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Sample records for canadian orthopaedic surgeons

  1. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  2. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Examinations Print Books Video Gallery Orthopaedic Video Theater eBooks Education Focus International Activities Resources for Residents and ... knowledge and prepare for MOC. Available in print, eBook, or USB flash drive for the ultimate in ...

  3. The orthopaedic surgeon and manufacturing industry relationship. Ethical guidelines.

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    Lim, E V; Aquino, N J

    1999-11-01

    Orthopaedic surgery has progressed over the years because of innovative work of pioneering orthopaedic surgeons; new developments in internal fixation techniques and implants codeveloped with the orthopaedic manufacturing industry have improved treatment greatly. This article analyzes and reviews the relationship of orthopaedic surgeons to the orthopaedic implant industry, analyzing three broad categories of the relationship: (1) physicians receiving gifts from industry; (2) the orthopaedic industry's financial support of educational and research endeavors of academic trauma and other centers; and (3) the relationship of the industry with innovators in the field of orthopaedic surgery by retainer fees, royalties, and stock options from industry. The ethical relationship requires: (1) putting the patient's concerns first above vested interests; (2) an awareness of a potential for abuse; and (3) a level of awareness of the relationship and the ability to explain and inculcate this relationship in the teaching program of young residents to maintain the high standards that have been set.

  4. A population-based study of ambulatory and surgical services provided by orthopaedic surgeons for musculoskeletal conditions

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    Davis Aileen M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ongoing process of population aging is associated with an increase in prevalence of musculoskeletal conditions with a concomitant increase in the demand of orthopaedic services. Shortages of orthopaedic services have been documented in Canada and elsewhere. This population-based study describes the number of patients seen by orthopaedic surgeons in office and hospital settings to set the scene for the development of strategies that could maximize the availability of orthopaedic resources. Methods Administrative data from the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and Canadian Institute for Health Information hospital separation databases for the 2005/06 fiscal year were used to identify individuals accessing orthopaedic services in Ontario, Canada. The number of patients with encounters with orthopaedic surgeons, the number of encounters and the number of surgeries carried out by orthopaedic surgeons were estimated according to condition groups, service location, patient's age and sex. Results In 2005/06, over 520,000 Ontarians (41 per 1,000 population had over 1.3 million encounters with orthopaedic surgeons. Of those 86% were ambulatory encounters and 14% were in hospital encounters. The majority of ambulatory encounters were for an injury or related condition (44% followed by arthritis and related conditions (37%. Osteoarthritis accounted for 16% of all ambulatory encounters. Orthopaedic surgeons carried out over 140,000 surgeries in 2005/06: joint replacement accounted for 25% of all orthopaedic surgeries, whereas closed repair accounted for 16% and reductions accounted for 21%. Half of the orthopaedic surgeries were for arthritis and related conditions. Conclusion The large volume of ambulatory care points to the significant contribution of orthopaedic surgeons to the medical management of chronic musculoskeletal conditions including arthritis and injuries. The findings highlight that surgery is only one component of the work

  5. [Collaboration between geriatricians and orthopaedic surgeons on elderly patients].

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    Damsgaard, Else Marie; Borris, Lars; Duus, Benn; van der Mark, Susanne

    2013-10-07

    Close collaboration between geriatricians and orthopaedic surgeons on elderly patients with hip fractures reduces mortality, the number of complications, and the length of hospital stay and increases the functional abilities of the patients. In some Danish hospitals the two groups of doctors work closely together, in others there are few or no geriatricians.

  6. Attitudes towards chiropractic: an analysis of written comments from a survey of north american orthopaedic surgeons

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    Busse Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest by chiropractors in North America regarding integration into mainstream healthcare; however, there is limited information about attitudes towards the profession among conventional healthcare providers, including orthopaedic surgeons. Methods We administered a 43-item cross-sectional survey to 1000 Canadian and American orthopaedic surgeons that inquired about demographic variables and their attitudes towards chiropractic. Our survey included an option for respondants to include written comments, and our present analysis is restricted to these comments. Two reviewers, independantly and in duplicate, coded all written comments using thematic analysis. Results 487 surgeons completed the survey (response rate 49%, and 174 provided written comments. Our analysis revealed 8 themes and 24 sub-themes represented in surgeons' comments. Reported themes were: variability amongst chiropractors (n = 55; concerns with chiropractic treatment (n = 54; areas where chiropractic is perceived as effective (n = 43; unethical behavior (n = 43; patient interaction (n = 36; the scientific basis of chiropractic (n = 26; personal experiences with chiropractic (n = 21; and chiropractic training (n = 18. Common sub-themes endorsed by surgeon's were diversity within the chiropractic profession as a barrier to increased interprofessional collaboration, endorsement for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal complaints, criticism for treatment of non-musculoskeletal complaints, and concern over whether chiropractic care was evidence-based. Conclusions Our analysis identified a number of issues that will have to be considered by the chiropractic profession as part of its efforts to further integrate chiropractic into mainstream healthcare.

