibular canines had accessory canals. Conclusion. The root canal anatomy of permanent maxillary and mandibular canines varied widely in an Indian population.

  5. Comparative analysis of efficacy and cleaning ability of hand and rotary devices for gutta-percha removal in root canal retreatment: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Narender; Admala, Shilpa Reddy; Dinapadu, Sainath; Pasari, Srikanth; Reddy, Manoranjan P; Rao, M S Rama

    2013-07-01

    instruments produce frictional heat which plasticises gutta-percha and aids in easy removal. Apical third of root canals showed more guttapercha debris compared to coronal and middle 1/3 and has been attributed to the greater anatomic variability and difficulty of instrumentation in the apical area. The existence of deep groves and depressions on dentine walls in this apical 1/3 make them less instrumented areas as it did be difficult to direct the file against the extreme root canal wall. The fastest technique to remove gutta-percha and the shortest time to reach working length was observed with ProTaper retreatment instruments with xylene followed by ProTaper retreatment files without xylene and Hedstrom files without xylene. After instrumentation for removal of gutta-percha, apical third was found to have more debris compared to coronal and middle 1/3 of the root canal.

  6. An Evaluation of Apical Cracks in Teeth Undergoing Orthograde Root Canal Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Elizabeth; Svec, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    Dentinal damage and cracks induced by orthograde preparation methods have been reported in studies using extracted teeth. The purpose of this in situ investigation was to evaluate dentinal cracks in nonextracted teeth after final instrumentation. The null hypothesis is that orthograde root canal instrumentation will have no effect on crack initiation in teeth retained in the natural periodontium. Mandibular first and second premolars of pig jaws were selected. Forty single-rooted canals were divided into 5 groups (n = 8): (1) WaveOne (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) 25/08; (2) ProTaper rotary S1, S2, F2 (25/08) (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties); (3) crown-down GT hand files 20/12, 20/10, 20/08 (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties); (4) positive control (purposefully cracked); and (5) negative control (uninstrumented teeth). After instrumentation, superficial soft tissue was removed, and bone was carefully peeled away with surgical burs to the level of the root apices. Roots were resected 1 mm coronal to the working length, stained with caries indicator dye, and transilluminated; images were captured and viewed at 30× magnification to determine the presence or absence of dentinal cracks. WaveOne, ProTaper rotary, and GT hand files produced no cracks. All positive controls had cracks; all negative controls had no cracks. Within the limits of this investigation, the presence of natural periodontal structures may prevent cracking or dentinal damage in teeth receiving orthograde root canal instrumentation. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mesiodens Within the Nasopalatine Canal: An Exceptional Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Georges; Nasseh, Ibrahim

    2016-10-24

    A supernumerary tooth is one that is supplementary to the normal dentition. It can be found anywhere at the dental arch. A mesiodens is a supernumerary tooth located between the two maxillary central incisors usually palatally or within the alveolar process. Less frequently, the mesiodens is in relation with the nasal floor and the nasopalatine canal walls. This paper presents a very rare case of an impacted inverted mesiodens located inside the nasopalatine canal and found incidentally with a cone-beam computed tomography examination.

  8. Mesiodens within the nasopalatine canal: an exceptional entity

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    Georges Aoun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A supernumerary tooth is one that is supplementary to the normal dentition. It can be found anywhere at the dental arch. A mesiodens is a supernumerary tooth located between the two maxillary central incisors usually palatally or within the alveolar process. Less frequently, the mesiodens is in relation with the nasal floor and the nasopalatine canal walls. This paper presents a very rare case of an impacted inverted mesiodens located inside the nasopalatine canal and found incidentally with a cone-beam computed tomography examination.

  9. Micro-computed tomography evaluation of the preparation of mesiobuccal root canals in maxillary first molars with Hyflex CM, Twisted Files, and K3 instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Shen, Ya; Peng, Bin; Haapasalo, Markus

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the canal shaping properties of Hyflex CM, Twisted Files (TF), and K3 rotary nickel-titanium files by using micro-computed tomography in maxillary first molars. A total of 36 mesiobuccal root canals of maxillary first molars were prepared with Hyflex CM, TF, or K3 system. Micro-computed tomography was used to scan the specimens before and after instrumentation. The volume of untreated canal, volume of dentin removed after preparation, amount of uninstrumented area, and the transportation for the coronal, middle, and apical thirds of canals were measured. Instrumentation of canals increased their volume and surface area. TF group showed the greatest amount of volumetric dentin removal (P Hyflex CM and K3 groups. There were no significant differences among instrument types concerning uninstrumented area. The TF system produced significantly less transportation than the K3 system in the apical third of canals. No significant difference was found between TF and Hyflex CM instruments relating to apical transportation. In vitro, Hyflex and TF instruments shaped curved root canals in maxillary first molar without significant shaping errors. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Temperature variation at the external root surface during Nd: YAG laser irradiation in the root canal in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan-Gao, Li; Xiao, Wang; Kexian, Xie; Dan, Liu

    2014-10-01

    To assess the temperature variation of the root surface using Nd: YAG laser irradiation in the root canal with different power and to evaluate the safety of laser application on the periodontal region. Thirty extracted human teeth with single-roots were collected. The teeth were cross-sectioned in the cervical portion, standardizing the roots at a 12-mm length. The roots were used as specimen. The roots were radiographed in the buccal-lingual direction to measure the thickness of the proximal walls, by means of a digital radiographic system. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the laser potency (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 W). Each group was subdivided into two subgroups according to laser frequency (15 and 30 Hz). With the Nd: YAG laser irradiation for 20 s, the temperature variation of the root surface was monitored by thermocouples located at different parts of the root external wall and recorded by digital thermometers. The groups irradiated with 4.5 W presented the greatest temperature variation (above 10°C), followed by 3.0 and 1.5 W. The temperatures were statistically different (P 0.05). The apical half of the root presented statistically higher temperature rises than the cervical half of the root (P temperature variation of the root surface was associated with laser power, irradiation time, and the thickness of dentin. Application of Nd: YAG laser in the root at 1.5 W for 20 s can safely be used in endodontic treatment.

  11. Canal plane dynamic visual acuity in superior canal dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janky, Kristen L; Zuniga, M Geraldine; Ward, Bryan; Carey, John P; Schubert, Michael C

    2014-06-01

    1) To characterize normal, horizontal active dynamic visual acuity (DVA) and passive canal plane head thrust DVA (htDVA) across ages to establish appropriate control data and 2) to determine whether horizontal active DVA and passive canal plane htDVA are significantly different in individuals with superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) before and after surgical repair in the acute (within 10 d) and nonacute stage (>6 wk). Prospective study. Tertiary referral center Patients diagnosed with SCDS (n = 32) and healthy control subjects (n = 51). Surgical canal plugging on a subset of patients. Static visual acuity (SVA), active horizontal DVA, and canal plane htDVA. Visual acuity (SVA, active DVA, and htDVA) declines with age. In SCDS, SVA and active DVA are not significantly affected in individuals after surgical canal plugging; however, htDVA in the plane of the affected canal is significantly worse after canal plugging. Age-based normative data are necessary for DVA testing. In SCDS, htDVA in the plane of the affected canal is normal before surgery but permanently reduced afterward.

  12. Light-emitting diode assessment of dentinal defects: the role of presumed extraction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Card, Steven J; Tawil, Peter Z

    2017-08-01

    The evaluation of iatrogenic dentinal defects in extracted teeth may be influenced by extraction forces and prolonged dry times. The purpose of this study was to compare the presence of dentinal defects in freshly extracted, periodontally compromised teeth with those in a group of teeth with uncontrolled extraction forces and storage time. The experimental group consisted of eighteen roots obtained from teeth extracted due to periodontal reasons with class II or III mobility. They were kept in saline and sectioned within 1 hour following extraction. The control group consisted of matched root types obtained from an anonymous tooth collection, consistent with previous dentinal defect studies. The slices were obtained at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex. The imaging process exposed all specimens to no more than 60 seconds of dry time. The × 12.8 magnification was used for the 9 mm slices and × 19.2 magnification for the 3 mm and 6 mm slices under light-emitting diode (LED) transillumination. The root canal spaces and periodontal tissues were masked to minimize extraneous factors that might influence the evaluators. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Dentinal defects were detected in 17% of the experimental group teeth, compared to 61% of control teeth (p = 0.015). LED transillumination assessment of freshly extracted roots with class II or III mobility showed smaller number of dentinal defects than roots with uncontrolled storage time and extraction forces. The use of freshly extracted roots with mobility should be considered for future dental defect assessment studies.

  13. Light-emitting diode assessment of dentinal defects: the role of presumed extraction forces

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    Marcelo Santos Coelho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The evaluation of iatrogenic dentinal defects in extracted teeth may be influenced by extraction forces and prolonged dry times. The purpose of this study was to compare the presence of dentinal defects in freshly extracted, periodontally compromised teeth with those in a group of teeth with uncontrolled extraction forces and storage time. Materials and Methods The experimental group consisted of eighteen roots obtained from teeth extracted due to periodontal reasons with class II or III mobility. They were kept in saline and sectioned within 1 hour following extraction. The control group consisted of matched root types obtained from an anonymous tooth collection, consistent with previous dentinal defect studies. The slices were obtained at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex. The imaging process exposed all specimens to no more than 60 seconds of dry time. The × 12.8 magnification was used for the 9 mm slices and × 19.2 magnification for the 3 mm and 6 mm slices under light-emitting diode (LED transillumination. The root canal spaces and periodontal tissues were masked to minimize extraneous factors that might influence the evaluators. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results Dentinal defects were detected in 17% of the experimental group teeth, compared to 61% of control teeth (p = 0.015. Conclusions LED transillumination assessment of freshly extracted roots with class II or III mobility showed smaller number of dentinal defects than roots with uncontrolled storage time and extraction forces. The use of freshly extracted roots with mobility should be considered for future dental defect assessment studies.

  14. Etidronate from Medicine to Endodontics: effects of different irrigation regimes on root dentin roughness

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    Talita Tartari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An increase in dentin roughness, associated with surface composition, contributes to bacterial adherence in recontaminations. Surface roughness is also important for micromechanical interlocking of dental materials to dentin, and understanding the characteristics of the surface is essential to obtain the adhesion of root canal sealers that have different physico-chemical characteristics. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA, etidronic (HEBP, and citric acid (CA associated with different irrigation regimens on root dentin roughness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five root halves of anterior teeth were used. The root parts were sectioned in thirds, embedded in acrylic resin and polished to a standard surface roughness. Initially, the samples of each third were randomly assigned into 3 groups and treated as follows: G1 - saline solution (control; G2 - 5% NaOCl+18% HEBP mixed in equal parts; and G3 - 2.5% NaOCl. After initial measuments, the G3 samples were distributed into subgroups G4, G5 and G6, which were subjected to 17% EDTA, 10% CA and 9% HEBP, respectively. Following the new measuments, these groups received a final flush with 2.5% NaOCl, producing G7, G8 and G9. The dentin surface roughness (Ra was determined before and after treatments using a profilometer. The Wilcoxon test (α<0.05 was used to compare the values before and after treatments, and the Friedman test (α<0.05 to detect any differences among root thirds. RESULTS: (i NaOCl did not affect the surface roughness; (ii there was a significant increase in roughness after the use of chelating agents (P<0.01; and (iii only the G3 group showed a difference in surface roughness between apical third and other thirds of the teeth (P<0.0043. CONCLUSION: Only the irrigation regimens that used chelating agents altered the roughness of root dentin.

