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Sample records for canadian spine society

  1. Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Canadian Thoracic Society Position Statement on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

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    David Langleben

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society requested a position statement on pulmonary arterial hypertension from leading Canadian experts. The present document is intended to act as an update for the clinician, to provide a template for the initial evaluation of patients, to enable the understanding of current therapeutic paradigms based on approved indications for Canada, to highlight new therapies on the horizon, and to state the positions of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society on resource management for pulmonary arterial hypertension in Canada.

  2. Canadian Civil Society Organizations and Human Rights and Global ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project aims to strengthen the capacity of Canadian civil society organizations (CSOs) to inform Canadian policy on human rights and global justice. The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) receives core funding from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). This grant will provide ...

  3. Does applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduce cervical spine radiography rates in alert patients with blunt trauma to the neck? A retrospective analysis

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    Yesupalan Rajam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cautious outlook towards neck injuries has been the norm to avoid missing cervical spine injuries. Consequently there has been an increased use of cervical spine radiography. The Canadian Cervical Spine rule was proposed to reduce unnecessary use of cervical spine radiography in alert and stable patients. Our aim was to see whether applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduced the need for cervical spine radiography without missing significant cervical spine injuries. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted in 2 hospitals. 114 alert and stable patients who had cervical spine radiographs for suspected neck injuries were included in the study. Data on patient demographics, high risk & low risk factors as per the Canadian Cervical Spine rule and cervical spine radiography results were collected and analysed. Results 28 patients were included in the high risk category according to the Canadian Cervical Spine rule. 86 patients fell into the low risk category. If the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied, there would have been a significant reduction in cervical spine radiographs as 86/114 patients (75.4% would not have needed cervical spine radiograph. 2/114 patients who had significant cervical spine injuries would have been identified when the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied. Conclusion Applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule for neck injuries in alert and stable patients would have reduced the use of cervical spine radiographs without missing out significant cervical spine injuries. This relates to reduction in radiation exposure to patients and health care costs.

  4. Neck and spine injuries in Canadian cheerleaders: An increasing trend.

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    Hardy, Isabelle; McFaull, Steven; Saint-Vil, Dickens

    2015-05-01

    Cheerleading, now increasingly practiced in Canada, has a high propensity to cause traumatic neck and spine injuries. We aimed to evaluate the importance of neck and spine injuries in the practice of cheerleading and their occurrence mechanisms in order to propose preventive measures. A retrospective cohort study of cheerleading injuries extracted from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program database between 1990 and 2010 was performed. Overall, there were 1496 cases of injuries documented secondary to cheerleading (median age 15, 4 (IQR=2, 2) years; 1410 women (94%)). Of those, 125 cases (8%) were neck and spine injuries. The most frequent injury was a sprain/strain (47%). More severe injuries included fractures (4%), muscle or tendon injury (3%), dislocation (1%), and nerve injury (1%). Over half of these injuries were caused by either falling from (26%) or basing/spotting a stunt from height (26%). Other mechanisms include being thrown/falling from a high toss (10%) and falling from a pyramid (8%). Of the 125 cases, 3 (2, 4%) were admitted to hospital. Most neck and spine injuries were related to stunts. Although the proportion of serious injury is low, the increasing trend for the practice of cheerleading calls for preventive measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Planning and Evaluation by Canadian Civil Society Organizations ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Planning and Evaluation by Canadian Civil Society Organizations : Bridging Gaps between Methodologies. In the current global context, Canadian civil society organizations (CSOs) are finding it increasingly difficult to assess their efficiency and effectiveness, and report to external stakeholders, both donor agencies and ...

  6. Children presenting to a Canadian hospital with trampoline-related cervical spine injuries.

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    Leonard, Heather; Joffe, Ari R

    2009-02-01

    Trampoline-related injuries are preventable by avoidance. There are few published reports focusing on cervical spine injuries from trampolines in the paediatric population. Patients younger than 18 years of age who presented to Stollery Children's Hospital (Edmonton, Alberta) between 1995 and 2006, with a cervical spine injury or death from trampoline use were identified via a medical records database search. Data were collected retrospectively from the hospital charts, and were presented using descriptive statistics. There were seven cases of cervical spine injury secondary to trampoline use. Four patients had lasting neurological deficits at discharge from hospital, and another patient died at the scene due to refractory cardiac arrest. Injuries were sustained both on (n=5) and off (n=2) the trampoline mat from mechanisms that included attempted somersaults on the trampoline and falls from the trampoline. All the trampolines were privately owned home trampolines. An ambulance was called for five patients, intravenous fluids were administered to two patients with hypotension and spinal shock, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed on one patient. All six patients surviving the initial injury were admitted to hospital for a mean +/- SD of 9.5+/-9.0 days. These six patients underwent imaging including x-rays, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and three patients required surgery for spinal stabilization. Cervical spine injuries from trampolines lead to severe neurological sequelae, death, hospitalization and significant resource use. The authors agree with the Canadian Paediatric Society's statement that trampolines should not be used for recreational purposes at home, and they support a ban on all paediatric use of trampolines.

  7. Diagnosis and Management of Asthma in Preschoolers: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Paediatric Society Position Paper

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    Francine M Ducharme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma often starts before six years of age. However, there remains uncertainty as to when and how a preschool-age child with symptoms suggestive of asthma can be diagnosed with this condition. This delays treatment and contributes to both short- and long-term morbidity. Members of the Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Clinical Assembly partnered with the Canadian Paediatric Society to develop a joint working group with the mandate to develop a position paper on the diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers.

  8. Enhancing Canadian Civil Society Research and Knowledge-Based ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Enhancing Canadian Civil Society Research and Knowledge-Based Practice in a Rapidly Changing Landscape for International Development ... Women in the developing world continue to face obstacles that limit their ability to establish careers and become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and ...

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Driving: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Sleep Society Position Paper

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    Najib Ayas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA experience sleep fragmentation and poor sleep quality that results in daytime sleepiness, which impairs performance during driving and leads to an increased risk for collisions. Not surprisingly, observational studies have shown that patients with OSA experience a two- to 10-fold higher risk for collision compared with healthy controls. Although treatment would clearly mitigate these risks, there is no current Canadian position on driving and OSA. This article, the first Canadian position statement addressing the issue, provides an overview of provincial regulations and proposes recommendations with regard to driving in patients with OSA.

  10. The Canadian Atherosclerosis Society--history and present status.

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    Haust, M D

    1991-10-01

    Since its inception in 1983 the Canadian Atherosclerosis Society (CAS) has established itself firmly on the national and international scene as a forceful scientific voice. Its presence and activities have had their dominant expression at annual meetings held jointly with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) and the Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation (CSCI) and in sponsoring other scientific and educational events, the most important of which was the Canadian Consensus Conference on Cholesterol (Ottawa, March 1988). It provided a forum for interaction between the scientific community, government, funding agencies, industry and the general public, and culminated in concrete recommendations for the populace of Canada. It also 'induced' a continuum in governmental and public concern for health with respect to atherosclerosis, and beyond it, the field of cardiovascular diseases. This dialogue continues. As a member (Constituent Society) of the International Atherosclerosis Society (IAS), the CAS has a voice in the international community, its policies and activities. The membership increase from 69 in 1983 to 175 in 1991 reflects steady growth of the CAS. The Society has been active in other areas (publications, awards for young investigators, and common educational endeavours with other groups) and will be host to the 1994 International Symposium on Atherosclerosis. Over a short period of only eight years, all of the above attests to sufficient progress (or achievement) for any scientific society. And yet, there remain quite a few areas not addressed as yet and some sad experiences (eg, that with the Long Term Planning Committee) that must be quickly remedied, if the Society is to keep pace with the everchanging emphasis in research that in the final analysis aims at improving the overall well-being and health of all Canadians. Inherent in the definition of history is the premise that accounts be provided of facts only. Historians

  11. Canadian Council for Area Studies Learned Societies - 2007-2008 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CCASLS) provides a shared secretariat for four area studies associations: the Canadian Association of African Studies (CAAS); the Canadian Asian Studies Association (CASA): the Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies ...

  12. Abstracts from the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society Quebec City, April 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Auais, M.; Morin, S.; Finch, L.; Sara, A.; Mayo, N.; Charise, A.; Islam, A.; Muir, Susan; Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Kennedy, C.C.; Papaioannou, A.; Ioannidis, G.; Giangregorio, L.M.; Adachi, J.D.; Thabane, L.

    2012-01-01

    The opinions expressed in the abstracts are those of the authors and are not to be construed as the opinion of the publisher (Canadian Geriatrics Society) or the organizers of the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society. Although the publisher (Canadian Geriatrics Society) has made every effort to accurately reproduce the abstracts, the Canadian Geriatrics Society and the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society assumes no responsibility and/...

  13. Canadian Pain Society Position Statement on Pain Relief

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    Judith H Watt-Watson

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report outlines key requirements that are central to helping patients manage pain effectively. Although current standards are available as guides for practice, the prevalence of pain suggests that many health professionals do not know and/or cannot relate to these standards. Therefore, a brief, pragmatic statement may be more useful initially for health professionals and patients learning about problematic pain outcomes. The principles in the brief statement produced by the Canadian Pain Society clarify and emphasize key underlying assumptions that have directed the development of many pain standards. The aim of the present paper is to increase awareness of ineffective pain practices and the importance of pain relief, and to stimulate further work in this area.

  14. Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Paediatric Society position paper.

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    Ducharme, Francine M; Dell, Sharon D; Radhakrishnan, Dhenduka; Grad, Roland M; Watson, Wade T A; Yang, Connie L; Zelman, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Asthma often starts before six years of age. However, there remains uncertainty as to when and how a preschool-age child with symptoms suggestive of asthma can be diagnosed with this condition. This delays treatment and contributes to both short- and long-term morbidity. Members of the Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Clinical Assembly partnered with the Canadian Paediatric Society to develop a joint working group with the mandate to develop a position paper on the diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers. In the absence of lung function tests, the diagnosis of asthma should be considered in children one to five years of age with frequent (≥ 8 days/month) asthma-like symptoms or recurrent (≥ 2) exacerbations (episodes with asthma-like signs). The diagnosis requires the objective document of signs or convincing parent-reported symptoms of airflow obstruction (improvement in these signs or symptoms with asthma therapy), and no clinical suspicion of an alternative diagnosis. The characteristic feature of airflow obstruction is wheezing, commonly accompanied by difficulty breathing and cough. Reversibility with asthma medications is defined as direct observation of improvement with short-acting ß2-agonists (SABA) (with or without oral corticosteroids) by a trained health care practitioner during an acute exacerbation (preferred method). However, in children with no wheezing (or other signs of airflow obstruction) on presentation, reversibility may be determined by convincing parental report of a symptomatic response to a three-month therapeutic trial of a medium dose of inhaled corticosteroids with as-needed SABA (alternative method), or as-needed SABA alone (weaker alternative method). The authors provide key messages regarding in whom to consider the diagnosis, terms to be abandoned, when to refer to an asthma specialist and the initial management strategy. Finally, dissemination plans and priority areas for research are identified.

  15. Home Mechanical Ventilation: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

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    Douglas A McKim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of user-friendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information.

  16. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment: 2014 update.

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    Quinn, Robert H; Williams, Jason; Bennett, Brad L; Stiller, Gregory; Islas, Arthur A; McCord, Seth

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of the injured or potentially injured spine in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made regarding several parameters related to spinal immobilization. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. A treatment algorithm based on the guidelines is presented. This is an updated version of original WMS Practice Guidelines for Spine Immobilization in the Austere Environment published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):241-252. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Canadian Civil Society Organizations Influencing Policy and Practice

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    those of the author(s), and do not necessarily represent those of IDRC or its Board of Governors. Canadian ...... The literature on policy-making is in many ways intertwined with what has been written on research ...... the access to education for indigenous girls, the consequences of the armed conflict on indigenous women ...

  18. A matched-pair cluster design study protocol to evaluate implementation of the Canadian C-spine rule in hospital emergency departments: Phase III

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    Rowe Brian H

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians in Canadian emergency departments (EDs annually treat 185,000 alert and stable trauma victims who are at risk for cervical spine (C-spine injury. However, only 0.9% of these patients have suffered a cervical spine fracture. Current use of radiography is not efficient. The Canadian C-Spine Rule is designed to allow physicians to be more selective and accurate in ordering C-spine radiography, and to rapidly clear the C-spine without the need for radiography in many patients. The goal of this phase III study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an active strategy to implement the Canadian C-Spine Rule into physician practice. Specific objectives are to: 1 determine clinical impact, 2 determine sustainability, 3 evaluate performance, and 4 conduct an economic evaluation. Methods We propose a matched-pair cluster design study that compares outcomes during three consecutive 12-months "before," "after," and "decay" periods at six pairs of "intervention" and "control" sites. These 12 hospital ED sites will be stratified as "teaching" or "community" hospitals, matched according to baseline C-spine radiography ordering rates, and then allocated within each pair to either intervention or control groups. During the "after" period at the intervention sites, simple and inexpensive strategies will be employed to actively implement the Canadian C-Spine Rule. The following outcomes will be assessed: 1 measures of clinical impact, 2 performance of the Canadian C-Spine Rule, and 3 economic measures. During the 12-month "decay" period, implementation strategies will continue, allowing us to evaluate the sustainability of the effect. We estimate a sample size of 4,800 patients in each period in order to have adequate power to evaluate the main outcomes. Discussion Phase I successfully derived the Canadian C-Spine Rule and phase II confirmed the accuracy and safety of the rule, hence, the potential for physicians to improve care. What

  19. Impacts of the Canadian Evaluation Society's Evaluation Competitions for Students: Guest Editors' Introduction.

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    Obrecht, Michael; Porteous, Nancy L.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces the special section on the Student Paper Contest and the Case Competition sponsored by the Canadian Evaluation Society to foster the development of evaluators. The articles are written by former participants and include reflections on the value of the competition for evaluator development. (SLD)

  20. Publication rate of paper presentations from the Cervical Spine Research Society annual meeting.

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    Okafor, Louis; Frost, Chelsea; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-05-15

    Observational study. To evaluate the publication rate of podium presentations from the Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS) annual meeting and to evaluate the publication rate of award-winning papers from the CSRS annual meeting. Although various publication rates from Orthopaedic meetings have been reported, the publication rates from the CSRS annual meetings are not known. Paper presentations and award-winning papers from the 2007 to 2011 annual CSRS meeting were identified. Using PubMed, we searched for publications with a title of the paper presentations or containing the same authors. The publication rate of the award-winning papers was evaluated in the same manner. We collected the title of the journals the papers were published in and identified the most common journals. Of the 321 podium presentations, 211 were published (65.7%). The publication rate was highest for 2007 abstracts (77.8%), followed by 2008 and 2011 (68.5%) and lowest for 2009 (58.5%). Of the 45 award-winning papers, 35 were published (77.8%), which was significantly different compared with the non-award-winning papers (63.8%, P=0.046). Spine, The Spine Journal, and Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine were the most common publication journals for the papers. In one of the first studies evaluating the publication rate of podium presentation from the CSRS annual meetings, we found an overall publication rate of 65.8% and 77.8% for award-winning papers. This high publication rate indicates the quality of papers presented at the CSRS annual meeting. 4.

  1. Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Evidence-Based Update by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society

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    Lionel A Mandell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in our knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

  2. Summary of Canadian Guidelines for the Initial Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: An Evidence-Based Update by the Canadian Infectious Disease Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel A Mandell

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a serious illness with a significant impact on individual patients and society as a whole. Over the past several years, there have been significant advances in the knowledge and understanding of the etiology of the disease, and an appreciation of problems such as mixed infections and increasing antimicrobial resistance. The development of additional fluoroquinolone agents with enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been important as well. It was decided that the time had come to update and modify the previous CAP guidelines, which were published in 1993. The current guidelines represent a joint effort by the Canadian Infectious Diseases Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society, and they address the etiology, diagnosis and initial management of CAP. The diagnostic section is based on the site of care, and the treatment section is organized according to whether one is dealing with outpatients, inpatients or nursing home patients.

  3. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 guideline update: Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers, children and adults

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    M. Diane Lougheed; Catherine Lemiere; Ducharme, Francine M.; Chris Licskai; Dell, Sharon D; Rowe, Brian H.; Mark FitzGerald; Richard Leigh; Wade Watson; Louis-Philippe Boulet; Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Clinical Assembly

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines.METHODS: Four clinical questions were identified as a focus f...

  4. Quality of Care for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Development of Canadian Cardiovascular Society Quality Indicators.

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    Quraishi, Ata Ur Rehman; Lambert, Laurie J; Madan, Mina; Gong, Yanyan; Forsey, Anne; Galbraith, Diane; Gill, Neala; Oakes, Garth H; Lavoie, Andrea; Carere, Ronald G; Welsh, Robert C

    2016-12-01

    Currently there are more than 40 centres in Canada that perform more than 65,000 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) in a year. Considering the high volume of procedures and number of operators, the potential for variation in processes of care is high, and might lead to variation in the quality of care. As part of its quality initiative, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society convened a working group to develop a set of PCI Quality Indicators (QIs) that would be relevant, scientifically acceptable, and feasible to measure and report. The working group was comprised of clinical experts from across Canada and members of provincial and federal organizations involved in promoting the quality of health care. Using the Canadian Cardiovascular Society "Best Practices for Developing Cardiovascular Quality Indicators" methodology, a total of 23 QIs were proposed. Subsequent ranking and discussion led to the selection of 8 QIs. The selection and ranking of QIs were on the basis of clinical importance and relevance, scientific acceptability, and feasibility of their operationalization at a national level. The data definitions and technical notes of the QIs were refined after feasibility testing and Web consultation. Feasibility testing indicated that standardization and enhancements of knowledge infrastructure are essential to provide the comprehensive patient data necessary to evaluate the quality of PCI across Canada. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: introduction.

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    Marelli, Ariane; Beauchesne, Luc; Mital, Seema; Therrien, Judith; Silversides, Candice K

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society consensus conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present introductory section is a summary of the epidemiology and scope of adult CHD in Canada, the structure of the Canadian health care system and adult congenital cardiac health services in Canada. The recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis and genetic evaluation in this population are included. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, outcomes, diagnostic workups, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up recommendations. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  6. Publication rate of abstracts presented at the 2010 Canadian Ophthalmological Society Annual Meeting.

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    Basilious, Alfred; Benavides Vargas, Ana Maria; Buys, Yvonne M

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the publication rate of submitted abstracts accepted for presentation at the 2010 Canadian Ophthalmological Society (COS) Annual Meeting in peer-reviewed journals. A retrospective analysis and literature search of abstracts presented at the 2010 COS Annual Meeting. Abstracts accepted as an oral presentation or poster from the 2010 COS Annual Meeting were tabulated by type of presentation (oral vs poster), subspecialty, study design, number of authors, and principal investigator's institution. A PubMed search was conducted for each abstract by key word, first author, and last author. The year of publication, journal, and impact factor were recorded for identified publications. Publication rate was calculated by type of presentation, subspecialty, study design, number of authors, and institution. A total of 175 abstracts were presented at the 2010 COS Annual Meeting. There were 105 oral (60%) and 70 poster (40%) presentations. The overall publication rate was 45.7%; 49.5% for oral presentations and 40.0% for posters. Cornea (57.6%) and public health (54.5%) had the highest publication rates of all subspecialties. Randomized control trials (71.4%) and cohort studies (70.0%) had higher publication rates than other study designs. Overall, 28.8% of abstracts were published in the Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. The average impact factor of all publications was 2.73. Of abstracts presented at the 2010 COS Annual Meeting, 45.7% were published within 5 years after the conference. This publication rate is within the upper end of previously reported meeting publication rates for medical societies. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Facilitators and barriers to application of the Canadian C-spine rule by emergency department triage nurses.

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    Clement, Catherine M; Stiell, Ian G; Lowe, Maureen A; Brehaut, Jamie C; Calder, Lisa A; Vaillancourt, Christian; Perry, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-01

    We recently conducted a multicentre implementation study on the use of the Canadian C-Spine Rule (CCR) by emergency department (ED) nurses to clear the c-spine in alert and stable trauma patients (n = 4506). The objective of this study was to conduct a survey of nurses, physicians, and administrators to evaluate their views on the facilitators and barriers to the implementation of the CCR. We conducted both a paper-based and an electronic survey of the three different ED hospital staff groups of nine large teaching hospitals in Ontario, including six regional trauma centres. The content of this survey was informed by a qualitative evaluation of the opinions of the study nurses who had participated in the validation study. 57.5% (281/489) ED triage nurses, 50.2% ED physicians, and 82.8% of administrators responded. Nurse responses most often showed support from manager/educators and teamwork between physicians, nurses, and managers as being important facilitators to the use of the CCR. Physician responses most often identified the importance of a nurse leader/champion/educator, and presence of strong physician leaders. Administrator responses indicated the importance of nurse educators/champions, nurse engagement, and educational support. Barriers indicated by all three groups included busy department, lack of physician support, and lack of nursing support. Bringing about change in clinical practice is complex. Strong leadership, effective communication, and senior physician buy-in appear to be very important. Identification of system-specific barriers and facilitators are important components of successful knowledge translation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Introducing the Canadian Thoracic Society Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation

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    Samir Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS is leveraging its strengths in guideline production to enable respiratory guideline implementation in Canada. The authors describe the new CTS Framework for Guideline Dissemination and Implementation, with Concurrent Evaluation, which has three spheres of action: guideline production, implementation infrastructure and knowledge translation (KT methodological support. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research ‘Knowledge-to-Action’ process was adopted as the model of choice for conceptualizing KT interventions. Within the framework, new evidence for formatting guideline recommendations to enhance the intrinsic implementability of future guidelines were applied. Clinical assemblies will consider implementability early in the guideline production cycle when selecting clinical questions, and new practice guidelines will include a section dedicated to KT. The framework describes the development of a web-based repository and communication forum to inventory existing KT resources and to facilitate collaboration and communication among implementation stakeholders through an online discussion board. A national forum for presentation and peer-review of proposed KT projects is described. The framework outlines expert methodological support for KT planning, development and evaluation including a practical guide for implementers and a novel ‘Clinical Assembly – KT Action Team’, and in-kind logistical support and assistance in securing peer-reviewed funding.

  9. Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the 2012 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Anemia in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moist, Louise M; Troyanov, Stéphan; White, Colin T; Wazny, Lori D; Wilson, Jo-Anne; McFarlane, Phil; Harwood, Lori; Sood, Manish M; Soroka, Steven D; Bass, Adam; Manns, Braden J

    2013-11-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) 2012 clinical practice guideline for anemia management in patients with chronic kidney disease provides the structural and evidence base for the Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on this guideline's relevancy and application to the Canadian health care system. While in general agreement, we provide commentary on 11 of the 61 KDIGO guideline statements. Specifically, we agreed that a therapeutic trial of iron is appropriate in cases in which a reduction in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) dosage or avoidance of ESA and transfusion is desired, transferrin saturations are >30%, and ferritin concentrations are >500 μg/L. However, we concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support an upper target or threshold for ferritin and transferrin saturation levels. We agree with the initiation of ESA treatment when hemoglobin (Hb) level is 90-100 g/L; however, we specifically state that an acceptable range for Hb level is 95-115 g/L, with a target of 100-110 g/L, and add caution to individualization above this range due to concerns regarding the safety of ESAs. We agree that ESAs should be used with considerable caution in patients with active malignancy, history of stroke, or history of malignancy, and we suggest initiating ESA therapy at Hb level of 90 g/L and to aim for a Hb level in the range of 90-105 g/L. The reader is encouraged to note the level of evidence and review the entire KDIGO anemia guideline to interpret the guideline statements and commentary appropriately. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Factor analysis of the North American Spine Society outcome assessment instrument: a study based on a spine registry of patients treated with lumbar and cervical disc arthroplasty.

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    Aghayev, Emin; Elfering, Achim; Schizas, Constantin; Mannion, Anne F

    2014-06-01

    Studies involving factor analysis (FA) of the items in the North American Spine Society (NASS) outcome assessment instrument have revealed inconsistent factor structures for the individual items. This study examined whether the factor structure of the NASS varied in relation to the severity of the back/neck problem and differed from that originally recommended by the developers of the questionnaire, by analyzing data before and after surgery in a large series of patients undergoing lumbar or cervical disc arthroplasty. Prospective multicenter observational case series. Three hundred ninety-one patients with low back pain and 553 patients with neck pain completed questionnaires preoperatively and again at 3 to 6 and 12 months follow-ups (FUs), in connection with the SWISSspine disc arthroplasty registry. North American Spine Society outcome assessment instrument. First, an exploratory FA without a priori assumptions and subsequently a confirmatory FA were performed on the 17 items of the NASS-lumbar and 19 items of the NASS-cervical collected at each assessment time point. The item-loading invariance was tested in the German version of the questionnaire for baseline and FU. Both NASS-lumbar and NASS-cervical factor structures differed between baseline and postoperative data sets. The confirmatory analysis and item-loading invariance showed better fit for a three-factor (3F) structure for NASS-lumbar, containing items on "disability," "back pain," and "radiating pain, numbness, and weakness (leg/foot)" and for a 5F structure for NASS-cervical including disability, "neck pain," "radiating pain and numbness (arm/hand)," "weakness (arm/hand)," and "motor deficit (legs)." The best-fitting factor structure at both baseline and FU was selected for both the lumbar- and cervical-NASS questionnaires. It differed from that proposed by the originators of the NASS instruments. Although the NASS questionnaire represents a valid outcome measure for degenerative spine diseases, it

  11. Canadian Cardiovascular Society atrial fibrillation guidelines 2010: rate and rhythm management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Anne M; Verma, Atul; Talajic, Mario; Nattel, Stanley; Dorian, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The goals of atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL) arrhythmia management are to alleviate patient symptoms, improve patient quality of life, and minimize the morbidity associated with AF and AFL. Arrhythmia management usually commences with drugs to slow the ventricular rate. The addition of class I or class III antiarrhythmic drugs for restoration or maintenance of sinus rhythm is largely determined by patient symptoms and preferences. For rate control, treatment of persistent or permanent AF and AFL should aim for a resting heart rate of myocardial infarction or left ventricular dysfunction. Digoxin is not recommended as monotherapy for rate control in active patients. Digoxin and dronedarone may be used in combination with other agents to optimize rate control. The first-choice antiarrhythmic drug for maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with non structural heart disease can be any one of dronedarone, flecainide, propafenone, or sotalol. In patients with abnormal ventricular function but left ventricular ejection fraction >35%, dronedarone, sotalol, or amiodarone is recommended. In patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <35%, amiodarone is the only drug usually recommended. Intermittent antiarrhythmic drug therapy ("pill in the pocket") may be considered in symptomatic patients with infrequent, longer-lasting episodes of AF or AFL as an alternative to daily antiarrhythmic therapy. Referral for ablation of AF may be considered for patients who remain symptomatic after adequate trials of antiarrhythmic drug therapy and in whom a rhythm control strategy remains desired. Copyright © 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 2015 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains seventeen papers that were presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics/La Société Canadienne d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Mathématiques, held in Washington, D.C. In addition to showcasing rigorously reviewed modern scholarship on an interesting variety of general topics in the history and philosophy of mathematics, this meeting also honored the memories of Jacqueline (Jackie) Stedall and Ivor Grattan-Guinness; celebrated the Centennial of the Mathematical Association of America; and considered the importance of mathematical communities in a special session. These themes and many others are explored in these collected papers, which cover subjects such as New evidence that the Latin translation of Euclid’s Elements was based on the Arabic version attributed to al-Ḥajjāj Work done on the arc rampant in the seventeenth century The history of numerical methods for finding roots of nonlinear equations An original play feat...

  13. 2016 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Schlimm, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    This volume contains fourteen papers that were presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics/La Société Canadienne d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Mathématiques, held at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada. In addition to showcasing rigorously reviewed modern scholarship on an interesting variety of topics in the history and philosophy of mathematics, this meeting also honored the life and work of the logician and philosopher of mathematics Aldo Antonelli (1962-2015). The first four papers in this book are part of that remembrance and have a philosophical focus. Included in these are a discussion of Bolzano’s objections to Kant’s philosophy of mathematics and an examination of the influence of rhetorical and poetic aesthetics on the development of symbols in the 16th and 17thCenturies. The remaining papers deal with the history of mathematics and cover such subjects as Early schemes for polar ordinates in the work of L’Hôpital, bas...

  14. 2014 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains thirteen papers that were presented at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics/La Société Canadienne d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Mathématiques, held on the campus of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. It contains rigorously reviewed modern scholarship on general topics in the history and philosophy of mathematics, as well as on the meeting’s special topic, Early Scientific Computation. These papers cover subjects such as •Physical tools used by mathematicians in the seventeenth century •The first historical appearance of the game-theoretical concept of mixed-strategy equilibrium •George Washington’s mathematical cyphering books •The development of the Venn diagram •The role of Euler and other mathematicians in the development of algebraic analysis •Arthur Cayley and Alfred Kempe’s influence on Charles Peirce's diagrammatic logic •The influence publishers had on the development of mathematical...

  15. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Targeted Testing and Augmentation Therapy: A Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DD Marciniuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Severe A1AT deficiency occurs in one in 5000 to one in 5500 of the North American population. While the exact prevalence of A1AT deficiency in patients with diagnosed COPD is not known, results from small studies provide estimates of 1% to 5%. The present document updates a previous Canadian Thoracic Society position statement from 2001, and was initiated because of lack of consensus and understanding of appropriate patients suitable for targeted testing for A1AT deficiency, and for the use of A1AT augmentation therapy. Using revised guideline development methodology, the present clinical practice guideline document systematically reviews the published literature and provides an evidence-based update. The evidence supports the practice that targeted testing for A1AT deficiency be considered in individuals with COPD diagnosed before 65 years of age or with a smoking history of <20 pack years. The evidence also supports consideration of A1AT augmentation therapy in nonsmoking or exsmoking patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s of 25% to 80% predicted attributable to emphysema and documented A1AT deficiency (level ≤11 μmol/L who are receiving optimal pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies (including comprehensive case management and pulmonary rehabilitation because of benefits in computed tomography scan lung density and mortality.

  16. The Surgical Management of Tibial Spine Fractures in Children: A Survey of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Taylor J; Storey, Eileen P; Ganley, Theodore J

    2017-09-22

    Tibial spine fractures are rare, complex injuries. Management remains varied given a lack of consensus about the optimal approach. Thus, the purpose of this study is to determine prevailing strategies among pediatric orthopaedists and establish areas of agreement and ongoing controversy in the management of tibial spine fractures. An electronic survey was distributed to the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) membership. Surgeon demographics, experience, and responses to clinical vignettes were collected. Surgeons were grouped according to how frequently they treat tibial spine fractures and responses were compared. Of the 180 POSNA members who completed the survey, all were attending surgeons and nearly all (90.4%) had academic affiliations, treated mostly skeletally immature patients (88.5%), and 3 or fewer fractures per year (62.4%). In younger patients, respondents were more likely to treat type II fractures closed and less likely to cross the physis. Arthrofibrosis was the most commonly reported complication and postoperative duration of immobilization was identified as a risk factor by most. However, high-frequency surgeons identified this risk factor more often (P=0.015) and recommended immobilization for <2 weeks more frequently (P=0.018). There was, however, considerable discrepancy regarding the duration of immobilization. Although there were areas of agreement on general principles, there continues to be disagreement regarding specific treatment strategies. Surgeons within POSNA agree on general principles of treatment for tibial spine fractures. Members, regardless of high-volume or low-volume caseload, are all less likely to pursue surgical options when treating younger patients and treating arthrofibrosis during the first 2 postoperative months. The most commonly reported adverse outcome after treatment was arthrofibrosis, for which high-frequency surgeons identified length of immobilization as a significant risk factor more often

  17. SHIFTING GROUND, SOLID FOUNDATIONS: IMAGINING A NEW PARADIGM FOR CANADIAN CIVIL SOCIETY ENGAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini Ramanujam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of civil society are increasingly decrying what they identify as an insidious trend whereby the government is targeting organizations whose mandates run contrary to the federal government’s political and economic agendas and creating a chill around public policy and advocacy work. The media as well as civil society organizations [CSOs] themselves have documented government attempts to undermine and stifle the voices of dissenting organizations, ranging from rhetorical attacks to the withdrawal of funding for ambiguous reasons. The climate of resentment and suspicion between civil society actors and the government is detrimental for safeguarding the tradition of accountability and transparency in Canada’s democratic institutions. Amidst this turbulent environment, this paper examines the often-made claim by CSO leaders in Canada that public funding is a necessary requirement for a strong civil society, with the aim of challenging and mobilizing the civil society community to not only survive but to reinvigorate its engagement to further social justice in this changing social and economic landscape. We argue that discussions of the state of civil society in Canada focus disproportionately on the question of funding and relationship-building with the government and expose the unforeseen consequences of this trade-off for CSOs, their members, and constituent communities.  We close by introducing the potential of a new paradigm of “principled engagement” that would allow Canadian CSOs to thrive as sustainable, adaptable social justice advocates in coming years.   Les membres de la société civile décrient de plus en plus ce qu’ils appellent la tendance insidieuse du gouvernement à cibler les organisations dont les mandats vont à l’encontre de ses programmes politiques et économiques et à freiner le travail de représentation et de plaidoyer lié aux politiques publiques. Tant les médias que les organisations de la soci

  18. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 Guideline Update: Diagnosis and Management of Asthma in Preschoolers, Children and Adults: Executive Summary

    OpenAIRE

    M. Diane Lougheed; Catherine Lemiere; Ducharme, Francine M.; Chris Licskai; Dell, Sharon D; Rowe, Brian H.; Mark FitzGerald; Richard Leigh; Wade Watson; Louis-Philippe Boulet; Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Clinical Assembly

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines.METHODS: Four clinical questions were identified as a focus f...

  19. Rates of infection after spine surgery based on 108,419 procedures: a report from the Scoliosis Research Society Morbidity and Mortality Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Sansur, Charles A; Berven, Sigurd H; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Broadstone, Paul A; Choma, Theodore J; Goytan, Michael J; Noordeen, Hilali H; Knapp, Dennis R; Hart, Robert A; Donaldson, William F; Polly, David W; Perra, Joseph H; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

    2011-04-01

    Retrospective review of a prospectively collected database. Our objective was to assess the rates of postoperative wound infection associated with spine surgery. Although wound infection after spine surgery remains a common source of morbidity, estimates of its rates of occurrence remain relatively limited. The Scoliosis Research Society prospectively collects morbidity and mortality data from its members, including the occurrence of wound infection. The Scoliosis Research Society morbidity and mortality database was queried for all reported spine surgery cases from 2004 to 2007. Cases were stratified based on factors including diagnosis, adult (≥ 21 years) versus pediatric (scoliosis, and type of kyphosis for both adult and pediatric patients. Factors associated with increased rate of infection included revision surgery (P spine surgeons, is an inherent potential complication. These data provide general benchmarks of infection rates as a basis for ongoing efforts to improve safety of care.

  20. Publication rate of abstracts presented at the Annual Congress of the Spine Society of Europe (years 2000-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Tobias L; Huck, Katharina; Osada, Nani; Trost, Matthias; Lange, Tobias; Schmidt, Carolin; Gosheger, Georg; Bullmann, Viola

    2012-10-01

    The quality of presentations at medical conferences is of major importance. The publication rate (PR) following congress presentation is an indicator of the extent and quality of a scientific society's activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate publication rates in the Spine Society of Europe (SSE), compare them with the results for American spine societies, and determine factors affecting publication. All 839 abstracts of podium and poster presentations at SSE congresses held in 2000-2003 were investigated. PRs in peer-reviewed journals within a period of 5 years were assessed. Subgroup analyses were performed for different study types. The consistency of abstracts with publications was also analyzed. The overall PR was 37.8%, with a mean of 17.7 ± 15.7 months between congress and publication and a mean impact factor of 1.8 ± 1.0 at the time of publication. Comparatively high PRs were found for podium presentations versus posters, studies with higher versus lower levels of evidence, experimental versus clinical studies, prospective versus retrospective studies, randomized versus nonrandomized studies, studies reporting significant main results versus those without, and multicenter studies versus single-center studies. Biomechanical studies also achieved high PRs. The PR was similar to that of NASS (40%) and only slightly inferior to that of SRS (47%) and ISSLS (45%). This shows the high quality of presentations at SSE congresses. The fate of unpublished abstracts is worth further consideration. It is questionable whether it is acceptable to cite abstracts that have not passed a journal's peer-review process and to implement their results in clinical practice.

  1. Publication rate of paper and podium presentations from the European Section of the Cervical Spine Research Society Annual Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, T; Bartels, R; Lind, B; Villas Tome, C; Vleggeert-Lankamp, C L A

    2016-07-01

    The Cervical Spine Research Society Europe (CSRS-E) actively promotes scientific activities, the annual meeting being the most evident of them. The publication rate of oral and poster presentations at the annual meeting could be a measure for the success of the promotional activities. The publication rates of abstracts presented at the annual European meetings of the CSRS are unknown. The quality of the abstracts presented at a conference is reflected by the publication rate. A high publication rate is usually interpreted as representative of high scientific value of the conference. Poster and podium presentations from the 2007 to 2012 annual meetings were identified. Pubmed was used to search for the abstract title and/or the combination of authors to verify whether the data were published in a peer-reviewed journal. Abstracts were considered published if the data presented at the meeting were identical to that in the publication. The journals in which the data were published were identified, as well as the origin of the research centre. From 2007 to 2012 826 abstracts were featured at the CSRS Europe annual meetings. There were 236 podium presentations and 590 poster presentations. 42 % of the podium presentations resulted in a publication, and 28 % of the poster presentations led to a publication. Overall, 32 % of accepted abstracts effectuated a publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Abstracts from European research groups had a publication rate of 29 % compared to 34 % for abstracts from non-European research groups. Spine, European Spine Journal, Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques and J Neurosurgery Spine were the most common publication journals for the abstracts. The mean impact factor of the journals in which was published was 2.2. 42 % of the abstracts that were accepted for podium presentation at the CSRS Europe resulted in a publication in peer-reviewed MEDLINE indexed journals. Publication rates are at the high end of the

  2. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single-ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the late outcomes, genetics, medical therapy and interventional approaches in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present executive summary is a brief overview of the new guidelines and includes the recommendations for interventions. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up requirements. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352134

  3. Report of the Canadian Hypertension Society Consensus Conference: 3. Pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, E; LeLorier, J; Burgess, E; Lange, I R; Leduc, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide Canadian physicians with evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. OPTIONS: No medication, or treatment with antihypertensive or anticonvulsant drugs. OUTCOMES: Prevention of maternal complications, and prevention of perinatal complications and death. EVIDENCE: Pertinent articles published from 1962 to September 1996 retrieved from the Pregnancy and Childbirth Module of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews an...

  4. Reliability and validity of the French-Canadian version of the scoliosis research society 22 questionnaire in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonjon, Guillaume; Ilharreborde, Brice; Odent, Thierry; Moreau, Sébastien; Glorion, Christophe; Mazda, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Outcome study to determine the internal consistency, reproducibility, and concurrent validity of the French-Canadian version of the Scoliosis Research Society 22 (SRS-22 fcv) patient questionnaire in France. To determine whether the SRS-22 fcv can be used in a population from France. The SRS-22 has been translated and validated in multiple countries, notably in the French-Canadian language in Quebec, Canada. Use of SRS-22 fcv seems appropriate for evaluating adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in France. However, French-Canadian French is noticeably different from the French spoken in France, and no study has investigated the use of a French-Canadian version of a health-quality questionnaire in another French population. The methods used for validating the SRS-22 fcv in Quebec were adopted for use with a group of 200 adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis and 60 healthy adolescents in France. Reliability and reproducibility were measured by the Cronbach α and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), construct validity by factorial analysis, concurrent validity by the Short-Form of the survey, and discriminant validity by analysis of variance and multivariate linear regression. In France, the SRS-22 fcv showed good global internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.87, intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.92), a coherent factorial structure, and high correlation coefficients between the SRS-22 fcv and Short-Form of the survey (P France, but further development and validation of a specific French questionnaire remain necessary to improve the assessment of functional outcomes of adolescents with scoliosis in France. N/A.

  5. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines on Perioperative Cardiac Risk Assessment and Management for Patients Who Undergo Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceppe, Emmanuelle; Parlow, Joel; MacDonald, Paul; Lyons, Kristin; McMullen, Michael; Srinathan, Sadeesh; Graham, Michelle; Tandon, Vikas; Styles, Kim; Bessissow, Amal; Sessler, Daniel I; Bryson, Gregory; Devereaux, P J

    2017-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines Committee and key Canadian opinion leaders believed there was a need for up to date guidelines that used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system of evidence assessment for patients who undergo noncardiac surgery. Strong recommendations included: 1) measuring brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal fragment of proBNP (NT-proBNP) before surgery to enhance perioperative cardiac risk estimation in patients who are 65 years of age or older, are 45-64 years of age with significant cardiovascular disease, or have a Revised Cardiac Risk Index score ≥ 1; 2) against performing preoperative resting echocardiography, coronary computed tomography angiography, exercise or cardiopulmonary exercise testing, or pharmacological stress echocardiography or radionuclide imaging to enhance perioperative cardiac risk estimation; 3) against the initiation or continuation of acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of perioperative cardiac events, except in patients with a recent coronary artery stent or who will undergo carotid endarterectomy; 4) against α2 agonist or β-blocker initiation within 24 hours before surgery; 5) withholding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin II receptor blocker starting 24 hours before surgery; 6) facilitating smoking cessation before surgery; 7) measuring daily troponin for 48 to 72 hours after surgery in patients with an elevated NT-proBNP/BNP measurement before surgery or if there is no NT-proBNP/BNP measurement before surgery, in those who have a Revised Cardiac Risk Index score ≥1, age 45-64 years with significant cardiovascular disease, or age 65 years or older; and 8) initiating of long-term acetylsalicylic acid and statin therapy in patients who suffer myocardial injury/infarction after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Responsiveness of the cervical Northern American Spine Society questionnaire (NASS) and the Short Form 36 (SF-36) in chronic whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Felix; Verra, Martin L; Lehmann, Susanne; Gysi, Françoise; Benz, Thomas; Aeschlimann, André

    2012-02-01

    To determine and compare the sensitivity to change of the condition-specific cervical Northern American Spine Society (NASS) and the generic Short Form 36 (SF-36). Prospective cohort study. One hundred and seventy five patients after whiplash injury. Four-week inpatient interdisciplinary pain management programme. MAIN MEASURES, ANALYSIS: Responsiveness of the NASS and the SF-36 was quantified by effect size and standardized response mean and compared within the same construct by the modified Jacknife test. Ability to detect improvement was compared using sensitivities determined from receiver operating characteristics curves. In pain, the NASS was comparable responsive to the SF-36 at the one-month follow-up (n = 175): effect sizes: 0.62 (NASS) versus 0.61 (SF-36), P = 0.914. The NASS was less responsive than the SF-36 in function: 0.23 versus 0.63, P SF-36), P = 0.234; function: 65% versus 80%, P = 0.002; pain+function: 68% versus 78%, P = 0.035. The six-month data were similar. The generic SF-36 was more responsive in function and equally responsive in pain when compared to the condition-specific NASS. The SF-36 can be recommended as a responsive instrument for measurement of pain and function in chronic whiplash syndrome.

  7. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Pediatric Cardiology Association Position Statement on Pulse Oximetry Screening in Newborns to Enhance Detection of Critical Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenny K; Fournier, Anne; Fruitman, Deborah S; Graves, Lisa; Human, Derek G; Narvey, Michael; Russell, Jennifer L

    2017-02-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital malformation and approximately 3 in 1000 newborns have critical congenital heart disease (CCHD). Timely diagnosis affects morbidity, mortality, and disability, and newborn pulse oximetry screening has been studied to enhance detection of CCHD. In this position statement we present an evaluation of the literature for pulse oximetry screening. Current detection strategies including prenatal ultrasound examination and newborn physical examination are limited by low diagnostic sensitivity. Pulse oximetry screening is safe, noninvasive, easy to perform, and widely available with a high specificity (99.9%) and moderately high sensitivity (76.5%). When an abnormal saturation is obtained, the likelihood of having CCHD is 5.5 times greater than when a normal result is obtained. The use of pulse oximetry combined with current strategies has shown sensitivities of up to 92% for detecting CCHD. False positive results can be minimized by screening after 24 hours, and testing the right hand and either foot might further increase sensitivity. Newborns with abnormal screening results should undergo a comprehensive assessment and echocardiography performed if a cardiac cause cannot be excluded. Screening has been studied to be cost neutral to cost effective. We recommend that pulse oximetry screening should be routinely performed in all healthy newborns to enhance the detection of CCHD in Canada. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. North American Spine Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Coverage Recommendations Access eBook Payor Access Practice Management Market Your Practice Career ... medical and scientific articles, topical debates, research review and commentary, and updates on the ...

  9. Report of the Canadian Hypertension Society Consensus Conference: 3. Pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, E; LeLorier, J; Burgess, E; Lange, I R; Leduc, L

    1997-11-01

    To provide Canadian physicians with evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. No medication, or treatment with antihypertensive or anticonvulsant drugs. Prevention of maternal complications, and prevention of perinatal complications and death. Pertinent articles published from 1962 to September 1996 retrieved from the Pregnancy and Childbirth Module of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and from MEDLINE; additional articles retrieved through a manual search of bibliographies; and expert opinion. Recommendations were graded according to levels of evidence. Maternal and fetal well-being were equally valued, with the belief that treatment side effects should be minimized. Reduction in the rate of adverse perinatal outcomes, including death. Potential side effects of antihypertensive drugs include placental hypoperfusion, intrauterine growth retardation and long-term effects on the infant. A systolic blood pressure greater than 169 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure greater than 109 mm Hg in a pregnant woman should be considered an emergency and pharmacologic treatment with hydralazine, labetalol or nifedipine started. Otherwise, the thresholds at which to start antihypertensive treatment are a systolic pressure of 140 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 90 mm Hg in women with gestational hypertension without proteinuria or pre-existing hypertension before 28 weeks' gestation, those with gestational hypertension and proteinuria or symptoms at any time during the pregnancy, those with pre-existing hypertension and underlying conditions or target-organ damage, and those with pre-existing hypertension and superimposed gestational hypertension. The thresholds in other circumstances are a systolic pressure of 150 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 95 mm Hg. For nonsevere hypertension, methyldopa is the first-line drug; labetalol, pindolol, oxprenolol and nifedipine are second-line drugs. Fetal distress attributed to

  10. Pharmacological Management of Chronic Neuropathic Pain – Consensus Statement and Guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE Moulin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NeP, generated by disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system, can be particularly severe and disabling. Prevalence estimates indicate that 2% to 3% of the population in the developed world suffer from NeP, which suggests that up to one million Canadians have this disabling condition. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of NeP are therefore urgently needed. Randomized, controlled trials, systematic reviews and existing guidelines focusing on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications are recommended in the guidelines if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound, randomized, controlled trial showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment are based on degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are certain antidepressants (tricyclics and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin. Second-line treatments recommended are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and topical lidocaine. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as third-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Recommended fourth-line treatments include cannabinoids, methadone and anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy, such as lamotrigine, topiramate and valproic acid. Treatment must be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Further studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes, and treatment of pediatric and central NeP.

