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Sample records for canadian urology residents

  1. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada

  2. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  3. Laparoscopic skill laboratory in urological surgery: tools and methods for resident training

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    Fabio C. M. Torricelli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Laparoscopy has certainly brought considerable benefits to patients, but laparoscopic surgery requires a set of skills different from open surgery, and learning in the operating room may increase surgical time, and even may be harmful to patients. Several training programs have been developed to decrease these potential prejudices. PURPOSES: to describe the laparoscopic training program for urological residents of the "Hospital das Clinicas" of the Sao Paulo Medical School, to report urological procedures that are feasible in dry and wet labs, and to perform a critical analysis of the cost-benefit relation of advanced laparoscopic skills laboratory. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The laparoscopic skill lab has two virtual simulators, three manual simulators, and four laparoscopic sets for study with a porcine model. The urology residents during their first year attend classes in the virtual and manual simulator and helps the senior urological resident in activities carried out with the laparoscopic sets. During the second year, the urological resident has six periods per week, each period lasting four hours, to perform laparoscopic procedures with a porcine model. Results: In a training program of ten weeks, one urological resident performs an average of 120 urological procedures. The most common procedures are total nephrectomy (30%, bladder suture (30%, partial nephrectomy (10%, pyeloplasty (10%, ureteral replacement or transuretero anastomosis (10%, and others like adrenalectomy, prostatectomy, and retroperitoneoscopy. These procedures are much quicker and caused less morbidity. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic skills laboratory is a good method for achieving technical ability.

  4. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, Nori L.; Bazzerelli, Amy; Lim, Jenny; Ying, Valerie Wu Chao; Steigerwald, Sarah; Strickland, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Currently, general surgeons provide about 50% of endoscopy services across Canada and an even greater proportion outside large urban centres. It is essential that endoscopy remain a core component of general surgery practice and a core competency of general surgery residency training. The Canadian Association of General Surgeons Residents Committee supports the position that quality endoscopy training for all Canadian general surgery residents is in the best interest of the Canadian public. H...

  5. Urologic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvigson, Adam E; Beaule, Lisa T

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of urologic emergencies are incorporated into the basic training of all urology residents. In institutions without access to urologic services, it is usually left to the General Surgeon or Emergency Medicine physician to provide timely care. This article discusses diagnoses that are important to recognize and treatment that is practically meaningful for the non-Urologist to identify and treat. The non-Urology provider, after reading this article, will have a better understanding and a higher comfort level with treating patients with urologic emergencies. PMID:27261785

  6. Experience with Emergency Ultrasound Training by Canadian Emergency Medicine Residents

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    Daniel J. Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Starting in 2008, emergency ultrasound (EUS was introduced as a core competency to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (Royal College emergency medicine (EM training standards. The Royal College accredits postgraduate EM specialty training in Canada through 5-year residency programs. The objective of this study is to describe both the current experience with and the perceptions of EUS by Canadian Royal College EM senior residents. Methods: This was a web-based survey conducted from January to March 2011 of all 39 Canadian Royal College postgraduate fifth-year (PGY-5 EM residents. Main outcome measures were characteristics of EUS training and perceptions of EUS. Results: Survey response rate was 95% (37/39. EUS was part of the formal residency curriculum for 86% of respondents (32/37. Residents most commonly received training in focused assessment with sonography for trauma, intrauterine pregnancy, abdominal aortic aneurysm, cardiac, and procedural guidance. Although the most commonly provided instructional material (86% [32/37] was an ultrasound course, 73% (27/37 of residents used educational resources outside of residency training to supplement their ultrasound knowledge. Most residents (95% [35/37] made clinical decisions and patient dispositions based on their EUS interpretation without a consultative study by radiology. Residents had very favorable perceptions and opinions of EUS. Conclusion: EUS training in Royal College EM programs was prevalent and perceived favorably by residents, but there was heterogeneity in resident training and practice of EUS. This suggests variability in both the level and quality of EUS training in Canadian Royal College EM residency programs.

  7. Access to palliative medicine training for Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneschuk, D; Bruera, E

    1998-01-01

    The authors conducted a nine-item mail questionnaire of the 16 Canadian family medicine teaching programme directors to determine the accessibility and operation of palliative care education for their respective family medicine residents. All 16 faculties of medicine responded (100%). The survey revealed that while all universities offer elective time in palliative care only five out of 16 (31%) have a mandatory rotation. The median durations of the mandatory and elective rotations are limited to two and three-and-a-half weeks, respectively. The majority of the universities offer formal lectures in palliative care (12/16, 75%) and educational reading material (13/16, 81%), with the main format in 14/16 (87%) of the sites being case-based learning. The two most common sites for teaching to occur for the residents are the community/outpatient environment and an acute palliative care unit. Fifty-six per cent (9/16) of the universities have designated faculty positions for palliative medicine with a median number of two positions per site. Only one centre offers a specific palliative medicine examination during the rotation. Feedback from the residents regarding their respective palliative medicine programmes were positive overall. Findings from our survey indicate an ongoing need for improved education in palliative medicine at the postgraduate level. PMID:9616456

  8. Evaluation of the orthopedic residency training program in Saudi Arabia and comparison with a selected Canadian residency program

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    Al-Ahaideb A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdulaziz Al-Ahaideb,1 Hamza M Alrabai,1 Osama A Alrehaili,1 Abdulaziz N Aljurayyan,1 Ranyah M Alsaif,2 Nizar Algarni,1 Hazem M Al-Khawashki,1 Abdulrahman D Algarni1 1Department of Orthopedics, 2Department of Physiotherapy, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Objective: The primary aim of the present study was to assess the quality of the Saudi Orthopedic Residency Program. Methodology: As a comparator, a cross-sectional survey involving 76 Saudi residents from different training centers in Saudi Arabia namely; Riyadh, Jeddah, Medina, Abha, and Dammam and 15 Canadian. Results: The results showed that Canadian residents read more peer-reviewed, scholarly articles compared with Saudi residents (P=0.002. The primary surgical role for residents was to hold retractors during surgery. The survey respondents strongly supported the ability to recommend removal of incompetent trainers. Saudi trainees were more apprehensive of examinations than Canadian trainees (P<0.0001. Most residents preferred studying multiple-choice questions before examinations. Saudi and Canadian participants considered their programs to be overcrowded. Unlike Canadian participants, Saudi trainees reported an inadequate level of training (P<0.0001. Conclusion: Educational resources should be readily accessible and a mentorship system monitoring residents' progress should be developed. The role of the resident must be clearly defined and resident feedback should not be ignored. Given the importance of mastering basic orthopedic operative skills for residents, meaningful remedial action should be taken with incompetent trainers. Keywords: evaluation, medical education, orthopedic board, residency program, training

  9. Educating physicians about women's health. Survey of Canadian family medicine residency programs.

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, M. A.; Sorbie, J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify which women's health issues are taught in the 2-year core curriculum of Canadian family medicine residency programs and whether educators think their current teaching of women's health is adequate. DESIGN: Mailed survey using a questionnaire. PARTICIPANTS: All program and unit directors of the 16 Canadian family medicine residency training programs were surveyed. Replies were received from 63% (10 of 16) of program directors and 79% (55 of 70) of unit directors. MAIN OU...

  10. Pharmaceutical policies in Canadian family medicine training. Survey of residency programs.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahood, S.; Zagozeski, C.; Bradel, T.; Lawrence, K

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether family medicine residency training programs have formal policies regarding interactions between residents and the pharmaceutical industry, to identify existing practices, and to find out what issues in industry-physician interaction are addressed during the 2-year core curriculum training in Canada. DESIGN: Mailed survey using a questionnaire. SETTING: The 16 Canadian residency training programs in family medicine. PARTICIPANTS: Program directors of all 16 Cana...

  11. Psychiatry Training in Canadian Family Medicine Residency Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Kates, Nick; Toews, John; Leichner, Pierre

    1985-01-01

    Family physicians may spend up to 50% of their time diagnosing and managing mental disorders and emotional problems, but this is not always reflected in the training they receive. This study of the teaching of psychiatry in the 16 family medicine residency programs in Canada showed that although the majority of program directors are reasonably satisfied with the current training, they see room for improvement—particularly in finding psychiatrists with a better understanding of family practice...

  12. Ranking in Canadian gastroenterology residency match: What do residents and program directors want?

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Khurram J; Levstik, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Matching to a gastroenterology (GI) fellowship position in Canada is increasingly competitive.OBJECTIVE: To identify factors that determine how residents rank programs across the country, and how program directors rank their applicants.METHODS: Using input from several current GI trainees and former program directors, two separate surveys were developed. An online survey was sent one month after the match to every resident matched to an adult GI program in the 2007 match. A separa...

  13. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the canadian R4 Fellowship Match: A qualitative study

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    Kassam Narmin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. Methods A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that determine the residents choice in the subspecialty (R4 fellowship match using focus group discussions involving third and fourth year internal medicine residents Results Based on content analysis of the discussion data, we identified five themes: 1 Practice environment including acuity of practice, ability to do procedures, lifestyle, job prospects and income 2 Exposure in rotations and to role models 3 Interest in subspecialty's patient population and common diseases 4 Prestige and respect of subspecialty 5 Fellowship training environment including fellowship program resources and length of training Conclusions There are a variety of factors that contribute to Internal Medicine residents' fellowship choice in Canada, many of which have been identified in previous survey studies. However, we found additional factors such as the resources available in a fellowship program, the prestige and respect of a subspecialty/career, and the recent trend towards a two-year General Internal Medicine fellowship in our country.

  14. Factors affecting residency rank-listing: A Maxdiff survey of graduating Canadian medical students

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    Forgie Melissa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, graduating medical students consider many factors, including geographic, social, and academic, when ranking residency programs through the Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS. The relative significance of these factors is poorly studied in Canada. It is also unknown how students differentiate between their top program choices. This survey study addresses the influence of various factors on applicant decision making. Methods Graduating medical students from all six Ontario medical schools were invited to participate in an online survey available for three weeks prior to the CaRMS match day in 2010. Max-Diff discrete choice scaling, multiple choice, and drop-list style questions were employed. The Max-Diff data was analyzed using a scaled simple count method. Data for how students distinguish between top programs was analyzed as percentages. Comparisons were made between male and female applicants as well as between family medicine and specialist applicants; statistical significance was determined by the Mann-Whitney test. Results In total, 339 of 819 (41.4% eligible students responded. The variety of clinical experiences and resident morale were weighed heavily in choosing a residency program; whereas financial incentives and parental leave attitudes had low influence. Major reasons that applicants selected their first choice program over their second choice included the distance to relatives and desirability of the city. Both genders had similar priorities when selecting programs. Family medicine applicants rated the variety of clinical experiences more importantly; whereas specialty applicants emphasized academic factors more. Conclusions Graduating medical students consider program characteristics such as the variety of clinical experiences and resident morale heavily in terms of overall priority. However, differentiation between their top two choice programs is often dependent on social/geographic factors

  15. Pediatric fractures – an educational needs assessment of Canadian pediatric emergency medicine residents

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    Dixon AC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Dixon Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Objectives: To determine the gaps in knowledge of Canadian pediatric emergency medicine residents with regards to acute fracture identification and management. Due to their predominantly medical prior training, fractures may be an area of weakness requiring a specific curriculum to meet their needs. Methods: A questionnaire was developed examining comfort level and performance on knowledge based questions of trainees in the following areas: interpreting musculoskeletal X-rays; independently managing pediatric fractures, physical examination techniques, applied knowledge of fracture management, and normal development of the bony anatomy. Using modified Dillman technique the instrument was distributed to pediatric emergency medicine residents at seven Canadian sites. Results: Out of 43 potential respondents, 22 (51% responded. Of respondents, mean comfort with X-ray interpretation was 69 (62–76 95% confidence interval [CI] while mean comfort with fracture management was only 53 (45–63 95% CI; mean comfort with physical exam of shoulder 60 (53–68 95% CI and knee 69 (62–76 95% CI was low. Less than half of respondents (47%; 95% CI 26%–69% could accurately identify normal wrist development, correctly manage a supracondylar fracture (39%; 95% CI 20%–61%, or identify a medial epicondyle fracture (44%; 95% CI 24%–66%. Comfort with neurovascular status of the upper (mean 82; 95% CI 75–89 and lower limb (mean 81; 95% CI 74–87 was high. Interpretation: There are significant gaps in knowledge of physical exam techniques, fracture identification and management among pediatric emergency medicine trainees. A change in our current teaching methods is required to meet this need. Keywords: pediatric, fractures, education, radiologic interpretation

  16. Urological management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuckow, Peter; Mishra, Pankaj

    2015-10-01

    The pediatric urologists role is confined to ischio-, para-, and pygopagus conjoined twins. The aim is to preserve renal function, to address problems with urinary continence, and to optimize genital issues with particular reference to sexual and reproductive function. Full urological imaging is essential prior to separation for planning and for the operation itself. PMID:26382264

  17. Status of Nutrition Education in Canadian Family Practice Residency Programs: Educating the family physician about nutritional standards

    OpenAIRE

    Corby, Lynda; Murphy, Peggy

    1991-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to all 62 unit and program directors of Canadian family practice residency programs to elicit details about the status of nutrition education. Although most respondents indicated that the registered dietitian was the primary person responsible for teaching nutrition, this responsibility comprised only 10% of the dietitian's time in most programs. Lack of funding and curriculum time were the most common reasons cited for the limited scheduling that the dietitian was ...

  18. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    McLeod, P. J.; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ...

  19. Selenium status and cancer mortality in subjects residing in four Canadian provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium status in male and female Canadian subjects was measured relative to cancer mortality in their respective provinces. Toenail specimens from 755 subjects, 377 males and 378 females, living in Vancouver (186), Edmonton (188), Toronto (197) and Montreal (184) were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis giving means of 0.968 ± 0.177, 0.950 ± 0.148, 0.932 ± 0.135 and 0.896 ± 0.127 ppm Se, respectively. The effect of selenium determinants such as gender, selenium supplementation and smoking on selenium status is presented. Details of the observed inverse relationship of selenium status and cancer mortality are discussed. (author)

  20. Evaluating the Impact of a Canadian National Anatomy and Radiology Contouring Boot Camp for Radiation Oncology Residents

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    Jaswal, Jasbir [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); D' Souza, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Tay, KengYeow [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Fung, Kevin; Nichols, Anthony [Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Victoria Hospital, London, Ontario (Canada); Landis, Mark [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Leung, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Kassam, Zahra [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care London, London, Ontario (Canada); Willmore, Katherine [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); D' Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Background: Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course (“boot camp”) designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. Methods: The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Results: Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, P<.001). Across all contoured structures, there was a 0.20 median improvement in students' average Dice score (P<.001). For individual structures, significant Dice improvements occurred in 10 structures. Residents self-reported an improved ability to contour OARs and interpret radiographs in all anatomic sites, 92% of students found the MDT format effective for their learning, and 93% found the boot camp

  1. Evaluating the Impact of a Canadian National Anatomy and Radiology Contouring Boot Camp for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course (“boot camp”) designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. Methods: The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Results: Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, P<.001). Across all contoured structures, there was a 0.20 median improvement in students' average Dice score (P<.001). For individual structures, significant Dice improvements occurred in 10 structures. Residents self-reported an improved ability to contour OARs and interpret radiographs in all anatomic sites, 92% of students found the MDT format effective for their learning, and 93% found the boot camp

  2. 78 FR 63997 - Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases Interagency Coordinating Committee; Urology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Coordinating Committee; Urology Subcommittee Workshop SUMMARY: The Urology Subcommittee of the Kidney, Urologic...--Urology Subcommittee, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 6707 Democracy..., workshop held by the KUHICC Urology Subcommittee, also called the ``Urology Interagency...

  3. Bridging the urological divide

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts Robin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The advanced disease clinical presentations, higher morbidity and mortality rates and lack of available treatment options in prostate cancer care, attest to disparities in the delivery and outcomes of urological services in Black men of African lineage in both the Developed and Developing countries. This gap in health care and services in the global management of prostate cancer denotes the urological divide. Through the experience of a Developing country urologist with a comparative...

  4. Robotic technology in urology

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, D.; Challacombe, B; Khan, M.S.; Dasgupta, P

    2006-01-01

    Urology has increasingly become a technology‐driven specialty. The advent of robotic surgical systems in the past 10 years has led to urologists becoming the world leaders in the use of such technology. In this paper, we review the history and current status of robotic technology in urology. From the earliest uses of robots for transurethral resection of the prostate, to robotic devices for manipulating laparoscopes and to the current crop of master–slave devices for robotic‐assisted laparosc...

  5. High acceptability of a newly developed urological practical skills training program.

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, A.H.; Luijk, S.J. van; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.; Koldewijn, E L; Wagner, C.; Schout, B.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Benefits of simulation training are widely recognized, but its structural implementation into urological curricula remains challenging. This study aims to gain insight into current and ideal urological practical skills training and presents the outline of a newly developed skills training program, including an assessment of the design characteristics that may increase its acceptability. Methods A questionnaire was sent to the urology residents (n = 87) and program directors (n = 45...

  6. Interventional radiology in urology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Ever since starting X-rays use in medical practice, the first interventional methods used in urological practice have been applied. In modern times, based on the use of different sources for image acquisition, the interventional procedures are generally conducted under three types of image control: X-ray, including the CT, non-X-ray, including ultrasound and MRI, and mixed. On the other hand, based on the access used for carrying out the interventional procedure on the urinary tract, the procedures are divided into the following types: the percutaneous, intravascular and intraluminal. Percutaneous manipulations, the most widely used ones, include puncture and drainage of renal cysts and collections in the kidney area, drainage studies of the upper urinary tract, bladder percutaneous drainage and percutaneous nephrostomy are now routinely used. In modern times, more practical interest is percutaneous renal lithotripsy, especially in combination with extracorporeal lithotripsy and percutaneous ablation of renal tumors. Intravascular manipulation, especially after the massive use of CT angiography, are limited to therapeutic use, as in this respect the mainly use is in transluminal angioplasty and renal artery stenting, and embolization. The modern devices entering into the urological practice, allow a high degree of overlap and less invasive therapeutic methods, such as uretero renoscopy, that gradually become major therapeutic approaches to many of the most common urological diseases. It should be noted the role of retrograde ureteric pyelography and ureteral endoprosthesis in the development of these methods. Key elements to achieve maximum efficiency, as diagnostic as therapeutic, from the application of interventional procedures, especially widely used in urological practice than technical mastery of the methodology, is the use of the most appropriate methods or a combination of an exact display and good collaboration with the urologist as in

  7. The laser in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Alfons G.

    2002-10-01

    Laser is an acronym for a physical principle and means: Light Amplification by stimulated Emission of Radiation. This principle offers a lot of tissue/light effects caused by the parameters: power density/time and the special qualities of the laser light. Nowadays for diagnosis and therapy following lasers are used in urology: Krypton- and Dye-lasers as well as the Neodymium-YAG- (nd:YAG-), Holmium-YAG (Ho:YAG-), Diode-, Argon- and the CO2-lasers.

  8. Urologic Issues During Pregnancy

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    Jeffrey P. Weiss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy induces a variety of physiologic changes in the urinary tract. When such changes become accentuated the physiologic becomes the pathologic and symptoms arise, at times of significance enough to threaten the well being of mother and/or fetus. This article intends to describe the basis for urinary physiology and its pathologic counterparts during pregnancy. Such a background may then facilitate a rational management protocol for various urologic problems in the gravid state.

  9. EMERGENCY UROLOGIC IN PREGNANCY

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    Putu Surya Utami

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE A variety of anatomical and physiological changes occurring during pregnancy, which can affect any organ system. Urological problems in pregnancy represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Urinary tract symptoms in pregnant women comprise urinary tract infection, acute pyelonephritis, acute urinary retention, hematuria, placenta percreta, nefrolithiasis, uropathy obstructive, and malignancy urologic. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary, from the anesthetic and obstetric team. In this review, I will discuss the common urological problems that occur during pregnancy and outline an approach to their management. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";}

  10. Bridging the urological divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Robin

    2011-09-23

    The advanced disease clinical presentations, higher morbidity and mortality rates and lack of available treatment options in prostate cancer care, attest to disparities in the delivery and outcomes of urological services in Black men of African lineage in both the Developed and Developing countries. This gap in health care and services in the global management of prostate cancer denotes the urological divide.Through the experience of a Developing country urologist with a comparative literature review, this presentation defines the determinants of the disparity through deficiencies in human, material and financial resources, as is most prevalent in Developing countries.Solutions to ending health care disparities must take into account the existing development phase of Third World countries and thus determine whether the Developed countries should export a total service delivery system or seek primarily to advance the competence and skills of the existing Developing country resources.Collaboration in prostate cancer research has the greatest promise and sustainability of bridging this urological divide and is of mutual benefit to both entities. PMID:21992183

  11. Met in Urological Cancers

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    Miyata, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: int.doc.miya@m3.dion.ne.jp; Asai, Akihiro; Mitsunari, Kensuke; Matsuo, Tomohiro; Ohba, Kojiro; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Sakai, Hideki [Department of Urology, Nagasaki University Hospital, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8501 (Japan)

    2014-12-16

    Met is a tyrosine kinase receptor that is considered to be a proto-oncogene. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-Met signaling system plays an important role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis in many types of malignancies. Furthermore, Met expression has been reported to be a useful predictive biomarker for disease progression and patient survival in these malignancies. Many studies have focused on the clinical significance and prognostic role of Met in urological cancers, including prostate cancer (PCa), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and urothelial cancer. Several preclinical studies and clinical trials are in progress. In this review, the current understanding of the pathological role of Met in cancer cell lines, its clinical significance in cancer tissues, and its predictive value in patients with urological cancers are summarized. In particular, Met-related malignant behavior in castration-resistant PCa and the different pathological roles Met plays in papillary RCC and other histological types of RCC are the subjects of focus. In addition, the pathological significance of phosphorylated Met in these cancers is shown. In recent years, Met has been recognized as a potential therapeutic target in various types of cancer; therapeutic strategies used by Met-targeted agents in urological cancers are summarized in this review.

  12. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  13. Predictive models in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestari, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Predictive modeling is emerging as an important knowledge-based technology in healthcare. The interest in the use of predictive modeling reflects advances on different fronts such as the availability of health information from increasingly complex databases and electronic health records, a better understanding of causal or statistical predictors of health, disease processes and multifactorial models of ill-health and developments in nonlinear computer models using artificial intelligence or neural networks. These new computer-based forms of modeling are increasingly able to establish technical credibility in clinical contexts. The current state of knowledge is still quite young in understanding the likely future direction of how this so-called 'machine intelligence' will evolve and therefore how current relatively sophisticated predictive models will evolve in response to improvements in technology, which is advancing along a wide front. Predictive models in urology are gaining progressive popularity not only for academic and scientific purposes but also into the clinical practice with the introduction of several nomograms dealing with the main fields of onco-urology. PMID:23423686

  14. Emergence of Integrated Urology-Radiation Oncology Practices in the State of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Integrated urology-radiation oncology (RO) practices have been advocated as a means to improve community-based prostate cancer care by joining urologic and radiation care in a single-practice environment. However, little is known regarding the scope and actual physical integration of such practices. We sought to characterize the emergence of such practices in Texas, their extent of physical integration, and their potential effect on patient travel times for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A telephone survey identified integrated urology-RO practices, defined as practices owned by urologists that offer RO services. Geographic information software was used to determine the proximity of integrated urology-RO clinic sites with respect to the state's population. We calculated patient travel time and distance from each integrated urology-RO clinic offering urologic services to the RO treatment facility owned by the integrated practice and to the nearest nonintegrated (independent) RO facility. We compared these times and distances using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 229 urology practices identified, 12 (5%) offered integrated RO services, and 182 (28%) of 640 Texas urologists worked in such practices. Approximately 53% of the state population resides within 10 miles of an integrated urology-RO clinic site. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer at an integrated urology-RO clinic site travel a mean of 19.7 miles (26.1 min) from the clinic to reach the RO facility owned by the integrated urology-RO practice vs 5.9 miles (9.2 min) to reach the nearest nonintegrated RO facility (P<.001). Conclusions: Integrated urology-RO practices are common in Texas and are generally clustered in urban areas. In most integrated practices, the urology clinics and the integrated RO facilities are not at the same location, and driving times and distances from the clinic to the integrated RO facility exceed those from the clinic to the nearest

  15. News on pediatric urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Masnata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric urology is a pediatric speciality dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of congenital and acquired genitourinary tract diseases. It is a speciality that is rapidly changing, thanks to the technological development that has been emerging in recent years. There have been important diagnostic and therapeutic news.Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT include various entities of structural malformations that result from defects in their morphogenesis. Clinical research and genetic studies on the origins of CAKUT are quickly evolving, with significant growth of high-quality research.Management goals of CAKUT include prevention of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs in newborns and toddles and renal injury, while minimizing the morbidity of treatment and follow-up. Treatment options include observation with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and surgical correction. Now, randomized controlled studies show that children with normal urinary tracts or low-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis.All children with known mechanical or functional obstructions of the urinary tract are considered to have UTI. Functional obstruction often results from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD of either neurogenic or non-neurogenic origin and dilating VUR.The role of bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD in children with UTI and the long-term risk of renal scarring have shed new light on treatment strategies. Often it is BBD, rather than reflux, that causes UTI in children older than 2 years.Pediatric urology has evolved in recent years, with a greater focus on bladder and renal function, minimally invasive treatment, evidence-based interventions, and guideline adherence. Other topics in pediatric urology include urinary incontinence in children with special needs and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS in children, with advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery

  16. Sexual abuse evaluation in urological practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, Jacobus Johannes Hendrikus

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of sexual abuse in a urological outpatient clinic. Can differences been made in urological population, i.e. general urological clinic, a university urological clinic and a tertiary university pelvic floor clinic? Do urologists inquire ab

  17. URobotics—Urology Robotics at Johns Hopkins

    OpenAIRE

    Stoianovici, D

    2001-01-01

    URobotics (Urology Robotics) is a program of the Urology Department at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions dedicated to the development of new technology for urologic surgery (http://urology.jhu.edu/urobotics). The program is unique in that it is the only academic engineering program exclusively applied to urology. The program combines efforts and expertise from the medical and engineering fields through a close partnership of clinical and technical personnel. Since its creation in 1996, t...

  18. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James T Kearns

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We seek to provide a background of the current state of pediatric urologic surgery including a brief history, procedural outcomes, cost considerations, future directions, and the state of robotic surgery in India. Pediatric robotic urology has been shown to be safe and effective in cases ranging from pyeloplasty to bladder augmentation with continent urinary diversion. Complication rates are in line with other methods of performing the same procedures. The cost of robotic surgery continues to decrease, but setting up pediatric robotic urology programs can be costly in terms of both monetary investment and the training of robotic surgeons. The future directions of robot surgery include instrument and system refinements, augmented reality and haptics, and telesurgery. Given the large number of children in India, there is huge potential for growth of pediatric robotic urology in India. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery has been established as safe and effective, and it will be an important tool in the future of pediatric urologic surgery worldwide.

  19. Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems Troublesome bladder symptoms ... early onset of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with ...

  20. Sexual abuse evaluation in urological practice

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Jacobus Johannes Hendrikus

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of sexual abuse in a urological outpatient clinic. Can differences been made in urological population, i.e. general urological clinic, a university urological clinic and a tertiary university pelvic floor clinic? Do urologists inquire about female sexual dysfunction and sexual abuse history? And if so, what percentage of the Dutch urologist does so? What do sexual abuse patients think about screening for sexual abuse history? Can ...

  1. Adolescent Urology and Transitional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Babies with the major congenital anomalies of the genito-urinary tract have all-embracing holistic care during childhood. They require the same level of care in adult life. This is the role of transition and adolescent urology. PMID:26153563

  2. Urological diagnosis using clinical PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stephen F.; Spetz, Kevin S.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III

    1995-05-01

    Urological diagnosis using fluoroscopy images has traditionally been performed using radiographic films. Images are generally acquired in conjunction with the application of a contrast agent, processed to create analog films, and inspected to ensure satisfactory image quality prior to being provided to a radiologist for reading. In the case of errors the entire process must be repeated. In addition, the radiologist must then often go to a particular reading room, possibly in a remote part of the healthcare facility, to read the images. The integration of digital fluoroscopy modalities with clinical PACS has the potential to significantly improve the urological diagnosis process by providing high-speed access to images at a variety of locations within a healthcare facility without costly film processing. The PACS additionally provides a cost-effective and reliable means of long-term storage and allows several medical users to simultaneously view the same images at different locations. The installation of a digital data interface between the existing clinically operational PACS at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center and a digital urology fluoroscope is described. Preliminary user interviews that have been conducted to determine the clinical effectiveness of PACS workstations for urological diagnosis are discussed. The specific suitability of the workstation medium is discussed, as are overall advantages and disadvantages of the hardcopy and softcopy media in terms of efficiency, timeliness and cost. Throughput metrics and some specific parameters of gray-scale viewing stations and the expected system impacts resulting from the integration of a urology fluoroscope with PACS are also discussed.

  3. Urologic laser types and instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalin, Ricardo A; Phillips, Courtney K; Clayman, Ralph V; Landman, Jaime

    2008-11-01

    Though the primary role of lasers in urology has always been in the treatment of urolithiasis, there are several other indications for their use. There are many different types of lasers currently available, each with unique properties conducive to treating certain disorders. As such, it is critical that today's urologist understands each laser's characteristics in order to optimize patient selection and treatment. The lasers which are primarily used in urologic applications include the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser; the Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG); the Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (KTP) laser and the Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser. This review focuses on the unique characteristics of each of these lasers as well as the instrumentation needed utilize and deploy these tools in the urinary tract. PMID:19140577

  4. Basic science research in urology training

    OpenAIRE

    Eberli, D.; Atala, A

    2009-01-01

    The role of basic science exposure during urology training is a timely topic that is relevant to urologic health and to the training of new physician scientists. Today, researchers are needed for the advancement of this specialty, and involvement in basic research will foster understanding of basic scientific concepts and the development of critical thinking skills, which will, in turn, improve clinical performance. If research education is not included in urology training, future urologists ...

  5. Current status of nanotechnology in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Goyal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has been investigated for its applications in medicine. The objective of this review was to summarize the current applications of nanotechnology in Urology. A systematic search of literature was performed and relevant articles were analyzed with specific reference to applications in Urology. Nanotechnology has applications in diagnostic urology like in uroimaging using nanoparticles and nanosensors. It has therapeutic applications in infections, malignancies, genetic disease using targeted drug delivery, gene transfers, nano device-based manipulations etc. Nanotechnology has many applications in Urology. More efforts are required to make these applications practically feasible and affordable. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3114-3120

  6. Augmented reality assisted surgery: a urologic training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Ryan M; Srikishen, Neel; Lipshultz, Larry I; Spiess, Philippe E; Carrion, Rafael E; Hakky, Tariq S

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality is widely used in aeronautics and is a developing concept within surgery. In this pilot study, we developed an application for use on Google Glass ® optical head-mounted display to train urology residents in how to place an inflatable penile prosthesis. We use the phrase Augmented Reality Assisted Surgery to describe this novel application of augmented reality in the setting of surgery. The application demonstrates the steps of the surgical procedure of inflatable penile prosthesis placement. It also contains software that allows for detection of interest points using a camera feed from the optical head-mounted display to enable faculty to interact with residents during placement of the penile prosthesis. Urology trainees and faculty who volunteered to take part in the study were given time to experience the technology in the operative or perioperative setting and asked to complete a feedback survey. From 30 total participants using a 10-point scale, educational usefulness was rated 8.6, ease of navigation was rated 7.6, likelihood to use was rated 7.4, and distraction in operating room was rated 4.9. When stratified between trainees and faculty, trainees found the technology more educationally useful, and less distracting. Overall, 81% of the participants want this technology in their residency program, and 93% see this technology in the operating room in the future. Further development of this technology is warranted before full release, and further studies are necessary to better characterize the effectiveness of Augmented Reality Assisted Surgery in urologic surgical training. PMID:26620455

  7. Augmented reality assisted surgery: a urologic training tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M Dickey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality is widely used in aeronautics and is a developing concept within surgery. In this pilot study, we developed an application for use on Google Glass ® optical head-mounted display to train urology residents in how to place an inflatable penile prosthesis. We use the phrase Augmented Reality Assisted Surgery to describe this novel application of augmented reality in the setting of surgery. The application demonstrates the steps of the surgical procedure of inflatable penile prosthesis placement. It also contains software that allows for detection of interest points using a camera feed from the optical head-mounted display to enable faculty to interact with residents during placement of the penile prosthesis. Urology trainees and faculty who volunteered to take part in the study were given time to experience the technology in the operative or perioperative setting and asked to complete a feedback survey. From 30 total participants using a 10-point scale, educational usefulness was rated 8.6, ease of navigation was rated 7.6, likelihood to use was rated 7.4, and distraction in operating room was rated 4.9. When stratified between trainees and faculty, trainees found the technology more educationally useful, and less distracting. Overall, 81% of the participants want this technology in their residency program, and 93% see this technology in the operating room in the future. Further development of this technology is warranted before full release, and further studies are necessary to better characterize the effectiveness of Augmented Reality Assisted Surgery in urologic surgical training.

  8. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Survey of Radiation Biology Educators in U.S. and Canadian Radiation Oncology Residency Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. Methods and Materials: In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada. Results: The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs. Conclusions: A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

  9. Hollow waveguide for urology treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, H.; Němec, M.; Koranda, P.; Pokorný, J.; Kőhler, O.; Drlík, P.; Miyagi, M.; Iwai, K.; Matsuura, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of our work was the application of the special sealed hollow waveguide system for the urology treatment - In our experimental study we have compared the effects of Ho:YAG (wavelength 2100 nm) and Er:YAG (wavelength 2940 nm) laser radiation both on human urinary stones (or compressed plaster samples which serve as a model) fragmentation and soft ureter tissue incision in vitro. Cyclic Olefin Polymer - coated silver (COP/Ag) hollow glass waveguides with inner and outer diameters 700 and 850 μm, respectively, were used for the experiment. To prevent any liquid to diminish and stop the transmission, the waveguide termination was utilized.

  10. Encouraging scholastic publishing by urologic trainees

    OpenAIRE

    STEERS, W D

    2009-01-01

    There are many reasons why urologic trainees should publish scholarly work: Personal, professional, and institutional. Publishing by trainees creates an environment that improves the specialty of urology, maintains the quality of our literature, and promotes professionalism of our practitioners. Strategies to encourage scholastic publishing distil down to providing recognition, time, and support to the individual trainee.

  11. Encouraging scholastic publishing by urologic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, W D

    2009-04-01

    THERE ARE MANY REASONS WHY UROLOGIC TRAINEES SHOULD PUBLISH SCHOLARLY WORK: Personal, professional, and institutional. Publishing by trainees creates an environment that improves the specialty of urology, maintains the quality of our literature, and promotes professionalism of our practitioners. Strategies to encourage scholastic publishing distil down to providing recognition, time, and support to the individual trainee. PMID:19672356

  12. Urologic robots and future directions

    CERN Document Server

    Mozer, Pierre; Stoianovici, Dan; 10.1097/MOU.0b013e32831cc1ba

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in urology has gained immense popularity with the daVinci system, but a lot of research teams are working on new robots. The purpose of this study is to review current urologic robots and present future development directions. RECENT FINDINGS: Future systems are expected to advance in two directions: improvements of remote manipulation robots and developments of image-guided robots. SUMMARY: The final goal of robots is to allow safer and more homogeneous outcomes with less variability of surgeon performance, as well as new tools to perform tasks on the basis of medical transcutaneous imaging, in a less invasive way, at lower costs. It is expected that improvements for a remote system could be augmented in reality, with haptic feedback, size reduction, and development of new tools for natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery. The paradigm of image-guided robots is close to clinical availability and the most advanced robots are presented with end-use...

  13. Basic science research in urology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberli, D; Atala, A

    2009-04-01

    The role of basic science exposure during urology training is a timely topic that is relevant to urologic health and to the training of new physician scientists. Today, researchers are needed for the advancement of this specialty, and involvement in basic research will foster understanding of basic scientific concepts and the development of critical thinking skills, which will, in turn, improve clinical performance. If research education is not included in urology training, future urologists may not be as likely to contribute to scientific discoveries.Currently, only a minority of urologists in training are currently exposed to significant research experience. In addition, the number of physician-scientists in urology has been decreasing over the last two decades, as fewer physicians are willing to undertake a career in academics and perform basic research. However, to ensure that the field of urology is driving forward and bringing novel techniques to patients, it is clear that more research-trained urologists are needed. In this article we will analyse the current status of basic research in urology training and discuss the importance of and obstacles to successful addition of research into the medical training curricula. Further, we will highlight different opportunities for trainees to obtain significant research exposure in urology. PMID:19672351

  14. 21 CFR 876.4370 - Gastroenterology-urology evacuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology evacuator. 876.4370... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4370 Gastroenterology-urology evacuator. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology evacuator is a device used to...

  15. 21 CFR 876.4530 - Gastroenterology-urology fiberoptic retractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology fiberoptic retractor. 876... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4530 Gastroenterology-urology fiberoptic retractor. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology fiberoptic...

  16. Potential role for metformin in urologic oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyid, Rashid Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide. It is currently considered first-line pharmacological agent for management of diabetes mellitus type 2. Recent studies have suggested that metformin may have further benefits, especially in the field of urologic oncology. Use of metformin has been shown to be associated with decreased incidence and improved outcomes of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. These studies suggest that metformin does have a future role in the prevention and management of urologic malignancies. In this review, we will discuss the latest findings in this field and its implications on the management of urologic oncology patients. PMID:27195314

  17. Telemedicine in Urology: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellimoottil, Chandy; Skolarus, Ted; Gettman, Matthew; Boxer, Richard; Kutikov, Alexander; Lee, Benjamin R; Shelton, Jeremy; Morgan, Todd

    2016-08-01

    Whereas telemedicine is recognized as one of the fastest-growing components of the healthcare system, the status of telemedicine use in urology is largely unknown. In this narrative review, we detail studies that investigate the use of televisits and teleconsultations for urologic conditions. Moreover, we discuss current regulatory and reimbursement policies. Finally, we discuss the significant barriers to widespread dissemination and implementation of telemedicine and reasons why the field of urology may be positioned to become a leader in the provision of telemedicine services. PMID:27109596

  18. Only a minority of patients in the urological emergency unit need urgent urology care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žana Saratlija Novaković

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To present patients who were examined, monitored and admitted at the urological emergency unit (UEU at the University Hospital, Split during the summer and winter of 2010 and to establish who of them were really in need of immediate urological care. Methods. A retrospective study of patients and diagnoses of patients examined at the UEU was undertaken during two winter and two summer months 2010. We compared the total number of patients, the number of patients with urological issues, patients with urological emergencies, patients with non-urological issues, patients who were briefly monitored at the UEU, and patients admitted to the urology department, within these two periods. Descriptive statistic and chi squared tests were used. Results. During the winter period 465 patients were examined at the UEU and during the summer 733 patients. During the summer period there were statistically more urological issues (χ2=12.3; p=0.005 and urological emergencies (χ2=4.14; p=0.042 while in the winter period there were more non-urological issues and more patients were monitored at the UEU (χ2=33.9; p<0.001. The most common diagnoses are: renal colic and urine retention, in both periods. Only 8% of patients in both the winter and summer periods were admitted to hospital after examination at the UEU, which represents the actual number of patients who needed immediate urological care. Conclusion. Of all the patients examined at the UEU, only a fraction constituted real, life-threatening urological emergencies. Primary care physicians and general emergency departments should be more educated in urological emergencies so that they can resolve more nonemergency patients themselves.

  19. Sexual and Urologic Problems of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  20. Paediatric urological investigations - dose comparison between urology-related and CT irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urological investigation in children frequently involves high radiation doses; however, the issue of radiation for these investigations receives little attention compared with CT. To compare the radiation dose from paediatric urological investigations with CT, which is commonly regarded as the more major source of radiation exposure. We conducted a retrospective audit in a tertiary paediatric centre of the number and radiation dose of CT scans, micturating cystourethrography exams and urological nuclear medicine scans from 2006 to 2011. This was compared with radiation doses in the literature and an audit of the frequency of these studies in Australia. The tertiary centre audit demonstrated that the ratio of the frequency of urological to CT examinations was 0.8:1 in children younger than 17 years. The ratio of the radiation dose of urological to CT examinations was 0.7:1. The ratio in children younger than 5 years was 1.9:1. In Australia the frequency of urological procedures compared with CT was 0.4:1 in children younger than 17 years and 3.1:1 in those younger than 5 years. The ratio of radiation-related publications was 1:9 favouring CT. The incidence and radiation dose of paediatric urological studies is comparable to those of CT. Nevertheless the radiation dose of urological procedures receives considerably less attention in the literature. (orig.)

  1. Attrition in surgical residency programmes: Causes and effects

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Mehwash; Effendi, M. Shahrukh; M. Hammad Ather

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate and trend of attrition from a surgical residency programme and to identify the reasons for attrition. Methods A questionnaire-based survey was conducted at a university hospital. Separate questionnaires were designed for residents and programme directors (PDs). The residents who left the training voluntarily from one of the five surgical residency programmes (i.e., general surgery, orthopaedics, neurosurgery, otorhinolaryngology and urology) during the academic...

  2. Guideline of guidelines: thromboprophylaxis for urological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violette, Philippe D; Cartwright, Rufus; Briel, Matthias; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2016-09-01

    Decisions regarding thromboprophylaxis in urologic surgery involve a trade-off between decreased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and increased risk of bleeding. Both patient- and procedure-specific factors are critical in making an informed decision on the use of thromboprophylaxis. Our systematic review of the literature revealed that existing guidelines in urology are limited. Recommendations from national and international guidelines often conflict and are largely based on indirect as opposed to procedure-specific evidence. These issues have likely contributed to large variation in the use of VTE prophylaxis within and between countries. The majority of existing guidelines typically suggest prolonged thromboprophylaxis for high-risk abdominal or pelvic surgery, without clear clarification of what these procedures are, for up to 4 weeks post-discharge. Existing guidance may result in the under-treatment of procedures with low risk of bleeding and the over-treatment of oncological procedures with low risk of VTE. Guidance for patients who are already anticoagulated are not specific to urological procedures but generally involve evaluating patient and surgical risks when deciding on bridging therapy. The European Association of Urology Guidelines Office has commissioned an ad hoc guideline panel that will present a formal thromboprophylaxis guideline for specific urological procedures and patient risk factors. PMID:27037846

  3. The impact of nuclear imaging on pediatric urology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear imaging has a key role in diagnosis and therapy in modern pediatric urology. We discuss the value and limitations of radionuclide studies (diuresis renogramm, DMSA, VCUG, MIBG scintigraphy) with special regard to characteristic pathologic entities in pediatric urology. (orig.)

  4. Iatrogenic urological triggers of autonomic dysreflexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Zhou, M; Biering-Sørensen, F;

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: This is a systematic review. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to review the literature on iatrogenic urological triggers of autonomic dysreflexia (AD). SETTING: This study was conducted in an international setting. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted from Pub......Med search using AD/ autonomic hyperreflexia and spinal cord injury (SCI). Studies selected for review involved iatrogenic urological triggers of AD in individuals with SCI, including original articles, previous practice guidelines, case reports and literature reviews. Studies that did not report AD or blood...... pressure (BP) assessments during urological procedures were excluded. RESULTS: Forty studies were included for analysis and categorized into four groups: (1) urodynamics and cystometry; (2) cystoscopy and transurethral litholapaxy; (3) extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL); and (4) other procedures...

  5. Our Urologic Laparoscopy Complications in Municipal Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Abat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the findings, complications and treatment methods of the laparoscopic urological procedures that are performed in a municipal hospital. Material and Method: 59 laparoscopic urology procedures performed on 57 patients in Kahramanmaras Afsin Municipal Hospital between November of 2011 and September of 2013 are evaluated retrospectively. Occurred complications are classified according to the Satava and Clavien classification system. Results: It is observed that intraoperative complications occurred in 13 of 57 patients who undergone a laparoscopic procedure (22.8%. Postoperative complications are observed in 7 of 57 patients (12.2%. All complications are presented in Table 3. Discussion: We believe that laparoscopic urology procedures should be used more extensively as most of the potential complications can be treated easily with the help of conservative methods in a municipal hospital.

  6. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories... Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories. (a) Identification. A suprapubic urological catheter...

  7. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. 876... Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is a... generic type of device includes the biopsy punch, gastrointestinal mechanical biopsy instrument,...

  8. 21 CFR 876.4890 - Urological table and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urological table and accessories. 876.4890 Section 876.4890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4890 Urological table...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5160 - Urological clamp for males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urological clamp for males. 876.5160 Section 876.5160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5160 Urological clamp for...

  10. Nuclear medicine in urology and nephrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Reilly, P.H.; Shields, R.A.; Testa, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This edition on radionuclide techniques in urology and nephrology reflects the many advances since 1979. Emphasis has been given to diuretic renography and studies of urinary reflux. A new chapter discusses the diagnosis of lower urinary tract problems. The editors have divided the book into three sections. The first part presents a description of the techniques and their interpretation. Renography, renal scanning, clearance studies, and bone scanning are covered. The second section gives an in-depth discussion of the application of these techniques to obstructive uropathy, urologic tumors, renal transplantation, trauma, and lower urinary tract, pediatric, and nephrologic problems. The last part of the book deals with basic principles. It expands on the relevant theoretical and technical aspects not covered in detail in part 1. In this last portion of the book the editors have grouped together the chapters on physics, instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiation dosimetry.