  15. In situ assessment of the setting of tricalcium silicate-based sealers using a dentin pressure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuereb, Maria; Vella, Paul; Damidot, Denis; Sammut, Charles V; Camilleri, Josette

    2015-01-01

    EndoSequence BC Sealer (Brasseler, Savannah, GA) is a premixed tricalcium silicate-based root canal sealer that requires moisture from the root dentin to hydrate. The aim of this study was to investigate the setting of EndoSequence BC Sealer and other sealers in contact with human dentin in a simulated clinical environment. EndoSequence BC Sealer, MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil), Septodont Sealer (Septodont, Saint Maur-des-Fosses, France), and Apexit Plus (Ivoclar, Schaan, Lichtenstein) were assessed. Caries-free lower premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes in patients aged 13-16 years were standardized to a 10-mm root length and were filled with test sealers and set up in a dentin pressure model for 14 days. In addition, set sealers immersed in physiologic solution for 14 days were also assessed. The set materials in solution and materials retrieved from the dentin pressure setup were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The setting time and radiopacity were assessed using ISO 6876:2002 specifications. Furthermore, mineral ion leaching was evaluated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. All the sealers tested exhibited formation of a calcium phosphate phase when in contact with physiologic solution. Septodont Sealer and Apexit Plus did not exhibit the formation of a calcium phosphate phase in the dentin pressure setup. The fluid in the system was enough to allow the setting of EndoSequence BC Sealer, which did not set in a dry environment. All materials leached calcium with the Septodont Sealer, exhibiting double the calcium ion leaching compared with EndoSequence BC Sealer. Using the dentinal fluid pressure system resulted in an adequate flow of dentinal fluid that allowed EndoSequence BC Sealer to set inside the root canal. Although the sealers tested were tricalcium silicate based, the hydration reaction and bioactivity in the presence of dentinal fluid were different to hydration in vitro. Thus

  16. Effects of carbodiimide dentin surface treatment on resin-dentin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haught, Yi Zhang; Tang, Lin; Liu, Yuhua; Zhou, Yongsheng; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Chan, Daniel C N

    2016-08-01

    To assess the effects of ethanol-based 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) dentin surface treatment on resin-dentin bonding and dentin collagen fibril biodegradation. Acid-etched dentin surfaces were pretreated with different concentrations of ethanol-based EDC solutions (0.01-2M) for 60 seconds, followed by two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive application and resin composite bonding. Dentin surfaces pretreated with either ethanol alone or no pretreatment were used as controls. The specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength testing after storage in 0.9% NaCl solution at 37°C for either 24 hours or 90 days. Furthermore, demineralized dentin slabs with and without ethanol-based EDC pretreatment were exposed to a collagenase solution for 24 hours, and subsequent hydroxyproline release was measured using ELISA. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and multiple comparison tests at α= 0.05. The bond strength values were significantly lower for dentin surfaces pretreated with 1 and 2 M ethanol-based EDC than for the control surfaces (Pbond strength values at 90 days compared to controls. Hydroxyproline release measurements revealed that there were significantly lower levels released in the 0.3 and 1 M ethanol-based EDC pretreated specimens than for controls (Pbonding can improve the stability of the resin-dentin bond and prevent dentin collagen fibril biodegradation.

  17. Comparison of the fracture resistance of simulated immature permanent teeth using various canal filling materials and fiber posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanalp, Jale; Dikbas, Idil; Malkondu, Ozlem; Ersev, Handan; Güngör, Tufan; Bayırlı, Gündüz

    2012-12-01

      The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistances of immature teeth treated with MTA along with root canal obturation methods using AH Plus, MetaSEAL, MTA Fillapex sealers + lateral compaction technique, and Unicore quartz fiber posts.   Fifty single-rooted maxillary anterior teeth were divided into five groups. The crowns were dissected and root canals were enlarged. #6 Peeso reamers were allowed to protrude 1 mm. beyond the apex to simulate immature teeth. The apical 4-5 mm of each tooth was filled using Angelus white MTA. The remaining portions of canals were obturated as follows: Group 1: No backfilling (control), Group 2: AH Plus + gutta-percha, lateral compaction, Group 3: MetaSEAL + gutta-percha, lateral compaction, Group 4: MTA Fillapex + gutta-percha, lateral compaction, Group 5: UniCore Fiber posts luted using PermaFlo DC. The specimens were embedded into self-curing acrylic poured into identical cylinders which were mounted on a jig providing a 45° angle. A compressive load increasing at 1 mm min(-1) was applied and the maximum load at which fracture occurred was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's multiple tests.   The highest fracture resistance was obtained with Group 5 (Fiber posts) whereas Group 4 (MTA Fillapex) yielded the lowest values. The mean fracture resistance value of Group 2 (AH Plus) was significantly higher than Group 4 (MTA Fillapex) (P = 0.001). The mean fracture value of Group 5 (Fiber posts) was significantly higher than Group 2 (AH Plus), Group 3 (MetaSEAL), and Group 4 (MTA Fillapex) (P = 0.02, 0.004, and 0.0001, respectively).   Within the limitations of this study, UniCore quartz fiber posts provided the highest resistance. This methodology may specifically be advantageous for teeth with arrest of development at early stages, as these teeth are more susceptible to fracture owing to their excessively weak dentinal walls. © 2011 John

  18. The influence of dentine permeability on cytotoxicity of four dentine bonding systems, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillaguet, S; Virgillito, M; Wataha, J; Ciucchi, B; Holz, J

    1998-01-01

    Dentine adhesives are often placed directly on dentine from which the smear layer has been removed, the thickness of the dentine is minimal and the potential for diffusion of adhesive components into the pulp is greatest. The permeability of the dentine is one factor that should be critical to whether sufficient diffusion of adhesive components occurs to cause damage to pulpal cells. Dentine discs were prepared and divided into those with low-, medium-, and high-permeability. They were then treated with four different dentine adhesives, after which the pulpal side of the dentine was placed in contact with 1 mL of cell-culture medium. The medium was collected at 24 h intervals for 168 h, and was then placed on monolayers of human pulpal fibroblasts for 24 h. The response of the cells was assessed by succinic dehydrogenase activity (MTT method). The results showed that four dentine adhesive systems released sufficient components to cause suppression of cellular metabolism through dentine. High-permeability dentine generally allowed more diffusion of these components, but the effect of dentine permeability depended on the material. On the other hand, the time interval between the application of the bonding agent and collection of the eluant was consistently important for all materials. Materials were most cytotoxic at early intervals, and were generally less cytotoxic at later intervals, although there were exceptions and there was persistent (> 15%) suppression of cellular metabolism even at late (168 h) intervals. The results suggest that application of these materials to dentine, and particularly dentine with high permeability, poses a potential risk to the health of pulpal tissues.

  19. Distributed control at Love canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, G.; Rider, G.J.; Sadowski, B.; Moore, M.

    1994-09-01

    Love Canal is known worldwide as the site of one of the worst non-nuclear environmental disasters in modern history. For 12 years, a Niagara Falls, New York chemical company used the canal bed as a chemical dump. This article discusses the computerized control of equipment used to remove the toxic materials from the ground under Love Canal, and how the minimization of maintenance is reducing maintenance costs and increasing operator safety.

  20. Analysis of sedimentation of canals

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    Agunwamba, J.C.,

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The dredged canals in the Niger Delta coastal flood plain are being threatened by siltation. This study is limited to those canals in Rivers State of Nigeria, which are under the influence of tidal waves. A total of eight canals were considered with four each from Ekulama and Cawthorne Channel. Different approaches were used to carry out this study, which includes field reconnaissance survey, hydrographic survey, soil sample analysis and collection of all available data and information. The typical bed materials size (D50 is approximately 0.01mm; which gives a settling velocity of 0.09mm/sec using stroke’s law. Hydrographic survey of the canals from 1992 to 1996 revealed an average siltation rate of 2.35m/yr. A regression equation was also derived which relates the cost of dredging to canal area, rate of siltation and average aggregation. A plot of canal centre profile; entrance, middle and end cross sections showing sediment distribution along the canal profile, shows that majority of the particles that form the sediment enter the canal from the rivers. The sedimentation is caused by the reduction in water current, which has average value of 0.0145m/sec. The bathyorographical check on the canals revealed that the sum of the two exterior angles of the canal with the river at the point of connection has to lie within 1800 + 50 for an effective flow that will minimize settlement of particles. In addition, the canals should be constructed to start and terminate on a moving water body, to avoid dead ends. A regression equation was determined which relates the cost of dredging to canal area, rate of siltation and average aggradations.

  1. Comparison of shaping ability of RaCe and Hero Shaper instruments in simulated curved canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Cumhur; Inan, Ugur; Yasar, Senay; Bulucu, Bilinc; Tunca, Yasar M

    2008-03-01

    This study compared the shaping ability of Hero Shaper and RaCe instruments in simulated curved canals. Forty simulated canals in resin blocks were divided into 2 experimental groups, each comprising 20 resin blocks, and prepared with Hero Shaper and RaCe using the crown-down technique. Preoperative and postoperative photographs, recorded using a digital camera, were superimposed and aberrations were recorded. Material removal was measured at 10 points beginning 1 mm from the end point of the canal. Mean total widths, outer and inner width measurements, were determined on each central canal path and differences were statistically analyzed using Student t test. The Hero Shaper and RaCe instruments removed almost the same amount of material from the inner side of the simulated canals. On the outer canal wall, the RaCe instruments removed significantly more material from the first 3 mm (P Hero Shaper removed more material from the middle and coronal aspects of the canal and the differences were statistically significant (P Hero Shaper removed more material from the middle and coronal thirds on the outer canal wall. Hero Shaper instruments showed better centering ability and fewer aberrations. No instrument fractures but some deformations were observed for both systems.

  2. Morphological aspects and physical properties of enamel and dentine of Sus domesticus: A tooth model in laboratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Nathalia Carolina Fernandes; Cardoso, Miquéias André Gomes; Miranda, Mayara Sabrina Luz; Silva, Raira de Brito; Teixeira, Francisco Bruno; Nogueira, Bárbara Catarina Lima; Nogueira, Brenna Magdalena Lima; de Melo, Sara Elisama Silva; da Costa, Natacha Malu Miranda; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to describe and analyze morphological and physical properties of deciduous teeth of Sus domesticus. Ultrastructural analysis, mineral composition and microhardness of enamel and dentine tissues were performed on 10 skulls of S. domesticus. External anatomic characteristics and the internal anatomy of the teeth were also described. Data regarding microhardness and ultrastructural analysis were subjected to statistical tests. For ultrastructural analysis, we used the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's post hoc (p≤0.05) test. In the analysis of microhardness, the difference between the enamel and dentine tissues was analyzed by a Student's t test. Values were expressed as mean with standard error. The results of ultrastructural analysis showed the presence of an enamel prism pattern. A dentinal tubule pattern was also observed, with a larger diameter in the pulp chamber and the cervical third, in comparison to middle and apical thirds. We observed an average microhardness of 259.2kgf/mm(2) for enamel and 55.17kgf/mm(2) for dentine. In porcine enamel and dentine, the chemical elements Ca and P showed the highest concentration. The analysis of internal anatomy revealed the presence of a simple root canal system and the occurrence of main canals in the roots. The observed features are compatible with the functional demand of these animals, following a pattern very similar to that seen in other groups of mammals, which can encourage the development of research using dental elements from the pig as a substitute for human teeth in laboratory research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. The mineralization of mantle dentine and of circumpulpal dentine in the rat: an ultrastructural and element-analytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, U; Schaarschmidt, K; Wiesmann, H P; Plate, U; Höhling, H J; Szuwart, T

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the biomineralization of circumpulpal dentine with that of mantle dentine by ultrastructural and element-analytical techniques. Forty upper second molar germs of 10-day-old albino rats were cryofixed in liquid nitrogen-cooled propane and embedded in resin after freeze drying. Semithin dry sections were cut for analyzing the calcium and phosphorous concentration in initial mantle dentine, at the mineralization front of circumpulpal dentine, in the middle region of circumpulpal dentine and in mantle dentine peripheral to circumpulpal dentine. For the morphological evaluation of mineral deposits we compared ultrathin and unstained sections of cryofixed molars with chemically fixed molars. For both dentine types it was found that they develop via identical steps of mineral formation at collagen fibrils and non-collagenous matrix molecules. In circumpulpal dentine no globular mineral protrusions along the mineralization front (i.e. calcospherites) and no indications of interglobular dentine at the transition from circumpulpal dentine to mantle dentine were present. Two von Korff fibres were not only visible in mantle dentine but also in circumpulpal dentine. Matrix vesicles were present only during the formation of an initial coherent layer of mantle dentine and could not be observed during successive formation of mantle dentine and circumpulpal dentine. The element-analytical data did not demonstrate any difference in the mineral content between the two dentine types. Therefore, we conclude that mantle dentine and circumpulpal dentine in the rat molar possess a high degree of structural and chemical similarity and that only the extent of terminal branching of the odontoblast processes gives an approximate estimation of the thickness of mantle dentine.

  4. Evaluation of the bactericidal effect of Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG laser radiation, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in experimentally infected root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaogang; Guan, Sumin; Lu, Hong; Zhao, Chunmiao; Chen, Xingxing; Li, Na; Bai, Qian; Tian, Yu; Yu, Qing

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, various laser systems have been introduced into the field of laser-assisted endodontic therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal effect of Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG laser radiation, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in experimentally infected root canals compared with standard endodontic treatment of 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) irrigation. Two hundred and twenty infected root canals from extracted human teeth (contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 4083 for 4 weeks) were randomly divided into five experimental groups (Nd:YAG, Er:YAG + 5.25% NaClO + 0.9% normal saline + distilled water (Er:YAG/NaClO/NS/DW), Er:YAG + 0.9% normal saline + distilled water (Er:YAG/NS/DW), Er,Cr:YSGG, and aPDT) and two control groups (5.25% NaClO as positive control and 0.9% normal saline (NS) as negative control). The numbers of bacteria on the surface of root canal walls and at different depths inside dentinal tubules before and after treatment were analyzed by means of one-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA). The morphology of bacterial cells before and after treatment was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After treatment, the bacterial reductions in the experimental groups and the positive control group were significantly greater than that of the negative control group (P therapy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of Osteoconductive and Osteogenic Potential of a Dentin-Based Bone Substitute Using a Calvarial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the osteoconductive and osteogenic properties of processed bovine dentin using a robust rabbit calvarial defect model. In total, 16 New Zealand White rabbits were operated to create three circular defects in the calvaria. One defect was left unfilled, one filled with collected autogenous bone, and the third defect was filled with the dentin-based bone substitute. Following surgery and after a healing period of either 1 or 6 weeks, a CT scan was obtained. Following sacrificing, the tissues were processed for histological examination. The CT data showed the density in the area grafted with the dentin-based material was higher than the surrounding bone and the areas grafted with autologous bone after 1 week and 6 weeks of healing. The area left unfilled remained an empty defect after 1 week and 6 weeks. Histological examination of the defects filled with the dentin product after 6 weeks showed soft tissue encapsulation around the dentin particles. It can be concluded that the rabbit calvarial model used in this study is a robust model for the assessment of bone materials. Bovine dentin is a biostable material; however, it may not be suitable for repairing large 4-wall defects.