  11. The Canadian experience with Durata and Riata ST Optim defibrillator leads: a report from the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society Device Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Matthew T; Ha, Andrew C T; Exner, Derek V; Tung, Stanley K K; Parkash, Ratika; Connors, Sean; Coutu, Benoit; Crystal, Eugene; Champagne, Jean; Philippon, Francois; Yee, Raymond; Stephenson, Elizabeth A; Nery, Pablo B; Essebag, Vidal; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Redfearn, Damian; Krahn, Andrew D; Healey, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    The St. Jude Medical Riata family of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) leads has demonstrated a high rate of externalized conductors and electrical failure. Given similar design elements of Durata to Riata, the purpose of this study was to assess the rates of failure of the Riata ST Optim and Durata lead families in Canada. All Canadian ICD-implanting centers were invited to submit follow-up information on all Optim-coated ICD leads implanted. Electrical failure was defined as a rapid change in impedance or pacing capture threshold leading to lead revision, or oversensing due to noise. Externalized conductors were defined as appearance of conductor wires outside the lead body. Systematic fluoroscopic screening for externalized conductors was not performed. As of December 1, 2012, 15 of 25 centers provided data on 3981 leads (44% of those sold in Canada during the same timeframe): 3477 Durata and 504 Riata ST Optim leads. The most common model numbers were 7122 (1516 leads [38%]), 7121 (707 leads [18%]), and 7120 (622 leads [16%]). Mean follow-up duration from implant to December 1, 2012, was 4.47 ± 0.48 years for Riata ST Optim leads and 2.00 ± 1.10 years for Durata leads. The annual rate of lead failure was 0.27% per year for Riata ST Optim leads and 0.24% per year for Durata leads. No instances of externalized conductors were identified in the failed leads. No deaths were attributed to lead failure; however, 2 patients experienced inappropriate shocks due to lead failure. The overall electrical failure rates of the Riata ST Optim and Durata leads appear to be low, and no instances of externalized conductors were observed. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Statistical Indicators of Ethno-Cultural Community Integration in Canadian Society = Indicateurs statistiques de l'integration des communautes ethnoculturelles dans la societe canadienne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, John

    This paper addresses the issue of measuring the integration of various ethnocultural communities into Canadian society by means of statistical or social indicators. The overall philosophy of the study is based on the following principles: (1) indicators should have a clear meaning with respect to the underlying concept of integration; (2)…

  13. Safety and effectiveness of the herpes zoster vaccine to prevent postherpetic neuralgia: 2014 Update and consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canadian Pain Society Study Day participants

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Pain Society (CPS hosted its first Study Day in Toronto in July 2014, attended by experts in various fields of pain management and research (listed below. The aim was to review the National Advisory Committee on Immunization guidelines and to prepare a CPS position statement concerning the use of the zoster vaccine in Canada.

  14. Lesbian mommy blogging in Canada: documenting subtle homophobia in Canadian society and building community online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes how lesbian mommy bloggers in Canada are using their blogs as forums for self-expression and a means to form community, as they record their unique experiences as queer parents. Further, it argues that lesbian mommy blogging is documenting a subtle form of homophobia that exists in Canada in terms of social acceptance. Although there is legal acceptance of queer families, society has not necessarily caught up with the law. These blogs show that lesbian parents in Canada still struggle with issues of equality, including difficulties being "out," invisibility, and having to advocate for the non-birth parent.

  15. Educators of the Information Society: Information Literacy Instruction in Canadian Informational Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Henkel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As information literacy is a key competence of the information society, information literacy instruction in public as well as academic libraries is crucial. Today, librarians do not only act as providers of information but also as educators of the information society's citizens. The rapid development of information and communications technologies is constantly changing the way we interact with information, making it difficult to keep up to date with instructional trends. This study aims to assess the perceived quality of information literacy instruction in libraries of Canada's informational cities: Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. Therefore, librarians were interviewed by means of a questionnaire inspired by the SERVQUAL diagnostic tool. The questionnaire comprises of two parts: The first part consists of questions regarding information literacy instruction, in the second part the focus is on the seven competence areas of information literacy. Based on the difference between the librarians' "Expectation" and "Experience", gap scores for all questionnaire items were calculated and are now being presented and discussed.

  16. A comparison of thoracolumbosacral orthoses and SpineCor treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients using the Scoliosis Research Society standardized criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Steven R; Mehlman, Charles T; Chan, Winston; Heifetz, Jonathan; Durrett, Gregory; Wall, Eric J

    2010-09-01

    SpineCor is a relatively new bracing system that uses dynamic bracing concepts in the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Limited data are available regarding its effectiveness. This study compared treatment outcomes of 2 groups of AIS patients treated via either a conventional rigid thoracolumbosacral orthoses (TLSO) or a SpineCor nonrigid orthosis. We identified 2 scoliosis patient cohorts: 35 patients treated with a TLSO and 32 patients treated with a SpineCor orthosis. All patients included in these groups conformed with the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) standardized criteria for AIS bracing: (1) Risser or =10 years. Outcomes were SRS standardized with failure being defined as curve progression > or =6 degrees, or ever exceeding 45 degrees, or having surgery recommended before skeletal maturity. All patients were followed through the completion of brace treatment or attainment of other treatment end points. The Yates corrected chi test and unpaired t test were used for data analysis. The 35 patients (32 girls, 3 boys) in the TLSO group had an average age of 13 years (range: 11.1-16.8) and an average primary curve magnitude of 33 degrees (range: 25-40 degrees). Follow-up averaged 2 years (range: 8-61 m) from the beginning of brace treatment. The 32 patients (28 girls, 4 boys) in the SpineCor group had an average age of 13 years (range: 11-15.2) and an average primary curve magnitude of 31 degrees (range: 25-40 degrees). Follow-up for this group averaged 2 years and 6 months (range: 13-73 mo) from the beginning of brace treatment. No significant difference (P=0.75) was found using the more strict outcome measure (< or =5-degree curve progression) as the success rates were 60% (21/35) for TLSO and 53% (17/32) for SpineCor. Similarly, no significant difference (P=0.62) was found using the more liberal outcome measure (never reached 45 degrees) as the success rates were 80% (28/35) for TLSO and 72% (23/32) for SpineCor. We were unable to identify

  17. Interventional spine and pain procedures in patients on antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications: guidelines from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, the American Academy of Pain Medicine, the International Neuromodulation Society, the North American Neuromodulation Society, and the World Institute of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narouze, Samer; Benzon, Honorio T; Provenzano, David A; Buvanendran, Asokumar; De Andres, José; Deer, Timothy R; Rauck, Richard; Huntoon, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Interventional spine and pain procedures cover a far broader spectrum than those for regional anesthesia, reflecting diverse targets and goals. When surveyed, interventional pain and spine physicians attending the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) 11th Annual Pain Medicine Meeting exhorted that existing ASRA guidelines for regional anesthesia in patients on antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications were insufficient for their needs. Those surveyed agreed that procedure-specific and patient-specific factors necessitated separate guidelines for pain and spine procedures. In response, ASRA formed a guidelines committee. After preliminary review of published complication reports and studies, committee members stratified interventional spine and pain procedures according to potential bleeding risk as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk procedures. The ASRA guidelines were deemed largely appropriate for the low- and intermediate-risk categories, but it was agreed that the high-risk targets required an intensive look at issues specific to patient safety and optimal outcomes in pain medicine. The latest evidence was sought through extensive database search strategies and the recommendations were evidence-based when available and pharmacology-driven otherwise. We could not provide strength and grading of these recommendations as there are not enough well-designed large studies concerning interventional pain procedures to support such grading. Although the guidelines could not always be based on randomized studies or on large numbers of patients from pooled databases, it is hoped that they will provide sound recommendations and the evidentiary basis for such recommendations.

  18. Effectiveness of the SpineCor brace based on the new standardized criteria proposed by the scoliosis research society for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coillard, Christine; Vachon, Valerie; Circo, Alin B; Beauséjour, Marie; Rivard, Charles H

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Dynamic SpineCor brace for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in accordance with the standardized criteria proposed by the Scoliosis Research Society Committee on Bracing and Nonoperative Management. They proposed these guidelines to make the comparison among studies more valid and reliable. From 1993 to 2006, 493 patients were treated using the SpineCor brace. Two hundred forty-nine patients met the criteria for inclusion, and 79 patients were still actively being treated. Overall, 170 patients have a definitive outcome. All girls were premenarchal or less than 1 year postmenarchal. Assessment of brace effectiveness included (1) percentage of patients who have 5 degrees or less curve progression, and percentage of patients who have 6 degrees or more progression; (2) percentage of patients who have been recommended/undergone surgery before skeletal maturity; (3) percentage of patients with curves exceeding 45 degrees at maturity (end of treatment); and (4) Two-year follow-up beyond maturity to determine the percentage of patients who subsequently underwent surgery. Successful treatment (correction, >5 degrees, or stabilization, +/-5 degrees) was achieved in 101 (59.4%) of the 170 patients from the time of the fitting of the SpineCor brace to the point in which it was discontinued. Thirty-nine immature patients (22.9%) required surgical fusion while receiving treatment. Two (1.2%) of 170 patients had curves exceeding 45 degrees at maturity. One mature patient (2.1%) required surgery within 2 years of follow-up beyond skeletal maturity. The conclusion drawn from these findings is that the SpineCor brace is effective for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Moreover, positive outcomes are maintained after 2 years because 45 (95.7%) of 47 patients stabilized or corrected their end of bracing Cobb angle up to 2 years after bracing. Therapeutic study-investigating the

  19. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 3. Recommendations on alcohol consumption. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, N R; Ashley, M J; Carruthers, S G; Lacourcière, Y; McKay, D W

    1999-05-04

    low-risk drinking guidelines (i.e., healthy adults who choose to drink should limit alcohol consumption to 2 or fewer standard drinks per day, with consumption not exceeding 14 standard drinks per week for men and 9 standard drinks per week for women). (3) Hypertensive patients should also be advised to limit alcohol consumption to the levels set out in the Canadian low-risk drinking guidelines. These recommendations are similar to those of the World Hypertension League, the National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on Primary Prevention of Hypertension and the previous recommendations of the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control and the Canadian Hypertension Society. They have not been clinically tested. The low-risk drinking guidelines are those of the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario and the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. The Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. The low-risk drinking guidelines have been endorsed by the College of Family Physicians of Canada and several provincial organizations.

  20. 55th Annual Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Conference on Epigenetics and Genomic Stability. Whistler, British Columbia, Canada, 14–18 March 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher J; Ausió, Juan

    2012-06-01

    The 55th Annual Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Conference on Epigenetics and Genomic Stability in Whistler, Canada, 14-18 March 2012, brought together 31 speakers from different nationalities. The organizing committee, led by Jim Davie (Chair) at the University of Manitoba (Manitoba, Canada), consisted of several established researchers in the fields of chromatin and epigenetics from across Canada. The meeting was centered on the contribution of epigenetics to gene expression, DNA damage and repair, and the role of environmental factors. A few interesting talks on replication added some insightful information on the controversial issue of histone post-translational modifications as genuine epigenetic marks that are inherited through cell division.

  1. Defining rates and causes of mortality associated with spine surgery: comparison of 2 data collection approaches through the Scoliosis Research Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffrey, Ellen; Smith, Justin S; Lenke, Lawrence G; Polly, David W; Chen, Ching-Jen; Coe, Jeffrey D; Broadstone, Paul A; Glassman, Steven D; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Ames, Christopher P; Shaffrey, Christopher I

    2014-04-01

    Retrospective review of prospectively collected databases. To compare 2 approaches for assessment of mortality associated with spine surgery. The Scoliosis Research Society collects morbidity and mortality data from its members. Previously, this included details for all spine cases and all complications. To reduce time burden and improve compliance, collection was changed to focus on a few major complications (death, neurological deficit, and blindness) for specific deformity diagnoses (scoliosis, spondylolisthesis, and kyphosis) and only for cases with complications. Data were extracted from the Scoliosis Research Society from 2004-2007 (detailed system) and 2009-2011 (simplified system). As an anchor for comparison, mortality rates were compared between the systems. Between 2009 and 2011, the number of deformity cases reported were 87,162, with 131 deaths (1.50/1000 cases). The mean age of these 131 patients was 50, mean American Society of Anesthesiologists grade was 2.8, 10% were smokers, and 18% had diabetes. Rates of death (per 1000 cases) were: idiopathic scoliosis (0.4), congenital scoliosis (1.3), neuromuscular scoliosis (3.6), other scoliosis (3.1), spondylolisthesis (0.6), and kyphosis (4.7). Common causes of mortality included respiratory (48), cardiac (32), sepsis (12), organ failure (9), and blood loss (7). Compared with the detailed system, the simplified system had greater surgeon compliance (79% vs. 62%, P < 0.001), greater number of deformity cases per reporting surgeon per year (139 vs. 90, P < 0.001), and modest but significantly lower mortality rates (1.50 vs. 1.80/1000 cases; P < 0.001). Causes of death were comparable between the 2 systems. On the basis of the simplified collection system, the rate of mortality for spinal deformity surgery was 1.50 per 1000 cases. Compared with the detailed system, the simplified system had significantly improved compliance and similar mortality rates. Although the simplified system is limited by less data

  2. Interventional Spine and Pain Procedures in Patients on Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Medications (Second Edition): Guidelines From the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, the American Academy of Pain Medicine, the International Neuromodulation Society, the North American Neuromodulation Society, and the World Institute of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narouze, Samer; Benzon, Honorio T; Provenzano, David; Buvanendran, Asokumar; De Andres, José; Deer, Timothy; Rauck, Richard; Huntoon, Marc A

    2017-12-22

    The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) 2012 survey of meeting attendees showed that existing ASRA anticoagulation guidelines for regional anesthesia were insufficient for their needs. Those surveyed agreed that procedure-specific and patient-specific factors required separate guidelines for pain and spine procedures. In response, a guidelines committee was formed. After preliminary review of published complications reports and studies, the committee stratified interventional spine and pain procedures according to potential bleeding risk: low-, intermediate-, and high-risk procedures. The ASRA regional anesthesia anticoagulation guidelines were largely deemed appropriate for the low- and intermediate-risk categories, but the high-risk category required further investigation. The first guidelines specific to interventional spine and pain procedures were published in 2015. Recent reviews evaluating bleeding complications in patients undergoing specific interventional pain procedures, the development of new regional anesthesia and acute pain guidelines, and the development of new anticoagulants and antiplatelet medications necessitate complementary updated guidelines. The authors desired coordination with the authors of the recently updated regional and acute pain anticoagulation guidelines. The latest evidence was sought through extensive database search strategies and the recommendations were evidence based when available and pharmacology driven otherwise. We could not provide strength and grading of these recommendations because there are not enough well-designed large studies concerning interventional pain procedures to support such grading. Although the guidelines could not always be based on randomized studies or on large numbers of patients from pooled databases, it is hoped that they will provide sound recommendations and the evidentiary basis for such recommendations. This publication is intended as a living document to be updated

  3. Morbidity and mortality of complex spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, Sven; Bari, Tanvir; Gehrchen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Most literature on complications in spine surgery has been retrospective or based on national databases with few variables. The Spine AdVerse Events Severity (SAVES) system has been found reliable and valid in two Canadian centers, providing precise information regarding all...

  4. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: outflow tract obstruction, coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silversides, Candice K.; Kiess, Marla; Beauchesne, Luc; Bradley, Timothy; Connelly, Michael; Niwa, Koichiro; Mulder, Barbara; Webb, Gary; Colman, Jack; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society

  5. [The Canadian Society of Nephrology 2014 clinical practice guideline for timing the initiation of chronic dialysis: a paradigm shift and the return of the clinical nephrologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina

    2014-01-01

    The recent guideline of the Canadian Society of Nephrology for timing the initiation of chronic dialysis may be seen as a "paradigm shift", meaning, according to the Kuhns theory, the development of a different viewpoint. The guideline is based on a careful review of the literature, with primary emphasis on patient survival and quality of life. Hence, the Authors choose qualitative keywords (intention -to-defer, in place of the intention-to-start-early), but also a qualitative process for deciding the start of dialysis, by providing an intentionally concise list of signs and symptoms not reducible to numbers, such as the presence of uremic symptoms. The recent guideline of the Canadian Society of Nephrology, regarding the timing of the initiation of chronic dialysis, may be seen as a "paradigm shift", that means, according to Kuhns theory, the development of a different viewpoint. The guideline is based on a careful review of the literature, with primary emphasis on patient survival and quality of life. Hence, the Authors choose not only qualitative keywords (intention -to-defer, in place of intention-to-start-early), but also a qualitative process for deciding the start of dialysis, by providing an intentionally concise list of signs and symptoms not reducible to numbers, such as the presence of uremic symptoms. The clinical Nephrologist emerges victorious; the decision to initiate dialysis is in his-her hands; it is not a team-work, or a numeric algorhythm: its a clinical choice. The clinical judgment is the only guide above 6 mL/min of eGFR. Below this limit, dialysis has to be started; however, the Authors state that the optimal management of patients with an eGFR of 6 mL/min per 1.73 m2 or less, it is based on limited data. Hence, numbers are back to haunt us; nevertheless, we should take the best of this paradigm shift: the decision is again in our hands, the clinic is our weapon, the responsibility is not reducible to pretty formulae. If we cannot hide

  6. Morphological and morphometric differentiation of dorsal-spined first stage larvae of lungworms (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae infecting muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus in the central Canadian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Kafle

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Umingmakstrongylus pallikuukensis and Varestrongylus eleguneniensis are the two most common protostrongylid nematodes infecting muskoxen in the North American Arctic and Subarctic. First stage larvae (L1 of these lungworms have considerable morphological similarity that makes their differential diagnosis very difficult. Using light microscopy, we studied in detail the L1 of these two species and identified the key differences in morphological and morphometric attributes. Thirty L1 of each species from naturally infected muskox were heat-killed and then assessed for morphological and morphometric features that could be used for species-level differentiation. Key differentiating features include: length and morphology of the tail extension, curvature of the body, ventral post-anal transverse cuticular striations, and total body length. A laboratory guide for differentiation of L1 based on these species-specific characters was prepared and used by an experienced observer to identify an additional 35 L1 extracted from a different set of fecal samples from free-ranging muskoxen with mixed infections. The identities of these L1 were confirmed by sequence analysis of the ITS-2 region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Accuracy of morphological identification was 100 percent, reflecting the reliability of the proposed guide for differentiation. Using the guide, three minimally trained lab assistants each fixed and accurately identified 10 of 10 randomly selected L1. Ability to morphologically differentiate these facilitates the monitoring of overlapping range expansion of both parasites in the Canadian Arctic. Studies enabling species-level parasite identification are also critical for defining biodiversity, detecting mixed infections, and understanding host–parasite interactions. Morphological identification is a simple, reliable and cost-effective alternative to labor and equipment intensive molecular methods and can easily be performed in low resource

  7. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 4. Recommendations on physical exercise training. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cléroux, J; Feldman, R D; Petrella, R J

    1999-05-04

    of moderate rhythmic exercise of the lower limbs, such as brisk walking or cycling, 3 or 4 times per week to reduce blood pressure, (2) Exercise should be prescribed as an adjunctive therapy for people who require pharmacologic therapy for hypertension, especially those who are not receiving beta-blockers. (3) People who do not have hypertension should participate in regular exercise as it will decrease blood pressure and reduce the risk of coronary artery disease, although there is no direct evidence that it will prevent hypertension. These recommendations agree with those of the World Hypertension League, the American College of Sports Medicine, the report of the US Surgeon General on physical activity and health, and the US National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Panel on Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health. These guidelines have not been clinically tested. The Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

  8. Lessons learned in applying the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research methodology to translating Canadian Emergency Department Information System Presenting Complaints List into German.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammen, Dominik; Greiner, Felix; Dormann, Harald; Mach, Carsten; Wrede, Christian; Ballaschk, Anne; Stewart, Declan; Walker, Steven; Oesterling, Christine; Kulla, Martin

    2017-03-02

    The patient's presenting complaint guides diagnosis and treatment in the emergency department, but there is no classification system available in German. The Canadian Emergency Department Information System (CEDIS) Presenting Complaint List (PCL) is available only in English and French. As translation risks the altering of meaning, the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) has set guidelines to ensure translational accuracy. The aim of this paper is to describe our experiences of using the ISPOR guidelines to translate the CEDIS PCL into German. The CEDIS PCL (version 3.0) was forward-translated and back-translated in accordance with the ISPOR guidelines using bilingual clinicians/translators and an occupationally mixed evaluation group that completed a self-developed questionnaire. The CEDIS PCL was forward-translated (four emergency physicians) and back-translated (three mixed translators). Back-translation uncovered eight PCL items requiring amendment. In total, 156 comments were received from 32 evaluators, six of which resulted in amendments. The ISPOR guidelines facilitated adaptation of a PCL into German, but the process required time, language skills and clinical knowledge. The current methodology may be applicable to translating the CEDIS PCL into other languages, with the aim of developing a harmonized, multilingual PCL.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  9. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  10. Superusers in social networks for smoking cessation: analysis of demographic characteristics and posting behavior from the Canadian Cancer Society's smokers' helpline online and StopSmokingCenter.net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Voci, Sabrina; Lee, Sharon; Fournier, Rachel; Selby, Peter

    2012-06-26

    Online social networks are popular components of behavior-change websites. Research has identified the participation of certain network members who assume leadership roles by providing support, advice, and direction to other members. In the literature, these individuals have been variously defined as key players, posters, active users, or caretakers. Despite their identification, very little research has been conducted on the contributions or demographic characteristics of this population. For this study, we collectively categorized key players, posters, active users, and caretakers as superusers. To analyze data from two large but distinct Web-assisted tobacco interventions (WATI) to help gain insight into superuser demographic characteristics and how they use social networks. We extracted cross-sectional data sets containing posting behaviors and demographic characteristics from a free, publicly funded program (the Canadian Cancer Society's Smokers' Helpline Online: SHO), and a free, privately run program (StopSmokingCenter.net: SSC). Within the reporting period (SHO: June 26, 2008 to October 12, 2010; SSC: May 17, 2007 to October 12, 2010), 21,128 individuals registered for the SHO and 11,418 registered for the SSC. Within the same period, 1670 (7.90%) registrants made at least one post in the SHO social network, and 1627 (14.25%) registrants made at least one post in the SSC social network. SHO and SSC superusers accounted for 0.4% (n = 95) and 1.1% (n = 124) of all registrants, and 5.7% (95/1670) and 7.62% (124/1627) of all social network participants, and contributed to 34.78% (29,422/84,599) and 46.22% (61,820/133,753) of social network content, respectively. Despite vast differences in promotion and group management rules, and contrary to the beliefs of group moderators, there were no statistically significant differences in demographic characteristics between the two superuser groups. To our knowledge, this is the first study that compared demographic

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a ... the Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  12. Reduction in sick leave and costs to society of patients with Meniere's disease after treatment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders: a controlled six-year cost-benefit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorne, Assar; Agerberg, Göran

    2003-04-01

    This study compares the frequency of sick leave between the three-year period after and the three-year period before coordinated treatment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders in 24 patients (ten males and 14 females) diagnosed with Meniere's disease. The frequency of sick leave for the patients was also compared with the frequency of sick leave in a control group from the population. A cost-benefit analysis was made regarding the costs to society of sick leave related to the treatment costs of the patients. In a previous study the same patients were treated for their severe signs and symptoms of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders, and they reported a substantial reduction in their vertigo, non-whirling dizziness, tinnitus, feeling of fullness in the ear, pain in the face and jaws, pain in the neck and shoulders, and headache. The number of days of sick leave and the year the patient began to receive disability pension due to the symptoms of Meniere's disease were obtained from the National Health Insurance Service in Sweden. Two of the patients received disability pension benefits due to Meniere's disease 17 years prior to their normal retirement pension. A third patient received disability pension for another reason and two were receiving a retirement pension. Data on the remaining 19 patients showed a considerable reduction in number of days of sick leave during the three-year period after coordinated treatment (270 days) compared with the three-year period before the treatment (1,536 days). The control subjects used a total of 14 days sick leave for the same symptoms during the same six-year period. Vertigo (nine days) was the dominant cause followed by pain in the neck and shoulders, and headache. The reduction in sick leave for the 19 nonretired patients and the treatment costs for the 24 patients can be used for a simple cost-benefit calculation for the subgroup of nonretired patients. During the first three years after treatment the

  13. Development of the Korean Spine Database and Automatic Surface Mesh Intersection Algorithm for Constructing e-Spine Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Dongmin; Jung, Hanmin; Sung, Won-Kyung; Nam, Dukyun

    2014-01-01

    By 2026, Korea is expected to surpass the UN’s definition of an aged society and reach the level of a superaged society. With an aging population come increased disorders involving the spine. To prevent unnecessary spinal surgery and support scientific diagnosis of spinal disease and systematic prediction of treatment outcomes, we have been developing e-Spine, which is a computer simulation model of the human spine. In this paper, we present the Korean spine database and automatic surface mes...

  14. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 1. Methods and an overview of the Canadian recommendations. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, N R; Burgess, E; Choi, B C; Taylor, G; Wilson, E; Cléroux, J; Fodor, J G; Leiter, L A; Spence, D

    1999-05-04

    the studies reviewed. Supplementing the diet with potassium, calcium and magnesium has not been associated with a clinically important reduction in blood pressure in people consuming a healthy diet. (1) It is recommended that health care professionals determine the body mass index (weight in kilograms/[height in metres]2) and alcohol consumption of all adult patients and assess sodium consumption and stress levels in all hypertensive patients. (2) To reduce blood pressure in the population at large, it is recommended that Canadians attain and maintain a healthy body mass index. For those who choose to drink alcohol intake should be limited to 2 or fewer standard drinks per day (maximum of 14/week for men and 9/week for women). Adults should exercise regularly. (3) To reduce blood pressure in hypertensive patients, individualized therapy is recommended. This therapy should emphasize weight loss for overweight patients, abstinence from or moderation in alcohol intake, regular exercise, restriction of sodium intake and, in appropriate circumstances, individualized cognitive behaviour modification to reduce the negative effects of stress. The recommendations were reviewed by all of the sponsoring organizations and by participants in a satellite symposium of the fourth international Conference on Preventive Cardiology. They are similar to those of the World Hypertension League and the Joint National committee, with the exception of the recommendations on stress management, which are based on new information. They have not been clinically tested. The Canadian Hypertension Society, the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at health Canada, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

  15. Professional Legitimation for Education in Canadian Universities: "The Canadian Journal of Education", 1976-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Donald

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, Donald Fisher reports on the history of the "The Canadian Journal of Education" as part of this 40th anniversary issue. Fisher states that the history of the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) has been profoundly influenced by changes in the role of the Canadian State. The 1960s and 1970s were a time…

  16. Lumbar spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower ... The lumbar CT scan is good for evaluating large herniated disks, ... smaller ones. This test can be combined with a myelogram to get ...

  17. Anatomy of the Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Resources Anatomy of the Spine Bones Vertebrae Each individual vertebra has unique features ... or "extensor". The muscles and ligaments in the spine work to hold the spine upright, and to ...

  18. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Affairs and Humanitarian Efforts Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  19. Thoracic spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - thoracic spine; Computed axial tomography scan - thoracic spine; Computed tomography scan - thoracic spine; CT scan - ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 44. US Food and Drug Administration. Computed tomography (CT). Updated August ...

  20. The Canadian Association for the Study of International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Canadian Association for the Study of International Development (CASID) was founded in 1989 to provide a forum for Canadian scholars, policymakers, and civil society to meet and exchange views. It is the only Canadian learned society devoted to the study of international development. The Association's journal, the ...

  1. Spine biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia

    2005-10-01

    Current trends in spine research are reviewed in order to suggest future opportunities for biomechanics. Recent studies show that psychosocial factors influence back pain behaviour but are not important causes of pain itself. Severe back pain most often arises from intervertebral discs, apophyseal joints and sacroiliac joints, and physical disruption of these structures is strongly but variably linked to pain. Typical forms of structural disruption can be reproduced by severe mechanical loading in-vitro, with genetic and age-related weakening sometimes leading to injury under moderate loading. Biomechanics can be used to quantify spinal loading and movements, to analyse load distributions and injury mechanisms, and to develop therapeutic interventions. The authors suggest that techniques for quantifying spinal loading should be capable of measurement "in the field" so that they can be used in epidemiological surveys and ergonomic interventions. Great accuracy is not required for this task, because injury risk depends on tissue weakness as much as peak loading. Biomechanical tissue testing and finite-element modelling should complement each other, with experiments establishing proof of concept, and models supplying detail and optimising designs. Suggested priority areas for future research include: understanding interactions between intervertebral discs and adjacent vertebrae; developing prosthetic and tissue-engineered discs; and quantifying spinal function during rehabilitation. "Mechanobiology" has perhaps the greatest future potential, because spinal degeneration and healing are both mediated by the activity of cells which are acutely sensitive to their local mechanical environment. Precise characterisation and manipulation of this environment will be a major challenge for spine biomechanics.

  2. Japanese 2011 nationwide survey on complications from spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    IMAJO, YASUAKI; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Yone , Kazunori; Okawa, Atsushi; Otani, Koji; Ogata, Tadanori; Ozawa, Hiroshi; SHIMADA, Yoichi; Neo, Masashi; Iguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Background The Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research (JSSR) previously carried out two nationwide surveys in 1994 and 2001 on complications from spine and spinal cord surgery. More than 10?years have now elapsed since 2001. Rapidly ageing populations have major impacts on society, particularly in the medical field. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the present situation for spine surgery in Japan. Methods The JSSR research team prepared a computerized questi...

  3. Hereditary angioedema: beyond international consensus - circa December 2010 - The Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Dr. David McCourtie Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema was published earlier this year in this Journal (Bowen et al. Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2010, 6:24 - http://www.aacijournal.com/content/6/1/24. Since that publication, there have been multiple phase III clinical trials published on either prophylaxis or therapy of hereditary angioedema and some of these products have changed approval status in various countries. This manuscript was prepared to review and update the management of hereditary angioedema. Objective To review approaches for the diagnosis and management of hereditary angioedema (HAE circa December 2010 and present thoughts on moving from HAE management from international evidence-based consensus to facilitate more local health unit considerations balancing costs, efficacies of treatments, and risk benefits. Thoughts will reflect Canadian and international experiences. Methods PubMed searches including hereditary angioedema and diagnosis, therapy, management and consensus were reviewed as well as press releases from various pharmaceutical companies to early December 2010. Results The 2010 International Consensus Algorithms for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema is reviewed in light of the newly published phase III Clinical trials for prevention and therapy of HAE. Management approaches and models are discussed. Conclusions Consensus approach and double-blind placebo controlled trials are only interim guides to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase IV clinical trials, meta analyses, data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, safety, and head-to-head clinical trials investigating superiority or non-inferiority comparisons of available approaches. Since not all therapeutic products are available in all jurisdictions

  4. Canadian petroleum history bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2003-09-27

    The Petroleum History Bibliography includes a list of more than 2,000 publications that record the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. The list includes books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles, company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry, humour, and an author index. It was created over a period of several years to help with projects at the Petroleum History Society. It is an ongoing piece of work, and as such, invites comments and additions.

  5. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) survey of radiation biology educators in U.S. and Canadian radiation oncology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Barry S; Held, Kathryn D; Rockwell, Sara; Williams, Jacqueline P; Zeman, Elaine M

    2009-11-01

    To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada. The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs. A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine ... limitations of MRI of the Spine? What is MRI of the Spine? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  7. Spine Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your backbone, or spine, is made up of 26 bone discs called vertebrae. The vertebrae protect your spinal cord and allow you to ... of problems can change the structure of the spine or damage the vertebrae and surrounding tissue. They ...

  8. Development of the Korean Spine Database and Automatic Surface Mesh Intersection Algorithm for Constructing e-Spine Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmin Seo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By 2026, Korea is expected to surpass the UN’s definition of an aged society and reach the level of a superaged society. With an aging population come increased disorders involving the spine. To prevent unnecessary spinal surgery and support scientific diagnosis of spinal disease and systematic prediction of treatment outcomes, we have been developing e-Spine, which is a computer simulation model of the human spine. In this paper, we present the Korean spine database and automatic surface mesh intersection algorithm to construct e-Spine. To date, the Korean spine database has collected spine data from 77 cadavers and 298 patients. The spine data consists of 2D images from CT, MRI, or X-ray, 3D shapes, geometry data, and property data. The volume and quality of the Korean spine database are now the world’s highest ones. In addition, our triangular surface mesh intersection algorithm automatically remeshes the spine-implant intersection model to make it valid for finite element analysis (FEA. This makes it possible to run the FEA using the spine-implant mesh model without any manual effort. Our database and surface mesh intersection algorithm will offer great value and utility in the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of patients suffering from spinal diseases.

  9. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    .... Focusing on the context of Canadian policy and society, the contributors illuminate migrants' testimonies of struggle, resistance, and solidarity as they negotiate a place for themselves in a new country. Topics range from the difficulties of Francophone refugees and the changing roles of fathers, to the experiences of queer newcomers and the importance of social unity to communal and individual health."--pub. desc.

  10. Workshops to disseminate the Canadian Thoracic Society guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to health care professionals in Ontario: impact on knowledge, perceived health care practices and participant satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Dilshad; Blouin, Maria; Hill, Kylie; Goldstein, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) has developed a clinical practice guideline (CPG) regarding the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Implementation of this CPG in the primary care setting requires an effective dissemination strategy. To examine the change in knowledge, participant satisfaction and perceived changes in clinical practice among health care professionals working in the primary care setting following attendance at a workshop to disseminate the CTS CPG for COPD. A 2.5 h workshop was conducted in three community health sites within Ontario. Each workshop comprised a didactic presentation and interactive case study discussions. Before, and one month following the workshop, a structured knowledge assessment questionnaire was administered. A structured satisfaction questionnaire and evaluative form that examined the impact of the workshop on the clinical management of COPD patients were administered immediately and three months following completion of the workshop, respectively. Sixty-nine participants attended the workshop. The mean score for the structured knowledge assessment questionnaire increased from 8.5+/-2.7 to 10.6+/-2.0 following the workshop (P=0.008). Eighty-nine per cent and 96% of participants indicated that they would recommend the workshop to a colleague and had greater confidence in their management of COPD patients, respectively. Following attendance of the workshop, 73%, 69% and 46% described increased patient education, patient monitoring and the use of objective testing in clinical practice, respectively. Workshop attendance was associated with high levels of satisfaction and important self-reported changes in clinical practice, which may reflect improved knowledge of the CTS CPG for COPD.

  11. I Am Canadian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joe

    2011-01-01

    "I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness......."I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness....

  12. Scoliosis and spine involvement in fibrous dysplasia of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Federico; Corsi, Alessandro; De Maio, Fernando; Riminucci, Mara; Ippolito, Ernesto

    2009-02-01

    Few studies focused on the prevalence of scoliosis and involvement of the spine in patients with fibrous dysplasia (FD) of bone. We examined for FD involvement of the spine and scoliosis in 56 patients affected by FD of bone. Fifty patients were part of a cohort reported in a multicentric study on FD promoted by European Pediatric Orthopedic Society (EPOS) in 1999, and six were new patients. There were 30 females and 26 males (mean age 12.5 years; range 1-42 years). Twenty-three had monostotic FD, 9 polyostotic FD, and 24 McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS). Scoliosis was observed in 11 cases of polyostotic FD and MAS (33.3%). In seven of the patients with scoliosis (63.3%) spine was involved by FD lesional tissue. FD lesions involved the thoracic or lumbar spine in all patients but one, where cervical spine was also affected. A correlation between scoliosis and either spinal (pscoliosis but in 2 of them spine was involved by FD. Scoliosis and spine involvement were never detected in monostotic FD. This study indicates that in FD patients with polyostotic disease (1) the prevalences of FD involvement of the spine and scoliosis are high enough to include spine in the clinico-radiographic survey of these patients, and (2) the involvement of the spine and pelvis by FD lesions and pelvic obliquity are important determinants in the occurrence of scoliosis.

  13. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. K.; Jeon, H. J.; Hong, K. C.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal.

  14. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  15. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... be placed over the lower part of your spine. You will be asked to hold your breath ... x-ray. The most common reason for lumbosacral spine x-ray is to look for the cause ...

  16. SpineData

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large-scale clinical registries are increasingly recognized as important resources for quality assurance and research to inform clinical decision-making and health policy. We established a clinical registry (SpineData) in a conservative care setting where more than 10,000 new cases...... of spinal pain are assessed each year. This paper describes the SpineData registry, summarizes the characteristics of its clinical population and data, and signals the availability of these data as a resource for collaborative research projects. Methods: The SpineData registry is an Internet-based system...... that captures patient data electronically at the point of clinical contact. The setting is the government-funded Medical Department of the Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, where patients receive a multidisciplinary assessment of their chronic spinal pain. Results: Started in 2011...

  17. Cervical spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the body area, called slices. These images can be stored, viewed on a monitor, or printed on film. Three-dimensional models of the cervical spine can ...

  18. Beyond the spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from...... highlight recent research in these new areas and discuss how clinical research efforts in musculoskeletal areas beyond the spine can benefit patient care and the future of the chiropractic profession....

  19. Universal values of Canadian astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brcic, Jelena; Della-Rossa, Irina

    2012-11-01

    Values are desirable, trans-situational goals, varying in importance, that guide behavior. Research has demonstrated that universal values may alter in importance as a result of major life events. The present study examines the effect of spaceflight and the demands of astronauts' job position as life circumstances that affect value priorities. We employed thematic content analysis for references to Schwartz's well-established value markers in narratives (media interviews, journals, and pre-flight interviews) of seven Canadian astronauts and compared the results to the values of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Russian Space Agency (RKA) astronauts. Space flight did alter the level of importance of Canadian astronauts' values. We found a U-shaped pattern for the values of Achievement and Tradition before, during, and after flight, and a linear decrease in the value of Stimulation. The most frequently mentioned values were Achievement, Universalism, Security, and Self-Direction. Achievement and Self Direction are also within the top 4 values of all other astronauts; however, Universalism was significantly higher among the Canadian astronauts. Within the value hierarchy of Canadian astronauts, Security was the third most frequently mentioned value, while it is in seventh place for all other astronauts. Interestingly, the most often mentioned value marker (sub-category) in this category was Patriotism. The findings have important implications in understanding multi-national crew relations during training, flight, and reintegration into society.

  20. Dictionaries of Canadian English

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Technology

    ... Globe and Mail said, an enterprising publication. Despite the existence of the Winston dictionary, some Canadians were still, at the end of the 1950s, prepared to dismiss Canadian lexicography as pointless. When the idea of a Canadian dictionary was introduced to the Dean of Arts and Science at Dalhousie University in ...

  1. Adult Spinal Deformity Knowledge in Orthopedic Spine Surgeons: Impact of Fellowship Training, Experience, and Practice Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabel, Zachary J; Hart, Robert A; Clark, Aaron P; Park, Sara Heejung; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Justin S; Kelly, Michael P; DePasse, J Mason; Gupta, Munish C; Ames, Christopher P; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-01-01

    Survey study. The purpose of this paper was to assess the level of adult spine deformity (ASD) knowledge among orthopedic spine surgeons and identify areas for improvement in spine surgery training. ASD is increasingly encountered in spine surgery practice. While ASD knowledge among neurosurgeons has been evaluated, ASD knowledge among orthopedic spine surgeons has not previously been reported. A survey of orthopedic spine surgeon members of North American Spine Society (NASS) was conducted to assess level of spine surgery training, practice experience, and spinal deformity knowledge base. The survey used was previously completed by a group of neurologic surgeons with published results. The survey used 11 questions developed and agreed upon by experienced spinal deformity surgeons. Complete responses were received from 413 orthopedic spine surgeons. The overall correct-answer rate was 69.0%. Surgeons in practice for less than 10 years had a higher correct-answer rate compared to those who have practiced for 10 years or more (74% vs. 67%; p = .000003). Surgeons with 75% or more of their practice dedicated to spine had a higher overall correct rate compared to surgeons whose practice is less than 75% spine (71% vs. 63%; p = .000029). Completion of spine fellowship was associated with a higher overall correct-answer rate compared to respondents who did not complete a spine fellowship (71% vs. 59%; p spine fellowship and having a dedicated spine surgery practice were significantly associated with improved performance on this ASD knowledge survey. Unlike neurosurgeons, orthopedic spine surgeons who have practiced for less than 10 years performed better than those who have practiced for more than 10 years. Ongoing emphasis on spine deformity education should be emphasized to improve adult spinal deformity knowledge base. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. "In Canada Even History Divides": Unique Features of Canadian Citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Explores the unique features of Canadian history and society that influence the conception of Canadian citizenship. These include the historical development of Canada as a frontier crown territory, the search for an elusive national identity, the decentralized political structure, and the proximity to the United States. (MJP)

  3. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  4. Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature and Genetic Correlations With Other Spine Traits: The Framingham Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Michelle S; Demissie, Serkalem; Zhou, Yanhua; Anderson, Dennis E; Lorbergs, Amanda L; Kiel, Douglas P; Allaire, Brett T; Yang, Laiji; Cupples, L Adrienne; Travison, Thomas G; Bouxsein, Mary L; Karasik, David; Samelson, Elizabeth J

    2016-12-01

    Hyperkyphosis is a common spinal disorder in older adults, characterized by excessive forward curvature of the thoracic spine and adverse health outcomes. The etiology of hyperkyphosis has not been firmly established, but may be related to changes that occur with aging in the vertebrae, discs, joints, and muscles, which function as a unit to support the spine. Determining the contribution of genetics to thoracic spine curvature and the degree of genetic sharing among co-occurring measures of spine health may provide insight into the etiology of hyperkyphosis. The purpose of our study was to estimate heritability of thoracic spine curvature using T4 -T12 kyphosis (Cobb) angle and genetic correlations between thoracic spine curvature and vertebral fracture, intervertebral disc height narrowing, facet joint osteoarthritis (OA), lumbar spine volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and paraspinal muscle area and density, which were all assessed from computed tomography (CT) images. Participants included 2063 women and men in the second and third generation offspring of the original cohort of the Framingham Study. Heritability of kyphosis angle, adjusted for age, sex, and weight, was 54% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43% to 64%). We found moderate genetic correlations between kyphosis angle and paraspinal muscle area (ρˆG , -0.46; 95% CI, -0.67 to -0.26), vertebral fracture (ρˆG , 0.39; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.61), vBMD (ρˆG , -0.23; 95% CI, -0.41 to -0.04), and paraspinal muscle density (ρˆG , -0.22; 95% CI, -0.48 to 0.03). Genetic correlations between kyphosis angle and disc height narrowing (ρˆG , 0.17; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.38) and facet joint OA (ρˆG , 0.05; 95% CI, -0.15 to 0.24) were low. Thoracic spine curvature may be heritable and share genetic factors with other age-related spine traits including trunk muscle size, vertebral fracture, and bone mineral density. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and

  5. Canadian women opting for less effective birth control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauren Vogel

    2017-01-01

    More Canadian women are relying on less effective methods of birth control and are using them less consistently than they did a decade ago, according to the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC...

  6. Consensus statement: the development of a national Canadian Migraine Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, W J; Christie, S N; Mackie, G; Cooper, P

    2010-07-01

    Migraine is a significant cause of suffering and disability in the Canadian population, and imposes a major cost on Canadian Society. Based on current medical science, much more could be done to provide better comprehensive medical care to the millions of individuals with migraine in Canada. To propose and design a national Canadian Migraine Strategy which could be implemented to reduce migraine related disability in Canada. A multidisciplinary task force of the Canadian Headache Society met for a Canadian Migraine Summit Meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia in June, 2009. Pertinent literature was reviewed and a consensus document was produced based upon the round table discussion at the meeting. The outline of a national Canadian Migraine Strategy was created. This strategy is based on the chronic disease management model, and would include: an outline of what constitutes appropriate migraine care for Canadians, educational programs (for health care professionals, individuals with migraine, and the general public), research programs, and the development of the necessary organizations and partnerships to develop further and implement the Canadian Migraine Strategy. Based upon the medical literature and expert discussion at the meeting, a national Canadian Migraine Strategy with a patient self-management focus has the potential to improve patient care and reduce headache related disability in Canada.

  7. Tuberculosis of the cervical spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare, comprising 3 -. 5% of cases of tuberculosis of the spine. Eight patients with tuberculosis of the cervicaJ spine seen during 1989 -. 1992 were reviewed. They all presented with neck pain. The 4 children presented with a kyphotic deformity. In all the children the disease was extensive, ...

  8. Research Awards: Canadian Partnerships Program Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... This award provides young and upcoming professionals with a unique opportunity to strengthen their research skills and gain a fresh perspective on the Canadian community – both in universities and civil society organizations (CSOs) – that is actively engaged in creating, sharing, and using knowledge to ...

  9. Statistics in action a Canadian outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Jerald F

    2014-01-01

    Commissioned by the Statistical Society of Canada (SSC), Statistics in Action: A Canadian Outlook helps both general readers and users of statistics better appreciate the scope and importance of statistics. It presents the ways in which statistics is used while highlighting key contributions that Canadian statisticians are making to science, technology, business, government, and other areas. The book emphasizes the role and impact of computing in statistical modeling and analysis, including the issues involved with the huge amounts of data being generated by automated processes.The first two c

  10. Canadian Petroleum Products Institute: Annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Annual report of the Institute, which represents the refining and marketing sectors of the petroleum industry on environmental, health, safety, and business issues affecting the industry and Canadian society. The report describes the Institute; gives highlights for the year; describes the recipient of the first CPPI Chairman's Award, Dr. Linton Kulak; provides a general policy and guiding principles for environment, health, and safety; describes the environmental achievements and challenges of the Canadian petroleum industry; and describes industry economics and operations. A list of 1991 publications is also included.

  11. Framing Canadian federalism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saywell, John; Anastakis, Dimitry; Bryden, Penny E

    2009-01-01

    ... the pervasive effects that federalism has on Canadian politics, economics, culture, and history, and provide a detailed framework in which to understand contemporary federalism. Written in honour of John T. Saywell's half-century of accomplished and influential scholarly work and teaching, Framing Canadian Federalism is a timely and fitting t...

  12. Cactus spine granuloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkan, Vandana K; Abraham, Tonya; Lesher, Jack L

    2007-03-01

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman with a 2-week history of painful erythematous papules on the palmar aspect of the fingertips of her right hand, resulting from contact with a cholla cactus 3 weeks prior in Arizona. The patient initially was given clobetasol propionate ointment, resulting in some improvement; however, the lesions resolved only after punch biopsies were performed to confirm the diagnosis of cactus spine granuloma.