  11. [Magnetic resonance urography in pediatric urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindele, D; Furth, C; Liehr, U B; Porsch, M; Baumunk, D; Janitzky, A; Wendler, J J; Genseke, P; Ricke, J; Schostak, M

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) provides high resolution imaging of the urogenital system and the use of paramagnetic contrast agents enables a functional depiction. This review summarizes existing data concerning this diagnostic procedure in pediatric urology. A systematic search and assessment of the literature was performed.A total of 12 studies were reviewed in detail. In mostly small study populations a great heterogeneity concerning methodology, use of comparative examinations and standards of reference was noted. Besides the quality of anatomical imaging, the functional study of renal excretory function and differential renal function was also assessed. Only a few studies performed statistical analyses.The authors' rating of MRU was mostly positive. Due to methodical weaknesses, lack of independent standards of reference and statistical analyses the overall level of evidence was low. Further high quality studies will be necessary to assess the value of MRU for the diagnostic workup in pediatric urology. PMID:23160606

  12. Determining specific competencies for General Internal Medicine residents (PGY 4 and PGY 5. What are they and are programs currently teaching them? A survey of practicing Canadian General Internists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Card Sharon E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General Internal Medicine (GIM has recently been approved as a subspecialty by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. As such, there is a need to define areas of knowledge that a General Internist must learn in those two years of training. There is limited literature as to what competencies are needed in a GIM practice. Draft competencies for GIM (4th and 5th year residents in internal medicine training were developed over eight years with input from many stakeholders. Practicing General Internists were surveyed and asked their perspective as to the level of importance of each of these competencies for GIM training. They were also asked if training gaps exist in current training programs. The survey was offered widely online in both English and French to gain perspectives from as many different contexts as possible. Results 157 General Internists, in practice on average for 15 years, responded from all of Canada's provinces and territories. Practice profiles were diverse (large urban centers to rural centers. The majority of the competencies surveyed were perceived as important to attain at least proficiency in. Perioperative care, risk reduction, and the management of common, emergent, and complex internal medicine problems were identified as key areas to focus training programs on, with respondents perceiving these should be mastered to an expert level. Training gaps were identified, most frequently in that of the manager role (example managing practice. Conclusions This is the first study we are aware of to attempt to isolate the opinions of practicing Canadian General Internists as to the major competencies that should be mastered as a General Internist. We suggest that "generalism" in the context of GIM, does not mean a bit of knowledge about everything but that defined objectives for training in this 'newest' of Royal College subspecialties can be identified. This includes mastery of core areas such as

  13. Minimal Invasive Urologic Surgery and Postoperative Ileus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative ileus (POI is the most common cause of prolonged length of hospital stays (LOS and associated healthcare costs. The advent of minimal invasive technique was a major breakthrough in the urologic landscape with great potential to progress in the future. In the field of gastrointestinal surgery, several studies had reported lower incidence rates for POI following minimal invasive surgery compared to conventional open procedures. In contrast, little is known about the effect of minimal invasive approach on the recovery of bowel motility after urologic surgery. We performed an overview of the potential benefit of minimal invasive approach on POI for urologic procedures. The mechanisms and risk factors responsible for the onset of POI are discussed with emphasis on the advantages of minimal invasive approach. In the urologic field, POI is the main complication following radical cystectomy but it is rarely of clinical significance for other minimal invasive interventions. Laparoscopy or robotic assisted laparoscopic techniques when studied individually may reduce to their own the duration and prevent the onset of POI in a subset of procedures. The potential influence of age and urinary diversion type on postoperative ileus is contradictory in the literature. There is some evidence suggesting that BMI, blood loss, urinary extravasation, existence of a major complication, bowel resection, operative time and transperitoneal approach are independent risk factors for POI. Treatment of POI remains elusive. One of the most important and effective management strategies for patients undergoing radical cystectomy has been the development and use of enhanced recovery programs. An optimal rational strategy to shorten the duration of POI should incorporate minimal invasive approach when appropriate into multimodal fast track programs designed to reduce POI and shorten LOS.

  14. Holmium laser for multifunctional use in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Graham M.; Shroff, Sunil; Thomas, Robert; Kellett, Michael

    1994-05-01

    The holmium laser pulsed at 350 microsecond cuts tissue and fragments calculi. It has been assessed for minimally invasive urological intervention. It is useful for partly excising and partly coagulating tumors, incising strictures and the obstructed PUJ. It partly drill and partly fragments urinary calculi however hard. Other lasers are more effective at any one particular application, but this laser is a useful compromise as a multifunctional device.

  15. Computer- and robot-assisted urological surgery

    CERN Document Server

    Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2006-01-01

    The author reviews the computer and robotic tools available to urologists to help in diagnosis and technical procedures. The first part concerns the contribution of robotics and presents several systems at various stages of development (laboratory prototypes, systems under validation or marketed systems). The second part describes image fusion tools and navigation systems currently under development or evaluation. Several studies on computerized simulation of urological procedures are also presented.

  16. Our Initial Experiences with Laparoscopic Urologic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Selçuk Altın; Ramazan Topaktaş2; Ali Akkoç; Cemil Aydın; Reha Girgin; Zeynep Banu Aydın; Kadir Yıldırım

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Retrospectively, to evaluate outcomes and complications of urological laparoscopic surgery cases performed in our clinic. Methods: A total of 115 patients who received laparo­scopic surgery between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Included patients were assessed in terms of demographic characteristics, pre­operative diagnosis, type of laparoscopic approach, dura­tion of surgery and hospitalization, complications before and after surgery, and postoper...

  17. Phytotherapy: emerging therapeutic option in urologic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sae Woong

    2012-01-01

    Phytotherapy belongs to the area of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the definition of phytotherapy is the use of plants or plant extracts for medicinal uses. Interest in phytotherapy is growing in both Asian and western countries for its use in the prevention and management of disease, improvement of general health and anti-aging. And also, there are several studies about the efficacy of phytotherapy in urologic diseases like benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), erectile dysfu...

  18. Emerging role of robotics in urology

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Rajeev; Hemal Ashok

    2005-01-01

    Robotic assistance is one of the latest additions to the field of laparoscopic surgery. The most commonly used robotic device in Urology is the da Vinci ® system of which over 200 devices are installed worldwide including 3 in India. This robot consists of three or four arms, one of which is used to hold and manipulate the laparoscopic camera while the others are used to manipulate specialized laparoscopic instruments with endowrist ® technology that allows 7 degre...

  19. Unsuspected urological anomalies in asymptomatic cryptorchid boys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a period of 6 years 144 asymptomatic boys with cryptorchidism, of mean age 7 ± SD 3.5 years, underwent orchiopexy. None of these boys referred to a history of a known urological anomaly, urinary tract infection haematuria, palpable mass in the renal region, bladder extrophy, epispadias, hypospadias or anorectal malformation. On the third day after orchiopexy an intravenous pyelography was done in every boy following testicular protection against irradiation. Ultrasonic investigation was not available at that time. There were minor urological abnormalities in 36 (25%) boys and major ones in 8 (5.5%) boys. A major anomaly is defined as one resulting in significant loss of renal substance (one case of single kidney and three cases of unilateral renal hypoplasia), or requiring surgical correction for conservation of the renal substance (one case of ureterocele, two cases of pelviureteric stenosis and one case of vesicoureteric stenosis with ipsilateral hydronephrosis). The unsuspected major urological abnormalities are usually ipsilateral to the more undescended testis. They may be associated with a hernia and are more frequent in bilateral cryptorchidism. In conclusion we encourage the routine use of IVP, or ultrasonic investigation or dynamic renal scanning (99mTc-DTPA), if it is possible, in all patients undergoing orchiopexy for the detection of an unsuspected major renal anomaly. (orig.)

  20. Robotic-Assisted Surgery for Benign Urological Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Declan G; Ben J. Challacombe; Lail-U-Mah Zaheer; M. Shamim Khan; Prokar Dasgupta

    2006-01-01

    Robotic technology for use in surgery has advanced considerably in the past 10 years. This has become particularly apparent in urology where robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy using the da VinciTM surgical system (Intuitive Surgical, CA) has become very popular. The use of robotic assistance for benign urological procedures is less well documented. This article considers the current robotic technology and reviews the situation with regard to robotic surgery for benign urological conditions.

  1. 10 years of the Urology Chair of the Siberian State Medical University. History of urology in Tomsk

    OpenAIRE

    Gudkov A.V. Gudkov A.V. Gudkov

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the history of development of urology in Tomskand the Tomsk Region. After the foundation of the ImperialTomskUniversity, the first university behind the Ural Mountains, in 1878, urology began to develop at the Chair of Hospital Surgery. University professors E.G. Salishchev, P.I. Tikhov, N.I. Berezganovskii, N.A. Bogoraz, V.M. Mysh, A.G. Savinykh, V.M. Voskresenskii and others contributed a tremendous contribution to the development of urology. Since the course of urology ...

  2. I Am Canadian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joe

    "I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness......."I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness....

  3. [The role of the laser in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anidjar, M; Cussenot, O; Ravery, V; Teillac, P; Le Duc, A; Boccon-Gibod, L

    1995-04-01

    There is currently a renewed interest in laser in the field of urology, essentially for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy, as a result of recent developments in the field of fibres. Laser is light coherent in time and space emitted continuously or in pulses. Only its thermal and photochemical properties are used in urology. Endoscopic coagulation of superficial bladder tumours by Nd YAG laser does not seem to be better than classical endoscopic resection, at the present time, as although it is less haemorrhagic, it does not decrease the recurrence rate. Photochemotherapy of bladder carcinoma in situ still constitutes a complex treatment protocol reserved for specialized centres. Lastly, upper urinary tract tumours can be treated by Nd YAG laser coagulation, in rare indications which are the same as those of ureteroscopic or percutaneous resection. The recent development of lateral firing laser fibres and contact tip fibres has led to a renewed interest in laser in benign prostatic hypertrophy. Two different techniques have been proposed: Nd YAG laser coagulation under direct visual or ultrasound control (TULIP), which gives delayed objective results (two or three months) and contact tissue vaporization (Nd YAG, diode), whose effects are more immediate. In both cases, intraoperative bleeding is minimal and the length of hospital stay is decreased, but the duration of urine drainage remains to be defined. Endoscopic pulsed laser urinary lithotripsy (dye, Ho YAG), although effective and atraumatic, is not justified at the present time because of its high cost compared to mechanical percussion lithotripters. Lastly, laser treatment for urethral stricture has not been found to be superior to classical scalpel urethrotomy and laser tissue welding is still in the experimental stages. In conclusion, laser technology, especially fibers, has currently reached an important phase of development with applications for urological disease, essentially in the treatment

  4. Significance of CT in urological imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been many reports about the usefulness of the CT imaging on the urological fields. Advance in CT equipment provides us some new diagnostic and therapeutic yields. There are the reconstruction, the dynamic scanning and the therapeutic application. Therefore, in addition to the ordinary characteristics of conventional CT equipment, the new CT scanner has several clinical advantages of the sagittal and coronal reformation, of the dynamic and quantitative evaluation, and of applying to radiation therapy planning. The CT scan should be performed reasonably after consideration of the potential advantages. (author)

  5. Common urological problems in children: prepuce, phimosis, and buried penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, I Hy; Wong, K Ky

    2016-06-01

    Parents often bring their children to the family doctor because of urological problems. Many general practitioners have received little training in this specialty. In this review, we aimed to provide a concise and informative review of common urological problems in children. This review will focus on the prepuce. PMID:27149978

  6. Should we train urologists in female urology? A European view.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Costantini, E.; Oelke, M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Training in female urology in Europe so far has been a national focus of individual European countries. Because of reasons like differentiation in pathology, activities of other specialisms like gynaecology and reimbursement issues, the way in which extra training in female urolog

  7. Prevalence of Sexual Abuse among Patients Seeking General Urological Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, Jack J. H.; Bekker, Milou D.; van Driel, Mels F.; Roshani, Hossein; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Sexual abuse (SA) history can be found in the backgrounds of an important fraction of men (8-10%) and women (12-25%). Until now there are no data about this prevalence within a urological patient population. Aim. To establish the prevalence of SA among men and women visiting a urologic

  8. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urological catheter and accessories. 876.5130 Section 876.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5130...

  9. The Global Prevalence of Infections in Urology Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenlehner, Florian; Tandogdu, Zafer; Bartoletti, Riccardo;

    2016-01-01

    The Global Prevalence of Infections in Urology (GPIU) study is a worldwide-performed point prevalence study intended to create surveillance data on antibiotic resistance, type of urogenital infections, risk factors and data on antibiotic consumption, specifically in patients at urological...... patients present in the urological department at 8:00 a.m. are screened for HAUTI encompassing their full hospital course from admission to discharge. Apart from the GPIU main study, several side studies are taking place, dealing with transurethral resection of the prostate, prostate biopsy, as well as...... urosepsis. The GPIU study has been annually performed since 2003. Eight-hundred fifty-six urology units from 70 countries have participated so far, including 27,542 patients. A proxy for antibiotic consumption is reflected by the application rates used for antibiotic prophylaxis for urological interventions...

  10. Emerging role of robotics in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rajeev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic assistance is one of the latest additions to the field of laparoscopic surgery. The most commonly used robotic device in Urology is the da Vinci ® system of which over 200 devices are installed worldwide including 3 in India. This robot consists of three or four arms, one of which is used to hold and manipulate the laparoscopic camera while the others are used to manipulate specialized laparoscopic instruments with endowrist ® technology that allows 7 degrees of freedom. The robot is currently used primarily for radical prostatectomies where complex dissection and reconstruction can be performed in less than 2 hours with excellent outcomes. There is a progressive increase in the number of surgeries being performed by this device which allows laparoscopy naοve surgeons to offer the benefits of minimally invasive surgery to their patients. The other surgeries where this device has been used to benefit are pyeloplasty, cystectomy with urinary diversion, nephrectomy and ureteric re-implant. The principal drawbacks of the device are the steep cost of machine and disposables. However, the benefits achieved in terms of improved surgical precision, magnified 3 dimensional vision, scaling of movements, remote surgery and as a teaching tools will help the robot establish a definitive place in the urologic armamentarium.

  11. Update in systemic therapy of urologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, David; Paluri, Ravikumar; Mehta, Amitkumar; Goyal, Jatinder; Sonpavde, Guru

    2014-01-01

    Systemic therapy of advanced prostate and renal cancers has gained several recent additions to the therapeutic armamentarium. Treatment of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer now includes additional immunotherapy (sipuleucel-T), chemotherapy (cabazitaxel), androgen-signaling inhibitors (abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide), and a radiopharmaceutical (alpharadin), based on extension of patient survival. Similarly, therapy for patients with renal cell carcinoma, a chemoresistant malignancy, has undergone dramatic changes based on an understanding of the role of angiogenesis. Multiple vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (sorafenib, sunitinib, pazopanib, axitinib, bevacizumab) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (temsirolimus, everolimus) have been added to the therapeutic arsenal. Additionally, immunotherapy retains an important treatment role, with a continuing application of high-dose interleukin-2 in select patients and the emergence of novel immunotherapeutic agents that may have significant benefit. Other major urologic malignancies, including urothelial, testicular, and penile cancers, have witnessed relatively few or no recent advances in therapy, although testicular germ cell tumors are one of the most curable malignancies. An agent for treatment of advanced urothelial cancer now has commercial approval, the chemotherapeutic agent, vinflunine, as second-line therapy in multiple countries-but not in the United States. Our review summarizes and updates the field of systemic therapy for advanced urologic malignancies, with a focus on castration-resistant prostate cancer and renal cell carcinoma. PMID:24393751

  12. Current status of laser applications in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, Ansgar; Thomas, Stephen; Durek, C.; Jocham, Dieter

    1993-05-01

    The overall development of laser use in urology is recessing. The reasons are the refinement of methods of radical surgery and the continuing development of alternative technologies involving electric current. Taking the cost factor into account, are lasers still opportune in medicine? The answer is definitely yes. Cost reduction in medical practice without quality loss is only possible with effective methods of minimally invasive surgery. Continuing investigation of cutting, welding, coagulating and ablating instruments is justified. Competition of lasers to other technologies can only be beneficial to the cause. But where are the highlights of laser applications? The unsurpassed utilization of optical properties of lasers lie in the concept of photodynamic therapies and in optical feedback mechanisms for laser applications. The combination of lasers with three dimensional visualization of the treatment area by ultrasound (TULIP-procedure for benign prostatic hyperplasia) is a novel approach in laser application. The further development of these treatment modalities will reveal the true benefit of laser technology in urological applications.

  13. Laser tissue welding: a urological surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppas, D P; Scherr, D S

    1998-07-01

    Laser tissue welding has proven its efficacy in the laboratory setting when compared with more traditional modalities of tissue reapproximation. In the clinical environment, several areas including urethral reconstructive surgery have shown great promise. Several technological advancements including solder development, chromophore enhancement and temperature control have improved upon the welding process and have added more precision and reproducibility to the technique. The current potential applications for laser welding in urology are numerous. On a molecular level, growth factor supplementation has certain potential in improving upon weld site healing and wound strength. Laparoscopic surgery with its need for less cumbersome modes of tissue closure is a field that will greatly benefit from the technology of laser tissue welding. Surgical specialties outside of urology are also participating in developing the field of laser welding. In particular, cardiothoracic surgery, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, neurosurgery among others, have utilized the concept of laser tissue welding. There are many ares that have potential use for laser welding that have yet to be explored. Further investigation will likely reveal more applications for this valuable technology. PMID:9873775

  14. The impact of transitioning from a 24-hour to a 16-hour call model amongst a cohort of Canadian anesthesia residents at McMaster University – a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sussman D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Sussman, James E Paul Department of Anesthesia, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to assess anesthesia residents' opinions and perceptions on wellness/burnout, fatigue, education, and patient safety after the initiation of a reduced call model (16-hour call. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted at three time points during the 2013–2014 academic year. A web-based questionnaire consisting of 23 questions was electronically distributed to all anesthesia residents from postgraduate years (PGY 1 to 5 who were part of the active call roster (n=84 at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. Descriptive summaries were calculated, counts and percentages were used for categorical variables, and answers to open text questions were reviewed for themes. Results: A response rate of 67% was obtained for this study. A majority of anesthesia residents (65% approved of 16-hour call, felt that their overall quality of life as a senior resident (PGY3 or greater or junior resident (PGY2 and below had improved (73% and 55%, respectively, and reported overall feeling less fatigued. Most respondents indicated that the quality of education remained unchanged (47%, or had improved (31%. And most felt better prepared for the royal college exam (52%. Most felt patient safety had improved or was unchanged (both 48%. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that 16-hour call improved resident wellness, reduced burnout and fostered an environment where residents are less fatigued and more satisfied with their educational experience promoting an environment of patient safety. Overall, the anesthesia residency group demonstrated that not only is 16-hour call preferred but beneficial. Keywords: resident wellness, reduced call model, duty hours, patient safety, cohort study, fatigue 

  15. [Use of the laser in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, M; Ferrière, J M; Piéchaud, T; Gaston, R; Brucher, P

    1988-01-01

    The usage of laser therapy in urology is based upon thermal effects that lead to tissue destruction by coagulation necrosis and volatilization. The endoscopic treatment of bladder tumors has been its most important utilization. The authors report their experience with 681 bladder tumors in 198 patients and present the technical details of laser therapy, the indications and the results. The recurrence rate at the previously treated tumor area was found to be rather improved: 0.75/100 months/patient for stage pTa and 0.92/100 months/patient for stage pT1. Other utilizations for laser therapy exist: upper tract urothelial tumors mainly in selected cases as solitary kidney; urethral localizations of urothelial tumors and condylomata acuminata; urethral stenosis, as a complement of optical urethrotomy; hemorrhagic cystitis after radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. The pulsed dye laser may become an important advance in endoscopic treatment of ureteral calculi. PMID:3289479

  16. The Global Prevalence of Infections in Urology Study: A Long-Term, Worldwide Surveillance Study on Urological Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, Florian; Tandogdu, Zafer; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Cai, Tommaso; Cek, Mete; Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Köves, Béla; Naber, Kurt; Perepanova, Tamara; Tenke, Peter; Wullt, Björn; Bogenhard, Florian; Johansen, Truls Erik Bjerklund

    2016-01-01

    The Global Prevalence of Infections in Urology (GPIU) study is a worldwide-performed point prevalence study intended to create surveillance data on antibiotic resistance, type of urogenital infections, risk factors and data on antibiotic consumption, specifically in patients at urological departments with healthcare-associated urogenital infections (HAUTI). Investigators registered data through a web-based application (http://gpiu.esiu.org/). Data collection includes the practice and characteristics of the hospital and urology ward. On a certain day in November, each year, all urological patients present in the urological department at 8:00 a.m. are screened for HAUTI encompassing their full hospital course from admission to discharge. Apart from the GPIU main study, several side studies are taking place, dealing with transurethral resection of the prostate, prostate biopsy, as well as urosepsis. The GPIU study has been annually performed since 2003. Eight-hundred fifty-six urology units from 70 countries have participated so far, including 27,542 patients. A proxy for antibiotic consumption is reflected by the application rates used for antibiotic prophylaxis for urological interventions. Resistance rates of most uropathogens against antibiotics were high, especially with a note of multidrug resistance. The severity of HAUTI is also increasing, 25% being urosepsis in recent years. PMID:26797640

  17. The Global Prevalence of Infections in Urology Study: A Long-Term, Worldwide Surveillance Study on Urological Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wagenlehner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Global Prevalence of Infections in Urology (GPIU study is a worldwide-performed point prevalence study intended to create surveillance data on antibiotic resistance, type of urogenital infections, risk factors and data on antibiotic consumption, specifically in patients at urological departments with healthcare-associated urogenital infections (HAUTI. Investigators registered data through a web-based application (http://gpiu.esiu.org/. Data collection includes the practice and characteristics of the hospital and urology ward. On a certain day in November, each year, all urological patients present in the urological department at 8:00 a.m. are screened for HAUTI encompassing their full hospital course from admission to discharge. Apart from the GPIU main study, several side studies are taking place, dealing with transurethral resection of the prostate, prostate biopsy, as well as urosepsis. The GPIU study has been annually performed since 2003. Eight-hundred fifty-six urology units from 70 countries have participated so far, including 27,542 patients. A proxy for antibiotic consumption is reflected by the application rates used for antibiotic prophylaxis for urological interventions. Resistance rates of most uropathogens against antibiotics were high, especially with a note of multidrug resistance. The severity of HAUTI is also increasing, 25% being urosepsis in recent years.

  18. 'Image and treat': an individualized approach to urological tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The current treatment options for advanced urologic cancers demonstrate limited efficacy. To obtain optimal clinical results, there is a need for new, individualized, therapeutic strategies, which have only recently been applied to these malignancies. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in e...... establishing imaging biomarkers necessary for personalized medicine. This review focuses on the current status of the 'image and treat' approach combining molecular imaging with targeted radionuclide therapy of urological malignancies...

  19. 'Image and treat': an individualized approach to urological tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The current treatment options for advanced urologic cancers demonstrate limited efficacy. To obtain optimal clinical results, there is a need for new, individualized, therapeutic strategies, which have only recently been applied to these malignancies. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in...... establishing imaging biomarkers necessary for personalized medicine. This review focuses on the current status of the 'image and treat' approach combining molecular imaging with targeted radionuclide therapy of urological malignancies...

  20. Prenatal diagnosis and telemedicine consultation of fetal urologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, Nader Z; Canon, Stephen; Patel, Ashay; Zamilpa, Ismael; Magann, Everett F; Higley, Jared

    2016-06-01

    In Arkansas, telemedicine is used commonly in obstetrics through Antenatal and Neonatal Guidelines, Education and Learning System (ANGELS), the existing statewide telemedicine network. This network is used primarily for tele-ultrasound and maternal-fetal medicine consultation. This study is a retrospective case series, describing all the patients who had a prenatally diagnosed urologic anomaly that required prenatal urologic consultation. From 2009-2013, approximately 1300 anomalies were recorded in the Arkansas Fetal Diagnosis and Management (AFDM) database, 14% of which were urologic anomalies. Twenty-six cases required prenatal urologic consultation, 25 of which were conducted via telemedicine. Teleconsultation allowed patients to combine maternal-fetal medicine and urologic consultations in one visit, saving time and effort and ultimately, for most patients, providing reassurance that delivery could be accomplished locally with postnatal follow-up already arranged. While there are several studies reporting the use of telemedicine for various subspecialty consultations, to our knowledge, this is the first to describe the use of telemedicine for prenatal urology consultation. Future research could randomize patients prospectively to allow comparison of both the outcomes as well as the patient experience. PMID:26199277

  1. The Canadian approach to nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the Canadian nuclear power safety philosophy and practice is traced from its early roots at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory to the licensing of the current generation of power reactors. Basic to the philosophy is a recognition that the primary responsibility for achieving a high standard of safety resides with the licensee. As a consequence, regulatory requirements have emphasized numerical safety goals and objectives and minimized specific design or operating rules. The Canadian licensing process is described along with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered. Examples of specific licensing considerations for each phase of a project are included

  2. Protest: The Canadian pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This popularly written article compares Canadian attitudes to protests against nuclear power to those in the United States. Canadian protesters are more peaceful, expressing their opinions within the law. The article describes the main anti-nuclear groups in Canada and presents the results of public opinion surveys of Canadians on the use of nuclear power for generating electricity. (TI)

  3. [The future of biomaterials in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grise, Philippe

    2002-12-01

    The fields of application of implanted biomaterials will continue to grow, ranging from the use of catheters and slings for the genitourinary tract, to the production of tissues and organs. The scale of research has changed over recent years, passing from a macroscopic view to a microscopic view, resulting in a change from mechanical devices, such as prostheses, catheters and slings to the cellular unit and more particularly in vitro cell cultures. New techniques, such as gene therapy and cell reconstruction have been recently introduced into the field of urology. Prospective biocompatibility studies must be conducted to establish appropriate biocompatibility standards adapted to new materials. The development of these new materials required a multidisciplinary approach involving engineers, biologists and physicists. It must be conducted in specialized centres skilled in biocompatibility research and in close collaboration with a basic bioscience and clinical practice. In the future, synthetic biomaterials will have an almost unlimited range of mechanical properties allowing much more specific applications. Another improvement of materials will concern a reduction of the risk of infection, erosion, mineral deposits, migration of particles, secondary reactions, and finally improved durability. However, the long-term properties of synthetic materials will probably not be as good as those of natural or almost natural biomaterials derived from biotechnology by tissue engineering. PMID:12545647

  4. Urological complications of illicit drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, Sean C; Goldenberg, S Larry

    2014-03-01

    Illicit drug use is prevalent worldwide; over 24 million people are estimated to have used recreational drugs during the past month in the UK and USA alone. Illicit drug use can result in a wide spectrum of potential medical complications that include many urological manifestations. To ensure optimal care and treatment, urologists need to be cognizant of these complications in their patients, particularly among youths. Ketamine uropathy is thought to affect over one-quarter of ketamine users and can lead to severe lower urinary tract symptoms, as well as upper tract obstruction. Cannabis use has been associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer, prostate cancer and nonseminomatous germ cell tumours in case-control studies. Fournier's gangrene has been reported following injection of heroin and cocaine into the penis. Excessive use of cough medicines can lead to the development of radiolucent stones composed of ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. As the current evidence is mostly limited to case reports and case series, future epidemiological studies are needed to fully address this issue. PMID:24535583

  5. Immediate postoperative feeding in urological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidmon, E J; Pizzimenti, K V; Blumenstock, F A; Huben, R P; Wajsman, Z; Pontes, J E

    1984-06-01

    The value of immediate postoperative enteral hyperalimentation with an elemental diet (high nitrogen Vivonex, full strength) at 125 cc per hour for 4 days was assessed in patients after radical urological surgery. Of 32 patients studied 21 received an elemental diet using a Vivonex Moss tube, which is a 3-lumen tube with esophagogastric decompression and simultaneous duodenal feeding, and the remaining 11 had a nasogastric tube only without nutritional support. We have used a selected group of parameters, including serum albumin, serum transferrin, creatinine height index, weight loss, total lymphocyte count, nitrogen balance and plasma fibronectin. All patients in the Moss tube group approached or achieved positive nitrogen balance by 4 days postoperatively, whereas the nasogastric tube group remained in negative nitrogen balance. Postoperative paralytic ileus was prevented in the majority of patients in the Moss tube group while receiving full nutritional support. We have found that the use of the Moss tube is a reasonable approach for postoperative alimentation. The tube is relatively easy to insert and well tolerated, and its use is a less expensive alternative to parenteral hyperalimentation. PMID:6427479

  6. [Theophilus Protospatharius: Byzantine forerunner of urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androutsos, Georges

    2007-01-01

    Theophilus Protospatharius was a physician in the court of the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius (610-641). His interesting medical manuscripts have been studied by many historians, although very little is known about his life. In Byzantium it was not unusual for prominent people to have many surnames according to their work, political status etc. For his piety two surnames were given to Theophilus : Philotheus (the person who loves god) and Philaretus (Virtuous). These last surnames gave rise to confusion and historians believed that two different medical men lived in Byzantium during the seventh century. Theophilus and Philaretus. This probably was the result of an error in the copies of ancient codes and erroneous translations to the old Latin manuscripts. These errors have been corrected after the studies of Corlieu who stated in 1885 that Theophilus and Philaretus were the same person. The written work left by Theophilus is very extensive. He continued the work of famous physicians of the Hellenistic period and contributed by his writings to the flourishing of the Medical School of Salerno which was founded on the 9th century D.C. Theophilus could be considered as one of the original forerunners of modern Urology. PMID:17992829

  7. [Primary prevention of urologic tumors: prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz-Dräger, B J; Lümmen, G; Bismarck, E; Fischer, C

    2011-10-01

    Assessment of the role of vitamins and micronutrients in the primary prevention of prostate cancer has changed dramatically in the past 10 years. Efforts to confirm the efficacy of a single substance have not yet succeeded. Therefore, such recommendations should at present no longer be given. Consideration could even be given to discussing whether additional large-scale interventional studies are expedient in this regard. There is still solid evidence that a well-balanced moderate diet, reduced consumption of milk products, and an Asian or Mediterranean diet are not only beneficial for general good health but can also prevent the development of prostate cancer. This should be the focus of further epidemiological studies. Thus, one can certainly speak of a paradigm shift in the prevention of prostate cancer. In contrast, available data on chemoprevention with 5α-reductase inhibitors is unequivocal: intake of finasteride as well as dutasteride correlates with significantly decreased evidence for prostate cancer. Converting this result into urologic practice remains the topic of extensive controversy. PMID:21927877

  8. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  9. Our Initial Experiences with Laparoscopic Urologic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Altın

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Retrospectively, to evaluate outcomes and complications of urological laparoscopic surgery cases performed in our clinic. Methods: A total of 115 patients who received laparo­scopic surgery between January 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Included patients were assessed in terms of demographic characteristics, pre­operative diagnosis, type of laparoscopic approach, dura­tion of surgery and hospitalization, complications before and after surgery, and postoperative requirement for open surgery. Results: 61 of included patients were women, 54 were male, and the mean age was 52.4±11.7 years. Sixty-eight patients underwent transperitoneal and 47 patients re­ceived retroperitoneal procedures. While 29 patients re­ceived renal cyst excision, 25 had simple nephrectomy, 22 had ureterolithotomy, 19 had radical nephrectomy, 15 had pyelolithotomy and 5 had pyeloplasty. Four (3,4% of the 115 patients required converting to open surgery. Except these patients, no major complication or mortal­ity was encountered. The mean duration of surgery for the most commonly applied procedures were as follows: renal cyst excision 62 (50-110 min, simple nephrectomy 125 (95-140 min, ureterolithotomy 108 (90-130 min, rad­ical nephrectomy 141 (105-175 min, pyelolithotomy 116 (95-140 min, and pyeloplasty 166 (150-190 min. The mean hospital stay was 3.7±2.8 (2-11 days. Conclusion: The success and complication rates of the laparoscopic surgeries performed in our clinic were con­sistent with those reported in the literature. In the light of technological advances and increasing experience, as well as based on the higher tolerance exhibited by pa­tients, we believe that laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive method that is a safe alternative to open surgery.

  10. Surgical Residents are Excluded From Robot-assisted Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Malene; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    performed. In 10 (1.3%) of these procedures, a resident attended as bedside assistant and never as operating surgeon in the console. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a severe problem with surgical education. Robot-assisted surgery is increasingly used; however, robotic surgical training during residency......PURPOSE: Implementation of a robotic system may influence surgical training. The aim was to report the charge of the operating surgeon and the bedside assistant at robot-assisted procedures in urology, gynecology, and colorectal surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of hospital charts from...... surgical procedures during a 1-year period from October 2013 to October 2014. All robot-assisted urologic, gynecologic, and colorectal procedures were identified. Charge of both operating surgeon in the console and bedside assistant were registered. RESULTS: A total of 774 robot-assisted procedures were...

  11. Permanent resident

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week wit...

  12. Late urologic morbidity in 177 consecutive patients after radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: a longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Thranow, Ingrid R.; Skovgaard, Lene Theil;

    2002-01-01

    Radiotherapy; carcinoma of the uterine cervix; Urologic morbidity; Franco-Italian glossary; Actuarial estimate......Radiotherapy; carcinoma of the uterine cervix; Urologic morbidity; Franco-Italian glossary; Actuarial estimate...

  13. The emerging role of social media in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveridge, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Social media have become so integrated into modern communications as to be universal in our personal and, increasingly, professional lives. Recent examples of social media uptake in urology, and the emergence of data to quantify it, reveal the expansion of conventional communication routes beyond the in-person forum. In every domain of urologic practice, from patient interaction through research to continuing professional development, the move online has unlocked another layer of conversation, dissemination, and, indeed, caveats. Social media have a democratizing effect, placing patients, trainees, practitioners, and thought leaders in the same arena and on equal footing. If uptake of social media in medicine even remotely parallels its rise to ubiquity in other areas, it will only expand and evolve in the coming years. For these reasons, this article presents an overview of the most recent data on the impact and potential complications of social media usage in the urologic community. PMID:25337040

  14. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: A Driving Force for Urological Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyid, Rashid K; Fleshner, Neil E

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing epidemic associated with many adverse complications. Urological complications of diabetes mellitus in men are gaining recognition. Previously unknown associations between T2DM and risk for prostate cancer, bladder cancer, renal cell carcinomas, urinary tract infections, nephrolithiasis, penile lesions, androgen deficiency, and erectile dysfunction have been discovered. Significantly, metformin could play a role in the management of urological malignancies, and therapies used for management of these cancers could in return lead to increased risk for diabetes. In this review, we aim to bridge the gap between T2DM and urological complications by discussing the latest findings in these fields, with the ultimate goal being improved patient care on both fronts. PMID:26969242

  15. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of rec...

  16. Basic Living Expenses for the Canadian Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnie-Jeanne MacDonald; Doug Andrews; Brown, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Our research undertakes to determine the basic living expenses required by Canadian seniors living in different circumstances in terms of age, gender, city of residence, household size, homeowner or renter, means of transportation and health status. The paper develops required expenses for food, shelter, health care, transportation and miscellaneous. The research identifies the typical expenses of seniors in each of these categories. Using 2001 as our base year, we follow the US Elder Standar...

  17. The standard of urological consultation of patients qualified for renal transplant – a review

    OpenAIRE

    Antoniewicz, Artur Andrzej; ZAPAŁA, ŁUKASZ; Bogucki, Arkadiusz; Małecki, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Urological consultation is an important step in the procedure of a patient's preparation before placing him/her on a waiting list for a renal transplant. Urological work-up aims to diagnose, treat, and optimize any preexisting urological disease. In the present paper we present the review of the literature together with the authors’ conclusions based on literature and their experience. There is not enough data in current literature and urology manuals on the adequate sequence of the urologica...

  18. THE STATE OF UROLOGIC CANCER CARE IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Shirokorad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2003 malignant neoplasms (MN of the urinary system and male genital organs affected more than 43,000 people in Russia, amounting to 9.4% in the structure of total cancer morbidity. In 2012, the incidence of urologic cancers at only three sites (prostate, kidney, and bladder was 12.1%. In the same year, Moscow showed the proportion of patients with new-onset urologic cancer, which accounted for one sixth (16.5% of the total MN morbidity and almost one fifth (18.5% of the total number of registered cancer patients.

  19. Surgical Management of Urologic Trauma and Iatrogenic Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinman, Leonard N; Vanni, Alex J

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary trauma usually occurs in the setting of multisystem trauma, accounting for approximately 10% of all emergency department admissions. Timely evaluation and management of the trauma patient have the potential to minimize urologic morbidity and mortality. New imaging modalities and a growing emphasis on nonoperative expectant management of both upper and lower urinary tract injuries have changed the field of urologic trauma. Concomitant injury to both the upper and the lower urinary tract is rare, but careful evaluation is critical to identify these devastating injuries. PMID:27261786

  20. 21 CFR 876.4730 - Manual gastroenterology-urology surgical instrument and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual gastroenterology-urology surgical... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4730 Manual gastroenterology-urology surgical instrument and accessories. (a)...

  1. Permanent resident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff. PMID:27193992

  2. Men's and Women's Quality of Work in the New Canadian Economy. Work Network Research Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Karen; Lowe, Graham S.; Schellenberg, Grant

    Men's and women's quality of work in the new Canadian economy was examined. The two data sources used were the 2000 Changing Employment Relationships Survey (CERS), which consisted of telephone interviews of 2,500 currently employed Canadian residents aged 18 or older, and the 2000 General Social Survey (GSS), which examined access to and use of…

  3. Adolescent urology: developing lifelong care for congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Dan

    2014-05-01

    Complex congenital urological anomalies often necessitate ongoing clinical and surgical management as patients reach adulthood and beyond. However, adolescent and lifelong care of such conditions is a relatively new urological specialty, and approaches to transitional health care require further development. Thus, although literature relating to the use of such approaches in urology are lacking, we are able to draw upon experience of models from other specialties. Urological anomalies might complicate an individual's development, particularly during adolescence, which represents a time of rapid and considerable change in most aspects of life. During this period, increased independence and responsibility, necessitating a shift from parent-driven to patient-driven care, and the desire to develop important and intimate social relationships can affect a patient's ability to cope with, and manage, disease. These factors also influence the ability of health-care providers to deliver adequate treatment. In particular, consideration of the effect of a condition or its treatment on the patient's capacity to live a normal life is important. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to overcoming these issues. Furthermore, diagnostic and treatment registries, as well as an increase in the number of adult-focused urologists willing to participate in the transition of patients from paediatric to adult care, are needed to enable provision of optimal patient care for the future. PMID:24709966

  4. Tumor banks: the cornerstone of basic research in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina T. Reis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Tumor banks have the primary responsibility for collecting, cataloging, storing and disseminating samples of tissues, cells and fluids, which are used by researchers to identify diagnostic molecular markers, prognostic indicators and therapeutic targets. The objective of this review was to describe a simple, reliable and reproducible protocol for obtaining and storing samples of urological tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Urogenital tumor tissues were collected by the surgeons from the Urology Division of University of Sao Paulo Medical School. The obtained surgical specimens were immediately placed in liquid nitrogen, dry ice or in a tube containing RNAlater ®, and then stored by cryopreservation (-80°C. A mirror fragment was fixed in 10% formalin processed routinely and embedded in Paraplast®. RESULTS: We developed a protocol for the collection, cataloging, storage, conservation and use of tumor samples. During a period of one year the Urological Tumor Bank of the Urology Division stored 274 samples of prostate, bladder, kidney, penis and testicle tumors of different histological types, 74 urine and 271 serum samples. CONCLUSIONS: Having biological materials characterized and available along with the clinical patient information provides an integrated portrait of the patients and their diseases facilitating advances in molecular biology. It also promotes the development of translational research improving methods of diagnosis and cancer treatment.

  5. [Artificial neural networks for decision making in urologic oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remzi, M; Djavan, B

    2007-06-01

    This chapter presents a detailed introduction regarding Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and their contribution to modern Urologic Oncology. It includes a description of ANNs methodology and points out the differences between Artifical Intelligence and traditional statistic models in terms of usefulness for patients and clinicians, and its advantages over current statistical analysis. PMID:18260271

  6. The spectrum of urological disease in patients with spina bifida.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, R A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: [corrected] Urological complications are the major cause of ill health during childhood and adult life of patients with spina bifida but the significance of urinary tract disease on the individual and the healthcare services is underemphasised. AIM: To assess the effects of spina bifida on the individual and the healthcare services. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed to assess the frequency and significance of urological conditions requiring hospital attendance in patients with spina bifida currently attending a specialised multidisciplinary clinic over a period of six months. RESULTS: Urinary sepsis accounted for the majority of admissions (62%), while 38 of 62 patients required 60 surgical procedures. Targeting the primary urological abnormality (the dysfunctional and usually poorly compliant bladder) allows implementation of effective treatments, including regular intermittent bladder catherisation (52%) in order to preserve upper renal tract function. Associated postural abnormalities complicated both conservative and interventional therapies. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the surgical commitment for units caring for patients with spina bifida, the important considerations for the future healthcare services, and the range and severity of urological diseases encountered by these patients.

  7. The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Schade, D.; Astronomy Data Centre, Canadian

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) is the world's largest astronomical data center, holding over 0.5 Petabytes of information, and serving nearly 3000 astronomers worldwide. Its current data collections include BLAST, CFHT, CGPS, FUSE, Gemini, HST, JCMT, MACHO, MOST, and numerous other archives and services. It provides extensive data archiving, curation, and processing expertise, via projects such as MegaPipe, and enables substantial day-to-day collaboration between resident astronomers and computer specialists. It is a stable, powerful, persistent, and properly supported environment for the storage and processing of large volumes of data, a condition that is now absolutely vital for their science potential to be exploited by the community. Through initiatives such as the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM), the Canadian Virtual Observatory (CVO), and the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), the CADC is at the global forefront of advancing astronomical research through improved data services. The CAOM aims to provide homogeneous data access, and hence viable interoperability between a potentially unlimited number of different data collections, at many wavelengths. It is active in the definition of numerous emerging standards within the International Virtual Observatory, and several datasets are already available. The CANFAR project is an initiative to make cloud computing for storage and data-intensive processing available to the community. It does this via a Virtual Machine environment that is equivalent to managing a local desktop. Several groups are already processing science data. CADC is also at the forefront of advanced astronomical data analysis, driven by the science requirements of astronomers both locally and further afield. The emergence of 'Astroinformatics' promises to provide not only utility items like object classifications, but to directly enable new science by accessing previously undiscovered or intractable

  8. Markets for Canadian oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference presentation presented charts and graphs on the market for Canadian oil. Graphs included crude oil and natural gas prices and heavy oil discount differential. Graphs depicting heavy oil economics such as bitumen blending with condensate were also included along with global crude oil reserves by country. Information on oil sands projects in the Athabasca, Peace River, and Cold Lake deposits was presented along with graphs on oil sands supply costs by recovery type; Canadian production for conventional, oil sands and offshore oil; new emerging oil sands crude types; and 2003 market demand by crude type in the United States and Canada. Maps included Canada and United States crude oil pipelines; western Canadian crude oil markets; long term oil pipeline expansion projects; Canadian and United States crude oil pipeline alternatives; and potential tanker markets for Canadian oil sands production. Lastly, the presentation provided graphs on 2003 refinery crude demand and California market demand. tabs., figs

  9. Concomitant laparoscopic urological procedures: Does it contribute to morbidity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurya Kamlesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With advancement in minimal access surgery two laparoscopic procedures can be combined together shortening the total hospital stay, decreasing morbidity and overall reduced cost. Combining two laparoscopic procedures in a single session has been reported in general surgery. Very few articles are available in literature with regard to combined urological laparoscopic surgeries. This article retrospectively analyses the outcomes of multiple laparoscopic procedures performed in a single stage at our centre. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing simultaneous procedures from May 2003 to Jan 2009 were included in the study. Patients were categorised into three groups according to the primary urological organ involved, for better comparison with the control group. Diseases involving the adrenals gland were grouped in (group 1, kidney (group 2 and renal collecting system/ureter (group 3. All patients had one urological procedure for either of the above-mentioned organs combined with another surgical procedure. Similarly three control groups were chosen according to the primary urological organ involved (group 1c- unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy, group 2c- unilateral laparoscopic radical nephrectomy and group 3c- unilateral laparoscopic ureterolithotomy for comparative study. The operative details, hospital stay and complications were analysed. Results: Thirty-two patients underwent 64 laparoscopic procedures under single anaesthesia. The most common procedure in this series was laparoscopic adrenalectomy (n=34 followed by laparoscopic nephrectomy (n=13. Group 1 patients had a prolonged operative time ( P=0.012 and hospital stay ( P=0.025 when compared with group 1c. However, blood loss was comparable in both the groups. Patients in groups 2 and 3 had comparable operative times, blood loss and recovery period with respect to their controls. Intraoperatively, the end tidal carbon dioxide levels were within permissible limits. All

  10. Attitude and perception of urology by medical students at the end of their medical school: An appraisal from Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Binsaleh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Knowledge of medical school graduates is insufficient in many urologic subjects, and there is a need for more urology exposure. Social reasons and lack of knowledge about urology hinder the choice of urology specialty as a future career. Clearance of learning objectives, immediate and prompt feedback on performance and adequate emphasis of common problems and ambulatory care are some aspects that should be taken into account by curriculum planners as they consider improvements to urology rotation program.