  7. Emil Theodor Kocher (1841-1917)--orthopaedic surgeon and the first surgeon Nobel Prize winner.

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    Bumbasirević, Marko Z; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Lesić, Aleksandar R

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Emil Kocher (1841-1917), born in Bern, educated in many universities in Europe. Kocher as many surgeons of that time performed orthopedic surgery, general surgery, neurosurgery and endocrine surgery, but he become famous in orthopaedic surgery and endocrine surgery. He is remember as a surgeon who described the approach to the hip joint, elbow joint, maneuver for the reduction of dislocated shoulder joint. He introduced many instruments and many of them, such as Kocher clamp is still in use. Most important Kocher work was the thyroid gland surgery, and he received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1909, for-in this matter. His nature of meticulous surgeon, scientific and hard working person, dedicated to his patients and students made- found him the place in a history of medicine.

  8. Radiation exposure to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, K; Vassileva, J; Alyakov, M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the radiation dose to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures and to make efforts to ensure that radiation protection is optimised. The study was performed for Fractura femoris and Fractura cruris procedures performed in orthopaedic operating theatres, as well as for fractures of wrist, ankle and hand/shoulder performed in the emergency trauma room. The highest mean value of the eye lens dose of 47.2 μSv and higher mean fluoroscopy time of 3 min, as well as the corresponding highest maximum values of 77.1 μSv and 5.0 min were observed for the Fractura femoris procedure performed with the Biplanar 500e fluoroscopy systems. At a normal workload, the estimated mean annual dose values do not exceed the annual occupational dose limit for the lens of eye, but at a heavy workload in the department, this dose limit could be achieved or exceeded. The use of protective lead glasses is recommended as they could reduce the radiation exposure of the lens of the eye. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the use of half-dose mode could additionally reduce dose to the operator's eye lens.

  9. Skeletal metastases - the role of the orthopaedic and spinal surgeon.

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    Eastley, Nicholas; Newey, Martyn; Ashford, Robert U

    2012-09-01

    Developments in oncological and medical therapies mean that life expectancy of patients with metastatic bone disease (MBD) is often measured in years. Complications of MBD may dramatically and irreversibly affect patient quality of life, making the careful assessment and appropriate management of these patients essential. The roles of orthopaedic and spinal surgeons in MBD generally fall into one of four categories: diagnostic, the prophylactic fixation of metastatic deposits at risk of impending fracture (preventative surgery), the stabilisation or reconstruction of bones affected by pathological fractures (reactive surgery), or the decompression and stabilisation of the vertebral column, spinal cord, and nerve roots. Several key principals should be adhered to whenever operating on skeletal metastases. Discussions should be held early with an appropriate multi-disciplinary team prior to intervention. Detailed pre-assessment is essential to gauge a patient's suitability for surgery - recovery from elective surgery must be shorter than the anticipated survival. Staging and biopsies provide prognostic information. Primary bone tumours must be ruled out in the case of a solitary bone lesion to avoid inappropriate intervention. Prophylactic surgical fixation of a lesion prior to a pathological fracture reduces morbidity and length of hospital stay. Regardless of a lesion or pathological fracture's location, all regions of the affected bone must be addressed, to reduce the risk of subsequent fracture. Surgical implants should allow full weight bearing or return to function immediately. Post-operative radiotherapy should be utilised in all cases to minimise disease progression. Spinal surgery should be considered for those with spinal pain due to potentially reversible spinal instability or neurological compromise. The opinion of a spinal surgeon should be sought early, as delays in referral directly correlate to worse functional recovery following intervention

  10. Do Politics Matter to an Orthopaedic Surgeon? (They Should!).

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    Lee, Adam K; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-11-01

    Orthopaedic trauma care is intimately tied with health policy, and current changes with health care reform may change how trauma care is delivered. This article offers a brief history of modern health care and the implications of new policies on the practice of orthopaedic trauma.

  11. Why veteran orthopaedic trauma surgeons are being fired and what we can do about it?

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    Hill, Austin; Althausen, Peter L; O'Mara, Timothy J; Bray, Timothy J

    2013-06-01

    The financial realities of providing trauma care to injured patients can make it difficult to produce an accurate assessment of the cumulative value orthopaedic trauma surgeons provide to healthcare and university institutions. As with many political battles in the field of medicine, physicians who have been diligently focused on providing patient care were completely unaware of the impending upheaval around them. Whether orthopaedic trauma surgeons are employed or in some type of partnership with hospitals, too often surgeons find the relationship one-sided. In order to effectively negotiate with hospitals, surgeons must demonstrate the comprehensive value they provide to their respective healthcare institutions and universities. Orthopaedic trauma surgeons make direct and indirect financial contributions to the hospital in addition to educational and community services. The sum total of these valued contributions helps fund non-revenue generating programs, provides marketing opportunities, and improves the regional and national reputation of the healthcare institution. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the value contributed to healthcare institutions by orthopaedic trauma surgeons and will serve as a blueprint for all surgeons to accurately account for and demonstrate their value to hospitals while providing efficient and compassionate care to our patients.