  13. Interventional spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, A.D. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr; Somon, T. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Yilmaz, H. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Bize, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Brountzos, E.N. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece); Lovblad, K. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Ruefenacht, D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Martin, J.B. [Clinique Generale Beaulieu 12 chemin Beau Soleil 1206 Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jbmartin@beaulieu.ch

    2005-09-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of some spinal diseases are percutaneous treatments, proposed before classic surgery. By using imaging guidance, one can significantly increase accuracy and decrease complication rates. This review report physiopathology and discusses indications, methods, complications and results of performing these techniques on the spine, including different level (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacroiliac) and different kind of treatments (nerve block, disc treatment and bone treatment). Finally the present article also reviews current literature on the controversial issues involved.

  14. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  15. The degenerative cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stabilization of the spine in patients with suspected cervical spine injury in Mulago Hospital. BM Ndeleva, T Beyeza. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eaoj.v5i1.67487 · AJOL African Journals ...

  17. Beyond the spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol

    2015-01-01

    traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such as brain injury, work disability prevention, undifferentiated chest pain, hip osteoarthritis, and prevention of pain in children and adolescents to name a few. In this paper, we......Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from...

  18. Return to play after cervical spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganti, C; Sweeney, C A; Albanese, S A; Burak, C; Hosea, T; Connolly, P J

    2001-05-15

    A questionnaire survey was mailed to members of the Cervical Spine Research Society, the Herodiuus Sports Medicine Society, and to members of the authors' Department of Orthopaedics. The purpose of our study was to evaluate what influence, if any, factors such as published guidelines, type of sport of the patient, number of years in practice, subspecialty interest, and sports participation of the respondent held in the "return to play" decision-making process after a cervical spine injury. The consequences of cervical spine injury are potentially catastrophic, and return to play decisions in athletes with a history of neck injury can be agonizing. Although recent publications have addressed some of the concerns regarding cervical spine injuries in the athletic population, many questions remain unanswered. Factors such as published guidelines, type of sport of the patient, number of years in practice, subspecialty interest, and sports participation of the respondent have all been suggested as having a possible role in return to play decisions. Representative radiographs and case histories of 10 athletes who had sustained neck injury were mailed to 346 physicians. For each case physicians selected every type of play (of six categories) that they felt comfortable recommending. Type of play was divided into six categories: Type 1, collision sports; Type 2, contact sports; Type 3, noncontact, high velocity sports; Type 4, noncontact, repetitive load sports (e.g., running); Type 5, noncontact, low impact sports; Type 6, no sports. In addition, demographic data regarding board certification, subspecialty interest, number of years in practice, use of guidelines in return to play decisions, and personal participation in sports were queried from all respondents. Statistical analysis was completed with Statview (Berkeley, CA). Basic descriptive statistics, chi2, and ANOVA were used where appropriate. Three hundred forty-six questionnaires were mailed and 113 were returned

  19. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ... more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  20. Canadians' eating habits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garriguet, Didier

    2007-01-01

    This report is an overview of Canadians' eating habits: total calories consumed and the number of servings from the various food groups, as well as the percentage of total calories from fat, protein and carbohydrates...

  1. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tsafnat

    Full Text Available The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  2. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsafnat, Naomi; Fitz Gerald, John D; Le, Hai N; Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2012-01-01

    The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT) and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  3. Spine injuries in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschlich, Laura M; Young, Craig C

    2011-01-01

    Care of a dancer calls for a unique balance between athlete and artist. The physician must familiarize himself or herself with dance terminology, common moves, correct technique, and dancer's mentality. The goal is to work intimately with the dancer to care for the injury and, if possible, continue to participate in portions of dance class to limit anxiety and increase compliance to treatment. The spine is the second most injured area of the body in dancers, and many issues stem from poor technique and muscle imbalance. This often leads to hyperlordosis, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, lumbar facet sprain, discogenic back pain, and muscle spasm and piriformis syndrome. This article reviews these causes of low back pain with a focus on dance-related presentation and treatment issues.

  4. Physiopathology of Spine Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Maccauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The metastasis is the spread of cancer from one part of the body to another. Two-thirds of patients with cancer will develop bone metastasis. Breast, prostate and lung cancer are responsible for more than 80% of cases of metastatic bone disease. The spine is the most common site of bone metastasis. A spinal metastasis may cause pain, instability and neurological injuries. The diffusion through Batson venous system is the principal process of spinal metastasis, but the dissemination is possible also through arterial and lymphatic system or by contiguity. Once cancer cells have invaded the bone, they produce growth factors that stimulate osteoblastic or osteolytic activity resulting in bone remodeling with release of other growth factors that lead to a vicious cycle of bone destruction and growth of local tumour.

  5. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  6. Lumbar spine injuries in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Ian F; Proctor, Mark R; Day, Arthur L

    2006-10-15

    Lumbar spine injuries in athletes are not uncommon and usually take the form of a mild muscle strain or sprain. More severe injuries sustained by athletes include disc herniations, spondylolistheses, and various types of fracture. The recognition and management of these injuries in athletes involve the additional consideration that to return to play, the lumbar spine must be able to withstand forces similar to those that were injurious. The authors consider common lumbar spine injuries in athletes and discuss management principles for neurosurgeons that are relevant to this population.

  7. Spine Care as a Framework for the Chiropractic Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Michael; Murphy, Donald; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    globally. CONCLUSION: Although the chiropractic profession may debate internally about its professional identity, the chiropractic identity seems to have already been established by society, practice, legislation, and education as a profession of health care providers whose area of expertise is spine care.......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this commentary is to provide an argument for the role and identity of chiropractors as spine care providers within the context of the greater health care system. DISCUSSION: Surveys of the general public and chiropractors indicate that the majority of patients seek...... chiropractic services for back and neck pain. Insurance company utilization data confirm these findings. Regulatory and legal language found in chiropractic practice acts reveals that most jurisdictions define the chiropractic scope of practice as based on a foundation of spine care. Educational accrediting...

  8. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.187 Lumbar spine. (a) The lumbar spine assembly consists of parts shown in drawing 175-5500. For purposes of this test, the lumbar spine is mounted within the...

  9. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  10. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and break.How are spinal fractures treated?Most fractures of the spine are treated with bed rest until the pain goes away. Pain medicines, back braces and physical therapy may also be used. For some patients, doctors ...

  11. Typhoid spine - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Salmonella typhi isolated from L4-L5 spine is reported here. The causative organism was not suspected preoperatively. The patient responded favourably to surgical drainage and appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  12. THE IMPACT OF CLASSICAL MASSAGE ON SPINE MOBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radzimińska Agnieszka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Irregularities in movable property of the spine affect a large part of society and the problem affects the people at an increasingly younger age. Classical massage is a form of mechanotherapy that affects the regulation of the work of muscles, joints, tendons and ligaments. Aim of work: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of classical massage section of thoracolumbar spine to increase the mobility in these segments. Material: The study was carried out on 36 healthy volunteers (20 women and 16 men aged 21 to 27 years old (average age - 23.8 who were subjected to a series of five classical massages (according to strictly established protocol. In order to objectify the effects in all subjects before and after a series of treatments the following measurements were made: the fingers-floor test; the Otto -Wurna test; the straightening of the spine; lateral flexion of the spine; twist of the spine. Results A statistically important difference has been shown in the results of all tested variables before the first and after the last treatment of classical massage. Conclusions The results of personal research apply to young, healthy volunteers. It is worth to continue research into the effects of this form of therapy in the case of restrictions of movable tangible property, resulting from spinal pain syndromes.

  13. Spine Tango annual report 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukamp, M; Perler, G; Pigott, T; Munting, E; Aebi, M; Röder, C

    2013-09-01

    Since the Spine Tango registry was founded over a decade ago it has become established internationally. An annual report has been produced using the same format as the SWEspine group to allow for first data comparisons between the two registries. Data was captured with the latest generation of surgery and follow-up forms. Also, the Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) from interventions performed in the year 2012 with follow-up to June 2013 was analyzed. Groups of patients with the most common degenerative lumbar spine diseases and a single group of patients with degenerative cervical spine diseases were created. The demographics, risk factors, previous treatments, current treatment, short-term outcomes, patient satisfaction and complications were analyzed. Pre- and postoperative pain and function scores were derived from the COMI. About 6,500 procedures were captured with Spine Tango in 2012. The definitions and composition of all the degenerative groups could not completely be matched between the two registries with the consequence that the age and sex distributions were partially different. Preoperative pain levels were similar. The short-term outcomes available did not allow for evaluation of the final result of surgical intervention. This will be possible with the longer term data in the next annual report. There was a distinct disparity in reported complication rates between surgeons and patients. This is a valuable first step in creating comparable reports for SWEspine and Spine Tango. The German spine registry may be able to collaborate in the future because of similar items and data structure as Spine Tango. There needs to be more work on understanding the harmonization of the different degenerative subgroups. The Spine Tango report is weakened by the short and incomplete follow-up. The visual presentation of data may be a useful model for aiding decision making for surgeons and patients in the future.

  14. Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spine Surgery: Comparative Microbiology of Patients with Idiopathic and Nonidiopathic Etiologies of Spine Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesani, Matthieu; Doit, Catherine; Lorrot, Mathie; Vitoux, Christine; Hilly, Julie; Michelet, Daphné; Vidal, Christophe; Julien-Marsollier, Florence; Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Dahmani, Souhayl

    2016-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a concern in pediatric spine surgery with unusually high rates for a clean surgery and especially for patients with deformity of nonidiopathic etiology. Microbiologic differences between etiologies of spine deformities have been poorly investigated. We reviewed all cases of SSI in spinal surgery between 2007 and 2011. Characteristics of cases and of bacteria according to the etiology of the spine disease were investigated. Of 496 surgeries, we identified 51 SSIs (10.3%) in 49 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent pathogen whatever the etiology (n = 31, 61% of infection cases). The second most frequent pathogens vary according to the etiology of the spine deformity. It was Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in nonidiopathic cases (n = 19, 45% of cases) and anaerobe in idiopathic cases (n = 8, 38% of cases), particularly Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (n = 5, 24% of cases). Infection rate was 6.8% in cases with idiopathic spine disease (n = 21) and 15.9% in cases with nonidiopathic spine disease (n = 30). Nonidiopathic cases were more frequently male with lower weight. American Society of Anesthesiologists score was more often greater than 2, they had more frequently sacral implants and postoperative intensive care unit stay. GNB were significantly associated with a nonidiopathic etiology, low weight, younger age and sacral fusion. SSIs were polymicrobial in 31% of cases with a mean of 1.4 species per infection cases. S. aureus is the first cause of SSI in pediatric spine surgery. However, Gram-positive anaerobic cocci should be taken into account in idiopathic patients and GNB in nonidiopathic patients when considering antibiotic prophylaxis and curative treatment.

  15. A multi-national report on methods for institutional credentialing for spine radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszten, Peter C; Sahgal, Arjun; Sheehan, Jason P; Kersh, Ronald; Chen, Stephanie; Flickinger, John C; Quader, Mubina; Fahim, Daniel; Grills, Inga; Shin, John H; Winey, Brian; Oh, Kevin; Sweeney, Reinhart A; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2013-06-27

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy and radiosurgery are rapidly emerging treatment options for both malignant and benign spine tumors. Proper institutional credentialing by physicians and medical physicists as well as other personnel is important for the safe and effective adoption of spine radiosurgery. This article describes the methods for institutional credentialing for spine radiosurgery at seven highly experienced international institutions. All institutions (n = 7) are members of the Elekta Spine Radiosurgery Research Consortium and have a dedicated research and clinical focus on image-guided spine radiosurgery. A questionnaire consisting of 24 items covering various aspects of institutional credentialing for spine radiosurgery was completed by all seven institutions. Close agreement was observed in most aspects of spine radiosurgery credentialing at each institution. A formal credentialing process was believed to be important for the implementation of a new spine radiosurgery program, for patient safety and clinical outcomes. One institution has a written policy specific for spine radiosurgery credentialing, but all have an undocumented credentialing system in place. All institutions rely upon an in-house proctoring system for the training of both physicians and medical physicists. Four institutions require physicians and medical physicists to attend corporate sponsored training. Two of these 4 institutions also require attendance at a non-corporate sponsored academic society radiosurgery course. Corporate as well as non-corporate sponsored training were believed to be complimentary and both important for training. In 5 centers, all cases must be reviewed at a multidisciplinary conference prior to radiosurgery treatment. At 3 centers, neurosurgeons are not required to be involved in all cases if there is no evidence for instability or spinal cord compression. Backup physicians and physicists are required at only 1 institution, but all institutions have more

  16. The ‘addicted’ spine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturnino eSpiga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Units of dendritic branches called dendritic spines represent more than simply decorative appendages of the neuron and actively participate in integrative functions of ‘spinous’ nerve cells thereby contributing to the general phenomenon of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of drug addiction, spines are profoundly affected by treatments with drugs of abuse and represent important sub cellular markers which interfere deeply into the physiology of the neuron thereby providing an example of the burgeoning and rapidly increasing interest in ‘structural plasticity.’Medium Spiny Neurons of the Nucleus Accumbens show a reduced number of dendritic spines and a decrease in TH-positive terminals upon withdrawal from opiates, cannabinoids and alcohol. The reduction is localized ‘strictly’ to second order dendritic branches where, dopamine-containing terminals impinging upon spines, make synaptic contacts. In addition, long-thin spines seems preferentially affected raising the possibility that cellular learning of these neurons may be selectively hampered. These findings suggest that dendritic spines are affected by drugs widely abused by humans and provide yet another example of drug-induced aberrant neural plasticity with marked reflections on the physiology of synapses, system structural organization, and neuronal circuitry remodeling.

  17. The postsurgical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Armentia, E; Prada González, R; Silva Priegue, N

    2016-04-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is the persistence or reappearance of pain after surgery on the spine. This term encompasses both mechanical and nonmechanical causes. Imaging techniques are essential in postoperative follow-up and in the evaluation of potential complications responsible for failed back surgery syndrome. This review aims to familiarize radiologists with normal postoperative changes and to help them identify the pathological imaging findings that reflect failed back surgery syndrome. To interpret the imaging findings, it is necessary to know the type of surgery performed in each case and the time elapsed since the intervention. In techniques used to fuse the vertebrae, it is essential to evaluate the degree of bone fusion, the material used (both its position and its integrity), the bone over which it lies, the interface between the implant and bone, and the vertebral segments that are adjacent to metal implants. In decompressive techniques it is important to know what changes can be expected after the intervention and to be able to distinguish them from peridural fibrosis and the recurrence of a hernia. It is also crucial to know the imaging findings for postoperative infections. Other complications are also reviewed, including arachnoiditis, postoperative fluid collections, and changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the surgical site. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Postoperative spine; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaeger, R. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Basel (Switzerland); Lieb, J.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgie Koeln-Merheim, Koeln (Germany); Ahlhelm, F.J. [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Abteilung Neuroradiologie, Institut fuer Radiologie, Baden (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    Approximately 15-30 % of surgical procedures involving the lumbar spine are associated with complications that require further diagnostic work-up. The choice of imaging modality for postoperative complications depends on the extent, pattern and temporal evolution of the postoperative neurological signs and symptoms as well as on the preoperative clinical status, the surgical procedure itself and the underlying pathology. The interpretation of imaging findings, in particular the distinction between postoperative complications and normally expected nonspecific postoperative imaging alterations can be challenging and requires the integration of clinical neurological information and the results of laboratory tests. The combination of different imaging techniques might help in cases of equivocal imaging results. (orig.) [German] Etwa 15-30 % der operativen Eingriffe im Bereich der lumbalen Wirbelsaeule verlaufen nicht komplikationsfrei und erfordern weiterfuehrende Abklaerungen. Die Auswahl des bildgebenden Verfahrens im Rahmen postoperativer Komplikationen haengt dabei wesentlich von der zeitlichen Entwicklung, dem Ausmass und Verteilungsmuster der neuaufgetretenen klinisch-neurologischen bzw. orthopaedischen Symptome sowie von den Ausfaellen vor dem Eingriff, der zugrundeliegenden Pathologie und der Lokalisation und Art des Eingriffs ab. Die Interpretation der bildgebenden Befunde, insbesondere die Abgrenzung postoperativer Komplikationen von natuerlicherweise zu erwartenden postoperativen Veraenderungen kann dabei eine Herausforderung darstellen. Bei unklaren Befunden kann ergaenzend zur eingehend klinisch-neurologischen und laborchemischen Bestandsaufnahme auch der kombinierte Einsatz mehrerer bildgebender Modalitaeten diagnostisch weiterhelfen. (orig.)

  19. Radiology illustrated. Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kwon, Jong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Offers a practical approach to image interpretation for spinal disorders. Includes numerous high-quality radiographic images and schematic illustrations. Will serve as a self-learning book covering daily routine cases from the basic to the advanced. Radiology Illustrated: Spine is an up-to-date, superbly illustrated reference in the style of a teaching file that has been designed specifically to be of value in clinical practice. Common, critical, and rare but distinctive spinal disorders are described succinctly with the aid of images highlighting important features and informative schematic illustrations. The first part of the book, on common spinal disorders, is for radiology residents and other clinicians who are embarking on the interpretation of spinal images. A range of key disorders are then presented, including infectious spondylitis, cervical trauma, spinal cord disorders, spinal tumors, congenital disorders, uncommon degenerative disorders, inflammatory arthritides, and vascular malformations. The third part is devoted to rare but clinically significant spinal disorders with characteristic imaging features, and the book closes by presenting practical tips that will assist in the interpretation of confusing cases.

  20. Sagittal Spine Length Measurement: A Novel Technique to Assess Growth of the Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurway, Alan J; Chukwunyerenwa, Chukwudi K; Kishta, Waleed E; Hurry, Jennifer K; El-Hawary, Ron

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy and repeatability of a novel sagittal spine length (SSL) radiographic measurement was examined using photographic and radiographic imaging. To validate the new SSL technique for measuring growth in early-onset scoliosis (EOS) patients. Current assessment of patient growth undergoing growth-friendly surgical treatment for EOS is the use of serial vertical spine height measurements (VH) on coronal radiographs. Spine-based distraction implants are able to control the coronal plane deformity of scoliosis, but exhibit a "law of diminishing returns" in the impact of each follow-up lengthening surgery. As these treatments are kyphogenic, we hypothesize that the increase in kyphosis is, in fact, growth out of plane, not captured by standard spine height measurements. Measurement accuracy was assessed using 6 spine model alignments and clinical radiographs of 23 retrospective EOS patients. Inter- and intrarater reliabilities were assessed using interclass coefficient (ICC) analyses. The discrepancy between the VH and SSL was also investigated. The model assessment showed excellent accuracy, with a 1.54 mm (SD: 1.07, range: 0.03-3.14, p = .226) mean error and mean ICCs of 0.999. As the kyphosis increased, a progressive difference between the phantom VH and SSL was observed. Interrater reliability ICCs of the clinical radiographs averaged 0.981 and 0.804, whereas intrarater reliabilities averaged 0.966 and 0.826, for the coronal and sagittal radiographs, respectively. Mean clinical SSLs were 177.5 mm (SD: 28.5, range: 114.3-250.3), whereas the VH averaged 161.6 mm (SD: 31.8, range: 58.5-243.0), resulting in a 16.0-mm (SD: 16.7, range: 0.3-90.3, p < .0001) difference between the two measurements with a progressive difference as the kyphosis increased. The novel SSL measurement is accurate, repeatable, and complements the current growth assessments for EOS treatments. Until sagittal spine lengths are taken into consideration, the "law of diminishing returns" should

  1. FOUNDING SOCIETIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry Petroski

    2008-01-01

      [...] with the development of the railroads, the telegraph, and other marvels of the Industrial Revolution, a civil engineering society did not provide a sufficiently broad umbrella under which mining...

  2. Daily smoking and lower back pain in adult Canadians: the Canadian Community Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Alkherayf

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Fahad Alkherayf1,2,3, Eugene K Wai4,5,6, Eve C Tsai1,3,4,6, Charles Agbi1,3,41University of Ottawa, Division of Neurosurgery, Ottawa, Ontario; 2University of Ottawa, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Ottawa, Ontario; 3The Ottawa Hospital, Civic campus, Division of Neurosurgery, Ottawa, Ontario; 4The Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, Spine Unit Ottawa, Ontario; 5The Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Ottawa, Ontario; 6The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, CanadaBackground: Lower back pain (LBP is one of the primary causes of disability in the Canadian community. However, only a limited number of studies have addressed the association between daily smoking and LBP in Canada. Of the studies that have explored this association, many had small sample sizes and failed to control for confounders.Objective: The primary objective of the study was to determine if daily smoking is associated with an increased risk of having LBP. The secondary objectives were to assess the risk for LBP among occasional smokers and to determine the prevalence of LBP in relation to different covariates.Data and study design: Using the Canadian Community Health Survey (cycle 3.1 data, 73,507 Canadians between the ages of 20 and 59 years were identified. LBP status, smoking level, sex, age, body mass index (BMI, level of activity and level of education were assessed in these subjects.Methods: Stratified analysis and logistic regression analysis were used to detect effect modifications and to adjust for covariates. Population weight and design were taken into consideration.Results: The prevalence of LBP was 23.3% among daily smokers and 15.7% among non-smokers. Age and sex were found to be effect modifiers. The association between LBP and daily smoking was statistically significant in all ages and genders; this association was stronger for younger age groups. The adjusted odds ratio for male daily smokers aged 20 to 29 was 1.87 (95

  3. Twitter and Canadian Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Max

    2012-01-01

    An emerging group of leaders in Canadian education has attracted thousands of followers. They've made Twitter an extension of their lives, delivering twenty or more tweets a day that can include, for example, links to media articles, research, new ideas from education bloggers, or to their own, or simply a personal thought. At their best,…

  4. Robotic systems in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Naderi, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Surgical robotic systems have been available for almost twenty years. The first surgical robotic systems were designed as supportive systems for laparoscopic approaches in general surgery (the first procedure was a cholecystectomy in 1987). The da Vinci Robotic System is the most common system used for robotic surgery today. This system is widely used in urology, gynecology and other surgical disciplines, and recently there have been initial reports of its use in spine surgery, for transoral access and anterior approaches for lumbar inter-body fusion interventions. SpineAssist, which is widely used in spine surgery, and Renaissance Robotic Systems, which are considered the next generation of robotic systems, are now FDA approved. These robotic systems are designed for use as guidance systems in spine instrumentation, cement augmentations and biopsies. The aim is to increase surgical accuracy while reducing the intra-operative exposure to harmful radiation to the patient and operating team personnel during the intervention. We offer a review of the published literature related to the use of robotic systems in spine surgery and provide information on using robotic systems.

  5. Macrolides: A Canadian Infectious Disease Society Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S McKenna

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of erythromycin in 1965, no new compounds from the macrolide antimicrobial class were licensed in Canada until the 1990s. Clarithromycin and azithromycin, since their introduction, have become important agents for treating a number of common and uncommon infectious diseases. They have become prime agents in the treatment of respiratory tract infections, and have revolutionized the management of both genital chlamydial infections, by the use of single-dose therapy with azithromycin, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, by the use of clarithromycin. The improvement of clarithromycin and azithromycin over the gastrointestinal intolerability of erythromycin has led to supplanting the use of the latter for many primary care physicians. Unfortunately, the use of these agents has also increased the likelihood for misuse and has raised concerns about a resultant increase in the rates of macrolide resistance in many important pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. This paper reviews the pharmacology and evidence for the current indications for use of these newer agents, and provides recommendations for appropriate use.

  6. Enhancing Canadian Civil Society Research and Knowledge-Based ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The increasingly complex interplay between peace and security, environmental sustainability, and social and economic development is changing the world of ... Engaging in the development agenda CCIC works globally to achieve sustainable human development, end global poverty, and promote social justice and human ...

  7. OFF COURSE: Restoring Balance between Canadian Society and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This crucial concept of "sustainability" brings us directly to the thesis and overriding thrust of the Brundtland Report, Our Common Future, by the world Commission on ...... The triad of deficits, debts, and inflation continues to bedevil the global economy, which functions solely in terms of the expansionist world view. This triad ...

  8. Off Course: Restoring Balance between Canadian Society and the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1994-01-01

    Jan 1, 1994 ... The concept of sustainable development was set out in the Brundtland Report in 1987 and since has become part of the environmental and political vocabulary of the South and the North. Author Duncan M. Taylor argues, however, that the term sustainable development is often misused. He uses the crisis ...

  9. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  10. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  11. Diversity of Spine Synapses in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Xian; Mattson, Mark P.; Yao, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Here we examine the structure of the various types of spine synapses throughout the animal kingdom. Based on available evidence, we suggest that there are two major categories of spine synapses: invaginating and non-invaginating, with distributions that vary among different groups of animals. In the simplest living animals with definitive nerve cells and synapses, the cnidarians and ctenophores, most chemical synapses do not form spine synapses. But some cnidarians have invaginating spine synapses, especially in photoreceptor terminals of motile cnidarians with highly complex visual organs, and also in some mainly sessile cnidarians with rapid prey capture reflexes. This association of invaginating spine synapses with complex sensory inputs is retained in the evolution of higher animals in photoreceptor terminals and some mechanoreceptor synapses. In contrast to invaginating spine synapse, non-invaginating spine synapses have been described only in animals with bilateral symmetry, heads and brains, associated with greater complexity in neural connections. This is apparent already in the simplest bilaterians, the flatworms, which can have well-developed non-invaginating spine synapses in some cases. Non-invaginating spine synapses diversify in higher animal groups. We also discuss the functional advantages of having synapses on spines and more specifically, on invaginating spines. And finally we discuss pathologies associated with spine synapses, concentrating on those systems and diseases where invaginating spine synapses are involved. PMID:27230661

  12. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  13. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  14. The lessons learned from the canadian forces physiotherapy experience during the peacekeeping operations in Bosnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Luc Jean; Rowe, Peter

    2007-08-01

    The musculoskeletal injuries and soldiers' demographic profiles observed by physiotherapy (PT) officers during the Canadian Forces peacekeeping mission Op-Palladium in Bosnia between 2000 and 2004 were characterized. The number of PT visits (N = 4,167; range, 310-974) and gender distribution (N = 2,558 cases; male, 80.8%-91%; female, 9.0%-16.4%) varied between tours. On average, >30% of the entire Canadian Forces contingent required PT services. Lower limb injuries were the single leading reason for PT treatment (41.8%) followed by the spine (28.5%) and the upper limb (21.5%). The most commonly affected joints were the knee (17.2%) and ankle (16.1%), the shoulder (14.4%), and the lumbar spine (14.4%). The 26 to 35 age group and combat arms showed the highest incidence of musculoskeletal injuries (p operational readiness of the troops.

  15. Canadian identity: Implications for international social work by Canadians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    This paper is in response to recent calls to conceptualize and articulate Canadian perspectives and experiences in international social work, given that the Canadian standpoint has been lacking in international social work literature. This paper contends that it is imperative, first of all......, to critically examine and unpack our ‘Canadian’ identity in order to practice international work that is socially just and anti-imperialist. Drawing on the work of post-colonial authors, critical race theorists, and those who study national myth-making, this essay revisits Canadian identity because...... it is this identity that Canadian social workers often carry into their international work....

  16. Smoke & Mirrors: The Canadian Tobacco War | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... before parliamentary committees, given hundreds of media interviews in Canada and the United States, published numerous tobacco-related articles, and initiated private prosecutions for violations of tobacco control laws. Cunningham now works in Ottawa as a senior policy analyst for the Canadian Cancer Society.

  17. Easily missed thoracolumbar spine fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Mark [NYU Langone Medical Center/Bellevue Hospital, 550 1st Avenue, IRM-234, New York, NY 10016 (United States)], E-mail: mark.bernstein@nyumc.org

    2010-04-15

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common and can be difficult to diagnose. Many of these fractures are associated with extraspinal injuries and are subtle on imaging further contributing to diagnostic delay or misdiagnosis. Missed fractures are associated with increased neurologic injury and resulting morbidity. Careful and thorough workup of the multitrauma patient with dedicated spinal imaging is necessary to identify these injuries. This article reviews the major thoracolumbar spine fractures and imaging findings with attention drawn to subtle and easily overlooked features of these injuries.

  18. Self-Perceived Eating Habits and Food Skills of Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Joyce J; Mudryj, Adriana N

    2016-01-01

    This study identified and described Canadians' self-perceived eating habits and food skills through the use of population-based data. Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2013 Rapid Response on Food Skills was used to examine the eating quality and patterns of Canadians. Data were collected from all provinces in January and February 2013. Respondent variables (sex, age, Aboriginal/immigrant status) were examined to assess differentiations between socio-demographic groupings (family structure, marital status, education, and income). Logistic regression was used to determine whether demographic variables increased the likelihood of certain responses. Forty-six percent of Canadians believe they have excellent/very good eating habits, with 51% categorizing their habits as good or fair. Similarly, the majority report having good food skills. Sex and age were significantly associated with food skills, with women rating their cooking skill proficiency higher than men (72% vs 55%), and older Canadians reporting higher food skill knowledge than their younger counterparts. Results indicate that while portions of the Canadian population have adequate food skills, others are lacking, which may negatively impact their diet. Findings from this study have implications for education and health promotion programs focusing on foods skills, particularly among vulnerable target groups. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Minimally invasive spine surgery: past and present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corniola, M V; Stienen, M N; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2015-11-18

    In the early twentieth century, the understanding of spine biomechanics and the advent of surgical techniques of the lumbar spine, led to the currently emerging concept of minimal invasive spine surgery, By reducing surgical access, blood loss, infection rate and general morbidity, functional prognosis of patients is improved. This is a real challenge for the spine surgeon, who has to maintain a good operative result by significantly reducing surgical collateral damages due to the relatively traumatic conventional access.

  20. Spine update: the biopsychosocial model and spine care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Bradley K

    2008-01-15

    Spine Update on the biopsychosocial model. To review and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the application of the model to spine care. The biopsychosocial model of illness has had (and will continue to have) a significant impact on spine care. It has changed-in a positive way-the ways in which view spinal disease, treat patients, and assess outcomes. To date, however, little discussion has taken place regarding concerns over its implementation. Using texts covering the general theory of the biopsychosocial model and the literature as the model is applied to spine care, a review was undertaken, evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the theory's application to our field. Just as the biomedical model allowed, and continues to allow, significant medical advances via the objective study of pathoanatomic disease; the biopsychosocial model has afforded similar advances by placing the disease back into the patient and emphasizing illness experienced within the patient's unique biologic, psychological, social, and economic milieu. Thus, the strength of the model is its service as a clear reminder that clinical decisions about how to manage a patient with persistent low back pain living in difficult social conditions are more complex than those for patients who are not. Concerns regarding the model, however, are real and include its application as the primary mode to assess outcomes with a blind eye toward other potential factors; the medical/historical tendency to overweight psychosocial factors when underlying pathology is not clearly defined; whether or not the theory underlying the model is falsifiable/scientific; whether it affords explanatory or predictive power; whether its implementation improves outcomes; and whether it contributes to the "medicalization" of patients with back pain. The biopsychosocial model has been readily adapted to all aspects of spine care with many positive implications. There are, however, some concerns and negative implications

  1. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  2. Clinical presentation of a traumatic cervical spine disc rupture in alpine sports: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinolli Luca

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Isolated non-skeletal injuries of the cervical spine are rare and frequently missed. Different evaluation algorithms for C-spine injuries, such as the Canadian C-spine Rule have been proposed, however with strong emphasis on excluding osseous lesions. Discoligamentary injuries may be masked by unique clinical situations presenting to the emergency physician. We report on the case of a 28-year-old patient being admitted to our emergency department after a snowboarding accident, with an assumed hyperflexion injury of the cervical spine. During the initial clinical encounter the only clinical finding the patient demonstrated, was a burning sensation in the palms bilaterally. No neck pain could be elicited and the patient was not intoxicated and did not have distracting injuries. Since the patient described a fall prevention attempt with both arms, a peripheral nerve contusion was considered as a differential diagnosis. However, a high level of suspicion and the use of sophisticated imaging (MRI and CT of the cervical spine, ultimately led to the diagnosis of a traumatic disc rupture at the C5/6 level. The patient was subsequently treated with a ventral microdiscectomy with cage interposition and ventral plate stabilization at the C5/C6 level and could be discharged home with clearly improving symptoms and without further complications. This case underlines how clinical presentation and extent of injury can differ and it furthermore points out, that injuries contracted during alpine snow sports need to be considered high velocity injuries, thus putting the patient at risk for cervical spine trauma. In these patients, especially when presenting with an unclear neurologic pattern, the emergency doctor needs to be alert and may have to interpret rigid guidelines according to the situation. The importance of correctly using CT and MRI according to both – standardized protocols and the patient's clinical presentation – is crucial for

  3. SPINE INJURY IN MULAGO HOSPITAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conciu.-riorr.'This study concluded that the initial clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with suspected CSI in iiilulago Hospital was inadequate with sorne injuries being missed alto-getlrer. INTRO DUCTIDN. Cervical Spine injury ECSI} occur in 2-5% oi' all trauma casesii] and in 5-10% of all major trauma cases 12}.

  4. Magnetic resonance of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzmann, D.R.; De La Paz, R.L.; Rubin, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Three chapters discuss principles of cerebrospinal fluid flow, spinal imaging techniques, and the physical basis and anatomic correlates of signal intensity in the spine. There are chapters on normal anatomy, congenital anomalies, trauma, tumors, infection, demyelinating disease, degenerative disease, vascular conditions, and syringomyelia.

  5. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  6. 2003 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Allan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the last 15 years; however, there has been little focus on issues relating to asthma in childhood. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies, particularly in children, have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines. The objectives of this article are to review the literature on asthma published between January 2000 and June 2003 and to evaluate the influence of new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and its 2001 update, with a major focus on pediatric issues. Methods The diagnosis of asthma in young children and prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy, inhalation devices, immunotherapy, and asthma education were selected for review by small expert resource groups. The reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Network For Asthma Care and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Data published through December 2004 were subsequently reviewed by the individual expert resource groups. Results This report evaluates early-life prevention strategies and focuses on treatment of asthma in children, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and preventive therapy, the benefits of additional therapy, and the essential role of asthma education. Conclusion We generally support previous recommendations and focus on new issues, particularly those relevant to children and their families. This document is a guide for asthma management based on the best available published data and the opinion of health care professionals, including asthma experts and educators.

  7. Male Spine Motion During Coitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkewicz, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. Repeated measures design. Objective. To describe male spine movement and posture characteristics during coitus and compare these characteristics across 5 common coital positions. Summary of Background Data. Exacerbation of pain during coitus due to coital movements and positions is a prevalent issue reported by low back pain patients. A biomechanical analysis of spine movements and postures during coitus has never been conducted. Methods. Ten healthy males and females engaged in coitus in the following preselected positions and variations: QUADRUPED, MISSIONARY, and SIDELYING. An optoelectronic motion capture system was used to measure 3-dimensional lumbar spine angles that were normalized to upright standing. To determine whether each coital position had distinct spine kinematic profiles, separate univariate general linear models, followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc analysis were used. The presentation of coital positions was randomized. Results. Both variations of QUADRUPED, mQUAD1 and mQUAD2, were found to have a significantly higher cycle speed than mSIDE (P = 0.043 and P = 0.034, respectively), mMISS1 (P = 0.003 and P = 0.002, respectively), and mMISS2 (P = 0.001 and P spine movement varied depending on the coital position; however, across all positions, the majority of the range of motion used was in flexion. Based on range of motion, the least-to-most recommended positions for a male flexion-intolerant patient are mSIDE, mMISS2, mQUAD2, mMISS1, and mQUAD1. Conclusion. Initial recommendations—which include specific coital positions to avoid, movement strategies, and role of the partner—were developed for male patients whose low back pain is exacerbated by specific motions and postures. Level of Evidence: N/A PMID:25208042

  8. Iron sufficiency of Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Marcia; Greene-Finestone, Linda; Lowell, Hélène; Levesque, Johanne; Robinson, Stacey

    2012-12-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world, but little is known about the iron status of people in Canada, where the last estimates are from 1970-1972. The data are from cycle 2 (2009 to 2011) of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, which collected blood samples from a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 3 to 79. Descriptive statistics (percentages, arithmetic means, geometric means) were used to estimate hemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations, and other markers of iron status. Analyses were performed by age/sex group, household income, self-perceived health, diet, and use of iron supplements. World Health Organization reference values (2001) were used to estimate the prevalence of iron sufficiency and anemia. The overall prevalence of anemia was low in the 2009-to-2011 period--97% of Canadians had sufficient hemoglobin levels. Generally, hemoglobin concentration increased compared with 1970-1972; however, at ages 65 to 79, rates of anemia were higher than in 1970-1972. Depleted iron stores were found in 13% of females aged 12 to 19 and 9% of females aged 20 to 49. Lower household income was associated with a lower prevalence of hemoglobin sufficiency, but was not related to lower serum ferritin sufficiency. Self-perceived health and diet were not significantly associated with hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels. The lack of a relationship between iron status and diet may be attributable to the use of questions about food consumption frequency that were not specifically designed to estimate dietary iron intake. Factors other than iron intake might have contributed to the increase in the prevalence of anemia among seniors.

  9. Canadian space robotic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallaberger, Christian; Space Plan Task Force, Canadian Space Agency

    The Canadian Space Agency has chosen space robotics as one of its key niche areas, and is currently preparing to deliver the first flight elements for the main robotic system of the international space station. The Mobile Servicing System (MSS) is the Canadian contribution to the international space station. It consists of three main elements. The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is a 7-metre, 7-dof, robotic arm. The Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a smaller 2-metre, 7-dof, robotic arm can be used independently, or attached to the end of the SSRMS. The Mobile Base System (MBS) will be used as a support platform and will also provide power and data links for both the SSRMS and the SPDM. A Space Vision System (SVS) has been tested on Shuttle flights, and is being further developed to enhance the autonomous capabilities of the MSS. The CSA also has a Strategic Technologies in Automation and Robotics Program which is developing new technologies to fulfill future robotic space mission needs. This program is currently developing in industry technological capabilities in the areas of automation of operations, autonomous robotics, vision systems, trajectory planning and object avoidance, tactile and proximity sensors, and ground control of space robots. Within the CSA, a robotic testbed and several research programs are also advancing technologies such as haptic devices, control via head-mounted displays, predictive and preview displays, and the dynamic characterization of robotic arms. Canada is also now developing its next Long Term Space Plan. In this context, a planetary exploration program is being considered, which would utilize Canadian space robotic technologies in this new arena.

  10. A review of pediatric lumbar spine trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayama, Christina; Chen, Tsulee; Trost, Gregory; Jea, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric spine fractures constitute 1%-3% of all pediatric fractures. Anywhere from 20% to 60% of these fractures occur in the thoracic or lumbar spine, with the lumbar region being more affected in older children. Younger children tend to have a higher proportion of cervical injuries. The pediatric spine differs in many ways from the adult spine, which can lead to increased ligamentous injuries without bone fractures. The authors discuss and review pediatric lumbar trauma, specifically focusing on epidemiology, radiographic findings, types and mechanisms of lumbar spine injury, treatment, and outcomes.

  11. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  12. Assessing Canadian Bank Branch Operating Efficiency Using Data Envelopment Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zijiang

    2009-10-01

    In today's economy and society, performance analyses in the services industries attract more and more attention. This paper presents an evaluation of 240 branches of one big Canadian bank in Greater Toronto Area using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). Special emphasis was placed on how to present the DEA results to management so as to provide more guidance to them on what to manage and how to accomplish the changes. Finally the potential management uses of the DEA results were presented. All the findings are discussed in the context of the Canadian banking market.

  13. Cervical spine clearance in adults following blunt trauma: a national survey across major trauma centres in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilvers, G; Porter, K; Choudhary, S

    2017-12-08

    To assess current practice in cervical spine clearance across major trauma centres in England and review current guidelines. An electronic survey was sent to lead trauma clinicians at 22 major trauma centres in England. This assessed the clinical decision tools used, the choice of initial imaging technique, and the methods used to clear the cervical spine in alert and obtunded patients without focal neurology, and where initial imaging was normal. British Orthopaedic Association Standards for Trauma (BOAST) 2 and Eastern Association for Surgery for Trauma (EAST) guidelines were used as standards. Eighteen out of the 22 (82%) centres responded by completing the survey. Most (71%) centres used the Canadian C-Spine Rule for clearing the cervical spine clinically. Seventy-two percent of centres preferred computed tomography (CT) as the first-line imaging technique, the choice based on age of patient and mechanism of injury. If the initial CT imaging was normal, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 52% of centres to clear the cervical spine, with half of these centres stating that they would discuss further imaging with a radiologist first. The practice across centres was highly variable for the obtunded patient, with most centres preferring continuing immobilisation or MRI to clear the cervical spine, with a small minority removing spinal precautions when a high-quality multidetector CT was normal. Multidetector CT is the preferred initial imaging technique across most major trauma centres in England when blunt cervical spine trauma is suspected. There is widespread reliance on MRI to clear the cervical spine in both alert and obtunded patients, if initial CT imaging is normal and there is no focal neurology on clinical assessment. This calls for greater awareness of the reliability of a high-quality normal multidetector CT examination in clearing the cervical spine in the absence of focal neurology. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  14. Reduction of the pectoral spine and girdle in domesticated Channel catfish is likely caused by changes in selection pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Michael L; Lahiri, Shweta; Sullivan, Amanda D H; Mayo, Mark; Newton, Scott H; Sismour, Edward N

    2014-07-01

    Locked pectoral spines of the Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus more than double the fish's width and complicate ingestion by gape-limited predators. The spine mates with the pectoral girdle, a robust structure that anchors the spine. This study demonstrates that both spine and girdle exhibit negative allometric growth and that pectoral spines and girdles are lighter in domesticated than in wild Channel Catfish. This finding could be explained by changes in selection pressure for spine growth during domestication or by an epigenetic effect in which exposure to predators in wild fish stimulates pectoral growth. We tested the epigenetic hypothesis by exposing domesticated Channel Catfish fingerlings to Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides predators for 13 weeks. Spines and girdles grow isometrically in the fingerlings, and regression analysis indicates no difference in proportional pectoral growth between control and predator-exposed fish. Therefore a change in selection pressure likely accounts for smaller pectoral growth in domesticated Channel Catfish. Decreasing spine growth in older fish suggests anti-predator functions are most important in smaller fish. Additionally, growth of the appendicular and axial skeleton is controlled differentially, and mechanical properties of the spine and not just its length are an important component of this defensive adaptation. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. All rights reserved.

  16. Aquatic antagonists: cutaneous sea urchin spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Clifford; Aronson, Erica R; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M

    2016-11-01

    Injuries from sea urchin spines are commonly seen in coastal regions with high levels of participation in water activities. Although these injuries may seem minor, the consequences vary based on the location of the injury. Sea urchin spine injuries may cause arthritis and synovitis from spines in the joints. Nonjoint injuries have been reported, and dermatologic aspects of sea urchin spine injuries rarely have been discussed. We present a case of a patient with sea urchin spines embedded in the thigh who subsequently developed painful skin nodules. Tissue from the site of the injury demonstrated foreign-body type granulomas. Following the removal of the spines and granulomatous tissue, the patient experienced resolution of the nodules and associated pain. Extraction of sea urchin spines can attenuate the pain and decrease the likelihood of granuloma formation, infection, and long-term sequelae.

  17. Spine school for patients with low back pain: interdisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Moreno Garcia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze and evaluate an interdisciplinary educational treatment - Spine School.METHODS: This study is a non-controlled clinical trial. Twenty one individuals (19 women aged 27-74 years diagnosed with chronic low back pain were enrolled and followed-up by a rheumatologist and an orthopedist. The evaluations used were SF36, Roland Morris, canadian occupational performance measure (COPM and visual analogue scale (VAS of pain that were performed before and after seven weeks of treatment.RESULTS: We found statistically significant improvements in vitality (mean 48.10 vs. 81.25 p=0.009 and limitations caused by physical aspects (mean 48.81 vs. 81.25 p=0.038 and perception of pain (mean 6.88 vs. 5.38 p=0.005. Although the results were suggestive of improvement, there were no statistical significant differences in the domains social aspects (average 70.82 vs. 92.86 p=0.078, emotional aspects (average 52.38 vs. 88.95 p=0.078, and the performance satisfaction (mean 4.94 vs. 8.24 p=0.074.CONCLUSION: The Interdisciplinary Spine School was useful for improvement in some domains of quality of life of people with low back pain.

  18. Unique Factors Affecting Canadian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Robin H.

    In a background statement identifying what is unique about Canada and the issues it currently faces, this paper begins by discussing the concurrent movements toward Canadian nationalism and Quebec nationalism as an illustration of the problems caused by large size and great diversity. It then focuses on unique aspects of Canadian education,…

  19. Conflict of interest in spine research reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Brian P; Sheth, Sameer A; Nahed, Brian V; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2012-01-01

    Medical studies are more likely to report favorable findings when a conflict of interest is declared. We aim to quantify and determine the effect of author disclosure of conflict of interest on scientific reporting. Abstracts from an international spine research meeting (North American Spine Society 2010) were selected that specifically evaluated a device, biologic, or proprietary procedure. They were then made anonymous to reviewers. An item of interest was established in each of the abstracts in order to standardize evaluation. Next, three blinded reviewers independently rated the abstracts as favorable, neutral, or unfavorable with regard to the item of interest. Additionally, the blinded reviewers attempted to predict whether a related disclosure was made. The meeting disclosure index was used to tabulate the minimum US dollar value attributable to disclosures. Of the 344 total abstracts, 76 met inclusion criteria. In 79%, a related conflict of interest was reported. The amount of the disclosure was incompletely reported in 30% of cases. Where available, it averaged a cumulative minimum of $219,634 USD per abstract. The results of the abstracts were judged to be favorable, neutral, and unfavorable in 63%, 32% and 5% of abstracts, respectively. There was no correlation between the presence of a related disclosure and the findings of the studies (p = 0.81), although interpretation of this is limited by a small sample size and an overall apparent bias to report favorable studies. Additionally, the blinded reviewers were unable to predict whether a related disclosure was made (p = 0.40). No association existed between the presence of a related disclosure and the results of the studies. While the actual compliance with reporting a potential conflict of interest is unable to be determined, the value amount related to the disclosures made was inadequately reported according to meeting guidelines.

  20. Multilevel noncontiguous cervical spine injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetunji Mapaderun Toluse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report highlights the successful combination of operative and nonoperative management of a patient with noncontiguous cervical spine fractures and incomplete spinal cord injury. A case report of a 40-year-old male victim of a motor vehicular accident who presented with noncontiguous cervical spine fractures (Anderson and D'Alonzo Type III odontoid fracture and traumatic spondylolisthesis of C4/C5 and incomplete spinal cord injury. The odontoid fracture was managed nonoperatively, whereas anterior cervical discectomy and fusion were done at the C4/C5 vertebral level. The patient made full neurologic recovery with radiologic evidence of successful fusion and fracture healing at 12 weeks postoperation in both levels of injuries. Operative and nonoperative modalities can be utilized to manage selected patients.