  11. [Urology and Sexology in Berlin 1880-1933: Original citations for the establishment of this frontier of urology - protagonists as reflected in their publications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Friedrich H; Fangerau, Heiner

    2016-02-01

    The connections between urology and sexology are often not obvious today. At the end of the 19th century both specialties developed in parallel especially in Berlin and had a fruitful relationship. Urologic journals and books were an ideal forum for publication especially for sexologists. PMID:26839117

  12. Using implementation science to improve urologic oncology care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Sales, Anne E

    2016-09-01

    There are many gaps between recommended urologic cancer care and real-world practice. Although we increasingly define these quality gaps because of our growing health services research capacity in urologic oncology, we often fall short in translating these findings into effective interventions and strategies to reduce gaps in care. In this article, we highlight implementation research as a logical next step for translating our health services research findings into effective individual and organizational behavior change strategies to improve quality of care. We explain how implementation research focuses on different, upstream outcomes from our clinical outcomes to get the right care to the right patient at the right time. Lastly, we share information about resources and training for those interested in learning more about this emerging, transdisciplinary field. PMID:27401405

  13. Robot-assisted laparoscopic urological surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sávio, Luís F; Nguyen, Hiep T

    2013-11-01

    Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) has been proven to be safe and effective for various urological procedures in children, including pyeloplasty, orchiopexy, nephrectomy, and bladder augmentation. The robot system enables delicate and precise movements, which are ideal for the types of reconstructive surgeries that children with urological issues often require, overcoming many of the impediments associated with the conventional laparoscopic approach. RALS helps the relative novice to perform fine surgical techniques and is thought to reduce the learning curve associated with some surgical techniques, such as intracorporeal suturing, owing to the improved freedom of movement of the surgical instruments, the ergonomic positioning of the surgeon, and the 3D vision provided by the robotic system. Given the favourable safety profile and associated benefits of the robot system, including reductions in mean postoperative hospital stay compared with conventional procedures, RALS is becoming more widely adopted by paediatric urologists. PMID:24100517

  14. Bilingualism: A Canadian Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bilingualism in French and English is a much-to-be hoped for common and shared characteristic of Canadian citizenship—even though to date the effect of forty years of the Official Languages Act has been most marked in government services and among various Canadian elites. Although it is important that Canada hold onto a goal of the widest possible bilingualism,more modest objectives are outlined for the years immediately ahead.

  15. Use of a semiconductor-diode laser in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Graham M.

    1994-05-01

    The gallium arsenide semiconductor laser can emit in the near infrared where the depth of penetration into tissue is great although scattering is less than with the Nd:YAG laser. The laser is highly compact. It runs off a normal electrical outlet with no cooling requirement. It is therefore quiet and convenient. The laser has been assessed in a wide variety of applications in our urological department.

  16. [Transparency regime: semiotics of radiographical images in urological diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M; Fangerau, H

    2012-10-01

    Shortly after Röntgen discovered x-rays urology became one of the main test fields for the application of this new technology. Initial scepticism among physicians, who were inclined to cling to traditional manual methods of diagnosing, was replaced by enthusiasm for radiographic technologies and the new method soon became the standard in, for example the diagnosis of concrements. Patients favoring radiographic procedures over the use of probes and a convincing documentation of stones in radiograms were factors that impacted the relatively rapid integration of radiology into urology. The radiographic representation of soft tissues and body cavities was more difficult and the development of contrast agents in particular posed a serious problem. Several patients died during this research. A new diagnostic dimension was revealed when radiography and cystography were combined to form the method of retrograde pyelography. However, the problem of how urologists could learn how to read the new images remained. In order to allow trainee physicians to practice interpreting radiograms atlases were produced which offered explanatory texts and drawings for radiographic images of the kidneys, the bladder etc. Thus, urologists developed a self-contained semiotics which facilitated the appropriation of a unique urological radiographical gaze. PMID:22914883

  17. Manipulating the epigenome for the treatment of urological malignancies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Rourke, Colm J

    2013-05-01

    Urological malignancies (cancers of the prostate, bladder, kidney and testes) account for 15% of all human cancers and more than 500,000 deaths worldwide each year. This group of malignancies is spread across multiple generations, affecting the young (testicular) through middle and old-age (kidney, prostate and bladder). Like most human cancers, urological cancers are characterized by widespread epigenetic insult, causing changes in DNA hypermethylation and histone modifications leading to silencing of tumor suppressor genes and genomic instability. The inherent stability yet dynamic plasticity of the epigenome lends itself well to therapeutic manipulation. Epigenetic changes are amongst the earliest lesions to occur during carcinogenesis and are essentially reversible (unlike mutations). For this reason, much attention has been placed over the past two decades on deriving pharmacological compounds that can specifically target and reverse such epi-mutations, either halting cancer on its developmental trajectory or reverting fully formed cancers to a more clinically manageable state. This review discusses DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase inhibitors that have been extensively studied in preclinical models and clinical trials for advanced and metastatic urological cancers.

  18. [Urological moulages: forgotten three-dimensional documents between university collections and panopticum -- a dying presentation form even in urological museology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, F H; Görgen, A; Fangerau, H

    2013-08-01

    The use of wax models traces its roots back to antiquity and appears to have reached the peak of perfection in the eighteenth century especially in Italy. From the beginning of the nineteenth century wax models and moulages were used in the new medical specialties, such as dermatology or urology depending on a new model of visualization in natural sciences. The moulage passed from local use into international acceptance with the institutionalization of the medical specialties and increase in scientific communication in the second half of the nineteenth century. By the 1970s moulages had all but lost their pre-eminent position as teaching and visual aids to depict dermatological and venereal diseases Unfortunately urology was not mentioned in the field of history of medicine or ethnic studies. PMID:23933709

  19. Main nursing diagnoses in hospitalized elderly people who underwent urological surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Walisson Guimarães Lima; Simony Fabíola Lopes Nunes; Angela Maria Alvarez; Rafaela Vivian Valcarenghi; Maria Luiza Rêgo Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify the main nursing diagnoses in the elderly during postoperative period of urologic surgeries. Methods: Cross-sectional and quantitative study conducted in a urological unit. Data collection was conducted through physical examinations and consultation to medical records. One hundred senior citizens who were hospitalized at the institution participated in the study. Results: The most frequent urological surgical procedures were: transurethral resection of the prostate (27 ...

  20. Task completion time: Objective tool for assessment of technical skills in laparoscopic simulator for urology trainees

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Shashi K.; Ganpule, A.; Kurien, A; Muthu, V.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Laparoscopic surgical simulation is a valuable training tool for urology trainees. Aims: We assessed the validity of task completion time (TCT) as an objective tool for practicing and acquiring technical skills in a simulated laparoscopy environment. Materials and Methods: Fifteen participants comprising postgraduate urology trainees from first to third year (n = 12), urology fellow (n = 1) and consultants (n = 2) underwent basic laparoscopic training on the “Beetle Universal” endotr...

  1. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C.

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents, immuno-oncology agents, and novel drug combinations.

  2. Canadian competitive advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the Canadian petrochemical industry was outlined, emphasizing the proximity to feedstocks as the principal advantage enjoyed by the industry over its international competitors. Annual sales statistics for 1995 were provided. Key players in the Canadian petrochemical industry (Nova, Dow, DuPont, Methanex, Esso, Union Carbide, Shell and Celanese), their share of the market and key products were noted. Manufacturing facilities are located primarily in Alberta, southern Ontario and Quebec. The feedstock supply infrastructure, historical and alternative ethane pricing in Canada and the US, the North American market for petrochemicals, the competitiveness of the industry, tax competitiveness among Canadian provinces and the US, the Canada - US unit labour cost ratio, ethylene facility construction costs in Canada relative to the US Gulf Coast, and projected 1997 financial requirements were reviewed. 19 figs

  3. mHealth in Urology: A Review of Experts' Involvement in App Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Pereira-Azevedo

    Full Text Available Smartphones are increasingly playing a role in healthcare and previous studies assessing medical applications (apps have raised concerns about lack of expert involvement and low content accuracy. However, there are no such studies in Urology. We reviewed Urology apps with the aim of assessing the level of participation of healthcare professionals (HCP and scientific Urology associations in their development.A systematic search was performed on PubMed, Apple's App Store and Google's Play Store, for Urology apps, available in English. Apps were reviewed by three graders to determine the app's platform, target customer, developer, app type, app category, price and the participation of a HCP or a scientific Urology association in the development.The search yielded 372 apps, of which 150 were specific for Urology. A fifth of all apps had no HCP involvement (20.7% and only a third had been developed with a scientific Urology association (34.7%. The lowest percentage of HCP (13.4% and urological association (1.9% involvement was in apps designed for the general population. Furthermore, there was no contribution from an Urology society in "Electronic Medical Record" nor in "Patient Information" apps. A limitation of the study is that only Android and iOS apps were reviewed.Despite the increasing Mobile Health (mHealth market, this is the first study that demonstrates the lack of expert participation in the design of Urology apps, particularly in apps designed for the general public. Until clear regulation is enforced, the urological community should help regulate app development. Maintaining a register of certified apps or issuing an official scientific seal of approval could improve overall app quality. We propose that urologists become stakeholders in mHealth, shaping future app design and promoting peer-review app validation.

  4. Canadian Irradiation Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Irradiation Centre is a non-profit cooperative project between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Radiochemical Company and Universite du Quebec, Institut Armand-Frappier, Centre for Applied Research in Food Science. The Centre's objectives are to develop, demonstrate and promote Canada's radiation processing technology and its applications by conducting applied research; training technical, professional and scientific personnel; educating industry and government; demonstrating operational and scientific procedures; developing processing procedures and standards, and performing product and market acceptance trials. This pamphlet outlines the history of radoation technology and the services offered by the Canadian Irradiation Centre

  5. Canadian beef quality audit.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Donkersgoed, J; Jewison, G; M. Mann; Cherry, B; Altwasser, B; Lower, R; Wiggins, K; Dejonge, R; Thorlakson, B; Moss, E.; C. Mills; Grogan, H

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted in 4 Canadian processing plants in 1995-96 to determine the prevalence of quality defects in Canadian cattle. One percent of the annual number of cattle processed in Canada were evaluated on the processing floor and 0.1% were graded in the cooler. Brands were observed on 37% and multiple brands on 6% of the cattle. Forty percent of the cattle had horns, 20% of which were scurs, 33% were stubs, 10% were tipped, and 37% were full length. Tag (mud and manure on the hide) wa...

  6. Urological surgery in elderly patients: results and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodak M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Milos Brodak, Jan Tomasek, Jaroslav Pacovsky, Lukas Holub, Petr Husek Department of Urology, University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic Purpose: Owing to the large aging population, a growing number of elderly patients are undergoing surgical treatment. Surgical procedures in elderly patients are associated with a higher risk of complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of urological surgeries in old patients.Methods: The authors carried out a retrospective study, evaluating results and early postoperative complications in patients aged 75 years and older. The cohort of patients included 221 patients who underwent surgical procedures in the department of urology between January 2011 and December 2012. The average age of patients was 78. The results and complications were categorized based on the type of surgery performed, and the Dindo–Clavien scale.Results: The median follow-up was 18 months. All surgeries for malignant tumors were performed successfully with no residual disease. Totally, 48 (22% complications were recorded. The most serious were as follows: one patient (<0.5% died; and four (<2% patients underwent reoperation. The most common complications involved infection, mainly sepsis and surgical site infections. Other complications included mild respiratory insufficiency, delirium, bleeding, etc.Conclusion: Surgeries in elderly patients were effective and safe. The cornerstone of safety is careful preparation and treatment of comorbidities. Complications occurred mainly as a result of emergency procedures during emergency procedures and in major surgeries such as cystectomy and nephrectomy. The standard use of low molecular-weight heparin caused no incidence of thromboembolic disease. Keywords: urinary tract, aged, postoperative complications, Dindo–Clavien classification

  7. Interventional urology: endourology in small animal veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Allyson C

    2015-07-01

    The use of novel image-guided techniques in veterinary medicine has become more widespread, especially in urologic diseases. With the common incidence of urinary tract obstructions, stones disease, renal disease, and urothelial malignancies, combined with the recognized invasiveness and morbidity associated with traditional surgical techniques, the use of minimally invasive alternatives using interventional radiology and interventional endoscopy techniques has become incredibly appealing to owners and clinicians. This article provides a brief overview of some of the most common procedures done in endourology in veterinary medicine to date, providing as much evidence-based medicine as possible when comparing with traditional surgical alternatives. PMID:26002798

  8. Urological anomalies in the Northern Region Fetal Abnormality Survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, J. E.; Renwick, M

    1993-01-01

    From 1 January 1985 to 31 December 1990, the Northern Region Fetal Abnormality Survey received 736 notifications of fetuses with suspected urological abnormalities; a prevalence of three per 1000 births. There was a male:female ratio of 2:1, the ratio was higher in obstructive than in intrinsic renal parenchymal lesions. Overall diagnostic sensitivity was 68.9% and positive predictive value 50.8%. Hydronephrosis was the most frequent antenatal diagnosis (421 cases, 57.2%): 233 (55.3%) of thes...

  9. Surgery therapy of lung metastasis by urological malignity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors analyse the group of 49 patients operated for pulmonary metastases due to a primary urological tumor. The patients were randomized into two groups. The first group were the patient suffering from from pulmonary metastases of testicular tumors treated by primary chemotherapy and subsequent surgery. The other group were the patients with pulmonary metastases of renal and urinal bladder cancer treated by primary surgery. On longitudinal fallow up, pulmonary recurrence was detected in 10 patients. Six patients underwent a repeat operation Based on their own experience, the authors consider indicated. Primary removal or their recurrence of pulmonary metastases (authors). 3 tabs., 2 figs., 16 refs

  10. Adherence to European Association of Urology Guidelines on Prophylactic Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Tommaso; Verze, Paolo; Brugnolli, Anna;

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli to piperacillin/tazobactam (9.1% vs. 5.4%; p=0.03), gentamicin (18.3% vs. 11.2%; p=0.02), and ciprofloxacin (32.3% vs. 19.1%; p=0.03) decreased significantly after protocol introduction. The defined daily dose (DDD) use of ciprofloxacin fell from 4.2 to 0.2 DDD per 100 patient-days after....... We found that adherence to the guidelines reduced the rate of bacterial resistance, in particular against piperacillin/tazobactam, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin, and reduced costs without increasing the risk of postoperative infection after urologic procedures. We recommend adherence to the...

  11. European Association of Urology--31st Annual Congress (March 11-15, 2016--Munich, Germany).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulsat, C

    2016-04-01

    The 31st Annual European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress held in Munich, Germany, was a platform for expert urological specialists from all over the world to find a unique space to share their evidence-based knowledge during state-of-the art lectures, presentations and courses. This report covers selected presentations covering cancer-related presentations. PMID:27252990

  12. A prospective audit of emergency urology activity in a university teaching hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2014-06-01

    Urology cover is commonly available out-of-hours in most teaching hospitals. However, increased pressure to reduce hospital expenditure has forced many institutions to consider removing middle grade cover outside of normal working hours. The aim of this study was to audit the emergency urology activity in our institution over a 12-month period.

  13. High acceptability of a newly developed urological practical skills training program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, A.H. de; Luijk, S.J. van; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Wagner, C.; Schout, B.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benefits of simulation training are widely recognized, but its structural implementation into urological curricula remains challenging. This study aims to gain insight into current and ideal urological practical skills training and presents the outline of a newly developed skills trainin

  14. mHealth in urology : A review of experts' involvement in app development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira-Azevedo, N. (Nuno); Carrasquinho, E. (Eduardo); De Oliveira, E.C. (Eduardo Cardoso); Cavadas, V. (Vitor); Osório, L. (Luís); Fraga, A. (Avelino); Castelo-Branco, M. (Miguel); Roobol, M.J. (Monique J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Smartphones are increasingly playing a role in healthcare and previous studies assessing medical applications (apps) have raised concerns about lack of expert involvement and low content accuracy. However, there are no such studies in Urology. We reviewed Urology apps with

  15. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of our research and development program on heavy water processes

  16. Canadian hydrogen safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes and Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates trade through fair insurance policies and rates, effective and efficient regulatory approval procedures and accommodation of the interests of the general public. The Program integrates a consistent quantitative risk assessment methodology with experimental (destructive and non-destructive) failure rates and consequence-of-release data for key hydrogen components and systems into risk assessment of commercial application scenarios. Its current and past six projects include Intelligent Virtual Hydrogen Filling Station (IVHFS), Hydrogen clearance distances, comparative quantitative risk comparison of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) refuelling options; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling validation, calibration and enhancement; enhancement of frequency and probability analysis, and Consequence analysis of key component failures of hydrogen systems; and fuel cell oxidant outlet hydrogen sensor project. The Program projects are tightly linked with the content of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety. (author)

  17. Twitter and Canadian Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Max

    2012-01-01

    An emerging group of leaders in Canadian education has attracted thousands of followers. They've made Twitter an extension of their lives, delivering twenty or more tweets a day that can include, for example, links to media articles, research, new ideas from education bloggers, or to their own, or simply a personal thought. At their best,…

  18. Reform in Canadian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 67 Canadian university vice presidents and 66 deans concerning reform in recent years found that the many changes reported were modest and reactive rather than bold and proactive. Most common changes involved strategic planning, retrenchment, curriculum expansion, response to enrollment changes, administrative restructuring, and more…

  19. Canadian Red Cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Red Cross is guided by its Fundamental Principles--humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence, voluntary service, unity, and universality--and organized in a traditional geographic hierarchical structure. Among the characteristics that have contributed to its success are a budgeting process that starts at the local level, measurement of program outcomes, and coordinated fundraising activities at the regional level. PMID:18551842

  20. Canadian petroleum industry review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide ranging discussion about the factors that have influenced oil and natural gas prices, the differences of the Canadian market from international markets, the differences between eastern and western Canadian markets, and shareholders' perspectives on recent commodity price developments was presented. Developments in the OPEC countries were reviewed, noting that current OPEC production of 25 mmbbls is about 60 per cent higher than it was in 1985. It is expected that OPEC countries will continue to expand capacity to meet expected demand growth and the continuing need created by the UN embargo on Iraqi oil sales. Demand for natural gas is also likely to continue to rise especially in view of the deregulation of the electricity industry where natural gas may well become the favored fuel for incremental thermal generation capacity. Prices of both crude oil and natural gas are expected to hold owing to unusually low storage levels of both fuels. The inadequacy of infrastructure, particularly pipeline capacity as a key factor in the Canadian market was noted, along with the dynamic that will emerge in the next several years that may have potential consequences for Canadian production - namely the reversal of the Sarnia to Montreal pipeline. With regard to shareholders' expectations the main issues are (1) whether international markets reach back to the wellhead, hence the producer's positioning with respect to transportation capacity and contract portfolios, and (2) whether the proceeds from increased prices are invested in projects that are yielding more than the cost of capital. 28 figs

  1. Current status of sentinel node biopsy in urological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedhelm Wawroschek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Like in most other malignancies the lymph node status is of outstanding prognostic relevance and an important tool for the determination of adjuvant strategies for urological tumor entities, too. Even in the era of PET/CT and MRI with iron oxid nano-particles the radiological imaging technology is strongly limited in cases of metastases smaller than 5 mm. Therefore only the operative lymph node exploration is suitable for an exact lymph node staging. The dilemma, however, is that the extended lymphadenectomy techniques feature a high morbidity and that any limitation of the dissection area results in a reduced detection rate of metastases in penile and prostate cancer. In contrast the sentinel- guided lymphadenectomy (SLND offers a short operation time and a low morbidity without the risk of a significantly reduced detection of lymph node positive patients. As a consequence of many published papers dealing with a few thousands of patients the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines recommend the SLND in penile cancer (tumor stages ≥ T1G2 and as an option in prostate cancer. The latest studies of bladder, renal cell and testicular cancer promise the feasibility for these tumor entities, too. Up to which extend these thera- peutic concepts are able to replace or at least complement the default therapeutic procedures has to be shown in further studies.

  2. Usefulness of fetal MR imaging for congenital urological anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akasaka, Yoshinobu; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Kanegawa, Kimio [Kobe Children' s Hospital (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Despite the fact that congenital urological anomalies are not rare, the role of fetal MRI in these disorders has not been well defined. We evaluated the usefulness of MRI in the prenatal diagnosis of patients with such anomalies. A total of 23 cases were included in this study. The 23 cases were divided as follows: 7 cases of bilateral renal agenesis or severe hypogenesis (Potter sequence: PS), 8 cases of multicystic dysplastic kidney (2 cases were bilateral: MCDK), 5 cases of hydronephrosis (HN), one case of hydroureteronephrosis (HUN) and 2 cases of HN or HUN with duplication (DUP). In this study the scan time for fetal MRI was approximately 30 seconds for one sequence. Overall, the diagnostic accuracy was 65.2%; 85.2% for PS, 87.5% for MCDK, 60.0% for HN, 50.0% for HUN and 0% for DUP. Even though imaging quality was relatively poor for motion artifact in this series, we were able to diagnose PS and MCDK because of associated lung hypoplasia and its characteristic shape. The diagnosis of HN, HUN and DUP was difficult. HN was sometimes misdiagnosed as a retroperitoneal cystic mass because the dilation of calices was obscured in severe cases. In HUN and DUP cases dilation of the ureter was unclear. However, using HASTE or true FISP sequence may solve this problem. Based on this data, we conclude that fetal MRI is useful for prenatal diagnosis of urological anomalies. (author)

  3. Investigation about the usefulness of strontium 89 for urological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the efficacy and the safety of Strontium89 (Sr89) for urological cancer. A total of 18 patients with urological cancers (6 patients with renal cell carcinoma and 12 patients with prostatic carcinoma) were administered intravenously at a dose of 2.0 MBq/kg, maximum 141 MBq/body Sr89 for pain palliation. The evaluation method of the efficacy is that effective' is for the case Sr89 could reduced the amount of pain killers, no change', and 'ineffective' is for the case increasing the amount of pain killers. We also investigated when the effect appeared and how long it continued in the effective cases. The safety of Sr89 was evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version3.0 (CTCAEv3.0). Sr89 was effective in 16 patients of the 18, no change in 1 patient, and ineffective in 1 patient. The pain level improved within 1 to 4 weeks and the effect continued for about 2 months. Bone marrow suppression was observed in 4 cases of the 18, but they were not critical. 18 patients with renal cell carcinoma or prostatic carcinoma were administered Sr89 for pain palliation. Pain was substantially improved after Sr89 therapy in 16 patients. Most of the improved patients experienced pain relief from 1 or 2 weeks following Sr89 therapy and the effect continued for 2 months. The minor adverse effects were observed, but they were not seemed to be in trouble through the clinical use. (author)

  4. Well-being in residency training: a survey examining resident physician satisfaction both within and outside of residency training and mental health in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the critical importance of well-being during residency training, only a few Canadian studies have examined stress in residency and none have examined well-being resources. No recent studies have reported any significant concerns with respect to perceived stress levels in residency. We investigated the level of perceived stress, mental health and understanding and need for well-being resources among resident physicians in training programs in Alberta, Canada. Methods A mail questionnaire was distributed to the entire resident membership of PARA during 2003 academic year. PARA represents each of the two medical schools in the province of Alberta. Results In total 415 (51 % residents participated in the study. Thirty-four percent of residents who responded to the survey reported their life as being stressful. Females reported stress more frequently than males (40% vs. 27%, p Residents highly valued their colleagues (67%, program directors (60% and external psychiatrist/psychologist (49% as well-being resources. Over one third of residents wished to have a career counselor (39% and financial counselor (38%. Conclusion Many Albertan residents experience significant stressors and emotional and mental health problems. Some of which differ among genders. This study can serve as a basis for future resource application, research and advocacy for overall improvements to well-being during residency training.

  5. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  6. The Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) Residency In-Training Exam: A Preliminary Psychometric Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Gregory P. J.; Crockford, David N.; Hecker, Kent

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) Residency In-Training Exam is a formative exam for Canadian psychiatric residents that was reconstructed using assessment best practices. An assessment of psychometric properties was subsequently performed on the exam to ensure preliminary validity and reliability. Methods: An exam…

  7. Canadian fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Research Council of Canada is establishing a coordinated national program of fusion research and development that is planned to grow to a total annual operating level of about $20 million in 1985. The long-term objective of the program is to put Canadian industry in a position to manufacture sub-systems and components of fusion power reactors. In the near term the program is designed to establish a minimum base of scientific and technical expertise sufficient to make recognized contributions and thereby gain access to the international effort. The Canadian program must be narrowly focussed on a few specializations where Canada has special indigenous skills or technologies. The programs being funded are the Tokamak de Varennes, the Fusion Fuels Technology Project centered on tritium management, and high-power gas laser technology and associated diagnostic instrumentation

  8. Canadian acid rain policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 13 of 1991, the Prime Minister of Canada, Brian Mulroney and the President of the United States of America, George Bush, signed an Agreement on Air Quality. This agreement enshrines Principle 21 of the 1972 Stockholm Declaration which states that countries are to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction do not cause damage to the environment of another country. This agreement also includes provisions for controlling acid rain. The Agreement on Air Quality followed years of discussion between the two countries and is a significant milestone in the history of Canadian acid rain policy. This paper begins by describing Canadian acid rain policy and its evolution. The paper also outlines the Canada-United States Air Quality Agreement and the effect of the acid rain provisions on deposition in Canada. Finally, it considers the future work that must be undertaken to further resolve the acid rain problem. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  9. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  10. Financing Canadian international operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primer on financing international operations by Canadian corporations was provided. Factors affecting the availability to project finance (location, political risk), the various forms of financing (debt, equity, and combinations), the main sources of government backed financing to corporations (the International Finance Corporation) (IFC), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Overseas Property Insurance Corporation (OPIC), government or agency guarantees, political risk coverage, the use of offshore financial centres, and the where, when and how these various organizations operate, were reviewed. Examples of all of the above, taken from the experiences of Canadian Occidental Petroleum of Calgary in the U.S., in South America, in the Middle and Far East, and in Kazakhstan, were used as illustrations. figs

  11. Canadian petroleum history bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2003-09-27

    The Petroleum History Bibliography includes a list of more than 2,000 publications that record the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. The list includes books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles, company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry, humour, and an author index. It was created over a period of several years to help with projects at the Petroleum History Society. It is an ongoing piece of work, and as such, invites comments and additions.

  12. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  13. [Experience with argon laser in urological diseases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothauge, C F; Nöske, H D; Kraushaar, J

    1981-09-01

    The application of the Argon laser in urology has proved to be effective in resecting recurrent, exophytic urothelial tumors of the bladder up to the size of a raspberry. In cases of wide spread bladder tumors we only perform a radiation of the resected area as local recurrence prophylaxis following transurethral resection. The urethroscopic Argon laser irradiation makes laser urethrotomy and evaporisation of urethral strictures possible. Furthermore, a curative and conservative treatment of urethral tumors is possible in combination with chemotherapy. The same applies for the penis carcinoma. Urethral ruptures are also successfully treated by urethroscopic laser recanalization. A determination of the ureteral submucosal course, which may allow a prognosis about the probable maturation, is possible in cases of cystoureteral reflux with the help of laser diaphanoscopy. PMID:7197839

  14. Novel Technologies in Urologic Surgery: a Rapidly Changing Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandaglia, Giorgio; Schatteman, Peter; De Naeyer, Geert; D'Hondt, Frederiek; Mottrie, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of laparoscopy and robotic surgery revolutionized the surgical management of urologic patients. Nonetheless, we live in an era of rapid changes, and we are probably still in the infancy of technology applied to surgery. When considering currently available technologies, there are several unmet needs to be addressed. These include the application of augmented reality, haptic feedback, tissue recognition, distant remote control, miniaturization of surgical instruments, the learning curve typical of the introduction of novel techniques, and excessive costs. In the next few years, evolution in imaging modalities in pre- and intraoperative surgical planning, as well as the introduction of novel minimally invasive platforms, would in part address these issues, substantially improving surgical outcomes. In addition, validated training programs would allow for the safe implementation of novel techniques in the clinical practice. Finally, a reduction in costs would be necessary to make technology affordable and to optimize healthcare resources. PMID:26874531

  15. Long-term urological outcomes in cloacal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Brian T; Wilcox, Duncan T

    2016-04-01

    Cloacal anomalies are the most complex and severe form of congenital anorectal malformations (ARM) and urogenital malformations, and it has been well documented that increased severity of ARM leads to worse outcomes. While short-term data on persistent cloaca are available, a paucity of data on long-term outcomes exists, largely because of a lack of uniform terminology, inclusion with other ARM and evolution of the operative technique. On comprehensive review of the published literature on long-term urological outcomes in patients with cloacal anomalies, we found a significant risk of chronic kidney disease and incontinence, however, with improvements in surgical technique, outcomes have improved. Continence often requires intermittent catheterization and in some cases, bladder augmentation. The complexity of cloacal malformations and associated anomalies make long-term multidisciplinary follow-up imperative. PMID:26969235

  16. Laparoscopy for urologic diseases (report of 286 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To report the experience in laparoscopy for urologic diseases. Methods: Two hundred and eighty-six patients were performed laparoscopy via the transperitoneal or retroperitoneal or extroperitoneal approach, including 160 cases of unroofing of renal cysts, 2 cases of radical nephrectomy, 15 cases of simple nephrectomy, 2 cases of nephroureterectomy of renal duplication, 7 cases of radical nephroureterectomy, 1 case of pyeloureteroplasty, 1 case of renal pedicle lymphatic disconnection, 57 cases of tumorectomy or adrenalectomy, 25 cases of ureterolithotomy, 4 cases of radical prostatecomy, 11 cases of ligations of spermatics vessels and 1 case of orchiopexy. Results: The procedures were successful in 156 cases of renal cyst. The average operative time was 82 min (ranging from 30 to 185 min). Four cases were converted to open surgery, and they were all performed retroperitoneal approach. Two radical nephrectomy were successful, the operation time were 145 to 160 min. Seventeen nephrectomy were also successful, the operation time were 85 to 220 min. Seven radical nephroureterectomy were successful, the operation time were 210 to 310 min. All adrenal procedure was successful except that in the first case. The average operation time was 132 min (ranging from 45 to 225 min). Twenty-five cases of ureterolithotomy, 4 radical prostatecomy, 11 ligations of spermatics vessels, 1 case of pyeloureteroplasty, l orchiopexy and 1 renal pedicle lymphatic disconnection were also successful. All patients recovered rightly. The average hospital stay was 5.3 days (ranging from 2 to 23 days). Conclusion: Laparoscopy is a safe, effective and minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of urologic diseases. Patients suffer pain little, and recover quickly from illness. (authors)

  17. Urological manifestations of Chikungunya fever: A single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baishya Ramen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chikungunya is a viral infection often associated with lower urinary tract dysfunction. This study evaluates the urological squeal of Chikungunya fever in a single centre after an epidemic in 2006-2007 in India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records of 13 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms after Chikungunya fever was evaluated and outcome following intervention assessed. Results: A total of 13 patients (M:F=9:4, with age ranging from 30 to 72 years, were included in the study. They presented with chronic urinary retention (n=9, 69.23% of which two had paraparesis, voiding symptoms alone (n=7, 53.8%, storage symptoms alone (n=3, 23%, and acute urinary retention (n=1, 7.6%. Presentation with lower urinary tract symptoms after an episode of Chikungunya fever was after a mean period of 163 days (range 30-360 days. Mean serum creatinine on presentation was 1.8 mg/dl (0.6-6.5 mg/dl. Evaluation revealed dilated upper tract in four (30.7% patients. Cystometrography showed acontractile detrusor (n=3, 37.5%, hypocontractile detrusor (n=3, 37.5%, overactive detrusor (n=1, 12.5% and normal study (n=1, 12.5%. At the mean follow up of 11 months, 11 patients (84.6% had satisfactory functional outcome after intervention, namely supra pubic diversion and bladder training (n=5, 38.4%, alpha blocker (n=3, 23%, timed frequent voiding (n=2, 15.3%, clean intermittent catheterization (n=2, 15.3%, trial void with alpha blocker (n=1, 7.6% while two are on continuing supra pubic diversion due to persistent neurological deficit. Conclusions: Chikungunya fever is an uncommon entity in urological practice, often associated with urinary symptoms. An accurate assessment of the symptoms and timely intervention prevents upper tract deterioration and improves the quality of life.

  18. Canadian identity: Implications for international social work by Canadians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    This paper is in response to recent calls to conceptualize and articulate Canadian perspectives and experiences in international social work, given that the Canadian standpoint has been lacking in international social work literature. This paper contends that it is imperative, first of all, to cr...

  19. The CAS Residents' Competition: a 25 year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, C D; McClenaghan, K M

    1994-02-01

    The popularity of the Residents' Competition at the annual meeting of the Canadian Anaesthetists' Society inspired this 25 yr review of the competitors and their presentations. Data were collected from a questionnaire survey of all participants and all current Anaesthesia programme directors, review of the Canadian Anaesthetists' Society records, and a Medline data-base search. Over the 25 yr review period, 226 presentations have been given by 211 different participants, with the annual number of participants ranging from 6 to 13. The majority of participants have been male (85.3% vs 14.2% female, P training in anaesthesia in Canada. PMID:8131226

  20. [Pregnancy during residency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, S M; van 't Hoff, B W; Rings, E H; van der Waals, F W; Büller, H A

    1992-12-19

    The number of female residents in the Netherlands has steadily increased in recent years. Due to the increased time on waiting lists to enter residency programmes and to the increased duration of training, female residents will be older during their residencies. This will probably result in an increased number of pregnancies during residencies. A questionnaire regarding pregnancy during residency was sent to 191 residents in two university hospitals in the Netherlands. The response rate was 74.3%. Fifty percent of the male and only 19% of the female residents had children. No negative effects of a pregnancy on their training were experienced or anticipated by the residents. However, a negative effect on the functioning of the department was expected. No formal provisions, like replacements were available and many solutions to replace pregnant colleagues depended on the flexibility of the colleagues. The wish to have children was high and equally distributed among male and female residents, 92% and 96%, resp. Given the difficulty to seek a permanent position and to have children after residency, the choice of many female residents will be to have their children during residency. This increase in number of pregnancies requires anticipation of the residency programme directors. They should take the lead in proposing adequate regulations. PMID:1470257

  1. Canadian photovoltaic industry directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This directory has been prepared to help potential photovoltaic (PV) customers identify Canadian-based companies who can meet their needs, and to help product manufacturers and distributors identify potential new clients and/or partners within the PV industry for new and improved technologies. To assist the reader, an information matrix is provided that identifies the product and service types offered by each firm and its primary clients served. A list of companies by province or territory is also included. The main section lists companies in alphabetical order. Information presented for each includes address, contact person, prime activity, geographic area served, languages in which services are offered, and a brief company profile

  2. The Canadian safeguards program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Canada provides technical support to the International Atomic Energy Agency for the development of safeguards relevant to Canadian designed and built nuclear facilities. Some details of this program are discussed, including the philosophy and development of CANDU safeguards systems; the unique equipment developed for these systems; the provision of technical experts; training programs; liaison with other technical organizations; research and development; implementation of safeguards systems at various nuclear facilities; and the anticipated future direction of the safeguards program

  3. Symptomatic Urinary Lithiasis: Epidemiology and Management at Urology Department of University Hospital of Cotonou

    OpenAIRE

    Prince Pascal Hounnasso; Josué Dejinnin Georges Avakoudjo; Abdoul Karim Paré; Kirakoya Brahima; Adama Ouattara; Michel Michael Agounkpé; Gilles Natchagandé; Sanni Rafiou Toré; Abubakar Babagana Mustapha; Alexandre Vodounou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the epidemiology and treatment modalities of urolithiasis at Urology Department of University Hospital of Cotonou. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective and descriptive study over a 10 years period ranging from January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2013. One hundred and two patients who were hospitalized for symptomatic urolithiasis at the Urology Department of University Hospital of Cotonou were enrolled. Results: Hospital incidence of urolithiasis w...

  4. Assessing urology and nephrology research activity in Arab countries using ISI web of science bibliometric database

    OpenAIRE

    Waleed M. Sweileh; Zyoud, Sa’ed H.; Al-Jabi, Samah W.; Sawalha, Ansam F

    2014-01-01

    Background Bibliometric analysis is increasingly being used for research assessment. The main objective of this study was to assess research output in Urology and Nephrology subject from the Arab countries. Original scientific articles or reviews published from the 21 Arab countries in “Urology and Nephrology” subject were screened using the ISI Web of Science database. Research productivity was evaluated based on a methodology developed and used in other bibliometric studies by analyzing the...

  5. Comparing the Efficacy of Intravenous Acetaminophen and Intravenous Meperidine in Pain Relief After Outpatient Urological Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kolahdouzan, Khosro; Eydi, Mahmood; Mohammadipour Anvari, Hassan; Golzari, Samad EJ; Abri, Reyhaneh; GHOJAZADEH, Morteza; Ojaghihaghighi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain relief after surgery is an essential component of postoperative care. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of intravenous acetaminophen and intravenous meperidine in pain relief after outpatient urological surgery. Patients and Methods: In a prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, 100 outpatients of urological surgery were studied in two groups of acetaminophen (A) and meperidine (M). Patients in group A received 1g of acetaminophen ...

  6. Surgical simulators in urological training--views of UK Training Programme Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, James A; Browning, Anthony J; Paul, Alan B; Biyani, C Shekhar

    2012-09-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The role of surgical simulators is currently being debated in urological and other surgical specialties. Simulators are not presently implemented in the UK urology training curriculum. The availability of simulators and the opinions of Training Programme Directors' (TPD) on their role have not been described. In the present questionnaire-based survey, the trainees of most, but not all, UK TPDs had access to laparoscopic simulators, and that all responding TPDs thought that simulators improved laparoscopic training. We hope that the present study will be a positive step towards making an agreement to formally introduce simulators into the UK urology training curriculum. To discuss the current situation on the use of simulators in surgical training. To determine the views of UK Urology Training Programme Directors (TPDs) on the availability and use of simulators in Urology at present, and to discuss the role that simulators may have in future training. An online-questionnaire survey was distributed to all UK Urology TPDs. In all, 16 of 21 TPDs responded. All 16 thought that laparoscopic simulators improved the quality of laparoscopic training. The trainees of 13 TPDs had access to a laparoscopic simulator (either in their own hospital or another hospital in the deanery). Most TPDs thought that trainees should use simulators in their free time, in quiet time during work hours, or in teaching sessions (rather than incorporated into the weekly timetable). We feel that the current apprentice-style method of training in urological surgery is out-dated. We think that all TPDs and trainees should have access to a simulator, and that a formal competency based simulation training programme should be incorporated into the urology training curriculum, with trainees reaching a minimum proficiency on a simulator before undertaking surgical procedures. PMID:22233327

  7. Are Patients at Nutritional Risk More Prone to Complications after Major Urological Surgery?

    OpenAIRE

    Cerantola, Yannick; Valerio, Massimo; Hubner, Martin; Iglesias, Katia; Vaucher, Laurent; Jichlinski, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The nutritional risk score is a recommended screening tool for malnutrition. While a nutritional risk score of 3 or greater predicts adverse outcomes after digestive surgery, to our knowledge its predictive value for morbidity after urological interventions is unknown. We determined whether urological patients at nutritional risk are at higher risk for complications after major surgery than patients not at nutritional risk. Materials and methods We performed a prospective observation...

  8. On Realities of Canadian Multiculturalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦辰

    2013-01-01

    Canada is a multicultural country which was mainly established by immigrants. Just because of that, Canadian govern⁃ment has carried out the policy of multiculturalism since1970s. However, it has encountered many problems such as policy con⁃flicts, national identity, democracy-inquiry and racial discrimination, etc. Hence the Canadian multiculturalism has been in a di⁃lemma.

  9. Status of urological Kampo medicine: a narrative review and future vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Tomonori; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2015-03-01

    Clinical evidence for traditional Japanese Kampo medicine has been provided by modern scientific methodologies. Indeed, more than 150 Kampo formulations have been approved for use as prescription drugs by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan, and are widely used in daily medical practice. More than 10 of these formulations can be used for urological problems, especially in cases of lower urinary tract dysfunction. However, there are few opportunities to introduce urological Kampo medicines for worldwide use, and the status of urological Kampo medicine has not been reviewed yet. Here, we present a narrative review to introduce the current status of urological Kampo medicine in Japan. First, we introduce the essence of general Kampo medicine, including its history and current status in Japan. We focused of Sou-Sei-Sou-Koku, "promotion and inhibition network among the Five Elements," which is the central dogma of Kampo medicine. To present Kampo medicine as scientific medicine, neural cross-talk among pelvic organs is presented in comparison with Sou-Sei-Sou-Koku. Second, we list representative urological Kampo formulations used for lower urinary tract symptoms. Furthermore, we also discuss their roles in the urological field, including their position in Japanese clinical guidelines. Third, we propose the multi-organ targeting strategy using Kampo formulations as a future vision. Dai-Ken-Chu-Tou (a common Kampo formulation for gastrointestinal problems and hypersensitivity to cold) is one candidate, and we present the results of a preliminary study using this Kampo medicine formulation. PMID:25597936

  10. Fourth joint meeting of the American Urological Association and the Japanese Urological Association Specialty Society program at the 104th annual meeting of the American Urological Association at Chicago 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperberg, Matthew R; Hinotsu, Shiro; Chancellor, Michael B; Homma, Yukio; Nelson, Peter S; Matsuyama, Hideyasu; Menon, Mani; Kucuk, Omer; Hara, Isao; Egawa, Shin; Uzzo, Robert G; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Okuyama, Akihiko; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2009-08-01

    We are heartily grateful for the warm support of all of the people concerned, including the moderators and panelists of both societies for giving us the opportunity to hold the 4th American Urological Association/Japanese Urological Association (AUA/JUA) Joint Meeting, held once again at the 104th Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (25-30 April 2009, Chicago, Illinois, USA). 2009 is a memorable year, being the start of new collaborations between AUA and JUA. The JUA in collaboration with AUA is promoting an academic exchange program whereby outstanding and promising Japanese and American junior faculty members will be given the opportunity to work in the USA and Japan for one month. The program not only allows the sharing of knowledge and experience, but is designed to foster a closer alliance between the AUA and JUA, and assists in identifying future leaders within both organizations. The JUA will have an exhibit booth at the AUA annual meeting, promoting our new joint activities. The Journal of Urology and International Journal of Urology will share reviewers. The JUA will participate in developing AUA guidelines. With all of these activities, the JUA hopes it will provide greater opportunities to young Japanese urologists to participate in educational projects in the US. We would like to thank Professor Robert C. Flanigan, the Secretary General of AUA, Professor Glenn M. Preminger, the Chairman of the AUA Office of Education and the staff of AUA and JUA for supporting our program. We hope to keep holding the joint meeting and have plenty of ideas on themes and forums. We believe that this international program helps to establish a closer relationship between JUA and AUA in the scientific field. PMID:19682110

  11. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  12. INAA of human scalp hair for environmental monitoring of Indonesian and Canadian population group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For monitoring and comparison of environmental condition of Indonesian and Canadian population groups, human scalp hair has been selected for use to assess the levels of various trace elements in each group. The samples studied included: 50 samples from an Indonesian population group residing near industrial and oil refinery sites and an unpolluted rural area, 50 samples from a Canadian group in a remote area near a metal smelter as well as 50 samples of a control group, plus 30 samples of Indonesians residing in an urban area of Canada for more than one year. By means of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), eight trace elements which are considered to be environmentally-important, namely Al, As, Cr, Hg, Mn, Sb, Sc, Zn, as well as three other trace elements, namely K, La, and W, were also of interest. Accuracy of these INAA hair analysis was checked by reference to SRM-1571, NIES-5, and a Chinese hair standard (agreement was generally from 5-15%). Of these elements, As, Cr, Mn, and Sc were found to be higher in the Canadian industrial groups, whereas Al and Zn were found to be higher in the Indonesian oil refinery group. Hg found to be higher in the industrial groups of both Canadian and Indonesian population. The concentration of all these elements in the hair of Indonesians residing in Canada were comparable to the Indonesian rural group. Other elements in both the Canadian and Indonesian groups were comparable

  13. [Oswald Schwarz: a pioneer in psychosomatic urology and sexual medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberich, H J; Schultheiss, D; Kieser, B

    2015-01-01

    Oswald Schwarz, a urologist from Vienna, was a scholar of Anton Ritter von Frisch and Hans Rubritius. As a physician during World War I, he was confronted with numerous bullet wounds to the spinal cord. In 1919, he completed his professorial thesis"Bladder dysfunction as a result of bullet wounds to the spinal cord". Oswald Schwarz was known as a committed surgeon. As an urologist he also treated patients with sexual dysfunction. Besides his practical and scientific urology-related work, he was also interested in psychology and philosophy. He held lectures on both subjects earning himself the nickname, the Urosoph. In the 1920s, Oswald Schwarz belonged to the inner circle of Alfred Adler, the founder of Individual Psychology, and was editor of the first psychosomatic textbook published in German, "Psychological origin and psychotherapy of physical symptoms" (1925). In addition, Schwarz wrote numerous articles and several books on sexual medicine. He also made many valuable contributions to the development of medical anthropology. Altogether, his work includes over 130 publications. Faced with the rise of fascism and National Socialism in Europe, Oswald Schwarz, who was of Jewish origin, emigrated to England in 1934. There he died in 1949. Unfortunately his scientific work has largely been forgotten. The aim of the following article is to remind us of his important contributions to the field. PMID:25537746

  14. Physicochemical properties investigations of metallic urological stent after implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tyrlik-Held

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: : The aim of the work was to determine the surfaces as well as physicochemical properties changes of the metallic urological stent. The tested stent was made of Co-Cr-Ni-Fe-Mo-Mn alloy and was implanted during four years.Design/methodology/approach: Electrochemical tests have been used for corrosion resistance investigations. They were carried out in the artificial urine solution at the temperature 37±1°C with the use of the VoltaLab® PGP 201 system. The evaluation of pitting corrosion was realized by recording of anodic polarization curves with the use of the potentiodynamic method. Chemical composition investigations of the surface have been carried out with the use of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS. The topography of surfaces changes was observed in scanning electron microscope (SEM.Findings: Surface observations haven’t showed the signs of pitting corrosion. No decrease of corrosion resistance for metallic material was stated. Furthermore in surface layer the presence of the organic compounds was observed.Practical implications: The time of four years of implantation didn’t induce the significant changes in electrochemical properties of metallic material of the tested stent which was in contact with the natural environment of physiological fluids.Originality/value: The results obtained concern to investigations of the metallic material of the stent, which was implanted during the period of four years in human body that mean in natural environment of human tissues and physiological fluids.