  12. Imaging in scoliosis from the orthopaedic surgeon's point of view

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    Thomsen, Marc [Stiftung Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Abel, Rainer [Stiftung Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: rainer.abel@ok.uni-heidelberg.de

    2006-04-15

    For treating patients with scoliosis orthopaedic surgeons need diagnostic imaging procedures in order to provide answers about a possible underlying disease, choice of treatment, and prognosis. Once treatment is instituted, imaging is also critical for monitoring changes of the deformity so as to optimize therapy. The combined effort of orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists helps detect treatable causes of scoliosis at an early stage, define the need and timing for surgery, and ensure that every precaution is taken to minimize the risks of surgery. Neurosurgical causes, with particular reference to spinal cord tumours and syringomyelia, need to be addressed before scoliosis surgery can be contemplated.

  13. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

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    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada.

  14. Advocacy--answering old mail. Canadian Association of General Surgeons.

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    Keith, R G

    1999-06-01

    Since its inception in 1977, the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) has struggled with its responsibility to represent general surgeons in practices across this country. The CAGS has tended to be mute in the presentation of many of its accomplishments, which have improved the role of specialists in community practice, training programs and the subspecialties of general surgery. With the forthcoming changes in direction for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, based on a recent external survey, the CAGS has a golden opportunity to advocate for a clear identity, autonomous from the Royal College for the purposes of scientific meetings, continuing professional development, scientific and practice affiliation with other surgical specialty societies, and new developments with corporate sector support for advancements in science technology and education. Advocacy for general surgery must be stressed as the priority for the CAGS into the future.

  15. The future of orthopaedics in the United States: an analysis of the effects of managed care in the face of an excess supply of orthopaedic surgeons.

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    Clark, R; Thurston, N K

    2000-03-01

    Recent technological advances in orthopaedic surgery have propelled both the volume of surgical cases and their complexity, resulting in increased costs, which should naturally result in higher incomes for surgeons. However, the transition from a fee-for-service model of physician compensation to a managed care model has resulted in major shifts in economic resource allocation. An economic model of this market based on imperfect competition shows that these changes have shifted market power from surgeons to the managed care organizations. Our model predicts that practicing surgeons will retire earlier, medical students will begin to select other specialties, and innovation will be slowed. Antitrust laws limit surgeons' ability to combat this trend through meaningful collective bargaining, creating the potential for future shortages as the baby boom generation reaches retirement age and the demand for orthopaedic services increases dramatically.

  16. 3D-BIOPRINTING OF CARTILAGE FOR ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONS.READING BETWEEN THE LINES

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    Claudia eDi Bella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chondral and Osteochondral lesions represent one of the most challenging and frustrating scenarios for the orthopaedic surgeon and for the patient. The lack of therapeutic strategies capable to reconstitute the function and structure of hyaline cartilage and to halt the progression towards osteoarthritis has brought clinicians and scientists together, to investigate the potential role of tissue engineering as a viable alternative to current treatment modalities. In particular, the role of bioprinting is emerging as an innovative technology that allows for the creation of organized 3D tissue constructs via a layer-by-layer deposition process. This process also has the capability to combine cells and biomaterials in an ordered and predetermined way. Here we review the recent advances in cartilage bioprinting and we identify the current challenges and the directions for future developments in cartilage regeneration.

  17. Critical review of patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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    Feghhi, Daniel P; Agarwal, Nitin; Hansberry, David R; Berberian, Wayne S; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2014-08-01

    We performed an expanded readability analysis to determine if the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, AAOS, had sufficiently improved its patient education materials since they were originally studied in 2007. In March 2013, we downloaded patient education materials from the AAOS patient information website, Your Orthopaedic Connection. Using 10 different readability formulas, we found that the mean grade level of patient education materials on the website is 8.84. Flesch-Kincaid analysis showed a mean grade level of 9.98, range, 6.6-12.6. Nine other readability analyses showed a mean reading level of 7.7, range, 6.5-13.7. Although this is an improvement over the 2007 level, it is above the average national reading comprehension level. The readability of patient education materials on the AAOS website still exceeds the average reading ability of a US adult. Revisions made over the 5 years leading up to this latest study resulted in better readability. The Prevention and Safety entries, written near seventh-grade level, should serve as a model for the remaining articles.

  18. Orthopaedic Surgeons as Clinical Leaders in the National Health Service, United Kingdom (NHS UK): Can the World Learn From Us?

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    Javed, Mustafa; Moulder, Elizabeth; Mohsen, Amr

    2015-07-01

    This article outlines some of the key concepts in leadership (both styles and theories) to provide a platform for further learning and to help the modern day orthopaedic surgeons to apply these concepts to their current practice. It is focused on two major aspects: management of medical organizations and effective twenty-first century care by surgeons through proper leadership guide and aimed in improving patient care outcomes. Practicing proper leadership skills based on evidence resulted in effective management of organization. Thus achieving patient's satisfaction.