  6. Lumbar canal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazanec, D J; Drucker, Y; Segal, A M

    1997-04-01

    Lumbar canal stenosis is an increasingly recognized condition in patients more than 65 years of age. The clinical syndrome is dominated by neurogenic claudication. The natural history of the Condition is not yet well described. Long-term results of surgical therapy are frequently disappointing, and reoperation is required in more than 10% of patients. Nonoperative treatment options include physical therapy exercise programs, calcitonin, analgesics, and epidural steroid injections. A clinical pathway for management of symptomatic stenosis, emphasizing an initial nonoperative approach, is suggested.

  7. Root dentin strain and temperature rise during endodontic treatment and post rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amade, Euridsse Sulemane; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Azevedo, Fabiane Maria Ferreira; Bicalho, Aline Aredes; Soares, Carlos José

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of endodontic treatment procedures and different post systems rehabilitation steps on the strain and temperature rise on apical and cervical root dentin regions. Twenty-one extracted human canine teeth had two strain gages attached to the distal root surface and two thermocouples attached to the mesial root surface (cervical and apical). The strain and temperature rise were recorded during the following procedures: root canal preparation, final rinse and drying, root canal filling and canal relief. Then the teeth were divided into three groups (n=7), according to the type of post system: CPC, cast post and core; FGP, fiberglass post; and PSP, prefabricated steel post. Data continued to be recorded during the post space preparation, post modeling (only for CPC), post trying and post cementation. Data were subjected to a two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). The post-space preparation caused the highest temperature rise (4.0-14.9 °C) and the highest strain in the apical region during irrespective of post type. The resin cement light-activation resulted in significant temperature increases in the cervical region for all of the groups. The canal relief and the post-space preparation produced highest temperature rises. The CPC post modeling resulted in higher root strain level similarly the level of post preparation. The PSP resulted in highest strain during post trying and post cementation.

  8. Regeneration of the dentine-pulp complex with revitalization/revascularization therapy: challenges and hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L M; Ricucci, D; Huang, G T-J

    2014-08-01

    The concept of regenerative endodontics has gained much attention in clinical endodontics in the past decade. One aspect of this discipline is the application of revitalization/revascularization therapies for infected and/or necrotic immature pulps in permanent teeth. Following the publication of a case report (Iwaya et al. ), investigators have been rigorously examining the types of tissues formed in the canals as well as exploring strategies to regenerate the pulp-dentine complex in revitalized teeth. This review will provide an update on the types of tissues generated in the canals after revitalization/revascularization therapy in both animal and human studies. The understanding of the role of stem cells and microenvironment in the process of wound healing resulting in either regeneration or repair will be thoroughly discussed. Stem cells and microenvironmental cues introduced into the canal during revitalization/revascularization procedures will be examined. In addition, requirement of a sterile microenvironment in the canal and vital tissue generation in revitalization/revascularization therapy will be emphasized. The challenges that we face and the hopes that we have in revitalization/revascularization therapy for regenerative endodontics will be presented. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Efficacy of bacterial removal from instrumented root canals in vitro related to instrumentation technique and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollison, Scott; Barnett, Frederic; Stevens, Roy H

    2002-09-01

    This in vitro investigation assessed the efficacy of removing radioactively labeled bacteria from infected canals with 2 engine-driven rotary nickel titanium instrumentation techniques differing in sequence and apical enlargement size. A standard quantity of (3)H-thymidine-labeled Enterococcus faecalis (3.70 x 10(4) cpm, 2.0 x 10(7) colony-forming units) was used to inoculate the mesiobuccal canals of 50 extracted mandibular molars. The teeth were incubated for 5 days to allow infection of the surrounding dentin from the canals. Five of the teeth were used as controls to determine the number of cycles of irrigation and drying necessary to reduce the (3)H counts recovered from the canals to baseline levels. After this process, the unbound bacteria in the root canals of the remaining 45 teeth then were washed out with buffer until baseline levels of radioactivity were obtained. The mesiobuccal root of 1 of these 45 teeth was removed, decalcified, and digested, and the total radioactivity released from the root dentin was measured. Of the remaining 44 teeth, 22 then were instrumented with GT and Profile (Dentsply/Tulsa Dental Co, Tulsa, Okla) instruments to apical size #35 (group 1) and 22 teeth with Pow-R instruments (Moyco/Union Broach, York, Pa) to apical size #50 (group 2), in the presence of a standard quantity of phosphate-buffered saline solution placed in the canal. After instrumentation, the medium from each canal was collected with paper points and its radioactivity was counted with liquid scintillation spectrometry. The mean (3)H level recovered with instrumentation of canals in group 1 was 75 cpm (+/- 29, standard deviation) and in group 2 was 123 cpm (+/- 50, standard deviation). A 2-tailed Mann-Whitney test indicated that the radioactivity of samples from group 2 was significantly higher than that of samples from group 1. The results suggested that instrumentation to an apical size of #50, as performed with the Pow-R instruments, was more effective in

  10. Exopolysaccharide dispelled by calcium hydroxide with volatile vehicles related to bactericidal effect for root canal medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Lei

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Enterococcus faecalis is the dominant microbial species responsible for persistent apical periodontitis with ability to deeply penetrate into the dentin. Exopolysaccharides (EPS contribute to the pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance of E. faecalis. Our aim was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide (CH, camphorated parachlorophenol (CMCP, and chlorhexidine (CHX against E. faecalis in dentinal tubules. Material and Methods: Decoronated single-canal human teeth and semicylindrical dentin blocks were incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks. Samples were randomly assigned to six medication groups for 1 week (n=10 per group: CH + 40% glycerin-water solution (1:1, wt/vol; CMCP; 2% CHX; CH + CMCP (1:1, wt/vol; CH + CMCP (2:3, wt/vol; and saline. Bacterial samples were collected and assayed for colony-forming units. After dentin blocks were split longitudinally, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the proportion of viable bacteria and EPS production in dentin. Results: CMCP exhibited the best antimicrobial activity, while CH was the least sensitive against E. faecalis (p0.05. CH combined with CMCP inhibited EPS synthesis by E. faecalis, which sensitized biofilms to antibacterial substances. Moreover, increasing concentrations of CMCP decreased EPS matrix formation, which effectively sensitized biofilms to disinfection agents. Conclusion: The EPS matrix dispelled by CH paste with CMCP may be related to its bactericidal effect; the visualization and analysis of EPS formation and microbial colonization in dentin may be a useful approach to verify medicaments for antimicrobial therapy.

  11. Correlation of panoramic radiographs and cone beam computed tomography in the assessment of a superimposed relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted third molars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Nah, Kyung Soo; Cho, Bong Hae [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    This study evaluated the association between cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic radiographs in the assessment of a superimposed relationship between the mandibular canal and impacted third molars. The study samples consisted of 175 impacted third molars from 131 patients who showed a superimposed relationship between the mandibular canal and third molars on panoramic radiographs and were referred for the examination of the mandibular canal with CBCT. Panoramic images were evaluated for the darkening of the root and the interruption of the mandibular canal wall. CBCT images were used to assess the buccolingual position of the mandibular canal relative to the third molar, the proximity of the roots to the canal, and lingual cortical bone loss. The association of the panoramic and CBCT findings was examined using a Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Panoramic radiographic signs were statistically associated with CBCT findings (P<0.01). In cases of darkening roots, lingual cortical bone loss or buccally positioned canals were more frequent. In cases in which the mandibular canal wall was interrupted on panoramic radiographs, contact or lingually positioned canals were more frequent. The results of this study suggest that contact between the mandibular third molar and canal and a lingually positioned canal could be more frequently observed in cases of the interruption of the white line of the mandibular canal and that there could be more lingual cortical loss in cases of darkening roots.

  12. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  13. Complete atrioventricular canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limongelli Giuseppe

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complete atrioventricular canal (CAVC, also referred to as complete atrioventricular septal defect, is characterised by an ostium primum atrial septal defect, a common atrioventricular valve and a variable deficiency of the ventricular septum inflow. CAVC is an uncommon congenital heart disease, accounting for about 3% of cardiac malformations. Atrioventricular canal occurs in two out of every 10,000 live births. Both sexes are equally affected and a striking association with Down syndrome was found. Depending on the morphology of the superior leaflet of the common atrioventricular valve, 3 types of CAVC have been delineated (type A, B and C, according to Rastelli's classification. CAVC results in a significant interatrial and interventricular systemic-to-pulmonary shunt, thus inducing right ventricular pressure and volume overload and pulmonary hypertension. It becomes symptomatic in infancy due to congestive heart failure and failure to thrive. Diagnosis of CAVC might be suspected from electrocardiographic and chest X-ray findings. Echocardiography confirms it and gives anatomical details. Over time, pulmonary hypertension becomes irreversible, thus precluding the surgical therapy. This is the reason why cardiac catheterisation is not mandatory in infants (less than 6 months but is indicated in older patients if irreversible pulmonary hypertension is suspected. Medical treatment (digitalis, diuretics, vasodilators plays a role only as a bridge toward surgery, usually performed between the 3rd and 6th month of life.

  14. Optical spectroscopy study of transparent noncarious human dentin and dentin-enamel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros G.; Balooch, Mehdi; Marshall, Grayson W.; Marshall, Sally J.; Gallagher, R. R.

    2000-03-01

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  15. Optical Spectroscopy Study of Transparent Non-Carious Human Dentin and Dentin-Enamel Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.W.; Marshall, S.J.; Gallagher, R.R.; Demos, S.

    1999-12-14

    Improving our knowledge of the morphology, composition and properties of the dentin, enamel, and the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) is vital for the development of improved restorative materials and clinical placement techniques. Most studies of dental tissues have used light microscopy for characterization. In our investigation, the spectroscopic properties of normal and non-carious transparent human root dentin, and the dentin-enamel junction were investigated using emission imaging microscopy, and micro-spectroscopy. Experimental results reveal new information on the structural and biochemical characteristics of these dental tissues.

  16. Human treated dentin matrix as a natural scaffold for complete human dentin tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Guo, Weihua; Yang, Bo; Guo, Lijuan; Sheng, Lei; Chen, Gang; Li, Ye; Zou, Qing; Xie, Dan; An, Xiaoxue; Chen, Yali; Tian, Weidong

    2011-07-01

    An essential aspect of tooth tissue engineering is the identification of suitable scaffolding materials to support cell growth and tissue regeneration. Treated dentin matrix (TDM) from a rat has recently been shown to be a suitable scaffold for rat dentin regeneration. However, due to species-specific differences, it remains unclear whether a similar fabrication method can be extended to human TDM and human dentin regeneration. Therefore, this present study explored the biological response to a human TDM (hTDM) created using a modified dentin treatment method. Various biological characteristics, including cell proliferation, cell migration, cell viability, and cytotoxity were investigated. To assess the inductive capacity of hTDM, dental follicle cells (DFCs) were combined with hTDM and were implanted in vivo for 8 weeks in a mouse model. The resulting grafts were studied histologically. The results showed hTDM released dentinogenic factors, indicating that hTDM could play a sustained role in odontogenesis. DFC attachment, growth, viability, and cytotoxicity on the surface of hTDM showed a notable improvement over those on calcium phosphate controls. Most importantly, in vivo hTDM induced and supported regeneration of complete dentin tissues, which expressed dentin markers DSP and DMP-1. As cells in and around the regenerated dentin were positive for human mitochondria, implanted DFCs and hTDM were responsible for the regenerated dentin tissues. In conclusion, hTDM is indicated as an ideal biomaterial for human dentin regeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Microtensile bond strength of cad-cam and pressed-ceramic inlays to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, A Nilgün; Inan, Ozgür; Inan, Erkan; Oztürk, Bora

    2007-04-01

    CAD-CAM system is popular because of high esthetic and short fabrication time. But, there is limited information available about the microtensile bonding of luting cements to CAD-CAM inlays and to dentin. The aim of this study was to examine the bond strength of CAD-CAM (Cerec 3) and pressed-ceramic (IPS Empress 2) inlays to dentin surface by microtensile testing using two luting cements. Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were made in forty extracted molar teeth. An occlusal reduction of 2 mm was made; the bucco-lingual width of the proximal boxes was 4 mm, the occlusal width 3 mm and the depth of the pulpal and axial walls 2 mm. The proximal boxes were extended 1 mm below the cemento-enamel junction. Teeth were randomly assigned to 2 groups to evaluate the bonding of 2 ceramic systems, Cerec 3 (Group I) and IPS Empress 2 (Group II), to dentin. Each of the 2 groups were further divided into 2 luting cement groups, Panavia F (Group A) and Variolink II (Group B). After cementation, the teeth were sectioned into two 1.2x1.2 mm wide 'I' shape sections. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used to evaluate the results. The mean microtensile bond strengths of Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2 bonding to dentin with luting agents in MPa were Panavia F (13.98+/-3.44), Variolink II (14.19+/-3.12) and Panavia F (15.12+/-3.15), Variolink II (15.45+/-3.08) respectively. No significant differences were found among the 2 ceramic systems (P>.05) and 2 luting cements with regard to dentin bond strengths (P>.05). There was no difference found between the dentin bond strength of the Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2 inlays cemented with two luting cements.