  15. Clinical application of positron emission tomography imaging in urologic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an advanced noninvasive molecular imaging modality that is being investigated for use in the differentiation, diagnosis, and guiding therapy ora variety of cancer types. FDG PET has the unique clinical value in the differentiation, diagnosis, and monitoring therapy of prostate, such as bladder, renal, and testicle cancer. However, high false-positive and false-negative findings are observed in the detection of these tumors with FDG PET. 11C-Choline (CH) and 11C-acetate (AC) can overcome the pitfall of FDG, and appear to be more successful than FGD in imaging prostate cancer and bladder cancer. The short half-life of 11C prevents the widespread use of CH and AC and 18F-fluorocholine (FCH) and 18F-fluoroacetate (FAC) seem to be potential tracers. Potential clinical value of the new PET tracers, such as 3'-deoxy-3'-18F-fluorothymidine (FLT), 18F-fluorodihydrotestosterone (FDHT), and 9-(4-18F-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)-guanine(18F-FHBG) in the detection of urologic tumors, can deserve further study. (authors)

  16. Extracellular MicroRNAs in Urologic Malignancies: Chances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs that are 19-23 nucleotides long, known as microRNAs (miRNAs, are involved in almost all biological mechanisms during carcinogenesis. Recent studies show that miRNAs released from live cells are detectable in body fluids and may be taken up by other cells to confer cell-cell communication. These released miRNAs (here referred to as extracellular miRNAs are often protected by RNA-binding proteins or embedded inside circulating microvesicles. Due to their relative stability, extracellular miRNAs are believed to be promising candidates as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease, or even as therapeutic agents for targeted treatment. In this review, we first describe biogenesis and characteristics of these miRNAs. We then summarize recent publications involving extracellular miRNA profiling studies in three representative urologic cancers, including: prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. We focus on the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential of these miRNAs in biological fluids, such as serum, plasma, and urine. Finally, we discuss advantages and challenges of these miRNAs in clinical applications.

  17. Laparoscopy in Urology Practice at a Tertiary Care Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the results of laparoscopic procedures at a Urology - Nephrology tertiary care centre. Study Design: Case series / observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The Kidney Centre Postgraduate Training Institute, Karachi, from August 2007 to March 2012. Methodology: Medical records of all planned laparoscopic surgery conducted during the study period were reviewed. Those cases which to open surgery were excluded. All were performed by a single surgeon, initially as supervised and later independently. Data was maintained for demographic data, procedure details, length of hospital stay, and complications including conversion to open surgeries. Data was analyzed through SPSS 17.0. Results: There were 36 planned laparoscopic surgeries in the specified period. Out of 36 cases, 8 were converted to open surgery. Those who underwent laparoscopic surgery include two diagnostic procedures and renal cyst deroofing each, four ureterolithotomy, nineteen simple nephrectomy and one radical nephrectomy. So in total 28 cases were performed on 15 females and 13 males with mean age of 33.01 A +- 10.9 years. The mean operative time was 216 A +- 100 minutes and mean length of hospital stay was as 2.7 A +- 1.04 days. There were 10 complications in 28 cases, majority being Clavien Grade II including 7% (2/28) blood transfusion. Conclusion: There are technical challenges in learning laparoscopy for practicing urologists. Following some learning model in a systematic manner will help surmounting the technical challenges in learning laparoscopy. (author)

  18. Clinical aspects of antimicrobial prophylaxis for invasive urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, Vincenzo; Franco, Marco

    2014-10-01

    The essential value of antimicrobial prophylaxis is to defend the patient undergoing invasive diagnostic procedures or surgery against infectious complications by reducing the bacterial load. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen (70-80%) isolated in acute community-acquired uncomplicated infections, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus (10 to 15%). Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Proteus species, and enterococci infrequently cause uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis. The pathogens traditionally associated with UTI are altering many of their features, particularly because of antimicrobial resistance. Currently, only transurethral resection of prostate and prostate biopsy has been well studied and has high and moderately high levels of evidence in favor of using antibiotic prophylaxis. Other urological interventions have not been well studied. The moderate to low evidence suggests that there is no need for antibiotic prophylaxis in cystoscopy, urodynamic investigations, and extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy, whereas the low evidence favors the use of antibiotic prophylaxis for therapeutic ureterorenoscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. The scarce data from studies on transurethral resection of bladder tumors cannot provide a definitive indication for antibiotic prophylaxis for this intervention. PMID:25245706

  19. Canadian beef quality audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Donkersgoed, J; Jewison, G; Mann, M; Cherry, B; Altwasser, B; Lower, R; Wiggins, K; Dejonge, R; Thorlakson, B; Moss, E; Mills, C; Grogan, H

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted in 4 Canadian processing plants in 1995-96 to determine the prevalence of quality defects in Canadian cattle. One percent of the annual number of cattle processed in Canada were evaluated on the processing floor and 0.1% were graded in the cooler. Brands were observed on 37% and multiple brands on 6% of the cattle. Forty percent of the cattle had horns, 20% of which were scurs, 33% were stubs, 10% were tipped, and 37% were full length. Tag (mud and manure on the hide) was observed on 34% of the cattle. Bruises were found on 78% of the carcasses, 81% of which were minor in severity. Fifteen percent of the bruises were located on the round, 29% on the loin, 40% on the rib, 16% on the chuck, and 0.02% on the brisket. Grubs were observed in 0.02% of the steers, and injection sites were observed in 1.3% of whole hanging carcasses. Seventy percent of the livers were passed for human food and 14% for pet food; 16% were condemned. Approximately 71% of the liver condemnations were due to liver abscesses. Four percent of the heads, 6% of the tongues, and 0.2% of whole carcasses were condemned. The pregnancy rate in female cattle was approximately 6.7%. The average hot carcass weight was 357 kg (s = 40) in steers, 325 kg (s = 41) in heifers, 305 kg (s = 53) in cows, 388 kg (s = 62) in virgin bulls and 340 kg (s = 39) in mature bulls. The average ribeye area in all cattle was 84 cm2 (s = 12); range 29 cm2 to 128 cm2. Grade fat was highly variable and averaged 9 mm (s = 4) for steers and heifers, 6 mm (s = 6) for cows, 5 mm (s = 1) for virgin bulls, and 4 mm (s = 0.5) for mature bulls. The average lean meat yield was 59.7% in cattle (s = 3.4); range 39% to 67%. One percent of the carcasses were devoid of marbling, 1% were dark cutters, and 0.05% of the steer carcasses were staggy. Six percent of the carcasses had poor conformation, 3.7% were underfinished, and 0.7% were overfinished. Yellow fat was observed in 4% of the carcasses; 10% of carcasses were

  20. Attitude and perception of urology by medical students at the end of their medical school: An appraisal from Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh Binsaleh; Abdulrahman Al-Jasser; Raed Almannie; Khaled Madbouly

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the attitude and perception of the graduates of King Saud University (KSU) College of Medicine regarding the quality of their urology rotation, urology exposure during this rotation, confidence about managing common conditions, and career prospects. Materials and Methods: In 2013, a questionnaire regarding the students′ perceptions of urology rotation was developed and E-mailed to all final (5 th ) year medical students and interns of KSU College of Medicine, Riyad...

  1. Canadian cogeneration economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aggressive cogeneration industry has developed in Canada, and is becoming a tool for provincial utilities to manage the procurement of independently generated power, while restricting plant size, maximizing socioeconomic benefit, minimizing environmental impacts and managing their own risks. An overview is presented of the economics of cogeneration in Canada. The Canadian cogeneration industry is driven by 3 key economic factors: utility power sale contracts, fuel pricing, and tax benefits. Utility cogeneration purchases, tax benefits, fuel prices, cogeneration efficiency, fuels, fuel strategies, displacement projects, solid fuel vs natural gas, operating flexibility, gas turbines, heat recovery steam generators, industrial and aeroderivative units, combined cycle steam turbines, steam injection, supplementary or duct firing, financial aspects and project management are discussed. 15 figs., 7 tabs

  2. Web-Based Learning: A Bridge to Meet the Needs of Canadian Nurses for Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurucz, Sue; Rietze, Lori; Lim, Angie; Swamy, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    Canada does not have enough nurses with doctoral degrees. Such nurses fill important roles as researchers, educators, leaders, and clinicians. While a growing number of Canadian universities offer doctorate degrees in nursing, most institutions have only traditional on-campus programs, posing barriers for nurses who reside in places geographically…

  3. Unmet Healthcare and Social Services Needs of Older Canadian Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooshtari, Shahin; Naghipur, Saba; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    The authors sought to create a demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related profile of older (40+) Canadian adults with developmental disabilities (DD) residing in their communities, and to enhance current knowledge of their unmet health and social support services needs. They provide a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2001…

  4. Canadian National Vegetation Classification (CNVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The mandate of the CNVC is to comprehensively classify and describe natural and semi-natural Canadian vegetation in an ecologically meaningful manner. The...

  5. 1944. The Canadians in Normandy

    OpenAIRE

    W.A. Dorning

    2012-01-01

    The story of the Allied invasion of France in June 1944 has been told in countless military-history books. Previous publications on the Allied invasion and the subsequent Normandy campaign have, however, tended to concentrate on the British and American role in the fighting, while the Canadian contribution has received scant attention. This in itself is surprising, as the Canadians played a far from peripheral role in the invasion and the campaign which followed in the hinterland of Normandy....

  6. A guide to the management of urologic dilemmas for the primary care physician (PCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Jack; Rosenberg, Matt T; Miner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Patients with urologic conditions may present to a primary care physician (PCP) in the emergency department or in the PCP's office. Some conditions are true emergencies that require immediate surgical intervention. Others may require medical treatment or possibly simply reassuring the patient that there is no serious medical problem. Sometimes the diagnosis can be easily made, whereas other times the PCP needs to be able to rule out serious causes for a presenting problem and execute a guideline-recommended patient work up, to make a final diagnosis. Sometimes recommended diagnostic tests may not be readily available. When a PCP believes that a patient may have a serious urologic condition and is unsure of the appropriate patient management strategy, then he or she must quickly refer the patient to a urologist. This article describes common urology-related issues-hematuria, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test interpretation, phimosis and paraphimosis, acute scrotal pain and masses in the child and adult, urinary tract infection, renal colic, and castration-treatment-induced bone loss. It provides insights into decision-making processes for patient management of some urologic conditions, and information about managing sequelae and side effects of long term treatment. It includes practical diagnostic suggestions and patient management strategies based on the authors' years of urologic clinical practice experience. PMID:24978632

  7. Current status of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in pediatric urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kun Suk

    2014-08-01

    Laparoscopic procedures for urological diseases in children have been proven to be safe and effective. However, the availability of laparoscopic procedures is still partly limited to experienced, high-volume centers because the procedures are technically demanding. The da Vinci robot system is being used for an increasing variety of reconstructive procedures because of the advantages of this approach, such as motion scaling, greater optical magnification, stereoscopic vision, increased instrument tip dexterity, and tremor filtration. Particularly in pediatric urologic surgery, where the operational field is limited owing to the small abdominal cavity of children, robotic surgical technology has its own strengths. Currently, robots are used to perform most surgeries in children that can be performed laparoscopically. In this review, we aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the current role of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in Pediatric Urology by analyzing the published data in this field. A growing body of evidence supports the view that robotic technology is technically feasible and safe in pediatric urological surgery. Robotic technology provides additional benefits for performing reconstructive urologic surgery, such as in pyeloplasty, ureteral reimplantation, and enterocystoplasty procedures. The main limitations to robotic surgery are its high purchase and maintenance costs and that the cost-effectiveness of this technology remains to be validated. PMID:25132942

  8. Stem cells, biomarkers and genetic profiling: approaching future challenges in Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Mariangela; Zazzara, Michele; Zattoni, Filiberto

    2016-03-01

    Urological research is facing future challenges, the most difficult one is the fast and meaningful transfer of the massive amount of data from research basic to clinical practice. Between the most important issues that research should focus in the next years are targeting of tumor stem cells, clinical application of biomarkers, and wide application of genetic profiling of urological neoplasms. Several clinical implications are expected, from diagnosis to selection of candidates for different treatment modalities, to modulation of sequential treatment plans, to prognosis. A number of clinical trials based on research data from the hottest issues are in the pipeline. In this review, we will focus on new insights from recent work worlwide in urological research, with particular attention to high-risk nonmuscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancer, prostate cancer, and kidney cancer. Cancer care is moving towards a personalized approach in patient management. The most important issues in urological research point strongly in this direction and show an enormous potential for the rapid landing of Urology in the era of personalized medicine. PMID:26940971

  9. A snapshot of the adult spina bifida patient – high incidence of urologic procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Joceline S.; Greiman, Alyssa; Casey, Jessica T.; Mukherjee, Shubhra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To describe the urologic outcomes of contemporary adult spina bifida patients managed in a multidisciplinary clinic. Material and methods A retrospective chart review of patients seen in our adult spina bifida clinic from January 2004 to November 2011 was performed to identify urologic management, urologic surgeries, and co-morbidities. Results 225 patients were identified (57.8% female, 42.2% male). Current median age was 30 years (IQR 27, 36) with a median age at first visit of 25 years (IQR 22, 30). The majority (70.7%) utilized clean intermittent catheterization, and 111 patients (49.3%) were prescribed anticholinergic medications. 65.8% had urodynamics performed at least once, and 56% obtained appropriate upper tract imaging at least every other year while under our care. 101 patients (44.9%) underwent at least one urologic surgical procedure during their lifetime, with a total of 191 procedures being performed, of which stone procedures (n = 51, 26.7%) were the most common. Other common procedures included continence procedures (n = 35, 18.3%) and augmentation cystoplasty (n = 29, 15.2%). Only 3.6% had a documented diagnosis of chronic kidney disease and 0.9% with end-stage renal disease. Conclusions Most adult spina bifida patient continue on anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. A large percentage of patients required urologic procedures in adulthood. Patients should be encouraged to utilize conservative and effective bladder management strategies to reduce their risk of renal compromise. PMID:27123330

  10. Robot-assisted urologic surgery in 2010 - Advancements and future outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paurush Babbar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic surgery is a cutting edge and minimally invasive procedure, which has generated a great deal of excitement in the urologic community. While there has been much advancement in this emerging technology, it is safe to say that robotic urologic surgery holds tremendous potential for progress in the near future. Hence, it is paramount that urologists stay up-to-date regarding new developments in the realm of robotics with respect to novel applications, limitations and opportunities for incorporation into their practice. Robot-assisted surgery provides an enhanced 3D view, increased magnification of the surgical field, better manual dexterity, relatively bloodless field, elimination of surgeon′s tremor, reduction in a surgeon′s fatigue and mitigation of scattered light. All these factors translate into greater precision of surgical dissection, which is imperative in providing better intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. Pioneering work assessing the feasibility of robotic surgery in urology began in the early 2000′s with robot-assisted radical prostatectomy and has since expanded to procedures such as robot-assisted radical cystectomy, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, robot-assisted nephroureterectomy and robot-assisted pyeloplasty. A MEDLINE search was used to identify recent articles (within the last two years and publications of specific importance, which highlighted the recent developments and future direction of robotics. This review will use the aforementioned urologic surgeries as vehicles to evaluate the current status and future role of robotics in the advancement of the field of urology.

  11. Subpubic Cartilaginous Pseudocyst: Orthopedic Feature with Urological Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzy Farag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Masses arising from structures adjacent to the female urethra can cause obstructive urinary symptoms. Subpubic cartilaginous pseudocyst is a rare degenerative lesion of pubic symphysis that may cause these symptoms. Materials and Methods. A 61-year- and 57-year-old women presented with symptoms of difficult micturition and dyspareunia. Physical examination revealed a painless smooth, rounded, firm, and cystic mass, at the anterior vaginal wall of about 4 cm width. The mass caused inward deviation of the external urethral meatus. Cystoscopy and MRI were done. Results. Cystoscopy of case 1 (61 y demonstrated anterior external urethral compression with normal urethral mucosa. Cystoscopy was not possible in case 2 (57 y because the urethra could not be entered under local anesthesia. MRI showed almost the same findings in both cases: midline, rounded, and cystic mass ~3×3×4 cm, anterosuperior to the urethra, and posteroinferior to the pubic symphysis, with normal features of the urinary bladder. Open surgical excision of theses lesions was performed in both patients. Histopathologic assessment of the specimen obtained from both patients showed degenerated hyaline with areas of fibrinous and mucoid degeneration, a picture suggestive of cartilaginous subpubic pseudocyst. After 11-month and 4-month followup of patients numbers 1 and 2, respectively, there is no evidence of local recurrence of the lesion, either clinically or radiologically and both patients void empty. Conclusions. Subpubic cartilaginous pseudocysts are rare benign lesions with only 13 cases were reported in the literature. Patients present with a spectrum of gynecological and/or urological manifestations. Sizable lesions severely compressing the urethra need surgical excision to restore the voiding function.

  12. ALGORITHM FOR MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS UNDERWENT UROLOGY INTERVENTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Davydova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the efficacy of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and pre-operative preparation in hypertensive patients needed in surgical treatment of urology dis- eases.Material and methods. Males (n=883, aged 40 to 80 years were included into the study. The main group consisted of patients that underwent laparotomic nephrectomy (LTN group; n=96 and patients who underwent laparoscopic nephrectomy (LSN group; n=53. Dynamics of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM data was analyzed in these groups in the immediate postoperative period. The efficacy of a package of non-invasive methods for cardiovascular system assessment was studied. ABPM was performed after nephrectomy (2-nd and 10-th days after surgery in patients with complaints of vertigo episodes or intense general weakness to correct treatment.Results. In LTN group hypotension episodes or blood pressure (BP elevations were observed in 20 (20.8% and 22 (22.9% patients, respectively, on the 2-nd day after the operation. These complications required antihypertensive treatment correction. Patients with hypotension episodes were significantly older than patients with BP elevation and had significantly lower levels of 24-hour systolic BP, night diastolic BP and minimal night systolic BP. Re-adjustment of antihypertensive treatment on the 10-th postoperative day was required to 2 (10% patients with hypotension episodes and to 1 (4.5% patient with BP elevation. Correction of antihypertensive therapy was required to all patients in LSN group on the day 2, and to 32 (60.4% patients on the 10-th day after the operation. Reduction in the incidence of complications (from 1.2% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2011, p<0.001 was observed during the application of cardiovascular non-invasive complex assessment and preoperative preparation in hypertensive patients.Conclusion. The elaborated management algorithm for patients with concomitant hypertension is recommended to reduce the cardiovascular

  13. Detection and Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells in Urologic Cancers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Loberg

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The American Cancer Society has estimated that in 2003, there will be approximately 239,600 new cases of urologic cancer diagnosed and 54,600 urologic cancer-related deaths in the United States. To date, the majority of research and therapy design have focused on the microenvironment of the primary tumor site, as well as the microenvironment of the metastatic or secondary (target tumor site. Little attention has been placed on the interactions of the circulating tumor cells and the microenvironment of the circulation (i.e., the third microenvironment. The purpose of this review is to present the methods for the detection and isolation of circulating tumor cells and to discuss the importance of circulating tumor cells in the biology and treatment of urologic cancers.

  14. Canadian fuel development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU power reactor fuel has demonstrated an enviable operational record. More than 99.9% of the bundles irradiated have provided defect-free service. Defect excursions are responsible for the majority of reported defects. In some cases research and development effort is necessary to resolve these problems. In addition, development initiatives are also directed at improvements of the current design or reduction of fueling cost. The majority of the funding for this effort has been provided by COG (CANDU Owners' Group) over the past 10 to 15 years. This paper contains an overview of some key fuel technology programs within COG. The CANDU reactor is unique among the world's power reactors in its flexibility and its ability to use a number of different fuel cycles. An active program of analysis and development, to demonstrate the viability of different fuel cycles in CANDU, has been funded by AECL in parallel with the work on the natural uranium cycle. Market forces and advances in technology have obliged us to reassess and refocus some parts of our effort in this area, and significant success has been achieved in integrating all the Canadian efforts in this area. This paper contains a brief summary of some key components of the advanced fuel cycle program. (Author) 4 figs., tab., 18 refs

  15. Canadian leadership in energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada's energy is complex and an important resource as it fuels and funds the economy. The unique character of Canada's energy production and consumption provides strength to the country. The purpose of this booklet was to highlight Canada's energy production and consumption and to demonstrate Canada's rank globally with other major global energy players. The document also presented information on the value of Canada's energy exports, Canada's relationship with the United States, and Canada's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Specifically, the document discussed Canada's energy in a global context; the value of Canada's energy exports; domestic value of energy; Canada's unique energy mix; Canada's electricity mix; Canada's carbon dioxide emissions; energy strategies; and the importance of energy to Canadians. It was concluded that there are 14 federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions managing their respective energy resources. All of these regions, with the exception of Saskatchewan have produced an energy strategy document or a climate change action plan focusing on 8 areas of action, notably awareness; benefit; efficiency; development; diversification; electricity; and emissions. refs., tabs., figs.

  16. Evaluation of urologic morbidity after radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma by urodynamic examinations and patient voiding schemes: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Thranov, Ingrid R; Bagi, Per;

    2002-01-01

    To assess urologic morbidity in a 5-year period by urodynamic examinations and patient voiding schemes after radiotherapy and brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma.......To assess urologic morbidity in a 5-year period by urodynamic examinations and patient voiding schemes after radiotherapy and brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma....

  17. 78 FR 41937 - Joint Meeting of the Gastroenterology-Urology Panel and the Radiological Devices Panel of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Joint Meeting of the Gastroenterology-Urology Panel and the... the public. Name of Committee: Gastroenterology-Urology Panel and Radiological Devices Panel of...

  18. Publication rates of full-text journal articles converted from abstracts presented during the 22nd Turkish National Urology Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaaslan, Ramazan; Kayalı, Yunus; Tok, Adem; Tepeler, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the publication rates of full-text journal articles converted from the abstracts presented in the 22nd Turkish National Urology Congress in 2012. Material and Methods A total of 576 abstracts accepted for presentation at the 22nd Turkish National Urology Association Meeting were identified from the published abstract book. The abstracts were categorized into subsections such as endourology and pediatric urology. The subsequent publication rate for the studies was evaluated by scanning PubMed Medline. Abstracts published before the proceedings were excluded from the study. Results The abstracts were categorized as being presented orally (n=155), by poster (n=421), or by video (n=78). Of the 28 (18.3%) of 155 oral and 34 (8.15%) of 421 poster presentations, were subsequently published in several journals until March 2015. The publication rates of the abstracts based on urology subsections were as follows: neurology (25%), andrology (18.6%), endourology (17.2%), urolithiasis (15.3%), general urology (12.5%), infectious diseases (7.14%), pediatric urology (6.25%), uro-gynecology (6.06%), reconstructive urology (5.8%), and urooncology (3.8%). The average time to publication was 11.77 (0–33) months. Conclusion This is the first study assessing the publication rates of abstracts presented at a Turkish National Urology Congress. It reveals that more qualified randomized studies need to be done to improve the rate of publication. PMID:27011876

  19. [From "Karzinos" to modern urologic oncology : A long way from the first surgical procedures to targeted therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konert, J

    2016-08-01

    Cancer can be traced back to the Iron Age. Both the ancient Egyptians and Hippocrates dealt with the disease. Urological tumor treatment is an integral part of urology and has undergone interesting developments. Today, it comprises all possible forms of treatment-from radical surgery to the most modern radiological therapies, including antihormal therapy, chemotherapy, and modern targeted therapy. PMID:27422312

  20. Prospective investigation of change in the prostate-specific antigens after various urologic procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SC

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Seung Chol Park,1 Yu Seob Shin,2 Li Tao Zhang,2 Dal Sik Kim,3 Sung Zoo Kim,4 Nam Cheol Park,5 Tai Young Ahn,6 Je Jong Kim,7 Sung Won Lee,8 Insuk So,9 Jong Kwan Park2,10,11 1Department of Urology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan, South Korea; 2Department of Urology, 3Department of Laboratory Medicine, 4Department of Physiology, Medical School, Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 5Department of Urology, College of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, 6Department of Urology, College of Medicine, Ulsan University, Seoul, 7Department of Urology, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, 8Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, College of Medicine, SungKyunkwan University, Seoul, 9Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, 10Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University, 11Biomedical Research Institute and Clinical Trial Center, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, South KoreaPurpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is the most important marker in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with prostate cancer. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various urologic procedures in prostatic area on serum free and total PSA levels.Subjects and methods: A series of 62 patients (8 after digital rectal examination [DRE], 12 after transrectal ultrasonography [TRUS], 11 after rigid cystoscopy, 13 after prostatic massage, 8 after TRUS-guided prostate biopsy, and 10 after transurethral resection of prostate [TURP] were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were taken from each patient before procedure and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 minutes after procedures.Results: Prostate massage, rigid cystoscopy, TURP, and TRUS-guided prostate biopsy caused statistically significant rise in total and free PSA levels in the serum. There was no significant increase in total and free PSA levels in the

  1. Advances in laparoscopic urologic surgery techniques [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidar M. Abdul-Muhsin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades witnessed the inception and exponential implementation of key technological advancements in laparoscopic urology. While some of these technologies thrived and became part of daily practice, others are still hindered by major challenges. This review was conducted through a comprehensive literature search in order to highlight some of the most promising technologies in laparoscopic visualization, augmented reality, and insufflation. Additionally, this review will provide an update regarding the current status of single-site and natural orifice surgery in urology.

  2. Ex vivo applications of multiphoton microscopy in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Manu; Mukherjee, Sushmita

    2016-03-01

    Background: Routine urological surgery frequently requires rapid on-site histopathological tissue evaluation either during biopsy or intra-operative procedure. However, resected tissue needs to undergo processing, which is not only time consuming but may also create artifacts hindering real-time tissue assessment. Likewise, pathologist often relies on several ancillary methods, in addition to H&E to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. Although, helpful these techniques are tedious and time consuming and often show overlapping results. Therefore, there is a need for an imaging tool that can rapidly assess tissue in real-time at cellular level. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is one such technique that can generate histology-quality images from fresh and fixed tissue solely based on their intrinsic autofluorescence emission, without the need for tissue processing or staining. Design: Fresh tissue sections (neoplastic and non-neoplastic) from biopsy and surgical specimens of bladder and kidney were obtained. Unstained deparaffinized slides from biopsy of medical kidney disease and oncocytic renal neoplasms were also obtained. MPM images were acquired using with an Olympus FluoView FV1000MPE system. After imaging, fresh tissues were submitted for routine histopathology. Results: Based on the architectural and cellular details of the tissue, MPM could characterize normal components of bladder and kidney. Neoplastic tissue could be differentiated from non-neoplastic tissue and could be further classified as per histopathological convention. Some of the tumors had unique MPM signatures not otherwise seen on H&E sections. Various subtypes of glomerular lesions were identified as well as renal oncocytic neoplasms were differentiated on unstained deparaffinized slides. Conclusions: We envision MPM to become an integral part of regular diagnostic workflow for rapid assessment of tissue. MPM can be used to evaluate the adequacy of biopsies and triage tissues for ancillary studies

  3. Urological complications after radical hysterectomy: Incidence rates and predisposing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likić-Lađević Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Radical hysterectomy is a surgical approach for stage Ib and IIa of cervical cancer. The incidence of intraoperative injuries of the bladder during radical hysterectomy ranges from 0.4-3.7%. The ureter can be crushed, caught in sutures, transsected, obstructed by angulation, or ischemic by the stippling or periureteric fascia. Vesicovaginal and ureterovaginal fistuls are reported to develop in 0.9-2% of patients after radical abdominal hysterectomy. Fistulas usually become manifested or visible at speculum examination within 14 days following the surgery. The aim of this study was to establish the incidence and predisposing factor of urological complications after radical hysterectomy. Methods. The study included a total of 536 patients with invasive stage Ib to IIb cancer of the cervix uteri who had underwent radical hysterectomy. The special elements considered were: the patient’s age; the International Federation of Ginecology and Obstetrics (FIGO stage after pathohistology; duration of operation; the result of preoperative laboratory tests for diabetes, anemia, hypoproteinemia, or disorders of liver or kidney function; ASA status; postoperative surgical infection. Results. The average age of the patients with complications was 48.68 years. All patients with intraoperative ureteric and bladder injuries had statisticaly significant higher stage of disease and operation lasted more than in others without injury. We noticed 1.3% ureteral injuries and 1.49% bladder injuries, more than 50% of the patients with a previously mentioned injuries were operated on more than 3 hours. We found 2.61% vesicovaginal and 2.43% ureterovaginal fistuls. A total of 50% of the patients with bladder injury and vesicovaginal fistuls and 70% of the patients with ureterovaginal fistuls had diabetes mellitus. Postoperative infection of surgical site is a very important factor for the development of fistule. Half of the patients with vesicovaginal

  4. FCC resid processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper narrows the definition of reside processor to those FCC's which run feedstocks containing 1 wt.% or more Conradson carbon residue. With this new definition, the resid survey is revisited to see if any new conclusions can be drawn from the data. The authors break down the numbers and geography of resid processors, feed types, operating variables, and yields. After examining the state of resid processing in the FCC, the paper focuses on the design of cracking catalysts for handling resid feeds. There are important considerations involved in processing resid including high levels of contaminants such as vanadium and nickel, the impact on heat balance, and diffusion effects. Catalysts can be designed to improve the profitability of a resid operation. A clear picture of the roles of zeolite and matrix is presented, along with a discussion of the different types of zeoliters which are commonly used. The paper demonstrates how zeolite and matrix are best combined to meet objectives within a given set of constraints while processing resid

  5. Canadian perspectives in evaluating transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's mission is to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect the health, safety, and security of Canadians and the environment, as well as to respect Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. In 2001, the CNSC established a vision to be one of the best nuclear regulators in the world and established four strategic priorities of effectiveness, transparency, excellence in staff, and efficiency. While fulfilling a very comprehensive mandate, the CNSC operates with a. very clear vision of its clientele - the Canadian people. That commitment guides every employee and every action of the CNSC and ensures a firm commitment to transparency. The presentation will begin with a brief overview of the worldwide context of transparency and transparency measurement, with a look at what lessons can be learned from other organizations and initiatives. It will look broadly at the Canadian context and the government framework that establishes transparency, including the keystone legislation of the Access to Information Act. The presentation will then focus on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The CNSC is firmly committed to putting additional measures in place to ensure transparency, which is being done concurrently with an overall organisational performance measurement system. It is within this framework that the presentation will address the transparency efforts at the CNSC as well transparency measurement activities. And, finally, the presentation will look at future directions for transparency and its measurement at the CNSC. (author)

  6. Canadian Food Irradiation Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) began work on the irradiation of potatoes in 1956, using spent fuel rods as the radiation source. In 1958 the first Gammacell 220, a self-contained irradiator, was designed and manufactured by AECL, and cobalt-60 was then used exclusively in the food irradiation programme. In 1960 the first food and drug clearance was obtained for potatoes. The next stage was to demonstrate to the potato industry that cobalt-60 was a safe, simple and reliable tool, and that irradiation would inhibit sprouting under field conditions. A mobile irradiator was designed and produced by AECL in 1961 to carry out this pilot-plant programme. The irradiator was mounted on a fully-equipped road trailer and spent the 1961/1962 season irradiating one million pounds of potatoes at various points in Eastern Canada. In 1965 the first commercial food irradiator was designed and built by AECL for Newfield Products, Ltd. Whilst the potato programme was under way, AECL initiated co-operative programmes with Canadian food research laboratories, using additional Gammacells. In 1960, AECL constructed an irradiation facility in a shielded room at its own plant in Ottawa for the irradiation of larger objects, such as sides of pork and stems of bananas. During 1963 the mobile irradiator, already a most useful tool, was made more versatile when its source strength was increased and it was equipped with a product cooling system and van air conditioning. Following these modifications, the unit was employed in California for the irradiation of a wide spectrum of fruits at the United States Department of Agriculture Station in Fresno. The Gammacell, mobile irradiator, shielded-room facility, the commercial food irradiator and some of the main food programmes are described in detail. There is an increasing amount of interest in irradiation by the food industry, and prospects are encouraging for future installations. (author)

  7. Canadian physical activity guidelines for adults: are Canadians aware?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Leila Pfaeffli; LeBlanc, Allana G; Orr, Krystn; Berry, Tanya; Deshpande, Sameer; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; O'Reilly, Norm; Rhodes, Ryan E; Tremblay, Mark S; Faulkner, Guy

    2016-09-01

    The present study evaluated awareness of the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology's 2011 Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines for Adults and assessed correlates. Reported awareness of the physical activity (PA) guidelines was 12.9% (204/1586) of the total sample surveyed. More than half (55%) self-reported meeting PA guidelines of ≥ 150 min of moderate to vigorous PA per week. Awareness of PA guidelines was significantly related to participants' level of PA (χ(2) (1) = 30.63, p < 0.001, φ = -0.14), but not to any demographic variables. PMID:27560541

  8. Chernobyl - a Canadian technical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we present the design review done to date in Canada by AECL. From the Canadian point of view it covers: 1) relevant information on the Chernobyl design and the accident, both as presented by the Soviets at the Post-Accident Review Meeting (PARM) held in Vienna from August 25-29, 1986, and as deduced from publicly available Soviet documentation; and 2) details of AECL's technical review of the CANDU PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) against the background of the Chernobyl accident, and implications of the Chernobyl accident. Reviews of operational aspects are underway by the Canadian electrical utilities and a review by the Canadian regulatory agency (the Atomic Energy Control Board) is near completion

  9. Political Affiliation of Canadian Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reza Nakhaie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The social role of universities has been the subject of a lengthy debate as to whether those who teach in the academy are system-legitimizing conservatives or radicals helping to generate critical thinking that challenges the status quo. The aim of this paper is to evaluate political affiliations of Canadian university professors based on a national survey conducted in 2000. The study shows that Canadian professors’ political affiliation can be identified as either left or right depending on how the political orientation of political parties is conceptualized. University professors tend to vote more for the Liberal Party than other parties, and view it as centrist party. Moreover, the study highlights a complex and non-monolithic picture of the Canadian academy. University professors are not politically homogenous and party vote depends on the prestige of their university, their discipline, gender, ethnicity, marital status, generation, and agreement with liberalism.

  10. Responsible Canadian energy progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) represents oil and gas companies throughout Canada; its members produce over 90% of Canada's natural gas and crude oil output. The aim of the Association is to improve the economics of the Canadian upstream petroleum sector in an environmentally and socially responsible way. The aim of this Responsible Canadian Energy report is to present the performance data of CAPP's members for the year 2009. Data, trends, and performance analyses are provided throughout the document. This analysis makes it possible to determine where progress has been made and where performance improvement is necessary. It also presents success stories and best practices so that other companies can learn from them how to improve their own performance. This paper provides useful information on the performance of the upstream petroleum industry in Canada and highlights where the focus should be for further improvement in its performance.

  11. When Does an Immigrant with HIV Represent an Excessive Demand on Canadian Health or Social Services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEDNAPA THAVORN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Immigration and Refugee Protection Act of 2001 outlines conditions under which individuals may be granted or denied admission to Canada. The Act stipulates that applications for residence will be rejected if their health is expected to generate excessive demand on Canadian health or social services. The purpose of this paper is to derive a statistical definition of excessive demand and to apply that threshold to persons with HIV who are seeking admission to Canada. The paper demonstrates that the current threshold used by Citizenship and Immigration Canada is much lower than the thresholds that may be derived statistically.

  12. Transnational archives: the Canadian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Creet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the concept of the transnational archive as a counterpoint to the idea that a national archive is necessarily a locus of a static idea of nation. The Canadian national archives is used as a case study of an archives that was transnational in its inception, and one that has continued to change in its mandate and materials as a response to patterns in migration and changing notions of multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy. It introduces the most recent formation of the transnational archive and its denizens: the genealogical archive inhabited by family historians.

  13. Staff lens doses in interventional urology. A comparison with interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Resel, L E; Moreno, J; Sanchez, R M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate radiation doses to the lens of urologists during interventional procedures and to compare them with values measured during interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery. The measurements were carried out in a surgical theatre using a mobile C-arm system and electronic occupational dosimeters (worn over the lead apron). Patient and staff dose measurements were collected in a sample of 34 urology interventions (nephrolithotomies). The same dosimetry system was used in other medical specialties for comparison purposes. Median and 3rd quartile values for urology procedures were: patient doses 30 and 40 Gy cm(2); personal dose equivalent Hp(10) over the apron (μSv/procedure): 393 and 848 (for urologists); 21 and 39 (for nurses). Median values of over apron dose per procedure for urologists resulted 18.7 times higher than those measured for radiologists and cardiologists working with proper protection (using ceiling suspended screens) in catheterisation laboratories, and 4.2 times higher than the values measured for vascular surgeons at the same hospital. Comparison with passive dosimeters worn near the eyes suggests that dosimeters worn over the apron could be a reasonable conservative estimate for ocular doses for interventional urology. Authors recommend that at least the main surgeon uses protective eyewear during interventional urology procedures. PMID:26583458

  14. 77 FR 9610 - Gastroenterology-Urology Devices; Reclassification of Sorbent Hemoperfusion Devices for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... electrical shocks in patients using them. Electromagnetic interference, which may lead to adverse... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 876 Gastroenterology-Urology Devices...) establish a comprehensive system for the regulation of medical devices intended for human use. Section...

  15. 76 FR 71983 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  16. Epididymitis in Patients with Anorectal Malformations: A Cause for Urologic Concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. VanderBrink

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Epididymitis in patients with anorectal malformation (ARM represents a unique problem because unlike the general population, an underlying urinary tract problem is frequently identified. We review our experience with epididymitis in ARM population with an emphasis on examining urologic outcomes. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective review of male patients with ARM cared for from 1980 to 2010. Clinical and pathologic variables recorded included age at presentation, recurrence, associated urologic anomalies, incidence of ureteral fusion with mesonephric ductal structures, glomerular filtration rate and urodynamic parameters. Results Twenty-six patients were identified with documented episodes of epididymitis. Renal injury was noted in five patients (19%, all of whom were diagnosed with neurogenic bladder (NGB several years after anorectoplasty. NGB was found in ten patients (38% in our series. Ectopic insertion of ureter into a mesonephric ductal structure was discovered in five patients (19%. Twelve patients (46% had recurrent episodes of epididymitis, with seven of these patients (58% being diagnosed with NGB. Two patients in the pubertal group presented with a history of epididymitis and complained of ejaculatory pain. Conclusion Epididymitis in a patient with ARM warrants a comprehensive urologic investigation, particularly in recurrent episodes. Attempts at surgical intervention (e.g. vasectomy should be avoided until functional assessment of the urinary tract has occurred. Failure to recognize this association may lead to potentially avoidable complications and morbidity. Long term urological follow up of these patients is warranted to identify at risk patients and minimize renal deterioration

  17. Variability of the urological clinical practice in prostate cancer in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez-Mora, Carlos; Angulo Cuesta, Javier; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Alonso, S.; Portillo, José A.; Villavicencio, Humberto

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to study the opinion of the Spanish urologists regarding the main points in the diagnosis, prevention, quality of life and treatment of prostate cancer. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to 290 specialists who represented the uro 1.144 JCR (2012) Q4, 57/73 Urology & nephrology

  18. About the Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group conducts and supports research on prostate and bladder cancers, and new approaches to clinical prevention studies including cancer immunoprevention. The group develops, implements and monitors research efforts in chemoprevention, nutrition, genetic, and immunologic interventions, screening, early detection and other prevention strategies. |

  19. Clinical applications of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and its potential role in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guiting; Lei, Hongen; Lue, Tom F.; Guo, Yinglu

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a form of ultrasound that delivered at a much lower intensity (erectile dysfunction (ED), and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the field of urology. It still needs an intense effort for basic-science and clinical investigators to explore the biomedical applications of ultrasound.

  20. Integrating Social Media into Urologic Health care: What Can We Learn from Other Disciplines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Johannes; Borgmann, Hendrik; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-02-01

    Social media (SoMe) have become an integral part in many aspects of personal and professional life. With current uptake rates of 50-70% among urologists, SoMe platforms merit huge potential for dissemination of information and professional exchange among stakeholders in urology. Application of SoMe includes conference conversations via tweet chats, health education via YouTube videos, and Twitter online journal clubs. In addition, a number of urology journals have embraced SoMe to allow rapid dissemination of their content and engagement with their readers. Guidance for the appropriate use of SoMe is provided to urologists by several organizations. Besides urology, other disciplines have adopted SoMe for a variety of areas: continuing professional development, awareness of rare diseases, recruitment of study participants, patient education and support, and publicizing research. Openness to new approaches is the basic prerequisite for a transfer of successful concepts embraced by other specialties, to the field of urology. PMID:26757907

  1. 78 FR 38867 - Gastroenterology-Urology Devices; Reclassification of Implanted Blood Access Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... discussed in the preamble to the proposed rule (46 FR 7616; January 23, 1981), the Gastroenterology-Urology... section 513(e) proposing the reclassification of implanted blood access devices for hemodialysis (77 FR... reclassification for June 27, 2013 (78 FR 25747; May 2, 2013). The three comments submitted in response to...

  2. 75 FR 57968 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Gastroenterology and...

  3. 77 FR 18829 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Gastroenterology and...

  4. Female Sexual Abuse Evaluation in the Urological Practice : Results of a Dutch Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, Jack; Bekker, Milou; Van Driel, Mels; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob; Nijeholt, A. A. B. Lycklama A.; Elzevier, Henk Willem

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. There is a strong association between urological complaints and a history of sexual abuse, especially in females. It is not known whether urologists integrate these facts in their daily practice. Aim. To evaluate whether Dutch urologists address the issues of sexual abuse in their fema

  5. Readability of American Online Patient Education Materials in Urologic Oncology: a Need for Simple Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Amanda; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine readability levels of reputable cancer and urologic websites addressing bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular cancers. Methods Online patient education materials (PEMs) for bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular malignancies were evaluated from the American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Urology Care Foundation (AUA-UCF), Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN), Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), Kidney Cancer Association (KCA), and Testicular Cancer Resource Center (TCRC). Grade level was determined using several readability indices, and analyses were performed based on cancer type, website, and content area (general, causes, risk factors and prevention, diagnosis and staging, treatment, and post-treatment). Results Estimated grade level of online PEMs ranged from 9.2 to 14.2 with an overall mean of 11.7. Websites for kidney cancer had the least difficult readability (11.3) and prostate cancer had the most difficult readability (12.1). Among specific websites, the most difficult readability levels were noted for the AUA-UCF website for bladder and prostate cancer and the KCA and TCRC for kidney and testes cancer. Readability levels within content areas varied based on disease and website. Conclusion Online PEMs in urologic oncology are written at a level above the average American reader. Simplification of these resources are necessary to improve patient understanding of urologic malignancy. PMID:25623686

  6. Bladder management methods and urological complications in spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roop Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The optimal bladder management method should preserve renal function and minimize the risk of urinary tract complications. The present study is conducted to assess the overall incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI and other urological complications in spinal cord injury patients (SCI, and to compare the incidence of these complications with different bladder management subgroups. Materials and Methods: 545 patients (386 males and 159 females of traumatic spinal cord injury with the mean age of 35.4±16.2 years (range, 18 - 73 years were included in the study. The data regarding demography, bladder type, method of bladder management, and urological complications, were recorded. Bladder management methods included indwelling catheterization in 224 cases, clean intermittent catheterization (CIC in 180 cases, condom drainage in 45 cases, suprapubic cystostomy in 24 cases, reflex voiding in 32 cases, and normal voiding in 40 cases. We assessed the incidence of UTI and bacteriuria as the number of episodes per hundred person-days, and other urological complications as percentages. Results: The overall incidence of bacteriuria was 1.70 / hundred person-days. The overall incidenceof urinary tract infection was 0.64 / hundered person-days. The incidence of UTI per 100 person-days was 2.68 for indwelling catheterization, 0.34 for CIC, 0.34 for condom drainage, 0.56 for suprapubic cystostomy, 0.34 for reflex voiding, and 0.32 for normal voiding. Other urological complications recorded were urethral stricture (n=66, 12.1%, urethritis (n=78, 14.3%, periurethral abscess (n=45, 8.2%, epididymorchitis (n=44, 8.07%, urethral false passage (n=22, 4.03%, urethral fistula (n=11, 2%, lithiasis (n=23, 4.2%, hematuria (n=44, 8.07%, stress incontinence (n=60, 11%, and pyelonephritis (n=6, 1.1%. Clean intermittent catheterization was associated with lower incidence of urological complications, in comparison to indwelling catheterization. Conclusions

  7. Survey on lower urinary tract symptoms and sleep disorders in patients treated at urology departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu N

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nobutaka Shimizu,1 Yasuharu Nagai,1 Yutaka Yamamoto,1 Takafumi Minami,1 Taiji Hayashi,1 Hidenori Tsuji,1 Masahiro Nozawa,1 Kazuhiro Yoshimura,1 Tokumi Ishii,1 Hirotsugu Uemura,1 Takashi Oki,2 Koichi Sugimoto,2 Kazuhiro Nose,2 Tsukasa Nishioka21Department of Urology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka, Japan; 2Department of Urology, Sakai Hospital, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka, JapanObjectives: This study examined the association between sleep disorders and lower urinary tract symptoms in patients who had visited urology departments.Methods: This was an independent cross-sectional, observational study. Outpatients who had visited the urology departments at the Kinki University School of Medicine or the Sakai Hospital, Kinki University School of Medicine, between August 2011 and January 2012 were assessed using the Athens Insomnia Scale and the International Prostate Symptom Score.Results: In total, 1174 patients (mean age, 65.7 ± 13.7 years, with 895 men (67.1 ± 13.2 years old and 279 women (61.4 ± 14.6 years old, were included in the study. Approximately half of these patients were suspected of having a sleep disorder. With regard to the International Prostate Symptom Score subscores, a significant increase in the risk for suspected sleep disorders was observed among patients with a post-micturition symptom (the feeling of incomplete emptying subscore of ≥1 (a 2.3-fold increase, a storage symptom (daytime frequency + urgency + nocturia subscore of ≥5 (a 2.7-fold increase, a voiding symptom (intermittency + slow stream + hesitancy subscore of ≥2 (a 2.6-fold increase, and a nocturia subscore of ≥2 (a 1.9-fold increase.Conclusion: The results demonstrated that the risk factors for sleep disorders could also include voiding, post-micturition, and storage symptoms, in addition to nocturia.Keywords: lower urinary tract symptoms, sleep disturbance, urological disease

  8. Canadian Postcolonialism: Recovering British Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2005-01-01

    The field of Postcolonial Studies is one of the academic fashions that has arisen in an attempt to amend or replace radical theories of social power since the alleged discrediting of Marxism. The Canadian case is more ambiguous. Postcolonialism, already an essentially contested concept, is especially conflicted where Canada is concerned. Canada…

  9. Canadian Government Electronic Information Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Kirsti

    1993-01-01

    Examines development and evolution of Canadian government information policy in response to issues of preservation of data, information industry involvement in government data development and marketing, role of Crown copyright, and public access to government information in electronic formats. Six key information policy instruments are also…

  10. Universal values of Canadian astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brcic, Jelena; Della-Rossa, Irina

    2012-11-01

    Values are desirable, trans-situational goals, varying in importance, that guide behavior. Research has demonstrated that universal values may alter in importance as a result of major life events. The present study examines the effect of spaceflight and the demands of astronauts' job position as life circumstances that affect value priorities. We employed thematic content analysis for references to Schwartz's well-established value markers in narratives (media interviews, journals, and pre-flight interviews) of seven Canadian astronauts and compared the results to the values of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Russian Space Agency (RKA) astronauts. Space flight did alter the level of importance of Canadian astronauts' values. We found a U-shaped pattern for the values of Achievement and Tradition before, during, and after flight, and a linear decrease in the value of Stimulation. The most frequently mentioned values were Achievement, Universalism, Security, and Self-Direction. Achievement and Self Direction are also within the top 4 values of all other astronauts; however, Universalism was significantly higher among the Canadian astronauts. Within the value hierarchy of Canadian astronauts, Security was the third most frequently mentioned value, while it is in seventh place for all other astronauts. Interestingly, the most often mentioned value marker (sub-category) in this category was Patriotism. The findings have important implications in understanding multi-national crew relations during training, flight, and reintegration into society.