  19. Readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

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    Ganta, Abhishek; Yi, Paul H; Hussein, Khalil; Frank, Rachel M

    2014-04-01

    Although studies have revealed high readability levels of orthopedic patient education materials, no study has evaluated sports medicine-related patient education materials. We conducted a study to assess the readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). All sports medicine patient education articles available online in 2012 from the AAOS and the AOSSM, including the Stop Sports Injuries Campaign (STOP), were identified, and their readability was assessed with the Flesch-Kinkaid (FK) readability test. Mean overall FK grade level of the 170 articles reviewed (104 from AAOS, 36 from AOSSM, 30 from STOP) was 10.2. Mean FK levels for the 3 sources were 9.5 (AAOS), 11.0 (AOSSM), and 11.5 (STOP) (P = .16). Fifteen (8.8%) of the 170 articles had a readability level at or below eighth grade (average reading level of US adults); only 2 (1.2%) of the 170 articles were at or below the recommended sixth-grade level. The majority of sports medicine-related patient education materials from AAOS and AOSSM had reading levels higher than recommended, indicating that the majority of the patient population may find it difficult to comprehend these articles.

  20. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Disclosure Policy Fails to Accurately Inform Its Members of Potential Conflicts of Interest.

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    Tanzer, Dylan; Smith, Karen; Tanzer, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) disclosure policy is designed to ensure that members involved in education or policy development remain free of outside influence. Although mandatory for these members, it is voluntary for the rest of the AAOS membership. To determine surgeon compliance with disclosure policy, we conducted a study in which we compared surgeon-consultants' disclosures as posted on 6 major orthopedic companies' websites in 2011 with those surgeons' disclosures as listed in AAOS disclosure program records. We found that 549 AAOS members were identified by at least 1 company as having received consulting payments. Overall, 44% of AAOS members did not comply with disclosure policy, or their information was not available on the AAOS website (range, 37%-61%). This study demonstrated that AAOS's policy of mandatory disclosure for select members and voluntary disclosure for all other members is ineffective. The AAOS disclosure program and the potential consequences of noncompliance need to be reevaluated by the organization if it wants its program to succeed.

  1. The surgeon and his tools-the case for a focused orthopaedic theatre induction programme

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    Wong Shaun KS

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction programme for trainee doctors in the UK generally do not focus on the surgical aspects of their jobs. In this context we decided to conduct a telephonic survey among the hospitals belonging to three orthopaedic training regions in the UK from the point of view of the diversity of instrumentations and implants used for index procedures. Results We chose four index trauma & orthopaedic procedures (Total hip replacement, total knee replacement, intramedullary nailing and external fixator systems for long bone fractures. A telephonic survey was done in six NHS trust hospitals which were part of an orthopaedic training rotation (2 from England, 2 from Wales and 2 from Scotland. In total there were 39 different instrumentation systems for these 4 index procedures in the 6 trusts (see table 1. These comprise 12 Total hip replacement (THR systems, 14 total knee replacement (TKR systems, 9 intra-medullary nailing systems, and 4 external fixator systems. The number of different systems for each trust ranged from 7 to 19. There is a vast array of implants and instrumentation systems in each trust, as highlighted by our survey. The surgical tools are not the same in each hospitals. This situation is more complicated when trainees move to new hospitals as part of training rotations. Table 1 Number of implants/instrumentations used in each of the 6 UK trusts (3 training regions. IMPLANT E1 E2 W1 W2 S1 S2 Total Knee Replacement 4 5 2 4 3 2 Total Hip Replacement 3 4 3 6 3 3 Intramnedullary nailing 2 1 1 6 2 3 External fixators 2 3 2 2 1 1 TOTAL 11 13 8 18 9 9 E = England, W = Wales, S = Scotland Conclusion In view of this we feel that more focused theatre based induction programmes for higher surgical trainees is advocated in each hospital trust so trainees can familiarise themselves with the tools available to them. This could include discussion with the consultants and senior theatre staff along with representatives from the

  2. Orthopaedic surgeon's nightmare: iatrogenic fractures of talus and medial malleolus following tibial nailing

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    Sanjay Meena; Vivek Trikha; Pramod Saini; Rakesh Kumar; Buddhadev Chowdhary

    2013-01-01

    Intramedullary interlocking nailing is the gold standard for treatment of tibial shaft fractures.The growing use of intramedullary nailing has resulted in an increased number of tibial nailing in daily clinical practice.Despite adequate surgeon experience,tibial nailing is not without complications if proper techniques are not followed.A case of iatrogenic talar neck and medial malleolus fractures during intramedullary nailing of tibia in a 24-year-old male is reported.It is believed to be caused by forceful hammering of insertion zig with foot dorsiflexed.To the best of our knowledge,no such case has been reported in the literature.It is possible to reduce the risk of this complication by adoption of preventive measures.

  3. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons/Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery Joint Position Statement on Open and Endovascular Surgery for Thoracic Aortic Disease.