  18. Effect of dentin conditioning on retention of airborne-particle-abraded, adhesively luted glass fiber-reinforced resin posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albashaireh, Zakereyya S M; Ghazal, Muhamad; Kern, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    The smear layer covering root canal dentin as a result of post space preparation procedures may negatively affect the retention of adhesively cemented glass fiber-reinforced resin posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the retention of airborne-particle-abraded glass fiber posts luted with 3 different bonding systems after conditioning the canal dentin with acidic conditioning methods. Post spaces were prepared in 6 groups of 8 endodontically treated single-rooted teeth. Glass fiber-reinforced resin posts were airborne-particle abraded and luted after etching the canal dentin with phosphoric acid and/or applying XP Bond, Clearfil New Bond, or ED Primer. The groups with their respective etching time, primer, and cement combinations were as follows: XP15: 15 seconds of phosphoric acid treatment, XP Bond and Calibra; XP30: 30 seconds of phosphoric acid treatment, XP Bond and Calibra; NB15: 15 seconds of phosphoric acid treatment, Clearfil New Bond and Panavia 21; NB30: 30 seconds of phosphoric acid treatment, Clearfil New Bond and Panavia 21; ED: ED Primer only and Panavia 21; ED15: 15 seconds phosphoric acid treatment, ED Primer and Panavia 21. Specimens were stored in water for 30 days and subjected to simulated aging conditions. Post retention was measured in tension at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by post hoc comparisons using Langley method (alpha =.05). The dislodged posts and canals were examined microscopically at x8 and x20 magnification to evaluate the mode of failure. For each group, the mean (SD) retention in N was: XP15: 376.8 (39); XP30: 305.5 (27); NB15: 370.3 (31); NB30: 297.6 (52); ED: 301.6 (43); ED15: 373.8 (46). The retention values of ED15, NB15, and XP15 were significantly higher than those of ED, NB30, and XP30 groups, respectively. Microscopic evaluation demonstrated that the failure mode was primarily mixed. Luting posts with Panavia 21 or Calibra after etching

  19. An ex vivo comparison of detection ability of three methods in discovering of MB2 canal in maxillary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbanzadeh A.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: A considerable percentage of failure in Endodontic treatments in maxillary molars is attributed to undiscovered second mesiobuccal canal (MB2.There are different methods for discovering and accessing to this canal. The purpose of this ex vivo study was to compare the detection ability of three methods (direct look, fiberoptic loup and surgical microscope to find MB2 after troughing with ultrasonic. "nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, we selected 90 extracted maxillary molars (45 first and 45 second molars in which after access cavity preparation MB2 canal was not discovered by direct vision and endodontic explorer. They were divided into 3 groups (n=30. The dentinal shelf between mesiobuccal and palatal canals was eliminated by an endodontic ultrasonic tip (troughing. After that, first group was searched by direct vision, second group by a loup and fiberoptic light and third group by dental operating microscope. Data were analyzed, specificity and sensitivity were calculated. "nResults: The results showed that 21%, 61%, and 92% of MB2 canals after troughing was found by direct vision, fiberoptic loup, and surgical microscope, respectively. "nConclusion: Based on the results of this study, surgical microscope and loup with fiberoptic are preferred methods for discovering MB2 canal. Troughing with ultrasonic can help find MB2 canal in all methods.

  20. Influence of Cervical Preflaring on the Incidence of Root Dentin Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Damião, Monique Sobral; Pereira, Thiago Machado; Filho, Gilberto Siebert; Miranda-Pedro, Fabio Luis; Luiz de Oliveira da Rosa, Welligton; Piva, Evandro; Guedes, Orlando Aguirre

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated the influence of cervical preflaring on the incidence of root dentin defects after root canal preparation. Extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and allocated to 1 control group and 12 experimental groups (n = 15). Teeth in the control group were left unprepared, whereas the others were prepared using 2 reciprocating single-file systems (Reciproc and WaveOne [WO]), 3 full-sequence rotary systems (ProTaper Universal, ProTaper Next [PTN], and ProFile), and K-files driven by an oscillatory system, with and without cervical preflaring. Roots were then horizontally sectioned at 4, 8, and 12 mm from the apex, stained with 1% methylene blue, and viewed through a stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. Slices were inspected and the absence/presence of defects (fractures, partial cracks, and craze lines) recorded. Data were analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene tests followed by the Tukey post hoc test at a significance level of P  .05). Cervical preflaring significantly reduced the incidence of fractures and other defects in the WO and PTN groups (P < .05). All instruments caused root dentin defects, regardless of the enlargement or not of the cervical portion. Cervical preflaring was associated with a lower incidence of defects, mainly in root canals prepared with WO and PTN. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Labyrinthine artery aneurysm as an internal auditory canal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Rodney C; Konia, Thomas; Brunberg, James

    2014-08-01

    We present the first case report of a labyrinthine artery aneurysm masquerading as an internal auditory canal tumor. A 72-year-old woman presented with sudden onset right facial paralysis, facial pain, hearing loss, and vertigo. She demonstrated dense right-sided facial paralysis involving all branches of the facial nerve, left beating horizontal nystagmus, and anacusis of the right ear. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast demonstrated a 6 × 7 mm peripherally enhancing lesion with lack of central uptake filling the right internal auditory canal. The patient elected to proceed with translabyrinthine approach to the internal auditory canal for definitive resection of the mass as well as to decompress the neural structures of the internal auditory canal in an attempt to recover neural function, particularly of the facial nerve. Intraoperatively, the internal auditory canal mass was resected with minimal difficulty, with intraoperative dissection notable for brisk bleeding at the medial base of the tumor just as the tumor was dissected off its medial fibrous attachments. Final pathology of the resected mass revealed a blood vessel with mucinous degeneration of the medial layer of the vessel wall, with immunohistochemical staining confirming the presence and structure of aneurysmal blood vessel.

  2. Knowledge of and management attitude regarding dentin hypersensitivity among dentists from a West African country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, Fatou Leye; Ndiaye, Fatou Gaye; Faye, Babacar; Bane, Khaly; Ngom, Papa Ibrahima; Ndong, Pierre Marie Koumakh

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess knowledge of, and management attitude of dentists regarding dentin hypersensitivity. The study involved all the dentists from private and public sectors, exerting in Senegal. The following data were requested from the surveyed dentists using an anonymous questionnaire; sociodemographics (i.e. age, gender, area of activity, etc.) and knowledge on triggering factor, type of pain, diagnosis, preventive and curative procedures. Out of the 238 dentists who received the questionnaire, 68.9% returned properly filled forms. They were 116 males and 48 females with a mean age of 41.99 ± 8.50 years. Eighty three percent of the participants had a good understanding of the characteristics of pain related to DH and 92% recognized chemical and thermal stimuli as triggering factor while mechanical stimulus was not evoked. Many responders (90.9%) did not have any idea of the mechanism for pain transmission across the dentin. Regarding diagnosis technique, 68% use mechanical stimuli to elicit DH pain. Regarding management procedure, the use of desensitizing tooth paste is the mostly chosen option followed by professional topical application of fluoride. More than 1/3rd of the surveyed dentists confess resorting to root canal to manage DH. We recommend incorporation of basic science knowledge on orofacial pain and competencies to manage painful conditions like dentin hypersensitivity. Also, health regulatory institutions should make continuing dental education a requirement to preserve the dental licensure.

  3. Effect on bonding of curing through dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, S; Asmussen, E

    1991-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the thickness of dentin (1, 2, or 3 mm) placed between the light guide and the composite resin on the shear bond strength to dentin treated with a simplified Gluma system. The effects of the thickness of composite resin (2 or 3 mm), irradiation time (20, 40, or 60 sec), and shade (universal or brown) were also examined. The results showed that the thickness of dentin influenced bonding and interacted with the other three variables. It is suggested that dentin located between the light guide and composite resin may attenuate the light aimed at the bonding interface in the same manner as a layer of composite resin.

  4. The use of plastic models for teaching root canal cleansing and shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eftekhar B

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of root canal models in endodontics education is of high importance. So, in this article"na new method is presented that the students can produce these models with simple and low cost"ninstruments."nThese plastic models are made of polyester which is low cost, available and has the approximate cutting"nproperties of dentin. The best molds were disposable syringes due to their low cost, availability and"nproducing smooth surfaces on polyester models. A spreader with desired curve and tapering is used for"nproducing canals. Rockwell A hardness coefficient of polyester is "33", which is near dentin "31" and"nforeign made models "35.5". Since these polyester models can tolerate up to 280°C and have acceptable"nresistance to chloroform, all root canal therapy techniques such as vertical condensation and retreatments"nare practicable. Their transparency encourage the students to work on them. As a result, the use of these"nmodels is recommended for endodontics training.

  5. Identification of dentin phosphophoryn localization by histochemical stainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Y; Fujisawa, R; Sasaki, S

    1986-01-01

    Phosphophoryn, the most abundant of the dentin non-collagenous proteins, has been considered to be related in function to the mineralization process. In the present study, identification of dentin phosphophoryn localization was attempted using newly developed, precautionary histological methods by which phosphophoryn was retained in the sections during the specimen preparation and stained selectively in situ. Phosphophoryn was found to be present widely in all of the calcified dentin except the mantle dentin, the external, first-formed portion of dentin, but was not found in the predentin, the inner, uncalcified layer of dentin. These results indicate that phosphophoryn is apparently related to the mineral phase of calcified dentin and that the mineralization process of mantle dentin, which is formed before the odontoblasts are fully differentiated, may be different from that of circumpulpal dentin.

  6. [Multi-factoriality of dentine hypersensitivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojsin, Ivana; Petrović, Ljubomir; Stojanac, Igor; Drobac, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity has been defined as a sharp, short pain arising from exposed dentin in response to stimuli typically thermal, evaporative tactile, osmoticor, chemical and which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or pathology. The most affected patients range in age from 20 to 40. The following teeth tend to be most sensitive: cuspids, premnolars and incisors, location-concentrated on the facial surface. MORPHOLOGICAL BASES OF DENTINE HYPERSENSITIVITY: Sensitive teeth have much greater numbers of open tubules per unit area and the average diameter of tubules is almost 2 times greater than tubules in nonsensitive teeth. MECHANISMS OF DENTINE HYPERSENSITIVITY: The most widely accepted theory of how the pain occurs is Brannstroms theory. Dentine hypersensitivity represents a condition of presumable multifactorial pathology. Two processes are essential for its development: (1) dentin must be exposed through either genetic disturbance, enamel defect (lamellae, tufs and spindles), loss of enamel (erosion, abrasion, attrition, abfraction), gingival recession with rapid loss of cementum and (2) the dentin tubules must be open to both the oral cavity and the pulp. Diagnostic protocol for this condition consisted of Medical, Dental Dietary, Oral Hygiene History and Inra-oral examinations with air indexing method. Differential Dianosis: We must take into consideration a numnber of variables such as: dental caries, cracked tooth, restorative sensitivity, medication sensitivity, bleaching sensitivity and abscessed or non-vital tooth. Dentin hypersensitivity is a problem that bothers many patients. Many conditions share the symptoms of tooth sensitivity so differential diagnosis is essential for suitable treatment or preventive measures.

  7. Dentin Biomodification Potential Depends on Polyphenol Source

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, T.R.; Vidal, C.M.P.; Phansalkar, R.S.; Todorova, I.; Napolitano, J.G.; McAlpine, J.B.; Chen, S.N.; Pauli, G.F.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Although proanthocyanidins (PACs) modify dentin, the effectiveness of different PAC sources and the correlation with their specific chemical composition are still unknown. This study describes the chemical profiling of natural PAC-rich extracts from 7 plants using ultra high pressure/performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) to determine the overall composition of these extracts and, in parallel, comprehensively evaluate their effect on dentin properties. The total polyphenol content of the e...