  11. Nuclear regulation - the Canadian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Atomic Energy Control Board was established 35 years ago the basic philosophy of nuclear regulation in Canada and the underlying principles of the regulatory process remain essentially unchanged. This paper outlines the Canadian approach to nuclear regulation and explains in practical terms how the principles of regulation are applied. (author)

  12. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    OpenAIRE

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; van de Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest percentage of burnout cases among medical residents in Psychiatry. Significantly more male residents than female residents suffered from severe burnout. Medical residents reported significantly lower mea...

  13. Indications and results of the unilateral /sup 123/I-hippurate-clearance in an ambulant urological-nephrological patients collective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariss, P.; Haubold, E.

    1988-02-01

    In 572 nephrological-urological ambulant patients 688 estimations of unilateral renal plasma flow were performed after application of 300 kBq/kg /sup 123/I-hippurate using a large field scintillation camera, external scintillation probe over the right shoulder and a computer system. The indications were patients with hypertension, chronic pyelonephritis, unilateral nephrocirrhosis, exclusion or approval of renal failure, furthermore diverse malformations of the urovesical system, nephrolithiasis and follow-up after urological operations. The unilateral renal clearance by /sup 123/I-hippurate represents an important diagnostic tool in urological-nephrological patients with special diseases in addition to morphological and microbiological methods.

  14. Indications and results of the unilateral 123I-hippurate-clearance in an ambulant urological-nephrological patients collective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 572 nephrological-urological ambulant patients 688 estimations of unilateral renal plasma flow were performed after application of 300 kBq/kg 123I-hippurate using a large field scintillation camera, external scintillation probe over the right shoulder and a computer system. The indications were patients with hypertension, chronic pyelonephritis, unilateral nephrocirrhosis, exclusion or approval of renal failure, furthermore diverse malformations of the urovesical system, nephrolithiasis and follow-up after urological operations. The unilateral renal clearance by 123I-hippurate represents an important diagnostic tool in urological-nephrological patients with special diseases in addition to morphological and microbiological methods. (orig.)

  15. Mandatory HIV Screening Policy & Everyday Life: A Look Inside the Canadian Immigration Medical Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAURA BISAILLON

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Findings that detail the social organization of day-to-day practices associated with the Canadian government policy of mandatory HIV testing of permanent residence applicants to Canada are reported. Institutional ethnography was used to investigate interactions between HIV-positive applicants and immigration physicians during the immigration medical examination. A composite narrative recounts details of a woman applicant's discovery through immigration testing that she was living with HIV. Mandatory HIV testing gives rise to serious difficulties for applicants to Canada living with HIV. Applicant, physician and federal state employee work practices associated with mandatory HIV testing are analysed. These practices contribute to the ideological work of the Canadian state, where interest bounds up in the examination serve the state and not the applicant. Findings should be useful for Canadian immigration policy makers who wish to develop constructive and functional strategies to address issues that matter in people's lives

  16. Challenges to publishing pharmacy resident research projects from the perspectives of residency program directors and residents

    OpenAIRE

    Olson KL; Irwin AN; Joline BR; Witt DM; Patel RJ

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify barriers to completing and publishing pharmacy residency research projects from the perspective of program directors and former residents.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of pharmacy residency program directors and former post-graduate year one and two residents. Directors of pharmacy residency programs whose residents present their projects at the Western States Conference (n=216) were invited to complete an online survey and asked to forward the survey to fo...

  17. Changes in medicine: residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The most important time in a physician’s educational development is residency, especially the first year. However, residency work and responsibility have come under the scrutiny of a host of agencies and bureaucracies, and therefore, is rapidly changing. Most important in the alphabet soup of regulatory agencies is the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME which accredits residencies and ultimately makes the governing rules.Resident work hours have received much attention and are clearly decreasing. However, the decline in work hours began in the 1970’s before the present political push to decrease work hours. The residency I entered in 1976 had every third night call during the first year resident’s 6-9 months on general medicine or wards. It had changed from every other night the year before. On wards, we normally were in the hospital for our 24 hours of call and followed this with a 10-12 hour day before …

  18. The teaching of physics and related courses to residents in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of physics and related teaching to radiation oncology residents in 21 Canadian cancer centres was undertaken in December 1987 and January 1988. This survey illustrates a very considerable variation in the formal teaching of physics to aspiring radiation oncologists with, for example, the number of hours offered ranging from 40 to 160 in those 10 centres that have a training program. It would appear to be of benefit to radiation oncology residents, those charged with teaching them, and the radiation oncology community as a whole, to develop specific guidelines for this aspect of resident education. (8 refs., tab.)

  19. Toward a Common Therapeutic Framework in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Model for Urologic Oncology and Medical Oncology Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    de Vere White, Ralph; Lara, Primo N.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution of palliative therapeutic choices in the last few years for patients with advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has resulted in a dilemma currently troubling a few other epithelial malignancies: which systemic agent to choose and at what time? In addition, which specialty specifically directs the delivery of such care – Urology or Medical Oncology – has not been clearly established. Recognizing the lack of consensus, we propose a framework for Urology and Me...

  20. Successful reduction of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a urology ward: a 10-year study

    OpenAIRE

    Tatokoro, Manabu; Kihara, Kazunori; Masuda, Hitoshi; Ito, Masaya; Yoshida, Soichiro; Kijima, Toshiki; Yokoyama, Minato; Saito, Kazutaka; Koga, Fumitaka; Kawakami, Satoru; Fujii, Yasuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Background To eradicate hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using a stepwise infection control strategy that includes an avoidance of antimicrobial prophylaxis (AMP) based on surgical wound classification and an improvement in operative procedures in gasless single-port urologic surgery. Methods The study was conducted at an 801-bed university hospital. Since 2001, in the urology ward, we have introduced the stepwise infection control strategy. In 2007, survei...

  1. Cultural transition of international medical graduate residents into family practice in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triscott, Jean A.C.; Waugh, Earle H.; Torti, Jacqueline M.I.; Barton, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the perceived strengths that international medical graduate (IMG) family medicine residents possess and the challenges they are perceived to encounter in integrating into Canadian family practice. Methods This was a qualitative, exploratory study employing focus groups and interviews with 27 participants - 10 family physicians, 13 health care professionals, and 4 family medicine residents. Focus group/interview questions addressed the strengths that IMGs possess and the challenges they face in becoming culturally competent within the Canadian medico-cultural context. Qualitative data were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed thematically. Results Participants identified that IMG residents brought multiple strengths to Canadian practice including strong clinical knowledge and experience, high education level, the richness of varied cultural perspectives, and positive personal strengths.  At the same time, IMG residents appeared to experience challenges in the areas of:  (1) communication skills (language nuances, unfamiliar accents, speech volume/tone, eye contact, directness of communication); (2) clinical practice (uncommon diagnoses, lack of familiarity with care of the opposite sex and mental health conditions); (3) learning challenges (limited knowledge of Canada’s health care system, patient-centered care and ethical principles, unfamiliarity with self-directed learning,  unease with receiving feedback); (4) cultural differences (gender roles, gender equality, personal space, boundary issues; and (5) personal struggles.   Conclusions Residency programs must recognize the challenges that can occur during the cultural transition to Canadian family practice and incorporate medico-cultural education into the curriculum.  IMG residents also need to be aware of cultural differences and be open to different perspectives and new learning. PMID:27149322

  2. The prospects for Canadian uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1980s have seen a decline in markets for uranium concentrate, largely as a result of falling estimates for reactor fuel requirements and rising inventories. Spot market prices fell to $44 in September 1982, but have since risen back to $60. World production also fell in 1982 and is not expected to increase significantly before 1990. Some opportunities exist for Canadian producers with new low-cost deposits to replace high-cost producers in Canada and other countries, particularly the United States. There will be strong competition between Canadian producers as well as from Australia. Australia's reserves are somewhat larger than Canada's, although the reported ore grades tend to be lower than those of Saskatchewan

  3. The Canadian safeguards support program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada supports international safeguards as a means by which the proliferation of nuclear weapons can be discouraged. Canada recognizes that,to meet that the IAEA must have effective safeguards techniques and the active cooperation of Member States. Therefore the Canadian Government decided in 1976 to initiate a program in support of IAEA safeguards, known as the Canadian Safeguards Support Program (CSSP). The CSSP is funded and administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The CSSP is a co-ordinated program for the development and the application of safeguards instruments and techniques for nuclear facilities and materials on behalf of the IAEA and also in support of Canada's own national nuclear material safeguards system, implemented by the AECB. (author)

  4. Exporting the Canadian licensing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the problems of an overseas regulatory agency in licensing a Canadian-supplied nuclear plant which is referenced to a plant in Canada. Firstly, the general problems associated with the use of a reference plant are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of specific problems which arise from the licensing practices in Canada. The paper concludes with recommendations to simplify the task of demonstrating the licensability of an overseas CANDU plant

  5. Canadian wind energy industry directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The companies and organizations involved, either directly or indirectly, in the wind energy industry in Canada, are listed in this directory. Some U.S. and international companies which are active or interested in Canadian industry activities are also listed. The first section of the directory is an alphabetical listing which includes corporate descriptions, company logos, addresses, phone and fax numbers, e-mail addresses and contact names. The second section contains 54 categories of products and services associated with the industry

  6. Canadian Content in Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    THEME: Internationalism: Worlds at Play Topics: Internationalism, Identity in Gaming and Learning to Play Abstract: How does Canada fit into the global cultural context of video games? This paper investigates the culture being reflected in video games being produced in Canada as Canada is one of the world's leading producers of video games. It examines the how Canadian culture is represented in current new media artistic output against the culture, or lack of culture, being represented in vid...

  7. Program director and resident perspectives of a competency-based medical education anesthesia residency program in Canada: a needs assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In July 2015, the University of Ottawa introduced a competency-based medical education (CBME) postgraduate program for anesthesia. Prior to program implementation, this study aimed to identify Canadian anesthesiology program directors perceptions of CBME and residents’ opinion on how the program should be designed and perceived consequences of CBME. Methods: This two-phase, qualitative study included semi-structured interviews with Canadian anesthesia program directors (Phase I) and a focus group interview with residents enrolled in the University of Ottawa time-based anesthesia program (Phase II). Both phases sought to gauge participant’s perceptions of CBME. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Results: Data was combined to protect anonymity of the six participants (three program directors and three residents). Participants spoke about the perceived advantages of CBME, the need to establish definitions, and challenges to a CBME program highlighting logistical factors, implications for trainees and the role assessment plays in CBME. Conclusion: These findings will inform CBME implementation strategies in anesthesia programs across the country, and may assist other residency programs in the design of their programs. Furthermore, our findings may help identify potential challenges and issues that other postgraduate specialties may face as they transition to a CBME model. PMID:26913772

  8. Applications of neuromodulation of the lower urinary tract in female urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouz Daneshgari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulation is becoming part of clinical armamentarium for treatment of a variety of lower urinary tract conditions in female urology. Its increased usage stems from need of patients who have exhausted all other therapeutic options for their complex and poorly understood lower urinary tract disorders. Currently neuromodulation may consist of the use of sacral nerve stimulation (SNS and injectable therapies. Herein, we will discuss the background and development of SNS, its current indications, methods of patient selection and will review the results of the recent published literature on SNS. In addition, we will discuss some of the newer developments in SNS such as Bion device and the future direction in integration of SNS in female urology.

  9. Providing cleaner air to Canadians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet is designed to explain salient aspects of the Ozone Annex, negotiated and signed recently by Canada and the United States, in a joint effort to improve air quality in North America. By significantly reducing the transboundary flows of air pollutants that cause smog, the Ozone Annex will benefit some 16 million people in central and eastern Canada and provide an example for a future round of negotiations to address concerns of the millions of Canadians and Americans who live in the border area between British Columbia and Washington State. The brochure provide summaries of the Canadian and American commitments, focusing on transportation, monitoring and reporting. The Ozone Annex complements other air quality initiatives by the Government of Canada enacted under the Environmental Protection Act, 1999. These measures include regulations to reduce sulphur content to 30 parts per million by Jan 1, 2005; proposing to restrict toxic particulate matter (PM) to less than 10 microns; establishing daily smog forecasts in the Maritimes and committing to a national program built upon existing smog advisories and forecasts in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia; and investing in more clean air research through the newly created Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences

  10. Canadian fusion fuels technology project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project was launched in 1982 to coordinate Canada's provision of fusion fuels technology to international fusion power development programs. The project has a mandate to extend and adapt existing Canadian tritium technologies for use in international fusion power development programs. 1985-86 represents the fourth year of the first five-year term of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP). This reporting period coincides with an increasing trend in global fusion R and D to direct more effort towards the management of tritium. This has resulted in an increased linking of CFFTP activities and objectives with those of facilities abroad. In this way there has been a continuing achievement resulting from CFFTP efforts to have cooperative R and D and service activities with organizations abroad. All of this is aided by the cooperative international atmosphere within the fusion community. This report summarizes our past year and provides some highlights of the upcoming year 1986/87, which is the final year of the first five-year phase of the program. AECL (representing the Federal Government), the Ministry of Energy (representing Ontario) and Ontario Hydro, have given formal indication of their intent to continue with a second five-year program. Plans for the second phase will continue to emphasize tritium technology and remote handling

  11. Mercury in Canadian crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates for average mercury concentrations in crude oil range widely from 10 ng/g of oil to 3,500 ng/g of oil. With such a broad range of estimates, it is difficult to determine the contributions of the petroleum sector to the total budget of mercury emissions. In response to concerns that the combustion of petroleum products may be a major source of air-borne mercury pollution, Environment Canada and the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute has undertaken a survey of the average total mercury concentration in crude oil processed in Canadian refineries. In order to calculate the potential upper limit of total mercury in all refined products, samples of more than 30 different types of crude oil collected from refineries were measured for their concentration of mercury as it enters into a refinery before processing. High temperature combustion, cold vapour atomic absorption and cold vapour atomic fluorescence were the techniques used to quantify mercury in the samples. The results of the study provide information on the total mass of mercury present in crude oil processed in Canada each year. Results can be used to determine the impact of vehicle exhaust emissions to the overall Canadian mercury emission budget. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  12. Use of inhaled medications and urgent care services. Study of Canadian asthma patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce, D P; McIvor, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine asthma patients' patterns of disease and knowledge of asthma. DESIGN: Telephone survey of patients with diagnosed asthma. SETTING: Residences in 10 Canadian provinces. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with asthma diagnosed by a doctor: 829 men and women with a mean age of 38 +/- 7 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Classes of asthma medications, patterns of use, frequency and severity of asthma symptoms use of emergency departments and urgent medical services, participation in asthma...

  13. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

  14. The Residence Life Cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Jane Fidler; Elion, Audrey; Gusmano, Phil

    1997-01-01

    Explores the implementation, results, and the limitations of the Residence Life Cinema program at the University of Memphis. Claims that such programs offer an innovative method for fostering student development by utilizing movies to stimulate affective and cognitive processes in students--processes that may not occur without a catalyst. (RJM)

  15. Quality of life in multiple sclerosis: translation in French Canadian of the MSQoL-54

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafortune Louise

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a neurodegenerative disease which runs its course for the remainder of the patient's life frequently causing disability of varying degrees. Negative effects on Health-related quality of life (HRQOL are well documented and a subject of clinical study. The Multiple Sclerosis QOL 54 (MSQOL-54 questionnaire was developed to measure HRQOL in patients with MS. It is composed of 54 items, and is a combination of the SF-36 and 18 disease-specific items. Objective The objective of this project was to translate the MSQOL-54 into French Canadian, and to make it available to the Canadian scientific community for clinical research and clinical practice. Methods Across all French speaking regions, there are occurrences of variation. They include the pronunciation, sentence structure, and the lexicon, where the differences are most marked. For this reason, it was decided to translate the US original MSQOL-54 into French Canadian instead of adapting the existing French version. The SF-36 has been previously validated and published in French Canadian, therefore the translation work was performed solely on the 18 MS specific items. The translation followed an internationally accepted methodology into 3 steps: forward translation, backward translation, and patients' cognitive debriefing. Results Instructions and Items 38, 43, 45 and 49 were the most debated. Problematic issues mainly resided in the field of semantics. Patients' testing (n = 5 did not reveal conceptual problems. The questionnaire was well accepted, with an average time for completion of 19 minutes. Conclusion The French Canadian MSQOL-54 is now available to the Canadian scientific community and will be a useful tool for health-care providers to assess HRQOL of patients with MS as a routine part of clinical practice. The next step in the cultural adaptation of the MSQOL-54 in French Canadian will be the evaluation of its psychometric properties.

  16. Urological surgery in epidermolysis bullosa: tactical planning for surgery and anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisieux Eyer de Jesus

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa (EB is characterized by extreme fragility of the skin and mucosae. Anesthetic and surgical techniques have to be adapted to those children and routine practice may not be adequate. Urological problems are relatively common, but surgical techniques adapted to those children have not been well debated and only low evidence is available to this moment. Herein we discuss the specifics of anesthetic and surgical techniques chosen to treat a six year old EB male presenting with symptomatic phimosis.

  17. Urological surgery in epidermolysis bullosa: tactical planning for surgery and anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Lisieux Eyer de Jesus; Maira Rangel; Ronaldo S. Moura Filho; Glória Novaes; Ada Quattrino; Angelica F. Aguas

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is characterized by extreme fragility of the skin and mucosae. Anesthetic and surgical techniques have to be adapted to those children and routine practice may not be adequate. Urological problems are relatively common, but surgical techniques adapted to those children have not been well debated and only low evidence is available to this moment. Herein we discuss the specifics of anesthetic and surgical techniques chosen to treat a six year old EB male presenting wi...

  18. Urological surgery in epidermolysis bullosa: tactical planning for surgery and anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Lisieux Eyer de; Rangel, Maira; Moura-Filho, Ronaldo S; Novaes, Glória; Quattrino, Ada; Aguas, Angelica F

    2014-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is characterized by extreme fragility of the skin and mucosae. Anesthetic and surgical techniques have to be adapted to those children and routine practice may not be adequate. Urological problems are relatively common, but surgical techniques adapted to those children have not been well debated and only low evidence is available to this moment. Herein we discuss the specifics of anesthetic and surgical techniques chosen to treat a six year old EB male presenting with symptomatic phimosis. PMID:25498283

  19. Rehabilitation of Patients with Urological Complications of Radical Surgery on Pelvic Organs

    OpenAIRE

    Sh. S. Allakhverdiev; A.O. Papoyan; A. R. Zagitov; A.A. Kazikhinurov; V. N. Pavlov

    2009-01-01

    One of the commonest urological complications of radical pelvic surgery is enuresis which effects patients quality of life and causes severe physical and moral sufferings. The operational methods of enuresis treatment are unproductive and often lead to recurring and more complicated surgical interventions. All this provides research and development of new non-invasive methods of treatment and rehabilitation of patients with enuresis. Treatment of enuresis after radical operations includes a s...

  20. Xenogenic extracellular matrices as potential biomaterials for interposition grafting in urological surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, N F

    2012-01-31

    PURPOSE: The field of tissue engineering focuses on developing strategies for reconstructing injured, diseased, and congenitally absent tissues and organs. During the last decade urologists have benefited from remodeling and regenerative properties of bioscaffolds derived from xenogenic extracellular matrices. We comprehensively reviewed the current literature on structural and functional characteristics of xenogenic extracellular matrix grafting since it was first described in urological surgery. We also reviewed the clinical limitations, and assessed the potential for safe and effective urological application of extracellular matrix grafting in place of autogenous tissue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed literature searches for English language publications using the PubMed(R) and MEDLINE(R) databases. Keywords included "xenogenic," "extracellular matrix" and "genitourinary tract applications." A total of 112 articles were scrutinized, of which 50 were suitable for review based on clinical relevance and importance of content. RESULTS: Since the mid 1990s xenogenic extracellular matrices have been used to successfully treat a number of pathological conditions that affect the upper and lower genitourinary tract. They are typically prepared from porcine organs such as small intestine and bladder. These organs are harvested and subjected to decellularization and sterilization techniques before surgical implantation. Bioinductive growth factors that are retained during the preparation process induce constructive tissue remodeling as the extracellular matrix is simultaneously degraded and excreted. However, recent documented concerns over durability, decreased mechanical strength and residual porcine DNA after preparation techniques have temporarily hampered the potential of extracellular matrices as a reliable replacement for genitourinary tract structures. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular matrices are a useful alternative for successfully treating a number of urological

  1. First Report of the Stapled Mesh Stoma Reinforcement Technique in a Urologic Context

    OpenAIRE

    Dwayne Tun Soong Chang; Isaac Andrew Thyer; John Oliver Larkin; Marina Helen Wallace; Dickon Hayne

    2014-01-01

    Parastomal hernia is a common complication of ileal conduit formation. Mesh repair of parastomal hernia has lower rate of recurrence than nonmesh techniques but can be time-consuming to perform. The stapled mesh stoma reinforcement technique (SMART) is a novel method of rapidly constructing a reinforced stapled stoma. We report the first case utilising this technique in a urologic context. The procedure was performed on a middle-aged female with recurrent parastomal hernia of her ileal condui...

  2. The Role of Religion and Spirituality in Psychological Distress Prior to Surgery for Urologic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Biegler, Kelly; Cohen, Lorenzo; Scott, Shellie; Hitzhusen, Katherine; Parker, Patricia; Gilts, Chelsea D.; Canada, Andrea; Pisters, Louis

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the associations between religion and spirituality (R/S), presurgical distress, and other psychosocial factors such as engagement coping, avoidant coping, and social support. Participants were 115 men scheduled for surgery for urologic cancer. Before surgery, participants completed scales measuring intrinsic religiosity, organized religious activity, and nonorganized religious activity (IR, ORA, NORA); social support (Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey); a...

  3. MR urography (MRU) for urologic diseases of the infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR urography (MRU) was performed for urologic diseases of 12 cases. The conditions are hydronephrosis, hydroureters, double renal pelvis, ureteral duplication, ectopic ureter, etc.. It has become clear that MRU can catch the whole image of urinary tract, and it is useful for the delineation of the urinary tract of infants and children with deteriorated renal function. MRU will become the primary urinary tract imaging which would replace DIP in the infants in the future. (author)

  4. [Expert opinion on surgical care pathway management of neurologic patients from Neuro-Urology Committee of the French National Association of Urology (AFU)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caremel, R; Phé, V; Bart, S; Castel-Lacanal, E; De Sèze, M; Duchene, F; Bertrandy-Loubat, M; Mazerolles, M; Scheiber-Nogueira, M C; Karsenty, G; Gamé, X

    2013-04-01

    The surgical care pathway of neurologic patients has two aims: preventing urinary morbidity and mortality and improving their quality of life. It requires taking into account the specificities of disabilities in domains of body functions: circulatory, ventilation and digestive physiology, motor functions, sensory functions, mental functions, and skin fragility which are responsible of dependencies in this heterogeneous group of patients. This management is necessarily multidisciplinary to be optimal and through specific clinical care pathway, providing guidance to the surgical procedure: preparation of the surgery, its realization, and post-operative rehabilitation. The indication for surgery must be coordinated and validated in neuro-urology multidisciplinary staff. Preoperative stay in a physical and rehabilitation medicine center may be useful to ensure a complete assessment and anticipate problems related to surgery. The patient will be hospitalized in the urology department in a single room suited to their disabilities and handicaps. The chronic treatments should be not modified if possible. The lack of sensitivity does not dispense anesthesia to prevent autonomic hyperreflexia, the most severe complication after high complete spinal cord injury. The laparoscopy and sub-peritoneal surgery, the early removal nasogastric tube and early refeeding make it possible to early resumption of intestinal transit. In many cases, the patients should be transferred to a physical and rehabilitation medicine during post-operative period where the nursing care will be most suitable. A quickly adapted rehabilitation must be able to reduce loss of function and physical dependence. PMID:23545005

  5. The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir is potentially active against urological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Akinori Sato Department of Urology, National Defense Medical College, Tokorozawa, Japan Abstract: The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir has recently been shown to have antineoplastic activity, and its use in urological malignancies is under investigation with an eye toward drug repositioning. Ritonavir is thought to exert its antineoplastic activity by inhibiting multiple signaling pathways, including the Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB pathways. It can increase the amount of unfolded proteins in the cell by inhibiting both the proteasome and heat shock protein 90. Combinations of ritonavir with agents that increase the amount of unfolded proteins, such as proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, or heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, therefore, induce endoplasmic reticulum stress cooperatively and thereby kill cancer cells effectively. Ritonavir is also a potent cytochrome P450 3A4 and P-glycoprotein inhibitor, increasing the intracellular concentration of combined drugs by inhibiting their degradation and efflux from cancer cells and thereby enhancing their antineoplastic activity. Furthermore, riotnavir’s antineoplastic activity includes modulation of immune system activity. Therapies using ritonavir are thus an attractive new approach to cancer treatment and, due to their novel mechanisms of action, are expected to be effective against malignancies that are refractory to current treatment strategies. Further investigations using ritonavir are expected to find new uses for clinically available drugs in the treatment of urological malignancies as well as many other types of cancer. Keywords: drug repositioning, novel treatment

  6. Soft-tissue applications of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    The ideal surgical laser for the treatment of soft tissue pathology should possess both ablative and hemostatic abilities. As well, for use in urologic conditions the laser must also be suitable for endoscopic use. The Holmium:YAG laser possesses these qualities and in preliminary clinical use has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications. In this study we review our initial experience with the Holmium:YAG laser over a 18 month period. A total of 51 patients underwent 53 procedures for a variety of soft tissue conditions including: bladder tumor ablation (25), incision of ureteral stricture (15), incision of urethral stricture (6), treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (3), incision of bladder neck contracture (2), and ablation of a ureteral tumor (2). Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved in all cases. Procedures were considered successful (no further intervention being required to treat the condition) in 81% of the cases. Two patients with dense bladder neck contractures required electroincision under the same anesthetic for completion of the procedure. A single complication, that of urinary extravasation following incision of a urethral stricture resolved with conservative management. In summary, the Holmium:YAG laser has demonstrated safety and proficiency in the treatment of a variety of urologic soft tissue conditions.

  7. Multi-institute survey on actual conditions of urologic management for severe bladder dysfunction after hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted a multi-institute survey on the conditions related to urologic management of severe voiding dysfunction after hysterectomy for uterine cancer with or without postoperative irradiation. Our first study population was a group of adult female patients currently managed by urologists, using clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). Of the 287 patients in this group, 99 (34%) had suffered from uterine cancer. Of these patients, 94 underwent hysterectomy for this disease; 44 and 30 were treated with or without postoperative radiation, respectively, while postoperative irradiation status was unknown for 20. Median follow-up after surgery was 21 (0.2-52) years and median interval from operation to the introduction of CIC was 4.0 (0-49) years. CIC tended to be introduced later for patients with postoperative radiation than those without it. Seventy-four patients, who required invasive urologic interventions other than CIC for voiding dysfunction after hysterectomy, are the second study population. Most of these (82%) had received postoperative irradiation. Continuous Foley catheter placement was the most frequent procedure. Long-term follow-up and urologic management for voiding dysfunction is required for patients undergoing hysterectomy. (author)

  8. Avicenna's Canon of Medicine and Modern Urology: part I: bladder and its diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madineh, Seyed Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    Studying the Avicenna's Canon of Medicine, provides noteworthy information on the subjects related to urology. Some examples of these amazing items have been confirmed by the modern urology: explaining the 2-stage function of the bladder (filling and emptying stages); indirect pointing to a scientific law, named later as the Laplace's law, which is applicable to bladder physiology and explains intravesical pressure stability; describing the bladder layers and strength of the urothelial layer, which was later proved to be due to the tight junctions; describing the intramural ureter and its antireflux mechanism; scientific classifying the urethral and bladder diseases; and describing meticulously the semiology and epidemiology of bladder calculi. Avicenna has also pointed to inversion therapy in the treatment of urinary calculi, grating sign in bladder calculi, manipulation methods for treatment of bladder calculi, and finally, the Crede maneuver. His methodology is completely scientific, based on experiments and truly a basis of the modern medicine. This article is a review of Avicenna's views in medicine and their comparison with the modern urology. PMID:19101908

  9. Skeletal-related events in urological cancer patients with bone metastasis. A multicenter study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of skeletal-related events (SRE) in urological cancer patients with bone metastases in Japan. Five hundred eleven patients with urological cancer and documented bone metastases treated from January 2003 to April 2008 in ten Japanese institutions were included in a retrospective analysis. Type and incidence of SRE (fracture, radiotherapy, spinal cord compression, surgery, hypercalcemia, and bone pain) were determined from patient medical records. The overall incidence of SRE, including 'pain', was 61%. The most common event was radiotherapy for bone metastases, with an incidence of 31%. The overall incidence of events seemed to be similar among Japanese and Western patients with prostate cancer and renal cell carcinoma when comparing data with previously published reports. Nevertheless, a much lower incidence of fracture (19.1%) was observed in Japanese renal cell carcinoma patients. The overall incidence of SRE in Japanese urological cancer patients with bone metastasis was similar to that in Western patients, but the incidence of fracture was lower in Japanese renal cancer patients. (author)

  10. Are Canadian Banks Ready for Basel III?

    OpenAIRE

    Imad Kutum; Khaled Hussainey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze and test the current liquidity coverage ratio of Canadian banks’, and draw conclusions about the readiness of Canadian banks to meet Basel III regulations. Liquidity coverage ratios for six major Canadian banks were calculated using the liquid assets and liabilities listed on their balance sheets from 2009 to 2013. The actual assets that meet Basel III requirements could not be acquired, as this is private information that does not have to be released u...

  11. entering the postindustrial society: the canadian case

    OpenAIRE

    Matejko, Alexander J.

    1986-01-01

    abstract: the canadian federation is based on the substantial autonomy of the provinces constituting it, the welfare orientation of central bodies, the volunteer activities at the grass-root level, and the external policy open to the world. there are no any doubts about the genuinely democratic character of canadian internal politics or the commitment of canadians to the world peace. the economic prosperity of the country is secured by the mineral resources, good agriculture, and the intensiv...

  12. The Secret of Canadian Banking: Common Sense?

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Booth

    2009-01-01

    This article looks at the basic reasons why the Canadian banking system was recently judged by the World Economic Forum to be the soundest in the world. It does so by first examining the basic functions of a financial system and what Canadian banks are allowed to do as intermediaries within that system. It then considers the market structure of Canadian banking and the role of the Canadian government in regulating the financial system. It finishes with a discussion of the four basic managemen...

  13. Canadian environmental sustainability indicators 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, the Canadian government committed to reporting annual national indicators of air quality, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and freshwater quality in order to provide Canadians with more regular and consistent information on the state of the environment and how it is linked with human activities. The national air quality indicators in this report focused on human exposure to ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). The report showed that from 1990 to 2004, the ozone indicator showed year-to-year variability, with an averaged increase of 0.9 per cent per year. Stations in southern Ontario reported the highest levels of ozone and PM2.5 in the country in 2004. There was no discernible upward or downward trend in PM2.5 levels at the national level for the 2000 to 2004 period, and GHG emissions rose 27 per cent from 1990 to 2004. In 2004, emissions were 35 per cent above the target to which Canada committed under the Kyoto Protocol. However, while total emissions rose, emissions per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) fell by 14 per cent from 1990 to 2004. GHG emissions also grew faster than the Canadian population, resulting in a 10 per cent rise in emissions per person. The freshwater quality indicator presented in this report covered the period from 2002 to 2004, and focused on the ability of Canada's surface waters to support aquatic life. For the 340 sites selected across southern Canada, water quality was rated as good or excellent at 44 per cent of sites, fair at 34 per cent of sites, and marginal or poor at 22 per cent of sites. The report included a chapter which attempted to integrate the indicators with other environmental impacts, measures of economic performance, and indices of social progress to improve the ability of the report to influence decision-making that fully accounts for environmental sustainability. 63 refs., 18 figs

  14. The Canadian National Seismograph Network

    OpenAIRE

    North, R G

    1994-01-01

    The Canadian National Seismograph Network currently consists of 5 very-broadband (VBB) and 15 broadband (BB) stations across Canada, supplemented by 6 short period (SP) stations. When it is completed by the end of 1995, a further 1 VBB, 12 BB and over 40 SP stations will have been added. Data from all sites are telemetered in real time to twin network acquisition, processing and archiving centres in Eastern and Western Canada. All data are continuously archived in SEED format on optical disk ...

  15. REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Modern English is an international language inthe world.Besides Great Britain,English is spokenas first language in 39 countries.These countries arelocated in different regions with different naturalfeatures,history development and cultural character-istics.Thus,English used in these different regionscarries its own regional character—forming Englishregional varieties.The main English regional varieties are:BritishEnglish,American English,Canadian English andSouth African English.Canada is a rich country inNorth America with its own characteristics,which of

  16. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  17. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  18. The Canadian Hospital Executive Simulation System (CHESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, G H; Knotts, U A; Parrish, L G; Shields, C A

    1991-01-01

    The Canadian Hospital Executive Simulation System (CHESS) is a computer-based management decision-making game designed specifically for Canadian hospital managers. The paper begins with an introduction on the development of business and health services industry-specific simulation games. An overview of CHESS is provided, along with a description of its development and a discussion of its educational benefits. PMID:10109530

  19. Theoretical Analysis of Canadian Lifelong Education Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukan Natalia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the problem of Canadian lifelong education development has been studied. The main objectives of the article are defined as theoretical analysis of scientific and pedagogical literature which highlights different aspects of the research problem; periods of lifelong education development; and determination of lifelong learning role and importance in modern Canadian society.

  20. Rural Canadian Youth Exposed to Physical Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laye, Adele M.; Mykota, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to physical violence is an unfortunate reality for many Canadian youth as it is associated with numerous negative psychosocial effects. The study aims to assist in understanding resilience in rural Canadian youth exposed to physical violence. This is accomplished by identifying the importance of protective factors, as measured by the…

  1. Looking Back: Tracing Trends in Canadian CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Mary-Louise; Sinyor, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    "CCALLNET" ("The Canadian Computer-Assisted Language Learning Network at the Post-Secondary Level") was a semi-annual newsletter published from 1987 to 2002 that was distributed to colleagues across Canada who taught languages to university students. Its objective was to create a network of Canadian faculty interested in CALL by informing them…

  2. Challenges to publishing pharmacy resident research projects from the perspectives of residency program directors and residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson KL

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify barriers to completing and publishing pharmacy residency research projects from the perspective of program directors and former residents.Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey of pharmacy residency program directors and former post-graduate year one and two residents. Directors of pharmacy residency programs whose residents present their projects at the Western States Conference (n=216 were invited to complete an online survey and asked to forward the survey to former residents of their program in 2009, 2010, or 2011. The survey focused on four broad areas: 1 demographic characteristics of the residency programs, directors, and residents; 2 perceived value of the research project; 3 perceived barriers with various stages of research; and 4 self-identified barriers to successful research project completion and publication.Results: A total of 32 program directors and 98 residents completed the survey. The minority of programs offered formal residency research training. Both groups reported value in the research project as part of residency training. Significantly more directors reported obtaining institutional review board approval and working through the publication process as barriers to the research project (46.7% vs. 22.6% and 73.3% vs. 43.0%, respectively p<0.05 while residents were more likely to report collecting and analyzing the data as barriers (34.4% vs. 13.3% and 39.8% vs. 20.0%, respectively, p<0.05. Both groups self-identified time constraints and limitations in study design or quality of the study as barriers. However, while program directors also indicated lack of resident motivation (65.5%, residents reported lack of mentorship or program structural issues (43.3%. Conclusion: Overall, while both groups found value in the residency research projects, there were barriers identified by both groups. The results of this study may provide areas of opportunity for improving the quality and publication rates of

  3. [Andres Vesalio, Francisco Díaz, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra and the birth of urology in the 16th Century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Esper, Raúl; Carrillo Córdova, Luis Daniel; Carrillo Córdova, Dulce María; Carrillo Córdova, Carlos Alberto; Carrillo Córdova, Jorge Raúl

    2015-01-01

    In the sixteenth century there were great advances in science, literature, and the arts. During this century, urology as a specialty was conceived, thanks to the contributions of Andreas Vesalius, anatomist and leading physician to the court of Charles V, and Dr. Francisco Diaz, a native of Alcala de Henares, surgeon and clinician. Dr. Diaz had a close relationship with Miguel de Cervantes, who at one point in his life suffered from renal colic. In his masterpiece "Re-Printed Treaty of all diseases of the kidneys, bladder and wattles of the Cock and Urina, divided into three books," of which the first book of urology is the History of Medicine, describes in detail the clinical and therapeutic aspects of urological diseases, known as the "bad stone" and urethral strictures known as "wattles", in addition to describing the different surgical techniques and the development of new instruments for urological procedures, which include the cisorio instrument and the Speculum pudendi. For the above, Dr. Francisco Diaz is considered the father of urology. PMID:26290034

  4. Resident Peritoneal NK cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzaga, Rosemary; Matzinger, Polly; Perez-Diez, Ainhoa

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe a new population of NK cells that reside in the normal, un-inflamed peritoneal cavity. Phenotypically, they share some similarities with the small population of CD49b negative, CD27 positive immature splenic NK cells, and liver NK cells but differ in their expression of CD62L, TRAIL and EOMES. Functionally, the peritoneal NK cells resemble the immature splenic NK cells in their production of IFN-γ, GM-CSF and TNF-α and in the killing of YAC-1 target cells. We also found that ...

  5. Clinical and preclinical treatment of urologic diseases with phosphodiesterase isoenzymes 5 inhibitors: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphodiesterase isoenzymes 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is are the first-line therapy for erectile dysfunction (ED. The constant discoveries of nitric oxide (NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP cell-signaling pathway for smooth muscle (SM control in other urogenital tracts (UGTs make PDE5-Is promising pharmacologic agents against other benign urological diseases. This article reviews the literature and contains some previously unpublished data about characterizations and activities of PDE5 and its inhibitors in treating urological disorders. Scientific discoveries have improved our understanding of cell-signaling pathway in NO/cGMP-mediated SM relaxation in UGTs. Moreover, the clinical applications of PDE5-Is have been widely recognized. On-demand PDE5-Is are efficacious for most cases of ED, while daily-dosing and combination with testosterone are recommended for refractory cases. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulators also have promising role in the management of severe ED conditions. PDE5-Is are also the first rehabilitation strategy for postoperation or postradiotherapy ED for prostate cancer patients. PDE5-Is, especially combined with α-adrenoceptor antagonists, are very effective for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH except on maximum urinary flow rate (Q max with tadalafil recently proved for BPH with/without ED. Furthermore, PDE5-Is are currently under various phases of clinical or preclinical researches with promising potential for other urinary and genital illnesses, such as priapism, premature ejaculation, urinary tract calculi, overactive bladder, Peyronie′s disease, and female sexual dysfunction. Inhibition of PDE5 is expected to be an effective strategy in treating benign urological diseases. However, further clinical studies and basic researches investigating mechanisms of PDE5-Is in disorders of UGTs are required.

  6. Practical recommendations for performing ultrasound scanning in the urological and andrological fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Martino

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: US scanning has been defined as the urologist’s stethoscope. These recommendations have been drawn up with the aim of ensuring minimum standards of excellence for ultrasound imaging in urological and andrological practice. A series of essential recommendations are made, to be followed during ultrasound investigations in kidney, prostate, bladder, scrotal and penile diseases. Methods: Members of the Imaging Working Group of the Italian Society of Urology (SIU in collaboration with the Italian Society of Ultrasound in Urology, Andrology and Nephrology (SIEUN identified expert Urologists, Andrologists, Nephrologists and Radiologists. The recommendations are based on review of the literature, previously published recommendations, books and the opinions of the experts. The final document was reviewed by national experts, including members of the Italian Society of Radiology. Results: Recommendations are listed in 5 chapters, focused on: kidney, bladder, prostate and seminal vesicles, scrotum and testis, penis, including penile echo-doppler. In each chapter clear definitions are made of: indications, technological standards of the devices, the method of performance of the investigation. The findings to be reported are described and discussed, and examples of final reports for each organ are included. In the tables, the ultrasound features of the principal male uro-genital diseases are summarized. Diagnostic accuracy and second level investigations are considered. Conclusions: Ultrasound is an integral part of the diagnosis and follow-up of diseases of the urinary system and male genitals in patients of all ages, in both the hospital and outpatient setting. These recommendations are dedicated to enhancing communication and evidence-based medicine in an inter- and multi-disciplinary approach. The ability to perform and interpret ultrasound imaging correctly has become an integral part of clinical practice in uro-andrology, but intra and inter

  7. Are urological procedures in tetraplegic patients safely performed without anesthesia? a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan Subramanian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some tetraplegic patients may wish to undergo urological procedures without anaesthesia, but these patients can develop autonomic dysreflexia if cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy are performed without anaesthesia. Case presentation We describe three tetraplegic patients, who developed autonomic dysreflexia when cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out without anesthesia. In two patients, who declined anaesthesia, blood pressure increased to more than 200/110 mmHg during cystoscopy. One of these patients developed severe bleeding from bladder mucosa and lithotripsy was abandoned. Laser lithotripsy was carried out under subarachnoid block a week later in this patient, and this patient did not develop autonomic dysreflexia. The third patient with C-3 tetraplegia had undergone correction of kyphoscoliotic deformity of spine with spinal rods and pedicular screws from the level of T-2 to S-2. Pulmonary function test revealed moderate to severe restricted curve. This patient developed vesical calculus and did not wish to have general anaesthesia because of possible need for respiratory support post-operatively. Subarachnoid block was not considered in view of previous spinal fixation. When cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out under sedation, blood pressure increased from 110/50 mmHg to 160/80 mmHg. Conclusion These cases show that tetraplegic patients are likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy, performed without anaesthesia. Health professionals should educate spinal cord injury patients regarding risks of autonomic dysreflexia, when urological procedures are carried out without anaesthesia. If spinal cord injury patients are made aware of potentially life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia, they are less likely to decline anaesthesia for urological procedures. Subrachnoid block or epidural meperidine blocks nociceptive impulses from urinary bladder

  8. Factors associated with the subspecialty choices of internal medicine residents in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorpe Kevin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, there are more residents enrolled in cardiology training programs in Canada than in immunology, pharmacology, rheumatology, infectious diseases, geriatrics and endocrinology combined. There is no published data regarding the proportion of Canadian internal medicine residents applying to the various subspecialties, or the factors that residents consider important when deciding which subspecialty to pursue. To address the concern about physician imbalances in internal medicine subspecialties, we need to examine the factors that motivate residents when making career decisions. Methods In this two-phase study, Canadian internal medicine residents participating in the post graduate year 4 (PGY4 subspecialty match were invited to participate in a web-based survey and focus group discussions. The focus group discussions were based on issues identified from the survey results. Analysis of focus group transcripts grew on grounded theory. Results 110 PGY3 residents participating in the PGY4 subspecialty match from 10 participating Canadian universities participated in the web-based survey (54% response rate. 22 residents from 3 different training programs participated in 4 focus groups held across Canada. Our study found that residents are choosing careers that provide intellectual stimulation, are consistent with their personality, and that provide a challenge in diagnosis. From our focus group discussions it appears that lifestyle, role models, mentorship and the experience of the resident with the specialty appear to be equally important in career decisions. Males are more likely to choose procedure based specialties and are more concerned with the reputation of the specialty as well as the anticipated salary. In contrast, residents choosing non-procedure based specialties are more concerned with issues related to lifestyle, including work-related stress, work hours and time for leisure as well as the patient populations

  9. An Urologic Face of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia:Sequential Prostatic and Penis Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in whom a leukemic involvement of prostate and penis occurred in the advanced phase of his disease. Obstructive urinary symptoms were indicative of prostatic CLL infiltration, followed by the occurrence of an ulcerative lesion on the glans. Histologic examination confirmed  the  neoplastic B-cell infiltration. Both localizations responded to conventional treatments. A review of the literature confirms that leukemic involvement of the genito-urinary system is   uncommon in CLL patients. However, such an involvement should be considered in CLL patients with urologic symptoms and a long history of the disease.