  1. Fetal evaluation of spine dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulas, Dorothy [George Washington University Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spinal dysraphism or neural tube defects (NTD) encompass a heterogeneous group of congenital spinal anomalies that result from the defective closure of the neural tube early in gestation with anomalous development of the caudal cell mass. Advances in ultrasound and MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and therapy of spinal dysraphism and caudal spinal anomalies both prenatally and postnatally. Advances in prenatal US including high frequency linear transducers and three dimensional imaging can provide detailed information concerning spinal anomalies. MR imaging is a complementary tool that can further elucidate spine abnormalities as well as associated central nervous system and non-CNS anomalies. Recent studies have suggested that 3-D CT can help further assess fetal spine anomalies in the third trimester. With the advent of fetal therapy including surgery, accurate prenatal diagnosis of open and closed spinal dysraphism becomes critical in appropriate counselling and perinatal management. (orig.)

  2. Potential conflicts of interest of editorial board members from five leading spine journals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein J Janssen

    Full Text Available Conflicts of interest arising from ties between pharmaceutical industry and physicians are common and may bias research. The extent to which these ties exist among editorial board members of medical journals is not known. This study aims to determine the prevalence and financial magnitude of potential conflicts of interest among editorial board members of five leading spine journals. The editorial boards of: The Spine Journal; Spine; European Spine Journal; Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine; and Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques were extracted on January 2013 from the journals' websites. Disclosure statements were retrieved from the 2013 disclosure index of the North American Spine Society; the program of the 20th International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques; the program of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Scoliosis Research Society; the program of the AOSpine global spine congress; the presentations of the 2013 Annual Eurospine meeting; and the disclosure index of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Names of the editorial board members were compared with the individuals who completed a disclosure for one of these indexes. Disclosures were extracted when full names matched. Two hundred and ten (29% of the 716 identified editorial board members reported a potential conflict of interest and 154 (22% reported nothing to disclose. The remaining 352 (49% editorial board members had no disclosure statement listed for one of the indexes. Eighty-nine (42% of the 210 editorial board members with a potential conflict of interest reported a financial relationship of more than $10,000 during the prior year. This finding confirms that potential conflicts of interest exist in editorial boards which might influence the peer review process and can result in bias. Academia and medical journals in particular should be aware of this and strive to improve transparency of the review process. We emphasize recommendations that contribute to achieving

  3. Potential conflicts of interest of editorial board members from five leading spine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Stein J; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Dhert, Wouter; de Kleuver, Marinus; Oner, F Cumhur; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts of interest arising from ties between pharmaceutical industry and physicians are common and may bias research. The extent to which these ties exist among editorial board members of medical journals is not known. This study aims to determine the prevalence and financial magnitude of potential conflicts of interest among editorial board members of five leading spine journals. The editorial boards of: The Spine Journal; Spine; European Spine Journal; Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine; and Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques were extracted on January 2013 from the journals' websites. Disclosure statements were retrieved from the 2013 disclosure index of the North American Spine Society; the program of the 20th International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques; the program of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Scoliosis Research Society; the program of the AOSpine global spine congress; the presentations of the 2013 Annual Eurospine meeting; and the disclosure index of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Names of the editorial board members were compared with the individuals who completed a disclosure for one of these indexes. Disclosures were extracted when full names matched. Two hundred and ten (29%) of the 716 identified editorial board members reported a potential conflict of interest and 154 (22%) reported nothing to disclose. The remaining 352 (49%) editorial board members had no disclosure statement listed for one of the indexes. Eighty-nine (42%) of the 210 editorial board members with a potential conflict of interest reported a financial relationship of more than $10,000 during the prior year. This finding confirms that potential conflicts of interest exist in editorial boards which might influence the peer review process and can result in bias. Academia and medical journals in particular should be aware of this and strive to improve transparency of the review process. We emphasize recommendations that contribute to achieving this goal.

  4. Readability of Spine-Related Patient Education Materials From Leading Orthopedic Academic Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Justine H; Yi, Paul H

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional analysis of online spine-related patient education materials from leading academic centers. To assess the readability levels of spine surgery-related patient education materials available on the websites of academic orthopedic surgery departments. The Internet is becoming an increasingly popular resource for patient education. Yet many previous studies have found that Internet-based orthopedic-related patient education materials from subspecialty societies are written at a level too difficult for the average American; however, no prior study has assessed the readability of spine surgery-related patient educational materials from leading academic centers. All spine surgery-related articles from the online patient education libraries of the top five US News & World Report-ranked orthopedic institutions were assessed for readability using the Flesch-Kincaid (FK) readability test. Mean readability levels of articles amongst the five academic institutions and articles were compared. We also determined the number of articles with readability levels at or below the recommended sixth- or eight-grade levels. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability of readability assessment were assessed. A total of 122 articles were reviewed. The mean overall FK grade level was 11.4; the difference in mean FK grade level between each department varied significantly (range, 9.3-13.4; P level at or below the eighth grade level, and only one (0.8%) was at or below the sixth grade level. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were both excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient of 1 for both). Online patient education materials related to spine from academic orthopedic centers are written at a level too high for the average patient, consistent with spine surgery-related patient education materials provided by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and spine subspecialty societies. This study highlights the potential difficulties patients might have in reading

  5. MRI of the fetal spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Erin M. [Departement of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  6. Biomarkers reflect differences in osteoarthritis phenotypes of the lumbar spine: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, A P; Nelson, A E; Kraus, V B; Renner, J B; Jordan, J M

    2017-10-01

    To determine differences in biomarker levels between radiographic phenotypes of facet joint osteoarthritis (FOA) only, spine OA only ((disc space narrowing (DSN) and vertebral osteophytes (OST)) or the combination of FOA and spine OA. A cross-sectional analysis of data from 555 participants in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project was performed. Lumbar spine levels were graded by severity (OST and DSN) and presence (FOA) of degeneration. Biomarkers included hyaluronan (HA) and type II collagen (CTX-II). Adjusted risk ratios (aRRR) were estimated using multinomial regression, with adjustment for age, race, sex, body mass index (BMI), and radiographic OA (knee, hip, hand). Interactions were tested between sex, race and low back symptoms. FOA only was present in 22.4%, 14.5% had spine OA only, and 34.6% had the combination of FOA and spine OA. Compared to the reference group of neither FOA or spine OA, a one unit higher ln HA level was associated with 31% higher relative risk ratio (RRR = 1.31 (95% 1.03, 1.67)) of having FOA only, while, a one unit higher lnuCTX-II level was associated with 84% higher relative risk ratio (RRR = 1.84 (95% CI 1.19, 2.84)) of having spine OA only. No significant interactions were identified. Interestingly, OA affecting the synovial facet joint was associated with a marker of inflammation (HA). Spine OA, affecting intervertebral discs that contain collagen type II, was associated with a marker reflecting collagen type II degradation (CTX-II). These findings suggest that biomarkers may reflect the different pathophysiologic processes of lumbar spine OA phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantifying the variability of financial disclosure information reported by authors presenting at annual spine conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Brian L; Miller, Christopher P; Whang, Peter G; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, greater attention has been directed toward determining how potential financial conflicts of interest may affect the integrity of biomedical research. To address this issue, various disclosure policies have been adopted in an attempt to increase the transparency of this process. However, the consistency of such reporting among spine surgeons remains unknown. This study quantifies the variability in the self-reported disclosures of individual authors presenting at multiple spine conferences during the same year. The author disclosure information published for the 2008 North American Spine Society (NASS), Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS), and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS), conferences were compiled into a database. We evaluated the disclosure policy for each society and compared the disclosure listings of authors who presented at more than one of these meetings. Disclosure records were available for 1,231 authors at NASS, 550 at CSRS, and 642 at SRS. Of these individuals, 278 (NASS), 129 (CSRS), and 181 (SRS) presented at one of the other conferences and 40 presented at all three conferences. North American Spine Society and CSRS required disclosure of all financial relationships, whereas SRS only requested disclosures pertinent to authors' presentations. Of the 153 authors who presented at the NASS and CSRS meetings, 51% exhibited discrepancies in their disclosure information. In contrast, only 9% of the 205 individuals whose data was listed at both the NASS and SRS conferences demonstrated irregularities. Similarly, 18% of the 56 authors who had provided information to both CSRS and SRS were inconsistent in their reporting. These findings emphasize the significant variability that currently exists in the reporting of financial conflicts of interest by authors who presented at three major spine conferences within the past year. We believe these discrepancies are likely because of confusion regarding what relationships should be acknowledged

  8. Maxillofacial trauma - Underestimation of cervical spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Waldemar; Surov, Alexey; Eckert, Alexander Walter

    2016-09-01

    Undiagnosed cervical spine injury can have devastating results. The aim of this study was to analyse patients with primary maxillofacial trauma and a concomitant cervical spine injury. It is hypothetised that cervical spine injury is predictable in maxillofacial surgery. A monocentric clinical study was conducted over a 10-year period to analyse patients with primary maxillofacial and associated cervical spine injuries. Demographic data, mechanism of injury, specific trauma and treatments provided were reviewed. Additionally a search of relevant international literature was conducted in PubMed by terms "maxillofacial" AND "cervical spine" AND "injury". Of 3956 patients, n = 3732 (94.3%) suffered from craniomaxillofacial injuries only, n = 174 (4.4%) from cervical spine injuries only, and n = 50 (1.3%) from both craniomaxillofacial and cervical spine injuries. In this study cohort the most prevalent craniofacial injuries were: n = 41 (44%) midfacial and n = 21 (22.6%) skull base fractures. Cervical spine injuries primarily affected the upper cervical spine column: n = 39 (58.2%) vs. n = 28 (41.8%). Only in 3 of 50 cases (6%), the cervical spine injury was diagnosed coincidentally, and the cervical spine column was under immobilised. The operative treatment rate for maxillofacial injuries was 36% (n = 18), and for cervical spine injuries 20% (n = 10). The overall mortality rate was 8% (n = 4). The literature search yielded only 12 papers (11 retrospective and monocentric cohort studies) and is discussed before our own results. In cases of apparently isolated maxillofacial trauma, maxillofacial surgeons should be aware of a low but serious risk of underestimating an unstable cervical spine injury. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  10. Report from the 2014 Scoliosis Research Society Travelling Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quraishi, Nasir A; Enercan, Meric; Naresh-Babu, J; Chopin, D

    2015-03-01

    The Scoliosis Research Society traveling fellowship was conceptualized in 1970, repeated in 1972, and, after a pause, restarted in 1993. International traveling fellows visiting North America first commenced in 2000 and have since alternated annually with the North American fellows. Although a senior fellow had always traveled with them, in 2012 the first senior international fellow traveled with the group. This year, the senior fellow was Daniel Chopin from the Neuro-Orthopedic Spine Unit, Lille University Hospital, France, and past Director of the Spine Center, Institut Calot Berck sur Mer (succeeding Dr. Cotrel). The junior fellows were Meric Enercan from the Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul Spine Center, Turkey; J. Naresh-Babu from Mallika Spine Centre, Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India; and Nasir A. Quraishi from the Centre for Spine Studies and Surgery, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK. The host centers were initially suggested by Dr. Chopin, the senior fellow; after some minor tweaking and extensive planning from the Scoliosis Research Society office, the itinerary was confirmed. The researchers were to visit 7 centers in just over 3 weeks. All of the international fellows were going to have an extraordinary adventure although they had not met each other previously. As it turned out, the trip was indeed sensational-professionally stimulating and socially endearing. The following is a short report on this unforgettable experience. Copyright © 2015 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spine-hip T-score difference predicts major osteoporotic fracture risk independent of FRAX(®): a population-based report from CAMOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, William D; Kovacs, Christopher S; Olszynski, Wojciech P; Towheed, Tanveer; Kaiser, Stephanie M; Prior, Jerilynn C; Josse, Robert G; Jamal, Sophie A; Kreiger, Nancy; Goltzman, David

    2011-01-01

    The WHO fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX(®)) estimates an individual's 10-yr major osteoporotic and hip fracture probabilities. When bone mineral density (BMD) is included in the FRAX calculation, only the femoral neck measurement can be used. Recently, a procedure was reported for adjusting major osteoporotic fracture probability from FRAX with femoral neck BMD based on the difference (offset) between the lumbar spine and the femoral neck T-score values. The objective of the current analysis was to independently evaluate this algorithm in a population-based cohort of 4575 women and 1813 men aged 50 yr and older from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study. For women and men combined, there was a 15% (95% confidence interval 7-24%) increase in major osteoporotic fracture risk for each offset T-score after adjusting for FRAX probability calculated with femoral neck BMD. The effect was stronger in women than men, but a significant sex interaction was not detected. Among the full cohort, 5.5% had their risk category reclassified after using the offset adjustment. Sex- and age-dependent offsets (equivalent to an offset based on Z-scores) showed improved risk classification among individuals designated to be at moderate risk with the conventional FRAX probability measurement. In summary, the T-score difference between the lumbar spine and femoral neck is an independent risk factor for major osteoporotic fractures that is independent of the FRAX probability calculated with femoral neck BMD. Copyright © 2011 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for tuberculosis of cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Huzurbazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective was to report this rare case and discuss the probable mechanism of thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for Kochs cervical spine.

  13. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    OpenAIRE

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between the watershed basins to trace the critical points in the density field and the separatrices defined by them. The separatrices are classified into walls and the spine, the network of filaments and node...

  14. Chondrosarcoma of the Mobile Spine and Sacrum

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan M. Stuckey; Rex A. W. Marco

    2011-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of bone. This family of tumors can be primary malignant tumors or a secondary malignant transformation of an underlying benign cartilage tumor. Pain is often the initial presenting complaint when chondrosarcoma involves the spine. In the mobile spine, chondrosarcoma commonly presents within the vertebral body and shows a predilection for the thoracic spine. Due to the resistance of chondrosarcoma to both radiation and chemotherapy, treatment is focuse...

  15. Selective Loss of Smaller Spines in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Matthew L; Alhassan, Jamil; Newman, Jason T; Richard, Michelle; Gu, Hong; Kelly, Ryan M; Sampson, Alan R; Fish, Kenneth N; Penzes, Peter; Wills, Zachary P; Lewis, David A; Sweet, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Decreased density of dendritic spines in adult schizophrenia subjects has been hypothesized to result from increased pruning of excess synapses in adolescence. In vivo imaging studies have confirmed that synaptic pruning is largely driven by the loss of large or mature synapses. Thus, increased pruning throughout adolescence would likely result in a deficit of large spines in adulthood. Here, the authors examined the density and volume of dendritic spines in deep layer 3 of the auditory cortex of 20 schizophrenia and 20 matched comparison subjects as well as aberrant voltage-gated calcium channel subunit protein expression linked to spine loss. Primary auditory cortex deep layer 3 spine density and volume was assessed in 20 pairs of schizophrenia and matched comparison subjects in an initial and replication cohort (12 and eight pairs) by immunohistochemistry-confocal microscopy. Targeted mass spectrometry was used to quantify postsynaptic density and voltage-gated calcium channel protein expression. The effect of increased voltage-gated calcium channel subunit protein expression on spine density and volume was assessed in primary rat neuronal culture. Only the smallest spines are lost in deep layer 3 of the primary auditory cortex in subjects with schizophrenia, while larger spines are retained. Levels of the tryptic peptide ALFDFLK, found in the schizophrenia risk gene CACNB4, are inversely correlated with the density of smaller, but not larger, spines in schizophrenia subjects. Consistent with this observation, CACNB4 overexpression resulted in a lower density of smaller spines in primary neuronal cultures. These findings require a rethinking of the overpruning hypothesis, demonstrate a link between small spine loss and a schizophrenia risk gene, and should spur more in-depth investigations of the mechanisms that govern new or small spine generation and stabilization under normal conditions as well as how this process is impaired in schizophrenia.

  16. Diagnostic Approach to Pediatric Spine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the developmental features of the pediatric spine and spinal cord, including embryologic steps and subsequent growth of the osteocartilaginous spine and contents is necessary for interpretation of the pathologic events that may affect the pediatric spine. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients suspected of harboring spinal abnormalities, whereas computed tomography and ultrasonography play a more limited, complementary role. This article discusses the embryologic and developmental anatomy features of the spine and spinal cord, together with some technical points and pitfalls, and the most common indications for pediatric spinal MR imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathophysiology and biomechanics of the aging spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Michael; Sapkas, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Katonis, Pavlos

    2011-01-01

    AGING OF THE SPINE IS CHARACTERIZED BY TWO PARALLEL BUT INDEPENDENT PROCESSES: the reduction of bone mineral density and the development of degenerative changes. The combination of degeneration and bone mass reduction contribute, to a different degree, to the development of a variety of lesions. This results in a number of painful and often debilitating disorders. The present review constitutes a synopsis of the pathophysiological processes that take place in the aging spine as well as of the consequences these changes have on the biomechanics of the spine. The authors hope to present a thorough yet brief overview of the process of aging of the human spine.

  18. Chondrosarcoma of the Mobile Spine and Sacrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Stuckey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of bone. This family of tumors can be primary malignant tumors or a secondary malignant transformation of an underlying benign cartilage tumor. Pain is often the initial presenting complaint when chondrosarcoma involves the spine. In the mobile spine, chondrosarcoma commonly presents within the vertebral body and shows a predilection for the thoracic spine. Due to the resistance of chondrosarcoma to both radiation and chemotherapy, treatment is focused on surgery. With en bloc excision of chondrosarcoma of the mobile spine and sacrum patients can have local recurrence rates as low as 20%.

  19. Development of the young spine questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Hestbæk, Lise

    2013-01-01

    primarily been on the working age population, and therefore specific questionnaires to measure spinal pain and its consequences, specifically aimed at children and adolescents are absent. The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire for schoolchildren filling this gap. Methods The Young Spine...... pain score ranged between 0.67 (cervical spine) and 0.79 (lumbar spine). Conclusions The Young Spine Questionnaire contains questions that assess spinal pain and its consequences. The items have been tested for content understanding and agreement between questionnaire scores and interview findings...

  20. The FAt Spondyloarthritis Spine Score (FASSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Zhao, Zheng; Lambert, Robert Gw

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that fat lesions follow resolution of inflammation in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Fat lesions at vertebral corners have also been shown to predict development of new syndesmophytes. Therefore, scoring of fat lesions in the spine may constitute both...... an important measure of treatment efficacy as well as a surrogate marker for new bone formation. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new scoring method for fat lesions in the spine, the Fat SpA Spine Score (FASSS), which in contrast to the existing scoring method addresses the localization...

  1. Canadian National Vegetation Classification (CNVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The mandate of the CNVC is to comprehensively classify and describe natural and semi-natural Canadian vegetation in an ecologically meaningful manner. The...

  2. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    .... What contributes to this deterioration, and how can its effects be mitigated? Engendering Migrant Health brings together researchers from across Canada to address the intersections of gender, immigration, and health in the lives of new Canadians...

  3. Natural history of Canadian mammals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naughton, Donna; Banfield, A. W. F

    2012-01-01

    .... A complete revision of A.W.F. Banfield's classic text Mammals of Canada, it features brand-new, full-colour images of each species, as well as stunning photographs from Canadian Geographic magazine's national photography...

  4. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    "Voluntary migrants to Canada are generally healthier than the average Canadian, but after ten years in the country they report poorer health and higher rates of chronic disease than those born here...

  5. Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature and Genetic Correlations With Other Spine Traits: The Framingham Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yau, Michelle S; Demissie, Serkalem; Zhou, Yanhua; Anderson, Dennis E; Lorbergs, Amanda L; Kiel, Douglas P; Allaire, Brett T; Yang, Laiji; Cupples, L Adrienne; Travison, Thomas G; Bouxsein, Mary L; Karasik, David; Samelson, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    ... spine curvature in older women. However, aging‐related changes in the anatomic structures of the spine, particularly loss of height in the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs, have been consistently associated with thoracic spine curvature severity. For example, women with vertebral fracture have a six‐degree higher kyphosis angle and a tw...

  6. Unveiled Sentiments: Gendered Islamophobia and Experiences of Veiling among Muslim Girls in a Canadian Islamic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zine, Jasmin

    2006-01-01

    The practice of veiling has made Muslim women subject to dual oppressions--racism and Islamophobia--in society at large and patriarchal oppression and sexism from within their communities. Based on a narrative analysis of the politics of veiling in schools and society, the voices of young Muslim women attending a Canadian Islamic school speak to…

  7. Minimally invasive cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2017-06-01

    Degenerative disorders of the cervical spine requiring surgical intervention have become increasingly more common over the past decade. Traditionally, open surgical approaches have been the mainstay of surgical treatment. More commonly, minimally invasive techniques are being developed with the intent to decrease surgical morbidity and iatrogenic spinal instability. This study will review four minimally invasive cervical techniques that have been increasingly utilized in the treatment of degenerative cervical spine disease. A series of PubMed-National Library of Medicine searches were performed. Only articles in English journals or with published with English language translations were included. Level of evidence of the selected articles was assessed. The significant incidence of postoperative dysphagia following ACDF has led to the development and increased use of zero-profile, stand-alone anterior cervical cages. The currently available literature examining the safety and effectiveness of zero-profile interbody devices supports the use of these devices in patients undergoing single-level ACDF. A multitude of studies demonstrating the significant incidence and impact of axial neck pain following open posterior spine surgery have led to a wave of research and development of techniques aimed at minimizing posterior cervical paraspinal disruption while achieving appropriate neurological decompression and/or spinal fixation. The currently available literature supports the use of minimally invasive posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy for the treatment of single-level radiculopathy. The literature suggests that fluoroscopically-assisted percutaneous cervical lateral mass screw fixation appears to be a technically feasible, safe and minimally invasive technique. Based on the currently available literature it appears that the DTRAX® expandable cage system is an effective minimally invasive posterior cervical technique for the treatment of single-level cervical

  8. Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemani, Venu M.; Derman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications. PMID:26949476

  9. ADULT SPINE DEFORMITY - AN OVERVIEW OF RADIOGRAPHIC AND CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Pratali

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Adult spine deformity is a complex pathology that represents a public health problem with a deep impact on society. When evaluating the patient, not only the clinical and radiographic aspects are essential, but also the clear understanding of the specific needs and expectations of the individual. To elaborate the treatment plan it is necessary to quantify the pain and disability, as well as the spinopelvic alignment of the patient, including the mechanisms that may be recruited to compensate for deformity. Considering these factors, it is possible to define objectives for the surgical correction in order to obtain clinical improvement.

  10. Canadian leadership in energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    Canada's energy is complex and an important resource as it fuels and funds the economy. The unique character of Canada's energy production and consumption provides strength to the country. The purpose of this booklet was to highlight Canada's energy production and consumption and to demonstrate Canada's rank globally with other major global energy players. The document also presented information on the value of Canada's energy exports, Canada's relationship with the United States, and Canada's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Specifically, the document discussed Canada's energy in a global context; the value of Canada's energy exports; domestic value of energy; Canada's unique energy mix; Canada's electricity mix; Canada's carbon dioxide emissions; energy strategies; and the importance of energy to Canadians. It was concluded that there are 14 federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions managing their respective energy resources. All of these regions, with the exception of Saskatchewan have produced an energy strategy document or a climate change action plan focusing on 8 areas of action, notably awareness; benefit; efficiency; development; diversification; electricity; and emissions. refs., tabs., figs.

  11. Perceived Impact of Terrorism on Nigerian Youths and Society ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terrorism is a hydra-headed global phenomenon but it has recently become a recurring menace in Nigeria, unleashing trauma, fear and psychological disorientation on individuals and the Nigerian society. Currently the news of any terrorist attack sends shock waves through the spines of Nigerians followed by apathy.

  12. AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 performance measures on cardiac rehabilitation for referral to and delivery of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention services endorsed by the American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Physical Therapy Association, Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, Inter-American Heart Foundation, National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Randal J; King, Marjorie; Lui, Karen; Oldridge, Neil; Piña, Ileana L; Spertus, John; Bonow, Robert O; Estes, 3rd, N A Mark; Goff, David C; Grady, Kathleen L; Hiniker, Ann R; Masoudi, Frederick A; Radford, Martha J; Rumsfeld, John S; Whitman, Gayle R

    2007-01-01

      Endorsed by the American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Sports Medicine, American Physical Therapy Association, Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation, European Association...

  13. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between

  14. Primary multiple osseous leiomyosarcomas of the spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary osseous leiomyosarcoma of the spine is a very unusual condition, with only few cases being reported in the literature.In fact, this type of tumors arises from the smooth muscle cells and occurs usually in the uterus and the gastrointestinal tracts. If the spine should be involved, it occurs generally as a metastatic ...

  15. Bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Willems; Braakman, R. (Reinder); B. van Linge (Bert)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractTwo cases of traumatic bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine are reported. Both patients had only minor neurological signs. They both made a full neurological recovery after surgical reduction of the locked facets. Bilateral locked facets are very uncommon in the thoracic spine.

  16. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... open mouth (odontoid view). Occasionally, additional pictures like flexion and extension views of the cervical spine might be needed. continue Why It's Done A cervical spine X-ray can help find the cause of symptoms such as neck, shoulder, upper back, or arm pain, as well ...

  17. Triage tools for detecting cervical spine injury in pediatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaar, Annelie; Fockens, M M; Wang, Junfeng; Maas, Mario; Wilson, David J; Goslings, J Carel; Schep, Niels Wl; van Rijn, Rick R

    2017-12-07

    Pediatric cervical spine injury (CSI) after blunt trauma is rare. Nonetheless, missing these injuries can have severe consequences. To prevent the overuse of radiographic imaging, two clinical decision tools have been developed: The National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) criteria and the Canadian C-spine Rule (CCR). Both tools are proven to be accurate in deciding whether or not diagnostic imaging is needed in adults presenting for blunt trauma screening at the emergency department. However, little information is known about the accuracy of these triage tools in a pediatric population. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the NEXUS criteria and the Canadian C-spine Rule in a pediatric population evaluated for CSI following blunt trauma. We searched the following databases to 24 February 2015: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, MEDLINE Non-Indexed and In-Process Citations, PubMed, Embase, Science Citation Index, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Database, OpenGrey, ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, the Health Technology Assessment, and the Aggressive Research Intelligence Facility. We included all retrospective and prospective studies involving children following blunt trauma that evaluated the accuracy of the NEXUS criteria, the Canadian C-spine Rule, or both. Plain radiography, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine, and follow-up were considered as adequate reference standards. Two review authors independently assessed the quality of included studies using the QUADAS-2 checklists. They extracted data on study design, patient characteristics, inclusion and exclusion criteria, clinical parameters, target condition, reference standard, and the diagnostic two-by-two table. We calculated and plotted sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value in

  18. Comparative Analysis of the Radiology of Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures in Women and Men: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Observations from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentle, Brian C; Berger, Claudie; Probyn, Linda; Brown, Jacques P; Langsetmo, Lisa; Fine, Ben; Lian, Kevin; Shergill, Arvind K; Trollip, Jacques; Jackson, Stuart; Leslie, William D; Prior, Jerilynn C; Kaiser, Stephanie M; Hanley, David A; Adachi, Jonathan D; Towheed, Tanveer; Davison, K Shawn; Cheung, Angela M; Goltzman, David

    2017-07-19

    We compared two methods for osteoporotic vertebral fracture (VF) assessment on lateral spine radiographs, the Genant semiquantitative (GSQ) technique and a modified algorithm-based qualitative (mABQ) approach. We evaluated 4465 women and 1771 men aged ≥50 years from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study with available X-ray images at baseline. Observer agreement was lowest for grade 1 VFs determined by GSQ. Among physician readers, agreement was greater for VFs diagnosed by mABQ (ranging from 0.62 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00-1.00] to 0.88 [0.76-1.00]) than by GSQ (ranging from 0.38 [0.17-0.60] to 0.69 [0.54-0.85]). GSQ VF prevalence (16.4% [95% CI 15.4-17.4]) and incidence (10.2/1000 person-years [9.2; 11.2]) were higher than with the mABQ method (prevalence 6.7% [6.1-7.4] and incidence 6.3/1000 person-years [5.5-7.1]). Women had more prevalent and incident VFs relative to men as defined by mABQ but not as defined by GSQ. Prevalent GSQ VFs were predominantly found in the mid-thoracic spine, whereas prevalent mABQ and incident VFs by both methods co-localized to the junction of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Prevalent mABQ VFs compared with GSQ VFs were more highly associated with reduced adjusted L 1 to L 4 bone mineral density (BMD) (-0.065 g/cm 2 [-0.087 to -0.042]), femoral neck BMD (-0.051 g/cm 2 [-0.065 to -0.036]), and total hip BMD (-0.059 g/cm 2 [-0.076 to -0.041]). Prevalent mABQ VFs compared with prevalent GSQ were also more highly associated with incident VF by GSQ (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3 [2.2-5.0]), incident VF by mABQ (9.0 [5.3-15.3]), and incident non-vertebral major osteoporotic fractures (1.9 [1.2-3.0]). Grade 1 mABQ VFs, but not grade 1 GSQ VFs, were associated with incident non-vertebral major osteoporotic fractures (OR = 3.0 [1.4-6.5]). We conclude that defining VF by mABQ is preferred to the use of GSQ for clinical assessments. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone

  19. Minimally invasive spine surgery in spinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, F; Vanaclocha-Vanaclocha, V; Gozalbes-Esterelles, L; Sánchez-Pardo, M

    2014-06-01

    Infections of the spine have been a constant throughout history. At present there are infections in the spine fostered in part by the same advances in medicine: there are a lot of immunocompromised patients, the life expectancy of patients with chronic diseases is augmented and the increasing number of complex spinal surgeries can result in secondary infection. In this review the main types of infection of the spine and its treatment highlighting techniques in minimally invasive surgery are discussed. Spontaneous pyogenic and nonpyogenic spine infections as well as iatrogenic infections can be treated in a different manner depending on its extension, location and microorganism involved. We will review the use and the indication of percutaneous image-guided techniques, endoscopic and microsurgical techniques with or without use of tubular retractors. We conclude that techniques in minimally invasive surgery in spine infections are safe, effective and have benefits in morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery.

  20. Canadian synthetic resins industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margeson, J. [Industry Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    The growth of the synthetic resin industry in Canada is described. In 1999 the industry had shipments totalling $6.3 billion and employed about 9,000 people in 105 establishments. The industry is concentrated in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. Plants in Alberta produce commodity-grade thermoplastic resins from raw materials derived mainly from natural gas, whereas plants in Ontario and Quebec produce both thermoplastic and thermoset resins using raw materials derived from both crude oil and natural gas. Sixty-four per cent of the synthetic reins produced in Canada, worth about $4.1 billion, are exported. This is offset by imports of 68 per cent of domestic consumption, (valued at $5.0 billion) reflecting rationalization and specialization of the resin industry on a continental basis. Process and product technologies used in Canada are up-to-date and licensed from parent or other foreign chemical companies. Capital investment in the Canadian resin industry is lagging behind investment in the United States, however, this is expected to change once the impact of recent investments in the industry in Alberta is reflected in the statistics. A five to seven per cent real average annual growth in world-wide consumption is predicted over the next five years. Growth in North America is projected to be in the three to four per cent range. The Alberta-based component of the industry, being relatively new, is expected to improve its ability to compete globally in commodity thermoplastics. In contrast, the plants in Ontario and Quebec suffer from the fact that they were built prior to the Free Trade Agreement and were designed to satisfy domestic requirements. They are attempting to compensate for their lack of economics of scale by developing strategies to supply niche products. 8 figs.

  1. Malpractice litigation following spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Ruttiman, Roy; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Brea, Bielinsky A; Palumbo, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Adverse events related to spine surgery sometimes lead to litigation. Few studies have evaluated the association between spine surgical complications and medical malpractice proceedings, outcomes, and awards. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent causes of alleged malpractice in spine surgery and to gain insight into patient demographic and clinical characteristics associated with medical negligence litigation. METHODS A search for "spine surgery" spanning February 1988 to May 2015 was conducted utilizing the medicolegal research service VerdictSearch (ALM Media Properties, LLC). Demographic data for the plaintiff and defendant in addition to clinical data for the procedure and legal outcomes were examined. Spinal cord injury, anoxic/hypoxic brain injury, and death were classified as catastrophic complications; all other complications were classified as noncatastrophic. Both chi-square and t-tests were used to evaluate the effect of these variables on case outcomes and awards granted. RESULTS A total of 569 legal cases were examined; 335 cases were excluded due to irrelevance or insufficient information. Of the 234 cases included in this investigation, 54.2% (127 cases) resulted in a defendant ruling, 26.1% (61) in a plaintiff ruling, and 19.6% (46) in a settlement. The awards granted for plaintiff rulings ranged from $134,000 to $38,323,196 (mean $4,045,205 ± $6,804,647). Awards for settlements ranged from $125,000 to $9,000,000 (mean $1,930,278 ± $2,113,593), which was significantly less than plaintiff rulings (p = 0.022). Compared with cases without a delay in diagnosis of the complication, the cases with a diagnostic delay were more likely to result in a plaintiff verdict or settlement (42.9% vs 72.7%, p = 0.007) than a defense verdict, and were more likely to settle out of court (17.5% vs 40.9%, p = 0.008). Similarly, compared with cases without a delay in treatment of the complication, those with a therapeutic delay were more

  2. Responsible Canadian energy progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) represents oil and gas companies throughout Canada; its members produce over 90% of Canada's natural gas and crude oil output. The aim of the Association is to improve the economics of the Canadian upstream petroleum sector in an environmentally and socially responsible way. The aim of this Responsible Canadian Energy report is to present the performance data of CAPP's members for the year 2009. Data, trends, and performance analyses are provided throughout the document. This analysis makes it possible to determine where progress has been made and where performance improvement is necessary. It also presents success stories and best practices so that other companies can learn from them how to improve their own performance. This paper provides useful information on the performance of the upstream petroleum industry in Canada and highlights where the focus should be for further improvement in its performance.

  3. Transnational archives: the Canadian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Creet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the concept of the transnational archive as a counterpoint to the idea that a national archive is necessarily a locus of a static idea of nation. The Canadian national archives is used as a case study of an archives that was transnational in its inception, and one that has continued to change in its mandate and materials as a response to patterns in migration and changing notions of multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy. It introduces the most recent formation of the transnational archive and its denizens: the genealogical archive inhabited by family historians.

  4. Instrumentation and fusion for congenital spine deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedequist, Daniel J

    2009-08-01

    A retrospective clinical review. To review the use of modern instrumentation of the spine for congenital spinal deformities. Spinal instrumentation has evolved since the advent of the Harrington rod. There is a paucity of literature, which discusses the use of modern spinal instrumentation in congenital spine deformity cases. This review focuses on modern instrumentation techniques for congenital scoliosis and kyphosis. A systematic review was performed of the literature to discuss spinal implant use for congenital deformities. Spinal instrumentation may be safely and effectively used in cases of congenital spinal deformity. Spinal surgeons taking care of children with congenital spine deformities need to be trained in all aspects of modern spinal instrumentation.

  5. Computed tomography of the postoperative lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    In the postoperative patient ordinary radiographs of the spine generally add very little information, revealing the usual postoperative bone changes and often postoperative narrowing of the intervertebral space. Myelography may sometimes be informative, showing evidence of focal arachnoiditis or a focal defect at the surgical site. However, the latter finding is difficult to interpret. As experience with high-resolution CT scanning of the lumbar spine has been increasing, it is becoming apparent that this noninvasive and easily performed study can give considerably more information about the postoperative spine than any of the other current imaging methods. About 750 patients with previous lumbar laminectomies had CT scanning within a 28 month period.

  6. Minimally invasive surgery for the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, S D; Anderson, D G

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery is a rapidly developing field that has the potential to decrease surgical morbidity and improve recovery compared to traditional spinal approaches. Minimally invasive approaches have been developed for all regions of the spine, but have been best documented for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. Lumbar decompression and lumbar interbody fusion are two of the most well-studied minimally invasive surgical approaches. This article will review both the rationale and technique for minimally invasive lumbar decompression and for a minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

  7. Minimally invasive approaches to the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestre, Paul C; Pazmiño, Pablo R; Mikhael, Mark M; Wolf, Christopher F; Feldman, Lacey A; Lauryssen, Carl; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive approaches and operative techniques are becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of cervical spine disorders. Minimally invasive spine surgery attempts to decrease iatrogenic muscle injury, decrease pain, and speed postoperative recovery with the use of smaller incisions and specialized instruments. This article explains in detail minimally invasive approaches to the posterior spine, the techniques for posterior cervical foraminotomy and arthrodesis via lateral mass screw placement, and anterior cervical foraminotomy. Complications are also discussed. Additionally, illustrated cases are presented detailing the use of minimally invasive surgical techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Canadian Children's Literature: An Alberta Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Carbonaro, Mike; Green, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an online survey administered to Alberta elementary school teachers in 2000-2001. The survey explored the teachers' knowledge and use of Canadian children's literature and their thoughts about the role of Canadian literature in elementary school classrooms. Canadian children's trade books espouse particular…

  9. Chronic Ethanol During Adolescence Impacts Corticolimbic Dendritic Spines and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jury, Nicholas J; Pollack, Gabrielle A; Ward, Meredith J; Bezek, Jessica L; Ng, Alexandra J; Pinard, Courtney R; Bergstrom, Hadley C; Holmes, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in adulthood is linked to alcohol drinking during adolescence, but understanding of the neural and behavioral consequences of alcohol exposure during adolescence remains incomplete. Here, we examined the neurobehavioral impact of adolescent chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) vapor exposure in mice. C57BL/6J-background Thy1-EGFP mice were CIE-exposed during adolescence or adulthood and examined, as adults, for alterations in the density and morphology of dendritic spines in infralimbic (IL) cortex, prelimbic (PL) cortex, and basolateral amygdala (BLA). In parallel, adolescent- and adult-exposed C57BL/6J mice were tested as adults for 2-bottle EtOH drinking, sensitivity to EtOH intoxication (loss of righting reflex [LORR]), blood EtOH clearance, and measures of operant responding for food reward. CIE during adolescence decreased IL neuronal spine density and increased the head width of relatively wide-head IL and BLA spines, whereas CIE decreased head width of relatively narrow-head BLA spines. Adolescents had higher EtOH consumption prior to CIE than adults, while CIE during adulthood, but not adolescence, increased EtOH consumption relative to pre-CIE baseline. CIE produced a tolerance-like decrease in LORR sensitivity to EtOH challenge, irrespective of the age at which mice received CIE exposure. Mice exposed to CIE during adolescence, but not adulthood, required more sessions than AIR controls to reliably respond for food reward on a fixed-ratio (FR) 1, but not subsequent FR3, reinforcement schedule. On a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule, break point responding was higher in the adolescent- than the adult-exposed mice, regardless of CIE. Finally, footshock punishment markedly suppressed responding for reward in all groups. Exposure to CIE during adolescence altered dendritic spine density and morphology in IL and BLA neurons, in parallel with a limited set of behavioral alterations. Together, these data add to growing

  10. 49 CFR 572.85 - Lumbar spine flexure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine flexure. 572.85 Section 572.85... Lumbar spine flexure. (a) When subjected to continuously applied force in accordance with paragraph (b) of this section, the lumbar spine assembly shall flex by an amount that permits the thoracic spine to...

  11. Mechanical coupling between transsynaptic N-cadherin adhesions and actin flow stabilizes dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazeau, Anaël; Garcia, Mikael; Czöndör, Katalin; Perrais, David; Tessier, Béatrice; Giannone, Grégory; Thoumine, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    The morphology of neuronal dendritic spines is a critical indicator of synaptic function. It is regulated by several factors, including the intracellular actin/myosin cytoskeleton and transcellular N-cadherin adhesions. To examine the mechanical relationship between these molecular components, we performed quantitative live-imaging experiments in primary hippocampal neurons. We found that actin turnover and structural motility were lower in dendritic spines than in immature filopodia and increased upon expression of a nonadhesive N-cadherin mutant, resulting in an inverse relationship between spine motility and actin enrichment. Furthermore, the pharmacological stimulation of myosin II induced the rearward motion of actin structures in spines, showing that myosin II exerts tension on the actin network. Strikingly, the formation of stable, spine-like structures enriched in actin was induced at contacts between dendritic filopodia and N-cadherin-coated beads or micropatterns. Finally, computer simulations of actin dynamics mimicked various experimental conditions, pointing to the actin flow rate as an important parameter controlling actin enrichment in dendritic spines. Together these data demonstrate that a clutch-like mechanism between N-cadherin adhesions and the actin flow underlies the stabilization of dendritic filopodia into mature spines, a mechanism that may have important implications in synapse initiation, maturation, and plasticity in the developing brain. © 2015 Chazeau, Garcia, Czöndör, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Canadian Public Libraries Are Aware of Their Role as Information Literacy Training Providers, but Face Several Challenges. A Review of: Lai, H.-J. (2011. Information literacy training in public libraries: A case from Canada. Educational Technology & Society, 14(2, 81-88.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Newton Miller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective– To explore the current state of information literacy (IL training in Canadian public libraries, and to identify strategies used for improving IL training skills for staff and patrons.Design – Mixed-methods approach, including document analysis, observations, and focus group interviews.Setting – Two libraries of a large public library system in Canada: the central library and one branch library.Subjects – Six staff members (manager, administrator, training coordinator, instructor, and computer technician who have been involved in designing and teaching information literacy courses for library patrons and staff.Methods – The researcher analyzed internal and external library documents related to information literacy, including, but not limited to, reports, posters, lesson plans, newsletters, and training scripts. He also observed interactions and behaviours of patrons during IL training sessions. Finally, he conducted a focus group with people involved in IL training, asking questions about facilities and resources, programs, patron reaction, librarian knowledge of IL theory, and impediments and benefits of IL training programs in public libraries.Main Results – Staff were aware of the importance of IL training in the library. Attracting more library patrons (including building partnerships with other organizations, improving staff IL and training skills, employing effective strategies for running training programs, and dealing with financial issues were all concerns about running IL training that were highlighted.Conclusion – Canadian public libraries are well aware of their role as IL training providers, but they still face several challenges in order to improve their effectiveness.

  13. Is the Readability of Spine-Related Patient Education Material Improving?: An Assessment of Subspecialty Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Cheatham, Morgan; Naqvi, Syed S; Marthi, Siddharth; Dang, Victor; Palumbo, Mark A; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of spine-related patient education materials (PEMs) from subspecialty websites. The aim of this study was to assess the readability of spine-related PEMs and compare to readability data from 2008. Many spine patients use the Internet for health information. Several agencies recommend that the readability of online PEMs should be no greater than a sixth-grade reading level, as health literacy predicts health-related quality of life outcomes. This study evaluated whether the North American Spine Society (NASS), American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) online PEMs meet recommended readability guidelines for medical information. All publicly accessible spine-related entries within the patient education section of the NASS, AANS, and AAOS websites were analyzed for grade level readability using the Flesch-Kincaid formula. Readability scores were also compared with a similar 2008 analysis. Comparative statistics were performed. A total of 125 entries from the subspecialty websites were analyzed. The average (SD) readability of the online articles was grade level 10.7 (2.3). Of the articles, 117 (93.6%) had a readability score above the sixth-grade level. The readability of the articles exceeded the maximum recommended level by an average of 4.7 grade levels (95% CI, 4.292-5.103; P related patient education articles (61 vs. 125, P = 0.045) and the average readability level improved from 11.5 to 10.7 (P = 0.018). Of three examined societies, only one showed significant improvement over time. Our findings suggest that the spine-related PEMs on the NASS, AAOS, and AANS websites have readability levels that may make comprehension difficult for a substantial portion of the patient population. Although some progress has been made in the readability of PEMs over the past 7 years, additional improvement is necessary. 2.

  14. Phonological Variability in Canadian English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Gaelan Dodds

    A study compared salient variables of Canadian English from two concurrent sociodialectal surveys, one for Ottawa, Ontario and one for Vancouver, British Columbia. Using the Labovian model of phonological variation in association with sociological parameters and other linguistic variables within each specific area, the analysis investigated four…

  15. Research articles published by Korean spine surgeons: Scientific progress and the increase in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hyun Jib; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2017-02-01

    There has been a marked increase in spine surgery in the 21st century, but there are no reports providing quantitative and qualitative analyses of research by Korean spine surgeons. The study goal was to assess the status of Korean spinal surgery and research. The number of spine surgeries was obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service. Research articles published by Korean spine surgeons were reviewed by using the Medline/PubMed online database. The number of spine surgeries in Korea increased markedly from 92,390 in 2004 to 164,291 in 2013. During the 2000-2014 period, 1982 articles were published by Korean spine surgeons. The annual number of articles increased from 20 articles in 2000 to 293 articles in 2014. There was a positive correlation between the annual spine surgery and article numbers (particles with Oxford levels of evidence 1, 2, and 3. The mean five-year impact factor (IF) for article quality was 1.79. There was no positive correlation between the annual IF and article numbers. Most articles (65.9%) were authored by neurosurgical spine surgeons. But spinal deformity-related topics were dominant among articles authored by orthopedics. The results show a clear quantitative increase in Korean spinal surgery and research over the last 15years. The lack of a correlation between annual IF and published article numbers indicate that Korean spine surgeons should endeavor to increase research value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The CBC and the Public: Management Decision Making in the English Television Service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, 1970-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Bruce

    A discussion of mass media studies, public broadcasting, and the relationship between public broadcasting and society provides the background for this study. Models for communication research study are examined to establish the methodology for the study of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). General background on Canadian public…

  17. San Pablo Avenue Green Stormwater Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP San Pablo Avenue Green Stormwater Spine Project project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  18. MAGNETIC RESONANCE TOMOGRAPHY OF SPINE AFTER DISKECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kholin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The author lists then possible immediate and remote complications after diskectomy and describes clinical presentations and methods of diagnostics at this pathology. Detailed MR-imaging of spine in 6 months after operation is presented.

  19. Biostratigraphy of Echinoid spines, Cretaceous of Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, P.L.

    1984-04-01

    Echinoid (sea urchin) spines from Cretaceous strata have widely varying morphology. They are common, and most are small enough to be recovered from well cuttings. Many forms have restricted ranges; consequently, echinoid spine have substantial biostratigraphic utility. There have been established 115 form taxa of echinoid spines and 14 form taxa of ophiuroid-asteroid spines for the Cretaceous of Texas. The specimens used for establishing the form taxa were processed from 533 outcrop samples (78 localities) from 30 Cretaceous formations, each with a well-defined age based on faunal zones of ammonites and Foraminifera. A dichotomous key in 9 parts and a catalog of scanning electron micrographs (87 plates) have been set up to assist identification of the form taxa. Range charts for the echinoid and ophiuroid-asteroid form taxa have utility through the Cretaceous of much of the Gulf Coastal area. The most precise zonation has been possible for the Albian.