  8. Neural elements in dental pulp and dentin.

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, P N R

    1995-01-01

    This article addresses the structural and quantitative aspects of human tooth innervation and briefly considers the functions and clinical relevance of tooth axons. The classification of peripheral axons, the pulpal and dentinal innervation, and the theories of dentin sensitivity are discussed. Quantitative studies on tooth innervation are also reviewed. Human premolars receive about 2300 axons at the root-apex of which about 13% are myelinated and 87% are nonmyelinated fibers. Most apical my...

  9. Dentine in a capsule: Clinical case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Mallikarjuna Kenchappa; Shilpi Gupta; Puneet Gupta; Priyamvada Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Biodentine TM , a calcium silicate based material has been popular now and can be used as an alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) due to superior physical and biologic properties. It has been known by several terms as Biodentine, dentin substitute, and RD 94. It has varied clinical applications such as apexification, apexogenesis, pulpotomy, internal resorption, root perforation repair, retrograde filling, pulp capping procedure, and dentin replacement. This article describes the c...

  10. Immunohistochemical and histochemical analysis of newly formed tissues in root canal space transplanted with dental pulp stem cells plus platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yuan; Huang, George T-J; Zhang, Chengfei

    2014-10-01

    Tissue regeneration in root canals after pulpectomy can be achieved by transplantation of autologous dental pulp stem cells and/or platelet-rich plasma. However, the identity of the newly formed tissue in the pulp space has been only examined by histologic analysis. This study aimed to apply immunohistochemistry and histochemistry to detect specific markers in the newly generated tissues after root canal regenerative treatment. In our previous study, 32 root canals in 4 mature dogs were treated with a pulp regeneration procedure after pulpectomy using either blood clot, transplantation of dental pulp stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, or a combination of cells and plasma. In the present study, the tissues were examined for the expression of periostin to detect periodontal ligament tissue, nestin and dentin sialoprotein for odontoblasts, and bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin for bone tissues. Samples were also stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) as a marker for osteoclastic lineages. Continuous periostin-positive tissue was observed extending from the periodontal ligament into the inner canal surface in which the mineral islands were surrounded by weak periostin staining. There was also positive staining for TRAP, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin in the canal space, suggesting the presence of bone tissue. A layer of mineralized tissue along the inner surface of the root canal was negative for TRAP, suggesting the tissue likely to be cementum. In all samples, no nestin-positive reaction was observed, whereas dentin sialoprotein was detected in PDL, dentinal tubules, and intracanal fibrous tissues. There was no difference between any of the 4 groups. The tissues formed in the dog mature root canals after regenerative endodontic procedures are not pulp tissues but mainly periodontal tissues. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Root Canal Irrigation with Saline, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Citric Acid,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    endodontic techniques; citric acid for root canal irrigation 4410,ABSTACgmf --,-,m- ,-rms n roc"---’This Study used a scanning electron microscope and a...wall is instrumented during canal preparation and that the smeared layer seems to be found only where endodontic instruments have scraped the surface...between the extremes. It was also decided to use a magnification of 75X to evaluate the superficial debris and 800X to evaluate the smeared layer

  12. Tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate dentin bonding agent on dentin surface at various drying techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several dentin surface drying techniques to provide a perfect resin penetration on dentin. There are two techniques which will be compared in this study. The first technique was by rubbing dentin surface gently using cotton pellet twice, this technique is called blot dry technique. The second technique is by air blowing dentin surface for one second and continued by rubbing dentin surface gently using moist cotton. Purpose: This experiment was aimed to examine the best dentin surface drying techniques after 37% phosphoric acid etching to obtain the optimum tensile bond strength between hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and dentin surface. Method: Bovine teeth was prepared flat to obtain the dentin surface and than was etched using 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. After etching the dentin was cleaned using 20 cc plain water and dried with blot dry techniques (group I, or dried with air blow for one second (group II, or dried with air blow for one second, and continued with rubbing gently using moist cotton pellet (group III, and without any drying as control group (group IV. After these drying, the dentin surfaces were applied with resin dentin bonding agent and put into plunger facing the composite mould. The antagonist plunger was filled with composite resin. After 24 hours, therefore bond strength was measured using Autograph. Result: Data obtained was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA with 95% confidence level and continued with LSD test on p≤0.05. The result showed that the highest tensile bond strength was on group I, while the lowest on group IV. Group II and IV, III and IV, II and III did not show signigicant difference (p>0.05. Conclusion: Dentin surface drying techniques through gentle rubbing using cotton pellet twice (blot dry technique gave the greatest tensile bond strength.Latar belakang masalah: Tehnik pengeringan permukaan dentin agar resin dapat penetrasi dengan sempurna adalah dengan cara pengusapan secara

  13. The cartilage bone junction and its implications for deep canal hearing instrument fittings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus; Darkner, Sune

    2011-01-01

    , or like talking in a barrel. This problem is caused by the occlusion effect. The effect is primarily due to vibrations of the walls in the soft part of the ear canal, which generate a sound pressure that is trapped in the cavity between the tip of the occluding hearing aid and the tympanic membrane....... If the hearing aid is fitted with a seal in the bony portion of the ear canal, preventing vibration in the soft part of the ear canal from reaching the tympanic membrane, then occlusion problems can be solved or at least reduced in most cases....

  14. Occlusion of dentin tubules with antibacterial ammonium hexafluorosilicate solution for the prevention of dentin caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shingo; Suge, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Kunio; Matsuo, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the degree of penetration of an ammonium hexafluorosilicate [SiF: (NH4)2SiF6] solution containing various antibacterial agents into dentin and the depth of dentin tubule occlusion by the precipitate. Various antibacterial SiF solutions were prepared with the addition to chlorhexidine (CHX), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), isopropyl methylphenol (IPMP), or epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), respectively. Two types of dentin disks were prepared from extracted teeth. One was a dentin surface covered with a smear layer, and the other treated with EDTA for 2 minutes to remove the smear layer and open dentin tubules. Then, the disks were treated with SiF solution with or without antibacterial agents for 3 minutes. The dentin surface and a longitudinally divided surface were observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) immediately after SiF treatment and after immersion in synthetic saliva for 7 days. SEM photographs demonstrated that dentin tubules after treatment with SiF were occluded homogeneously and similar to those on conventional SiF treatment regardless of the addition of an antibacterial agent. However, the depth of occlusion became significantly shallower when SiF was applied to dentin specimens covered with a smear layer.

  15. Hood Canal Steelhead - Hood Canal Steelhead Supplementation Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hood Canal Steelhead Project is a 17-year before-after-control-impact experiment that tests the effects of supplementation on natural steelhead populations in...

  16. Fusarium solani fungal infection of the lateral line canal system in captive scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini) in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, G L; Brock, J A; Kaiser, S

    1995-10-01

    Two of five scalloped hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna lewini) captured May 1987 in Hawaii (USA) developed granulomatous exudative mycotic dermatitis localized in the lateral line canal system. The lesion initially was noted in the cephalic canals, but over a period of months extended into the lateral canal. Fusarium solani and Vibrio spp. were isolated from the canal exudate of both sharks. Bacterial colonies were not observed in the canal walls or surrounding tissues. Fusarium solani infection resulted in a chronic physical and behavioral deterioration of the two sharks; one shark was euthanized in September 1988 and the other in July 1989. This is the first report of Fusarium solani infection in the lateral line canal system and the third account in hammerhead sharks.

  17. Pengaruh Konsentrasi dan Lama Aplikasi Sodium Hipoklorit (NaOCL sebagai Bahan Irigasi Saluran Akar terhadap Kekuatan Geser Perlekatan Siler Berbahan Dasar Resin Pada Dentin Saluran Akar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunjung Nugraheni

    2012-07-01

    menit dengan kelompok yang diirigasi NaOCI 5% selama 10 menit. Kesimpulan. Kekuatan geser perlekatan siler berbahan dasar resin pada dentin saluran akar berbeda setelah diirigasi NaOCI dengan konsentrasi dan waktu irigasi yang berbeda.   Background. Biomechanichal preparationin of root canal treatment used 0,5-5,25% sodium Hypochlorite as root canal irrigation, that may effect to physical properties of dentin. The purpose of this study was to find out the effect of concentration and duration application of sodium hypochlorite to shear bond strength of sealer resin based to root canal dentin. Methods. Thirthy premolar were splitted buccolingual then pulp tissue were cleaned out, smoothed and fixed into acrylic resin cast. They were devided into 2 group, group I were soaking into NaOCI 2,5% group II were soaking into NaOCI 5%. Group I and II were devided into 3 subgroup, group a were soaking 5 minutes, group b were soaking 10 minutes. Group c were soaking 15 minutes. Then sealer cast were fixed and filled with sealer resin-based, and incubated for 74 hours. They were tested for shear bond strength with Universal Testing Machine. The data were analyzed with two way Anava and LSD. Result. Two way Avana show that shear bond strength of sealer resin-based to root canal after irrigation with different concentration and duration application of sodium hypochlorite are significant. Conclusion. Shear bond strength of sealer resin-based to root canal dentin after irrigation with different concentration and duration application of sodium hypochlorite are different.

  18. The effects of sodium hypochlorite (5.25%), Chlorhexidine (2%), and Glyde File Prep on the bond strength of MTA-dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ping; Peng, Bin; Fan, Bing; Fan, Mingwen; Bian, Zhuan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sodium hypochlorite (5.25%), chlorhexidine (2%), and Glyde File Prep on the bond strengths of MTA-dentin in vitro. Standardized dentin disks were prepared and the central hole in each disk was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The specimens were randomly divided into four groups to be immersed in saline, 5.25% NaOCl, 2% chlorhexidine, and Glyde File Prep for 2 hours. The bond strengths of MTA-dentin were measured with a material testing system (MTS) and the fractured surfaces on the root walls were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Compared with the control group, the bond strengths were significantly lower in Glyde File Prep group (p chlorhexidine group or in the NaOCl group (p > 0.05). This study suggested that Glyde File Prep could negatively affect the bond strengths of MTA-dentin.

  19. Method for Constructing Standardized Simulated Root Canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Bongert, Udo; Weine, Franklin S.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of visual and manipulative aids, clear resin blocks with root-canal-like spaces, for simulation of root canals is explained. Time, materials, and techniques are discussed. The method allows for comparison of canals, creation of any configuration of canals, and easy presentation during instruction. (MSE)

  20. Effects of Novel 3D Antibiotic-Containing Electrospun Scaffolds on Dentin Discoloration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Margaret Louise A.; Münchow, Eliseu A.; Albuquerque, Maria T. P.; Spolnik, Kenneth J.; Hara, Anderson T.; Bottino, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although intracanal application of the triple antibiotic paste (TAP) may offer advantages (e.g., disinfection), this practice has been associated with significant drawbacks, including tooth discoloration. In this study, the color change of dentin was monitored during treatment with distinct TAP pastes and novel tubular-shaped three-dimensional (3D) electrospun scaffolds containing minocycline-MINO or doxycycline-DOX. Methods Two TAP pastes (TAPMINO–MINO, metronidazole/MET, and ciprofloxacin/CIP; and TAPDOX–DOX, MET, and CIP), four scaffold-based groups containing MINO or DOX, at distinct concentrations; one antibiotic-free scaffold (Scaffold); and one untreated group (Control) were investigated. Human canines were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) and tubular-shaped scaffolds or paste were placed into the root canals and sealed. Color measurements (CIEL*a*b* parameters) were performed at baseline and after 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Color changes were expressed as ΔE* values. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were also performed on the specimens after treatment. Data were analyzed using Repeated-measures ANOVA (alpha=0.05). Results All antibiotic-containing groups led to greater discoloration than the antibiotic-free groups. A severe discoloration occurred after 1 day. At the end of the experiment, antibiotic-treated samples exhibited crusts/agglomerates over the dentin surface, which totally or partially obliterated the dentinal tubules. The presence of MINO resulted in greater color change than DOX. Conclusion Scaffolds containing MINO or DOX produced similar color change to dentin when compared to their respective TAP systems, although DOX-related discoloration was less pronounced. PMID:26602451

  1. Bond strength of different endodontic sealers to dentin: push-out test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Vicente Baroni Barbizam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of different root canal sealers to dentin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty extracted single-rooted human teeth were examined and the coronal and middle thirds of the canals were prepared with a 1.50 mm post drill (FibreKor Post System, Pentron. The teeth were allocated in two experimental groups, irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl+17% EDTA or saline solution (control group and instrumented using Race rotary files (FKG to a size #40 at the working length. Then, the groups were divided into four subgroups and filled with Epiphany sealer (Group 1, EndoREZ (Group 2, AH26 (Group 3 and Grossman's Sealer (Group 4. After 2 weeks of storage in 100% humidity at 37ºC, all teeth were sectioned transversally into 2-mm-thick discs. Push-out tests were performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. The maximum load at failure was recorded and expressed in MPa. RESULTS: Means (±SD in root canals irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA were: G1 (21.6±6.0, G2 (15.2±3.7, G3 (14.6±4.5 and G4 (11.7±4.1.Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test showed the highest bond strength for the Epiphany's group (p< 0.01 when compared to the other tested sealers. Saline solution decreased the values of bond-strength (p<0.05 for all sealers. CONCLUSION: Epiphany sealer presented higher bond strength values to dentin in both irrigating protocols, and the use of 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA increased the bond strength values for all sealers.