  10. [German-Japanese scientific exchange in urology in the early 20th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, T; Umehara, H; Moll, F

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the importance of the German language and German culture and institutional development of urology in Japan in the early 20th century, starting from the development of the medical school for Japanese in Germany and their function in the process of modernization of the Meiji period (1868-1912). Examples of bi-directional German-Japanese relations in medicine, which also included an integrated knowledge transfer, are shown. The study is based mainly on Japanese and German sources about Japanese physicians in Germany as well as contemporary publications in German and international medical journals. Methodologically, the article combines quantitative analysis with individual biographical aspects. PMID:24452403

  11. One-Year Experience of Urological Laparoscopic Surgery with 99 Cases in a State Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Çelik, Hüseyin; Karazindiyanoglu, Sinan; Gokcen, Kağan; Kobaner, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To present the experiences and results of laparoscopic surgeries we conducted in a year’s time in our clinic.Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of ninety-nine patients who underwent laparoscopic urological surgery between May 2013 and May 2014.Results: There were fifty-eight males and forty-two females in our study. Three of patients were pediatric. Transperitoneal approach was used for 99 patients. Mean age of all patients was 47.2 (2-76) years. The operation type and total n...

  12. Magnetic resonance urography and laparoscopy in paediatric urology: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Costanzo, Sara; Podestà, Emilio; Ghiggeri, Gianmarco; Piaggio, Giorgio; Faranda, Fabio; Degl'Innocenti, Maria Ludovica; Jasonni, Vincenzo; Magnano, Gian Michele; Buffa, Piero; Montobbio, Giovanni; Mattioli, Girolamo

    2013-11-01

    Paediatric urology often presents challenging scenarios. Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and laparoscopy are increasingly used. We retrospectively studied children affected by a disease of the upper urinary tract who after MRU were elected for laparoscopic treatment. This pictorial essay draws on our experience; it illustrates some specific MRU findings and highlights the usefulness of MRU for the diagnosis of upper urinary tract pathology in children. It also offers some examples of the potential additional diagnostic information provided by laparoscopy as well as its therapeutic role. PMID:23900764

  13. [The German Museum for the History of Medicine: a museum tour from the perspective of urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisinger, M M

    2012-08-01

    In 1973, Germany's first museum of the history of medicine was founded in the former anatomical theatre of Ingolstadt University. Today, the baroque building with its beautiful medical garden is one of the attractions of the old city of Ingolstadt. The paper gives a round tour through the permanent exhibition, the medical technology wing and the herbal garden. The emphasis is put on those objects and plants which have a connection to the history of urology, from a "ladies urinal" to the world's first ESWL apparatus. PMID:22526173

  14. The impact of the National Treatment Purchase Fund on numbers of core urology training cases at University Hospital Galway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harney, T J

    2011-06-01

    Since the National Treatment Purchase Fund (NTPF) scheme was introduced in 2002, public patients waiting longer than three months for investigations and treatment are offered care in the private medical sector. Our aim was to assess the impact of the NTPF scheme on the number of training cases performed at University Hospital Galway (UHG). The number and type of urological procedures performed in the private medical sector under the NTFP scheme in 2008 were obtained from the UHG waiting list office. The number of these procedures performed on public patients by trainees at UHG in 2008 was determined retrospectively by reviewing theatre records. A significant number of core urology procedures were performed in the private sector via the NTPF scheme. Cancer centre designation and implementation of the EWTD will also place further pressures on urological training opportunities in Ireland.

  15. Emerging Canadian QA standards for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Canada operates a publicly funded health care system in which 70% of health care costs are paid by some level of government. Radiotherapy, indeed most cancer management, falls within the publicly funded realm of Canada's health care system. National legislation (the Canada Health Act) guarantees access to cancer services for all Canadians. However, the financial responsibility for these services is borne by the provinces. Most Canadian provinces manage the cancer management problem through central cancer agencies. In the past few decades, these provincial cancer agencies have formed the Canadian Association of Provincial Cancer Agencies (CAPCA). This association has adopted a broad mandate for cancer management in Canada (see www.capca.ca). Included in this mandate is the adoption of standards and guidelines for all aspects of cancer control. The complexity of radiation therapy has long underscored the need for cooperation at the international and national levels in defining programmes and standards. In recent decades formal quality assurance programme recommendations have emerged in the United States, Europe and Great Britain. When defining quality assurance programs, Canadian radiation treatment centres have referenced U.S. and other program standards since they have been available. Recently, under the leadership of the Canadian Association of Provincial Cancer Agencies (CAPCA), Canadian national quality assurance program recommendations are emerging. A CAPCA sponsored project to harmonize Canadian quality assurance processes has resulted in a draft document entitled 'Standards for Quality Assurance at Canadian Radiation Treatment Centres'. This document provides recommendations for the broad framework of radiation therapy quality assurance programs. In addition, detailed work is currently underway regarding equipment quality control procedures. This paper explores the historical and political landscape in which the quality assurance problem has

  16. Cancer risks among residents of Manitoba Indian reserves, 1970-79

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    A descriptive epidemiologic study of malignant neoplasms among residents of Indian reserves in Manitoba from 1970 to 1979 based on the Manitoba Cancer Registry revealed an unusual pattern. There was a greater risk for kidney cancer in both sexes and for gallbladder and invasive cervical cancer in women. The risk was reduced, however, for cancer of the lung in men and of the breast in women, cancers with a high incidence in the general Canadian population. Overall the risk for cancer was lower...

  17. The planning of a national breastfeeding educational intervention for medical residents

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine M. Pound; Moreau, Katherine A.; Hart, Francine; Ward, Natalie; Amy C. Plint

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breastfeeding is the ideal form of nutrition for newborns, yet our recent pan-Canadian study showed that the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of primary care pediatricians and family physicians are suboptimal with regard to breastfeeding.Objective: We aim to develop, implement, and evaluate a national breastfeeding educational intervention at the postgraduate residency level.Methods: Our initial development process is informed by Kern’s approach to curriculum development. To date...

  18. The Canadian National Seismograph Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. North

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian National Seismograph Network currently consists of 5 very-broadband (VBB and 15 broadband (BB stations across Canada, supplemented by 6 short period (SP stations. When it is completed by the end of 1995, a further 1 VBB, 12 BB and over 40 SP stations will have been added. Data from all sites are telemetered in real time to twin network acquisition, processing and archiving centres in Eastern and Western Canada. All data are continuously archived in SEED format on optical disk and access to the most recent three days of data is provided through a mail-based AutoDRM system. Continuous data from the VBB sites are sent to the FDSN Data Management Centre approximately one month after being recorded.

  19. Tritium technology. A Canadian overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the various tritium research and operational activities in Canada is presented. These activities encompass tritium processing and recovery, tritium interactions with materials, and tritium health and safety. Many of these on-going activities form a sound basis for the tritium use and handling aspects of the ITER project. Tritium management within the CANDU heavy water reactor, associated detritiation facilities, research and development facilities, and commercial industry and improving the understanding of tritium behaviour in humans and the environment remain the focus of a long-standing Canadian interest in tritium. While there have been changes in the application of this knowledge and experience over time, the operating experience and the supporting research and development continue to provide for improved plant and facility operations, an improved understanding of tritium safety issues, and improved products and tools that facilitate tritium management. (author)

  20. Canadian natural gas price debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunoco Inc. is a subsidiary of Suncor Energy, one of Canada's largest integrated energy companies having total assets of $2.8 billion. As one of the major energy suppliers in the country, Sunoco Inc has a substantial stake in the emerging trends in the natural gas industry, including the Canadian natural gas price debate. Traditionally, natural gas prices have been determined by the number of pipeline expansions, weather, energy supply and demand, and storage levels. In addition to all these traditional factors which still apply today, the present day natural gas industry also has to deal with deregulation, open competition and the global energy situation, all of which also have an impact on prices. How to face up to these challenges is the subject of this discourse. tabs., figs

  1. THE CANADIAN POLITICAL BUSINESS CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Libby

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss the existence of a Canadian Political Business Cycle (PBC during the period 1946-1989. Logit analysis was used to determine if changes in the unemployment rate, growth of real GNE and the rate of inflation are significantly different in the period before an election than during the rest of the electoral term. It was found that the rate of growth in the unemployment rate declines and the rate of growth of real GNP increases in the four quarters before an election. The behavior of these variables reverses in the period after an election. These findings are consistent with a political business cycle. Policy variables, under a majority government, also behave in a manner associated with a PBC, with the government stimulating the economy approximately two years into its term so that good economic news will occur before it has to call an election. Minority governments tend to simulate the economy immediately after taking office.

  2. Nuclear communications : A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Times have changed since the early days of nuclear energy when it was a symbol of a brave new world, Public information strategies have evolved to meet increasing public concerns, and have shifted from being a largely unfocused attempt at publicity to being more concerned with managing issues and solving problems. This paper describes some of the salient features of the Canadian experience in nuclear communications and examines four key aspects: opinion and attitude research; media relations; coeducation; and advertising. It also addresses the challenge of responding to the allegations and tactics of those who are actively hostile to nuclear energy, and recommends that the principles of Total Quality Management and of organizational effectiveness be applied more thorough and more consistently to the public affairs function

  3. A perspective on Canadian shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mike; Davidson, Jim; Mortensen, Paul

    2010-09-15

    In a relatively new development over just the past few years, shale formations are being targeted for natural gas production. Based on initial results, there may be significant potential for shale gas in various regions of Canada, not only in traditional areas of conventional production but also non-traditional areas. However, there is much uncertainty because most Canadian shale gas production is currently in experimental or early developmental stages. Thus, its full potential will not be known for some time. If exploitation proves to be successful, Canadian shale gas may partially offset projected long-term declines in Canadian conventional natural gas production.

  4. Dental fitness classification in the Canadian forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Richard R

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Forces Dental Services utilizes a dental classification system to identify those military members dentally fit for an overseas deployment where dental resources may be limited. Although the Canadian Forces Dental Services dental classification system is based on NATO standards, it differs slightly from the dental classification systems of other NATO country dental services. Data collected by dental teams on overseas deployments indicate a low rate of emergency dental visits by Canadian Forces members who were screened as dentally fit to deploy. PMID:18277717

  5. Canadian national internal dosimetry performance testing programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design and construction of new Performance Testing programme that was implemented in Canada in 2008. The Canadian Regulator (Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission - CNSC) had determined that their licensees, in addition to the existing In Vivo and In Vitro performance tests, needed to demonstrate their ability in interpreting bioassay results. The program is administered by the Canadian National Calibration Reference Centre for Bioassay and In Vivo Monitoring (NCRC). Currently the NCRC carries out the performance testing for the In Vitro and In Vivo. At time of writing, the first round has not been completed and the pass/fail criteria have not been determined. (author)

  6. “A Tree Must Be Bent While It Is Young”: Teaching Urological Surgical Techniques to Schoolchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Buntrock, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Background Playing video games in childhood may help achieve advanced laparoscopic skills later in life. The virtual operating room will soon become a reality, as “doctor games 2.0” will doubtlessly begin to incorporate virtual laparoscopic techniques. Objectives To teach surgical skills to schoolchildren in order to attract them to urology as a professional choice later in life. Materials and Methods As part of EAU Urology Week 2010, 108 school children aged 15–19 attended a seminar with lec...

  7. Report from the First Latin American Urological Oncology Symposium (SLAURO) 19-21 June 2014, Viña del Mar, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglevic, Christian; Pinto, Ivàn; Altamirano, Jaime; Vilches, Roberto; Martìn, Eu Marìa Eliana San; Gallardo, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most important diseases in Chile, with alarming incidence and mortality rates that are among the highest in Latin America. Economic growth in South America has led to demographic change, with an aging population typical of developed countries, but also a growing population with cancer. The incidence and mortality of urological cancers in Chile is significant, and has led to the formulation of health laws and policies promoting the early treatment of urological cancers. It is also well known that there are regions of Chile with extremely high incidence and mortality of bladder cancer caused by arsenic exposure. SLAURO (Simposio Latinoamericano de Urología Oncológica [Latin American Oncological Urology Symposium]) is a new Latin American forum for discussing and promoting knowledge of urological cancers across the region. PMID:25525468

  8. Expression of anti-Mullerian hormone receptor on the appendix testis in connection with urological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kornél Kistamás; Olga Ruzsnavszky; Andrea Telek; Lívia Kosztka; Ilona Kovács; Beatrix Dienes; László Csernoch

    2013-01-01

    The female internal sex organs develop from the paramesonephric (Mullerian) duct.In male embryos,the regression of the Mullerian duct is caused by the anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH),which plays an important role in the process of testicular descent.The physiological remnant of the Mullerian duct in males is the appendix testis (AT).In our previous study,we presented evidence for the decreased incidence of AT in cryptorchidism with intraoperative surgery.In this report,the expression of the anti-Mullerian hormone receptor type 2 (AMHR2),the specific receptor of AMH,on the AT was investigated in connection with different urological disorders,such as hernia inguinalis,torsion of AT,cysta epididymis,varicocele,hydrocele testis and various forms of undescended testis.The correlation between the age of the patients and the expression of the AMHR2 was also examined.Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the receptor's mRNA and protein levels,respectively.We demonstrate that AMHR2 is expressed in the ATs.Additionally,the presence of this receptor was proven at the mRNA and protein levels.The expression pattern of the receptor correlated with neither the examined urological disorders nor the age of the patients;therefore,the function of the AT remains obscure.

  9. Antidepressant Drugs for Chronic Urological Pelvic Pain: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Papandreou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of antidepressant drugs for the management of chronic pelvic pain has been supported in the past. This study aimed to evaluate the available evidence for the efficacy and acceptability of antidepressant drugs in the management of urological chronic pelvic pain. Studies were selected through a comprehensive literature search. We included all types of study designs due to the limited evidence. Studies were classified into levels of evidence according to their design. Ten studies were included with a total of 360 patients. Amitriptyline, sertraline, duloxetine, nortriptyline, and citalopram are the antidepressants that have been reported in the literature. Only four randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified (two for amitriptyline and two for sertraline with mixed results. We conclude that the use of antidepressants for the management of chronic urological pelvic pain is not adequately supported by methodologically sound RCTs. From the existing studies amitriptyline may be effective in interstitial cystitis but publication bias should be considered as an alternative explanation. All drugs were generally well tolerated with no serious events reported.

  10. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hes, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney tumours form a broad spectrum of distinguished histopathological and molecular genetic entities. The last WHO classification is dated to 2004. Current classification has been published in October 2013 by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology). There were 5 new epithelials tumours: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo-)papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Another 3 subtypes of RCC were added as "provisional" entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Modifications were performed in already existing entities: multicystic clear cell RCC (formerly multilocular cystic RCC) is newly included as a subcategory of clear cell RCC with low malignant potential. Oncocytic papillary RCC (PRCC) has not been recognized as a distinctive subcategory of PRCC yet. Hybrid oncocytic-chromophobe tumour was placed within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, current approach to our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid variant and angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts was clarified. Cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumour were considered as a spectrum of one entity. Synovial sarcoma was placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia. PMID:25418900

  11. Urine cytology in the evaluation of urological malignancy revisited: is it still necessary?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Falebita, Opeyemi Adegboyega

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: We aim to determine if urine cytology was still necessary as a routine part of the evaluation for the presence of urological malignancy and to evaluate its cost effectiveness. METHODS: Urine cytology reports over a 6-year period (2000-2005) were retrieved from our institution\\'s pathology department database. Patients with urine cytology positive for malignant cells were identified. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of these patients for age, sex, flexible cystoscopy and radiological imaging results. The cost of urine cytology was retrieved from the pathology department. RESULTS: There were a total of 2,568 urine cytological examinations. Of these, 25 were positive for malignant cells. There were 19 male (76%) and 6 female (24%) patients with a mean age of 72 years (range: 49-97). In 21 patients with positive cytology, a bladder tumor was identified at flexible cystoscopy and\\/or imaging studies. For a positive cytology yield of 1%, EUR 210,000 was spent. CONCLUSIONS: Routine urine cytology was not cost effective and did not add to the diagnostic yield beyond cystoscopy and diagnostic imaging. It may be omitted in the initial evaluation of urological malignancy.

  12. Does solitary- and organ-confined metastasectomy really improve survival in advanced urologic malignancies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyali, Senol; Yazici, Sertac

    2016-05-01

    The role of metastasectomy on survival in advanced/urologic malignancies still remains unclear. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common solid tumor within the kidney. 25-30 % of patients have metastases at manifestation. Urothelial carcinoma (UC) consists of bladder carcinoma, upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinoma and urethral carcinoma. Bladder cancer is the ninth most common cancer worldwide. Half of patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer have lymph node or distant metastases. In metastatic disease first-line treatment is multi-agent platinum-based systemic chemotherapy. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men between the age of 15 and 35. Testicular tumors represent excellent oncologic outcomes. Prostate cancer is the most common solid tumor in Europe. Surgical resection of metastases can be considered as a treatment choice in advanced/metastatic urologic malignancies to improve survival rates, particularly in RCC and UC. Metastasectomy can be suggested in conjunction with effective chemotherapy if complete resection is possible. Solitary metastasectomy can represent better survival rates compared to multiple metastasectomy even if multiple metastases confined to single organ. Site of metastases is one of the main determinants of successful metastasectomy such as lung metastasectomy in urothelial cell carcinoma and liver metastasectomy in RCC may lead to better oncologic outcomes. Due to the lack of the relevant data it is not possible to make an evidence-based recommendation on the role of metastasectomy for solitary-/organ-confined metastases of prostate cancer, testicular cancer and penile cancer. PMID:26843415

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of urologic disease: an all-in-one approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an ''all-in-one'' MR procedure to examine the kidneys, the renal vascular supply and renal perfusion, and the urinary tract. In 64 patients (58 with urologic disease and 6 healthy volunteers), MR was performed including: (a) T1- and T2-weighted imaging; (b) 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA), including the renal arteries, renal veins, as well as renal perfusion; and (c) 3D contrast-enhanced MR urography (MRU) in the coronal and sagittal plane. For the latter, low- and high-resolution images were compared. Prior to gadolinium injection, 0.1 mg/kg body weight of furosemide was administered intravenously. The results were compared with correlative imaging modalities (ultrasonography, intravenous urography, CT), ureterorenoscopy and/or surgical-pathologic findings. Visualization of the renal parenchyma, the vascular supply, and the collecting system was adequate in all cases, both in nondilated and in dilated systems and irrespective of the renal function. One infiltrating urothelial cancer was missed; there was one false-positive urothelial malignancy. Different MR techniques can be combined to establish an all-in-one imaging modality in the assessment of diseases which affect the kidneys and urinary tracts. Continuous refinement of the applied MR techniques and further improvements in spatial resolution is needed to expand the actual imaging possibilities and to create new tracts and challenges in the MR evaluation of urologic disease. (orig.)

  14. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Clinical Urological Practice: Preoperative Control of Bacteriuria and Management of Recurrent UTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU is a common clinical condition that often leads to unnecessary antimicrobial use. The reduction of antibiotic overuse for ABU is consequently an important issue for antimicrobial stewardship and to reduce the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. There are two issues in everyday urological practice that require special attention: the role of ABU in pre-operative prophylaxis and in women affected by recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs. Nowadays, this is the time to think over our practice and change our way of thinking. Here, we aimed to summarize the current literature knowledge in terms of ABU management in patients undergoing urological surgery and in patients with rUTIs. In the last years, the approach to patient with ABU has changed totally. Prior to all surgical procedures that do not enter the urinary tract, ABU is generally not considered as a risk factor, and screening and treatment are not considered necessary. On the other hand, in the case of all procedures entering the urinary tract, ABU should be treated in line with the results of a urine culture obtained before the procedure. In patients affected by rUTIs, ABU can even have a protective role in preventing symptomatic recurrence, particularly when Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis has been isolated.

  15. Resident Exposure to Peripheral Nerve Surgical Procedures During Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Joseph A; Daniels, Alan H; Akelman, Edward

    2016-05-01

    Background Variability in case exposures has been identified for orthopaedic surgery residents. It is not known if this variability exists for peripheral nerve procedures. Objective The objective of this study was to assess ACGME case log data for graduating orthopaedic surgery, plastic surgery, general surgery, and neurological surgery residents for peripheral nerve surgical procedures and to evaluate intraspecialty and interspecialty variability in case volume. Methods Surgical case logs from 2009 to 2014 for the 4 specialties were compared for peripheral nerve surgery experience. Peripheral nerve case volume between specialties was performed utilizing a paired t test, 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and linear regression was calculated to assess the trends. Results The average number of peripheral nerve procedures performed per graduating resident was 54.2 for orthopaedic surgery residents, 62.8 for independent plastic surgery residents, 84.6 for integrated plastic surgery residents, 22.4 for neurological surgery residents, and 0.4 for surgery residents. Intraspecialty comparison of the 10th and 90th percentile peripheral nerve case volume in 2012 revealed remarkable variability in training. There was a 3.9-fold difference within orthopaedic surgery, a 5.0-fold difference within independent plastic surgery residents, an 8.8-fold difference for residents from integrated plastic surgery programs, and a 7.0-fold difference within the neurological surgery group. Conclusions There is interspecialty and intraspecialty variability in peripheral nerve surgery volume for orthopaedic, plastic, neurological, and general surgery residents. Caseload is not the sole determinant of training quality as mentorship, didactics, case breadth, and complexity play an important role in training. PMID:27168883

  16. Shared residence: lessons from Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Newnham, Annika

    2011-01-01

    This article, which draws on Swedish experience, argues that the English courts are currently using the shared residence order in ways that are unlikely either to benefit children or produce the intended results. Shared residence is considerably more demanding than co-parenting within an intact family, and attempts to use this order to improve parental co-operation are likely to prove counter productive. Using shared residence to send symbolic messages about parental status is not only contra...

  17. Canadian Law Schools: In Search of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakman, Leon E.

    1980-01-01

    Academically, Canadian education is at the crossroads between formalism and functionalism, with the latter prevailing in recent years. There now arises a demand for a more integrated approach, linking legal theory with legal practice. (MSE)

  18. Canadian used fuel disposal concept review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A federal government environmental assessment review of the disposal concept developed under the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is currently underway. The Canadian concept is, simply stated, the placement of used fuel (or fuel waste) in long-lived containers at a depth between 500 m and 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited submitted an Environmental Impact Statement in 1994 and the public hearing aspect of the concept review is in its final phase. A unique aspect of the Canadian situation is that government has stipulated that site selection can not commence until the concept has been approved. Hence, the safety and acceptability of the concept is being reviewed in the context of a generic site. Some comments and lessons learned to date related to the review process are discussed. (author)

  19. Canadian Business Schools: Going out of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobni, Dawn; Dobni, Brooke

    1996-01-01

    Using Porter's five-forces model (potential entrants, suppliers, buyers, rivalry, substitutes) to analyze competition in Canadian university business schools, the authors conclude that schools are becoming increasingly vulnerable to competitive pressures and that strategic reorientation is necessary. (SK)

  20. Canadian media representations of mad cow disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Amanda D; Jardine, Cynthia G; Driedger, S Michelle

    2009-01-01

    A Canadian case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or "mad cow disease" was confirmed in May, 2003. An in-depth content analysis of newspaper articles was conducted to understand the portrayal of BSE and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the Canadian media. Articles in the "first 10 days" following the initial discovery of a cow with BSE in Canada on May 20, 2003, were examined based on the premise that these initial stories provide the major frames that dominate news media reporting of the same issue over time and multiple occurrences. Subsequent confirmed Canadian cases were similarly analyzed to determine if coverage changed in these later media articles. The results include a prominence of economic articles, de-emphasis of health aspects, and anchoring the Canadian outbreak to that of Britain's crisis. The variation in media representations between those in Canada and those documented in Britain are explored in this study. PMID:19697246

  1. DISTANCE EDUCATION POTENTIAL FOR A CANADIAN RURAL ISLAND COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom JONES

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential impact of distance education on a small, rural, Canadian island community. Presently, the population of small, rural island communities on the west coast of Canada are facing numerous challenges to retain and to attract permanent residents and families and to provide support and direction for those residents who wish to pursue K-12 accreditation, post-secondary education, vocational/trades training and up-grading or life-long learning. A unique set of considerations confront many of these isolated communities if they wish to engage in distance education and training. This set ranges from internet access to excessive travel by secondary students to the lack of centralized facility. For this study, a group of 48 participants were interviewed to determine their perceptions of the potential for distance education to impact on the community's educational, both academic and vocational, life-long learning and economic needs. The results indicated that there were four general areas of purported benefit: academic advancement, an improved quality of life, support for young families and a stabilizing affect on the local economy. Suggestions for the implementation of a suitable distance education resource are noted.

  2. Canadian experience with structured clinical examinations.

    OpenAIRE

    Grand'Maison, P.; Lescop, J; Brailovsky, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    The use of structured clinical examinations to improve the evaluation of medical students and graduates has become significantly more common in the past 25 years. Many Canadian medical educators have contributed to the development of this technique. The Canadian experience is reviewed from the introduction of simulated-standardized patients and objective-structured clinical examinations to more recent developments and the use of such examinations for licensure and certification.

  3. South Asian Canadian experiences of depression

    OpenAIRE

    Grewal, Amarjit

    2010-01-01

    This narrative research study explored the socio-cultural context surrounding depression through semi-structured interviews with six South Asian Canadian participants, who self identified as having experienced depression. The study sought to expand on the knowledge of depression and South Asian Canadians by considering the roles of the family, the community, and the culture in the experiences of depression. Thematic analysis of the participant interviews resulted in five major themes: the exp...

  4. Canadian National Identity and Anti-Americanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭万宏

    2015-01-01

    Canadian national identity is closely related to anti-Americanism and for Canadians,comparing with America has become the main way to identify themselves.So some scholars argue that Canada lacks a real national identity and this is the main reason of its anti-American tradition.However,the author remarks Canada has its national identity.In this paper,the author will present three reasons to support her view.

  5. Canadian National Identity and Anti-Americanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭万宏

    2015-01-01

    Canadian national identity is closely related to antiAmericanism and for Canadians,comparing with America has become the main way to identify themselves.So some scholars argue that Canada lacks a real national identity and this is the main reason of its anti-American tradition.However,the author remarks Canada has its national identity.In this paper,the author will present three reasons to support her view.

  6. How Canadians feel about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey conducted by Decima Research in April 1989 showed that 50% of Canadians were somewhat or strongly in favour of nuclear energy, the percentage varying from 37% in British Columbia to 65% in Ontario. A majority (56%) questioned the nuclear industry's ability to handle its waste safely, but 45% believed that it was working hard to solve the problem. It was evident that an advertising campaign by the Canadian Nuclear Association had an effect

  7. Shocking Aspects of Canadian Labor Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett Sutton; Tamim Bayoumi; Andrew Swiston

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the flexibility of the Canadian labor market across provinces in both an interand intra-national context using macroeconomic data on employment, unemployment, participation, and (for Canada) migration and real wages. We find that Canadian labor markets respond in a similar manner to their U.S. counterparts and are more flexible than those in major euro area countries. Within Canada, the results indicate that labor markets in Ontario and provinces further west are more flexible, par...

  8. Labour Market Progression of Canadian Immigrant Women

    OpenAIRE

    Adsera, Alicia; Ferrer, Ana

    2014-01-01

    We use the confidential files of the 1991-2006 Canadian Census, combined with information from O*NET on the skill requirements of jobs, to explore whether Canadian immigrant women behave as secondary workers, remaining marginally attached to the labour market and experiencing little career progression over time. Our results show that the labor market patterns of female immigrants to Canada do not fit the profile of secondary workers, but rather conform to patterns recently exhibited by marrie...

  9. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Ketovuori, Mikko Mr.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about a multidisciplinary R&D project in which a Canadian Learning Through The Arts (LTTA) program was imported to Finland in 2003–2004. Cultural differences in arts education in Finland and Canada are discussed. While Finland has a national school curriculum with all the arts included. Canada relies more on partnerships to ensure arts education for children in the schools. Despite the fact that Canadian learning methods appeared to be quite similar to the ones Finnish teacher...

  10. Development of High-Performance Pressure Tube Material for the Canadian SCWR Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, L.; Donohue, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Canadian super-critical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) concept is moderated by using heavy water, while the coolant is light water at 25 MPa with an inlet temperature of 625 K and an outlet temperature of 900 K. The fuel assemblies reside in vertical pressure tubes that are the pressure boundary. The pressure tubes are insulated from the fuel assemblies and operate at temperatures near the moderator temperature, at 390 K. The zirconium alloy Excel has been selected as a candidate material for the pressure tube based on favorable properties such as high strength, resistance to radiation-induced diametral strain, and high terminal solid solubility. However, significant future effort will be required to obtain material properties and crack initiation mechanisms at super-critical water (SCW) conditions to verify that annealed Excel is a viable option as a pressure tube material in the Canadian SCWR.

  11. Urological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The London Hospital radiation and patient management techniques are discussed in detail for bladder, testicular, prostate and kidney tumours and carcinoma of the penis. Substantial bibliography. (U.K.)

  12. Resident training in pathology: From resident's point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal KÖSEMEHMETOĞLU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In many recent studies in the literature have described and commented on “competency based resident training” in pathology. According to this model, competencies are subclassified in 6 main categories: Patient care, medical knowledge, practice based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, and systems based practice. Assessment of competency forms the main component of this model.Under the framework of Ankara Society of Pathology, a working group, composed of 11 residents, 6 of which representing the Training and Research Hospitals of Ministry of Health and the rest representing the university hospitals in Ankara, was established in order to participate in the think-tank about resident training in pathology. A questionnaire, composed of 12 questions, was prepared. According to this questionnaire, the number of trainers in the university hospitals is much higher than in the commercial hospitals. While the total number of cases and cases per resident do not differ between the university and commercial hospitals, microscopes used for the educational purposes are significantly less in the commercial hospitals, that is due to less number of binocular microscopes. The amount of resident training program, which consists of intra and intersectional meetings, are similar in the university and commercial hospitals, however, theoretic lectures are given only in 3 departments. Residents working in the university hospitals have obviously heavier burden than in the commercial hospitals. Lastly, residents generally exclaimed that the time dedicated to the macroscopy training is less sufficient than time used for the microscopy training.The factors affecting the training of resident in pathology are divided into two main groups: 1 Factors directly affecting training (quality of trainer, time dedicated for education, feed back, eg. and 2 Conditions which waste residents' time. For instant, workload which does need

  13. Validation of a questionnaire for self-rating of urological and gynaecological morbidity after treatment of gynaecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Tine; Klee, Marianne Carol; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    of the uro-gynaecological questionnaire (UGQ), a new instrument for patient self-assessment of urological-, genital-, menopausal-, and pain symptomatology in gynaecological cancer patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The UGQ was developed after literature review, patient- and expert interviews and pilot...

  14. The impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus guidelines on Gleason grading - a matched pair analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Thomsen, Frederik Birkebaek; Nerstrøm, Camilla;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2005 revision of the Gleason grading system has influenced the risk of biochemical recurrence (BR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), as the new guideline implies that some prostate cancers (PCa) previously...

  15. Residence Hall Seating That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Describes the seating chosen for residence halls at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of New England. The seating required depends on ergonomics, aesthetics, durability, cost, and code requirements. In addition, residence halls must have a range of seating types to accommodate various uses. (SLD)

  16. Sexual Education for Psychiatric Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Stephen B.; Scott, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors seek to promote sexuality curriculum development in departments of psychiatry. Methods: The authors first focus on educational philosophy about what residents can be taught about sexual topics and then provide numerical and narrative resident evaluation data following a 6-month, half day per week rotation in a sexuality…

  17. Canadian Attitudes toward Labour Market Issues: A Survey of Canadian Opinion. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Resources and Social Development Canada, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, Human Resources and Social Development Canada commissioned Environics Research Group Limited to conduct a public opinion survey on labour market issues among 3,000 adult Canadians. The objective of the public opinion survey was to better understand the perceptions of Canadians regarding labour market challenges and opportunities in order…

  18. Canadian photovoltaic industry directory --1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The directory is intended to help potential PV customers identify Canadian-based companies who can meet their needs, and to help product manufacturers and distributors identify potential new clients and/or partners within the PV industry for new and improved technologies leading to greater end-use customer satisfaction. The principal feature of the directory is an information matrix that identifies the product and service types offered by each firm and the primary clients served. There is also a list of companies by province and territory, followed by an alphabetical listing of all companies, with detailed information including, mailing address, contact person, prime activity, geographic area served, languages in which services are provided, and a brief company profile. Additional information provided by the companies themselves, dealing with items such as number of systems sold, the total installed capacity, etc., is included in an 'experience matrix' for each firm. Sources of additional information on photovoltaic systems are included in a list at the end of the directory

  19. The Canadian mobile satellite program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, P. M.; Breithaupt, R. W.; McNally, J. L.

    The progressions and selection of design features for the Canadian segment of a mobile satellite (MSAT) communications system are traced. The feasibility study for a satellite-based public and government mobile communications service to underserved areas was carried out between 1980-82. The results covered the market demand, commercial viability, user cost-benefit, and spacecraft concepts. A subsequent 2 yr study was initiated to proceed with project definition. A market of 1.1 million users was identified in all of Canada, with MSAT replacing other systems for 50 percent of the market. Operations would be in the 806-890 MHz range. Traffic will be routed through gateway links functioning in the 8/7 GHz SHF band while the mobile units will be connected through an 821-825 MHz up link and an 866-870 MH downlink. New technologies will be needed for a central control station, the gateway stations, and the base stations for the mobile radio service, the mobile user terminals, and data collection platforms.

  20. The Canadian nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the Canadian nuclear power program is presented. Domestically developed CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactors account for all of Canada's nuclear electric capacity (5000 MWe in operation and 10,000 MWe under construction or in commissioning) and have also been exported. CANDU reactors are reliable, efficient, and consistently register in the world's top ten in performance. The safety record is excellent. Canada has excess capability in heavy water and uranium production and can easily service export demands. The economic activity generated in the nuclear sector is high and supports a large number of jobs. The growth in nuclear commitments has slowed somewhat as a result of the worldwide recession; however, the nuclear share of expected electricity demand is likely to continue to rise in the next decade. Priorities in the future direction of the program lie in the areas of maintaining high response capability to in-service problems, improving technology, high-level waste management, and advanced fuel cycles. (author)

  1. Canadian landmine detection research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFee, John E.; Das, Yogadhish; Faust, Anthony A.

    2003-09-01

    Defence R&D Canada (DRDC), an agency within the Department of National Defence, has been conducting research and development (R&D) on the detection of landmines for countermine operations and of unexploded ordnance (UXO) for range clearance since 1975. The Canadian Centre for Mine Action Technologies (CCMAT), located at DRDC Suffield, was formed in 1998 to carry out R&D related to humanitarian demining. The lead group responsible for formulating and executing both countermine and humanitarian R&D programs in detection is the Threat Detection Group at DRDC Suffield. This paper describes R&D for both programs under the major headings of remote minefield detection, close-in scanning detection, confirmation detection and teleoperated systems. Among DRDC's achievements in landmine and UXO detection R&D are pioneering work in electromagnetic and magnetic identification and classification; the first military-fielded multisensor, teleoperated vehicle-mounted landmine detection system; pioneering use of confirmation detectors for multisensor landmine detection systems; the first fielded thermal neutron activation landmine confirmation sensor; the first detection of landmines using a real-time hyperspectral imager; electrical impedance imaging detection of landmines and UXO and a unique neutron backscatter landmine imager.

  2. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  3. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. PMID:25995656

  4. Prevention of surface encrustation of urological implants by coating with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, P; Sayyad, M; Rzany, A; Schaldach, M; Seiter, H

    2001-03-01

    The encrustation of materials used for urological implants is as yet an unresolved problem. The crystallisation-inhibiting effect of the glycosaminoglycan heparin was used to reduce encrustation. Heparin was covalently bound to the surface of slotted-tube stents of tantalum and stainless steel using a spacer molecule. To verify the inhibition of crystallisation processes, reproducible in vitro tests and in vivo tests using the rat as animal model were carried out. The in vitro and in vivo experiments showed that the heparin coating has a significant influence on the encrustation of the surface. After 7 days in vitro and 120 days in vivo, heparin coated stents were free of encrustation, whereas the uncoated reference stents were extensively covered. PMID:11214762

  5. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alotaibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors.

  6. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abusamra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to.

  7. Electrochemical investigations of Cr-Ni-Mo stainless steel used in urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przondziono, J.; Walke, W.

    2011-05-01

    The influence of chemical passivation process on physical and chemical characteristics of samples made of X2CrNiMo 17-7-2 steel with differentiated hardening, in the solution simulating the environment of human urine was analysed in the study. Wire obtained in cold drawing process is used for the production of stents and appliances in urological treatment. Proper roughness of the surface was obtained through mechanical working - grinding (Ra = 0,40 μn) and electrochemical polishing (Ra = 0,12 μn). Chemical passivation process was carried out in 40% solution of HN03 within 60 minutes in the temperature of 65°C. The tests of corrosion resistance were made on the ground of registered anodic polarisation curves and Stern method. For evaluation of phenomena occurring on the surface of tested steel, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was applied.

  8. Recent Developments in the Use of Robotic Technology in Pediatric Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, Angela M; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2016-02-01

    Robotic surgery affords refined surgical movements that exceed the natural range of motion of the human hand, combined with high definition three-dimensional visualization and superior magnification. While open surgery has long been the standard of care in the pediatric population, robot-assisted surgery (RAS) has gained increasing acceptance among pediatric urologists, bridging the gap between laparoscopy and open surgery. Pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction remains the most commonly performed robotic procedure in pediatric urology; however, utilization of RAS has expanded to include nearly all upper and lower urinary tract surgeries in the pediatric urologist's armamentarium. Ongoing innovation has led to improved methods and instrumentation, facilitating ease of patient recovery and improved quality of life outcomes. PMID:26700679

  9. Construction and evaluation of urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, Niall F

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: To design and construct a urinary bladder bioreactor for urologic tissue-engineering purposes and to compare the viability and proliferative activity of cell-seeded extracellular matrix scaffolds cultured in the bioreactor with conventional static growth conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A urinary bladder bioreactor was designed and constructed to replicate physiologic bladder dynamics. The bioreactor mimicked the filling pressures of the human bladder by way of a cyclical low-delivery pressure regulator. In addition, cell growth was evaluated by culturing human urothelial cells (UCs) on porcine extracellular matrix scaffolds in the bioreactor and in static growth conditions for 5 consecutive days. The attachment, viability, and proliferative potential were assessed and compared with quantitative viability indicators and by fluorescent markers for intracellular esterase activity and plasma membrane integrity. Scaffold integrity was characterized with scanning electron microscopy and 4\\

  10. New Amniotic Membrane Based Biocomposite for Future Application in Reconstructive Urology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Adamowicz

    Full Text Available Due to the capacity of the amniotic membrane (Am to support re-epithelisation and inhibit scar formation, Am has a potential to become a considerable asset for reconstructive urology i.e., reconstruction of ureters and urethrae. The application of Am in reconstructive urology is limited due to a poor mechanical characteristic. Am reinforcement with electrospun nanofibers offers a new strategy to improve Am mechanical resistance, without affecting its unique bioactivity profile. This study evaluated biocomposite material composed of Am and nanofibers as a graft for urinary bladder augmentation in a rat model.Sandwich-structured biocomposite material was constructed from frozen Am and covered on both sides with two-layered membranes prepared from electrospun poly-(L-lactide-co-E-caprolactone (PLCL. Wistar rats underwent hemicystectomy and bladder augmentation with the biocomposite material.Immunohistohemical analysis (hematoxylin and eosin [H&E], anti-smoothelin and Masson's trichrome staining [TRI] revealed effective regeneration of the urothelial and smooth muscle layers. Anti-smoothelin staining confirmed the presence of contractile smooth muscle within a new bladder wall. Sandwich-structured biocomposite graft material was designed to regenerate the urinary bladder wall, fulfilling the requirements for normal bladder tension, contraction, elasticity and compliance. Mechanical evaluation of regenerated bladder wall conducted based on Young's elastic modulus reflected changes in the histological remodeling of the augmented part of the bladder. The structure of the biocomposite material made it possible to deliver an intact Am to the area for regeneration. An unmodified Am surface supported regeneration of the urinary bladder wall and the PLCL membranes did not disturb the regeneration process.Am reinforcement with electrospun nanofibers offers a new strategy to improve Am mechanical resistance without affecting its unique bioactivity profile.

  11. Aesthetic, urological, orthopaedic and functional outcomes in complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias′s management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertin Dibi Kouame

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative complications are related to the surgical procedures, of failures of initial bladder closure and influence the urological, aesthetical and orthopaedic outcomes. Materials and Methods: We reviewed four patients who underwent complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias repair over a period of 14 years. The outcomes of treatment were assessed using, aesthetic, urological and orthopaedic examination data. Orthopaedic complications were explored by a radiography of the pelvis. Results: Out of four patients who underwent bladder exstrophy surgical management, aesthetic, functional outcomes and complications in the short and long follow-up were achieved in three patients. The first patient is a male and had a good penis aspect. He has a normal erection during micturition with a good jet miction. He has a moderate urinary incontinence, which requires diaper. In the erection, his penis-measures 4 cm long and 3 cm as circumference. The second patient was a female. She had an unsightly appearance of the female external genitalia with bipartite clitoris. Urinary continence could not be assessed; she did not have the age of cleanness yet. The third patient had a significant urinary leakage due to the failure of the epispadias repair. He has a limp, a pelvic obliquity, varus and internal rotation of the femoral head. He has an inequality of limbs length. Pelvis radiograph shows the right osteotomy through the ilium bone, the left osteotomy through the hip joint at the acetabular roof. Conclusion: When, the epispadias repair is performed contemporary to initial bladder closure, its success is decisive for urinary continence. In the female, surgical revision is required after the initial bladder closure for an aesthetic appearance to the external genitalia. Innominate osteotomy must be performed with brilliancy amplifier to avoid osteotomy through to the hip joint to prevent inequality in leg length.

  12. Optimization of dosimetry and safety using the holmium laser for urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Swol, Christiaan F. P.; Verdaasdonck, Rudolf M.; Zeijlemaker, Bram Y. W.; Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Boon, Tom A.

    1998-07-01

    The holmium laser has become accepted as a versatile instrument for urological applications, such as prostate resection, urethrotomy, tumor coagulation and lithotripsy. Presently, more powerful lasers have become available generating pulses up to 4 J at 80 W. The necessity of these high power systems in urology is ambiguous. In this study, the dosimetry as to efficacy and especially safety was investigated for various applications. The holmium laser ((lambda) equals 2.1 micrometer) emits its energy in 350 microsecond pulses which instantly turn water into vapor. Using high-speed photography explosive vapor bubbles with diameters over 10 mm were captured. The mechanical force of these bubbles, effectively fragments stones but may dilate and rupture a small lumen like the ureter. After implosion of the bubble, the energy of vaporization turns into heat. Depending on pulse energy and pulse repetition rate, tissue can be thermally affected up to 5 mm. For soft tissue applications, e.g., urethrotomy, prostatectomy or tumor coagulation, pulse energies of 0.5 - 1.5 J were applied at a high repetition rate (20 - 40 Hz) to provide sufficient coagulative and hemostatic effects. At higher pulse energies, the fiber tip was vibrating vigorously and the tissue was ripped to pieces decreasing hemostasis and visibility. For hard tissue applications, bursts of 0.5 J pulses at 5 Hz, proved to be sufficient to fragment all types of stones (including cystine) in the ureter and the bladder without mechanical or thermal damage to surrounding tissue. At higher settings, targeting the stone was less controlled and effective due to 'jumping' of the fiber tip with resulting mechanical and thermal trauma to the surrounding tissue. The holmium laser can be used effectively to coagulate and cut soft tissue and fragment stones at relatively low energy and power settings, thus minimizing the risk of complications.

  13. New Amniotic Membrane Based Biocomposite for Future Application in Reconstructive Urology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tworkiewicz, Jakub; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; van Breda, Shane V.; Tyloch, Dominik; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Bodnar, Magda; Skopinska-Wisniewska, Joanna; Marszałek, Andrzej; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Malgorzata; Kowalewski, Tomasz A.; Drewa, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Objective Due to the capacity of the amniotic membrane (Am) to support re-epithelisation and inhibit scar formation, Am has a potential to become a considerable asset for reconstructive urology i.e., reconstruction of ureters and urethrae. The application of Am in reconstructive urology is limited due to a poor mechanical characteristic. Am reinforcement with electrospun nanofibers offers a new strategy to improve Am mechanical resistance, without affecting its unique bioactivity profile. This study evaluated biocomposite material composed of Am and nanofibers as a graft for urinary bladder augmentation in a rat model. Material and Methods Sandwich-structured biocomposite material was constructed from frozen Am and covered on both sides with two-layered membranes prepared from electrospun poly-(L-lactide-co-E-caprolactone) (PLCL). Wistar rats underwent hemicystectomy and bladder augmentation with the biocomposite material. Results Immunohistohemical analysis (hematoxylin and eosin [H&E], anti-smoothelin and Masson’s trichrome staining [TRI]) revealed effective regeneration of the urothelial and smooth muscle layers. Anti-smoothelin staining confirmed the presence of contractile smooth muscle within a new bladder wall. Sandwich-structured biocomposite graft material was designed to regenerate the urinary bladder wall, fulfilling the requirements for normal bladder tension, contraction, elasticity and compliance. Mechanical evaluation of regenerated bladder wall conducted based on Young’s elastic modulus reflected changes in the histological remodeling of the augmented part of the bladder. The structure of the biocomposite material made it possible to deliver an intact Am to the area for regeneration. An unmodified Am surface supported regeneration of the urinary bladder wall and the PLCL membranes did not disturb the regeneration process. Conclusions Am reinforcement with electrospun nanofibers offers a new strategy to improve Am mechanical resistance without

  14. Canadian environmental sustainability indicators: highlights 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadians' health and their social and economic well-being are fundamentally linked to the quality of their environment. Recognizing this, in 2004 the Government of Canada committed to establishing national indicators of freshwater quality, air quality and greenhouse gas emissions. The goal of these new indicators is to provide Canadians with more regular and reliable information on the state of their environment and how it is linked with human activity. Canadians need clearly defined environmental indicators - measuring sticks that can track the results that have been achieved through the efforts of governments, industries and individuals to protect and improve the environment. Environment Canada, Statistics Canada and Health Canada are working together to further develop and communicate these indicators. Reflecting the joint responsibility for environmental management in Canada, this effort has benefited from the cooperation and input of the provinces and territories. The indicators are: air quality; greenhouse gas emissions; and, freshwater quality. Air quality tracks Canadians' exposure to ground-level ozone - a key component of smog. The indicator measures one of the most common, harmful air pollutants to which people are exposed. The use of the seasonal average of ozone concentrations reflects the potential for long-term health effects. Greenhouse gas emissions tracks the annual releases of the six greenhouse gases that are the major contributors to climate change. The indicator comes directly from the greenhouse gas inventory report prepared by Environment Canada for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol. The data are widely used to report on progress toward Canada's Kyoto target for reduced emissions. Freshwater quality reports the status of surface water quality at selected monitoring sites across the country. For this first report, the focus of the indicator is on the protection of aquatic life, such as

  15. VLF propagation measurements in the Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Wilfred R.; Bertrand, Jean M.