  20. Development of Ontology and 3D Software for the Diseases of Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungbock Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available KISTI is carrying out an e-Spine project for spinal diseases to prepare for the aged society, so-called NAP. The purpose of the study is to build a spine ontology that represents the anatomical structure and disease information which is compatible with simulation model of KISTI. The final use of the ontology includes diagnosis of diseases and setting treatment directions by the clinicians. The ontology was represented using 3D software. Twenty diseases were selected to be represented after discussions with a spine specialist. Several ontology studies were reviewed, reference books were selected for each disease and were organized in MS Excel. All the contents were then reviewed by the specialists. Altova SemanticWorks and Protégé were used to code spine ontology with OWL Full model. Links to the images from KISTI and sample images of diseases were included in the ontology. The OWL ontology was also reviewed by the specialists again with Protégé. We represented unidirectional ontology from anatomical structure to disease, images, and treatment. The ontology was human understandable. It would be useful for the education of medical students or residents studying diseases of spine. But in order for the computer to understand the ontology, a new model with OWL DL or Lite is needed.

  1. A method for articulating and displaying the human spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Robert W

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive and effective method for articulating a dry human spine is described. By constructing a Styrofoam spine tray, analysts can now accurately position and align each vertebra in correct anatomical order, allow for gaps because of missing vertebrae, and lay out the spine for documentation and photography. The spine tray provides analysts with a quick, easy, and professional quality method for aligning and orienting the human spine in the field and laboratory.

  2. A Rare Nasal Bone Fracture: Anterior Nasal Spine Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egemen Kucuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anterior nasal spine fractures are a quite rare type of nasal bone fractures. Associated cervical spine injuries are more dangerous than the nasal bone fracture. A case of the anterior nasal spine fracture, in a 18-year-old male was presented. Fracture of the anterior nasal spine, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the midface injuries and also accompanying cervical spine injury should not be ignored.

  3. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. (Cleveland Chiropractic College, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  4. Sea urchin spine arthritis of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takuro; Soma, Tamotsu; Gaman, Keiko; Usui, Masamichi; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2008-03-01

    Although rare, hand injury caused by puncture with the sea urchin spine can result in serious complications. To emphasize its clinical significance, this article describes a group of patients who sustained chronic granulomatous arthritis induced by puncture with sea urchin spine (designated sea urchin spine arthritis). Five patients who developed sea urchin spine arthritis of the hand after puncture with sea urchin spine were treated at our hospitals. All lesions involved the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (4 index fingers and 1 middle finger). Patients experienced pain, swelling, and discomfort around the site of puncture immediately after the injury. These initial symptoms subsided within a few days, and secondary symptoms including fusiform swelling, limited motion, and mild pain of the PIP joint appeared from 1 to 2 months later. Laboratory tests of inflammation and blood cell counts were negative. Plain radiographs showed soft tissue swelling and osteolysis but no visible spine. Thorough synovectomy of the PIP joint was performed, and the granulation tissue around the joint was also removed. No microorganism was identified from tissue culture or polymerase chain reaction in any of the 5 patients. At a mean follow-up of 21 months, 2 patients exhibited essentially normal active motion of the affected PIP joint, whereas the remaining 3 patients had diminished range of motion. Diagnosis of sea urchin spine arthritis can be made by history of sea urchin spine injury, a symptom-free period before the development of synovitis, and the absence of laboratory test abnormalities. Neither antibiotics nor nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are effective. Undertaken early enough, thorough synovectomy might avoid complications and obtain favorable results. Therapeutic IV.

  5. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Of The Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Teyrnoorian

    1972-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new cases of aneurysmal bone cyst of the spine are presented. In one of them only the spinous process was involved, and in the second case mthe neural arch and the body were involved. A brief review of the literature with clinical, radiological and pathilogical features of this benign lesion is made and its differential diagnosis, specially from giant cell tumor of the spine emphasised.

  6. Citizenship in civil society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by

  7. The 100 most cited spine articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael R; Wang, Tianyi; Schroeder, Gregory D; Hsu, Wellington K

    2012-10-01

    Spine-related research has evolved dramatically during the last century. Significant contributions have been made by thousands of authors. A citation rank list has historically been used within a particular field to measure the importance of an article. The purpose of this article is to report on the 100 most cited articles in the field of spine. Science Citation Index Expanded was searched for citations in 27 different journals (as of 30 November 2010) chosen based on the relevance for all cited spine publications. The top 100 most cited articles were identified. Important information such as journal, date, country of origin, author, subspecialty, and level of evidence (for clinical research) were compiled. The top 100 publications ranged from 1,695 to 240 citations. Fifty-three articles were of the lumbar, 17 were of the thoracolumbar, and 15 of the cervical spine. Eighty-one of the articles were clinical and 19 were basic science in nature. Level of evidence varied for the clinical papers, however, was most commonly level IV (34 of 81 articles). Notably, the 1990-1999 decade was the most productive period with 43 of the top 100 articles published during this time. Identification of the most cited articles within the field of spine recognizes some of the most important contributions in the peer-reviewed literature. Current investigators may utilize the aspects of their work to guide and direct future spine-related research.

  8. BIOTECHNOLOGIES AND BIOMATERIALS IN SPINE SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadala', G; Russo, F; Ambrosio, L; Di Martino, A; Papalia, R; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, spine disorders have become a major health concern and the number of spinal surgical procedures has been rising significantly. Several biotechnologies and biomaterials are often used in spine surgery to increase the effectiveness of the treatment. In the degenerative spine, when conservative treatment is ineffective the most recommended surgical procedure is decompression followed by spinal fusion. Success rates of spine fusion extensively rely on bone grafts peculiar properties. Autograft has been considered the gold standard to achieve a solid fusion but current research is focused on the development of new biomaterials. Osteoporosis is the main cause of vertebral compression fractures that are significantly associated with pain and disability, especially in the aging population. Vertebral augmentation is a minimally invasive approach in which cement is injected into the vertebral body to stabilize the fracture. New cements are being developed in the clinical scenario with reabsorbable properties and biomechanical features more similar to the native bone. The development of disc regeneration strategies such as nucleus pulposus restoration and annulus fibrosus repair may represent a minimally invasive procedure towards regeneration rather than fusion. Therefore, biomaterials and tissue engineering are fields of growing interest among both surgeons and manufacturing companies, with a major involvement in spine surgery. This review discusses current and novel biotechnologies and biomaterial used in spine surgery employing fusion, augmentation and regeneration.

  9. Automatic lumbar spine measurement in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yunxiang; Zheng, Dong; Liao, Shu; Peng, Zhigang; Yan, Ruyi; Liu, Junhua; Dong, Zhongxing; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Zhan, Yiqiang; Fei, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Accurate lumbar spine measurement in CT images provides an essential way for quantitative spinal diseases analysis such as spondylolisthesis and scoliosis. In today's clinical workflow, the measurements are manually performed by radiologists and surgeons, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Therefore, automatic and accurate lumbar spine measurement algorithm becomes highly desirable. In this study, we propose a method to automatically calculate five different lumbar spine measurements in CT images. There are three main stages of the proposed method: First, a learning based spine labeling method, which integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information, is used to detect lumbar and sacrum vertebrae in CT images. Then, a multiatlases based image segmentation method is used to segment each lumbar vertebra and the sacrum based on the detection result. Finally, measurements are derived from the segmentation result of each vertebra. Our method has been evaluated on 138 spinal CT scans to automatically calculate five widely used clinical spine measurements. Experimental results show that our method can achieve more than 90% success rates across all the measurements. Our method also significantly improves the measurement efficiency compared to manual measurements. Besides benefiting the routine clinical diagnosis of spinal diseases, our method also enables the large scale data analytics for scientific and clinical researches.

  10. The influence of power in the Canadian healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seenandan-Sookdeo, Kendra-Ann I

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a review of the literature as it relates to the influence of the word power in the context of the Canadian healthcare system. The concept of power is used to explore issues of gender and the evolution of advanced nurse practice in the development of the Canadian healthcare system. Furthermore, issues related to the call for interprofessional collaboration are addressed. Healthcare workers, in particular nurses, are trusted in a society that seeks, promotes, and aspires for power and control. In addition, societal norms continue to shape our healthcare reform. As a consequence, the discussion centers on a call for true collaboration among our healthcare providers and concludes with implications for nursing.

  11. [Sagittal balance of the spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, P; Sénégas, J

    1997-01-01

    The authors examined the modifications of sagittal shape and muscular functions in different vertebral diseases in order to investigate their correlations and to specify the role of hip extension in standing posture. We included 57 patients presenting various diseases, among which lumbar kyphosis, spondylosis and spondylolisthesis, backache and lumbar stenosis. We measured joint mobility (hip extension, lumbar flexion), muscular retractions (ilio-psoas, hamstrings, rectus femoris), and muscular strength (spine flexors and extensors, hamstrings, quadriceps femoris). On standing lateral x-rays, measurements were made of various spinal and pelvic parameters, among which the "pelvi-femoral angle", proposed by the authors for hip extension evaluation. There was a significant correlation between pelvi-femoral angle and pelvic backward tilting (r = 0.8037 p tilt-up arise compensating the anterior displacement of the center of gravity, while in spondylolisthesis, anterior displacement is secondary to sacral obliquity. It is very important to evaluate the pelvis position in sagittal spinal diseases, in order to understand postural deterioration mechanisms. Lumbar kyphosis and spondylolisthesis are two examples of failure of upright posture.

  12. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  13. Neurenteric cysts of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J J Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurenteric cysts account for 0.7-1.3% of spinal axis tumors. These rare lesions result from the inappropriate partitioning of the embryonic notochordal plate and presumptive endoderm during the third week of human development. Heterotopic rests of epithelium reminiscent of gastrointestinal and respiratory tissue lead to eventual formation of compressive cystic lesions of the pediatric and adult spine. Histopathological analysis of neurenteric tissue reveals a highly characteristic structure of columnar or cuboidal epithelium with or without cilia and mucus globules. Patients with symptomatic neurenteric cysts typically present in the second and third decades of life with size-dependent myelopathic and/or radicular signs. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are essential diagnostic tools for the delineation of cyst form and overlying osseous architecture. A variety of approaches have been employed in the treatment of neurenteric cysts each with a goal of total surgical resection. Although long-term outcome analyses are limited, data available indicate that surgical intervention in the case of neurenteric cysts results in a high frequency of resolution of neurological deficit with minimal morbidity. However, recurrence rates as high as 37% have been reported with incomplete resection secondary to factors such as cyst adhesion to surrounding structure and unclear dissection planes. Here we present a systematic review of English language literature from January 1966 to December 2009 utilizing MEDLINE with the following search terminology: neurenteric cyst, enterogenous cyst, spinal cord tumor, spinal dysraphism, intraspinal cyst, intramedullary cyst, and intradural cyst. In addition, the references of publications returned from the MEDLINE search criteria were surveyed in order to examine other pertinent reports.

  14. An evidence-based clinical guideline for antibiotic prophylaxis in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, William O; Baisden, Jamie L; Fernand, Robert; Matz, Paul G

    2013-10-01

    The North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline on Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Spine Surgery provides evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions regarding the efficacy and the appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis protocol to prevent surgical site infections in patients undergoing spine surgery. The guideline is intended to address these questions based on the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of June 2011. Provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine surgeons in preventing surgical site infections. Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This guideline is a product of the Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Spine Surgery Work Group of NASS Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group consisted of neurosurgeons and orthopedic surgeons who specialize in spine surgery and are trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English language references found in MEDLINE (PubMed), ACP Journal Club, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE (Drugs and Pharmacology), and Web of Science to identify articles published since the search performed for the original guideline. The relevant literature was then independently rated using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final recommendations to answer each clinical question were developed via work group discussion, and grades were assigned to the recommendations using standardized grades of recommendation. In the absence of Levels I to IV evidence, work group consensus statements have been developed using a modified nominal group technique, and these statements are clearly identified as such in the guideline. Sixteen clinical questions

  15. The Canadian safeguards support program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeffe, R. [Atomic Energy Control Board, Canadian Safeguards Support Program, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Canada supports international safeguards as a means by which the proliferation of nuclear weapons can be discouraged. Canada recognizes that,to meet that the IAEA must have effective safeguards techniques and the active cooperation of Member States. Therefore the Canadian Government decided in 1976 to initiate a program in support of IAEA safeguards, known as the Canadian Safeguards Support Program (CSSP). The CSSP is funded and administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The CSSP is a co-ordinated program for the development and the application of safeguards instruments and techniques for nuclear facilities and materials on behalf of the IAEA and also in support of Canada's own national nuclear material safeguards system, implemented by the AECB. (author)

  16. Canadian safeguards - an historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ironside, A.M. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Smith, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper summarizes safeguards activities and programs undertaken in Canada. In 1970, Canada, in collaboration with the IAEA, began a study of procedures and equipment required for the application of safeguards to on-line-fueled reactors. In 1977, this assistance was substantially increased and formalized into the Canadian Safeguards Support Program (CSSP). To date, Canada has spent in excess of $35 million Canadian on this program. The CSSP provides support to the IAEA safeguards effort for areas in which Canada has expertise and has been primarily engaged in developing safeguards procedures and equipment for the CANDU power reactors in Canada and throughout the world. Work, projects, and equipment development undertaken by CANDU CSSP are highlighted.

  17. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  18. National representation in the spine literature: a bibliometric analysis of highly cited spine journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fan; Jia, Zhiwei; Liu, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Significant progress has been seen in the field of spine in recent years as a consequence of worldwide contributions. However, the national productivity to the field of spine is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the national contributions in the field of spine. Web of Science was searched for articles published in the five highly cited spine journals from 2009 to 2013, including The Spine Journal, European Spine Journal, Spine, Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, and Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques. The number of total articles, the per capita numbers, impact factors, citations and funding source were recorded and analyzed. A total number of 6920 articles were published in the five journals from 2009 to 2013 worldwide. North America, East Asia, and West Europe were the most productive world areas. High-income countries published 83.97% of articles, middle-income 16.01%, and lower-income just 0.01%. The United States published the most number of articles (35.79%), followed by China, Japan, South Korea, and Canada, and had the highest total impact factors and the highest total citations. However, when normalized to population size, Switzerland had the highest number of articles per million populations, followed by The Netherlands and Sweden. The majority of the spine articles are published by authors from high-income countries while few publications from low-income countries. The United States is the most productive country in the field of spine. However, some European countries may be more productive when normalized to population size.

  19. Reframing the Canadian Oil Sands

    OpenAIRE

    Patchett, Merle M; Lozowy, A

    2012-01-01

    Reframing the Canadian Oil Sands” is a collaborative exchange between photographer Andriko Lozowy and cultural geographer Merle Patchett that engages photography and photographic theory to evoke a more critical and politically meaningful visual engagement with the world’s largest capital oil project. Since the appearance of Edward Burtynsky’s aerial and abstracted photographic-mappings of the region, capturing the scale of the Oil Sands from ‘on high’ has become the dominant visual imaginary....

  20. Nutritional risk among older Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage-Morin, Pamela L; Garriguet, Didier

    2013-03-01

    Nutritional risk screening is typically done in clinical settings to identify individuals at risk of malnourishment. This article presents the first population-level assessment of nutritional risk based on a large national sample representative of Canadian householders aged 65 or older. Data from the 2008/2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging were used to estimate the prevalence of nutritional risk by selected characteristics. Factors associated with nutritional risk were examined with restricted and full logistic models. The distribution of responses on the SCREEN II-AB nutritional risk instrument is reported. Based on the results of the 2008/2009 survey, 34% of Canadians aged 65 or older were at nutritional risk. Women were more likely than men to be at risk. Among people with depression, 62% were at nutritional risk, compared with 33% of people without depression. Level of disability, poor oral health, and medication use were associated with nutritional risk, as were living alone, low social support, infrequent social participation, and not driving on a regular basis. Lower income and education were also associated with nutritional risk. Nutritional risk is common among seniors living in private households in Canada. The characteristics of people most likely to be at nutritional risk provide evidence for targeted screening and assessment.

  1. Conspicuous and aposematic spines in the animal kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbar, Moshe; Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2005-04-01

    Spines serve as a common physical defence mechanism in both the plant and animal kingdoms. Here we argue that as in plants, defensive animal spines are often conspicuous (shape and colour) and should be considered aposematic. Conspicuous spines may evolve as signals or serve as a cue for potential predators. Spine conspicuousness in animals has evolved independently across and within phyla occupying aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, indicating that this convergent phenomenon is highly adaptive. Still, many spines are cryptic, suggesting that conspicuity is not simply constrained by developmental factors such as differences in the chemical composition of the integument. Aposematism does not preclude the signalling role of conspicuous spines in the sexual arena.

  2. Quality in Family Child Care: A Focus Group Study with Canadian Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of American, Canadian and English preschoolers regularly participate in family child care making its quality of vital importance for the children concerned, their parents, the school system and the society in which they live. This article discusses the seven key caregiver behaviors and physical space characteristics…

  3. Using a Wider Lens to Shift the Discourse on Food in Canadian Curriculum Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Lorayne; Scheidler-Benns, Joli

    2016-01-01

    Healthy eating is important to overall health, but Canadian health agencies disagree on the degree to which lifestyle or society determines healthy eating. The authors review the literature and design a policy analysis framework that captures discursive elements of both arguments. They apply this framework to education policy, analysing the…

  4. 50 Shades of Green: An Examination of Sustainability Policy on Canadian Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughter, Philip; Wright, Tarah; Herbert, Yuill

    2015-01-01

    Koichiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO, asserts that education is one of the most effective instruments that society can employ in the effort to adopt sustainable development. This paper is a first effort to explore the degree to which Canadian institutions of higher education, including colleges and universities, have embraced this…

  5. Hippocrates. The father of spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marketos, S G; Skiadas, P

    1999-07-01

    Hippocrates (5th-4th century B. C.), the founder of scientific medicine, left a valuable heritage of knowledge and methodology, which extends to almost all branches of modern medicine. Among the many fields of medicine he explored, he devoted much of his scientific interest to the study of orthopedics. In fact, some of the principles found in the Hippocratic treatises On Fractures and On Joints are still valid today. This great physician also was the first to deal with the anatomy and the pathology of human spine. In his books, he provides a precise description of the segments and the normal curves of the spine, the structure of the vertebrae, the tendons attached to them, the blood supply to the spine, and even its anatomic relations to adjacent vessels. The Hippocratic list of spinal diseases includes tuberculous spondylitis, post-traumatic kyphosis, scoliosis, concussion, dislocations of the vertebrae, and fractures of the spinous processes. Hippocrates devised two apparatuses, known as the Hippocratic ladder and the Hippocratic board, to reduce displaced vertebrae. Those pioneer methods are deemed to be the precursors to the sophisticated techniques used in spine surgery today. Because of his thorough study of spinal diseases and their management, which was the first such study in orthopedics in the history of medicine, Hippocrates should be regarded as the father of spine surgery.

  6. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-05

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (pspine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The bent spine syndrome: myopathy + biomechanics = symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, Andrew J; Tong, Henry C; Kendall, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The bent spine syndrome, which mimics spinal stenosis, is thought to be a focal paraspinal myopathy, but because paraspinal fatigue with ambulation is not a feature of more severe myopathies, the cause of symptoms is not clear. To evaluate electromyographic and biomechanical aspects of the bent spine syndrome. University spine clinic. A patient with severe disability from the bent spine syndrome was compared with a fortuitously discovered asymptomatic research subject with the syndrome, in terms of physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and electrodiagnostic testing. Both subjects had fatty paraspinal replacement on magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography. More detailed electromyography of the patient showed abnormalities medially and caudally, but changes including apparent myopathic motor units up to the high thoracic region. The research subject had no hip flexion contracture, whereas the patient had severe contracture. Correction of contracture increased ambulation from 20 to 300 meters. Bent spine syndrome is likely a paraspinal myopathy, but symptoms do not occur unless there is also a hip flexion contracture.

  8. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rajasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC] and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches.

  9. The impact of spine stability on cervical spinal cord injury with respect to demographics, management, and outcome: a prospective cohort from a national spinal cord injury registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Jérôme; Rivers, Carly S; Kurban, Dilnur; Finkelstein, Joel; Tee, Jin W; Noonan, Vanessa K; Kwon, Brian K; Hurlbert, R John; Christie, Sean; Tsai, Eve C; Ahn, Henry; Drew, Brian; Bailey, Christopher S; Fourney, Daryl R; Attabib, Najmedden; Johnson, Michael G; Fehlings, Michael G; Parent, Stefan; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2018-01-01

    Emergent surgery for patients with a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is seen as the gold standard in acute management. However, optimal treatment for those with the clinical diagnosis of central cord syndrome (CCS) is less clear, and classic definitions of CCS do not identify a unique population of patients. The study aimed to test the authors' hypothesis that spine stability can identify a unique group of patients with regard to demographics, management, and outcomes, which classic CCS definitions do not. This is a prospective observational study. The sample included participants with cervical SCI included in a prospective Canadian registry. The outcome measures were initial hospitalization length of stay, change in total motor score from admission to discharge, and in-hospital mortality. Patients with cervical SCI from a prospective Canadian SCI registry were grouped into stable and unstable spine cohorts. Bivariate analyses were used to identify differences in demographic, injury, management, and outcomes. Multivariate analysis was used to better understand the impact of spine stability on motor score improvement. No conflicts of interest were identified. Compared with those with an unstable spine, patients with cervical SCI and a stable spine were older (58.8 vs. 44.1 years, p<.0001), more likely male (86.4% vs. 76.1%, p=.0059), and have more medical comorbidities. Patients with stable spine cervical SCI were more likely to have sustained their injury by a fall (67.4% vs. 34.9%, p<.0001), and have high cervical (C1-C4; 58.5% vs. 43.3%, p=.0009) and less severe neurologic injuries (ASIA Impairment Scale C or D; 81.3% vs. 47.5%, p<.0001). Those with stable spine injuries were less likely to have surgery (67.6% vs. 92.6%, p<.0001), had shorter in-hospital lengths of stay (median 84.0 vs. 100.5 days, p=.0062), and higher total motor score change (20.7 vs. 19.4 points, p=.0014). Multivariate modeling revealed that neurologic severity of injury and spine stability

  10. Representing Canadian Muslims: Media, Muslim Advocacy Organizations, and Gender in the Ontario Shari’ah Debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena Sharify-Funk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes a highly public conflict between two Muslim non-profit organizations, the Canadian Islamic Congress (CIC and the Muslim Canadian Congress (MCC, as it played out on the pages of Canadian newspapers and Internet websites. Sparked by profoundly divergent convictions about gender norms and fuelled by contradictory blueprints for “being Muslim in Canada”, this incendiary conflict was fanned by Canadian media coverage. Focusing especially, but not exclusively, on the 2003-2005 debate over Shari’ah-based alternative dispute resolution in Ontario, I will argue that the media have played a role in constructing internal Muslim debates and identity negotiations concerning what it means to be genuinely Canadian and authentically Muslim through controversy-driven journalism that has highlighted opposing ends of a liberal/progressive versus conservative/traditional axis in a search for “point/counter-point” views. Through short stories and commentaries on controversial topicsthat juxtapose two increasingly antagonistic organizational voices, the media have not merely reflected Muslim realities, but also helped to shape them and, more often than not, reinforce polarization between a “majority Muslim” culture seeking to secure space for itself within Canadian society and a “dissident Muslim” culture that seeks to consolidate external support for internal change.

  11. The Internet as a communication tool for orthopedic spine fellowships in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Overley, Samuel C; Cho, Samuel K; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C

    2015-04-01

    Orthopedic residents seeking additional training in spine surgery commonly use the Internet to manage their fellowship applications. Although studies have assessed the accessibility and content of Web sites in other medical specialties, none have looked at orthopedic spine fellowship Web sites (SFWs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility of information from commonly used databases and assess the content of SFWs. This was a Web site accessibility and content evaluation study. A comprehensive list of available orthopedic spine fellowship programs was compiled by accessing program lists from the SF Match, North American Spine Society, Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA), and Orthopaedicsone.com (Ortho1). These databases were assessed for accessibility of information including viable links to SFWs and responsive program contacts. A Google search was used to identify SFWs not readily available on these national databases. SFWs were evaluated based on online education and recruitment content. Evaluators found 45 SFWs of 63 active programs (71%). Available SFWs were often not readily accessible from national program lists, and no program afforded a direct link to their SFW from SF Match. Approximately half of all programs responded via e-mail. Although many programs described surgical experience (91%) and research requirements (87%) during the fellowship, less than half mentioned didactic instruction (46%), journal clubs (41%), and national meetings or courses attended (28%). Evaluators found an average 45% of fellow recruitment content. Comparison of SFWs by program characteristics revealed three significant differences. Programs with greater than one fellowship position had greater online education content than programs with a single fellow (p=.022). Spine fellowships affiliated with an orthopedic residency program maintained greater education (p=.006) and recruitment (p=.046) content on their SFWs. Most orthopedic

  12. Reliability assessment of a novel cervical spine deformity classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Christopher P; Smith, Justin S; Eastlack, Robert; Blaskiewicz, Donald J; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Bess, Shay; Kim, Han Jo; Mundis, Gregory M; Klineberg, Eric; Gupta, Munish; O'Brien, Michael; Hostin, Richard; Scheer, Justin K; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Hart, Robert; Albert, Todd J; Riew, K Daniel; Fehlings, Michael G; Deviren, Vedat; Lafage, Virginie

    2015-12-01

    Despite the complexity of cervical spine deformity (CSD) and its significant impact on patient quality of life, there exists no comprehensive classification system. The objective of this study was to develop a novel classification system based on a modified Delphi approach and to characterize the intra- and interobserver reliability of this classification. Based on an extensive literature review and a modified Delphi approach with an expert panel, a CSD classification system was generated. The classification system included a deformity descriptor and 5 modifiers that incorporated sagittal, regional, and global spinopelvic alignment and neurological status. The descriptors included: "C," "CT," and "T" for primary cervical kyphotic deformities with an apex in the cervical spine, cervicothoracic junction, or thoracic spine, respectively; "S" for primary coronal deformity with a coronal Cobb angle ≥ 15°; and "CVJ" for primary craniovertebral junction deformity. The modifiers included C2-7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), horizontal gaze (chin-brow to vertical angle [CBVA]), T1 slope (TS) minus C2-7 lordosis (TS-CL), myelopathy (modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association [mJOA] scale score), and the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab classification for thoracolumbar deformity. Application of the classification system requires the following: 1) full-length standing posteroanterior (PA) and lateral spine radiographs that include the cervical spine and femoral heads; 2) standing PA and lateral cervical spine radiographs; 3) completed and scored mJOA questionnaire; and 4) a clinical photograph or radiograph that includes the skull for measurement of the CBVA. A series of 10 CSD cases, broadly representative of the classification system, were selected and sufficient radiographic and clinical history to enable classification were assembled. A panel of spinal deformity surgeons was queried to classify each case twice, with a minimum of 1 intervening week. Inter- and

  13. Recent Canadian ophthalmology graduates: experiences in finding jobs and assessment of their training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Lorne

    2012-06-01

    To examine the ability of recent Canadian ophthalmology graduates to commence clinical practice and obtain surgical privileges. A secondary objective was to assess their perception of the adequacy of their residency training. An Internet questionnaire survey. Canadian graduates of Canadian ophthalmology residency programs between 2005 and 2009, inclusive. Email addresses for the participants were obtained from the Canadian Ophthalmological Society and invitations to participate were sent, followed by 2 reminder emails. A 44% response rate was obtained (65 out of 154 emails sent). Of the respondents, 91% were working full time, and 89% had operating-room time. Training was adequate for all CanMEDs competencies except working as a manager. Assessment that one's practice did not live up to expectations correlated with male gender, dissatisfaction with location, inability to get operating-room time, inability to get other hospital resources, feelings about fairness of distribution of resources, and net income below expectations. For the most part, recent graduates are successful in establishing practices that meet their expectations. Training in management skills should be improved in residency programs. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reconstructive or cosmetic plastic surgery? Factors influencing the type of practice established by Canadian plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Colin W; Courtemanche, Douglas J; Verchere, Cynthia G; Bush, Kevin L; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2012-01-01

    Some argue that the specialty of plastic surgery is facing a changing identity. Challenged by factors such as increasing competition in the cosmetic marketplace and decreasing reimbursement for reconstructive procedures, many American plastic surgeons have increasingly adopted cosmetic-focused practices. The present study investigated the currently unknown practice profiles of Canadian plastic surgeons to determine the reconstructive-cosmetic mix, as well as factors that influence practice type to determine whether a similar pattern exists in Canada. An anonymous online survey regarding practice profiles was distributed to all 352 Canadian plastic surgeons with e-mail accounts registered with the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and/or the Canadian Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. The survey response rate was 34% (120 responses), of which 75% of respondents currently had a reconstructive practice and 25% had a cosmetic practice. Reconstructive surgeons had more educational debt following their training, spent more time on emergency call, academics and teaching and, when deciding which type of practice to establish, were more influenced by academic opportunities and less influenced by financial and nonfinancial metrics. Similarities between the groups included hours worked per week and academic achievements. The field of reconstructive plastic surgery appears to be thriving in Canada. While a transition from reconstructive to cosmetic practice is common, compared with their American colleagues, a greater proportion of Canadian plastic surgeons maintain reconstructive practices. Differences between reconstructive and cosmetic plastic surgeons are discussed.

  15. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT FOR THORACOLUMBAR SPINE BURST FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barajas Vanegas Raymundo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the category of evidence and the strength of recommendation for the conservative treatment of thoracolumbar spine burst fractures. Method: A systematic review was conducted from April 2014 to June 2015, selecting articles according to their prospective design, related to thoracolumbar spine burst fractures and their treatment. These studies were published in the electronic bibliographic databases from January 2009 to January 2015. Results: A total of 9,504 articles were found in a free search, of which 7 met the selection criteria and were included for analysis in a study of a total of 435 patients, of whom 72 underwent surgical treatment and 363 received some type of conservative treatment, showing predominantly level of evidence "1b", with strength of recommendation type "A". Conclusions: According to the evidence obtained, the conservative treatment is a choice for patients with stable burst fracture in a single level of thoracolumbar spine and with no neurological injury.

  16. Palpation of the upper thoracic spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Vach, Kirstin

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated-measures des......OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated...... procedure. RESULTS: Using an "expanded" definition of agreement that accepts small inaccuracies (+/-1 segment) in the numbering of spinal segments, we found--based on the pooled data from the thoracic spine--kappa values of 0.59 to 0.77 for the hour-to-hour and the day-to-day intraobserver reliability...

  17. The Management of Unstable Cervical Spine Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venu M. Nemani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to the cervical spine can cause potentially devastating morbidity and even mortality. In this review we discuss the anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine. The evaluation and treatment of cervical spine injuries begins with the prompt immobilization of suspected injuries in the field. Once an assessment of the patient's neurological status is made, imaging studies are obtained, which can include X-rays, CT, and MRI. Careful scrutiny of the imaging studies for bony and/or ligamentous injury allows the physician to determine the mechanism of injury, which guides treatment. The ultimate treatment plan can consist of non-operative or operative management, and depends on patient specific factors (medical condition and neurological status, the mechanism of injury, and the resultant degree of instability. With prompt diagnosis and appropriate management, the morbidity of these injuries can be minimized.

  18. Imaging of current spinal hardware: lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Alice S; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of this article are to review the indications for and the materials and designs of hardware more commonly used in the lumbar spine; to discuss alternatives for each of the types of hardware; to review normal postoperative imaging findings; to describe the appropriateness of different imaging modalities for postoperative evaluation; and to show examples of hardware complications. Stabilization and fusion of the lumbar spine with intervertebral disk replacement, artificial ligaments, spinous process distraction devices, plate-and-rod systems, dynamic posterior fusion devices, and newer types of material incorporation are increasingly more common in contemporary surgical practice. These spinal hardware devices will be seen more often in radiology practice. Successful postoperative radiologic evaluation of this spinal hardware necessitates an understanding of fundamental hardware design, physiologic objectives, normal postoperative imaging appearances, and unique complications. Radiologists may have little training and experience with the new and modified types of hardware used in the lumbar spine.

  19. Supplementary Educational Models in Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2017-03-01

    The proposed implementation of work hour restrictions has presented a significant challenge of maintaining the quality of resident education and ensuring adequate hands-on experience that is essential for novice surgeons. To maintain the level of resident surgical competency, revision of the apprentice model of surgical education to include supplementary educational methods, such as laboratory and virtual reality (VR) simulations, have become frequent topics of discussion. We aimed to better understand the role of supplementary educational methods in Canadian neurosurgery residency training. An online survey was sent to program directors of all 14 Canadian neurosurgical residency programs and active resident members of the Canadian Neurosurgical Society (N=85). We asked 16 questions focusing on topics of surgeon perception, current implementation and barriers to supplementary educational models. Of the 99 surveys sent, 8 out of 14 (57%) program directors and 37 out of 85 (44%) residents completed the survey. Of the 14 neurosurgery residency programs across Canada, 7 reported utilizing laboratory-based teaching within their educational plan, while only 3 programs reported using VR simulation as a supplementary teaching method. The biggest barriers to implementing supplementary educational methods were resident availability, lack of resources, and cost. Work-hour restrictions threaten to compromise the traditional apprentice model of surgical training. The potential value of supplementary educational methods for surgical education is evident, as reported by both program directors and residents across Canada. However, availability and utilization of laboratory and VR simulations are limited by numerous factors such as time constrains and lack of resources.

  20. Social Support and Exclusive Breast feeding among Canadian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugen, Chris M; Islam, Nazrul; Janssen, Patricia A

    2016-09-01

    The World Health Organization recommendation for exclusive breast feeding for 6 months has been endorsed by Health Canada, the Canadian Pediatric Society, Dietitians of Canada, and the Breastfeeding Committee for Canada as of 2012. This study examines whether social support is associated with exclusive breast feeding up to 6 months among Canadian mothers. We utilised data from the Canadian Community Health Survey and limited our sample to mothers who gave birth in the 5 years prior to the 2009-2010 survey (n = 2133). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between exclusive breast feeding and four dimensions of social support: (i) tangible, (ii) affectionate, (iii) positive social interaction, and (iv) emotional and informational, based on the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale. Absolute and relative differences in the probability of breast feeding exclusively and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated. In adjusted models, differences in the probability of exclusive breast feeding for 6 months were not different among women with high vs. low social support. The association between social support and breastfeeding exclusively was modified by education level, with significantly higher probability of breast feeding exclusively among women with lower education and high vs. low levels of tangible and affectionate support. Among women with education below a high school level, high tangible and affectionate support significantly increased probability of exclusive breast feeding for 6 months in this study. Efforts to encourage exclusive breast feeding need to address social support for mothers, especially those with lower education. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the relevant recommendations and references related to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. The goal was to provide the clinician with concise, evidence-based contemporary recommendations, and the supporting documentation to encourage their application. The full text includes disclosure of all relevant relationships with industry for each writing committee member. A fundamental aspect of all expert consensus statements is that these carefully developed, evidence-based documents can neither encompass all clinical circumstances, nor replace the judgment of individual physicians in management of each patient. The science of medicine is rooted in evidence, and the art of medicine is based on the application of this evidence to the individual patient. This expert consensus statement has adhered to these principles for optimal management of patients requiring percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, the Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  2. Minimally invasive spine technology and minimally invasive spine surgery: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Jeffrey H; DeCastro, Igor; McDonnell, Dennis E

    2009-09-01

    The trend of using smaller operative corridors is seen in various surgical specialties. Neurosurgery has also recently embraced minimal access spine technique, and it has rapidly evolved over the past 2 decades. There has been a progression from needle access, small incisions with adaptation of the microscope, and automated percutaneous procedures to endoscopically and laparoscopically assisted procedures. More recently, new muscle-sparing technology has come into use with tubular access. This has now been adapted to the percutaneous placement of spinal instrumentation, including intervertebral spacers, rods, pedicle screws, facet screws, nucleus replacement devices, and artificial discs. New technologies involving hybrid procedures for the treatment of complex spine trauma are now on the horizon. Surgical corridors have been developed utilizing the interspinous space for X-STOP placement to treat lumbar stenosis in a minimally invasive fashion. The direct lateral retroperitoneal corridor has allowed for minimally invasive access to the anterior spine. In this report the authors present a chronological, historical perspective of minimal access spine technique and minimally invasive technologies in the lumbar, thoracic, and cervical spine from 1967 through 2009. Due to a low rate of complications, minimal soft tissue trauma, and reduced blood loss, more spine procedures are being performed in this manner. Spine surgery now entails shorter hospital stays and often is carried out on an outpatient basis. With education, training, and further research, more of our traditional open surgical management will be augmented or replaced by these technologies and approaches in the future.

  3. Influence of previous surgery on patient-rated outcome after surgery for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Pascal; Aghayev, Emin; Fekete, Tamas F; Haschtmann, Daniel; Pigott, Tim; Mannion, Anne F

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have used multivariate models to quantify the effect of multiple previous spine surgeries on patient-oriented outcome after spine surgery. This study sought to quantify the effect of prior spine surgery on 12-month postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for different degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. The study included 4940 patients with lumbar degenerative disease documented in the Spine Tango Registry of EUROSPINE, the Spine Society of Europe, from 2004 to 2015. Preoperatively and 12 months postoperatively, patients completed the multidimensional Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI; 0-10 scale). Patients' medical history and surgical details were recorded using the Spine Tango Surgery 2006 and 2011 forms. Multiple linear regression models were used to investigate the relationship between the number of previous surgeries and the 12-month postoperative COMI score, controlling for the baseline COMI score and other potential confounders. In the adjusted model including all cases, the 12-month COMI score showed a 0.37-point worse value [95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) 0.29-0.45; p lumbar disc herniation, the corresponding effect was 0.52 points (95 % CI 0.27-0.77; p lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, 0.40 points (95 % CI 0.17-0.64; p = 0.001). We were able to demonstrate a clear "dose-response" effect for previous surgery: the greater the number of prior spine surgeries, the systematically worse the outcome at 12 months' follow-up. The results of this study can be used when considering or consenting a patient for further surgery, to better inform the patient of the likely outcome and to set realistic expectations.

  4. Trampoline injuries of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P G; Lee, M

    2000-04-01

    Trampolines were responsible for over 6,500 pediatric cervical spine injuries in 1998. This represents a five-fold increase in just 10 years. While most have been minor, paraplegia, quadriplegia and death are all reported. We present 2 cases of trampoline-related cervical spine injury and review the relevant literature. Additionally, we examine the efforts made to reduce the incidence of trampoline injuries, and discuss why these have failed. We conclude that safety guidelines and warnings are inadequate. In addition, we support recommendations for a ban on the use of trampolines by children. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Cervical Spine Axial Rotation Goniometer Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Ulaş Erdem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cervical spine rotation movement is quiet harder than other joints. Configuration and arrangement of current goniometers and devices is not always practic in clinics and some methods are quiet expensive. The cervical axial rotation goniometer designed by the authors is consists of five pieces (head apparatus, chair, goniometric platform, eye pads and camera. With this goniometer design a detailed evaluation of cervical spine range of motion can be obtained. Besides, measurement of "joint position sense" which is recently has rising interest in researches can be made practically with this goniometer.

  6. Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettlich, Bianca F

    2018-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) seems to have many benefits for human patients and is currently used for various minor and major spine procedures. For MISS, a change in access strategy to the target location is necessary and it requires intraoperative imaging, special instrumentation, and magnification. Few veterinary studies have evaluated MISS for canine patients for spinal decompression procedures. This article discusses the general requirements for MISS and how these can be applied to veterinary spinal surgery. The current veterinary MISS literature is reviewed and suggestions are made on how to apply MISS to different spinal locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nonspecific purulent osteomyelitis of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosul'nikov S.O.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, in Ukraine a trend to increased incidence of suppurative osteomyelitis of the spine is defined. The main factors contributing to incidence increase is the growth of proportion of population with immunodeficiency and implementation of computer and magnetic resonance tomography in clinical practice. Treatment of suppurative osteomyelitis of the spine should include antibiotic therapy, adequate sanitation of the infectious focus, strict bed rest with exercise therapy. Tactics of surgical treatment combined with antibiotic deescalation therapy with glycopeptide antibiotic – teicoplanin and rehabilitation program which helped to achieve recovery in 23 (37.8% of patients treated conservatively and in 55 (91% of the operated patients was proposed.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine What's in this article? What ...

  9. Degenerative Changes in the Spine: Is This Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in my spine. Does this mean I have arthritis? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Yes. ... spine. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. Doctors may also refer to it as degenerative ...

  10. Sheep cervical spine biomechanics: a finite element study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeVries Watson, Nicole A; Gandhi, Anup A; Fredericks, Doug C; Smucker, Joseph D; Grosland, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    .... The sheep model has emerged as an important model in spine biomechanics. Although there are several experimental biomechanical studies of the sheep cervical spine, only a limited number of computational models have been developed...

  11. Actin Remodeling and Polymerization Forces Control Dendritic Spine Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Miermans, Karsten; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. This striking progression is coincident with the (re)configuration of the neuronal network during early development, learning and memory formation, and has been conjectured to be part of the machinery that encodes these processes at the scale of individual neuronal connections. It is well established that the structural plasticity of spines is strongly dependent upon the actin cytoskeleton inside the spine. A general framework that details the precise role of actin in directing the transitions between the various spine shapes is lacking. We address this issue, and present...

  12. Sleep duration estimates of Canadian children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Janssen, Ian

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to provide contemporary sleep duration estimates of Canadian school-aged children and adolescents and to determine the proportion adhering to the sleep duration recommendations. This study included 24 896 participants aged 10-17 years from the 2013/2014 Canadian Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study (HBSC), a nationally representative cross-sectional study. Bedtime and wake-up times were reported by participants and their sleep duration was calculated. Participants were then classified as having a sleep duration that met the recommended range (9-11 h per night for 10-13-year-olds or 8-10 h per night for 14-17-year-olds), a sleep duration that was shorter than the recommended range or a sleep duration that was longer than the recommended range. An estimated 68% of children aged 10-13 years and 72% of adolescents aged 14-17 years sleep for the recommended amount per night when averaged across all days of the week. Short sleepers represent 31% of school-aged children and 26% of adolescents. Long sleepers are rare (adolescents sleep ~1 h more at weekends compared to weekdays. Approximately 5% of the participants typically went to bed after midnight on weekdays and 31% did so at weekends; these proportions reached 11 and 45%, respectively, within 16-17-year-olds. In general, differences in sleep times between boys and girls are small and not clinically significant. In conclusion, almost one-third of Canadian children and adolescents sleep less than the recommended amount. Public health efforts should continue to monitor the sleep of Canadian children and adolescents and identify subgroups of the population more likely to be affected by insufficient sleep. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Incorporation of CT-based measurements of trunk anatomy into subject-specific musculoskeletal models of the spine influences vertebral loading predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Alexander G; Mokhtarzadeh, Hossein; Allaire, Brett T; Velie, Kelsey R; De Paolis Kaluza, M Clara; Anderson, Dennis E; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2017-10-01

    We created subject-specific musculoskeletal models of the thoracolumbar spine by incorporating spine curvature and muscle morphology measurements from computed tomography (CT) scans to determine the degree to which vertebral compressive and shear loading estimates are sensitive to variations in trunk anatomy. We measured spine curvature and trunk muscle morphology using spine CT scans of 125 men, and then created four different thoracolumbar spine models for each person: (i) height and weight adjusted (Ht/Wt models); (ii) height, weight, and spine curvature adjusted (+C models); (iii) height, weight, and muscle morphology adjusted (+M models); and (iv) height, weight, spine curvature, and muscle morphology adjusted (+CM models). We determined vertebral compressive and shear loading at three regions of the spine (T8, T12, and L3) for four different activities. Vertebral compressive loads predicted by the subject-specific CT-based musculoskeletal models were between 54% lower to 45% higher from those estimated using musculoskeletal models adjusted only for subject height and weight. The impact of subject-specific information on vertebral loading estimates varied with the activity and spinal region. Vertebral loading estimates were more sensitive to incorporation of subject-specific spinal curvature than subject-specific muscle morphology. Our results indicate that individual variations in spine curvature and trunk muscle morphology can have a major impact on estimated vertebral compressive and shear loads, and thus should be accounted for when estimating subject-specific vertebral loading. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2164-2173, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Scoliosis Research Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate ... a Member Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of ...

  16. The Canadian mobile satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertenyi, Elemer

    1992-07-01

    Plans to upgrade Canadian mobile data services by introducing a full, two way mobile voice and data service, using a large geostationary satellite which is scheduled to be launched in 1994, are reported. This Mobile Satellite (MSAT) will offer customers the ability to communicate, using mobile or transportable terminals, from the most remote parts of the continent, to any other point within North America, and indeed the whole world. Currently planned MSAT services are reviewed, the main features of the overall system are outlined, and the configuration and key performance parameters of the MSAT satellite are presented. The communications subsystem is detailed, and a summary of the spacecraft service module is given.

  17. Spine surgery practice in Nigeria: present perceptions and future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spine surgery is an emerging orthopaedic surgery subspecialty in Nigeria. There are about 2 designated spine surgeons and about 10 other orthopaedic surgeons and neurosurgeons that operate on the spine for 140 million Nigerians. This study is an evaluation of the perception of the health workers in the ...

  18. Barriers in the brain : resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and

  19. Surgical Disorders of the Spine in Adults: Aetiology and Outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There has been steady and progressive advancement in spine surgery in Nigeria with the increase in spine surgeons, availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intraoperative fluoroscopy and some spinal titanium implants. We decided to study the frequency of various spine pathologies requiring ...

  20. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis... component surfaces are clean, dry and untreated unless otherwise specified. (2) Attach the pelvis to the...

  1. Surgical treatment for spine diseases in Abuja: Early outcomes study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three patients with severe spinal cord injury died after discharge due to poor rehabilitation and care. Overall patients rated the ... patients to other countries for spine care. Keywords: Abuja, Anterior cervical discectomy, cervical spine traumatic instability, Lumbar, Nigeria, Operation, Outcome, Spine, Surgical fixation, Trauma ...

  2. Patterns of spine surgeries at Mulago Hospital | Kigera | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spine surgery is a specialised area of orthopaedics that is still in its formative stages in Africa. It may be done to relieve symptoms, or stabilise the spine to allow rehabilitation of patients. This review analyses spine surgeries done in the period 2005-2009 in a National Referral Hospital. Objectives: Patterns of ...