  2. Bond strength of different endodontic sealers to dentin: push-out test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbizam, João Vicente Baroni; Trope, Martin; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario; Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Teixeira, Fabricio Batista

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of different root canal sealers to dentin. Forty extracted single-rooted human teeth were examined and the coronal and middle thirds of the canals were prepared with a 1.50 mm post drill (FibreKor Post System, Pentron). The teeth were allocated in two experimental groups, irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl+17% EDTA or saline solution (control group) and instrumented using Race rotary files (FKG) to a size #40 at the working length. Then, the groups were divided into four subgroups and filled with Epiphany sealer (Group 1), EndoREZ (Group 2), AH26 (Group 3) and Grossman's Sealer (Group 4). After 2 weeks of storage in 100% humidity at 37ºC, all teeth were sectioned transversally into 2-mm-thick discs. Push-out tests were performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. The maximum load at failure was recorded and expressed in MPa. Means (±SD) in root canals irrigated with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA were: G1 (21.6±6.0), G2 (15.2±3.7), G3 (14.6±4.5) and G4 (11.7±4.1).Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test showed the highest bond strength for the Epiphany's group (p< 0.01) when compared to the other tested sealers. Saline solution decreased the values of bond-strength (p<0.05) for all sealers. Epiphany sealer presented higher bond strength values to dentin in both irrigating protocols, and the use of 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA increased the bond strength values for all sealers.

  3. Effect of chitosan-ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid on Enterococcus faecalis dentinal biofilm and smear layer removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethapriya, Nagarajan; Subbiya, Arunajatesan; Padmavathy, Kesavaram; Mahalakshmi, Krishnan; Vivekanandan, Paramasivam; Sukumaran, Virudhachalam Ganapathy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of chitosan and chitosan-ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) (3:1,1:1,1:3) in comparison with 5.2% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in disinfecting Enterococcus faecalis biofilm on root canal dentin and in the removal of smear layer with minimal erosion. Materials and Methods: Seventy single-rooted extracted human mandibular premolars (n = 70) were selected for the study. Forty tooth samples were biomechanically prepared, vertically sectioned, and sterilized by autoclaving. The tooth sections were artificially infected with E. faecalis (ATCC 29212 [n = 35] and clinical isolate [SBEF2, n = 35]) to form mature dentinal biofilm in vitro. The tooth samples were treated with the test solutions: chitosan and chitosan-EDTA (3:1, 1:1, 1:3), and the killing time was determined. The smear layer removal ability of the test solutions (Group A: chitosan-EDTA [1:1], Group B: EDTA, Group C: control) (n = 10 tooth/group) was assessed. Results: Chitosan and chitosan-EDTA (3:1, 1:1, 1:3) exhibited antibacterial activity against both the strains of E. faecalis. Chitosan and chitosan-EDTA caused 3 log reduction in the viable count of the sessile cells of E. faecalis at 15 min while 5.2% NaOCl exhibited 99.98% inhibition at 15 min. Chitosan-EDTA (1:1) was found to be effective in removing the smear layer and showed lesser erosion than EDTA at the coronal and middle portions. Conclusion: Chitosan-EDTA (1:1) is a potential root canal irrigant that performs a dual role – root canal disinfection and smear layer removal. PMID:27656070

  4. Regulation of reactionary dentin formation by odontoblasts in response to polymicrobial invasion of dentin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charadram, Nattida; Farahani, Ramin M; Harty, Derek; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V; Hunter, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Odontoblast synthesis of dentin proceeds through discrete but overlapping phases characterized by formation of a patterned organic matrix followed by remodelling and active mineralization. Microbial invasion of dentin in caries triggers an adaptive response by odontoblasts, culminating in formation of a structurally altered reactionary dentin, marked by biochemical and architectonic modifications including diminished tubularity. Scanning electron microscopy of the collagen framework in reactionary dentin revealed a radically modified yet highly organized meshwork as indicated by fractal and lacunarity analyses. Immuno-gold labelling demonstrated increased density and regular spatial distribution of dentin sialoprotein (DSP) in reactionary dentin. DSP contributes putative hydroxyapatite nucleation sites on the collagen scaffold. To further dissect the formation of this altered dentin matrix, the associated enzymatic machinery was investigated. Analysis of extracted dentin matrix indicated increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the reactionary zone referenced to physiologic dentin. Likewise, gene expression analysis of micro-dissected odontoblast layer revealed up-regulation of MMP-2. Parallel up-regulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and membrane type 1- matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) was observed in response to caries. Next, modulation of odontoblastic dentinogenic enzyme repertoire was addressed. In the odontoblast layer expression of Toll-like receptors was markedly altered in response to bacterial invasion. In carious teeth TLR-2 and the gene encoding the corresponding adaptor protein MyD88 were down-regulated whereas genes encoding TLR-4 and adaptor proteins TRAM and Mal/TIRAP were up-regulated. TLR-4 signalling mediated by binding of bacterial products has been linked to up-regulation of MMP-2. Further, increased expression of genes encoding components of the TGF-β signalling pathway, namely SMAD-2 and SMAD-4

  5. Influence of Contracted Endodontic Access on Root Canal Geometry: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alovisi, Mario; Pasqualini, Damiano; Musso, Edoardo; Bobbio, Elena; Giuliano, Carlotta; Mancino, Davide; Scotti, Nicola; Berutti, Elio

    2018-01-12

    Contracted endodontic cavities (CECs) have developed from the concept of minimally invasive dentistry and provide an alternative to traditional endodontic cavities (TECs). They have been designed in an effort to preserve the mechanical stability of teeth. The contracted cavity design preserves more of the dentin but may influence the geometric shaping parameters. The aim of this micro-computed tomographic study was to evaluate the influence of contracted endodontic cavities on the preservation of the original root canal anatomy after shaping with nickel-titanium rotary instruments. Thirty extracted human mandibular molars with fully formed apices and independent mesial canals were randomly assigned to group 1 (TEC) and group 2 (CEC). Each group was shaped using ProGlider (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and WaveOne Gold (Dentsply Maillefer). Irrigation was performed with 10% EDTA and 5% sodium hypochlorite. Samples were scanned before and after canal shaping to match canal volumes (SkyScan; Bruker microCT, Kontich, Belgium [100 kV, 100 μA, and 15-μm resolution]), and images were analyzed to evaluate canal volumes, surface areas, and centroid shift on cross sections at -1 mm and -3 mm from the apex. TECs showed a greater preservation of the original root canal anatomy with less apical transportation than CECs, possibly because of the absence of coronal interferences and, therefore, fewer pecking motions required to complete instrumentation. Within the limitations of this study, TECs may lead to a better preservation of the original canal anatomy during shaping compared with CECs, particularly at the apical level. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cytotoxicity of 5% Tamarindus indica extract and 3% hydrogen peroxide as root canal irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erawati Wulandari

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preparation of root canal is an important stage in endodontic treatment. During conducting preparation, it is always be followed with root canal irrigation that has aim to clean root canal from necrotic tissue remains, grind down dentin powder, micro organism, wet the root canal to make preparation process of root canal easier, and solute root canal content at area that can not be reached by equipment. Flesh of Tamarindus indica (pulpa tamarindorum is used as traditional medicine and it contains vitamin C (antioxidant, protein, fat, glucose, etc. Previous research shows that 5% tamarindus indica extract can clean smear layer but it is more cytotoxicity to cell line BHK–21 than sterilized aquabides. Purpose: This research is to compare cytotoxicity between 5% Tamarindus indica extract with 3% H2O2 as root canal irrigation material. Method: Four teen culture cell line BHK 21 divides into 2 groups. Group 1 is treated with 3% H2O2 and Group 2 is treated with 5% Tamarindus indica extract, for about 2.5 minutes in every group. Then, living and death cell percentage is measured. Data is analyzed with independent t test with significant level of 0.05%. Result: The research showed that death cell in group 1 was 29.3% and in group 2 was 21.1%. There was a significant different (p < 0.05 between group 1 and group 2. Conclusion: Cytotoxicity of 5% Tamarindus indica extract to the cell line BHK–21 is lower than 3% H2O2.

  7. [Dentascan computed tomography of the mandibular incisive canal. Its radiologic anatomy and the therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgaro, A; Bison, L; Bellis, G B; Pozzi Mucelli, R

    1999-11-01

    To stress the importance of CT depiction of the mandibular incisive canal. This anatomical structure contains a major neurovascular bundle and is thus very important in the planning of mandibular implants in the canine-incisive area. January through December 1998, sixty patients unselected by age and gender were submitted to mandibular CT. Axial slices were acquired with 1-1.5 mm thickness and 1 mm table feed, and the images were then reformatted with a dedicated dental software. Both the conventional and the Helical techniques were used. The incisive canal appears on Dentascan transverse reconstructions as a round low-density area within mandibular trabecular bone, which is surrounded by a higher-density rim representing the canal walls. This anatomical structure originates from the mental foramen and continues mesially to the mental symphysis. The mandibular canal was visualized in 95% of cases bilaterally (57/60); the incisive canal was depicted on the left side in 41.6% of cases (25/60) and on the right side in 51.6% (31/60). The importance of careful assessment of the mandibular canal course before implantology is now widely recognized. The same holds true for the canine-incisive region in the jaw, to detect the incisive canal if present and prevent any complications from its accidental damage. CT with a dedicated software showed the incisive canal in a large number of patients, which calls for precise reporting of its presence, course, and relationships with teeth.

  8. An ion extract obtained from mineral trioxide aggregate induced dentin remineralization and dentin tubule occlusion in artificially demineralized bovine dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Linlin; Okiji, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the ability of a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) extract mixed with a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) system to induce remineralization and dentin tubule occlusion in artificially demineralized bovine dentin. The MTA extract solution was prepared by mixing white ProRoot MTA with distilled water (1:2) for 48 hours, before subjecting it to centrifugation. The elemental composition of the MTA extract solution was analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The deposits produced by the MTA extract-PBS mixture were chemically analyzed using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the two-step application of the mixture (MTA extract solution followed by PBS) to bovine dentin samples that had been artificially demineralized with phosphoric acid (10%, 10 seconds) were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and EPMA after the specimens had been stored in PBS for 1 or 7 days. The MTA extract solution contained calcium, silicone, and aluminum (Ca>Si>Al), and the deposits produced by the MTA extract-PBS mixture contained calcium, phosphorous, sodium, silicone, and aluminum (Ca>P>Na>Si>Al) as major mineral elements. XRD also revealed that the deposits contained hydroxyapatite. The two-step application process resulted in the formation of a 2-3 microm-thick "mineral infiltration layer", together with mineral tag-like structures in the dentin tubules. The MTA extract-treated specimens exhibited a significantly higher dentin tubule occlusion rate than the untreated specimens (P < 0.05).

  9. Fracture toughness of two dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kimberly; Söderholm, Karl-Johan M

    2010-12-01

    Test the hypothesis that a self-etching adhesive is more likely to fail at the dentin-adhesive interface than an etch-and-rinse adhesive. Forty-eight composite-dentin short rod chevron-notched specimens were prepared. XP Bond and G Bond were used as adhesives. After 7 days in distilled water at 37°C, each specimen was tested (cross-head speed=0.05 mm/min). Fractured surfaces were inspected and characterized as interfacial failures, composite failures or a combination of interfacial and composite failures. The fracture toughness values (K(IC)) of the two adhesives were compared (Student's t-test and Weibull statistics). Of the specimens bonded with XP Bond, 50% failed at the dentin-adhesive interface, 42% at both the dentin-adhesive and composite interface and 8% in the composite alone. Of the specimens bonded with G Bond, 41% failed at the dentin-adhesive interface, 53% at both the dentin-adhesive and composite interface and 6% in the composite alone. The K(IC) values of the two adhesives differed significantly (pBond had a K(IC) of 0.77±0.11 MNm(-3/2) (n=17), while G Bond a K(IC) of 0.62±0.21 MNm(-3/2) (n=12). The high percentage of mixed failures did not support the hypothesis that the dentin-adhesive interface is clearly less resistant to fracture than the adhesive-composite interface. The finding that cracks occurred in 6-8% in the composite suggests that defects within the composite or at the adhesive-composite interface are important variables to consider in adhesion testing. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative scanning electron microscopy evaluation of Canal Brushing technique, sonic activation, and master apical file for the removal of triple antibiotic paste from root canal (in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Ashoksingh Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare and evaluate the effectiveness of Canal Brushing technique, sonic activation, and master apical file (MAF for the removal of triple antibiotic paste (TAP from root canal using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two single rooted teeth were instrumented with ProTaper up to the size number F2 and dressed with TAP. TAP was removed with Canal Brush technique (Group I, n: 6, sonic (EndoActivator (Group II, n: 6, and MAF (Group III, n: 6. Four teeth served as positive (n: 2 and negative (n: 2 controls. The roots were split in the buccolingual direction and prepared for SEM examination (×1000 at coronal, middle, and apical third. Three examiners evaluated the wall cleanliness. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by Kruskal–Wallis test and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: Difference in cleanliness between three groups is statistically significant in cervical region only. Pairwise comparison in cervical region Canal Brush and sonic activation showed more removal of TAP than MAF. Conclusions: Canal Brush and sonic activation system showed better result than MAF in the cervical and middle third of canal. In the apical third, none of the techniques showed a better result. None of the techniques showed complete removal of TAP from the canal.