    1993-05-01

    For the past three years, during a period of high sun spot numbers, propagation measurements were made on the reception of VLF signals in the Canadian Arctic. Between Aug. and Dec. 1989, the received signal strengths were measured on the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker, John A. MacDonald in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. Between Jul. 1991 and Jun. 1992, the received signal strengths were measured at Nanisivik, Baffin Island. The purposes of this work were to check the accuracy and estimate variances of the Naval Ocean Systems Center's (NOSC) Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) predictions in the Canadian Arctic and to gather ionospheric storm data. In addition, the NOSC data taken at Fort Smith and our data at Nanisivik were used to test the newly developed Longwave Noise Prediction (LNP) program and the CCIR noise predictions, at 21.4 and 24.0 kHz. The results of the work presented and discussed in this paper show that in general the LWPC predicts accurate values of received signal strength in the Canadian Arctic with standard deviations of 1 to 2 dB over several months. Ionospheric storms can gauge the received signal strengths to decrease some 10 dB for a period of several hours or days. However, the effects of these storms are highly dependent on the propagation path. Finally the new LNP atmospheric noise model predicts lower values of noise in the Arctic than the CCIR model and our limited measurements tend to support these lower values.

  16. JUDGING SELECTION: APPOINTING CANADIAN JUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter McCormick

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s, the appointment of trial judges in Canada has generally involved an arms-length committee of professionals, although the structure of these committees and their role in the process has varied from province to province, as well as evolving over time. Yet these “new” structures and “new” processes did not prevent a major judicial appointment scandal in the province of Quebec in 2010, culminating in the formation of the Bastarache Committee to recommend changes. This paper summarizes the forty-year history of Canadian judicial appointment committees, identifies the major challenges that face those committees, and suggests the basic values toward which reforms to the appointment process might be directed. Depuis les années 1970, la nomination des juges de première instance au Canada a généralement mis à contribution un comité de professionnels indépendants, bien que la structure de ce comité et son rôle dans le processus de nomination aient varié d’une province à l’autre et évolué avec le temps. Ces « nouvelles » structures et « nouveaux » processus n’ont certes pas empêché l’éclatement du scandale sur la nomination des juges au Québec en 2010. Ce scandale a donné lieu à la formation de la Commission Bastarache qui avait notamment le mandat de recommander des changements. La présent document résume les quarante ans d’histoire des comités canadiens de nomination des juges, recense les principaux défis que ces comités doivent relever, et propose les valeurs fondamentales qui devraient inspirer les réformes du processus de nomination.

  17. Canadian Petroleum Products Inst. annual report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Petroleum Products Institute (CPPI) was created in 1989 as a nonprofit association of Canadian refiners and marketers of petroleum products. In 1991, the Atlantic Petroleum Association, the Quebec Petroleum Association, the Ontario Petroleum Association, the Canada West Petroleum Association, and the Petroleum Association for Conservation of the Canadian Environment (PACE) were integrated into the CPPI. The objective of the CPPI is to serve and represent the refining and marketing sectors of the petroleum industry with respect to environment, health and safety, and business issues. An industry overview is provided, as well as highlights of environmental achievements and challenges, and economics and operations for the year. Lists of CPPI publications, standing committees, and officers are also included. 9 figs

  18. A Roadmap for Canadian Submillimetre Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Tracy; Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda; Murray, Norm; Scott, Douglas; Wilson, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We survey the present landscape in submillimetre astronomy for Canada and describe a plan for continued engagement in observational facilities to ~2020. Building on Canada's decadal Long Range Plan process, we emphasize that continued involvement in a large, single-dish facility is crucial given Canada's substantial investment in ALMA and numerous PI-led submillimetre experiments. In particular, we recommend: i) an extension of Canadian participation in the JCMT until at least the unique JCMT Legacy Survey program is able to realize the full scientific potential provided by the world-leading SCUBA-2 instrument; and ii) involvement of the entire Canadian community in CCAT, with a large enough share in the partnership for Canadian astronomers to participate at all levels of the facility. We further recommend continued participation in ALMA development, involvement in many focused PI-led submillimetre experiments, and partnership in SPICA.

  19. Introducing Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special issue of OSCAR introduced the newly created Western Canadian Spill Services Ltd. (WCSS). The organizations known as PROSCARAC and the oil spill co-ops WCOC have been dissolved and their operations have merged into the WCSS. The history of PROSCARAC and the WCOC, the process leading to their merger, and the new organization's plans to increase the petroleum industry's spill response capabilities were described. WCSS is run by a board of directors representing the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, the Small Explorers and Producers Association of Canada, the Canadian Petroleum Products Association, Trans Mountain Pipe Line Company Ltd., and Interprovincial Pipe Line Inc. Organizations with similar objectives in Manitoba and Saskatchewan have been invited to join

  20. Peacock: 100 years of servicing Canadian industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1997 Peacock Inc., a supplier of pipeline, filtration, pumping, materials handling and mechanical equipment of all kinds to the Canadian oil and natural gas industries, will celebrate its 100th year of servicing Canadian industry, and 50th year in the oil patch. The company has outlets in several Canadian cities from Halifax to Vancouver. It manufactures, distributes, maintains and repairs all types of industrial equipment. It also manages the Naval Engineering Test Establishment at LaSalle, PQ, for the Department of Defence. Peacock service centres provide 24-hour service response to emergency breakdowns anywhere in Canada; its engineers and technicians are ISO 9003 qualified or better, and are experts in turnarounds and planned maintenance outages, major overhauls of critical equipment, supplying mechanical crews for emergency equipment breakdowns, and grouting of heavy machinery. By close coordination of its four divisions, and by maintaining their dedication to service, the company looks to the future with pride and confidence

  1. Residence time vs influence time

    OpenAIRE

    E. J. M. Delhez; de Brye, B.; de Brauwere, A.; Deleersnijder, E.

    2014-01-01

    The concepts of age, residence time, exposure time and influence time provide space and time dependent quantitative measures of the rate at which water masses and pollutants enter and/or leave a control domain. To help avoid confusion between these concepts, this paper provides clear definitions of the residence time and the influence time. The similarities and differences between them are illustrated using both a simplified 1D advection-diffusion model and a realistic two-dimensional model o...

  2. Resilience Approach for Medical Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Bezemer, R.A.; Bos, E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Medical residents are in a vulnerable position. While still in training, they are responsible for patient care. They have a dependent relation with their supervisor and low decision latitude. An intervention was developed to increase individual and system resilience, addressing burnout, patient safety, and intention to leave. A participative development protocol was followed in close collaboration with residents and doctors in a middle-sized general hospital. The evaluation combined a quantit...

  3. The Canadian oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is provided of the global oil and gas market, industry, reserves, and factors affecting the market's instability. The Canadian oil and gas sector is then profiled. Research and technology strategies in the global oil and gas sector are reviewed in the areas of increasing supplies, improving energy efficiency, developing alternative energy sources, mitigating environmental impacts, and developing new products and services. Finally, research, development, and technology strategies in the Canadian oil and gas sector are evaluated, including private sector research and development (R ampersand D) government support programs, and technology opportunities for the industry in refining, in-situ oil sands production, ultrasour gas production, and downstream gas processing. Total R ampersand D spending by the Canadian oil and gas industry is only ca $300 million/y, with most small to medium-size companies doing little R ampersand D. Since 64% of the Canadian petroleum sector is foreign owned, decisions to increase R ampersand D investment must involve foreign decision makers. The focus of Canadian R ampersand D tends to be upstream-oriented and on the exploitation of unconventional resources, notably the oil sands. Opportunities also exist in downstream R ampersand D such as alternative fuels and energy systems management. Since upstream R ampersand D is a risky long-term proposition, the roles of resource companies, refiners, research institutions, and Canadian and overseas governments must be defined to ensure that research efforts are coordinated and costs are shared equitably. This will likely require a concerted action plan specifying technology goals, memoranda of understanding between all the players, and reasonable accountability levels. 19 refs., 10 tabs

  4. Minimum Data Set Active Resident Information Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS Active Resident Report summarizes information for residents currently in nursing homes. The source of these counts is the residents MDS assessment record....

  5. Statistics in action a Canadian outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Jerald F

    2014-01-01

    Commissioned by the Statistical Society of Canada (SSC), Statistics in Action: A Canadian Outlook helps both general readers and users of statistics better appreciate the scope and importance of statistics. It presents the ways in which statistics is used while highlighting key contributions that Canadian statisticians are making to science, technology, business, government, and other areas. The book emphasizes the role and impact of computing in statistical modeling and analysis, including the issues involved with the huge amounts of data being generated by automated processes.The first two c

  6. Management of hereditary angioedema: 2010 Canadian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract C1-inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency is a rare blood disorder resulting in angioedema attacks that are debilitating and may be life-threatening. Prophylaxis and therapy of events has changed since our first Canadian Consensus Conference on the diagnosis, therapy and management of HAE. We have formed the Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'Angioédème Héréditaire (RCAH - http://www.haecanada.com to advance care of patients with this disorder in Canada. We here present a review of management of HAE in Canada.

  7. Open Access Funds: A Canadian Library Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Fernandez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey of Canadian research libraries was conducted to determine the extent of funding support for open access publications in these institutions. Results indicate that there is substantial support for open access publishing, and a diversity of approaches is being used to fund open access resources. The reasons for funding support along with policy and promotional issues are explored. The broader implications of funding open access are discussed in the context of a changing scholarly publishing landscape. This paper will be especially relevant to Canadian academic libraries that are exploring options for funding open access publications.

  8. A Demographic and Career Profile of Canadian Research University Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date career and demographic profile of Canadian research university librarians by comparing newly derived data from the 8Rs Study: The "Future of Human Resources in Canadian Libraries", with corresponding information from the author's 2006 survey: "The Scholarship of Canadian Research University Librarians", and other…

  9. The flow of radionuclides through the Canadian archipelago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport of contaminants to the Canadian Arctic by air and in water and their concentration through the marine food web has lead to enhanced levels of contaminants in several foods of Canadian northern inhabitants. Artificial radionuclides in the marine water can be used to determine water circulation and to trace contaminant transport through the Canadian Archipelago

  10. Transnational Education -- An Opportunity and a Canadian Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Transnational education is a huge growth industry and a potential source of considerable income for Canadian educational institutions. Canadian educational establishments seem to be missing out on this, and this seems short sighted. Canada has a very good reputation globally; this could be utilized when selling Canadian educational institutions in…

  11. Women in the Canadian Economy: A Teaching Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Sylvia; Staunton, Ted, Ed.

    One of a series of teaching units designed to introduce secondary school students to the Canadian economy, this handbook contains activities on the economic status and roles of Canadian women. The first of 4 sections presents a profile of male and female occupations. Section 2 contains statistics on females in the Canadian labor force. Section 3,…

  12. Social and economic context and attitudes toward immigrants in Canadian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schissel, B; Wanner, R; Frideres, J S

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a study of the effects of a number of socioeconomic features of Canadian cities, particularly their unemployment rates, on the attitudes toward immigrants of their native-born residents. Using data from a national study of ethnicity and multiculturalism, the authors estimate several regression models predicting 3 separate dimensions of attitude toward immigrants and including as independent variables both individual characteristics and structural characteristics of city of residence. They found no evidence of a sizeable effect of local unemployment rate on attitude toward immigrants. Of the other contextual variables included in the models, the only 2 consistently influencing these attitudes included in the models, educational attainment and income, along with mother tongue, exhibit the strongest and most consistent effects on the attitude dimensions. PMID:12315958

  13. Canadian municipal carbon trading primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trading of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is being suggested as an effective economic way to meet Canada's Kyoto target. Emissions trading is a market-based instrument that can help achieve environmental improvements while using the market to absorb the economical and effective measures to achieve emissions reductions. Placing a value on emissions means that in order to minimize costs, companies will be motivated to apply the lowest-cost emission reductions possible for regulatory approval. The two main types of emissions trading that exist in Canada are the trading of emissions that lead to the formation of smog or acid rain, and the trading of greenhouse gas emissions that lead to climate change. Since carbon dioxide is the most prevalent GHG, making up approximately 75 per cent of Canadian GHG emissions, the trading of units of GHGs is often referred to as carbon trading. The impact that emissions trading will have on municipal operations was the focus of this primer. The trading of GHG involves buying and selling of allowances of GHGs between contracting parties, usually between one party that is short of GHG credits and another that has excess credits. The 3 common approaches to emissions trading include allowance trading (cap and trade), credit trading (baseline and credit), and a hybrid system which combines both credit and allowance trading systems. The issues that impact municipalities include the debate regarding who owns the credits from landfills, particularly if power is generated using landfill gas and the power is sold as green power. Other viable questions were also addressed, including who can claim emission reduction credits if a city implements energy efficiency projects, or fuel substitution programs. Also, will municipalities be allowed to trade internationally, for example, with municipalities in the United States, and how should they spend their money earned from selling credits. This report also presents highlights from 3 emissions

  14. A randomized controlled study comparing intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture and isobaric bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture in common urological procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudan Upadya; Neeta, S.; Jesni Joseph Manissery; Nigel Kuriakose; Rakesh Raushan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Bupivacaine is available in isobaric and hyperbaric forms for intrathecal use and opioids are used as additives to modify their effects. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and haemodynamic effect of intrathecal isobaric bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture and hyperbaric bupivacaine-fentanyl mixture in common urological procedures. Methods: One hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 and 2 patients undergoing urological procedures were rando...

  15. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweiki E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehyal Shweiki,1 Niels D Martin,2 Alec C Beekley,1 Jay S Jenoff,1 George J Koenig,1 Kris R Kaulback,1 Gary A Lindenbaum,1 Pankaj H Patel,1 Matthew M Rosen,1 Michael S Weinstein,1 Muhammad H Zubair,2 Murray J Cohen1 1Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. Keywords: learning, education, achievement

  16. Medical image computing and computer-aided medical interventions applied to soft tissues. Work in progress in urology

    CERN Document Server

    Troccaz, Jocelyne; Berkelman, Peter; Cinquin, Philippe; Daanen, Vincent; Leroy, Antoine; Marchal, Maud; Payan, Yohan; Promayon, Emmanuel; Voros, Sandrine; Bart, Stéphane; Bolla, Michel; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Dusserre, Andrée; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Long, Jean-Alexandre; Moalic, Ronan; Mozer, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Until recently, Computer-Aided Medical Interventions (CAMI) and Medical Robotics have focused on rigid and non deformable anatomical structures. Nowadays, special attention is paid to soft tissues, raising complex issues due to their mobility and deformation. Mini-invasive digestive surgery was probably one of the first fields where soft tissues were handled through the development of simulators, tracking of anatomical structures and specific assistance robots. However, other clinical domains, for instance urology, are concerned. Indeed, laparoscopic surgery, new tumour destruction techniques (e.g. HIFU, radiofrequency, or cryoablation), increasingly early detection of cancer, and use of interventional and diagnostic imaging modalities, recently opened new challenges to the urologist and scientists involved in CAMI. This resulted in the last five years in a very significant increase of research and developments of computer-aided urology systems. In this paper, we propose a description of the main problems rel...

  17. Central Nervous System-Peripheral Immune System Dialogue in Neurological Disorders: Possible Application of Neuroimmunology in Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Min-Jung; Kwon, Min-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Previous concepts of immune-privileged sites obscured the role of peripheral immune cells in neurological disorders and excluded the consideration of the potential benefits of immunotherapy. Recently, however, numerous studies have demonstrated that the blood-brain barrier in the central nervous system is an educational barrier rather than an absolute barrier to peripheral immune cells. Emerging knowledge of immune-privileged sites suggests that peripheral immune cells can infiltrate these sites via educative gates and that crosstalk can occur between infiltrating immune cells and the central nervous system parenchyma. This concept can be expanded to the testis, which has long been considered an immune-privileged site, and to neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Thus, we propose that the relationship between peripheral immune cells, the brain, and the urologic system should be considered as an additional possible mechanism in urologic diseases, and that immunotherapy might be an alternative therapeutic strategy in treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:27230462

  18. Human security and Canadian foreign policy: the new face of Canadian internationalism

    OpenAIRE

    DeJong, Melissa Joy

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1990s, human security was promoted as a new idea to guide the formation of Canadian foreign policy in the post-Cold War era. However, a review of the ideas which have influenced foreign policymaking in Canada since the end of the Second World War demonstrates that human security is rooted in internationalism, the dominant Canadian foreign policy tendency. Internationalism prescribes that cooperation, multilateralism, responsibility, international law and a consideration of the v...

  19. Bidi and Hookah Use Among Canadian Youth: Findings From the 2010 Canadian Youth Smoking Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Czoli, Christine D; Leatherdale, Scott T; Rynard, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although cigarette use among Canadian youth has decreased significantly in recent years, alternative forms of tobacco use are becoming increasingly popular. Surveillance of youth tobacco use can help inform prevention programs by monitoring trends in risk behaviors. We examined the prevalence of bidi and hookah use and factors associated with their use among Canadian youth by using data from the 2010–2011 Youth Smoking Survey (YSS). Methods We analyzed YSS data from 28,416 studen...

  20. Consultation on urological specimens from referred cancer patients using real-time digital microscopy: Optimizing the workflow

    OpenAIRE

    Henrik Holten-Rossing; Lise Grupe Larsen; Birgitte Grønkær Toft; Anand Loya; Ben Vainer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Centralization of cancer treatment entails a reassessment of the diagnostic tissue specimens. Packaging and shipment of glass slides from the local to the central pathology unit means that the standard procedure is time-consuming and that it is difficult to comply with governmental requirements. The aim was to evaluate whether real-time digital microscopy for urological cancer specimens during the primary diagnostic process can replace subsequent physical slide referral and reas...

  1. Complications rates of non-oncologic urologic procedures in population-based data: a comparison to published series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Aaronson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PUSPOSE: Published single institutional case series are often performed by one or more surgeons with considerable expertise in specific procedures. The reported incidence of complications in these series may not accurately reflect community-based practice. We sought to compare complication and mortality rates following urologic procedures derived from population-based data to those of published single-institutional case series. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In-hospital mortality and complications of common urologic procedures (percutaneous nephrostomy, ureteropelvic junction obstruction repair, ureteroneocystostomy, urethral repair, artificial urethral sphincter implantation, urethral suspension, transurethral resection of the prostate, and penile prosthesis implantation reported in the U.S.’s National Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project were identified. Rates were then compared to those of published single-institution series using statistical analysis. RESULTS: For 7 of the 8 procedures examined, there was no significant difference in rates of complication or mortality between published studies and our population-based data. However, for percutaneous nephrostomy, two published single-center series had significantly lower mortality rates (p < 0.001. The overall rate of complications in the population-based data was higher than published single or select multi-institutional data for percutaneous nephrostomy performed for urinary obstruction (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: If one assumes that administrative data does not suffer from under reporting of complications then for some common urological procedures, complication rates between population-based data and published case series seem comparable. Endorsement of mandatory collection of clinical outcomes is likely the best way to appropriately counsel patients about the risks of these common urologic procedures.

  2. Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Surgery for Benign Urologic Disease with a Homemade Single Port Device: Design and Tips for Beginners

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joo Yong; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Chung, Jae Hoon; Jo, Jung Ki; Lee, Seung Wook

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A single surgeon skilled in conventional laparoscopic surgery used laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) to treat benign urological diseases. This study reports our surgical results and introduces a simple technique with tips based on our experience. Materials and Methods LESS surgery was performed on 116 patients by use of a homemade single-port device composed of an Alexis wound retractor and a powder-free surgical glove. Cases were 44 varicocelectomies (including 8 bilateral ...

  3. Initial Experience with Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Surgery by Use of a Homemade Transumbilical Port in Urology

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seok Young; Kim, Yong Tae; Park, Hae Young; Lee, Tchun Yong; Park, Sung Yul; Rha, Koon Ho

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We present our initial experience with laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) by a single surgeon in the urologic field. Materials and Methods From May 2009 to April 2010, 30 consecutive patients underwent LESS including seven cases of nephrectomy, five cases of nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision, four cases of ureterolithotomy, eight cases of marsupialization, and six cases of varicocelectomy. We performed a retrospective analysis of the medical records of the above p...

  4. Forecasting Canadian nuclear power station construction costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the huge volume of capital required to construct a modern electric power generating station, investment decisions have to be made with as complete an understanding of the consequences of the decision as possible. This understanding must be provided by the evaluation of future situations. A key consideration in an evaluation is the financial component. This paper attempts to use an econometric method to forecast the construction costs escalation of a standard Canadian nuclear generating station (NGS). A brief review of the history of Canadian nuclear electric power is provided. The major components of the construction costs of a Canadian NGS are studied and summarized. A database is built and indexes are prepared. Based on these indexes, an econometric forecasting model is constructed using an apparently new econometric methodology of forecasting modelling. Forecasts for a period of 40 years are generated and applications (such as alternative scenario forecasts and range forecasts) to uncertainty assessment and/or decision-making are demonstrated. The indexes, the model, and the forecasts and their applications, to the best of the author's knowledge, are the first for Canadian NGS constructions. (author)

  5. The Canadian nuclear scene - a 1983 perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the previous year's performance and future prospects for the Canadian nuclear industry. Continued economic difficulties have meant continued streamlining of the industry. Basic strength is still the year-after-year record performance of the Ontario Hydro CANDU units. Given this performance, flexibility in the structure of the industry, and strong government support commercial success can be achieved eventually

  6. Asian and Pacific Migration: The Canadian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, T. John

    1994-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of landed immigrants (permanent settlers) from Asia, and explores their settlement, adaptation, and integration experience in Canada. It suggests that access to Canadian land does not always translate into equal opportunity in the economy and society, but notes that Canada may be more successful at assimilating Asian…

  7. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five trends that…

  8. Canadian export potential for EMF 9 study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Energy Board staff study of Canadian export potential for EMF-9 considers conventionally producible gas from western Canada, northern Canada and eastern offshore regions. The supply is limited only by the size and physical characteristics of the resource base, economic factors, and the ability of the industry to drill and equip the required number of wells. A potential for additional supply from the very low permeability reservoirs of west-central Alberta and the adjacent sector of northeastern British Columbia is recognized, but because there has been very little experience in producing this gas we do not feel we have enough information to estimate with confidence either the size of the resource base or future levels of production. To the extent that supply from this source does prove to be available, our projections will be understated. Canadian Hunter Exploration, Ltd., in its submission to the EMF-9 study estimates that under the price assumptions of the study production in excess of 1 Tcf/year could be achieved by about the year 2000 from the better quality low permeability sands, those having in situ permeabilities between 0.006 and 0.05 millidarcies. The Canadian Energy Research Institute in a report made public recently includes about 300 Bcf/year of tight sand production by 2005 in its projection of Canadian supply

  9. Computer Language Settings and Canadian Spellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The language settings used on personal computers interact with the spell-checker in Microsoft Word, which directly affects the flagging of spellings that are deemed incorrect. This study examined the language settings of personal computers owned by a group of Canadian university students. Of 21 computers examined, only eight had their Windows…

  10. Heat exposure in the Canadian workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2010-08-01

    Exposure to excessive heat is a physical hazard that threatens Canadian workers. As patterns of global climate change suggest an increased frequency of heat waves, the potential impact of these extreme climate events on the health and well-being of the Canadian workforce is a new and growing challenge. Increasingly, industries rely on available technology and information to ensure the safety of their workers. Current Canadian labor codes in all provinces employ the guidelines recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) that are Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) based upon Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT). The TLVs are set so that core body temperature of the workers supposedly does not exceed 38.0 degrees C. Legislation in most Canadian provinces also requires employers to install engineering and administrative controls to reduce the heat stress risk of their working environment should it exceed the levels permissible under the WBGT system. There are however severe limitations using the WGBT system because it only directly evaluates the environmental parameters and merely incorporates personal factors such as clothing insulation and metabolic heat production through simple correction factors for broadly generalized groups. An improved awareness of the strengths and limitations of TLVs and the WGBT index can minimize preventable measurement errors and improve their utilization in workplaces. Work is on-going, particularly in the European Union to develop an improved individualized heat stress risk assessment tool. More work is required to improve the predictive capacity of these indices. PMID:20623643

  11. An Overview of Canadian Education. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayfer, Margaret

    An overview of Canadian education is provided in this book. Chapter 1 presents basic facts and figures on the educational system's general structure and diversity and the role of the federal government. The second chapter describes provincial/territorial structure, specifically: the role of the departments of education and school board, financing,…

  12. Family Business Training: A Canadian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A. B.; Soufani, K.; Lam, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Family firms play an important role in the working of the Canadian economy; despite their importance to the economic activities and job creation it is observed that family businesses have lower survival rates than non-family firms, some argue that this can possibly be attributed (amongst other factors) to the lack of training. Most of the training…

  13. After Access: Canadian Education and Copyright Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Michael

    2006-01-01

    With the dramatic growth of the Internet in the 1990s, the Canadian government developed a well-regarded strategy for addressing the emerging issues posed by the "information highway." The strategy featured legal reforms to address privacy and e-commerce, administrative reforms for the government online initiative, and connectivity programs such…

  14. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  15. Indigenous populations health protection: A Canadian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Katya L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disproportionate effects of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on many Canadian Aboriginal communities have drawn attention to the vulnerability of these communities in terms of health outcomes in the face of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Exploring the particular challenges facing these communities is essential to improving public health planning. In alignment with the objectives of the Pandemic Influenza Outbreak Research Modelling (Pan-InfORM team, a Canadian public health workshop was held at the Centre for Disease Modelling (CDM to: (i evaluate post-pandemic research findings; (ii identify existing gaps in knowledge that have yet to be addressed through ongoing research and collaborative activities; and (iii build upon existing partnerships within the research community to forge new collaborative links with Aboriginal health organizations. The workshop achieved its objectives in identifying main research findings and emerging information post pandemic, and highlighting key challenges that pose significant impediments to the health protection and promotion of Canadian Aboriginal populations. The health challenges faced by Canadian indigenous populations are unique and complex, and can only be addressed through active engagement with affected communities. The academic research community will need to develop a new interdisciplinary framework, building upon concepts from ‘Communities of Practice’, to ensure that the research priorities are identified and targeted, and the outcomes are translated into the context of community health to improve policy and practice.

  16. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketovuori, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    This article is about a multidisciplinary R&D project in which a Canadian Learning Through The Arts (LTTA) program was imported to Finland in 2003-2004. Cultural differences in arts education in Finland and Canada are discussed. While Finland has a national school curriculum with all the arts included. Canada relies more on partnerships to ensure…

  17. Heroes and Canadian History. Current Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Penney

    1999-01-01

    Believes that social studies teachers should encourage young people to learn about Canadian heroes but simultaneously assist them in developing skepticism as opposed to only idealizing heroes. Explains that when students understand the qualities of heroes they will be able to cope when someone they hold as a hero falters. (CMK)

  18. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Eble, John N; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tickoo, Satish K; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram

    2013-10-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group performed an exhaustive literature review, assessed the results of the preconference survey and participated in the consensus conference discussion and polling activities. On the basis of the above inputs, there was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as new distinct epithelial tumors within the classification system: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, there are 3 rare carcinomas that were considered as emerging or provisional new entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Further reports of these entities are required to better understand the nature and behavior of these highly unusual tumors. There were a number of new concepts and suggested modifications to the existing World Health Organization 2004 categories. Within the clear cell RCC group, it was agreed upon that multicystic clear cell RCC is best considered as a neoplasm of low malignant potential. There was agreement that subtyping of papillary RCC is of value and that the oncocytic variant of papillary RCC should not be considered as a distinct entity. The hybrid oncocytic chromophobe tumor, which is an indolent tumor that occurs in 3 settings, namely Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome, renal oncocytosis, and as a sporadic neoplasm, was placed, for the time being, within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC

  19. Slow Gait Speed and Rapid Renal Function Decline Are Risk Factors for Postoperative Delirium after Urological Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tendo; Okamoto, Teppei; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hosogoe, Shogo; Tobisawa, Yuki; Yoneyama, Tohru; Hashiba, Eiji; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Hirota, Kazuyoshi; Ohyama, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with postoperative delirium in patients undergoing urological surgery. Methods We prospectively evaluated pre- and postoperative risk factors for postoperative delirium in consecutive 215 patients who received urological surgery between August 2013 and November 2014. Preoperative factors included patient demographics, comorbidities, and frailty assessment. Frailty was measured by handgrip strength, fatigue scale of depression, fall risk assessment, and gait speed (the timed Get-up and Go test). Postoperative factors included types of anesthesia, surgical procedure, renal function and serum albumin decline, blood loss, surgery time, highest body temperature, and complications. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess pre- and postoperative predictors for the development of postoperative delirium. Results Median age of this cohort was 67 years. Ten patients (4.7%) experienced postoperative delirium. These patients were significantly older, had weak handgrip strength, a higher fall risk assessment score, slow gait speed, and greater renal function decline compared with patients without delirium. Multivariate analysis revealed slow gait speed (>13.0 s) and rapid renal function decline (>30%) were independent risk factors for postoperative delirium. Conclusions Slow gait speed and rapid renal function decline after urological surgery are significant factors for postoperative delirium. These data will be helpful for perioperative patient management. This study was registered as a clinical trial: UMIN: R000018809. PMID:27145178

  20. Financial outlook for the Canadian gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The financial outlook for the Canadian natural gas industry is discussed in terms of the price of Canadian gas and its production and transportation costs. Demand growth for natural gas is fairly steady, reflecting economic growth and technological advances. Supply growth is more volatile, overshooting demand growth in an up market and undershooting in a down market. In the past year and a half, gas prices have improved as the supply deliverability surplus has eroded. It is predicted that supply will again exceed demand and prices will decline, the length of this price cycle being a few years. Production costs for western Canadian gas had been declining during the mid-1980s to 1991, and current replacement costs average ca $1.87/GJ. It is doubtful that fieldgate costs will increase to overtake fieldgate market prices and the Canadian gas industry will remain in a healthy state. The availability and cost of gas transport, however, is critically important. The major costs of pipeline transport are fixed demand charges and the value of transport services out of western Canada is determined by the demand and the supply (the location and size of the pipeline infrastructure, which is essentially fixed over short to medium time frames). This value can vary significantly as the demand for pipeline space varies both daily and seasonally. Excess pipeline capacity is generally good for the Canadian producing industry since it lowers transport costs, but excess capacity also plays a role in linking producing-basin and market area prices to one another. This is illustrated for the case of Alberta and Texas gas prices, which show higher correlation with falling load factors on ex-Alberta pipeline capacity. 5 figs

  1. Predictors of Success in an Anesthesiology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Shirley S.; Crumrine, Robert S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that contributed to successful residency performance by anesthesiology residents were examined in order to assist the program's selection committee in developing selection criteria. The best predictor of a resident's academic average in the anethesiology program was the number of years the resident had spent in other specialities.…

  2. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    OpenAIRE

    Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J.; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K.; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident.Methods: Online surveys were given to all 29 intern...

  3. Robotic prostatectomy: the anesthetist's view for robotic urological surgeries, a prospective study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menekse Oksar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Although many features of robotic prostatectomy are similar to those of conventional laparoscopic urological procedures (such as laparoscopic prostatectomy, the procedure is associated with some drawbacks, which include limited intravenous access, relatively long operating time, deep Trendelenburg position, and high intra-abdominal pressure. The primary aim was to describe respiratory and hemodynamic challenges and the complications related to high intra-abdominal pressure and the deep Trendelenburg position in robotic prostatectomy patients. The secondary aim was to reveal safe discharge criteria from the operating room. Methods: Fifty-three patients who underwent robotic prostatectomy between December 2009 and January 2011 were prospectively enrolled. Main outcome measures were non-invasive monitoring, invasive monitoring and blood gas analysis performed at supine (T0, Trendelenburg (T1, Trendelenburg + pneumoperitoneum (T2, Trendelenburg-before desufflation (T3, Trendelenburg (after desufflation (T4, and supine (T5 positions. Results: Fifty-three robotic prostatectomy patients were included in the study. The main clinical challenge in our study group was the choice of ventilation strategy to manage respiratory acidosis, which is detected through end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure and blood gas analysis. Furthermore, the mean arterial pressure remained unchanged, the heart rate decreased significantly and required intervention. The central venous pressure values were also above the normal limits. Conclusion: Respiratory acidosis and "upper airway obstruction-like" clinical symptoms were the main challenges associated with robotic prostatectomy procedures during this study.

  4. Correlation of Hydronephrosis Index to Society of Fetal Urology Hydronephrosis Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Venkatesan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We seek to correlate conventional hydronephrosis (HN grade and hydronephrosis index (HI. Methods. We examined 1207 hydronephrotic kidneys by ultrasound. HN was classified by Society of Fetal Urology guidelines. HN was then gauged using HI, a reproducible, standardized, and dimensionless measurement of renal area. We then calculated average HI for each HN grade. Results. Comparing HI to standard SFU HN grade, average HI is 89.3 for grade I; average HI is 83.9 for grade II; average HI is 73.0 for grade III; average HI is 54.6 for SFU grade IV. Conclusions. HI correlates well with SFU HN grade. The HI serves as a quantitative measure of HN. HI can be used to track HN over time. Versus conventional grading, HI may be more sensitive in defining severe (grades III and IV HN, and in indicating resolving, stable, or worsening HN, thus providing more information for clinical decision-making and HN management.

  5. Surface modification and corrosion resistance of Ni-Ti alloy used for urological stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kajzer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The work presents the influence of the surface treatment of Ni-Ti alloy, intended for implants applied inurogenital surgery, on their corrosion resistance. The tests were carried out in the simulated urine at the temperature37±1ºC and pH = 5.6÷6.4. In particular, the pitting and crevice corrosion resistance tests were carried out.Design/methodology/approach: The corrosion tests were realized by recording of anodic polarization curveswith the use of the potentiodynamic method. The VoltaLab® PGP 201 system for electrochemical tests wasapplied. The tests were carried out in electrolyte simulating urine (pH = 5.6 ÷ 6.4 at the temperature of 37±1ºC.Findings: Surface condition of metallic biomaterial determines its corrosion resistance.Research limitations/implications: The obtained results are the basis for the optimization of physicochemicalproperties of the Ni-Ti alloy.Practical implications: On the basis of the obtained results it can be stated that Ni-Ti alloy can be applied in urology.Originality/value: The paper presents the influence of the surface treatment on corrosion resistance of Ni-Ti alloy.

  6. Re: 3D Printing: A Revolutionary Advance for the Field of Urology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Neu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 3D bioprinting based on thermal inkjet has great potential to develop promising approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for organ replacement. With layer by layer assembly, 3D tissues with complex structures can be printed using scanned CT or MRI images. The traditional tissueengineering approach of seeding the isolated cells to the pre-formed solid and rigid scaffolds was introduced in 1993 by Langer and Vacanti. With the thermal inkjet printers, the viability of printed mammalian cells at the different cell concentrations were varying from 85-95%. Bioprinting is flexible in that it can accommodate abroad variety of materials including organ-specific cells, blood vessels, smooth muscle and endothelial cells. With the 3D bioprinters, vascular or nevre systems can be enabled simultaneously during the organ construction with digital control. The research field of tissueengineering has seen explosive growth over the past five years where testing is stil primarily limited to animal specimens. In the literature, A. Atala and et al. demostared the power of 3D printing in thefield of urology. Especially, at the endstage of renal disease and bladder dysfunctions, tissue enginnering will be hopeful for the part of alternative treatment modality in nearfuture.

  7. Comparison of conventional and nuclear-medical examination methods in the field of nephro-urology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main part of this study is a further simplification of the 131I-hippuran total body clearance, a method which was first described by Oberhausen (1968). As a result of the study the clearance can now be calculated with only one scintillation detector after i.v. injection of 131I-hippuran. Essential for this simplification is the exact localisation of the detector at the right or left shoulder region of the patient. The unilateral clearance is calculated from the total body clearance in conjunction with the simultaneously registered isotope renogram. This method was routinely applied to 4,138 patients during November 15th 1971 and March 31st 1975. In special groups of patients sequential renal studies with the gamma-camera, renal rectilinear scans, xenon-133-washout curves from the kidneys and radioimmuno-assays of angiotensin were performed for comparison. All data were analysed in view of other clinical and radiological data. Recommendations for rational procedures in diagnosis and control of therapy of the most common nephro-urological disorders were derived from a joint study of 16 hospitals analysing 1,979 cases. (orig.)

  8. [Scientific activity of the University Urological Department in Budapest after WWII (1946-1956)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romics, I; Romics, M

    2016-04-01

    The authors studied the publications written by the staff of the University Department of Urology in Budapest, Hungary between 1946 and 1956. The collection was contributed on the occasion of Professor Babics's 10-year-long chairmanship. Over a period of 10 years, 214 papers were published by 15 urologists, including 3 books and 3 PhD theses; 16 papers were published in German, 22 in English, 2 in French, and 1 in Italian. The most frequent topic of the papers (26) was basic science (e.g., ureter motility, lymph circulation, intrarenal pressure condition). Other papers dealt with nephrology, artificial kidneys, TURP, and nephron-sparing renal surgery. Some articles examined various types of malignant tumors and benign prostatic hyperplasia, while 17 publications focused on the topic of andrology. Tuberculosis was also discussed by the authors. Despite political isolation, the communist dictatorship, poverty, the lack of health equipment, physicians educated before WWII with their work morality and hard work managed to perform contemporary clinical and basic scientific research. PMID:27000284

  9. Risk of radiation exposure to medical staff involved in interventional endo-urology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim is to estimate the possibility the new annual dose limit for eye lens to be exceeded and to study the impact of protective shield. Radiation exposure to medical personnel was evaluated with EDD-30 dosemeter in positions of operating surgeon, assisting doctor and nurse. At the operator's typical position for diagnosis and treatment of the urinary tract, the lens dose rates were 0.9 mSv h-1 and 0.06 mSv h-1 without and with lead shield. At the operator's position typical for percutaneous intervention dose rates were 1.9 and 0.02 mSv h-1, respectively. At typical workload, the annual eye lens dose to the main operator without protective screen was estimated to be 29 mSv. With lead screen, operator lens dose can be reduced by a factor of 15-95 according to the procedure. Installation and use of lead screen and use of lead glasses were recommended to the endo-urology medical team. (authors)

  10. Sodium iodide symporter (NIS) in extrathyroidal malignancies: focus on breast and urological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expression and function of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is requisite for efficient iodide transport in thyrocytes, and its presence in cancer cells allows the use of radioiodine as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool in thyroid neoplasia. Discovery of NIS expression in extrathyroidal tissues, including transformed cells, has opened a novel field of research regarding NIS-expressing extrathyroidal neoplasia. Indeed, expression of NIS may be used as a biomarker for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic purposes. Moreover, stimulation of endogenous NIS expression may permit the radioiodine treatment of extrathyroidal lesions by concentrating this radioisotope. This review describes recent findings in NIS research in extrathyroidal malignancies, focusing on breast and urological cancer, emphasizing the most relevant developments that may have clinical impact. Given the recent progress in the study of NIS regulation as molecular basis for new therapeutic approaches in extrathyroidal cancers, particular attention is given to studies regarding the relationship between NIS and clinical-pathological aspects of the tumors and the regulation of NIS expression in the experimental models

  11. Can We Further Improve the Quality of Nephro-Urological Care in Children with Myelomeningocele?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewska, Monika; Korohoda, Przemysław; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Wolnicki, Michał; Mizerska-Wasiak, Małgorzata; Drożdż, Dorota; Pietrzyk, Jacek A

    2016-01-01

    Myelomeningocele (MMC) results from a failure of normal neural tube fusion in early fetal development. Retrospective, observational study of medical data of 54 children treated in Pediatric Nephrology and Urology Clinics for five years was performed. The following data were analyzed: serum creatinine, eGFR, urine analysis, renal scintigraphy (RS), renal ultrasound, and urodynamics. Mean age of studied population: 12.3 years, median of eGFR at the beginning and at the end of survey was 110.25 and 116.5 mL/min/1.73 m² accordingly. Median of frequency of urinary tract infections (fUTI): 1.2 episodes/year. In 24 children: low-pressure, in 30 children: high-pressure bladder was noted. Vesicouretral reflux (VUR) was noted in 23 children (42.6%). fUTI were more common in high-grade VUR group. High-grade VURs were more common in group of patients with severe renal damage. At the end of the survey 11.1% children were qualified to higher stages of chronic kidney disease. Renal parenchyma damage progression in RS was noted in 22.2% children. Positive VUR history, febrile recurrent UTIs, bladder wall trabeculation, and older age of the patients constitute risk factors of abnormal renal scans. More than 2.0 febrile, symptomatic UTIs annually increase by 5.6-fold the risk of severe renal parenchyma damage after five years. PMID:27598183

  12. Síndrome urológica felina: 13 casos Feline urologic syndrome: 13 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flademir Wouters

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Treze casos (8,44% de síndrome urológica felina foram diagnosticados em 154 necropsias de gatos realizadas de 1991 a 1997. Dados epidemiológicos, sinais clínicos, lesões de necropsia e achados histopatológicos foram revisados. Sete animais eram machos inteiros e seis eram machos castrados. Obstrução uretral, hematúria, disúria e distensão vesical foram os principais sinais clínicos. Os principais achados de necropsia e histopatológicos foram cistite hemorrágica, pielonefrite, edema perirrenal, hidronefrose, necrose tubular e uretrite.Thirteen cases (8.44% of feline urologic syndrome were diagnosed in 154 necropsies carried out in cats from 1991 to 1997. Epidemiological data, clinical signs, gross, and histopalhological features were reviewed. Seven cats were intact males and six were castrated males. Urethral obstruction, hematuria, dysuria, and urinary bladder distention were the main clinical signs. Main gross and histopathological findings were hemorrhagic cystitis, pyelonephritis, perirenal edema, hydronephrosis, tubular necrosis, urethritis.

  13. Differential diagnosis and staging of urological tumors by magnetic resonance imaging compared with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 49 urological tumors (11 renal cell carcinomas, 3 renal pelvic cancers, 2 renal angiomyolipomas, 1 renal leiomyosarcoma, 1 large renal cvst, 4 adrenal tumors, 11 bladder cancers, 2 bone metastasis from bladder cancer, 10 prostatic cancers, 1 prostatic sarcoma, 1 urethral cancer, 1 penile cancer and 1 perivesical granuloma) since October 1985 to September 1986. MRI was performed using a Signa (G.E.) with a 1.5 T superconductive magnet and 3 images, including T1 weighted image, T2 weighted image, and proton density image, were obtained. In conclusion MRI is a noninvasive examination and gives more information than computed tomography despite its high cost. In renal cell carcinoma, the chemical shift in MRI and clear visualization of tumor thrombus enable accurate staging. Differential diagnosis from other renal mass lesions may be possible by the T2 weighted image. In adrenal disease, most of the adrenal masses can be differentiated, but in some cases it is impossible. In bladder cancer, wall invasion of tumor may be evaluated in T2 weighted image, and MRI is suitable for staging of locally advanced tumor. In prostatic cancer, visualization of periprostatic plexus and differentiation between internal and external gland may enable local staging and identification of low stage tumors. (author)

  14. History of education in medicine and surgery, first hospitals development of urology in danzig/Gdańsk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajączkowski, Tadeusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to present the development of hospital services and the teaching of medicine, and the development of urology in Danzig (Gdańisk). Well known Danzig surgeons who were interested in surgery of the genitourinary system are also presented. The beginning of urological surgery and its development within the framework of the department of surgery and as an independent facility at the Medical Academy of Gdafisk in the post-war period is also described. Extensive research was undertaken for the collection of literature and documents in German and Polish archives and libraries in order to prepare this study. The history of hospitals in Danzig goes back to the arrival of the Teutonic Knights in 1308. The earliest institution, according to historical sources, was the Hospital of the Holy Spirit, built in the years 1310-1311. It was run by the Hospitalet Order until 1382, and was intended for the sick, elderly and disabled people, orphans and needy pilgrim, and the poor. Later centuries saw the further development of hospital services in Danzig. In the 19th century, the city's increas ing population, the development of the sciences, and rapid advances in medicine subsequently led to the establishment of three more hospitals in Gdafisk: The Hospital for Obstetrics and Gynaecological Disease (1819), the Holy Virgin Hospital (1852), and the Evangelical Hospital of Deaconess Sisters (1857), in addition to the old Municipal Hospital. In 1911, new modern buildings of Municipal Hospital in Danzig were finished. On the basis of the Municipal Hospi- tal, the Academy of Practical Medicine was established in 1935. It was known under the name Staatliche Akademie fiir Praktische Medizin in the Free City of Danzig. Five years later (in 1940) the Academy was developed and changed to the Medical Academy of Danzig (Medizinische Akad- emie Danzig - MAD). The beginning of medical teaching at the middle level in Danzig (Gdafsk) dates back to the 16th century. It had its

  15. The Emotional Intelligence of Resident Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    McKinley, Sophia Kim

    2014-01-01

    Since academic literature indicates that emotional intelligence (EI) is tied to work performance, there is increasing interest in understanding physician EI. We studied the EI of resident physicians in surgery, pediatric, and pathology residency programs at three academic centers to describe the EI profiles of residents in different specialties and determine whether gender differences in resident physician EI profiles mirror those in the general population. 325 residents were electronically...