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    Appoo, Jehangir J; Bozinovski, John; Chu, Michael W A; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Forbes, Thomas L; Moon, Michael; Ouzounian, Maral; Peterson, Mark D; Tittley, Jacques; Boodhwani, Munir

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) published a position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease addressing size thresholds for surgery, imaging modalities, medical therapy, and genetics. It did not address issues related to surgical intervention. This joint Position Statement on behalf of the CCS, Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons, and the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery provides recommendations about thoracic aortic disease interventions, including: aortic valve repair, perfusion strategies for arch repair, extended arch hybrid reconstruction for acute type A dissection, endovascular management of arch and descending aortic aneurysms, and type B dissection. The position statement is constructed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and has been approved by the primary panel, an international secondary panel, and the CCS Guidelines Committee. Advent of endovascular technology has improved aortic surgery safety and extended the indications of minimally invasive thoracic aortic surgery. The combination of safer open surgery with endovascular treatment has improved patient outcomes in this rapidly evolving subspecialty field of cardiovascular surgery.

  4. Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic injections for painful shoulder conditions: comparisons among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and physical medicine and primary-care physicians

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    Skedros John G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in corticosteroid/anesthetic doses for injecting shoulder conditions were examined among orthopaedic surgeons, rheumatologists, and primary-care sports medicine (PCSMs and physical medicine and rehabilitation (PMRs physicians to provide data needed for documenting inter-group differences for establishing uniform injection guidelines. Methods 264 surveys, sent to these physicians in our tri-state area of the western United States, addressed corticosteroid/anesthetic doses and types used for subacromial impingement, degenerative glenohumeral and acromioclavicular arthritis, biceps tendinitis, and peri-scapular trigger points. They were asked about preferences regarding: 1 fluorinated vs. non-fluorinated corticosteroids, 2 acetate vs. phosphate types, 3 patient age, and 4 adjustments for special considerations including young athletes and diabetics. Results 169 (64% response rate, RR surveys were returned: 105/163 orthopaedic surgeons (64%RR, 44/77 PCSMs/PMRs (57%RR, 20/24 rheumatologists (83%RR. Although corticosteroid doses do not differ significantly between specialties (p > 0.3, anesthetic volumes show broad variations, with surgeons using larger volumes. Although 29% of PCSMs/PMRs, 44% rheumatologists, and 41% surgeons exceed "recommended" doses for the acromioclavicular joint, >98% were within recommendations for the subacromial bursa and glenohumeral joint. Depo-Medrol® (methylprednisolone acetate and Kenalog® (triamcinolone acetonide are most commonly used. More rheumatologists (80% were aware that there are acetate and phosphate types of corticosteroids as compared to PCSMs/PMRs (76% and orthopaedists (60%. However, relatively fewer rheumatologists (25% than PCSMs/PMRs (32% or orthopaedists (32% knew that phosphate types are more soluble. Fluorinated corticosteroids, which can be deleterious to soft tissues, were used with these frequencies for the biceps sheath: 17% rheumatologists, 8% PCSMs/PMRs, 37

  5. Is There an Association Between Study Materials and Scores on the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons Part 1 Examination?

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    2014-06-01

    Sharkey PF, Hilibrand AS. Passing the boards: can USMLE and orthopaedic in training examination scores predict passage of the ABOS part 1 examination. J... USMLE Step 1 and OITE correlate with the ABOS part I certifying examination?: a multicenter study. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010;468(10):2797 2802. 16...examination and scores on USMLE steps 1 and 2. Acad Med. 2009;84:S21 S24. 17. Drystad BW, Pope D, Milbrandt JC, Beck RT, Weinhoeft AL, Idusuyi OB. Predictive

  6. Canadian Hepatitis C Look-Back Investigation to Detect Transmission from an Infected General Surgeon

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    Meenakshi Dawar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In February 2007, a general surgeon in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, tested positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV. The surgeon’s infection onset date could not be determined; however, episodic hepatic enzyme elevations were first detected in November 2004 and again in February 2007. HCV transmission during surgery, alhough rare, has been documented. A phased look-back HCV screening program was conducted to detect HCV transmission from this surgeon to patients who underwent the highest-risk procedures in the three years before his positive test.

  7. How Social Are We? A Cross-Sectional Study of the Website Presence and Social Media Activity of Canadian Plastic Surgeons.

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    McEvenue, Giancarlo; Copeland, Andrea; Devon, Karen M; Semple, John L

    2016-10-01

    The internet and social media are increasingly being used by patients not only for health-related research, but also for obtaining information on their surgeon. Having an online presence via a website and social media profile is one-way plastic surgeons can meet this patient driven demand. The authors sought to document current website and social media usage of Canadian plastic surgeons and to determine if this usage correlated with years in practice. A Google search was performed using publicly available lists of all plastic surgeons registered with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) and the Canadian Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (CSAPS). This search found 42% (268/631) of RCPSC plastic surgeons had a website and 85% (536/631) had a profile on social media. Younger RCPSC surgeons (registered for less years) were significantly more likely to have a website (12.8 vs. 21.9 years, P social media profile (16.2 vs. 23.9 years, P social media platform most used was RateMDs (81%) followed in decreasing order by: LinkedIn (28%), RealSelf (22%), Facebook (20%), Google+ (17%) and Twitter (16%). Dual RCPSC-CSAPS members were more likely than RCPSC-only members to have a website (56 vs. 36%, P social media profile (P social media presence by Canadian plastic surgeons is comparable to counterparts in the US and UK. It may be possible to better optimize online presence through education of current search engine technology and becoming active on multiple social media platforms.