  11. Looking back at Love Canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deegan, J. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    In the first part of this series (ES and T, April 1987, pp. 328-31) it was pointed out that the methods and conclusions of EPA's Love Canal Study were the subject of some controversy in the environmental community. Others defended the agency's approaches and methods. Part 2 makes no attempt to resolve the controversy; its purpose is to present the results and conclusions of the Love Canal.

  12. blood in the canal space of the teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Soleymani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Apical seal in blood or dry root canal is a problem in endodontic treatment. Failure of apical seal causes inflammatory reaction and failure root canal treatment. Because of the sealer properties, root canal should be dry for obturation. But hydrophilic sealers can adhere to root canal walls nowadays and this problem is still controversial. This study aimed at determining the apical microleakage of AH26 and MTA Fillapex sealers in dry and bloody condition. Methods: This experimental in vitro study was done on 48 extracted central teeth. The researchers used the Mtwo rotary files for root canal instrumentation. In this process, the teeth were divided into four groups (2 dry groups and 2 bloody groups and two groups as positive and negative control (each group of 4 teeth. All sealers were prepared according to the factory instruction and the obturation was done with gutta-percha and sealer. After 7 days in 100% moisture condition, the teeth were placed in the ink for 3 days and then were cut across longitudinal axis and the level of microleakage was measured by stereomicroscope.Finally, the data were analyzed by SPSS software, ANOVA, Chi-Square and t-test statistical tests. Results:The mean of MTA Fillapex and AH26 apical microleakage in blood groups were (448.61± 34.67 Mm and (429.84± 31.63 Mm respectively. The minimum microleakage belonged to AH26 sealer, but it was not significant. Conclusion: AH26 sealer is a better barrier against microleakage in comparison with MTA Fillapx, although it is not significant. Also, the evidence suggests drying the canal leads to a better apical seal and the blood significantly increases apical microleakage. 

  13. [Three dimensional finite element analysis on stress distribution in dentin of the maxillary central incisor restored with different shapes and materials of post].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuying; Sun, Jing; Lu, Jun

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the stress distribution in dentin of the maxillary central incisor restored with post-core which is related to different shapes and materials. CT scan, digital-image processing and Unigraphics (UG) software were applied to construct the three-dimensional finite element models of maxillary central incisor restored with cone or column post-core. Based on this model, stress distribution of Von Mises in dentin with three different materials(polyethylene fiber resin, carbon fiber and zirconia) were analyzed respectively. Static loading(100N) was used on the lingual boundary line between upper-one-third and middle-one-third of maxillary central incisor, the direction of the loading was 45 degrees to the tooth long axis. In posts made of zirconia and restored with column post, the stress distribution in dentin was higher than with cone post (P0.05). The elastic modulus of post-core materials affected the stress distribution, and the higher the elastic modulus was, the higher the stress concentrated. Cone post excels column post in higher elastic modulus materials. Using the lower elastic modulus materials possibly can avail to the stress distribution and prevent the root breakage. During the root canal preparation, the dentin around the root neck should be conserved as more as possible, especially the dentin in the labial side.

  14. [Mantle dentin as biomodel of materials for structural teeth restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubova, A V; Vinnichenko, Yu A; Pourovskaya, I Ya; Rusanov, F S

    The article describes a structural element of natural teeth - mantle dentin. It has been shown that the presence of this element in the structure of a natural tooth largely ensures its strength under the influence of repeated loads in a functional oral environment and arrests crack growth at the enamel/dentine interface. This later effect is explained by the influence of a thin layer of mantle dentine, which has physical and mechanical characteristics different from that of the main dentin.

  15. The effect of dentin-cleaning agents on resin cement bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Bulucu, Bilinc; Saraç, Y Sinasi; Kulunk, Safak

    2008-06-01

    Provisional cement remnants on dentin affect the bond strength of resin cements to dentin. The authors investigated the effects of dentin-cleaning agents and etching systems on the bond strength of adhesive resin cement. The authors removed the provisional cement from the dentin surfaces of the specimens and then cleaned the surfaces with the dentin-cleaning agents Sikko Tim (VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany), Cavity Cleanser (Bisco, Schaumburg, Ill.) or Consepsis Scrub (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They used adhesive resin cement after applying the different etching adhesive systems. Then they examined the dentin surfaces by using scanning electron microscopy. The authors analyzed data by means of a two-way analysis of variance with Tukey honestly significant difference tests (alpha= .05). They found that specimens cleaned with Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub had higher shear bond strength values than did those in the no-treatment control group or the group cleaned with Cavity Cleanser. The specimens treated with the total-etching adhesive system had higher shear bond strength than did those treated with the self-etching adhesive systems. Sikko Tim and Consepsis Scrub were effective in removing provisional cement. Adhesive resin cement showed higher bond strength when used in conjunction with the total-etching adhesive system. The use of an effective dentin cleaner before cementation with resin cement can increase bond strength.

  16. Retention of adhesively bonded posts: effect of pretreatment of the root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of three different root canal pretreatments on the retention of prefabricated titanium posts luted in the root canal with one of three resin cements. After removal of the clinical crowns of 216 extracted premolars, the root canals were prepared with the ParaPost system (length = 5 mm, diameter = 1.25 mm). The walls of the roots were subjected to either none (control) or one of three pretreatments: etching with citric acid, application of EDTA C, or mechanical roughening with a diamond-coated bur (n = 18 per group). CoJet-treated ParaPost XH posts were luted in the root canals with one of three resin cements: Panavia 2.0 F, Rely X Unicem, or ParaCem. Following water storage at 37 degrees C for 7 days, retention was determined by extraction of the posts. Mechanical roughening of root canal walls resulted in improved retention of posts, irrespective of the type of resin cement. Etching of root canal walls with citric acid resulted in improved retention only when Panavia 2.0 F was used. Depending on the resin cement, application of EDTA C had either no effect or a negative effect. Luting of posts with Panavia 2.0 F resulted in higher retention than did luting with Rely X Unicem or ParaCem. Mechanical roughening of the root canal walls with a diamond-coated bur was the most effective method to improve retention of posts. The use of Panavia 2.0 F resulted in higher retention than did the use of Rely X Unicem or ParaCem.

  17. Regeneration of dental pulp/dentine complex with a three-dimensional and scaffold-free stem-cell sheet-derived pellet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sijia; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Fang; Wang, Weiqi; Ding, Yin; Li, Dechao; Jin, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Dental pulp/dentine complex regeneration is indispensable to the construction of biotissue-engineered tooth roots and represents a promising approach to therapy for irreversible pulpitis. We used a tissue-engineering method based on odontogenic stem cells to design a three-dimensional (3D) and scaffold-free stem-cell sheet-derived pellet (CSDP) with the necessary physical and biological properties. Stem cells were isolated and identified and stem cells from root apical papilla (SCAPs)-based CSDPs were then fabricated and examined. Compact cell aggregates containing a high proportion of extracellular matrix (ECM) components were observed, and the CSDP culture time was prolonged. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dentine sialoprotein (DSPP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and runt-related gene 2 (RUNX2) mRNA was higher in CSDPs than in cell sheets (CSs), indicating that CSDPs have greater odonto/osteogenic potential. To further investigate this hypothesis, CSDPs and CSs were inserted into human treated dentine matrix fragments (hTDMFs) and transplanted into the subcutaneous space in the backs of immunodeficient mice, where they were cultured in vivo for 6 weeks. The root space with CSDPs was filled entirely with a dental pulp-like tissue with well-established vascularity, and a continuous layer of dentine-like tissue was deposited onto the existing dentine. A layer of odontoblast-like cells was found to express DSPP, ALP and BSP, and human mitochondria lined the surface of the newly formed dentine-like tissue. These results clearly indicate that SCAP-CSDPs with a mount of endogenous ECM have a strong capacity to form a heterotopic dental pulp/dentine complex in empty root canals; this method can be used in the fabrication of bioengineered dental roots and also provides an alternative treatment approach for pulp disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effect of Different Agitation Techniques on the Penetration of Irrigant and Sealer into Dentinal Tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu; Perinpanayagam, Hiran; Kum, David J W; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Jeong, Jin-Sun; Lim, Sang-Min; Chang, Seok-Woo; Baek, Seung-Ho; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of five intracanal agitation techniques on the penetration of irrigant and sealer into dentinal tubules. Intracanal agitation techniques could promote chemomechanical debridement and the sealing of root canals during endodontic treatment. However, there is limited evidence for the agitation effect of Nd:YAP laser. Human maxillary premolars with single straight canals (N = 60) were prepared with ProTaper Next(®) NiTi rotary files (Dentsply Maillefer) up to X4 (ISO 40 size). Rhodamine B-labeled sodium hypochlorite was used for final irrigation together with the conventional syringe (control), sonic, ultrasonic, Nd:YAP laser, or V-Clean™ endodontic agitation system. All canals were obturated with gutta-percha and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled AH Plus sealer. Transverse sections were obtained at 2, 5, and 8 mm from the apex and observed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. Maximum penetration depth and penetration percentage of both irrigant and sealer were recorded. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were performed for multiple comparisons. The Spearman coefficient was calculated to confirm correlations between irrigant and sealer penetration. Laser agitation attained the most irrigant and sealer penetration depth and penetration percentage (p penetration percentage than the control group at 2 mm from the apex (p penetration correlated significantly for all agitation techniques (p penetration of irrigant and sealer at one or more sectioned levels from the apex.

  19. Effect of irrigation technique for removal of triple antibiotic paste on bond strength of MTA to root dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Dumani, Aysin; Yilmaz, Sehnaz; Yoldas, Oguz; Bek, Zeliha Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the bond strength of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to root canal dentin after the performance of various irrigation procedures to remove triple antibiotic paste (TAP). A total of 56 single-rooted human mandibular premolars were instrumented using a rotary system to size 40 and divided randomly into a control group (no intracanal dressing) and three experimental groups (TAP application for 28 days). TAP was then removed by rinsing with 10 mL 2.5% NaOCl using th...

  20. SHRINKAGE OF SOUND AND DEMINERALIZED HUMAN CORONAL DENTIN SLABS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RUBEN, J; ARENDS, J

    1993-01-01

    In this article a method is presented for dentine shrinkage measurements. The relative shrinkage of sound dentine slabs is assessed using a Perthometer with respect to a steel reference. The relative shrinkage of lesions in dentine slabs can be estimated using combined Perthometer/microradiography

  1. Micromorphological Evaluation of Dentin Treated with Different Desensitizing Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Osmari, Deise; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ana Carolina; de Carlo Bello, Mariana; Henrique Susin, Alexandre; Cecília Correa Aranha, Ana; Marquezan, Marcela; Lopes da Silveira, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of a desensitizing agent is a permanent coating or filling of dentin surface. Morphological analysis in vitro of this treated surface is essential to understand the interaction between desensitizing agent and hypersensitive dentin. The aim was to evaluate the morphology of four dentin surface treated with desensitizing agents.

  2. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  3. RETRATAMENTO ENDODÔNTICO: ESTUDO COMPARATIVO ENTRE TÉCNICA MANUAL, ULTRA-SOM E CANAL FINDER ENDODONTIC RETREATMENT: COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN MANUAL TECHNIQUE, ULTRASONIC SCALER, AND CANAL FINDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Monteiro BRAMANTE

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Instrumentações manual, ultra-sônica e com Canal Finder foram utilizadas para retratamento de 30 dentes com canais obturados com guta-percha e óxido de zinco e eugenol. Avaliaram-se: 1. tempo gasto para a penetração inicial até o ápice; 2. tempo para completar a limpeza; 3. extrusão de material e 4. limpeza dos canais. O Canal Finder foi a técnica que propiciou melhor limpeza, seguida da manual e da ultra-sônica. A parede palatina do canal foi constantemente mais limpa do que a vestibular. Quanto à extrusão, a técnica de ultra-som foi a que propiciou mais extravasamento de material obturador.Endodontic retreatment of 30 teeth filled with guta percha and zinc oxide-eugenol was carried out using manual instrumentation, ultrasonic scaler, and the Canal Finder System. The following variables were evaluated: time spent to reach the apex; time spent to complete cleaning of the canal; apical extrusion of material; and cleanliness of the canals. Results showed the Canal Finder System as providing the highest level of cleanliness of the canal system; lingual walls were constantly cleaner than buccal walls; ultrasonic technique presented a greater degree of apical extrusion of filling material.