  16. Resilience Approach for Medical Residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, R.A.; Bos, E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Medical residents are in a vulnerable position. While still in training, they are responsible for patient care. They have a dependent relation with their supervisor and low decision latitude. An intervention was developed to increase individual and system resilience, addressing burnout, patient safe

  17. Seeing Oneself in a Book: The Changing Face of Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Fayjean, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Takes a look at children's literature over time, and its recent emergence as a respected body of literary work. Discusses what is Canadian about Canadian children's literature. Annotates six picture books. Notes that Canadian literature reflects the diversity of the Canadian population, the vast differences in the Canadian landscape, and the…

  18. International uranium production. An eastern Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Eastern Canadian perspective on uranium production is based on 30 years of continuous mining at Elliot Lake and on the experience of selling uranium over the same time period, mainly to export markets. In Ontario the orebodies are basically contiguous, being part of the same large formation. All the mining is underground. Ore grades are low, but economic extraction is improved by continuity and uniformity of grades, stable ground conditions, and the ability to mine and mill on a large scale. Mining is being carried out by two companies, Denison and Rio Algom. It is unlikely that mine capacity will be increased. Government policies have significant effects on the Eastern Canadian uranium industry in particular, as to U.S. import policies. (L.L.)

  19. Canadian Petroleum Products Inst. annual report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Petroleum Products Institute (CPPI) was created in 1989 as a nonprofit association of Canadian refiners and marketers of petroleum products. The objective of the CPPI is to serve and represent the refining and marketing sectors of the petroleum industry with respect to environment, health and safety, and business issues. CPPI conducts research to develop industry policy on a wide variety of environmental, health, safety and business issues. Key activities include: developing guidelines for the safe handling of petroleum products, establishing environmental policies, managing a national environmental protection network of over 100 centers across Canada; providing information on industry activities to the public; and developing working partnerships with government and public interest groups to address issues of common concern. An overview is provided of industry operations, economics and financial performance, and environmental protection and safety. Lists of CPPI publications, awards, standing committees, and officers are also included. 9 figs

  20. Survey of Canadian hospitals radiation emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the findings of a survey of Canadian hospitals conducted by Social Data Research Ltd. during the Spring and Summer, 1995. The main objective of the survey was to determine the state of readiness of Canadian hospitals in respect of radiation emergency planning. In addition, the AECB was interested in knowing the extent to which a report by the Group of Medical Advisors, 'GMA-3: Guidelines on Hospital Emergency Plans for the Management of Minor Radiation Accidents', which was sponsored and distributed in 1993, was received and was useful to hospital administrators and emergency personnel. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 598 acute care hospitals, and 274 responses were received. The main conclusion of this study is that, with the exception of a few large institutions, hospitals generally do not have specific action plans to handle minor radiation accidents. (author)

  1. Canadian oil and gas survey : 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An outlook of the Canadian Petroleum Industry, financial and operating statistics of the top 100 Canadian public oil and gas companies and 15 energy income trusts, were summarized for the fiscal year ending in 1996. In general, 1996 was a good year for the industry. Greater industry financing resulted in increased drilling activity and good stock market returns for investors. However, strong commodity prices also resulted in record levels of hedging activity, which meant lost revenues for the industry. The top 100 companies recorded losses of about $800 million in 1996, largely on crude oil hedges. The fact that volumes hedged forward to 1997 are down from 1996 indicate that many companies are rethinking their commitment to risk management. Details of crude oil and natural gas prices and production levels during 1996 were provided. A list of significant corporate mergers and acquisitions during the year under review rounded out the presentation

  2. Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Yuka; Tan, Jerry; Baibergenova, Akerke; Barankin, Benjamin; Cochrane, Chris L; Humphrey, Shannon; Lynde, Charles W; Marcoux, Danielle; Poulin, Yves; Rivers, Jason K; Sapijaszko, Mariusz; Sibbald, R Gary; Toole, John; Ulmer, Marcie; Zip, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic facial inflammatory dermatosis characterized by background facial erythema and flushing and may be accompanied by inflammatory papules and pustules, cutaneous fibrosis and hyperplasia known as phyma, and ocular involvement. These features can have adverse impact on quality of life, and ocular involvement can lead to visual dysfunction. The past decade has witnessed increased research into pathogenic pathways involved in rosacea and the introduction of novel treatment innovations. The objective of these guidelines is to offer evidence-based recommendations to assist Canadian health care providers in the diagnosis and management of rosacea. These guidelines were developed by an expert panel of Canadian dermatologists taking into consideration the balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, the quality of supporting evidence, the values and preferences of patients, and the costs of treatment. The 2015 Cochrane review "Interventions in Rosacea" was used as a source of clinical trial evidence on which to base the recommendations. PMID:27207355

  3. Canadian petroleum history bibliography. Release update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2010-01-07

    The petroleum history bibliography was created over several years as a record dedicated to preserving the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. It comprises a list of more than 5000 publications, including books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles and stories of the many companies that have come and gone. It aims to include all publications and audio visual products from the Social Sciences and Humanities on company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry and humour. An author index is included. Most government documents are excluded as they are accessible through Library and Archives Canada. This bibliography is an ongoing piece of work, and welcomes any additions relating to the study and preservation of Canadian petroleum industry history.

  4. Canadian gas surplus to linger through 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that Canada's natural gas surplus will persist at least through 1995, although the gap between production and deliverability will narrow. Meantime, prices will slowly rise, the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) predicts. The Calgary firm says surplus productive capacity will fall to 426 bcf in 1992 from 874 bcf in 1990. Those volumes amount to 12% and 25%, respectively, of deliverability. Prices for a processing plant's outlet stream, pegged at $1.38 (Canadian)/Mcf in 1991, will inch up to $1.53 in 1994, then climb to $1.69 in 1995, all in current dollars. Prices will firm as a reduced surplus reduces sales competition among producers. Increasing sales as a result of expanded export pipeline capacity will be a major factor in reducing surplus capacity. The study says after 1995 increased drilling will raise productive capacity and create some downward pressure on prices

  5. Effect of Doximity Residency Rankings on Residency Applicants’ Program Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee M. Rolston

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Choosing a residency program is a stressful and important decision. Doximity released residency program rankings by specialty in September 2014. This study sought to investigate the impact of those rankings on residency application choices made by fourth year medical students. Methods: A 12-item survey was administered in October 2014 to fourth year medical students at three schools. Students indicated their specialty, awareness of and perceived accuracy of the rankings, and the rankings’ impact on the programs to which they chose to apply. Descriptive statistics were reported for all students and those applying to Emergency Medicine (EM. Results: A total of 461 (75.8% students responded, with 425 applying in one of the 20 Doximity ranked specialties. Of the 425, 247 (58% were aware of the rankings and 177 looked at them. On a 1-100 scale (100=very accurate, students reported a mean ranking accuracy rating of 56.7 (SD 20.3. Forty-five percent of students who looked at the rankings modified the number of programs to which they applied. The majority added programs. Of the 47 students applying to EM, 18 looked at the rankings and 33% changed their application list with most adding programs. Conclusion: The Doximity rankings had real effects on students applying to residencies as almost half of students who looked at the rankings modified their program list. Additionally, students found the rankings to be moderately accurate. Graduating students might benefit from emphasis on more objective characterization of programs to assess in light of their own interests and personal/career goals

  6. Hepatitis E in a Canadian Traveller

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis E is clinically indistinguishable from hepatitis A and is caused by an enterically transmitted rna virus that is endemic in developing countries of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and North America. This report describes a Canadian traveller to Nepal, Thailand and India with one of the first confirmed cases of hepatitis E reported in Canada. Although this disease is usually self-limited with no known sequelae, it may produce fulminant hepatitis with a high case fatality rate in pregna...

  7. Electronic fetal monitoring: a Canadian survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, B L; Niday, P A; Nimrod, C A; Drake, E R; Sprague, A E; Trépanier, M J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the current status of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) in Canadian teaching and nonteaching hospitals, to review the medical and nursing standards of practice for EFM and to determine the availability of EFM educational programs. DESIGN: National survey in 1989. PARTICIPANTS: The directors of nursing at the 737 hospitals providing obstetric care were sent a questionnaire and asked to have it completed by the most appropriate staff member. The response rate was 80.5% ...

  8. The Development of the Canadian Veterinary Profession

    OpenAIRE

    Prescott, J F

    1985-01-01

    A proposal for the development of Canadian veterinary education and of the organization of the profession is described. There should be one veterinary school with four branches (the current colleges). A student would train at any college in comparative medicine for two and one-half years and then train for 12 months or more in a specialty taught at one or more colleges. These specialties are general veterinary practice, poultry practice, public health and regulatory medicine, ruminant practic...

  9. Development options for Canadian natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haughey, D.J.; Varangu, K.

    1982-01-01

    This work provides a methodology for, and preliminary economic examination of, alternative development options for Western Canadian natural gas. Four development options are addressed: pipeline exports to the U.S., domestic pipeline expansion to the Maritimes, liquefied natural gas exports to Japan, and methanol manufacturing in Alberta. Each option was evaluated in terms of the costs and benefits which accrue as producer returns, project sponsor returns, and government returns.

  10. Canadians trying to join US transmission groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various competition problems faced by Canadian utilities and attempts to solve them, were described. E.g. B.C. Hydro and its electricity trade subsidiary Powerex have moved to become members of the Western Regional Transmission Association (WRTA), an association of about 40 utilities which serve part of the western United States. Through the WRTA, Powerex seeks fair terms to ensure its access to the U.S. market. Membership allows fast dispute resolution and enhances sales to California and other western states. Concern was expressed by the U.S Dept.of Energy about the lack of reciprocity.In the year ending March 1994, Powerex exported 2,600 gigawatt-hours of electricity, over 90% to the U.S. This was a low water year for hydroelectric-based BC Hydro, in which surplus energy available for export was only about half of what is usually available. Ontario Hydro and other provincially owned utilities were said to be challenged by U.S. industry deregulation and open transmission policies. If Canadian utilities fail to initiate structural changes leading to open access policies, their economic competitiveness may well decline. If on the other hand Canadian utilities decided to adopt open access policies, they would need to shed their monopolistic practices and accelerate restructuring in the face of wholesale competition. They could face direct retail competition in their currently captive provincial markets from U.S. and alternative Canadian suppliers. In an open competition scenario up to 20% of Ontario Hydro's domestic sales were said to be in danger of being displaced by imports from New York and Michigan

  11. Roundtable Discussion on the Canadian Economy


    OpenAIRE

    McArthur, Doug; Ivanova, Iglika; Dobrzanski, Chris; Garrosino, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Since the 2008 global financial earthquake, the world economy has continued to be turbulent.

The roundtable discussion focussed on the Canadian economy within the 2012 global environment, but with a specific Vancouver and BC based perspective. Each of the panellists, from their own vantage point, talked about concerns with the economy, opportunities in the mid and long term for BC, and public policy ideas that they would put forward to improve the BC economy. The discussion was  followe...

  12. Tornado Mitigation in the Canadian Prairie Region

    OpenAIRE

    Durage, Samanthi, Prof.

    2014-01-01

    Tornadoes are a destructive form of the extreme weather associated with thunderstorms. Canada gets more tornadoes than any other country with the exception of the US. This paper presents some results of a study on tornado mitigation in the Canadian Prairie region. Initially, a regression-based analysis of the Prairie tornado database was conducted, and the trend for the number of tornadoes reported in each year is discussed in this paper. The detection, warning, communication, and evacuation ...

  13. Canadian Multiculturalism, Same as it ever Was?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hoyos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available After the Second World War ended, Canada was no longer mainly composed of its two dominant ethnocultural groups, French and English, but rather constituted by polyethnicity; meaning, Canadian culture was made up of many different ethnic groups. Since then, Canada has actively embraced multiculturalism and on 12 July 1988, the House of Commons passed Bill C-93, ‘An Act for the preservation and enhancement of multiculturalism in Canada’. The Canadian multicultural experience has been much portrayed as a celebration of ethnicity where different cultural groups share their customs and learn from each other. However, it is recently being rumoured that the multiculturalism hype is not all it is cut out to be and segregates communities rather than integrate. According to Canadian authors Keith Banting and Will Kymlicka, “in much of the world and particularly in Europe, there is a widespread perception that multiculturalism has failed” (44. In this paper, I examine some recent common issues of concern, especially, racism and discrimination, through the literary expression of Canadian playwrights and writers such as George F. Walker, Cecil Foster, and Mordecai Richler. These writers are not meant to represent any ethnic group as a whole, but rather try to project a general feeling about the nation in individual ways. I will finally explore the idea of how perhaps multiculturalism in Canada is evolving into another state since migratory patterns and the social circumstances that Canada is facing in the 21st century have changed. Today, the idea of celebrating different ethnicities and customs is no longer as important as celebrating the transcultural or “transnational” aspects of relations between individuals and groups of immigrants.

  14. Canadian mercury inventories: the missing pieces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagreen, L.A.; Lourie, B.A. [Summerhill Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Research was conducted to determine the significance of the deliberate use of mercury in products in Canada and the associated releases from these sources. Through a combination of literature review and new calculations, the reservoir, flux, and releases of mercury from eight product sources were calculated, and these results compared to historical Canadian inventories. Mercury contributions from the waste sector were also assessed and compared to total Canadian mercury releases and to mercury releases from coal-fired generating stations. Results suggest the use and release of mercury associated with its use in products is 4.5 times what previous inventories indicate. Including dental amalgam and sewage sludge, the total releases of mercury to all environmental compartments in Canada totals 20 tonnes per year. This accounts for less than one-half of the 44 tonnes per year of mercury released from mercury waste disposal each year in Canada. Waste mercury contributions from hazardous waste imports, unknown product sources, and incomplete information on the use of mercury in known products may account for this discrepancy. Waste-related mercury releases and transfers for disposal and recycling are 11 times greater than that of electricity generation in Canada. Results indicate that Canadian inventories have underestimated the significance of mercury use and release associated with products, calling into question the current priorities for mercury management. This paper was developed as part of a panel session at the International Joint Commission 'Mercury in the Ecosystem' workshop, February 26-27, 2003, Windsor, ON, Canada, as a complement to the information on Canadian Inventories presented by Luke Trip (Senes Consulting, Ottawa, ON, Canada).

  15. Competition in the Canadian Mortgage Market

    OpenAIRE

    Jason Allen

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a brief examination of the Canadian mortgage market, focusing on the market’s evolution following changes to the Bank Act in 1992, which allowed chartered banks to enter the trust business, and the subsequent entrance of virtual banks and mortgage brokers. It then summarizes key research currently being undertaken by the Bank of Canada. This research suggests that the mortgage rates paid by borrowers depend on their observable characteristics, their local market, and ...

  16. Morbidity Experiences and Disability Among Canadian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Linda

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health Issue Women are more frequently affected by chronic conditions and disability than men. Although some of these sex differences have been in part attributed to biological susceptibility, social determinants of health and other factors, these gaps have not been fully explained in the current literature. This chapter presents comparisons of hospitalization rates, and the prevalence of chronic conditions and physical disability between Canadian women and men and between various subgroups of women, adjusting for selected risk factors. The Canadian Hospital Morbidity Database (2000–2001 and Canadian Community Health Survey (2000–2001 were used to examine inpatient hospital morbidity, prevalence of chronic conditions and disability. Key Findings Hospitalization rates were 20% higher among women than men. This was due to the large number of hospitalizations for pregnancies and childbirth. When "normal" deliveries were excluded, hospitalization rates remained higher among women. Women had slightly lower rates of hospitalizations for ambulatory-care sensitive conditions than men. Prevalence of activity limitation (mild and severe was higher among women than men, and differences remained after adjusting for age, chronic conditions, socio-economic status, and smoking. Women who reported a disability were less likely than men to be in a partnered relationship, have less tangible social support, and have lower income and employment rates. Data Gaps and Recommendations The impact of morbidity and disability on Canadian women is substantial. These results identify areas for interventions among more vulnerable subgroups, and point to the need for further research in the area of risk factors for the prevention of morbidity and disability in the population.

  17. Immunization policies in Canadian medical schools.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowan, M S; Carter, A O; Walker, V J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the policies of Canadian medical schools concerning immunization of students and the methods used to promote these policies. DESIGN: Mail survey with the use of a 12-item, self-administered questionnaire; telephone follow-up to ensure response. SETTING: All 16 medical schools in Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Deans of Canada's 16 medical schools or their designates. All of them responded to the questionnaire. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Policies on vaccination of students against di...

  18. Fatal falciparum malaria in Canadian travellers

    OpenAIRE

    Humar, A.; Sharma, S.; Zoutman, D; Kain, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    The authors report 2 cases of severe falciparum malaria in Canadians that had fatal outcomes. In the first case a man presented to a local hospital shortly after returning from Africa, but a diagnosis of malaria was not considered. He was transferred to a secondary and then to a tertiary care facility, where he subsequently died. Intravenous quinidine therapy, the treatment of choice, was unavailable at all 3 hospitals. In the second case, a woman taking chloroquine prophylaxis while visiting...

  19. Globalization, health, and the future Canadian metropolis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schrecker, Ted

    2010-01-01

    This chapter represents a preliminary effort to understand the health implications of transnsational economic integration (globalization) for population health in Canadian metropolitan areas, and to inform the development of policy responses and strategies of resistance. Special emphasis is placed on health equity as it is affected by social determinants of health. I first provide a stylized description of the rationale for concentrating on major metropolitan areas, rather than on...

  20. Canadian survey on pandemic flu preparations

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy CS; Guglietti C; Gibson JL; Wilson Kumanan; Ritvo Paul; Nie JX; Jadad AR; Upshur REG

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The management of pandemic influenza creates public health challenges. An ethical framework, 'Stand on Guard for Thee: ethical considerations in pandemic influenza preparedness' that served as a template for the World Health Organization's global consultation on pandemic planning, was transformed into a survey administered to a random sample of 500 Canadians to obtain opinions on key ethical issues in pandemic preparedness planning. Methods All framework authors and additi...

  1. Industry analysis - Canadian medical doctoral universities

    OpenAIRE

    Crighton, Lyla Eileen

    2005-01-01

    Most public sector and non-profit entities do not undergo standard business analysis that is typically found in their private sector counterparts, however such approaches may provide administrators with information to better understand their industry. A high-level industry analysis of Canadian medical-doctoral universities, based on Porter's five forces and value chain analysis, combined with an analysis of pertinent issues indicated that universities are greatly affected by strategic decisio...

  2. A Canadian Medical Team in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Caldwell, J. Paul; Kain, Brian F.; Robert C. McDonald

    1985-01-01

    In February 1985, a Canadian medical relief team was established in a northern Ethiopia refugee camp. Volunteer physicians, nurses, and support staff have worked in the camp since February 1985. Their activities range from supervising intensive feeding programs, to controlling infections, to educating patients. About 300-400 patients visit the outpatient clinics daily. Malnutrition, vitamin A and B deficiencies, scurvy, rickets, gastroenteritis, malaria, leprosy, tuberculosis, pneumonia, trac...

  3. Open Access Funds: A Canadian Library Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Fernandez; Rajiv Nariani

    2011-01-01

    A survey of Canadian research libraries was conducted to determine the extent of funding support for open access publications in these institutions. Results indicate that there is substantial support for open access publishing, and a diversity of approaches is being used to fund open access resources. The reasons for funding support along with policy and promotional issues are explored. The broader implications of funding open access are discussed in the context of a changing scholarly publis...

  4. Canadian mercury inventories: the missing pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research was conducted to determine the significance of the deliberate use of mercury in products in Canada and the associated releases from these sources. Through a combination of literature review and new calculations, the reservoir, flux, and releases of mercury from eight product sources were calculated, and these results compared to historical Canadian inventories. Mercury contributions from the waste sector were also assessed and compared to total Canadian mercury releases and to mercury releases from coal-fired generating stations. Results suggest the use and release of mercury associated with release of mercury associated with its use in products is 4.5 times what previous inventories indicate. Including dental amalgam and sewage sludge, the total releases of mercury to all environmental compartments in Canada totals 20 tonnes per year. This accounts for less than one-half of the 44 tonnes per year of mercury released from mercury waste disposal each year in Canada. Waste mercury contributions from hazardous waste imports, unknown product sources, and incomplete information on the use of mercury in known products may account for this discrepancy. Waste-related mercury releases and transfers for disposal and recycling are 11 times greater than that of electricity generation in Canada. Results indicate that Canadian inventories have underestimated the significance of mercury use and release associated with products, calling into question the current priorities for mercury management. This paper was developed as part of a panel session at the International Joint Commission 'Mercury in the Ecosystem' workshop, February 26-27, 2003, Windsor, ON, Canada, as a complement to the information on Canadian Inventories presented by Luke Trip (Senes Consulting, Ottawa, ON, Canada)

  5. Medium Term Outlook for Canadian Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Charlebois, Pierre; Gagne, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the features of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Medium Term Outlook for Canadian Agriculture (previously entitled Medium Term Policy Baseline) covering the period 2007 to 2017. The outlook is an attempt to outline a plausible future of the international and domestic agri-food sectors. It serves as a benchmark for discussion and scenario analysis. The outlook makes specific assumptions and outlines their implications. Since it assumes tha...

  6. Viewpoint: Canadian competition policy: progress and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Ross

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the state of competition policy - in particular the economics of competition policy - in Canada today and considers its prospects going forward. It argues that: (i) the importance of competition policy has become accepted widely in Canada and indeed throughout much of the world; (ii) competition policy design and enforcement is in general well done in Canada; (iii) economists, including many Canadians, have played a central role in the development of an efficient and effe...

  7. A Canadian perspective on environmental issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leading environmental concerns in Canada are acid rain, ozone depletion, toxic substances, climate change, and biodiversity. These concerns have a number of elements in common, including a need for international actions for their solution, a high degree of scientific complexity, long life cycles from a policy point of view, and large differences in priorities between developing and developed countries. Canadians have favorable attitudes toward sustainable development and expect government and industry to be active in protecting the environment. Canadians also demand and expect a secure supply of competitively priced energy. Although industry may be concerned that incorporating environmental considerations into their business may impede competitiveness, this view is shown to be unsound for the following reasons: productivity is closely linked to a healthy environment; pollution prevention is less costly than cleanup; environmental protection can create new business opportunities; and the market is demanding more environmentally friendly industries. In the energy sector, a number of successful initiatives are under way to integrate environmental considerations into their decision making. The challenge is for industries to go beyond individual activities and build a case for sustainable energy development. The role of government includes informing Canadians about environmental risks and government priorities, ensuring that environmental assessment rules are clear and fair, streamlining regulatory processes, and using a balanced mix of legislation and regulation with market-based approaches to environmental protection

  8. Canadian oil and gas survey 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The year 1997 brought record levels of financing for the Canadian oil and gas industry which led to record levels of capital spending and unprecedented merger and acquisition activity. Production records were achieved, but soft commodity prices in the fourth quarter resulted in a significant downturn in the equity markets. El Nino reduced demand for natural gas and heating oil, resulting in increased storage levels for both commodities. Record drilling and capital spending fueled the Canadian oilfield service industry as total market capitalization rose to $10 billion. As for the 1998 outlook, the industry has turned to natural gas as the favoured commodity, as indicated by the conclusion of the Alliance pipeline hearings and the Nova/TCPL merger. This survey presents a review of crude oil and natural gas production, prices, and capital spending for development and exploratory wells, and the financial and operating results for fiscal year 1997 of selected oil and gas companies and income trusts. All listed companies are Canadian public companies, or publicly traded income trusts, traded on one of the country's four major stock exchanges. They are ranked according to gross oil and gas production revenue only (before royalties). Syncrude and oil sands production is also included. The remaining data in the financial statistics tables includes all business segments of each company included. The survey excluded companies that were wholly-owned subsidiaries, divisions or U.S. subsidiaries and private companies. tabs., figs

  9. Canadian Petroleum Products Institute 1995 annual review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Petroleum Products Institute works on behalf of its member companies involved in the refining, distribution, and marketing of petroleum products. It is involved in the development of industry policy of business, environmental, health and safety issues. The 1995 annual review presented a summary of industry operations and trends. This included a summary of imports and exports of petroleum products, Canadian refining areas and pipelines, refinery utilization rates, and demand versus capacity for refined petroleum products. Demand for petroleum products increased in 1995, with the transportation sector representing over two-thirds of petroleum products sold. The debate concerning the use of the octane enhancing additive MMT in gasoline in Canada, was discussed. The additive reduces air emissions, but has been alleged to cause failures of some new vehicle emission control monitoring systems. A review of institute highlights included a table of average price of regular gasoline in Canada since 1980, gasoline prices for major markets, and average Canadian pump price components. 14 figs

  10. Deep saline groundwater within the Canadian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwaters have been sampled from depths greater than 1000 m within the Canadian Shield. The samples were obtained from boreholes in mines and from test drilling programs carried out as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. At the depths explored, water is found in fractures, shear zones and similar structural features. The salinity of the water is frequently very high, with total dissolved solids often exceeding 200 g.L-1. These saline waters can be classified as Ca-Na-Cl brines. Isotopic analyses for 2H and 18O show that these fluids are not modern, local meteoric waters which dissolve salts in sedimentary, metasedimentary or metamorphic rocks. The chemical and isotopic data suggest that all saline waters analyzed to date have a similar origin. This source is not well-understood but could be highly modified Paleozoic seawater, residual metamorphic fluids, or less likely, groundwaters that have been in contact with the rocks in the Canadian Shield for millions of years. In all cases the fluids appear to have been isolated from the biosphere for geological time periods. The existence of these highly saline fluids influences the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program in several areas. A major concern is the corrosion resistance of the radioactive waste containers. Saline waters may also influence the buffer and backfill and vault sealing materials, the rock mass and the waste form itself, although the effects may not always be deleterious. Corrosion of underground test equipment during the geoscience research phase is also a concern

  11. The development of the Canadian peat industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, J.J. (New Brunswick Dept. of Natural Resources and Energy, Bathurst, NB (Canada). Mineral Resources Division)

    1994-02-01

    Peatlands occupy 111 million hectares or about 12% of Canada's land surface and are principally located in the boreal region of the country. Most of the bog surveys which were initiated in Canada since 1908 have been prompted by a national interest in gaining fuel self-sufficiency, but the production of peat has almost always been exclusively for horticultural purposes. The birth of the Canadian peat industry dates back to the early 1940s, when the United States' traditional supplies from Europe were cut off during the Second World War. Between 1938 and 1992, the production of horticultural peat has grown from 4,000 and 745,000 tonnes, making Canada the world's third largest producer of horticultural peat. Canadian peat is exported to 25 countries. In 1992, the United States accounted for 89% of all exports, and Japan ranked second with 10%. In 1992, the total value of the production was estimated at 108 million dollars and provided employment for thousands of people in rural areas. The present industry owes its existence to an abundant supply of sphagnum moss located near population centres and in proximity to important transportation corridors. The continued development of the Canadian peat industry depends on establishing sound environmental practices, examining alternate uses for peat and exploring new market opportunities. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study is to evaluate patient and staff doses in fluoroscopically guided invasive diagnostic and interventional urology procedures. All the data were collected in the Emergency Hospital 'N. I. Pirogov'. While recording data for the patients, a real time dosimetry measurement of the medical staff was made. Air kerma-area product (KAP) was recorded for intravenous pyelogram (IVP), percutaneous nephrostomy (PN) and ureteral 'double-J' stenting. Patient data sex, age and weight were also taken. Staff doses were estimated with the system RaySafe i2. It contains four dosimeters, with a wireless connection to a real time display. The dosimeters were worn on the unprotected upper part of the body and measured the personal dose equivalent Hp(10). The mean KAP values for the procedures are: 3.21 Gy.cm2 for IVP, 10.37 Gy.cm2 for PN and 4.15 Gy.cm2 for 'double-J' respectively. The highest staff dose for PN and 'double-J' is received by the urologist (160 μSv and 47.3 μSv, respectively), while for the IVP the radiographer has the highest exposure (20 μSv). Each member of the medical staff was on a different position in respect to the X-ray tube and the patient, which is the main reason for the differences in the staff doses. The variations in the mean patient and staff doses are mostly due to the interventions themselves, their complexity and the individual treatment of every patient. RaySafe i2 is very useful as guideline for making a choice of a better position and in the decreasing of radiation exposure to the staff

  13. Emergency readmissions to paediatric surgery and urology: The impact of inappropriate coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraully, R; Henderson, K; Davies, B

    2016-04-01

    Introduction In England, emergency readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge after an elective admission are not reimbursed if they do not meet Payment by Results (PbR) exclusion criteria. However, coding errors could inappropriately penalise hospitals. We aimed to assess the accuracy of coding for emergency readmissions. Methods Emergency readmissions attributed to paediatric surgery and urology between September 2012 and August 2014 to our tertiary referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Payment by Results (PbR) coding data were obtained from the hospital's Family Health Directorate. Clinical details were obtained from contemporaneous records. All readmissions were categorised as appropriately coded (postoperative or nonoperative) or inappropriately coded (planned surgical readmission, unrelated surgical admission, unrelated medical admission or coding error). Results Over the 24-month period, 241 patients were coded as 30-day readmissions, with 143 (59%) meeting the PbR exclusion criteria. Of the remaining 98 (41%) patients, 24 (25%) were inappropriately coded as emergency readmissions. These readmissions resulted in 352 extra bed days, of which 117 (33%) were attributable to inappropriately coded cases. Conclusions One-quarter of non-excluded emergency readmissions were inappropriately coded, accounting for one-third of additional bed days. As a stay on a paediatric ward costs up to £500 a day, the potential cost to our institution due to inappropriate readmission coding was over £50,000. Diagnoses and the reason for admission for each care episode should be accurately documented and coded, and readmission data should be reviewed at a senior clinician level. PMID:26924486

  14. The Assessment of the Applications to University Hospital Urology Outpatient Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Gucuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Provision of health care services to persons where it is needed required for the production of quality service in the organization of health services. The purpose of this study, determine the reason for admission and factors affecting admission and evaluate the current status for the patients admitted to a tertiary health care center. Materials and methods: The study was planned descriptive. Participants were determined among the patients were admitted to urology clinic between December 2011-March 2012 for any reason on a voluntary basis. Fourteen item questionnaire was completed by the physician. The survey asked the age, educational status, initial complaint, elapsed time from the beginning of complaints, whether was the previous treatment from another institution, reasons for choosing a university hospital polyclinics for participants. Results: A total of 337 participants attended, and their gender were 23.7% female, 76.3% male. 61.7% participants had received earlier medical attention because of complaints, 38.3% of had not received previously medical attention in any health institution and had to apply directly to the tertiary health care center. Apply directly to the university hospital outpatient clinic was significantly higher in men (p:0.11(table 1. Direct applications are increasing significantly in participant has higher education level. Compared to complexity of required investigations for patients had received and had not received earlier medical attention were no significant differences (p:0.134. Conclusion: For more effective use of health resources and results-oriented, training must be relevant to users of health care services to increase health literacy as well as a number of legal arrangements. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(2.000: 165-168

  15. Advances in renal neoplasia: recommendations from the 2012 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding the classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. There was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as novel tumors: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor-family translocation RCC [in particular t(6; 11) RCC], and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, 3 rare epithelial carcinomas were considered emerging or provisional entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation RCC. There were also a number of suggested modifications to existing World Health Organization 2004 categories, with the new classification to be known as the ISUP Vancouver Classification. Tumor morphotype, sarcomatoid/rhabdoid differentiation, and tumor necrosis were identified as significant prognostic parameters for RCC. The ISUP Grading System was accepted with grades 1-3 of clear cell and papillary RCC being based on nucleolar prominence, whereas extreme nuclear pleomorphism or sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation defined grade 4 tumors. It was agreed that chromophobe RCC should not be graded. Consensus guidelines were formulated for specimen handling, and it was agreed that renal sinus invasion is present when tumor is in direct contact with fat or loose connective tissue of the sinus or if there is involvement of endothelial-lined spaces within the renal sinus, regardless of the size. The role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors was considered, and panels of immunohistochemical markers were identified for use in specific differential diagnostic scenarios. PMID:24661331

  16. Redesigning journal club in residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence.

  17. Redesigning journal club in residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. PMID:27313486

  18. Political Ideology and Economic Freedom across Canadian Provinces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Potrafke, Niklas

    This paper examines how political ideology influenced economic freedom in the Canadian provinces. We analyze the dataset of economic freedom indicators compiled by the Fraser Institute in 10 Canadian provinces over the 1981-2005 period and introduce two different indices of political ideology...... leftist and rightwing governments concerning the role of government in the economy and (2) indicates that ideological polarization concerns governments but less parliamentary fractions in the Canadian provinces. ...

  19. Social relations and remittances: evidence from Canadian micro data

    OpenAIRE

    Vadean, Florin P.; DeVoretz, Don J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper models transfers outside the household for both the Canadian- born and foreign-born Canadian populations in a traditional expenditure framework with an unique composition of goods to illustrate the special motivations to remit by immigrants. We theorise that remittances to persons outside the households represent transfers to maintain social relations with relatives and friends and religious/charitable remittances are expenditures which foster group membership. Using Canadian surve...

  20. Predicting Canadian Recessions Using Financial Variables: A Probit Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Atta-Mensah, Joseph; Tkacz, Greg

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of a number of financial variables to predict Canadian recessions. Regarding methodology, we follow closely the technique employed by Estrella and Mishkin (1998), who use a probit model to predict U.S. recessions up to eight quarters in advance. Our main finding is that the spread between the yield on Canadian long bonds and the 90-day commercial paper rate is particularly useful in predicting Canadian recessions. This result is consistent with those of Estrell...

  1. Beyond "medical tourism": Canadian companies marketing medical travel

    OpenAIRE

    Turner Leigh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite having access to medically necessary care available through publicly funded provincial health care systems, some Canadians travel for treatment provided at international medical facilities as well as for-profit clinics found in several Canadian provinces. Canadians travel abroad for orthopaedic surgery, bariatric surgery, ophthalmologic surgery, stem cell injections, “Liberation therapy” for multiple sclerosis, and additional interventions. Both responding to publi...

  2. Canadian capital spending to slip 4.7% in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total capital and exploration spending by the Canadian petroleum industry is estimated at $6.579 billion in 1993, a drop of 4.7% from estimated 1992 outlays. Last year Canadian capital spending of $6.9 billion represented a drop of 8.9% from 1991 outlays, according to an Oil and Gas Journal survey. All survey related spending estimates in this paper are in U.S. dollars. All individual company spending estimates are in Canadian dollars

  3. Family Medicine: A Resident's Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Bipin

    2012-01-01

    Though family medicine has existed as a qualification for more than a decade in India, structured residency based training is a recent phenomenon. A growing number of young physicians are opting for this challenging and exciting new speciality as post graduate qualification through NBE (National Board of Examination) affiliated three year DNB (Diplomate of National Board) training program. MD family medicine is also in offing as Medical Council of India (MCI) has recently notified curriculum ...

  4. [Medical ethics in residency training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civaner, Murat; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Balcioğlu, Harun

    2009-04-01

    Medical ethics education in residency training is one of the hot topics of continuous medical education debates. Its importance and necessity is constantly stressed in declarations and statements on national and international level. Parallel to the major structural changes in the organization and the finance model of health care system, patient-physician relationship, identity of physicianship, social perception and status of profession are changing. Besides, scientific developments and technological advancements create possibilities that never exists before, and bring new ethical dilemmas along with. To be able to transplant human organs has created two major problems for instance; procurement of organs in sufficient numbers, and allocating them to the patients in need by using some prioritizing criteria. All those new and challenging questions force the health care workers to find authentic and justifiable solutions while keeping the basic professional values. In that sense, proper medical ethics education in undergraduate and postgraduate term that would make physician-to-be's and student-physicians acquire the core professional values and skill to notice, analyze and develop justifiable solutions to ethical problems is paramount. This article aims to express the importance of medical ethics education in residency training, and to propose major topics and educational methods to be implemented into. To this aim, first, undergraduate medical education, physician's working conditions, the exam of selection for residency training, and educational environment were revised, and then, some topics and educational methods, which are oriented to educate physicians regarding the professional values that they should have, were proposed. PMID:19357056

  5. Redesigning journal club in residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Achkar M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Morhaf Al Achkar Department of Family Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. Keywords: journal club, residents, peer teaching, evidence-based medicine, dialogical learning

  6. Radioactive waste disposal - ethical and environmental considerations - A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with ethical and environmental considerations of radioactive waste disposal in Canada. It begins with the canadian attitudes toward nature and environment. Then are given the canadian institutions which reflect an environmental ethic, the development of a canadian radioactive waste management policy, the establishment of formal assessment and review process for a nuclear fuel waste disposal facility, some studies of the ethical and risk dimensions of nuclear waste decisions, the canadian societal response to issues of radioactive wastes, the analysis of risks associated with fuel waste disposal, the influence of other energy related environmental assessments and some common ground and possible accommodation between the different views. (O.L.). 50 refs

  7. Urological management (medical and surgical) of BK-virus associated haemorrhagic cystitis in children following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Nikhil Vasdev; Angela Davidson; Christian Harkensee; Mary Slatter; Andrew Gennery; Ian Willetts; Andrew Thorpe

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is uncommon and in its severe form potentially life threatening complication of Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in children. We present our single centre experience in the urological management of this clinically challenging condition. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients were diagnosed with BK-Virus HC in our centre. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.8 years (range, 3.2-18.4 years). The mean number of days post-BMT until onset of HC was 20.8 (...

  8. Serious renal and urological complications in fast-track primary total hip and knee arthroplasty; a detailed observational cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Lars S; Jorgensen, Christoffer C; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    stay > 4 days or 30-day readmissions after fast-track THA and TKA, we conducted a detailed observational study based upon prospectively collected pre-operative data and a complete 30-day follow-up on complications and re-admissions in a unselected cohort of 8,804 consecutive fast-track THAs and TKAs......BACKGROUND: Overall medical complications have been reduced after fast-track total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA), but data on specific renal and urological (RU) complications are limited. METHODS: To describe the incidence and consequences of serious RU complications resulting in length of...

  9. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  10. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  11. Suicidal Thoughts Among Medical Residents with Burnout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Frank; Dillingh, Gea; Bakker, Arnold; Prins, Jelle

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Recent research showed that medical residents have a high risk for developing burnout. The present study investigates the prevalence of burnout and its relationship with suicidal thoughts among medical residents. Methods: All Dutch medical residents (n = 5126) received a self-report ques

  12. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resident assessment. 51...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The... condition a comprehensive, accurate, standardized, reproducible assessment of each resident's...

  13. Negotiations of Acknowledgement among Middle Class Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nina Blom

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of communication processes between residents, between residents and people in the broader societal context as well as of media coverage of a fireworks disaster in a Danish suburb. It demonstrates how residents (all members of the Danish middle class) were able to...

  14. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... live in the same facility and both spouses consent to the arrangement. (n) Self-Administration of Drugs... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  15. Perceptions of surgical specialists in general surgery, orthopaedic surgery, urology and gynaecology on teaching endoscopic surgery in The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Schijven, M. P.; Schout, B.M.A.; Dolmans, V. E. M. G.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.; Broeders, I. A. M. J.; Borel Rinkes, I. H. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Specific training in endoscopic skills and procedures has become a necessity for profession with embedded endoscopic techniques in their surgical palette. Previous research indicates endoscopic skills training to be inadequate, both from subjective (resident interviews) and objective (skills measurement) viewpoint. Surprisingly, possible shortcomings in endoscopic resident education have never been measured from the perspective of those individuals responsible for resident training...

  16. Canadian natural gas market: dynamics and pricing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication by the National Energy Board is part of a continuing program of assessing applications for long-term natural gas export licences. The market-based procedure used by the Board is based on the premise that the marketplace will generally operate in a way that will ensure that Canadian requirements for natural gas will be met at fair market prices. The market--based procedure consists of a public hearing and a monitoring component. The monitoring component involves the on-going assessment of Canadian energy markets to provide analyses of major energy commodities on either an individual or integrated commodity basis. This report is the result of the most recent assessment . It identifies factors that affect natural gas prices and describes the functioning of regional markets in Canada. It provides an overview of the energy demand, including recent trends, reviews the North American gas supply and markets, the natural gas pricing dynamics in Canada, and a regional analysis of markets, prices and dynamics in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and the Atlantic provinces. In general, demand growth outstripped growth in supply, but natural gas producers throughout North America have been responding to the current high price environment with aggressive drilling programs. The Board anticipates that in time, there will be a supply and demand response and accompanying relief in natural gas prices. A review of the annual weighted average border price paid for Alberta gas indicates that domestic gas users paid less than export customers until 1998, at which point the two prices converged, suggesting that Canadians have had access to natural gas at prices no less favourable than export customers. The influence of electronic trading systems such as NYMEX and AECO-C/NIT have had significant impact on the pricing of natural gas. These systems, by providing timely information to market participants. enables them to manage price

  17. Canadian hydrocarbon transportation system : transportation assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provided an assessment of the Canadian hydrocarbon transportation system. In addition to regulating the construction and operation of Canada's 45,000 km of pipeline that cross international and provincial borders, Canada's National Energy Board (NEB) regulates the trade of natural gas, oil and natural gas liquids. The ability of pipelines to delivery this energy is critical to the country's economic prosperity. The pipeline system includes large-diameter, cross-country, high-pressure natural gas pipelines, low-pressure crude oil and oil products pipelines and small-diameter pipelines. In order to assess the hydrocarbon transportation system, staff at the NEB collected data from pipeline companies and a range of publicly available sources. The Board also held discussions with members of the investment community regarding capital markets and emerging issues. The assessment focused largely on evaluating whether Canadians benefit from an efficient energy infrastructure and markets. The safety and environmental integrity of the pipeline system was also evaluated. The current adequacy of pipeline capacity was assessed based on price differentials compared with firm service tolls for major transportation paths; capacity utilization on pipelines; and, the degree of apportionment on major oil pipelines. The NEB concluded that the Canadian hydrocarbon transportation system is working effectively, with an adequate capacity in place on existing natural gas pipelines, but with a tight capacity on oil pipelines. It was noted that shippers continue to indicate that they are reasonably satisfied with the services provided by pipeline companies and that the NEB-regulated pipeline companies are financially stable. 14 refs, 11 tabs., 28 figs., 4 appendices

  18. Residència canina

    OpenAIRE

    Rafart Roca, Mariola

    2013-01-01

    L’idea principal d’aquest projecte consisteix en la construcció d’una Residència Canina a la localitat de la Torre d’Oristà (Osona), en una zona de proximitat al poble però dins de terreny rústic. La zona estarà composta per cinc grans espais: - Edifici on s’ubicarà: lavabos, oficina, perruqueria canina i magatzem. - Bateria de gosseres. - Sala de maquinària. - Zona de piscina. - Zona d’esbarjo. A més també es modificarà en petita escala l’entorn de la zona, per adapta...

  19. OCT assisted identification of the grade of encrustation of urologic catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Püls, Michaela; Stepp, Herbert; Zilinberg, Katja; Bader, Markus; Weidlich, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Introduction: Ureteric stenting is a commonly used endourologic procedure for temporary and long-term drainage of an obstructed upper urinary tract. The indication for ureteric stenting is obstruction due to intrinsic (intraureteral stones, strictures, or tumors) or extrinsic (for example compressing pelvic or retroperitoneal mass) causes. Despite the fact that stents do certainly have proven benefits in all fields of urology, there are potential morbidities. The most common problem of indwelling ureteral stents is infection. As foreign body in the urinary system, stents act as a nidus for bacteria colonization, crystallization and encrustation. Bacteria induced biofilm formation predisposes for the crystallization of lithogenic salts, such as calcium-phosphate, calcium-oxalate, magnesium-phosphate on the surface initiating stent encrustation. It was the objective of this study to evaluate whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) using both the surface and the endoluminal technique is feasible to investigate the locations and degree of encrustation process in clinically used ureteral stents. Patients and methods: After removal from patients, fourteen polyurethane JJ stents were investigated. A fresh JJ served as a control. The external surfaces were examined using an endoscopic surface OCT whereas the intraluminal surfaces were investigated by an endoluminal radial OCT device. The focus was on detection of encrustation or crystalline sedimentation. Results: In 12 female and 2 male patients, the median indwelling time of the ureteral catheter was 100 days (range 19- 217). Using the endoluminal OCT, the size and grade of intraluminal encrustation could be expressed as a percentage relating to the open lumen of the reference stent. The maximum encrustation observed resulted in a remaining unrestricted lumen of 15-35% compared to the reference. The luminal reduction caused by encrustation was significantly higher at the proximal end of the ureteral stent as compared

  20. Refugees and education in Canadian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprielian-Churchill, Isabel

    1996-07-01

    This article summarizes some of the findings and recommendations of a research project focusing on the nature and needs of refugee students in Canadian schools. The school performance of refugee students is examined under the following headings: immigration regulations; initial identification, assessment, placement and monitoring; unaccompanied youngsters; "at risk" students; academic needs; the conflict of cultures. In particular, the article discusses the changing role of the school in the light of recent immigration trends. Many of the findings are applicable to other national settings.