  8. Do geography and resources influence the need for colostomy in Hirschsprung′s disease and anorectal malformations? A Canadian association of paediatric surgeons: Association of paediatric surgeons of Nigeria survey

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    Lukman O. Abdur-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This survey compared surgical management of Hirschsprung′s disease (HD and anorectal malformations (ARM in high and low resource settings. Materials and Methods: An online survey was sent to 208 members of the Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons (CAPS and the Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria (APSON. Results: The response rate was 76.8% with 127 complete surveys (APSON 34, CAPS 97. Only 29.5% of APSON surgeons had frozen section available for diagnosis of HD. They were more likely to choose full thickness rectal biopsy (APSON 70.6% vs. CAPS 9.4%, P < 0.05 and do an initial colostomy for HD (APSON 23.5% vs. CAPS 0%, P < 0.05. Experience with trans-anal pull-through for HD was similar in both groups (APSON 76.5%, CAPS 66.7%. CAPS members practising in the United States were more likely to perform a one-stage pull-through for HD during the initial hospitalization (USA 65.4% vs. Canada 28.3%, P < 0.05. The frequency of colostomy in females with vestibular fistula varied widely independent of geography. APSON surgeons were less likely to have enterostomal therapists and patient education resources. Conclusions: Local resources which vary by geographic location affect the management of HD and ARM including colostomy. Collaboration between CAPS and APSON members could address resource and educational needs to improve patient care.

  9. Smartphones in orthopaedics.

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    Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Gikas, Panagiotis D; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said

    2012-08-01

    With the introduction of the European Working Time Directive, surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities and doctors are required to maximise their training opportunities. Smartphone sales have been rapidly increasing over the last five years and can be used as a training tool for the orthopaedic trainee and surgeon. Common uses include applications (AO, eLogbook and PubMed), Ebooks, online Logbooks, Guidelines and surgical techniques. In addition, smartphones can be used to immediately complete work-based assessments, in the absence of computers, hopefully increasing completion rates and reliability. Some journals now provide podcasts and video tutorials which may be accessed on smartphones, which is useful for higher examinations. Smartphones can also be used in the clinical setting to take photographs of wounds. Smartphones are enjoying increased uptake and application in the workplace and we review their use for orthopaedic surgeons and trainees to allow them to make the most out of their training opportunities.

  10. Orthopaedic research and education foundation and industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurth, Gene R; Sherr, Judy H; Coffman, Thomas M

    2003-07-01

    Members of orthopaedic industry commit a significant amount of funds each year to support research and education programs that are directly related to their product(s). In addition, industry supports organizations such as the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation. The relationship between the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and industry began in the early 1980s. The support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation from industry primarily has come in the form of unrestricted grants. These grants best can be looked at as an investment rather than a contribution. This form of giving, once called corporate philanthropy is more accurately referred to as strategic philanthropy. Members of industry make these investments to enhance their reputations, build brand awareness, market their products and services, improve employee morale, increase customer loyalty, and establish strategic alliances. The specialty of orthopaedics is among the leaders in medicine in the amount of funding raised within the specialty for research and education programs. This is because of the amount of support from members of industry and the surgeons. During the past 15 years, 40% of the annual support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation has come from industry and the balance has come from surgeons and members of lay public. Future industry support of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and other organizations within the specialty of orthopaedics will be dependent on the continued demonstration of tangible returns in areas described.

  11. American Academy of Neurological and Orthopaedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seattle, Washington – June 16-17, 2017 at the Marriott Hotel (SEATAC). Our Mission Our Mission The Academy was ... yearly event in Seattle, Washington at the Airport Marriott Hotel where a highly informative educational program has been ...

  12. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  13. Two surgeons and the ECG-a double blind study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Martin Schilling

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the capability of operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons to analyze a set of standardized ECG. Methods: Twenty operating abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons at a university hospital were included. Each participant analyzed a set of five standardized ECG with an answering scheme for eight different items, giving a maximum score of 40. The answers were matched according to specialty and experience of the doctors of less than 5 years, between 5 and 10 years or more than 10 years. The reference standard was set by two independent consultants in cardiology. Results: The mean overall score was 25.25 (63.13%±4.78%) varying between 38 (95%) and 20(50%). Abdominal surgeons performed a mean score of 27.625 (69.06%±9.53%), and orthopaedic surgeons 23.67 points (59.17%±3.69%). The difference between the performance of abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons was not significant (P=0.09). 20/20 surgeons identified ST-elevation and no surgeon accepted the ECG showing acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction as normal. Conclusions: Abdominal and orthopaedic surgeons provided an answering scheme are able to interprete the ECG and identify both the normal and the ECG showing life-threatening pathology. The hypothesis that surgeons were unable to interprete the ECG must be rejected.