  3. Financial unhealthiness predicts worse health outcomes: evidence from a sample of working Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmaghani, Maryam

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates how financial health associates with self-rated health, for a sample of working Canadians. Financial health is defined as an indicator of the proportionality of household consumption to its income. The study draws on the Canadian General Social Survey of 2011, a cross-sectional data set. Multivariate regression analysis is employed. The results show that financial unhealthiness is a statistically significant and strong predictor of worse physical and mental health outcomes, controlling for a wide array of characteristics, including income and job security implied by occupational category. Policy implications are explored. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Description and Results of a Comprehensive Care Protocol for Overnight-Stay Spine Surgery in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Drew A

    2017-07-15

    This is a prospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to define the probability of successful morning-after discharge after adult spine surgery achieved with a standard care protocol as applied to patients with a large variety of common degenerative spine disorders. Qualifying criteria for ambulatory or overnight-stay adult spine surgery are not well defined in either the spine or anesthesia literature. Most reports simply go to American Society of Anesthesiology risk classification or surgical technique alternatives and do not present a clearly defined patient care and case management protocol. A standardized protocol of patient preparation, preoperative comorbidities optimization, and perioperative care was applied in a prospective cohort of 126 patients including 83 lumbar and 41 cervical procedures. Office and hospital chart records were reviewed for relevant outcomes. Fully 122 of 124 appropriately selected cases were able to successfully achieve uneventful same-day discharge without any need for readmission, unscheduled early emergency room or clinic visits, or other major complications. Both failures were for urinary retention in senior males and resolved after a single-day admission to the main hospital. A wide variety of common degenerative spinal pathology in adults can be routinely and safely managed on an overnight-stay basis without requirement for formal hospital inpatient admission in patients appropriately selected and pre-educated to the experience and whose major comorbidities are preoperatively optimized. N/A.

  5. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  6. Congenital spine anomalies: the closed spinal dysraphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Erin Simon [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The term congenital spinal anomalies encompasses a wide variety of dysmorphology that occurs during early development. Familiarity with current terminology and a practical, clinico-radiologic classification system allows the radiologist to have a more complete understanding of malformations of the spine and improves accuracy of diagnosis when these entities are encountered in practice. (orig.)

  7. Cervical spine instability in rheumatoid arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-01-22

    Jan 22, 1983 ... the upper cervical spine. The atlanta-axial joint. Normal anatomy. The anterior surface ofthe dens forms a diarthrodial joint with the posterior border of the arch of the atlas. The structures mainly responsible for the ... of the dens should be 3 mm or less. If a line is drawn from the hard palate to the inner ...

  8. Biomechanics of the Flexion of Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Harry K.; Aurora, T. S.

    1991-01-01

    The forces and torques experienced by the spine are examined to understand, and possibly avoid, low back pain. The structure, degrees of freedom, forces and torques when lifting objects, an experimental study, and other factors affecting the back are discussed. (KR)

  9. On the controversies of spine surgery research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, W.C.H.

    1974-01-01

    This thesis is about effectiveness of surgical interventions in the spine and the value of different methodologies for providing a valid answer. In the first part five systematic reviews were performed. One reviewed cervical degenerative disc disease comparing the different anterior fusion

  10. Degenerative intraspinal cyst of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Nojiri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe two cases of degenerative intraspinal cyst of the cervical spine that caused a gradually progressive myelopathy. One case had a cyst that arose from the facet joint and the other case had a cyst that formed in the ligamentum flavum. The symptoms improved immediately after posterior decompression by cystectomy with laminoplasty.

  11. History of Spine Deformity in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Sait; Dinc, Gulten

    2017-01-01

    Spine deformities are among the most important spinal disorders, affecting health-related life quality. Although there are some studies in past centuries, most spine deformity-related studies and research has started in the last century. Many surgical techniques, performed between 1960 and 1990, made scoliosis a touchable pathology. These techniques started with Harrington"s system, wiring techniques, pedicle screw techniques, and all other universal techniques. Anterior and 360 degree techniques contributed to this process. The use of spinal osteotomies, and recent technologies such as magnetic rods, intraoperative neuromonitoring added much to the body of knowledge of literature and improved the outcome. Advancement has not been limited to surgery only and diagnostic advancements had also impact to this process. Surgical techniques performed in the west have been performed soon in our countries. Currently almost all surgical techniques for treatment of spine deformities can be performed in our country. This article reviews historical aspects related to the diagnosis and treatment of spine deformities in Turkey.

  12. Retropharyngeal cold abscess without Pott's spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    space is one of the rareforms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Early diagnosis and ... We present a case of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess in an adult woman without tuberculosis of the cervical spine who was managed surgically by aspirating the .... settings of immune suppression, such as diabetes. A plain lateral.

  13. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; Weygaert, Rien van de; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new concept, the Spine of the Cosmic Web, for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its filaments and walls. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the method invokes the local properties of the regions adjacent to the critical

  14. Histopathology of Synovial Cysts of the Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebib, Ivan; Chang, Connie Y; Schwab, Joseph H; Kerr, Darcy A; Deshpande, Vikram; Nielsen, G Petur

    2018-01-04

    Cystic lesions derived from the synovial and ligamentous structures of the spine have varied histologic appearances. Not uncommonly, there is discrepancy between the clinico-radiologic diagnosis and histology. Therefore, we sought to characterize the histologic features of tissue submitted as "synovial cysts" of the spine. Resected specimens of the spine labeled "synovial cysts" and "lumbar cysts" were histologically evaluated and classified based on histopathologic features. 75 histologic samples of spinal cysts were identified. 31 were classified as synovial cysts (definite synovial lining), 28 showed pseudocystic degeneration of the ligamentum flavum, 7 showed pseudocyst formation without evidence of synovial lining or degeneration of the ligamentum flavum, 8 showed cyst contents only or no histologic evidence of cyst wall for evaluation. Twenty-five cases (33%), especially those showing pseudocystic degeneration of the ligamentum flavum were associated with very characteristic tumor calcinosis-like calcium deposition with surrounding foreign-body giant cell reaction. Histology of "synovial cysts" of the spine shows varied types of cysts; a large proportion are not synovial lined cysts but rather show pseudocystic degenerative changes of the ligamentum flavum often associated with very characteristic finely granular calcifications and foreign body giant cell reaction. This may have implications, not only in understanding the pathogenesis of these lesions, but also in their varied response to non-surgical interventions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-16

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

  16. Pediatric spine imaging post scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharief, Alaa N; El-Hawary, Ron; Schmit, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Many orthopedic articles describe advances in surgical techniques and implants used in pediatric scoliosis surgery. However, even though postoperative spine imaging constitutes a large portion of outpatient musculoskeletal pediatric radiology, few, if any, radiology articles discuss this topic. There has been interval advancement over the last decades of the orthopedic procedures used in the treatment of spinal scoliosis in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. The goal of treatment in these patients is to stop the progression of the curve by blocking the spinal growth and correcting the deformity as much as possible. To that end, the authors in this paper discuss postoperative imaging findings of Harrington rods, Luque rods, Luque-Galveston implants and segmental spinal fusion systems. Regarding early onset scoliosis, the guiding principles used for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis do not apply to a growing spine because they would impede lung development. As a result, other devices have been developed to correct the curve and to allow spinal growth. These include spine-based growing rods, vertically expandable prosthetic titanium rods (requiring repetitive surgeries) and magnetically controlled growing rods (with a magnetic locking/unlocking system). Other more recent systems are Shilla and thoracoscopic anterior vertebral body tethering, which allow guided growth of the spine without repetitive interventions. In this paper, we review the radiologic appearances of different orthopedic implants and techniques used to treat adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and early onset scoliosis. Moreover, we present the imaging findings of the most frequent postoperative complications.

  17. Scalp dysesthesia related to cervical spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornsberry, Laura A; English, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Scalp dysesthesia is characterized by abnormal sensations of the scalp in the absence of any other unusual physical examination findings. The pathogenesis of this condition is unknown but has been reported in the setting of underlying psychiatric disorders. Other localized pruritic syndromes, including brachioradial pruritus and notalgia paresthetica, have been associated with pathologic conditions of the spine and have been successfully treated with gabapentin. Among 15 women identified in a retrospective review of medical records as having been seen with scalp dysesthesia, 14 patients had cervical spine disease confirmed by imaging. The most common finding on imaging was degenerative disk disease, with 10 of 14 patients having these changes at C5-C6. Other abnormal imaging findings included anterolisthesis, osteophytic spurring, lordosis, kyphosis, and nerve root impingement. A gabapentin regimen (topical or oral) had been recommended to 14 patients; of 7 patients who were followed up, 4 patients noted improvement in symptoms when taking gabapentin. Patients with scalp dysesthesia also had abnormal cervical spine images. Chronic muscle tension placed on the pericranial muscles and scalp aponeurosis secondary to the underlying cervical spine disease may lead to the symptoms of scalp dysesthesia.

  18. AOSpine subaxial cervical spine injury classification system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Koerner, John D.; Radcliff, Kris E.; Oner, F. Cumhur|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/188615326; Reinhold, Maximilian; Schnake, Klaus J.; Kandziora, Frank; Fehlings, Michael G.; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Vialle, Luiz R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This project describes a morphology-based subaxial cervical spine traumatic injury classification system. Using the same approach as the thoracolumbar system, the goal was to develop a comprehensive yet simple classification system with high intra- and interobserver reliability to be used

  19. Cervical human spine loads during traumatomechanical investigations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallieris, D.; Rizzetti, A.; Mattern. R.; Thunnissen, J.G.M.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.

    1996-01-01

    The last decade's improvements in automotive safety resulted into a significant decrease of fatal injuries. However, due to the use of belts and airbags it can be observed that cervical spine injuries, non-severe and severe, have become more important. It seems that inertial loading of the neck by

  20. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-20

    Mar 20, 2016 ... Comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, and anemia were significant risk factors. The organisms cultured were Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus species. Conclusions: Wound infection is a significant complication of posterior spine surgery. This causes distress for both patient and surgeons alike ...

  1. CASID and Canadian Journal of Development Studies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CASID and Canadian Journal of Development Studies : Organizational Strengthening 2007-2010. The Canadian Association for the Study of International Development (CASID) is a national, bilingual, multidisciplinary and pluralistic association devoted to the study of international development in all parts of the world.

  2. Guide to Canadian Aerospace Related Industries,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    fabrication, PWC assembly & test, automatic backplane wiring, computerized wire History : AEI, an established Canadian company for over 55...production of Automatic Number Identification (ANI) systems and 911 Emergency History : Aeo Machining Ltd is a small machining company Reporting Systems for...Aircraft, DeHavilland, Grumman Aircraft, and Canadian Digital Radar Data Processing - Contract with Fundacao Vickers Ltd. Educacional de Bauru, Brazil

  3. 47 CFR 90.121 - Canadian registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian registration. 90.121 Section 90.121 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations § 90.121 Canadian registration. Form 410 shall be...

  4. Rural Canadian Youth Exposed to Physical Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laye, Adele M.; Mykota, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to physical violence is an unfortunate reality for many Canadian youth as it is associated with numerous negative psychosocial effects. The study aims to assist in understanding resilience in rural Canadian youth exposed to physical violence. This is accomplished by identifying the importance of protective factors, as measured by the…

  5. Laser triangulation measurements of scoliotic spine curvatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čelan, Dušan; Jesenšek Papež, Breda; Poredoš, Primož; Možina, Janez

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to develop a new method for differentiating between scoliotic and healthy subjects by analysing the curvatures of their spines in the cranio-caudal view. The study included 247 subjects with physiological curvatures of the spine and 28 subjects with clinically confirmed scoliosis. The curvature of the spine was determined by a computer analysis of the surface of the back, measured with a non-invasive, 3D, laser-triangulation system. The determined spinal curve was represented in the transversal plane, which is perpendicular to the line segment that was defined by the initial point and the end point of the spinal curve. This was achieved using a rotation matrix. The distances between the extreme points in the antero-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) views were calculated in relation to the length of the spine as well as the quotient of these two values LR/AP. All the measured parameters were compared between the scoliotic and control groups using the Student's t-Test in case of normal data and Kruskal-Wallis test in case of non-normal data. Besides, a comprehensive diagram representing the distances between the extreme points in the AP and LR views was introduced, which clearly demonstrated the direction and the size of the thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures for each individual subject. While the distances between the extreme points of the spine in the AP view were found to differ only slightly between the groups (p = 0.1), the distances between the LR extreme points were found to be significantly greater in the scoliosis group, compared to the control group (p < 0.001). The quotient LR/AP was statistically significantly different in both groups (p < 0.001). The main innovation of the presented method is the ability to differentiate a scoliotic subject from a healthy subject by assessing the curvature of the spine in the cranio-caudal view. Therefore, the proposed method could be useful for human posture

  6. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care: Endorsed by the American Heart Assocation, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-05-19

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie D'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella®; left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  8. The Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Nath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly discusses various definitions and concepts of the so-called information society. The term information society has been proposed to refer to the post-industrial society in which information plays a pivotal role. The definitions that have been proposed over the years highlight five underlying characterisations of an information society: technological, economic, sociological, spatial, and cultural. This article discusses those characteristics. While the emergence of an information society may be just a figment of one’s imagination, the concept could be a good organising principle to describe and analyse the changes of the past 50 years and of the future in the 21st century.

  9. Injuries at a Canadian National Taekwondo Championships: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Willy

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the injury rates in male and female adult Canadian Taekwondo athletes relative to total number of injuries, type and body part injured. Methods Subjects (219 males, 99 females participated in the 1997 Canadian National Taekwondo Championships in Toronto, Canada. Injuries were recorded on an injury form to documents any injury seen and treatment provided by the health care team. These data were later used for this study. The injury form describes the athlete and nature, site, severity and mechanism of the injury. Results The overall rate of injuries was 62.9/1,000 athlete-exposures (A-E. The males (79.9/1,000 A-E sustained significantly more injuries than the females (25.3/1,000 A-E. The lower extremities were the most commonly injured body region in the men (32.0 /1,000 A-E, followed by the head and neck (18.3/1,000 A-E. Injuries to the spine (neck, upper back, low back and coccyx were the third most often injured body region in males (13.8/1,000 A-E. All injuries to the women were sustained to the lower extremities. The most common type of injury in women was the contusion (15.2/1,000 A-E. However, men's most common type of injury was the sprain (22.8/1,000 A-E followed by joint dysfunction (13.7/1,000A-E. Concussions were only reported in males (6.9/1,000 A-E. Compared to international counterparts, the Canadian men and women recorded lower total injury rates. However, the males incurred more cerebral concussions than their American colleagues (4.7/1,000 A-E. Conclusions Similar to what was found in previous studies, the current investigation seems to suggest that areas of particular concern for preventive measures involve the head and neck as well as the lower extremities. This is the first paper to identify spinal joint dysfunction.

  10. Cervical spine injury in child abuse: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooks, V.J.; Sisler, C.; Burton, B. [Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-03-01

    Pediatric cervical spine injuries have rarely been reported in the setting of child abuse. We report two cases of unsuspected lower cervical spine fracture-dislocation in twin infant girls who had no physical examination findings to suggest cervical spine injury. Classic radio-graphic findings of child abuse were noted at multiple other sites in the axial and appendicular skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging proved to be valuable in both the initial evaluation of the extent of cervical spine injury and in following postoperative changes. The unexpected yet devastating findings in these two cases further substantiate the importance of routine evaluation of the cervical spine in cases of suspected child abuse. (orig.)

  11. Multilingualism in Canadian schools: Myths, realities and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Duff

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bilingualism and multiculturalism have for four decades been official ideologies and policies in Canada but, as is often the case, the implementation and outcomes of such government policies nationally are less impressive than the rhetoric would suggest. This article reviews the political, theoretical and demographic contexts justifying support for the learning and use of additional languages in contemporary Canadian society and schools, and summarizes research demonstrating that bilingualism and multilingualism are indeed cognitively, socially, and linguistically advantageous for children (and adults, as well as for society. The five studies in this special issue are then previewed with respect to the following themes that run across them: (1 the potential for bilingual synergies and transformations in language awareness activities and crosslinguistic knowledge construction; (2 the role of multiliteracies and multimodality in mediated learning; and (3 the interplay of positioning, identity, and agency in language learning by immigrant youth. The article concludes that more Canadian schools and educators must, like the researchers in this volume, find ways to embrace and build upon students’ prior knowledge, their creativity, their collaborative problem-solving skills, their potential for mastering and manipulating multiple, multilingual semiotic tools, and their desire for inclusion and integration in productive, engaging learning communities.

  12. The polarity protein Angiomotin p130 controls dendritic spine maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigerius, Michael; Quinn, Dylan; Diab, Antonios; Clattenburg, Leanne; Kolar, Annette; Qi, Jiansong; Krueger, Stefan R; Fawcett, James P

    2018-01-09

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for the structural changes in dendritic spines that lead to the formation of new synapses. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying spine formation are well characterized, the events that drive spine maturation during development are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that Angiomotin (AMOT-130) is necessary for spine stabilization. AMOT-130 is enriched in mature dendritic spines and functions to stabilize the actin cytoskeleton by coupling F-actin to postsynaptic protein scaffolds. These functions of AMOT are transiently restricted during postnatal development by phosphorylation imposed by the kinase Lats1. Our study proposes that AMOT-130 is essential for normal spine morphogenesis and identifies Lats1 as an upstream regulator in this process. Moreover, our findings may link AMOT-130 loss and the related spine defects to neurological disorders. © 2018 Wigerius et al.

  13. Us, them, and others: reflections on Canadian multiculturalism and national identity at the turn of the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Elke

    2014-05-01

    The John Porter Lecture at the annual meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria 2013 draws upon my book Us, Them, and Others: Pluralism and National Identity in Diverse Societies. Incorporating the findings from an analysis of Canadian English-language newspaper discourses during the 1990s into a theoretical framework inspired by Weberian sociology, the book argues that pluralism is best understood as a dynamic set of triangular relations where the compromise between unequal groups--"us" and "others"--is rendered meaningful through the confrontation with real or imagined outsiders ("them"). The lecture summarizes the theoretical contribution and explains how multiculturalism became consolidated in dominant Canadian discourses in the late 1990s. The lecture then discusses changes to Canadian multicultural identity at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

  14. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  15. Repeat spine imaging in transferred emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Kadakia, Rishin J; Kay, Harrison F; Zhang, Chi E; Casimir, Geoffrey E; Devin, Clinton J

    2014-02-15

    Retrospective study. Assess frequency of repeat spine imaging in patients transferred with known spine injuries from outside hospital (OSH) to tertiary receiving institution (RI). Unnecessary repeat imaging after transfer has started to become a recognized problem with the obvious issues related to repeat imaging along with potential for iatrogenic injury with movement of patients with spine problems. Consecutive adult patients presenting to a single 1-level trauma center with spine injuries during a 51-month period were reviewed (n = 4500), resulting in 1427 patients transferred from OSH emergency department. All imaging and radiology reports from the OSH were reviewed, as well as studies performed at RI. A repeat was the same imaging modality used on the same spine region as OSH imaging. The overall rate of repeat spine imaging for both OSH imaging sent and not sent was 23%, and 6% if repeat spine imaging via traumagram (partial/full-body computed tomography [CT]) was excluded as a repeat. The overall rate of repeat CT was 29% (7% dedicated spine CT scans and 22% part of nondedicated spine CT scan).An observation of only those patients with OSH imaging that was sent and viewable revealed that 23% underwent repeat spine imaging with 23% undergoing repeat spine CT and 41% repeat magnetic resonance imaging.In those patients with sent and viewable OSH imaging, a lack of reconstructions prompted 14% of repeats, whereas inadequate visualization of injury site prompted 8%. In only 8% of the repeats did it change management or provide necessary surgical information. This study is the first to investigate the frequency of repeat spine imaging in transfers with known spine injuries and found a substantially high rate of repeat spine CT with minimal alteration in care. Potential solutions include only performing scans at the OSH necessary to establish a diagnosis requiring transfer and improving communication between OSH and RI physicians. 4.

  16. Prospective Validation of Modified NEXUS Cervical Spine Injury Criteria in Low-risk Elderly Fall Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Tran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The National Emergency X-radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS criteria are used extensively in emergency departments to rule out C-spine injuries (CSI in the general population. Although the NEXUS validation set included 2,943 elderly patients, multiple case reports and the Canadian C-Spine Rules question the validity of applying NEXUS to geriatric populations. The objective of this study was to validate a modified NEXUS criteria in a low-risk elderly fall population with two changes: a modified definition for distracting injury and the definition of normal mentation. Methods: This is a prospective, observational cohort study of geriatric fall patients who presented to a Level I trauma center and were not triaged to the trauma bay. Providers enrolled non-intoxicated patients at baseline mental status with no lateralizing neurologic deficits. They recorded midline neck tenderness, signs of trauma, and presence of other distracting injury. Results: We enrolled 800 patients. One patient fall event was excluded due to duplicate enrollment, and four were lost to follow up, leaving 795 for analysis. Average age was 83.6 (range 65-101. The numbers in parenthesis after the negative predictive value represent confidence interval. There were 11 (1.4% cervical spine injuries. One hundred seventeen patients had midline tenderness and seven of these had CSI; 366 patients had signs of trauma to the face/neck, and 10 of these patients had CSI. Using signs of trauma to the head/neck as the only distracting injury and baseline mental status as normal alertness, the modified NEXUS criteria was 100% sensitive (CI [67.9-100] with a negative predictive value of 100 (98.7-100. Conclusion: Our study suggests that a modified NEXUS criteria can be safely applied to low-risk elderly falls.

  17. Cervical Spine Alignment in Helmeted Skiers and Snowboarders With Suspected Head and Neck Injuries: Comparison of Lateral C-spine Radiographs Before and After Helmet Removal and Implications for Ski Patrol Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jared; Rust, David A

    2017-09-01

    Current protocols for spine immobilization of the injured skier/snowboarder have not been scientifically validated. Observing changes in spine alignment during common rescue scenarios will help strengthen recommendations for rescue guidelines. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (18 men, 10 women) age 47±17 (range 20-73) (mean ±SD with range) underwent a mock rescue in which candidate patrollers completing an Outdoor Emergency Care course performed spine immobilization and back boarding in 3 scenarios: 1) Ski helmet on, no c-collar; 2) helmet on, with c-collar; and 3) helmet removed, with c-collar. After each scenario, a lateral radiograph was taken of the cervical spine to observe for changes in alignment. Compared with the control group (helmet on, no collar), we observed 9 degrees of increased overall (occiput-C7) cervical extension in the helmet on, with collar group (P Ski helmet removal and c-collar application each leads to increased extension of the cervical spine. In the absence of other clinical factors, our recommendation is that helmets should be left in place and c-collars not routinely applied during ski patrol rescue. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anterior decompression, fusion and plating in cervical spine injury: Early experience in Abuja, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogungbo, Biodun

    2011-01-01

    We present a review of the results of the current surgical management of acute cervical spine injuries in the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria. This is the first detailed retrospective study on the surgical management of patients with cervical spine injuries from Nigeria. The medical reports of patients with traumatic cervical spine and spinal cord injuries undergoing surgery from 1 August 2009 till 30 August 2010 were reviewed. Management and early results of outcome were ascertained and detailed consecutively in a prospective Microsoft Office Access(®) database (Microsoft Group of Companies). Frankel grading was used for pre- and immediate post-operative evaluation (within 48 hours). The Barthel index (BI) was used to classify patients as dependent or independent at follow-up. Twenty consecutive patients presented with acute cervical spine and spinal cord injuries since August 2009. Twenty anterior cervical spine decompression and fixation with an iliac graft and an anterior cervical plate (ACDF) were performed in 18 patients. All operations were performed with general anaesthesia using standard techniques but without a microscope or a high speed drill. Of the 18 patients who were operated, 4 patients died within a short period following surgical intervention. Seven patients have made a full recovery and seven remain fully dependent. Only two of the dependent quadriplegic patients have become reintegrated back into the society. The management of spinal cord injuries in Abuja is evolving. The operations were performed adequately with much limited complement of equipment. Poor intensive care therapy is a major challenge and improvements in this area of care will likely lead to better patient outcomes.

  19. Endoscopic Spine Surgery: Distance Patients Will Travel for Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfeian, Albert E; Iprenburg, Menno; Wagner, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy is a minimally invasive spine surgery procedure performed principally for the treatment of lumbar herniated discs. Endoscopic spine surgeons around the world have noted how far patients will travel to undergo this minimally invasive spine surgery, but the actual distance patients travel has never been investigated. We present here our analysis of how far patients will travel for endoscopic spine surgery by studying the referral patterns of patients to 3 centers in 3 different countries. Retrospective chart review of de-identified patient data was performed to analyze the distance patients travel for spine surgery. Patient demographic data was analyzed for patients undergoing transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy procedures over the same 8 month period in 2015 at centers in the United States (U.S.), Netherlands, and Germany. Travel distances for patients were determined for 327 patients. The average distance traveled for the U.S. center was 91 miles, the Dutch center was 287 miles, and the German center was 103 miles. For the U.S. center 16% of patients traveled out of state for surgery and for the European centers combined, 4% of patients traveled out of the country for surgery. The period of data analyzed was less than one year and the data collected was analyzed retrospectively. Quality metrics in health care tend to be focused on how health care is delivered. Another health care metric that focuses more on what patients desire is presented here: how far patients will travel for innovative spine care.Key words: Endoscopic spine surgery, transforaminal, minimally invasive, travel, lumbar disc herniation.

  20. Civil Society and Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars

    An illustration of how important the relationship is between civil society anbd governance. A short historic journey with four snapshots of times and situations that have provided interesting evidence about the connection between civil society and governance. My goal for the short historic journey...... is to make clear and hopefully even verify that providing knowledge about the impact of civil society and citizens’ participation on governance is one of the most urgent research tasks in the current period of time....

  1. Factors affecting food selection in Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, M; Riediger, N; Moghadasian, M H

    2008-11-01

    To establish health-related reasons behind Canadian food choices, and how variables such as education, income, gender, ethnicity and age may affect food selection. Approximately 98 733 Canadians responded to the 12 questions regarding food choices in the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) cycle 2.1, conducted by the Canadian Government in 2003. These included 13 727 adolescents (12-19 years), 19 089 young adults (20-34 years), 31 039 middle-aged adults (35-54 years), 25 338 older adults (55-74 years) and 9580 elderly (75+ years). Approximately 70% of Canadian adolescents in the sample indicated that their food choices were independent of health concerns. Body weight management was a major concern for food selection by adolescents and adults, while the elderly stated heart disease as their main concern. Among all participants, females, and individuals with high levels of education and income reported the highest response to choosing or avoiding foods due to health concerns and food content. Our data indicate that several factors significantly affect food choices for health-related reasons in the Canadian population. Among them, age- and gender-related gaps, particularly between adolescents and adults, are profound. This observation may urge authorities to implement effective strategies to educate Canadians, especially adolescents, that selection of appropriate foods may prevent chronic diseases.

  2. Factors associated with lack of awareness and uncontrolled high blood pressure among Canadian adults with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Marianne E; Bienek, Asako; McAlister, Finlay A; Robitaille, Cynthia; Joffres, Michel; Tremblay, Mark S; Johansen, Helen; Campbell, Norm R C

    2012-05-01

    Approximately 17% of Canadians with high blood pressure were unaware of their condition, and of Canadians aware of having the condition, approximately 1 in 5 have uncontrolled high blood pressure despite high rates of pharmacotherapy. The objectives of the current study are to estimate the prevalence of resistant hypertension and examine factors associated with (1) lack of awareness and (2) uncontrolled hypertension despite pharmacotherapy. Using the 2007-2009 Canadian Health Measures Survey (N = 3473, aged 20-79 years) and logistic regression, we quantified relationships between characteristics and (1) presence of hypertension, (2) lack of awareness (among those with hypertension), and (3) uncontrolled high blood pressure (among those treated for hypertension). Older age, lowest income, and less than high school education were associated with presence of hypertension. Men (odds ratio [OR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.2) and adults high blood pressure (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.1-5.2) despite treatment. Elevated systolic blood pressure was the issue in over 90% of women and 80% of men with uncontrolled hypertension. Depending on the definition employed, 4.4% (95% CI, 2.4-6.4) to 7.8% (95% CI, 6.0-9.6) of the population with hypertension had resistant hypertension. Messaging or interventions encouraging screening may be helpful for all younger Canadian adults and men; programs encouraging blood pressure control may help older women. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nuclear communications : A Canadian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macpherson, John A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ottawa (Canada)

    1994-04-15

    Times have changed since the early days of nuclear energy when it was a symbol of a brave new world, Public information strategies have evolved to meet increasing public concerns, and have shifted from being a largely unfocused attempt at publicity to being more concerned with managing issues and solving problems. This paper describes some of the salient features of the Canadian experience in nuclear communications and examines four key aspects: opinion and attitude research; media relations; coeducation; and advertising. It also addresses the challenge of responding to the allegations and tactics of those who are actively hostile to nuclear energy, and recommends that the principles of Total Quality Management and of organizational effectiveness be applied more thorough and more consistently to the public affairs function.

  4. Tritium technology. A Canadian overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmings, R.L. [Canatom NPM (Canada)

    2002-10-01

    An overview of the various tritium research and operational activities in Canada is presented. These activities encompass tritium processing and recovery, tritium interactions with materials, and tritium health and safety. Many of these on-going activities form a sound basis for the tritium use and handling aspects of the ITER project. Tritium management within the CANDU heavy water reactor, associated detritiation facilities, research and development facilities, and commercial industry and improving the understanding of tritium behaviour in humans and the environment remain the focus of a long-standing Canadian interest in tritium. While there have been changes in the application of this knowledge and experience over time, the operating experience and the supporting research and development continue to provide for improved plant and facility operations, an improved understanding of tritium safety issues, and improved products and tools that facilitate tritium management. (author)

  5. Canadian orthodontist Internet user profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Neal G; Yacyshyn, James R; Northcott, Herbert C; Nebbe, Brian; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Major, Paul W

    2006-01-01

    An anonymous, self-administered, mail-out survey of Canadian Orthodontists was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of orthodontic Internet use. The response rate was 45.6% (304 of 667). A total of 76.6% of orthodontists reported having Internet access at work, and an additional 12.4% reported having Internet access from a different location. Statistically significant associations between Internet usage and office staff size (P < .001) and years of practice (P = .046) were observed. Offices with larger staffs had greater Internet access. Number of staffs and number of case starts were positively correlated (P < .001, r = 0.498). The odds ratio for having Internet access on the basis of increased case starts from the less than 100 to 300-399 categories was 5.67. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend for greater Internet access by younger practitioners.

  6. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Heart Rhythm Society joint position statement on the use of remote monitoring for cardiovascular implantable electronic device follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Raymond; Verma, Atul; Beardsall, Marianne; Fraser, Jennifer; Philippon, Francois; Exner, Derek V

    2013-06-01

    Remote monitoring (RM) is a form of telemedicine technology that permits implanted pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators to transmit diagnostic information for review by health care professionals without patients needing to visit the device follow-up clinic. A bedside transmitter in the patient's home conveys the device data using standard telecommunication protocol to a protected internet-accessible RM data server, which authorized health care professionals can access at any time using standard web browser software. Evidence indicates it can accelerate identification of clinical events and potential device problems. RM raises important medicolegal issues concerning the protection of a patient's rights and the safeguarding of patient health information related to the collection, storage, and use of patient device information that must be addressed by follow-up centres. This position statement recommends that remote monitoring be available at all device follow-up clinics as an integral part of the standard of care of device patients and also provides helpful advice to centres for the proper design, implementation, and integration of a remote monitoring system into the clinic. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Research productivity of Canadian ophthalmology departments in top 10 ophthalmology and vision science journals from 2001 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Matthew B; Manalo, Elbert; Wong, Agnes M F

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the research productivity of Canadian ophthalmology departments in terms of research volume, impact, funding, and cost-efficiency, and compare these measures with the top 6 U.S. departments. Systemic review. Using the Web of Science, we obtained the number of peer-reviewed research articles and citations in which an author listed an ophthalmology department (or affiliated university or hospital) from 2001 to 2010 in the top 10 ophthalmology and vision sciences journals, as well as the Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology. Federal research funding received from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and National Institutes of Health was also obtained. The 3 universities that produced the highest number of articles were the University of Toronto (UofT), McGill University, and the University of British Columbia (UBC). UofT also produced the largest number of citations, followed by UBC and Dalhousie University. For the number of citations per article, the top 3 were the University of Ottawa, Dalhousie University, and the University of Calgary. McGill University, the University of Montreal, and UofT received the most federal funding. The 3 Canadian universities with the lowest funding (cost) per article were UofT, UBC, and McMaster University. The top contributors to the Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology from 2001 to 2010 were UofT, the University of Ottawa, and McGill University. Larger Canadian departments tended to generate higher research volume and obtained more federal funding, but smaller departments also contributed significantly, and sometimes surpassed larger departments, in terms of research impact and cost-efficiency. The top 6 U.S. departments generated higher research volume and received more federal research funding than their Canadian counterparts. However, when research impact and cost-efficiency were examined, Canadian departments performed similar to the top U.S. departments. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published

  8. Upright positional MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyas, F.; Connell, D. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: asif.saifuddin@rnoh.nhs.uk

    2008-09-15

    Supine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the assessment of low back pain and radiculopathy. However, imaging findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. This is partly related to the positional dependence of spinal stenosis, which reflects dynamic changes in soft-tissue structures (ligaments, disc, dural sac, epidural fat, and nerve roots). Upright MRI in the flexed, extended, rotated, standing, and bending positions, allows patients to reproduce the positions that bring about their symptoms and may uncover MRI findings that were not visible with routine supine imaging. Assessment of the degree of spinal stability in the degenerate and postoperative lumbar spine is also possible. The aim of this review was to present the current literature concerning both the normal and symptomatic spine as imaged using upright MRI and to illustrate the above findings using clinical examples.

  9. Sagittal parameters of the spine: biomechanical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussouly, Pierre; Pinheiro-Franco, João Luiz

    2011-09-01

    According to the anatomical segmentation, spine curves are the sacral kyphosis (sacrum), lumbar lordosis (L1 to L5), thoracic kyphosis (T1 to T12) and cervical lordosis (C1 to C7). From the morphological point of view the vertebrae of a curve are not identical: from cranial to caudal and vice versa there is a progressive anatomical modification. Both curves of the thoraco-lumbar spine may be divided at the Inflexion Point where lordosis turns into kyphosis. A geometrical construct of each curve by two tangent arcs of circle allows understanding the reciprocal changes between both curves. Lumbar Lordosis is mainly dependent on SS orientation, and the top of thoracic curve on C7 is very stable over the sacrum. Thoracic curve is dependent on lumbar lordosis orientation and C7 positioning. On a reverse effect, structural changing of thoracic kyphosis may affect the shape of the lumbar lordosis and the orientation of the pelvis.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Menahem; Korkotian, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the role of calcium stores in dendritic spines structure, function and plasticity is still debated. The reasons for this may have to do with the multitude of overlapping calcium handling machineries in the neuron, including stores, voltage and ligand gated channels, pumps and transporters. Also, different cells in the brain are endowed with calcium stores that are activated by different receptor types, and their differential compartmentalization in dendrites, spines and presynaptic terminals complicates their analysis. In the present review we address several key issues, including the role of calcium stores in synaptic plasticity, their role during development, in stress and in neurodegenerative diseases. Apparently, there is increasing evidence for a crucial role of calcium stores, especially of the ryanodine species, in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival.

  11. Minimally invasive spine surgery: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banczerowski, Péter; Czigléczki, Gábor; Papp, Zoltán; Veres, Róbert; Rappaport, Harry Zvi; Vajda, János

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures in spine surgery have undergone significant development in recent times. These procedures have the common aim of avoiding biomechanical complications associated with some traditional destructive methods and improving efficacy. These new techniques prevent damage to crucial posterior stabilizers and preserve the structural integrity and stability of the spine. The wide variety of reported minimally invasive methods for different pathologies necessitates a systematic classification. In the present review, authors first provide a classification system of minimally invasive techniques based on the location of the pathologic lesion to be treated, to help the surgeon in selecting the appropriate procedure. Minimally invasive techniques are then described in detail, including technical features, advantages, complications, and clinical outcomes, based on available literature.

  12. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Branched standard spines of 3-manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, Riccardo

    1997-01-01

    This book provides a unified combinatorial realization of the categroies of (closed, oriented) 3-manifolds, combed 3-manifolds, framed 3-manifolds and spin 3-manifolds. In all four cases the objects of the realization are finite enhanced graphs, and only finitely many local moves have to be taken into account. These realizations are based on the notion of branched standard spine, introduced in the book as a combination of the notion of branched surface with that of standard spine. The book is intended for readers interested in low-dimensional topology, and some familiarity with the basics is assumed. A list of questions, some of which concerning relations with the theory of quantum invariants, is enclosed.

  14. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 2 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    To provide guidelines for health care providers on the use of contraceptive methods to prevent pregnancy and on the promotion of healthy sexuality. Guidance for Canadian practitioners on overall effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, non-contraceptive benefits, side effects and risks, and initiation of cited contraceptive methods; family planning in the context of sexual health and general well-being; contraceptive counselling methods; and access to, and availability of, cited contraceptive methods in Canada. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Database from January 1994 to January 2015 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., contraception, sexuality, sexual health) and key words (e.g., contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English from January 1994 to January 2015. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to June 2015. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of the evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Chapter 1: Contraception in Canada Summary Statements  1. Canadian women spend a significant portion of their lives at risk of an unintended pregnancy. (II-2)  2. Effective contraceptive methods are underutilized in Canada, particularly among vulnerable populations. (II-2)  3. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, including contraceptive implants and intrauterine contraception (copper-releasing and levonorgestrel

  15. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 1 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    To provide guidelines for health care providers on the use of contraceptive methods to prevent pregnancy and on the promotion of healthy sexuality. Guidance for Canadian practitioners on overall effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, non-contraceptive benefits, side effects and risks, and initiation of cited contraceptive methods; family planning in the context of sexual health and general well-being; contraceptive counselling methods; and access to, and availability of, cited contraceptive methods in Canada. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Database from January 1994 to January 2015 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., contraception, sexuality, sexual health) and key words (e.g., contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English from January 1994 to January 2015. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to June 2015. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of the evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Chapter 1: Contraception in Canada Summary Statements 1. Canadian women spend a significant portion of their lives at risk of an unintended pregnancy. (II-2) 2. Effective contraceptive methods are underutilized in Canada, particularly among vulnerable populations. (II-2) 3. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, including contraceptive implants and intrauterine contraception (copper-releasing and levonorgestrel

  16. A perspective on Canadian shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mike; Davidson, Jim; Mortensen, Paul

    2010-09-15

    In a relatively new development over just the past few years, shale formations are being targeted for natural gas production. Based on initial results, there may be significant potential for shale gas in various regions of Canada, not only in traditional areas of conventional production but also non-traditional areas. However, there is much uncertainty because most Canadian shale gas production is currently in experimental or early developmental stages. Thus, its full potential will not be known for some time. If exploitation proves to be successful, Canadian shale gas may partially offset projected long-term declines in Canadian conventional natural gas production.

  17. The international spine registry SPINE TANGO: status quo and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloh, Markus; Staub, Lukas; Aghayev, Emin; Zweig, Thomas; Barz, Thomas; Theis, Jean-Claude; Chavanne, Albert; Grob, Dieter; Aebi, Max; Roeder, Christoph

    2008-09-01

    With an official life time of over 5 years, Spine Tango can meanwhile be considered the first international spine registry. In this paper we present an overview of frequency statistics of Spine Tango for demonstrating the genesis of questionnaire development and the constantly increasing activity in the registry. Results from two exemplar studies serve for showing concepts of data analysis applied to a spine registry. Between 2002 and 2006, about 6,000 datasets were submitted by 25 centres. Descriptive analyses were performed for demographic, surgical and follow-up data of three generations of the Spine Tango surgery and follow-up forms. The two exemplar studies used multiple linear regression models to identify potential predictor variables for the occurrence of dura lesions in posterior spinal fusion, and to evaluate which covariates influenced the length of hospital stay. Over the study period there was a rise in median patient age from 52.3 to 58.6 years in the Spine Tango data pool and an increasing percentage of degenerative diseases as main pathology from 59.9 to 71.4%. Posterior decompression was the most frequent surgical measure. About one-third of all patients had documented follow-ups. The complication rate remained below 10%. The exemplar studies identified "centre of intervention" and "number of segments of fusion" as predictors of the occurrence of dura lesions in posterior spinal fusion surgery. Length of hospital stay among patients with posterior fusion was significantly influenced by "centre of intervention", "surgeon credentials", "number of segments of fusion", "age group" and "sex". Data analysis from Spine Tango is possible but complicated by the incompatibility of questionnaire generations 1 and 2 with the more recent generation 3. Although descriptive and also analytic studies at evidence level 2++ can be performed, findings cannot yet be generalised to any specific country or patient population. Current limitations of Spine Tango include

  18. Pedicular stress fracture in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Htoo, M.M. [Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, (Singapore). Department of Diagnostic Radiology

    1997-08-01

    Spondylolisthesis with or without spondylolysis is common in the lumbar spine. Associated fracture in the pedicle (`pediculolysis`) is unusual. The margins of pedicular stress fractures, like spondylolysis, usually appear sclerotic. A patient with a pedicular stress fracture with minimal marginal sclerosis suggesting an injury of recent onset is presented here. There was associated bilateral spondylolysis. The findings in this patient suggest that established pediculolysis probably represents a stress fracture that has failed to heal. (authors). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Neuronavigation in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ziev B; Mayer, Rory R; Strickland, Benjamin A; Kretzer, Ryan M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Baaj, Ali A

    2013-08-01

    Parallel advancements in image guidance technology and minimal access techniques continue to push the frontiers of minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). While traditional intraoperative imaging remains widely used, newer platforms, such as 3D-fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, and intraoperative CT/MRI, have enabled safer, more accurate instrumentation placement with less radiation exposure to the surgeon. The goal of this work is to provide a review of the current uses of advanced image guidance in MISS. The authors searched PubMed for relevant articles concerning MISS, with particular attention to the use of image-guidance platforms. Pertinent studies published in English were further compiled and characterized into relevant analyses of MISS of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions. Fifty-two studies were included for review. These describe the use of the iso-C system for 3D navigation during C1-2 transarticular screw placement, the use of endoscopic techniques in the cervical spine, and the role of navigation guidance at the occipital-cervical junction. The authors discuss the evolving literature concerning neuronavigation during pedicle screw placement in the thoracic and lumbar spine in the setting of infection, trauma, and deformity surgery and review the use of image guidance in transsacral approaches. Refinements in image-guidance technologies and minimal access techniques have converged on spinal pathology, affording patients the ability to undergo safe, accurate operations without the associated morbidities of conventional approaches. While percutaneous transpedicular screw placement is among the most common procedures to benefit from navigation, other areas of spine surgery can benefit from advances in neuronavigation and further growth in the field of image-guided MISS is anticipated.

  20. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rigid Spine Syndrome among Children in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Koul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rigidity of the spine is common in adults but is rarely observed in children. The aim of this study was to report on rigid spine syndrome (RSS among children in Oman. Methods: Data on children diagnosed with RSS were collected consecutively at presentation between 1996 and 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. A diagnosis of RSS was based on the patient’s history, clinical examination, biochemical investigations, electrophysiological findings, neuro-imaging and muscle biopsy. Atrophy of the paraspinal muscles, particularly the erector spinae, was the diagnostic feature; this was noted using magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Children with disease onset in the paraspinal muscles were labelled as having primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy. Secondary RSS was classified as RSS due to the late involvement of other muscle diseases. Results: Over the 18-year period, 12 children were included in the study, with a maleto- female ratio of 9:3. A total of 10 children were found to have primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy syndrome while two had secondary RSS. Onset of the disease ranged from birth to 18 months of age. A family history was noted, with two siblings from one family and three siblings from another (n = 5. On examination, children with primary RSS had typical features of severe spine rigidity at onset, with the rest of the neurological examination being normal. Conclusion: RSS is a rare disease with only 12 reported cases found at SQUH during the study period. Cases of primary RSS should be differentiated from the secondary type.

  2. Instrumentation related complications in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, Efstathios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Karamanis, Eirineos; Mimidis, George; Tolis, Konstantinos; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2012-01-01

    Spinal instrumentation constructs are frequently necessary for the surgical management of patients with variable spinal pathology. However, surgical complications may appear. These should be detected early and managed to achieve recovery and good functional outcome for the patient. This article provides an in-depth analysis of the most common instrumentation-related complications of spine surgery as well as a diagnostic plan and treatment options for the management of these challenging entities once they occur.

  3. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Quiron Clinic, Avd. Blasco Ibanez, 14, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  4. Biomechanical Comparison Of Intact Lumbar Lamp Spine And Endoscopic Discectomized Lamp Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karakasli

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Purpose of current study was biomechanical comparison of changes wrought on motion segments after minimally invasive percutan endoscopic discectomized and intact spine. Materials and Methods: We prepared ten fresh-frozen lamb spines were used for this study. The spine of each specimen was dissected between L4-L5. The biomechanical tests for both intact spine and discectomized spine were performed by using axial compression testing machine (AG-I 10 kN, Shimadzu, Japanese. The axial compression was applied to all specimens with the loading speed of 5 mm/min. 8400 N/mm moment was applied to each specimen to achieve flexion and extension motions, right and left bending by a specially designed fixture. Results: In axial compression and flexion tests, the specimens were more stable according to displacement values. The displacement values of sectioned specimens were closer to intact specimens. Only displacement values of left-bending anteroposterior test for both situations were significant (0.05 ;#8805; P. Conclusion: PTED hasn't biomechanical and cilinical disadvantages. Endoscopic discectomy hadn't any disadvantages in stability. Only anterior-posterior displacement values of left bending test were statistically significant. We consider that cause of these results were due to the fact that all specimens had percutan transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED from left side.

  5. Spine Metastasis Practice Patterns among Korean, Chinese, and Japanese Radiation Oncologists: A Multinational Online Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Gao, Xian-Shu; Wang, Jun-Jie; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Ito, Yoshinori; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2017-01-01

    This online survey of practising radiation oncologists from Korea, China and Japan was conducted to investigate the current practices in radiotherapy (RT) for spine metastasis and to compare these practices across the three countries. The questionnaire included nine general information questions and two clinical scenarios (representing 'typical' and 'good' prognosis spine metastasis), with seven questions for each scenario. An anonymous web-based survey using Google Docs® was undertaken from 2 September 2014 to 9 April 2015. A total of 54 Korean, 107 Chinese and 104 Japanese radiation oncologists participated in the study. The first scenario involved a typical case of spine metastasis (~25% expected 1-year survival rate), and the preferred fractionation scheme was 10 fractions of 3 Gy, though the pattern was slightly different in each country. The second scenario involved a good prognosis case (>50% expected 1-year survival rate), and 10 fractions of 3 Gy was the preferred practice in all three countries (however, use of a larger fraction dose with a smaller fraction number was more common in Korea). A more conformal RT technique was more prominent in China and Korea, especially for patients with a good prognosis. Avoidance of reirradiation was notable in China. In summary, a preference for multiple fractionation in RT for spine metastasis was observed in the majority of Korean, Chinese and Japanese radiation oncologists, although there were slight differences in practice preferences, especially for patients with a favorable prognosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine.