  4. Hearing outcome after canal wall down mastoidectomy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This was a retrospective review of record charts of patients' hearing status before surgery and between 18 – 24 months after surgery using the pure tone average derived according to the guidelines of the Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium of the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery ...

  5. A comparison of canal preparations by Mtwo and RaCe rotary files using full sequence versus one rotary file techniques; a cone-beam computed tomography analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Aminsobhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Using one rotary file can result in a faster canal preparation. This can be done with several file systems and endodontic motors. In the present study, a newly single file technique (one rotary file technique with available rotary file systems is introduced. The aim of the present study was to evaluate centering ability and remaining dentin thickness of 2 rotary nickel-titanium systems (Mtwo versus RaCe and instrumentation techniques (conventional versus one rotary file by cone-beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 mandibular molar teeth were selected and divided to 4 groups (n = 19 teeth with 57 canals. The teeth were mounted in resin and pre-instrumentation scans were prepared by Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT. The canals instrumented with Mtwo and RaCe rotary files either in conventional or one rotary file technique (ORF. After cleaning and shaping of distal and mesial canals, post instrumentation scans were performed by CBCT in the same position as pre instrumentation scans. Centering ability and remaining dentin thickness were evaluated by Planmeca Romexis viewer. The data were analyzed with analysis of variance and post hoc t test (P 0.05. However, in a few cross-sections, conventional technique and/or RaCe showed higher centering ability. One rotary file technique with either RaCe or Mtwo was significantly faster than conventional technique (P = 0.02. There was no significant difference among groups regarding file fracture. Mesiolingual canals showed more transportation compared with mesiobuccal and distal canals. Conclusions: Both of the instrumentation systems and techniques produced canal preparations with adequate centering ratio. One rotary file technique prepared canal significantly faster than conventional technique.

  6. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering.

  7. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Brandão Mollica

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10, according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. RESULTS: ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05 were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7±105.0; a, Caries-detector dye (370.5±78.3; ab, Tactile method (322.8±51.5; bc. Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2±10.5; bc, Caries-detector dye (44.6±11.8; abc, Tactile method (24.3±9.0; d. CONCLUSIONS: DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values.

  8. Dentine in a capsule: Clinical case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjuna Kenchappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodentine TM , a calcium silicate based material has been popular now and can be used as an alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA due to superior physical and biologic properties. It has been known by several terms as Biodentine, dentin substitute, and RD 94. It has varied clinical applications such as apexification, apexogenesis, pulpotomy, internal resorption, root perforation repair, retrograde filling, pulp capping procedure, and dentin replacement. This article describes the clinical case reports using Biodentine in apexification, apexogenesis, pulpotomy, and root perforation repair.

  9. Dentine in a capsule: clinical case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenchappa, Mallikarjuna; Gupta, Shilpi; Gupta, Puneet; Sharma, Priyamvada

    2015-01-01

    Biodentine TM , a calcium silicate based material has been popular now and can be used as an alternative to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) due to superior physical and biologic properties. It has been known by several terms as Biodentine, dentin substitute, and RD 94. It has varied clinical applications such as apexification, apexogenesis, pulpotomy, internal resorption, root perforation repair, retrograde filling, pulp capping procedure, and dentin replacement. This article describes the clinical case reports using Biodentine in apexification, apexogenesis, pulpotomy, and root perforation repair.

  10. Analysis of ground vibrations produced by an 80 in3 water gun in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Lemont, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebel, Carolyn Michelle

    Since its completion in 1910, the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) has become a pathway for invasive species (and potentially Asian carp) to reach the Great Lakes. Currently, an electric barrier is used to prevent Asian carp migration through the canal, but the need for a secondary method is necessary, especially when the electric barrier undergoes maintenance. The underwater Asian carp "cannon" (water gun) provides such a method. Analysis of the ground movement produced by an 80 in3 water gun in the CSSC was performed in order to establish any potential for damage to the either the canal or structures built along the canal. Ground movement was collected using 3-component geophones on both the land surface and in boreholes. The peak particle velocities (PPVs) were analyzed to determine if damage would be caused to structures located along the canal. Vector sum velocity ground movement along the canal wall was as high as 0.28 in/s (7.11 mm/s), which is much lower than the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM) ground vibration damage threshold of 0.75 in/s (19.1 mm/s), causing no potential for damage to structures along the canal wall. The dominant frequency of ground motion produced by the water gun is primarily above 40 Hz, so the wave energy should attenuate fairly quickly away from the canal wall, with little disturbance to structures further from the wall.

  11. Comparison of Endodontic Medicaments on Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Dentin Using Resin Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Jahromi, Maryam; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Ravanbod, Shirin; Ranjbarian, Parisa; Kousehlar, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Endodontic irrigants and medicaments may affect the bond strength of intracanal posts to root dentin. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) and 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX) on bond strength of fiber post cemented with resin cement to root dentin. This in vitro experimental study was conducted on 36 mandibular premolars. Canals were prepared using the step back technique. After root canal irrigation, the teeth were divided into three groups of 12. Ca(OH)2 paste and CHX gel were used as intracanal medicaments in the first and second groups respectively. No intracanal medicament was used in the third group (control group). Access cavities were then sealed and the teeth were incubated for one week. The root canals were then filled using gutta percha and AH26 sealer and the teeth were incubated for 72 hours. Tooth crowns were then cut at the level of the cementoenamel junction and intracanal posts were placed. The teeth were mounted in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin, and incubated for one week .They were then sectioned into 1.5mm thick slices from their coronal surface using a fully automated cutting machine, and subjected to push-out test until failure. The load at debonding was recorded and data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, post-hoc test and t-test. The coronal margin of the root was at the level of the surface of acrylic resin in the mold. The mean bond strength was 4.45 MPa in the Ca(OH)2, 2.45 MPa in the CHX and 2.48 MPa in the control group. The difference in this regard was statistically significant among groups (p= 0.04). The Ca(OH)2 group had significant differences with the CHX and control groups (p= 0.03 and p= 0.02, respectively). The difference between the CHX and control groups was not significant (p= 0.974). Based on the results, Ca(OH)2 increased the bond strength of fiber post to root dentin but 2% CHX had no effect on bond strength.

  12. El Canal del Atazar I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López de Berges y de los Santos, Emilio

    1967-03-01

    Full Text Available The Atazar Canal helps to supply Madrid with water, from the rivers Lozoya, Jarama and Sorbe. The section which operates at present starts at the Torrelaguna dam and finishes at the El Goloso reservoir. Later a further section will be added, from the Atazar dam, on the Lozoya river, to link up with the control dam at Torrelaguna. The canal capacity is 16 m3/sec, and it is 43.47 km long. It has a slope of 4/10.000. The cross section is similar to that of the Jarama canal, already built. There are interconnections between this canal and the Canal Alto, which previously supplied the high and medium part of Madrid. To overcome the ground unevenness 5 syphons have been built, the most important of which is the Colmenar Goloso syphon, which is 10.88 km in length. Construction commenced on December 10, 1962, and water reached Madrid on June 15th, 1966. The initial budget for this project was 1,500 million pesetas.El canal del Atazar refuerza considerablemente el abastecimiento de aguas a Madrid, procedentes de los ríos Lozoya, Jarama y, en un próximo futuro, del Sorbe. El tramo, actualmente en funcionamiento, empieza en el salto de Torrelaguna y finaliza en los depósitos de El Goloso. Más adelante se completará su trazado mediante un nuevo tramo que partirá del embalse de Atazar, en el Lozoya, para unirse al actual en el depósito regulador de Torrelaguna. Su capacidad es de 16 m3/s; su longitud, 43,471 km, y su pendiente, 4 diezmilésimas. La sección tipo es análoga a la del canal del Jarama, de construcción anterior. Mediante la oportuna obra de transvase se realizan intercambios entre este Canal y el Canal Alto que abastecía anteriormente la parte media y alta de la capital. Para salvar los desniveles del terreno se han construido 5 sifones, siendo el más importante el de Colmenar-Goloso, con una longitud de 10,8S4 km. El comienzo de las obras tuvo lugar el 10 de diciembre de 1962, y el agua llegó a Madrid el 15 de junio de 1966. Su

  13. Detection of dentinal cracks after root-end resection: an ex vivo study comparing microscopy and endoscopy with scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Thomas; Kunz, Renato; Schneider, Adrienne Christina; Bürgin, Walter; Lussi, Adrian

    2010-09-01

    Dentinal cracks are occasionally observed at the cut root face after root-end resection in apical surgery. The objective of this ex vivo study was to evaluate and compare the efficiency of visual aids to identify root-end dentinal cracks. Twenty-six extracted human molars were decoronated, and the root canals were instrumented and filled. The apical 3 mm of the roots were resected, and the cut root faces were assessed with microscopy at x16 and x24 magnification and with endoscopy at x8 and x64 magnification (four visual aids). Roots were then duplicated for inspection with scanning electron microscopy. The presence, type, and location of cracks were registered by a blinded observer, with the scanning electron microcopy serving as the reference. The percentages of correct identification of dentinal cracks were then statistically compared among the four test configurations. Endoscopy x64 showed the highest sensitivity for crack identification, irrespective of the applied methodology (ie, per root and per crack). However, higher scores of false-positive cracks (lower specificity) were found with endoscopy x64 than with the other tested visual aids. The correct detection and location of complete canal cracks (55.3%, 52.6%, 68.4%, and 78.9%) were higher than the detection of incomplete canal cracks (42.2%, 42.2%, 52.0%, and 64.7%) using the four tested visual aids (microscopy at x16 and x24 magnification and endoscopy at x8 and x64 magnification, respectively). Only one of five intradentin cracks was identified with endoscopy x64. Overall, endoscopy x64 proved the most accurate visual aid for the identification of dentinal cracks after root-end resection in extracted human teeth; however, it also provided the most false identifications. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectroscopic imaging of mineral maturation in bovine dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelis, K; Crenshaw, M A; Paschalis, E P; Doty, S; Atti, E; Boskey, A L

    2003-09-01

    Dentin is a useful model for the study of mineral maturation. Using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI), we characterized distinct regions in developing dentin at 7- micro m spatial resolution. Mineral-to-matrix ratio and crystallinity in bovine dentin from cervical and incisal parts of 3rd-trimester fetal compared with one-year-old incisor crowns showed that virtually all maturation stages in dentin could be spectroscopically isolated and analyzed. In the fetal incisors, mantle and circumpulpal dentin presented distinct patterns of mineral maturation. Gradients in both mineral properties examined were observed at the mineralization front and at the dentino-enamel junction.

  15. Transmission electron microscopic characterization of hypersensitive human radicular dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiyama, M.; Noiri, Y.; Ozaki, K.; Uchida, A.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ishida, H. (Tokushima Univ. School of Dentistry (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray microanalysis (XMA) were used for the study of the ultrastructure of the lumens of dentinal tubules in superficial layers of dentin specimens obtained by use of a new biopsy technique from both hypersensitive and naturally desensitized areas of exposed root surfaces, in vivo. The TEM images showed clearly that the lumens of most of the tubules were occluded with mineral crystals in naturally desensitized areas, but such lumens were empty and surrounded with peritubular and intertubular dentin in hypersensitive areas. Moreover, electron-dense structures that lined peritubular dentin were observed in the empty lumens of dentinal tubules.

  16. The wetting ability of root canal sealers after using various irrigants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjyot Mulay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate and compare the wettability of root canal sealers after using various irrigants. To determine wettability, we evaluated the contact angle, because lower the contact angle, better the wettability. Green tea has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; therefore, it was used as an irrigant. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two freshly extracted, human, single-rooted teeth were used in the study. The roots were split into 144 dentin sections. The specimens were divided into the following four groups having 36 samples each: Group I—sodium hypochlorite 3%, Group II—chlorhexidine (CHX 2%, Group III—green tea extract, and Group IV (control—normal saline. The groups were further subdivided based on the sealer used. Results: There was highly significant difference among the mean contact angle values of zinc oxide eugenol sealer, AH Plus sealer, and MTA Fillapex sealer using 2% CHX (P < 0.01. The least contact angle was observed with green tea as root canal irrigant and MTA as root canal sealer (25.20 ± 4.00. Conclusion: The type of irrigant used had an influence on the contact angle of sealer. Among all the irrigants and sealers used in this study, the least contact angle was observed with green tea root canal irrigant and MTA Fillapex sealer.

  17. Efficacy of various root canal irrigants on removal of smear layer in the primary root canals after hand instrumentation: A scanning electron microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariharan V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this in-vitro study is to determine the efficacy of various irrigants in removing the smear layer in primary teeth root canals after hand instrumentation.