  14. Patient compliance and effect of orthopaedic shoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, A B; Ellitsgaard, N; Krogsgaard, M R

    1999-01-01

    Orthopaedic shoes are individually handmade after a prescription from an orthopaedic surgeon, hence relatively expensive. Bad compliance is mentioned in the literature but not investigated. In order to evaluate patient compliance and the effect of orthopaedic shoes, 85 patients who were prescribed...... orthopaedic shoes at the authors' department during a 3 year period received a questionnaire concerning relief of symptoms and daily use of the shoes. The answers from 74 patients were correlated to the prescription procedure and the degree of medical follow-up. Only 60 of 74 patients used their shoes. Some...... 51 patients had some benefit while 23 had no effect or even worse symptoms. Some patients even used their shoes despite no symptomatic relief. However, patients who felt they were well informed about the purpose and function of their shoes had more benefit than the rest. Only 12 patients of the 74...

  15. Leo Doyle, master surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellar, I

    2000-10-01

    On 3 March 1953 Leo Doyle died at the Mercy Hospital, Melbourne. The day before he died Leo Doyle had been operating at the Mercy Hospital when he took ill. Doyle's final illness was almost certainly the result of the severe aortic stenosis that had been developing over some years. His death at the relatively young age of 61 ended the career of a man described by Sir Gordon Gordon Taylor as the greatest technical surgeon that he had ever seen. In all likelihood Australian surgery will never see the likes of Doyle, a virtuoso surgeon, again. And yet to many of the surgeons who were Doyle's contemporaries and to those who followed him he remained somewhat of an enigma. Perhaps in some way the description of the great French surgeon Baron Dupuytren may also be applicable to Leo Doyle: known to all, loved by many, understood by few. By all accounts Leo Doyle's surgical repertoire knew no bounds. He operated with equal facility on the central nervous system, the head and neck, in the thorax, abdomen and pelvis and he was more than competent in gynaecology, urology and orthopaedics. In the latter part of his career he became, par excellence, a cancer surgeon. He was, arguably, Australia's first surgical oncologist. No procedure was deemed too complicated or demanding. Like some other superb technicians his judgement at times did not match his technical ability. Doyle was one of the first surgeons in Australia to perform hindquarter amputation and he helped to pioneer the operations of total gastrectomy and oesophagogastrectomy. An avid reader of the surgical literature, he possessed an enormous library which was matched by an equally large collection of surgical instruments. Unlike Devine he published relatively little. He was not a good clinical teacher, preferring to teach by example in the operating theatre. Although interested in music and the visual arts, surgery was his life.

  16. [Distraction osteogenesis in orthopaedics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, P. de; Baat, C. de; Bessems, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    For several decades, distraction osteogenesis has been applied in orthopaedics for lengthening limbs. Other indications for distraction osteogenesis in orthopaedics are nonunions, open fractures, oncologic defects, and ankle osteoarthritis. The main principle of distraction osteogenesis is that, wit

  17. Atypical Clavicular Involvement of Nonbacterial Osteitis: An Orthopaedic Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil Umrani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonbacterial osteitis (NBO is an underdiagnosed and poorly understood condition caused by sterile inflammation. It can mimic the presentation of many other orthopaedic conditions, for example, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, or malignancy, in particular for those patients who have unifocal presentation. Because NBO is a diagnosis by exclusion, it poses much difficulty and confusion to many orthopaedic surgeons in treating such disease. Clavicular involvement is common but it is typically present at the medial aspect of the clavicle. We report a case of NBO with atypical clavicular involvement who presented to our orthopaedic clinic with painful swelling in the left shoulder. Appropriate investigations and management are discussed together with literature review.

  18. Audit of Orthopaedic Surgical Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fionn Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Royal College of Surgeons in England published guidelines in 2008 outlining the information that should be documented at each surgery. St. James’s Hospital uses a standard operation sheet for all surgical procedures and these were examined to assess documentation standards. Objectives. To retrospectively audit the hand written orthopaedic operative notes according to established guidelines. Methods. A total of 63 operation notes over seven months were audited in terms of date and time of surgery, surgeon, procedure, elective or emergency indication, operative diagnosis, incision details, signature, closure details, tourniquet time, postop instructions, complications, prosthesis, and serial numbers. Results. A consultant performed 71.4% of procedures; however, 85.7% of the operative notes were written by the registrar. The date and time of surgery, name of surgeon, procedure name, and signature were documented in all cases. The operative diagnosis and postoperative instructions were frequently not documented in the designated location. Incision details were included in 81.7% and prosthesis details in only 30% while the tourniquet time was not documented in any. Conclusion. Completion and documentation of operative procedures were excellent in some areas; improvement is needed in documenting tourniquet time, prosthesis and incision details, and the location of operative diagnosis and postoperative instructions.