  7. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Domínguez-Iturza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine.

  8. ATLS® and damage control in spine trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Oliver I; Gahr, Ralf H; Gosse, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph E

    2009-01-01

    Substantial inflammatory disturbances following major trauma have been found throughout the posttraumatic course of polytraumatized patients, which was confirmed in experimental models of trauma and in vitro settings. As a consequence, the principle of damage control surgery (DCS) has developed over the last two decades and has been successfully introduced in the treatment of severely injured patients. The aim of damage control surgery and orthopaedics (DCO) is to limit additional iatrogenic trauma in the vulnerable phase following major injury. Considering traumatic brain and acute lung injury, implants for quick stabilization like external fixators as well as decided surgical approaches with minimized potential for additional surgery-related impairment of the patient's immunologic state have been developed and used widely. It is obvious, that a similar approach should be undertaken in the case of spinal trauma in the polytraumatized patient. Yet, few data on damage control spine surgery are published to so far, controlled trials are missing and spinal injury is addressed only secondarily in the broadly used ATLS® polytrauma algorithm. This article reviews the literature on spine trauma assessment and treatment in the polytrauma setting, gives hints on how to assess the spine trauma patient regarding to the ATLS® protocol and recommendations on therapeutic strategies in spinal injury in the polytraumatized patient. PMID:19257904

  9. ATLS® and damage control in spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosse Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Substantial inflammatory disturbances following major trauma have been found throughout the posttraumatic course of polytraumatized patients, which was confirmed in experimental models of trauma and in vitro settings. As a consequence, the principle of damage control surgery (DCS has developed over the last two decades and has been successfully introduced in the treatment of severely injured patients. The aim of damage control surgery and orthopaedics (DCO is to limit additional iatrogenic trauma in the vulnerable phase following major injury. Considering traumatic brain and acute lung injury, implants for quick stabilization like external fixators as well as decided surgical approaches with minimized potential for additional surgery-related impairment of the patient's immunologic state have been developed and used widely. It is obvious, that a similar approach should be undertaken in the case of spinal trauma in the polytraumatized patient. Yet, few data on damage control spine surgery are published to so far, controlled trials are missing and spinal injury is addressed only secondarily in the broadly used ATLS® polytrauma algorithm. This article reviews the literature on spine trauma assessment and treatment in the polytrauma setting, gives hints on how to assess the spine trauma patient regarding to the ATLS® protocol and recommendations on therapeutic strategies in spinal injury in the polytraumatized patient.

  10. Intrapartum Ultrasound Assessment of Fetal Spine Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Gizzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of foetal spine position in the first and second labour stages to determine the probability of OPP detection at birth and the related obstetrical implications. We conducted an observational-longitudinal cohort study on uncomplicated cephalic single foetus pregnant women at term. We evaluated the accuracy of ultrasound in predicting occiput position at birth, influence of fetal spine in occiput position during labour, labour trend, analgesia request, type of delivery, and indication to CS. The accuracy of the foetal spinal position to predict the occiput position at birth was high at the first labour stage. At the second labour stage, CS (40.3% and operative vaginal deliveries (23.9% occurred more frequently in OPP than in occiput anterior position (7% and 15.2%, resp., especially in cases of the posterior spine. In concordant posterior positions labour length was greater than other ones, and analgesia request rate was 64.1% versus 14.7% for all the others. The assessment of spinal position could be useful in obstetrical management and counselling, both before and during labour. The detection of spinal position, more than OPP, is predictive of successful delivery. In concordant posterior positions, the labour length, analgesia request, operative delivery, and caesarean section rate are higher than in the other combination.

  11. Intrapartum ultrasound assessment of fetal spine position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Andrisani, Alessandra; Noventa, Marco; Burul, Giorgia; Di Gangi, Stefania; Anis, Omar; Ancona, Emanuele; D'Antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Ambrosini, Guido

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of foetal spine position in the first and second labour stages to determine the probability of OPP detection at birth and the related obstetrical implications. We conducted an observational-longitudinal cohort study on uncomplicated cephalic single foetus pregnant women at term. We evaluated the accuracy of ultrasound in predicting occiput position at birth, influence of fetal spine in occiput position during labour, labour trend, analgesia request, type of delivery, and indication to CS. The accuracy of the foetal spinal position to predict the occiput position at birth was high at the first labour stage. At the second labour stage, CS (40.3%) and operative vaginal deliveries (23.9%) occurred more frequently in OPP than in occiput anterior position (7% and 15.2%, resp.), especially in cases of the posterior spine. In concordant posterior positions labour length was greater than other ones, and analgesia request rate was 64.1% versus 14.7% for all the others. The assessment of spinal position could be useful in obstetrical management and counselling, both before and during labour. The detection of spinal position, more than OPP, is predictive of successful delivery. In concordant posterior positions, the labour length, analgesia request, operative delivery, and caesarean section rate are higher than in the other combination.

  12. Education Societies in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scottish Educational Review, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes origins, membership criteria, activities, and publications of the Scottish branches of six educational societies: British Association of Early Childhood Education, British Psychological Society, National Association for Gifted Children, National Council for Special Education, United Kingdom Reading Association, and Education Otherwise.…

  13. Fieldwork in Transforming Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Ed; Michailova, Snejina

    The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China.......The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China....

  14. Refractions of Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmanovic, Daniella

    The thesis investigates various perceptions of civil society among civic activists in Turkey, and how these perceptions are produced and shaped. The thesis is an anthropological contribution to studies of civil society in general, as well as to studies on political culture in Turkey....

  15. Glaciers and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagné, Karine; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg; Orlove, Ben

    2014-01-01

    toward technological methodologies. Yet, as elements of the landscape, glaciers are strongly integrated to various societies around the world in ways that exceed their role as provider of fundamental sources of water. The relation between glaciers and societies is therefore marked by processes...

  16. World Society and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  17. Skin-Color Preferences and Body Satisfaction among South Asian-Canadian and European-Canadian Female University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Sarita; Piran, Niva

    1997-01-01

    Examines skin-color preferences and body satisfaction among South Asian-Canadian and European-Canadian female university students. Hypothesizes that South Asian-Canadians would display a greater wish to be lighter in skin color than would European-Canadians and that the discrepancy would be greater the darker their skin color. Reports that the…

  18. Islam dan Civil Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sukardi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article tries to address the concept of civil society from varied perspectives. From a historical point of view, civil society demands not only the absent domination of state but also liberates individuals from the hegemony of state. The article shows that in Indonesia and Malaysian discourse, masyarakat madani is often used to represent the term of civil society. Using this conception, major values of civil society also share with basic ideas within the Medina Treaty in the history of Islam. These ideas include egalitarianism, human rights protection, participation, law and justice enforcement and pluralism. In this frame, the question on whether or not Islam is compatible with the concept of civil society is clearly answered. Muslims could benefit such a concept to build their awareness of being progressive and adaptive to social changes.

  19. Cervical spine injuries in American football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihn, Jeffrey A; Anderson, David T; Lamb, Kathleen; Deluca, Peter F; Bata, Ahmed; Marchetto, Paul A; Neves, Nuno; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2009-01-01

    American football is a high-energy contact sport that places players at risk for cervical spine injuries with potential neurological deficits. Advances in tackling and blocking techniques, rules of the game and medical care of the athlete have been made throughout the past few decades to minimize the risk of cervical injury and improve the management of injuries that do occur. Nonetheless, cervical spine injuries remain a serious concern in the game of American football. Injuries have a wide spectrum of severity. The relatively common 'stinger' is a neuropraxia of a cervical nerve root(s) or brachial plexus and represents a reversible peripheral nerve injury. Less common and more serious an injury, cervical cord neuropraxia is the clinical manifestation of neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord due to hyperextension, hyperflexion or axial loading. Recent data on American football suggest that approximately 0.2 per 100,000 participants at the high school level and 2 per 100,000 participants at the collegiate level are diagnosed with cervical cord neuropraxia. Characterized by temporary pain, paraesthesias and/or motor weakness in more than one extremity, there is a rapid and complete resolution of symptoms and a normal physical examination within 10 minutes to 48 hours after the initial injury. Stenosis of the spinal canal, whether congenital or acquired, is thought to predispose the athlete to cervical cord neuropraxia. Although quite rare, catastrophic neurological injury is a devastating entity referring to permanent neurological injury or death. The mechanism is most often a forced hyperflexion injury, as occurs when 'spear tackling'. The mean incidence of catastrophic neurological injury over the past 30 years has been approximately 0.5 per 100,000 participants at high school level and 1.5 per 100,000 at the collegiate level. This incidence has decreased significantly when compared with the incidence in the early 1970s. This decrease in the incidence of

  20. Dysplastic Nevus: Management by Canadian Dermatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Priya; Rosen, Cheryl; Siddha, Sanjay; Lynde, Charles W

    2015-01-01

    The management of dysplastic nevi is controversial. No studies have collected data regarding management of the lesion amongst Canadian dermatologists. To provide a comprehensive review of what the prevailing opinions are, regarding treatment and terminology of dysplastic nevi, amongst Canadian dermatologists. An online survey of 25 questions was e-mailed to 613 members of the Canadian Dermatology Association, in French and English. A total of 179 responses were received. Varying numbers of participants completed each question. The majority of participants think that the term dysplastic nevus should not be abandoned, and they indicated that they never reexcise lesions with mild to moderate atypia even when the margins are positive. The majority of Canadian dermatologists retain the use of the term dysplastic nevus and do not reexcise lesions with mild to moderate atypia even when the margins are positive. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Freezing at sea: a Canadian opportunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bollivar, D.R; Cadegan, E; Demone, E.H; Matthew, P; Nicholson, P.J; Shannon, C.P; Stirling, R.C

    This report was prepared for the Nova Scotia Fish Packers Association in an effort to set out as clearly as possible the issues relating to introduction of freezing at sea technology to the Canadian...

  2. The Canadian Forces Recruitment/Attrition Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wait, Tracey

    1998-01-01

    ...), as part of its mandate to provide analysis of potential impacts of trends and change on defense and defense related issues, has designed a prototype model of recruitment and attrition of the Canadian Forces (C F...

  3. Canadian shellfish sanitation program: manual of operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1992-01-01

    This manual outlines the authorities (acts and regulations), policies and procedures which apply to the Canadian program and which will be used to evaluate regional activities associated with the shellfish Sanitation Program...

  4. Canadian Business Schools: Going out of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobni, Dawn; Dobni, Brooke

    1996-01-01

    Using Porter's five-forces model (potential entrants, suppliers, buyers, rivalry, substitutes) to analyze competition in Canadian university business schools, the authors conclude that schools are becoming increasingly vulnerable to competitive pressures and that strategic reorientation is necessary. (SK)

  5. Clinical significance of gas myelography and CT gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Haruhiko (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1984-05-01

    Basic and clinical applications relating to air myelography of the cervical spine have already been studied and extensively been used as an adjuvant diagnostic method for diseases of the spine and the spinal cord. However, hardly any application and clinical evaluation have been made concerning gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine. The author examined X-ray findings of 183 cases with diseases of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine, including contral cases. Gas X-ray photography included simple profile, forehead tomography, sagittal plane, and CT section. Morphological characteristics of normal X-ray pictures of the throacic spine and the lumbar spine were explained from 54 control cases, and all the diameters of the subarachnoidal space from the anterior to the posterior part were measured. X-ray findings were examined on pathological cases, namely 22 cases with diseases of the throacic spine and 107 cases with diseases of the lumbar spine, and as a result these were useful for pathological elucidation of spinal cord tumors, spinal carries, yellow ligament ossification, lumbar spinal canal stenosis, hernia of intervertebral disc, etc. Also, CT gas myelography was excellent in stereo observation of the spine and the spinal cord in spinal cord tumors, yellow ligament ossification, and spinal canal stenosis. On the other hand, it is not suitable for the diagnoses of intraspinal vascular abnormality, adhesive arachinitis, and running abnormality of the cauda equina nerve and radicle. Gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lambar spine, is very useful in clinics when experienced techniques are used in photographic conditions, and diagnoses are made, well understanding the characteristics of gas pictures. Thus, its application has been opened to selection of an operative technique, determination of operative ranges, etc.

  6. Comparison of the immature sheep spine and the growing human spine: a spondylometric database for growth modulating research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Carol; Sprecher, Christoph Martin; Milz, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    A comparative study on growth of the sheep and human spine. To validate the immature sheep spine as model for the growing human spine and to yield a database for planning and interpretation of future animal experiments. With the current change of paradigm to nonfusion strategies for pediatric spine deformities, experimental surgery on spines of growing goats, sheep, and pigs has gained importance as preclinical proof-of-concept test. However, despite the proceeding use of animals, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the growth of the sheep spine and the relation to the human spine. Thoracic and lumbar cadaver spines were harvested from 50 Swiss alpine sheep. Specimens were obtained from newborn, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12, 15 and 18 months old female sheep. Direct spondylometry yielded vertebral body heights, widths, and depths and spinal canal size, which were compared to pooled data on human spine growth retrieved from the literature. Sheep spine growth ceases at age 15 to 18 months, which corresponds to a time-lapse model of human growth. Main growth occurs within the first 3 to 6 months of life, as opposed to human spines with maximal growth during the first 4 years and puberty. The relation between sheep and human vertebral shape is continuously changing with growth: at birth, sheep vertebrae are twice as tall, but equally wide and deep. At skeletal maturity, height is 15% to 25% bigger in sheep, but width 15% to 30% and depth 30% to 50% are smaller. The immature sheep spine offers fast effects if growth-modulating interventions are performed within the first 3 to 6 months of age. The differences in vertebral shapes and further distinctions between human and sheep spines such as biomechanics, facet anatomy, and rib cage morphology have to be considered when interpreting results after experimental surgery.

  7. Subsequent, unplanned spine surgery and life survival of patients operated for neuropathic spine deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Marc A; Lai, Sue-Min; Burton, Douglas C

    2012-01-01

    Retrospective study of a prospectively assembled cohort. To characterize the survival from subsequent spine surgery and the life survival of patients treated surgically for severe spinal deformity due to neuropathic diseases. Survivorship analysis is widely used to study the natural history of disease processes and of treatments provided, but has very seldom been used to study patients' course after surgery for spinal deformity associated with neuropathic diseases. Patients with neuropathic spinal deformity treated with primary posterior instrumentation and arthrodesis from 1989 through 2002 were identified and studied by review of charts and radiographs, and by mail survey. Subsequent spine surgery and death events, and the time interval from surgery were identified. Fifteen variables possibly influencing survivorship were studied. There were no perioperative deaths, spinal cord injuries, or acute wound infections in the 117 eligible patients. Reoperation and life survival statuses were available for 110 patients (94%) at an average follow-up of 11.89 years (±5.3; range: 2-20.9 yr). Twelve patients (11%) had subsequent spine surgery. Survival from subsequent spine surgery was 91% at 5 years, 90% at 10 and 15 years, and 72% at 20 years. Proximal fixation problems occurred in 4 patients. Twenty-two patients (20%) had died from 4 to 20 years postoperative. Life survival was 98% at 5 years, 89% at 10 years, 81% at 15 years, and 56% at 20 years. The only variable associated with life survival was the occurrence of one or more perioperative complications, P = 0.0032. The younger half of the series at operation (spine operation was similar to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis series studied in the same manner. Life survival decline began at 4 years postoperative and was significantly associated with the occurrence of one or more perioperative complications. Even after successful spine deformity surgery, this population's health status is often precarious.

  8. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Ketovuori, Mikko Mr.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about a multidisciplinary R&D project in which a Canadian Learning Through The Arts (LTTA) program was imported to Finland in 2003–2004. Cultural differences in arts education in Finland and Canada are discussed. While Finland has a national school curriculum with all the arts included. Canada relies more on partnerships to ensure arts education for children in the schools. Despite the fact that Canadian learning methods appeared to be quite similar to the ones Finnish teacher...

  9. Canadian Multiculturalism, Same as it ever Was?

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen Hoyos

    2014-01-01

    After the Second World War ended, Canada was no longer mainly composed of its two dominant ethnocultural groups, French and English, but rather constituted by polyethnicity; meaning, Canadian culture was made up of many different ethnic groups. Since then, Canada has actively embraced multiculturalism and on 12 July 1988, the House of Commons passed Bill C-93, ‘An Act for the preservation and enhancement of multiculturalism in Canada’. The Canadian multicultural experience has been much portr...

  10. Occupational spine biomechanics: a journey to the spinal frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Jim R

    2008-12-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to the variety of research areas focusing on spine biomechanics as it pertains to understanding and preventing low back injuries in the workplace. While certainly not a comprehensive review of the literature, some of the earliest, pioneering studies are presented from the following areas: (1) spine tissue testing, (2) estimating spine tissue loading, (3) manual materials handling studies, (4) prolonged or repetitive spine loading, (5) ergonomic assessment tools, (6) sudden/unexpected loading and (7) spine stability. Where possible, some of our own research contributions are integrated into the relevant sections. This paper concludes with a suggestion of some future research directions to continue and enhance the important impact of occupational spine biomechanics.

  11. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  12. EphB/syndecan-2 signaling in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethell, I M; Irie, F; Kalo, M S

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported that the cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-2 can induce dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons. We demonstrate here that the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylates syndecan-2 and that this phosphorylation event is crucial for syndecan-2 clustering and spine...... formation. Syndecan-2 is tyrosine phosphorylated and forms a complex with EphB2 in mouse brain. Dominant-negative inhibition of endogenous EphB receptor activities blocks clustering of endogenous syndecan-2 and normal spine formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. This is the first evidence that Eph...... receptors play a physiological role in dendritic spine morphogenesis. Our observations suggest that spine morphogenesis is triggered by the activation of Eph receptors, which causes tyrosine phosphorylation of target molecules, such as syndecan-2, in presumptive spines....

  13. High Grade Infective Spondylolisthesis of Cervical Spine Secondary to Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgaonkar, Shailesh; Shah, Kunal; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2015-12-01

    Spondylolisthesis coexisting with tuberculosis is rarely reported. There is a controversy whether spondylolisthesis coexists or precedes tuberculosis. Few cases of pathological spondylolisthesis secondary to tuberculous spondylodiscitis have been reported in the lumbar and lumbosacral spine. All cases in the literature presented as anterolisthesis, except one which presented as posterolisthesis of lumbar spine. Spondylolisthesis in the cervical spine is mainly degenerative and traumatic. Spondylolisthesis due to tuberculosis is not reported in the lower cervical spine. The exact mechanism of such an occurrence of spondylolisthesis with tuberculosis is sparsely reported in the literature and inadequately understood. We report a rare case of high grade pathological posterolisthesis of the lower cervical spine due to tubercular spondylodiscitis in a 67-year-old woman managed surgically with a three-year follow-up period. This case highlights the varied and complex presentation of tuberculosis of the lower cervical spine and gives insight into its pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

  14. [Accident analytics for structural traumas of the cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, E; Elbel, M; Schultheiss, M; Kettler, A; Kinzl, L; Kramer, M

    2004-12-01

    The differentiation between degenerative syndromes of the cervical spine and post-traumatic symptoms requires accident analysis. Experiments with human subjects yield data only in the low-energy range, and there are still no accident analyses of structural traumas of the cervical spine. From 1 January 2000 to 30 April 2002, 15 patients with structural injuries to the cervical spine due to car accidents were treated in the Department of Trauma Surgery of the University of Ulm. In 11 of these cases, the DEKRA Ulm completed an appraisal of the accident process.With lateral impacts, structural injuries to the cervical spine can occur even at speeds of only ca 10 km/h. Injuries to the alar ligaments are produced by frontal collisions with substantial differences in speed. Data from accident analysis of structural injuries to the cervical spine must be taken into consideration in causality examinations of distortions of the cervical spine.

  15. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars.

  16. Anatomy of large animal spines and its comparison to the human spine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Yi-Fei

    2010-01-01

    Animal models have been commonly used for in vivo and in vitro spinal research. However, the extent to which animal models resemble the human spine has not been well known. We conducted a systematic review to compare the morphometric features of vertebrae between human and animal species, so as to give some suggestions on how to choose an appropriate animal model in spine research. A literature search of all English language peer-reviewed publications was conducted using PubMed, OVID, Springer and Elsevier (Science Direct) for the years 1980-2008. Two reviewers extracted data on the anatomy of large animal spines from the identified articles. Each anatomical study of animals had to include at least three vertebral levels. The anatomical data from all animal studies were compared with the existing data of the human spine in the literature. Of the papers retrieved, seven were included in the review. The animals in the studies involved baboon, sheep, porcine, calf and deer. Distinct anatomical differences of vertebrae were found between the human and each large animal spine. In cervical region, spines of the baboon and human are more similar as compared to other animals. In thoracic and lumbar regions, the mean pedicle height of all animals was greater than the human pedicles. There was similar mean pedicle width between animal and the human specimens, except in thoracic segments of sheep. The human spinal canal was wider and deeper in the anteroposterior plane than any of the animals. The mean human vertebral body width and depth were greater than that of the animals except in upper thoracic segments of the deer. However, the mean vertebral body height was lower than that of all animals. This paper provides a comprehensive review to compare vertebrae geometries of experimental animal models to the human vertebrae, and will help for choosing animal model in vivo and in vitro spine research. When the animal selected for spine research, the structural similarities and

  17. The Influence of Canadian Intellectuals’ Ideological Views on the Political Culture in Canada at the Beginning of the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOKOV I.A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the political views of Canadian intellectuals which had influence on the formation of Canadian political culture at the turn of the 20th century. The author confirms that the Canadian intellectual thought was the main ideological factor in the conditions of the formation of Canadian statehood, undeveloped party and political system, the lack of deep traditions of the parliamentary system, insufficient political practice and the lack of distinct ideology of basic political parties in the process of forming the Canadian nation. On the basis of studied Canadian sources, the author makes conclusion that the most of Canadian intellectuals did not participate directly in the political process and they considered themselves its bystanders. Besides, the Canadian intellectuals promoted the British political culture of the Victorian epoch. Although all of them were familiar wih the British socialistic thought – Fabianism, they insisted that the social transformation in the Canadian society is possible only through the improvement of moral system, the education of lower social classes and the maintenance of elite monarch traditions. The American influence on Canadian political culture was peripheral at the beginning of the 20th century. The ideas of the Chicago Sociological School and the European continental thought were not used. The Victorian intellectuals understood their time as the social crisis and their political discussions were often devoted to the problems of imperialism, religion, education and feminism. They undoubtedly influenced the Canadian political elite in the matter of further development of the Canadian nation and state, but they expressed their own unique views on the contemporary society in academic press and in elite clubs discussions. They did not share the opinion of publicity about contemporary social processes, because their position was far from the direct party policy. Though some of them participated as

  18. Information society studies

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Alistair S

    2013-01-01

    We are often told that we are ""living in an information society"" or that we are ""information workers."" But what exactly do these claims mean, and how might they be verified? In this important methodological study, Alistair S. Duff cuts through the rhetoric to get to the bottom of the ""information society thesis."" Wide-ranging in coverage, this study will be of interest to scholars in information science, communication and media studies and social theory. It is a key text for the newly-unified specialism of information society studies, and an indispensable guide to the future of this disc

  19. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  20. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    ABSTRACT This study evaluated the relationship between 3D geometry of the lumbar spine, under different loading conditions and positions, and the...results of this study will allow researchers to better relate the complex 3D geometry of the lumbar spine in subjects with different levels of lumbar...posture in active-duty Marines. Accepted. Spine. § Books or other non-periodical, one-time publications. § Nothing to report § Other publications

  1. Paravertebral muscles in disease of the cervical spine.

    OpenAIRE

    Wharton, S. B.; Chan, K. K.; Pickard, J D; Anderson, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cervical spine disorders are common in the older population. The paravertebral muscles are essential to the support and stabilisation of the cervical spine but have been little studied. The aim was to determine whether pathological changes develop in these muscles in patients with severe cervical spine disease, which, if present, might contribute to the pathogenesis and symptomatology of their disorder. METHODS: Open biopsies of superficial and deep paravertebral muscles were obta...

  2. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that the...

  3. Baastrup?s disease (kissing spines syndrome): a pictorial review

    OpenAIRE

    Filippiadis, Dimitrios K.; Mazioti, Argyro; Argentos, S.; Anselmetti, G.; Papakonstantinou, O.; Kelekis, N.; Kelekis, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Excessive lordosis is a common finding and may produce mechanical pressure that causes repetitive strains of the interspinous ligament with subsequent degeneration and collapse. Baastrup?s disease (kissing spine syndrome) is a term referring to close approximation of adjacent spinous processes due to degenerative changes of the spine. Baastrup?s disease usually affects the lumbar spine, with L4-L5 being the most commonly affected level. There is higher occurrence at ages over 70 and ...

  4. Ethnocultural Groups--The Making of Canada: Economic Contributions to Canadian Life. Report 2: Seven Successful Small Business Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, S.; And Others

    Immigrants and refugees come to Canada for many reasons and are often risk-takers. Some ethnic groups follow identifiable patterns of distinctive economic development, while others meld and blend into Canadian society so that no discernible pattern can be identified. This publication provides an overview of the contributions made by seven…

  5. Valie EXPORT Society. Overlok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Valie EXPORT Society asutasid 23. okt. 1999. a. Frankfurdis Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit ja Mari Laanemets, kui olid külastanud austria naiskunstniku Valie Exporti näitust. Rühmituse aktsioonide kirjeldus

  6. Valie EXPORT Society Rooseumis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Malmös Rooseumi Kaasaegse Kunsti Keskuses näitus "Baltic Babel". Projekt koosneb Läänemeremaade linnades tegutsevate innovatiivsete gruppide aktsioonidest. Kuraator Charles Esche. Esinejatest (Eestist Valie Export Society: Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit)

  7. American Geriatrics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Social Media Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Social Media Bar Right Menu Annual Meeting Donate to our Foundation Contact Us American Geriatrics Society 40 Fulton St., 18th Floor New York, NY ...

  8. The global knowledge society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fedoroff, Nina V

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge societies rest on a foundation of educational and research excellence. The Internet, advances in communications technology, and the rapidly expanding global fiber optic network are necessary, but not sufficient...

  9. American Rhinologic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6th Bulgarian-Italian Rhinology Friendship Meeting Sofia Hotel Balkan, Sofia, Bulgaria, December 1-3, 2017 9.17. ... you there! Terms of Use | Site Map © 2011 American Rhinologic Society All Rights Reserved

  10. Producing Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Liv Egholm; Hein Jessen, Mathias

    Since the beginning of the 1990’s, civil society has attracted both scholarly and political interest as the ‘third sphere’ outside the state and the market not only a normatively privileged site of communication and ‘the public sphere’, but also as a resource for democratization processes......’ and as such dominates our way of thinking about civil society. Yet, this view hinders the understanding of how civil society is not a pre-existing or given sphere, but a sphere which is constantly produced both discursively, conceptually and practically. Through two examples; 1,the case of philanthropy in the beginning...... of the century. 2, the laws and strategies of implementing regarding the regulation of civil societal institutions (folkeoplysningsloven) since the 1970’s this paper shows how civil society in 20th century Denmark was produced both conceptually and practically and how this entailed a specific vision and version...

  11. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good News About Echo Marketing and Promotional Opportunities Social Media Mobile Resources About ▼ About ASE Board of Directors Committees and Councils Industry Roundtable Partners Contact Us American Society of Echocardiography 2100 Gateway Centre Boulevard, Ste. 310 ...

  12. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  13. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have you met? d Our Healthcare Voice National Multiple Sclerosis Society International Progressive MS Alliance live from Paris ... Persist for Years October 25, 2017 View All Multiple Sclerosis News & Press View All Clinical Trial Alerts Every ...

  14. Transnationalising Civil Society?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    The paper takes a transnational perspective on developing an analytical framework for understanding how transnationalism interacts with civil society and how immigrant organisations use transnational strategies to challenge the pre-given positions of immigrants within given integration...

  15. Changing Anthropology, Changing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University. PMID:20027281

  16. American Society of Hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share ... youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda for Hematology Research Sickle Cell Priorities Lymphoma Roadmap Moonshot Initiative ...

  17. The Tranquebarian Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niklas Thode

    2015-01-01

    of this development was the establishment of the Tranquebarian Society, the third learned society east of the Cape of Good Hope. The article examines the unique assemblage of scientific networks, people, instruments, institutions, and ideas of local and global origin that converged in Tranquebar, and it investigates...... the fusion of local problems and radical ideas of enlightenment, education, and improvement that united government, mission, and merchants in Tranquebar in the quest for ‘useful knowledge’....

  18. Publication patterns of comparative effectiveness research in spine neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Tsai, Chia-Lin; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Ma, Hsin-I

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate publication patterns for comparative effectiveness research (CER) on spine neurosurgery. The authors searched the PubMed database for the period 1980-2012 using the key words "cost analysis," "utility analysis," "cost-utility," "outcomes research," "practical clinical research," "comparator trial," and "comparative effectiveness research," linked with "effectiveness" and "spine neurosurgery." From 1980 through April 9, 2012, neurosurgery CER publications accounted for 1.38% of worldwide CER publications (8657 of 626,330 articles). Spine neurosurgery CER accounted for only 0.02%, with 132 articles. The journal with the greatest number of publications on spine neurosurgery CER was Spine, followed by the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine. The average annual publication rate for spine neurosurgery CER during this period was 4 articles (132 articles in 33 years), with 68 (51.52%) of the 132 articles being published within the past 5 years and a rising trend beginning in 2008. The top 3 contributing countries were the US, Turkey, and Japan, with 68, 8, and 7 articles, respectively. Only 8 regular articles (6.06%) focused on cost analysis. There is a paucity of publications using CER methodology in spine neurosurgery. Few articles address the issue of cost analysis. The promotion of continuing medical education in CER methodology is warranted. Further investigations to address cost analysis in comparative effectiveness studies of spine neurosurgery are crucial to expand the application of CER in public health.

  19. Variation in armour of three-spine stickleback

    OpenAIRE

    Wiig, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    The three-spine stickleback is an adaptable fish with variation in morphology and behaviour, inhabiting saltwater, brackish water and fresh water. It is armoured with 30-35 bone plates along its lateral line. In addition, it is equipped with three spines on its back and two pelvic spine. These features constitute an excellent anti-predator defence system. Yet, there is a strong selection for reduction in armour of three-spine stickleback in freshwater stickleback. In this project, the bone st...

  20. Violence on canadian television networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Guy

    2004-02-01

    Over the past twenty years, the question of the effects of violence on television has figured prominently in public opinion and hundreds of studies have been devoted to this subject. Many researchers have determined that violence has a negative impact on behavior. The public, broadcasters and political figures all support the idea of reducing the total amount of violence on television - in particular in shows for children. A thousand programs aired between 1993 and 2001 on major non-specialty television networks in Canada were analyzed: TVA, TQS, as well as CTV and Global, private French and English networks, as well as the English CBC Radio and French Radio-Canada for the public networks. The methodology consists of a classic analysis of content where an act of violence constitutes a unit of analysis. The data collected revealed that the amount of violence has increased regularly since 1993 despite the stated willingness on the part of broadcasters to produce programs with less violence. The total number of violent acts, as well as the number of violent acts per hour, is increasing. Private networks deliver three times more violence than public networks. Researchers have also noted that a high proportion of violence occurs in programs airing before 21:00 hours, thereby exposing a large number of children to this violence. Psychological violence is taking on a more significant role in Canadian Television.

  1. The Canadian mobile satellite program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, P. M.; Breithaupt, R. W.; McNally, J. L.

    The progressions and selection of design features for the Canadian segment of a mobile satellite (MSAT) communications system are traced. The feasibility study for a satellite-based public and government mobile communications service to underserved areas was carried out between 1980-82. The results covered the market demand, commercial viability, user cost-benefit, and spacecraft concepts. A subsequent 2 yr study was initiated to proceed with project definition. A market of 1.1 million users was identified in all of Canada, with MSAT replacing other systems for 50 percent of the market. Operations would be in the 806-890 MHz range. Traffic will be routed through gateway links functioning in the 8/7 GHz SHF band while the mobile units will be connected through an 821-825 MHz up link and an 866-870 MH downlink. New technologies will be needed for a central control station, the gateway stations, and the base stations for the mobile radio service, the mobile user terminals, and data collection platforms.

  2. Medical cannabis - the Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gordon D; Bober, Sara L; Mindra, Sean; Moreau, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been widely used as a medicinal agent in Eastern medicine with earliest evidence in ancient Chinese practice dating back to 2700 BC. Over time, the use of medical cannabis has been increasingly adopted by Western medicine and is thus a rapidly emerging field that all pain physicians need to be aware of. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a significant and dose-dependent relationship between neuropathic pain relief and tetrahydrocannabinol - the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. Despite this, barriers exist to use from both the patient perspective (cost, addiction, social stigma, lack of understanding regarding safe administration) and the physician perspective (credibility, criminality, clinical evidence, patient addiction, and policy from the governing medical colleges). This review addresses these barriers and draws attention to key concerns in the Canadian medical system, providing updated treatment approaches to help clinicians work with their patients in achieving adequate pain control, reduced narcotic medication use, and enhanced quality of life. This review also includes case studies demonstrating the use of medical marijuana by patients with neuropathic low-back pain, neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. While significant preclinical data have demonstrated the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating pain in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, and cancer, further studies are needed with randomized controlled trials and larger study populations to identify the specific strains and concentrations that will work best with selected cohorts.

  3. Physician assisted suicide: the great Canadian euthanasia debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    A substantial majority of Canadians favours a change to the Criminal Code which would make it legally permissible, subject to careful regulation, for patients suffering from incurable physical illness to opt for either physician assisted suicide (PAS) or voluntary active euthanasia (VAE). This discussion will focus primarily on the arguments for and against decriminalizing physician assisted suicide, with special reference to the British Columbia case of Lee Carter vs. Attorney General of Canada. The aim is to critique the arguments and at the same time to describe the contours of the current Canadian debate. Both ethical and legal issues raised by PAS are clarified. Empirical evidence available from jurisdictions which have followed the regulatory route is presented and its relevance to the slippery slope argument is considered. The arguments presented by both sides are critically assessed. The conclusion suggested is that evidence of harms to vulnerable individuals or to society, consequent upon legalization, is insufficient to support continued denial of freedom to those competent adults who seek physician assistance in hastening their death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diversity Management in the Canadian Workplace: Towards an Antiracism Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanmala Hiranandani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most diversity management programs in Canada maintain that enhancing workforce diversity is of tremendous significance for business organizations in today’s competitive global urban markets. Since well-meaning diversity management initiatives have been largely ineffective thus far in dealing with workplace discrimination and racism in the Canadian workplace, this paper underscores the need to decenter the focus of diversity management from a business imperative to an antidiscrimination and social justice imperative. Within this latter perspective, the paper examines the strengths and limitations of the antiracism approach that has been implemented in various developed countries in recent years. The antiracism approach is an action-oriented strategy for institutional and systemic change that has at its core the interrogation of privilege, power disparities, and other forms of inequity within the organization. Drawing from the lessons of various initiatives that have utilized this approach, the present paper emphasizes the need for a nuanced antiracism approach in the multicultural Canadian society if diversity management is to attain its goal of greater inclusion of all individuals in informal networks and formal organizational programs.

  5. Time Series EROI for Canadian Oil and Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Poisson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern economies are dependent on fossil energy, yet as conventional resources are depleted, an increasing fraction of that energy is coming from unconventional resources such as tar sands. These resources usually require more energy for extraction and upgrading, leaving a smaller fraction available to society, and at a higher cost. Here we present a calculation of the energy return on investment (EROI for all Canadian oil and gas (including tar sands over the period 1990–2008, and also for tar sands alone (1994–2008. We used energy production and energy use data from Statistics Canada’s Material and Energy Flow Accounts (MEFA. We were able to quantify both direct and indirect energy use, the latter from Statistics Canada’s energy input-output model. We found that since the mid-1990s, total energy used (invested in the Canadian oil and gas sector increased about 63%, while the energy production (return increased only 18%, resulting in a decrease in total EROI from roughly 16:1 to 11:1. We also found (although with less certainty that the EROI for tar sands alone has fluctuated around 4:1 since 1994, with only a slight increasing trend. Finally, we analyzed underlying factors possibly influencing these trends.

  6. The Society for Scandinavian Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]......The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]...

  7. The Health Services Use Among Older Canadians in Rural and Urban Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Conde; James Ted McDonald

    2007-01-01

    Even though universal health care is one of the fundamental pillars of Canadian society, the rising cost of all services has resulted in the relocation and redistribution of funding and services between rural and urban areas. While most econometric analyses of health service use in Canada include broad controls by province and rural/urban status, there has been relatively little econometric work that has focused specifically on geographical variation in health service use. Using the 2002-03 w...

  8. Theorizing Gender in Contemporary Canadian Citizenship: Lessons Learned from the CBC's "Greatest Canadian" Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubas, Kaela

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I have used the 2004 Greatest Canadian contest as an example of media's educational function. Contrary to mainstream discourse of gender-neutral citizenship, this contest reiterates a notion of Canadian citizenship as masculinized, classed, and raced. Gramsci's concepts of "hegemony," "ideology", and…

  9. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Niels Cornelisse

    Full Text Available Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action potentials (AP are almost never measured due to technical limitations, but they could be crucial for synaptic plasticity. With high-speed, precisely-targeted, two-photon point imaging we measured both calcium rise and decay kinetics in spines and secondary dendrites in neocortical pyramidal neurons. We found that both rise and decay kinetics of changes in calcium-indicator fluorescence are about twice as fast in spines. During AP trains, spine calcium changes follow each AP, but not in dendrites. Apart from the higher surface-to-volume ratio (SVR, we observed that neocortical dendritic spines have a markedly smaller endogenous buffer capacity with respect to their parental dendrites. Calcium influx time course and calcium extrusion rate were both in the same range for spines and dendrites when fitted with a dynamic multi-compartment model that included calcium binding kinetics and diffusion. In a subsequent analysis we used this model to investigate which parameters are critical determinants in spine calcium dynamics. The model confirmed the experimental findings: a higher SVR is not sufficient by itself to explain the faster rise time kinetics in spines, but only when paired with a lower buffer capacity in spines. Simulations at zero calcium-dye conditions show that calmodulin is more efficiently activated in spines, which indicates that spine morphology and buffering conditions in neocortical spines favor synaptic plasticity.

  10. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelisse, L Niels; van Elburg, Ronald A J; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Yuste, Rafael; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2007-10-24

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action potentials (AP) are almost never measured due to technical limitations, but they could be crucial for synaptic plasticity. With high-speed, precisely-targeted, two-photon point imaging we measured both calcium rise and decay kinetics in spines and secondary dendrites in neocortical pyramidal neurons. We found that both rise and decay kinetics of changes in calcium-indicator fluorescence are about twice as fast in spines. During AP trains, spine calcium changes follow each AP, but not in dendrites. Apart from the higher surface-to-volume ratio (SVR), we observed that neocortical dendritic spines have a markedly smaller endogenous buffer capacity with respect to their parental dendrites. Calcium influx time course and calcium extrusion rate were both in the same range for spines and dendrites when fitted with a dynamic multi-compartment model that included calcium binding kinetics and diffusion. In a subsequent analysis we used this model to investigate which parameters are critical determinants in spine calcium dynamics. The model confirmed the experimental findings: a higher SVR is not sufficient by itself to explain the faster rise time kinetics in spines, but only when paired with a lower buffer capacity in spines. Simulations at zero calcium-dye conditions show that calmodulin is more efficiently activated in spines, which indicates that spine morphology and buffering conditions in neocortical spines favor synaptic plasticity.

  11. Lumbar spine degenerative disease : effect on bone mineral density measurements in the lumbar spine and femoral neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Koplyay, Peter; Jeffrey Carr, J.; Lenchik, Leon [Wake Forest Univ. School of Medicine, Winston-salem (United States)

    2001-04-01

    To determine the effect of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine on bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. We reviewed radiographs and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans of the lumbar spine and hip in 305 Caucasian women with suspected osteoporosis. One hundred and eight-six patient remained after excluding women less than 40 years of age (n=18) and those with hip osteoarthritis, scoliosis, lumbar spine fractures, lumbar spinal instrumentation, hip arthroplasty, metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis, or medications known to influence bone metabolism (n=101). On the basis of lumbar spine radiographs, those with absent/mild degenerative disease were assigned to the control group and those with moderate/severe degenerative disease to the degenerative group. Spine radiographs were evaluated for degenerative disease by two radiologists working independently; discrepant evaluations were resolved by consensus. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density was compared between the two groups. Forty-five (24%) of 186 women were assigned to the degenerative group and 141 (76%) to the control group. IN the degenerative group, mean bone mineral density measured 1.075g/cm? in the spine and 0.788g/cm{sup 2} in the femoral neck, while for controls the corresponding figures were 0.989g/cm{sup 2} and 0.765g/cm{sup 2}. Adjusted for age, weight and height by means of analysis of variance, degenerative disease of the lumbar spine was a significant predictor of increased bone mineral density in the spine (p=0.0001) and femoral neck (p=0.0287). Our results indicate a positive relationship between degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and suggest that degenerative disease in that region, which leads to an intrinsic increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck, may be a good negative predictor of osteoporotic hip fractures.

  12. Percutaneous spine injection: considerations for improving treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, In Sook; Choi, Jung Ah; Yoon, Chang Jin; Hwang, Sung Il; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Young Hwan; Hong, Sung Hwan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    To discuss the causes of treatment failure in percutaneous spine injections for low back pain or radiculopathy by analyzing patients who have experienced negative treatment effect on their first visit and a positive treatment effect on their second visit. The authors reviewed the cases of 24 patients who visited the pain intervention outpatient department in our hospital due to back pain or radiculopathy. All patients reviewed experienced a negative treatment effect following their first spine injection, but a positive treatment effect following the second injection. The dates of the cases range from June 2003 to May 2004. Two radiologists analyzed the possible causes of the negative treatment effect following the first injection therapies by considering clinical aspects as well as reviewing radiological images. The most common condition was the presence of the change in the level of the second selective nerve root block (n=13). In seven cases, the methods for administering the injections were changed to facet block (n=2), midline epidural block (n=1), selective nerve root block (n=3) and caudal epidural block (n=1). In four cases, there were no changes in the methods for administering the injections nor were there any changes in the level of the selective nerve root block between first and second visit. In those cases, after reviewing spot radiographs performed during injection, we attributed the causes of failure of injection therapy to an inappropriate distribution of drugs. We can improve the effect of percutaneous spine injections for low back pain or radioculopathy by determining the exact level of perineural root block, trying alternative methods, and insuring a good distribution of the injected drugs.

  13. Toward laboratory torsional spine magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesny, David L.; Orange, N. Brice; Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Valletta, David R.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental energy conversion mechanism in nature. Major attempts to study this process in controlled settings on Earth have largely been limited to reproducing approximately two-dimensional (2-D) reconnection dynamics. Other experiments describing reconnection near three-dimensional null points are non-driven, and do not induce any of the 3-D modes of spine fan, torsional fan or torsional spine reconnection. In order to study these important 3-D modes observed in astrophysical plasmas (e.g. the solar atmosphere), laboratory set-ups must be designed to induce driven reconnection about an isolated magnetic null point. As such, we consider the limited range of fundamental resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and kinetic parameters of dynamic laboratory plasmas that are necessary to induce the torsional spine reconnection (TSR) mode characterized by a driven rotational slippage of field lines - a feature that has yet to be achieved in operational laboratory magnetic reconnection experiments. Leveraging existing reconnection models, we show that within a 3$ apparatus, TSR can be achieved in dense plasma regimes ( 24~\\text{m}-3$ ) in magnetic fields of -1~\\text{T}$ . We find that MHD and kinetic parameters predict reconnection in thin current sheets on time scales of . While these plasma regimes may not explicitly replicate the plasma parameters of observed astrophysical phenomena, studying the dynamics of the TSR mode within achievable set-ups signifies an important step in understanding the fundamentals of driven 3-D magnetic reconnection and the self-organization of current sheets. Explicit control of this reconnection mode may have implications for understanding particle acceleration in astrophysical environments, and may even have practical applications to fields such as spacecraft propulsion.

  14. Augmented reality visualization for thoracoscopic spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Frank; Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Heining, Sandro; Euler, Ekkehard; Schneberger, Marc; Zuerl, Konrad; Mutschler, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an augmented reality (AR) image guidance system in which information derived from medical images is overlaid onto a video view of the patient. The centerpiece of the system is a head-mounted display custom fitted with two miniature color video cameras that capture the stereo view of the scene. Medical graphics is overlaid onto the video view and appears firmly anchored in the scene, without perceivable time lag or jitter. We have been testing the system for different clinical applications. In this paper we discuss minimally invasive thoracoscopic spine surgery as a promising new orthopedic application. In the standard approach, the thoracoscope - a rigid endoscope - provides visual feedback for the minimally invasive procedure of removing a damaged disc and fusing the two neighboring vertebrae. The navigation challenges are twofold. From a global perspective, the correct vertebrae on the spine have to be located with the inserted instruments. From a local perspective, the actual spine procedure has to be performed precisely. Visual feedback from the thoracoscope provides only limited support for both of these tasks. In the augmented reality approach, we give the surgeon additional anatomical context for the navigation. Before the surgery, we derive a model of the patient's anatomy from a CT scan, and during surgery we track the location of the surgical instruments in relation to patient and model. With this information, we can help the surgeon in both the global and local navigation, providing a global map and 3D information beyond the local 2D view of the thoracoscope. Augmented reality visualization is a particularly intuitive method of displaying this information to the surgeon. To adapt our augmented reality system to this application, we had to add an external optical tracking system, which works now in combination with our head-mounted tracking camera. The surgeon's feedback to the initial phantom experiments is very positive.

  15. Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery: Pseudomeningocoele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailon, Tamir; Smith, Justin S; Nassr, Ahmad; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Hilibrand, Alan S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Chou, Dean; Sasso, Rick C; Traynelis, Vincent C; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Buser, Zorica; Lord, Elizabeth L; Massicotte, Eric M; Sebastian, Arjun S; Than, Khoi D; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Riew, K Daniel; Shaffrey, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Rare complications of cervical spine surgery are inherently difficult to investigate. Pseudomeningocoele (PMC), an abnormal collection of cerebrospinal fluid that communicates with the subarachnoid space, is one such complication. In order to evaluate and better understand the incidence, presentation, treatment, and outcome of PMC following cervical spine surgery, we conducted a multicenter study to pool our collective experience. This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of patients who underwent cervical spine surgery at any level(s) from C2 to C7, inclusive; were over 18 years of age; and experienced a postoperative PMC. Thirteen patients (0.08%) developed a postoperative PMC, 6 (46.2%) of whom were female. They had an average age of 48.2 years and stayed in hospital a mean of 11.2 days. Three patients were current smokers, 3 previous smokers, 5 had never smoked, and 2 had unknown smoking status. The majority, 10 (76.9%), were associated with posterior surgery, whereas 3 (23.1%) occurred after an anterior procedure. Myelopathy was the most common indication for operations that were complicated by PMC (46%). Seven patients (53%) required a surgical procedure to address the PMC, whereas the remaining 6 were treated conservatively. All PMCs ultimately resolved or were successfully treated with no residual effects. PMC is a rare complication of cervical surgery with an incidence of less than 0.1%. They prolong hospital stay. PMCs occurred more frequently in association with posterior approaches. Approximately half of PMCs required surgery and all ultimately resolved without residual neurologic or other long-term effects.

  16. Improvement in Scoliosis Top View: Evaluation of Vertebrae Localization in Scoliotic Spine-Spine Axial Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Główka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Morphological analysis of the scoliotic spine is based on two-dimensional X-rays: coronal and sagittal. The three-dimensional character of scoliosis has raised the necessity for analyzing scoliosis in three planes. We proposed a new user-friendly method of graphical presentation of the spine in the third plane–the Spine Axial Presentation (SAP. Eighty-five vertebrae of patients with scoliosis were analyzed. Due to different positions during X-rays (standing and computer tomography (CT (supine, the corresponding measurements cannot be directly compared. As a solution, a software creating Digital Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs from CT scans was developed to replace regular X-rays with DRRs. Based on the measurements performed on DRRs, the coordinates of vertebral bodies central points were defined. Next, the geometrical centers of vertebral bodies were determined on CT scans. The reproducibility of measurements was tested with Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC, using p = 0.05. The intra-observer reproducibility and inter-observer reliability for vertebral body central point’s coordinates (x, y, z were high for results obtained based on DRRs and CT scans, as well as for comparison results obtained based on DRR and CT scans. Based on two standard radiographs, it is possible to localize vertebral bodies in 3D space. The position of vertebral bodies can be present in the Spine Axial Presentation.

  17. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the lumbar spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugati, Goutham; Pande, Anil; Jain, Pradeep K.; Symss, Nigel Peter; Ramamurthi, Ravi; Vasudevan, Chakravarthy M.

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign, locally proliferative vascular disorder of non-neoplastic osseous lesions in children and young adults. Seventy-five percent of ABCs occur before the age of 20 years. They comprise 1.4% of all primary bone tumors, and commonly occur in the long bones. Spinal ABCs are much rarer. We present to you one such rare case of ABC involving the lumbar spine which was successfully treated with surgery. The clinical pathological and radiological features are described. The treatment options available are discussed. PMID:26396610

  18. Respiratory Disorders in Complicated Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Pervukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluating the results of respiratory therapy in patients with complicated traumatic injury of the cervical spine.Materials and methods. A retrospective comparative analysis of the clinical course was carried out in 52 patients with complicated traumatic injury of the cervical spine: group A: complete spinal cord injury (ASIA A, 37 patients and group B: incomplete injury (ASIA B, 15 patients. The severity of patients' status on integral scales, parameters of the respiratory pattern and thoracopulmonary compliance, gas composition, and acidbase status of the blood were assessed. Data on patients who required prolonged mechanical ventilation, duration of mechanical ventilation, incidence of nosocomial pneumonia, duration of stay in the ICU, time of hospital treatment, and mortality were included in the analysis. Results. The average APACHE II and SOFA scores were higher in group A patients. The development of the acute respiratory failure required longterm mechanical ventilation (more than 48 hours in 91.4% of group A patients and in 53.3% of group B patients. Ventilatorassociated pneumonia complicated the disease in 81.3% of group A patients and 62.5% of group B patients and was accompanied by sepsis in 25% and 12.5% of cases, respectively. Statistically significant deterioration of biomechanical properties and gas exchange function of the lungs was observed in patients complicated with septic pneumonia.Conclusion. Patients with complicated ASIA A and ASIA B cervical spine injuries demonstrate the presence of respiratory failure of neurogenic origin. In addition, the infectious bronchopulmonary complications aggravated respiratory failure in patients with ASIA A injury in 70.3% versus 33.3% in patients with ASIA B. Developmentof pulmonogenic sepsis led to deterioration of the biomechanical and gas exchange functions of the lungs and increased the likelihood of unfavorable outcome of the disease in 77.8% of cases. The high

  19. Standardizing care for high-risk patients in spine surgery: the Northwestern high-risk spine protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Ryan J; Sugrue, Patrick A; Gould, Robert W; Kallas, Peter G; Schafer, Michael F; Ondra, Stephen L; Koski, Tyler R

    2010-12-01

    Review article of current literature on the preoperative evaluation and postoperative management of patients undergoing high-risk spine operations and a presentation of a multidisciplinary protocol for patients undergoing high-risk spine operation. To provide evidence-based outline of modifiable risk factors and give an example of a multidisciplinary protocol with the goal of improving outcomes. Protocol-based care has been shown to improve outcomes in many areas of medicine. A protocol to evaluate patients undergoing high-risk procedures may ultimately improve patient outcomes. The English language literature to date was reviewed on modifiable risk factors for spine surgery. A multidisciplinary team including hospitalists, critical care physicians, anesthesiologists, and spine surgeons from neurosurgery and orthopedics established an institutional protocol to provide comprehensive care in the pre-, peri-, and postoperative periods for patients undergoing high-risk spine operations. An example of a comprehensive pre-, peri-, and postoperative high-risk spine protocol is provided, with focus on the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing high-risk spine operations and modifiable risk factors. Standardizing preoperative risk assessment may lead to better outcomes after major spine operations. A high-risk spine protocol may help patients by having dedicated physicians in multiple specialties focusing on all aspects of a patients care in the pre-, intra-, and postoperative phases.

  20. Defensive medicine in neurosurgery: the Canadian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy R; Hulou, M Maher; Yan, Sandra C; Cote, David J; Nahed, Brian V; Babu, Maya A; Das, Sunit; Gormley, William B; Rutka, James T; Laws, Edward R; Heary, Robert F

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Recent studies have examined the impact of perceived medicolegal risk and compared how this perception impacts defensive practices within the US. To date, there have been no published data on the practice of defensive medicine among neurosurgeons in Canada. METHODS An online survey containing 44 questions was sent to 170 Canadian neurosurgeons and used to measure Canadian neurosurgeons' perception of liability risk and their practice of defensive medicine. The survey included questions on the following domains: surgeon demographics, patient characteristics, type of physician practice, surgeon liability profile, policy coverage, defensive behaviors, and perception of the liability environment. Survey responses were analyzed and summarized using counts and percentages. RESULTS A total of 75 neurosurgeons completed the survey, achieving an overall response rate of 44.1%. Over one-third (36.5%) of Canadian neurosurgeons paid less than $5000 for insurance annually. The majority (87%) of Canadian neurosurgeons felt confident with their insurance coverage, and 60% reported that they rarely felt the need to practice defensive medicine. The majority of the respondents reported that the perceived medicolegal risk environment has no bearing on their preferred practice location. Only 1 in 5 respondent Canadian neurosurgeons (21.8%) reported viewing patients as a potential lawsuit. Only 4.9% of respondents would have selected a different career based on current medicolegal risk factors, and only 4.1% view the cost of annual malpractice insurance as a major burden. CONCLUSIONS Canadian neurosurgeons perceive their medicolegal risk environment as more favorable and their patients as less likely to sue than their counterparts in the US do. Overall, Canadian neurosurgeons engage in fewer defensive medical behaviors than previously reported in the US.

  1. Numerical evaluation of the correlation between the normal variation in the sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine and the spinal loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Costa, Francesco; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2014-04-01

    We present a numerical approach to reproduce various patterns of spino-pelvic organization. We wanted to predict the spinal loads in two static conditions (standing and holding a weight in the hands) based on parameters describing the shape of the lumbar spine: type following Roussouly classification, sacral slope, apex, inflection point and lumbar lordosis. Four hundred eighty finite element models including trunk muscles and representing the entire range of normal variability were created. The models predicted that, in the case of a moderate external load of 50 N, a lordotic and well balanced spine (e.g., type 3) could reduce the muscle activation in comparison with a more lordotic (type 4) spine, with negligible differences compared to a more straight spine (type 2). However, such a sagittal configuration was not correlated with a minimization of the loading state in the intervertebral discs, especially regarding anteroposterior shear loads. In the standing posture without any additional load, a less lordotic and more vertical spine (e.g., types 1 and 2) was sufficient to ensure a condition of minimal spinal loads. Despite a number of limitations, inverse statics numerical models of spine biomechanics including trunk muscles appear to be a promising tool to fill the knowledge gap between the clinical observations of the correlations between the spino-pelvic organization and the consequent spinal disorders. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Evaluating the effectiveness of teeth and dorsal fin spines for non-lethal age estimation of a tropical reef fish, coral trout Plectropomus leopardus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, J-P A; Frisch, A J; Mutz, S; Ford, B M

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated whether teeth and dorsal fin spines could be used as non-lethal methods of age estimation for a vulnerable and highly valued tropical fisheries species, coral trout Plectropomus leopardus. Age estimation of individuals from 2 to 9 years old revealed that dorsal spines represent an accurate ageing method (90% agreement with otoliths) that was more precise [average per cent error (APE) = 4·1, coefficient of variation (c.v.) = 5·8%] than otoliths (APE = 6·2, c.v. = 8·7%). Of the three methods for age estimation (otoliths, dorsal spines and teeth), spines were the most time and cost efficient. An aquarium-based study also found that removing a dorsal spine or tooth did not affect survivorship or growth of P. leopardus. No annuli were visible in teeth despite taking transverse and longitudinal sections throughout the tooth and trialling several different laboratory methods. Although teeth may not be suitable for estimating age of P. leopardus, dorsal spines appear to be an acceptably accurate, precise and efficient method for non-lethal ageing of individuals from 2 to 9 years old in this tropical species. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  3. Preoperative bracing affects postoperative outcome of posterior spine fusion with instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Mohammad; Sharkey, Melinda; Emans, John; Lenke, Lawrence; Oswald, Timothy; Sucato, Daniel

    2010-09-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: Multicenter, prospective clinical series. OBJECTIVE.: To investigate the effect of preoperative bracing on postoperative outcome of posterior spine fusion with instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Bracing is the standard of care for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis between 25° and 45°, yet the efficacy of bracing is questionable. It is important to evaluate the effect of bracing on outcomes in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis population. METHODS.: We reviewed the outcomes of 281 before surgery braced and 328 before surgery nonbraced patients who underwent posterior spine fusion with instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis before operation and at 2 years after operation using the Scoliosis Research Society instrument (SRS-30) and the Spinal Appearance Questionnaire. RESULTS.: At 2 years after operation, nonbraced patients demonstrated a greater improvement in the SRS-30 Pain domain score (0.23 vs. 0.08, P spine-specific" appearance concerns compared to nonbraced patients. These results suggest a negative impact of preoperative bracing on outcomes after posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This "brace signature" should be taken into account when brace treatment is being considered.

  4. A survey for the need of translational aids among Canadian ophthalmologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednick, Zale D; Cao, Kathy; Braga-Mele, Rosa

    2015-10-01

    To conduct a needs assessment survey of Canadian ophthalmologists to determine whether there is a requirement for translational aids in ophthalmology, and if so, the content, format, and languages to include. Anonymous voluntary online needs assessment questionnaire. A total of 139 ophthalmologists completed the online needs assessment questionnaire. An anonymous voluntary online survey in English and French was distributed to 700 active members (practicing Canadian ophthalmologists) of the Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Data were collected regarding the potential utility of translational aids, as well as the contents and languages that should be included if such aids were to be created. Level of support for translational aids, as well as the contents and languages of potential translational aids, was assessed. The survey response rate was 19.9% (139/700). The majority of the respondents (130/139, 93.5%) have encountered difficulty in communicating with patients because of language barrier, and 88.5% (123/139) would benefit from having a list of ophthalmologic terms translated into several of Canada's most popular languages. The top 10 languages that the respondents indicated would be most beneficial are (in descending order): Chinese, Hindi, Spanish, Punjabi, Italian, Portuguese, Arabic, Greek, Cree, and Vietnamese. The survey responses provided a comprehensive list of the most useful ophthalmologic symptoms, instructions to patients, and diagnoses to be translated. Most respondents (120/139, 86.3%) believed that having basic information pamphlets on specific ocular conditions translated into several languages would benefit their practice; the top 3 conditions were cataract, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Producing the translational aids in both paper and electronic format was found to be the most favoured (89/139, 64.0%). Canadian ophthalmologists believe they would benefit from translational aids. The results of this survey provide a

  5. On-line Ratings of Spine Surgeons: Analysis of 208 surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Omar, Adan; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-11-14

    Observational study OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate the online ratings of spine surgeons and variables that may affect online ratings. Physician review websites (PRW) are rapidly growing for-profit businesses. Most Orthopaedic surgeons are rated on at least one PRW as are other surgical specialists. To date the online ratings of spine surgeons have not been evaluated. Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS) surgeon ratings on 5 physician rating websites were performed in April 2016: 'healthgrade.com', 'vitals.com', 'ratemd.com', 'webmd.com' and 'yelp.com'. Numeric ratings from the PRWs were standardized on a scale of 0 to 100 with a higher score indicating positive ratings. Sex, practice sector (academic or private), specialty (orthopaedics or neurosurgery), geographic location, and years of practice were also collected. 209 spine surgeons were included in our study. 208 of the 209 (99.52%) were rated at least once in one of the five PRWs. Average number of ratings per surgeon was 2.96. Average rating was 80 (40 to 100). There were 4 female (1.92%) and 204 male surgeons (98.1%). There were 121 (58.2%) in academic practice and 87 (41.8%) in private practice. There were 175 (84.1%) orthopaedic surgeons and 33 (15.9%) neurosurgeons. Most of the surgeons were Caucasian 163 (78.4%) and worked in the South and Northeast 135 (64.9%). Those in academic practice had significantly higher ratings (81.6 versus 77.65; p = 0.026). Number of years in practice was significantly associated with ratings (p = 0.0003) with those in practice for 21 or more years having significantly lower ratings. In this first study evaluating the online ratings of spine surgeons, we found that 99.5% of spine surgeon had at least one rating on a PRW. The average score, 80, indicated mostly positive ratings. Being in practice for twenty years or less and being in academic practice significantly associated with higher ratings. 4.

  6. Is a pelvic fracture a predictor for thoracolumbar spine fractures after blunt trauma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Deunk, J.; Brink, M.; Dekker, H.M.; Kool, D.R.; Vugt, A.B. van; Edwards, M.J.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discussion still remains which polytraumatized patients require radiologic thoracolumbar spine (TL spine) screening. The purpose of this study is to determine whether pelvic fractures are associated with TL spine fractures after a blunt trauma. Additionally, the sensitivity of

  7. Advanced information society(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  8. Civil society sphericules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    the organization strategizes about and seeks to articulate amongst Tanzanian youth. Situated in the ‘perverse confluence’ (Dagnino, 2011) between neoliberal and radical democratic agendas in the communicative practices of civil society-driven media platforms, Femina navigates between identities as an NGO, a social...... movement and a media initiative. In the context of the growing literature on social networking sites and their affordances, dynamics and structures, the case of Femina illustrates how a civil society sphericule emerges within the dynamic co-evolution of new and old media platforms. The study is furthermore...... an example of the difficult shift in civil society practice, from service provision to an agenda of public service monitoring, social accountability and community engagement....

  9. Portrayal of youth suicide in canadian news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easson, Amanda; Agarwal, Arnav; Duda, Stephanie; Bennett, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Responsible media reporting of youth suicide may reduce the risk of contagion and increase help-seeking behaviour. Accordingly, we conducted a content analysis of Canadian youth suicide newspaper articles to assess quality and summarize content (themes, age groups, populations and use of scientific evidence). The Canadian Periodical Index Quarterly (CPI.Q) was searched (2008-2012) for full-text Canadian newspaper articles using the keywords "youth" and "suicide." The top five most relevant articles as judged by CPI.Q were selected sequentially for each year (n=25). Quality was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for responsible media reporting. Content analysis was completed in duplicate by two reviewers. All articles addressed youth suicide generally rather than reporting exclusively on a specific death by suicide. Alignment of articles with individual WHO guideline items ranged from 16 to 60%. The most common content theme was prevention (80%). No article was judged to glamorize suicide. Help seeking was addressed in 52% of articles, but only 20% provided information on where to obtain help. Statistics were referenced more frequently than scientific research (76% vs. 28%). Our review suggests that Canadian media presents youth suicide as an issue for which hope and help exist. While the majority of reports aim to educate the public about suicide, increased use of scientific evidence about risk factors and prevention is recommended to facilitate the translation of rigorous scientific knowledge into improved mental health and reduced suicide risk among Canadian youth.

  10. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City...... brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city...

  11. Advanced information society(7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  12. Science and Society Colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Randi, J

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  13. Tophaceous gout of spine causing neural compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo LI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the imaging and clinicopathological features of spinal tophaceous gout in thoracic vertebra and the key points of its diagnosis and treatment, in order to improve the recognition of this disease.  Methods and Results A 36-year-old male was admitted because of weakness and numbness of both lower extremities for 2 months with progressive aggravation for 2 weeks. MRI revealed an extradural mass compressing the spinal cord at T9-10. The tumor was totally removed by piecemeal resection. Histopathological examination of the fresh specimen by light microscope demonstrated brown linear crystals, which showed strong birefringence in polarized light microscope, located in fibrous connective tissue, with local bone invasion and foreign body granuloma. However, histopathological examination of the removed specimen demonstrated white amorphous materials, with scatteredly distributed remaining brown linear crystals, which showed single refraction in polarized light microscope. The final pathological diagnosis was tophaceous gout. The patient was followed-up for 6 months. He stopped taking anti-uric acid drugs by himself and could walk with crutch.  Conclusions Tophaceous gout of spine is caused by uratic deposition in spinal joints, which needs to be differentiated from other intraspinal extradural space-occupying lesions like tuberculosis, central nervous system lymphoma, metastatic tumors and lipomyoma. A definite diagnosis of tophaceous gout of spine requires histopathological examination detecting uratic crystals. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.11.013

  14. [Tumours of the upper cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández García, Borja Jesús; Isla Guerrero, Alberto; Castaño, Ana; Alvarez Ruiz, Fernando; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral tumours arising in the upper cervical spine are rare. We present our experience in managing these neoplasms. We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of patients treated at our institution between January 2000 and June 2011. There were 9 patients with tumours in C1-C2-C3: 2metastases, 3chordomas, 2plasmocytomas, 1chondrosarcoma and 1osteochondroma. All patients complained of neck pain at the time of diagnosis. Three patients underwent an anterior and posterior approach, 3 an exclusively posterior approach and 3 an exclusively anterior surgical approach. Tumour resection was intralesional in 7 cases. Chemo-radiotherapy was used as adjuvant therapy in patients with malignant tumours. Vertebral tumours in the upper cervical spine are usually malignant. Achieving en bloc resection is particularly challenging and is technically unfeasible in many cases. This worsens the prognosis and makes adjuvant treatment very important. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine.

  16. Research of Spined Heat-Exchanging Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akulov Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Work is devoted to a research of spined heat-exchanging pipes that are assumed to use in air-cooler exchangers (ACE. The proposed new geometry of finning allows intensifying heat exchange and improving the efficiency of air coolers. It is caused by the increased area of finned surface with a value of finning ratio (the ratio of the area of the smooth pipe to a finned one to 42.7, while in the commercially available ACE, the figure is 22. Besides, the geometrical arrangement of the pin fins turbulizes the airflow. It should be mentioned that an easier method of manufacturing of heat exchanging pipes is proposed to use, which will reduce their costs. The proposed heat exchange pipes are made by winding cut aluminum strip to the supporting pipe or stretching stamped blanks on it. To increase the efficiency of the heat exchange surface pin fins should be as thin and long as possible; however, their strength should be sufficient for deformation-free operation. Fins should be staggered to maximize the distance between them. Spined heat-exchange pipes are designed to operate in a commercially produced ACE and their service is carried out similarly to commercially produced transversely finned pipes.

  17. Dendritic spine changes associated with normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickstein, D L; Weaver, C M; Luebke, J I; Hof, P R

    2013-10-22

    Given the rapid rate of population aging and the increased incidence of cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases with advanced age, it is important to ascertain the determinants that result in cognitive impairment. It is also important to note that much of the aged population exhibit 'successful' cognitive aging, in which cognitive impairment is minimal. One main goal of normal aging studies is to distinguish the neural changes that occur in unsuccessful (functionally impaired) subjects from those of successful (functionally unimpaired) subjects. In this review, we present some of the structural adaptations that neurons and spines undergo throughout normal aging and discuss their likely contributions to electrophysiological properties and cognition. Structural changes of neurons and dendritic spines during aging, and the functional consequences of such changes, remain poorly understood. Elucidating the structural and functional synaptic age-related changes that lead to cognitive impairment may lead to the development of drug treatments that can restore or protect neural circuits and mediate cognition and successful aging. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Automated 4D analysis of dendritic spine morphology: applications to stimulus-induced spine remodeling and pharmacological rescue in a disease model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swanger Sharon A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Uncovering the mechanisms that regulate dendritic spine morphology has been limited, in part, by the lack of efficient and unbiased methods for analyzing spines. Here, we describe an automated 3D spine morphometry method and its application to spine remodeling in live neurons and spine abnormalities in a disease model. We anticipate that this approach will advance studies of synapse structure and function in brain development, plasticity, and disease.

  19. Relevant Anatomic and Morphological Measurements of the Rat Spine: Considerations for Rodent Models of Human Spine Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumard, Nicolas V; Leung, Jennifer; Gokhale, Akhilesh J; Guarino, Benjamin B; Welch, William C; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-10-15

    Basic science study measuring anatomical features of the cervical and lumbar spine in rat with normalized comparison with the human. The goal of this study is to comprehensively compare the rat and human cervical and lumbar spines to investigate whether the rat is an appropriate model for spine biomechanics investigations. Animal models have been used for a long time to investigate the effects of trauma, degenerative changes, and mechanical loading on the structure and function of the spine. Comparative studies have reported some mechanical properties and/or anatomical dimensions of the spine to be similar between various species. However, those studies are largely limited to the lumbar spine, and a comprehensive comparison of the rat and human spines is lacking. Spines were harvested from male Holtzman rats (n = 5) and were scanned using micro- computed tomography and digitally rendered in 3 dimensions to quantify the spinal bony anatomy, including the lateral width and anteroposterior depth of the vertebra, vertebral body, and spinal canal, as well as the vertebral body and intervertebral disc heights. Normalized measurements of the vertebra, vertebral body, and spinal canal of the rat were computed and compared with corresponding measurements from the literature for the human in the cervical and lumbar spinal regions. The vertebral dimensions of the rat spine vary more between spinal levels than in humans. Rat vertebrae are more slender than human vertebrae, but the width-to-depth axial aspect ratios are very similar in both species in both the cervical and lumbar regions, especially for the spinal canal. The similar spinal morphology in the axial plane between rats and humans supports using the rat spine as an appropriate surrogate for modeling axial and shear loading of the human spine.

  20. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the spine: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Su Ok; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Yi, Jeong Geun [Cheongju St. Mary' s Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-10-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a synovial lesion of joints or tendon sheaths, characterized by villous and nodular overgrowth of the synovial membrane. It commonly occurs in synovial joints of the appendicular skeleton, particularly those of the knee and hip, but rarely affecting those of the spine. We report a case of PVNS of the lumbar spine mimicking epidural mass.

  1. Retropharyngeal cold abscess without Pott's spine | Singh | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In adults these abscesses can develop as a result of vertebral pyogenic osteomyelitis, tube‚rculosis of the spine, or external injuries caused by endoscopes or foreign ... We present a case of tuberculous retropharyngeal abscess in an adult woman without tuberculosis of the cervical spine who was managed surgically by ...

  2. Links between the mechanics of ventilation and spine stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Simon; McGill, Stuart M

    2008-05-01

    Spine stability is ensured through isometric coactivation of the torso muscles; however, these same muscles are used cyclically to assist ventilation. Our objective was to investigate this apparent paradoxical role (isometric contraction for stability or rhythmic contraction for ventilation) of some selected torso muscles that are involved in both ventilation and support of the spine. Eight, asymptomatic, male subjects provided data on low back moments, motion, muscle activation, and hand force. These data were input to an anatomically detailed, biologically driven model from which spine load and a lumbar spine stability index was obtained. Results revealed that subjects entrained their torso stabilization muscles to breathe during demanding ventilation tasks. Increases in lung volume and back extensor muscle activation coincided with increases in spine stability, whereas declines in spine stability were observed during periods of low lung inflation volume and simultaneously low levels of torso muscle activation. As a case study, aberrant ventilation motor patterns (poor muscle entrainment), seen in one subject, compromised spine stability. Those interested in rehabilitation of patients with lung compromise and concomitant back troubles would be assisted with knowledge of the mechanical links between ventilation during tasks that impose spine loading.

  3. Tuberculosis Of The Spine In Childhood In Kano, Nigeria | Adeleke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis is a necrotizing bacterial infection with protean manifestation and wide distribution. The involvement of the spine is also increasing because of the resurgence of tuberculosis and HIV. Objectives: The objective of this study is to clinically evaluate the outcome of tuberculosis of the spine in children ...

  4. Comparative anatomical dimensions of the complete human and porcine spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Iris; Ploegmakers, Joris J. W.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus J.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    New spinal implants and surgical procedures are often tested pre-clinically on human cadaver spines. However, the availability of fresh frozen human cadaver material is very limited and alternative animal spines are more easily available in all desired age groups, and have more uniform geometrical

  5. Computed tomographic evaluation of TB spine in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:- Tuberculosis still remains a major problem in the developing countries. The involvement of the spine is also of increasing importance, because of the resurgence of TB in association with AIDS. This paper is designed to evaluate the applicability of CT in the diagnosis and definition of tuberculosis of the spine ...

  6. Historical contributions from the Harvard system to adult spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J

    2011-10-15

    Literature review. To document the historical contributions from the Harvard Medical School system to the field of adult spine surgery. Despite the fact that significant contributions to the discipline of spinal surgery have derived from the Harvard system, no prior study documents the history of the Harvard spine services in a cohesive narrative. This historical perspective reviews the history of adult spine surgery within the Harvard system and outlines the significant contributions made by orthopedic and neurosurgical practitioners to the field. Literature reviews were performed from historical works, as well as scientific publications to fashion a cohesive review covering the history of spine surgery at Harvard from the early 19th century to the present. The development of the spine surgical services at the three main Harvard hospitals, and significant spine surgical personalities within the system, are discussed, including W. Jason Mixter, MD, Joseph S. Barr Sr., MD, and Marius N. Smith-Petersen, MD. Substantial developments that have arisen from the Harvard teaching hospitals include the recognition of disc herniation as the cause of radicular symptoms in the lower extremities, the description of lumbar discectomy as a surgical treatment for radicular pain, osteotomy for the correction of spinal deformity, and the first attempt to create a systematic algorithm capable of informing treatment for cervical spine trauma. Despite humble beginnings, the surgeons and scientists at Harvard have influenced nearly every facet of spine surgery over the course of the last two centuries.

  7. 49 CFR 572.43 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.43 Section 572.43... Percentile Male § 572.43 Lumbar spine and pelvis. (a) When the pelvis of a fully assembled dummy (SA-SID... section, the peak acceleration at the location of the accelerometer mounted in the pelvis cavity in...

  8. Asymptomatic cervical spine fractures: Current guidelines can fail older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Christopher D; Spilman, Sarah K; King, Bradley D; Sherrill, Joseph E; Pelaez, Carlos A

    2017-07-01

    Older adults represent a growing proportion of trauma patients treated in the United States, and cervical spine (c-spine) fracture is an injury that is increasingly common in this population. Neck pain is a major component of current clinical clearance guidelines, but some older adults with c-spine fractures report no neck pain after injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the frequency at which c-spine fractures were unassociated with neck pain in an aging population. A retrospective review was performed for patients 55 years or older with a c-spine fracture during a 4-year study period. All patients had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15 and were considered asymptomatic if they did not complain of neck pain on initial presentation, denied tenderness to palpation of the c-spine on examination, and were without neurologic deficit. Differences between groups were assessed with Kruskal-Wallis and χ tests. Of 173 patients with c-spine fractures, 36 (21%) were asymptomatic and reported no neck pain on presentation or on examination. The group without neck pain had higher median injury severity scores (15 vs 10; p guidelines, denial of pain may lead to missed injury. We recommend liberal c-spine imaging for older trauma patients with significant mechanism of trauma. Therapeutic study, level III.

  9. Stability of the Scoliotic Spine: Effect of Scoliosis Braces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havey, Robert M; Gavin, Thomas M; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2016-04-01

    Orthotic treatment (braces) for scoliosis is best understood in light of the natural history of idiopathic scoliosis and the mechanics of spine stability. Idiopathic scoliosis is a spinal deformity confronted often by spine surgeons. With prompt recognition, treatment can be effective.

  10. Following Scoliosis Progression in the Spine using Ultrasound Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnama, Ketut; Wilkinson, M.H.F.; Veldhuizen, A.G.; Ooijen, P.M.A. van; Sardjono, T.A.; Lubbers, Jacob; Verkerke, G.J.; Dossel, O; Schlegel, WC

    2009-01-01

    Scoliosis is a three-dimensional deformation of the spine which is characterized by a lateral deviation of the spine and axial rotation of the vertebrae. It must be monitored frequently to be in time to start the treatment in case of progression. Nowadays, X-ray is used, but has a detrimental effect

  11. Cobb Angle Changes in Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The annual incidence of spinal column fracture is 350 per million populations. with Motor vehicular accident being the major single cause of spine injuries. The victims are predominantly young and male. The aim of this study to evaluate the clinical outcome of conservative treatment of closed thoracic and lumbar spine ...

  12. Audit of blood transfusion practice during anaesthesia for spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood loss during spine surgery is often considerable, necessitating blood transfusion. The elective nature and other peculiarities of most spine surgeries, however, make them amenable to several blood conservation techniques, such that reduction in allogeneic blood transfusion is considered high priority in ...

  13. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  14. Upper spine morphology in hypophosphatemic rickets and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Sonnesen, Liselotte; Beck-Nielsen, Signe S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe upper spine morphology in adult patients with hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) compared with controls to assess differences in spine morphology in terms of severity of skeletal impact and to study associations between spine morphology...... and craniofacial morphology. MATERIAL/METHODS: The study population comprised 36 HR patients and 49 controls. The atlas and axis dimensions were measured on cephalograms, and the differences between the groups were estimated by regression analysis. The upper spine morphology was visually assessed to estimate...... and the axis and the prevalence of the FUS were increased in HR patients compared with controls. Upper spine dimensions were associated with craniofacial dimensions, primarily in relation to the posterior cranial fossa....

  15. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the in uence of dened geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilizing ve parametrized musculoskeletal lumbar spine...... models for four different postures. The in uence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine were studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force...... were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most in uential. The results indicated that measuring these parameters from X-rays would be most important to morph an existing musculoskeletal...

  16. Big Society, Big Deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  17. Literacy in Traditional Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Jack, Ed.

    This series of essays derives from an interest in communications, in media and their effect upon human intercourse. Primarily, this concern with the technology of the intellect centers upon the effect of literacy on human culture, especially in 'traditional' or pre-industrial societies. In most of the essays, the effects of literacy are considered…

  18. Education for Jobless Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkin, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design.…

  19. Rationality in Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flache, Andreas; Dijkstra, Jacob; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary theories of rational behavior in human society augment the orthodox model of rationality both by adding various forms of bounded rationality and relaxing the assumptions of self-interest and materialistic preferences. This entry discusses how these extensions of the theory of rational

  20. SOCIETY: LESSONS FORZUNIVERSITIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the interaction model of knowledge utilization is engaged to ... and organizational diversity,” (4) “social accountability and reflexivity,” and (5) ... The system of reference for knowledge production under Mode 2 is the network of ... based society characterized by increased demand for transfer and utilization of.

  1. The Civil Society Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Anheier, Helmut K.; Lester M. Salamon

    2015-01-01

    Salamon and Anheier bring the civil society sector - the plethora of private, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations that have emerged in recent decades - into better focus conceptually as well as empirically. They draw on the results of a major inquiry into the scope, structure, financing and role of the "nonprofit sector" in a broad cross-section of countries around the world.

  2. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... STS The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr About STS Governance and Leadership ... All Events » Tweets by @STS_CTsurgery Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr Footer menu Home Contact Us ...

  3. Connecting Science with Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    awareness of the important questions of our society reflected in scientific research and of the answers produced by these research activities. The CRIS2010 conference, entitled “Bringing Science to Society”, therefore seeks to highlight the role of Current Research Information Systems for communicating...

  4. MARX EMBRYOLOGY OF SOCIETY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOUTERS, A

    This article presents a new interpretation of Marx's dialectical method. Marx conceived dialectics as a method for constructing a model of society. The way this model is developed is analogous to the way organisms develop according to the German embryologist Karl Ernst von Baer, and, indeed, Marx's

  5. Cognitive aspects of sexual functioning: differences between East Asian-Canadian and Euro-Canadian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Heather; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sexual beliefs of female undergraduates, as well as the thoughts they experience during sexual experiences. The study aimed to determine potential differences in these variables between East Asian-Canadians and Euro-Canadians, as well as the influence of acculturation on these variables. In addition, the relationships between sexual beliefs, automatic thoughts, and specific aspects of sexual functioning were examined. Euro-Canadian (n = 77) and East Asian-Canadian (n = 123) undergraduate women completed the Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire, the Sexual Modes Questionnaire, the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Vancouver Index of Acculturation. East Asian women endorsed almost all sexual beliefs assessed in this study more than did Euro-Canadian women, and endorsement of these beliefs was associated with acculturation. In addition, East Asian-Canadian and Euro-Canadian women differed in the frequency of experiencing negative automatic thoughts. Results also revealed associations between difficulties in sexual functioning, and both sexual beliefs and automatic thoughts. Together, these results provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that differences in cognitive aspects of sexuality may underlie the differences in sexual functioning previously observed between these two groups.

  6. The importance of nature to Canadians: survey highlights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DuWors, E

    1999-01-01

    .... The 1996 Survey on the Importance of Nature to Canadians (the Nature Survey) also tells us that Canadians commit large amounts of their leisure time to activities that depend on natural areas and wildlife...

  7. Visualization of scoliotic spine using ultrasound-accessible skeletal landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Ben; Lasso, Andras; Schlenger, Christopher; Borschneck, Daniel P.; Mousavi, Parvin; Fichtinger, Gabor; Ungi, Tamas

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Ultrasound imaging is an attractive alternative to X-ray for scoliosis diagnosis and monitoring due to its safety and inexpensiveness. The transverse processes as skeletal landmarks are accessible by means of ultrasound and are sufficient for quantifying scoliosis, but do not provide an informative visualization of the spine. METHODS: We created a method for visualization of the scoliotic spine using a 3D transform field, resulting from thin-spline interpolation of a landmark-based registration between the transverse processes that we localized in both the patient's ultrasound and an average healthy spine model. Additional anchor points were computationally generated to control the thin-spline interpolation, in order to gain a transform field that accurately represents the deformation of the patient's spine. The transform field is applied to the average spine model, resulting in a 3D surface model depicting the patient's spine. We applied ground truth CT from pediatric scoliosis patients in which we reconstructed the bone surface and localized the transverse processes. We warped the average spine model and analyzed the match between the patient's bone surface and the warped spine. RESULTS: Visual inspection revealed accurate rendering of the scoliotic spine. Notable misalignments occurred mainly in the anterior-posterior direction, and at the first and last vertebrae, which is immaterial for scoliosis quantification. The average Hausdorff distance computed for 4 patients was 2.6 mm. CONCLUSIONS: We achieved qualitatively accurate and intuitive visualization to depict the 3D deformation of the patient's spine when compared to ground truth CT.

  8. A Survey of Innovative Reimbursement Models in Spine Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazberouk, Alex; McGuire, Kevin; Landon, Bruce E

    2016-02-01

    Structured key informant interviews with follow-up. The aim of the study was to describe innovative reimbursement models in spine care and gather perspectives on the future of spine care reimbursement. The United States spends $90 billion annually on medical expenses for low back pain. One approach to promoting high-quality, cost-effective care is through bundled payments and other reimbursement models wherein physicians are held accountable for costs and utilization. Little data exist on innovative payment models in spine care. Through literature review and discussions with leaders in the field, we identified organizations that were engaged in bundled payment initiatives for spine care and surgery. These included healthcare systems, physician groups, organizations helping to set up bundles, and a large employer. We conducted interviews to understand the background and specific features of each initiative, generalizable success factors and challenges, and perspectives on the future of spine reimbursement. We interviewed 24 stakeholders across 18 organizations that collectively perform approximately 12,000 inpatient spine surgeries annually. Fee-for-service reimbursement accounts for a majority of revenue, but several organizations expect 30% to 45% of their spine volume to be covered under bundled payments within 3 years and cite new patient volume, increased surgical yield, and financial benefits from efficiency improvements as reasons for adopting bundled payments. Current initiatives are heterogeneous, but share similar success factors and challenges. Institutions are more hesitant to adopt risk-based payment models for chronic back care, citing difficulty modeling risk, patient heterogeneity, and difficulty aligning incentives. Payment models outside of the traditional fee-for-service paradigm are emerging in spine care. Providers that preemptively adopt bundled payments can increase patient volumes from payers seeking cost-effective care. Going forward

  9. Consumption in the Information Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  10. [Canadian Petroleum Products Institute]: Annual review, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-01-01

    The CPPI was created as a non-profit association of Canadian refiners and marketers of petroleum products. The Institute represents a membership of Canadian companies involved in refining, transporting and marketing of petroleum products. These companies supply domestic and industrial consumers with products ranging from gasoline and diesel fuel to asphalt. The Institute conducts research to develop industry policy on environmental, health, safety and business issues. This report covers industry operations, industry economics and financial performance, environmental protection and safety, awards, and publications.

  11. Canadian Petroleum Products Institute: Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The CPPI was created as a non-profit association of Canadian refiners and marketers of petroleum products. The Institute represents a membership of Canadian companies involved in refining, transporting and marketing of petroleum products. These companies supply domestic and industrial consumers with products ranging from gasoline and diesel fuel to asphalt. The Institute conducts research to develop industry policy on environmental, health, safety and business issues. This report covers industry operations, industry economics and financial performance, environmental protection and safety, awards, and publications.

  12. Trends in Canadian Respiratory Clinical Trials from 2001 to 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Elizabeth Tacon; Hina Abbas; Shiyuan Zhang; Barbara Nicholls; Glenn Crater; Zhen Su

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research bridges patients’ unmet medical need with innovative medicines, increases knowledge acquisition by clinicians, and creates solutions to improve the sustainability and quality of the Canadian health care system and economy. The Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Canadian Lung Association have recently raised concerns over declining research activities within the Canadian respiratory community. While there are currently >3000 ongoing clinical trials in Canada, the ...

  13. Solitary plasmacytoma of spine with amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-yun SUN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report the diagnosis and treatment of one case of solitary plasmacytoma of spine with amyloidosis and investigate the clinicopathological features combined with literatures. Methods and Results The patient was a 46-year-old woman. She suffered from weakness of both lower limbs, unsteady gait and numbness of toes for 20 d. MRI examination revealed an irregular mass behind the spinal cord at T5-7 level and T6-7 vertebral body accessory. The enhanced MRI showed obvious heterogeneous enhancement. The border was clear and spinal dura mater was compressed to shift forward. During operation, T5-7 processus spinosus and vertebral laminae were eroded, and the cortex of bone showed "moth-eaten" erosion. The intraspinal and extradural lesion had rich blood supply, loose bone structure and intact spinal dura mater. Histologically, tumor cells were composed of intensive small cells, and focal plasmacytoid cells were seen. Flake pink staining substance was among them. Artificial cracks were common and multinuclear giant tumor cells were scatteredly distributed. Immunohistochemical analysis showed the cytoplasm of tumor cells were diffusely positive for CD138, CD38 and vimentin (Vim,scatteredly positive for leukocyte common antigen (LCA, and negative for immune globulin κ light chain(IgGκ and λ light chain (IgGλ, CD99, S-100 protein (S-100, pan cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, HMB45 and CD34. The Ki-67 labeling index was 1.25%. Congo red staining showed the pink staining substance was brownish red. Hybridization in situ examination showed the DNA content of IgGκ was more than that of IgGλ. The final pathological diagnosis was solitary plasmacytoma of spine with amyloidosis. The patient was treated with postoperative chemotherapy, and there was no recurrence or metastasis during 18-month follow-up period. Conclusions Solitary plasmacytoma of spine with amyloidosis is a rare tumor. The imaging features can offer a few

  14. Minimally invasive spine stabilisation with long implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logroscino, Carlo Ambrogio; Proietti, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Originally aimed at treating degenerative syndromes of the lumbar spine, percutaneous minimally invasive posterior fixation is nowadays even more frequently used to treat some thoracolumbar fractures. According to the modern principles of saving segment of motion, a short implant (one level above and one level below the injured vertebra) is generally used to stabilise the injured spine. Although the authors generally use a short percutaneous fixation in treating thoracolumbar fractures with good results, they observed some cases in which the high fragmentation of the vertebral body and the presence of other associated diseases (co-morbidities) did not recommend the use of a short construct. The authors identified nine cases, in which a long implant (two levels above and two levels below the injured vertebra) was performed by a percutaneous minimally invasive approach. Seven patients (five males/two females) were affected by thoracolumbar fractures. T12 vertebra was involved in three cases, L1 in two cases, T10 and L2 in one case, respectively. Two fractures were classified as type A 3.1, two as A 3.2, two as A 3.3 and one as B 2.3, according to Magerl. In the present series, there were also two patients affected by a severe osteolysis of the spine (T9 and T12) due to tumoral localisation. All patients operated on with long instrumentation had a good outcome with prompt and uneventful clinical recovery. At the 1-year follow-up, all patients except one, who died 11 months after the operation, did not show any radiologic signs of mobilisation or failure of the implant. Based on the results of the present series, the long percutaneous fixation seems to represent an effective and safe system to treat particular cases of vertebral lesions. In conclusion, the authors believe that a long implant might be an alternative surgical method compared to more aggressive or demanding procedures, which in a few patients could represent an overtreatment. PMID:19399530

  15. The Lived Experiences of Canadian-Born and Foreign-Born Chinese Canadian Post-Secondary Students in Northern Ontario

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fei Wang

    2016-01-01

    ... and (d) the effect of Canadian education on career options. The study revealed that Canadian-born Chinese students differed from their foreign-born counterparts in their viewpoints on ethnic identity...

  16. Imaging current spine hardware: part 1, cervical spine and fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M; Ha, Alice S

    2014-08-01

    The goals of this article are to review the indications for use, the materials, and the designs of hardware more commonly used in the cervical spine; to discuss alternatives for each of the different types of hardware; to review normal postoperative imaging findings; to describe the appropriateness of different imaging modalities for postoperative evaluation; and to illustrate examples of hardware complications. This article will also review vertebral body fracture fixation. Stabilization and fusion of the spine with intervertebral disk replacement, artificial ligaments, spinous process distraction devices, plate-and-rod systems, dynamic posterior fusion devices, and implants composed of new types of material are increasingly more common in the contemporary surgical practice. These spinal hardware devices will be seen more often in radiology practice. Successful postoperative radiologic evaluation of spinal hardware necessitates an understanding of the fundamental design of the hardware, the physiologic objective of the hardware, normal and abnormal postoperative imaging appearances, and complications unique to the hardware.

  17. Transnational Education -- An Opportunity and a Canadian Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Transnational education is a huge growth industry and a potential source of considerable income for Canadian educational institutions. Canadian educational establishments seem to be missing out on this, and this seems short sighted. Canada has a very good reputation globally; this could be utilized when selling Canadian educational institutions in…

  18. Next-generation models for Canadian collaboration in international ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through this project, the Canadian Council for International Cooperation (CCIC), in partnership with the Canadian Association for the Study of International Development, will identify and promote new ways for Canadian practitioners, academics, and public policymakers to work together in international development.

  19. Heterogeneity in Treatment Response of Spine Metastases to Spine Stereotactic Radiosurgery Within "Radiosensitive" Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Vincent; Bishop, Andrew J; Allen, Pamela K; Amini, Behrang; Wang, Xin A; Li, Jing; Tatsui, Claudio E; Rhines, Laurence D; Brown, Paul D; Ghia, Amol J

    2017-12-01

    To characterize outcomes of metastatic colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) histologies, compared with other radiosensitive histologies, treated with spine stereotactic radiosurgery with regard to local control, overall survival, and predictors of response. A total of 127 patients with 148 spine stereotactic radiosurgery-treated metastatic lesions at our institution between 2003 and 2013 were reviewed. We assessed clinical endpoints in relation to histologic type, including local control (LC) and overall survival (OS), using univariate and multivariate analyses. For all patients, the 1- and 2-year actuarial rates for LC were 82.6% and 75.8%, and rates for OS were 72.9% and 51.5% respectively. Among tumor histologies, 1-year cumulative incidence rates of local failure for thyroid, breast, lung, and colon cancer were 8.7%, 7.0%, 26.6%, and 39.6%, respectively. When analyzed together, NSCLC and colorectal cancers had significantly greater cumulative incidence rates at 1 and 2 years (30.4% and 38.7%, respectively) than other histologies (8.0% and 14.1% respectively, P=.0008). Non-small cell lung cancer/colorectal tumor status was a significant predictor of local failure in a competing risk univariate model (hazard ratio 2.12, 95% confidence interval 1.07-4.17, P=.03) and multivariate model (hazard ratio 2.35, 95% confidence interval 1.12-4.92, P=.024). Spine stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective strategy in achieving local control of spine metastases, particularly among radiosensitive histologies. However, a subset of these classically defined histologies (NSCLC and colorectal) has a propensity toward local failure. In addition to resulting in poorer OS outcomes, the poor LC rates seen in NSCLC and colorectal cancers in this study are more consistent with a radioresistant phenotype, suggesting the need for optimized dosing regimens in this subgroup. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. l'Internet Society

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1997-01-01

    Conference of Vinton "Vint" Gray Cerf in the Intercontinental Hostel. Vinton Gray Cerf (born June 23, 1943) is an American computer scientist who is commonly referred to as one of the "founding fathers of the Internet" for his key technical and managerial role, together with Bob Kahn, in the creation of the Internet and the TCP/IP protocols which it uses. He was also a co-founder (in 1992) of the Internet Society (ISOC) which is intended to both promote the views of ordinary users of the Internet, and also serve as an umbrella body for the technical groups developing the Internet (such as the Internet Engineering Task Force). He served as the first president of the Internet Society from 1992-1995.