  19. Housing design and testing of a surgical robot developed for orthopaedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai-Yin Qin

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: This project demonstrated a good model of multidisciplinary R&D of surgical robotics led by orthopaedic surgeons, in collaboration with mechanical and electronic engineers and industrial designers.

  20. Accredited Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayac, Michael; Javandal, Mitra; Mulcahey, Mary K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of orthopaedic surgeons apply for sports medicine fellowships after residency completion. The Internet is one of the most important resources applicants use to obtain information about fellowship programs, with the program website serving as one of the most influential sources. The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), San Francisco Match (SFM), and Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) maintain databases of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs. A 2013 study evaluated the content and accessibility of the websites for accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships. Purpose: To reassess these websites based on the same parameters and compare the results with those of the study published in 2013 to determine whether any improvement has been made in fellowship website content or accessibility. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We reviewed all existing websites for the 95 accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships included in the AOSSM, SFM, and AANA databases. Accessibility of the websites was determined by performing a Google search for each program. A total of 89 sports fellowship websites were evaluated for overall content. Websites for the remaining 6 programs could not be identified, so they were not included in content assessment. Results: Of the 95 accredited sports medicine fellowships, 49 (52%) provided links in the AOSSM database, 89 (94%) in the SFM database, and 24 (25%) in the AANA database. Of the 89 websites, 89 (100%) provided a description of the program, 62 (70%) provided selection process information, and 40 (45%) provided a link to the SFM website. Two searches through Google were able to identify links to 88% and 92% of all accredited programs. Conclusion: The majority of accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs fail to utilize the Internet to its full potential as a resource to provide applicants with detailed information about the

  1. [The history and development of computer assisted orthopaedic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, J-Y

    2006-10-01

    Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) was developed to improve the accuracy of surgical procedures. It has improved dramatically over the last years, being transformed from an experimental, laboratory procedure into a routine procedure theoretically available to every orthopaedic surgeon. The first field of application of computer assistance was neurosurgery. After the application of computer guided spinal surgery, the navigation of total hip and knee joints became available. Currently, several applications for computer assisted surgery are available. At the beginning of navigation, a preoperative CT-scan or several fluoroscopic images were necessary. The imageless systems allow the surgeon to digitize patient anatomy at the beginning of surgery without any preoperative imaging. The future of CAOS remains unknown, but there is no doubt that its importance will grow in the next 10 years, and that this technology will probably modify the conventional practice of orthopaedic surgery.

  2. Complex M&E for new orthopaedic centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briars, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Paul Briars, North West regional director for independent engineering, IT, and facilities services business, NG Bailey (pictured), discusses the company's part in a major redevelopment at one of the UK's top orthopaedic hospitals, Wrightington Hospital in Lancashire --famous as the site, in the early 1960s, of first ever hip replacement operations, by pioneering surgeon, Professor Sir John Charnley (HEJ --April 2013).

  3. Is surgeons' experience important on intra- and inter-observer reliability of classifications used for adult femoral neck fracture?

    OpenAIRE

    Turgut, Ali; Kumbaracı, Mert; Kalenderer, Önder; İlyas, Gökhan; Bacaksız, Tayfun; Karapınar, Levent

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether surgeons' experience affect inter- and intra-observer reliability among mostly used classification systems for femoral neck fractures. Material and Methods: A power point presentation was prepared with 107 slides which were antero-posterior radiographs of each femoral neck fracture. 5 residents, 5 orthopaedic surgeons and 5 senior orthopaedic surgeons reviewed this presentation and classified the fractures according to Garden, Pauwels and AO classifications. ...

  4. Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-03-01

    The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene.

  5. Evaluation of malnutrition in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Michael Brian; Yi, Paul Hyunsoo; Thomas, Charlotte F; Garcia, Jane; Della Valle, Craig J

    2014-03-01

    Malnutrition can increase the risk of surgical site infection in both elective spine surgery and total joint arthroplasty. Obesity and diabetes are common comorbid conditions in patients who are malnourished. Despite the relatively high incidence of nutritional disorders among patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery, the evaluation and management of malnutrition is not generally well understood by practicing orthopaedic surgeons. Serologic parameters such as total lymphocyte count, albumin level, prealbumin level, and transferrin level have all been used as markers for nutrition status. In addition, anthropometric measurements, such as calf and arm muscle circumference or triceps skinfold, and standardized scoring systems, such as the Rainey-MacDonald nutritional index, the Mini Nutritional Assessment, and institution-specific nutritional scoring tools, are useful to define malnutrition. Preoperative nutrition assessment and optimization of nutritional parameters, including tight glucose control, normalization of serum albumin, and safe weight loss, may reduce the risk of perioperative complications, including infection.

  6. Quantification of facial contamination with blood during orthopaedic procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, D

    2012-02-03

    Operative surgery exposes the surgeon to possible blood-borne infections. Risks include pen-etrating injuries and conjunctival contact with infected blood. Visor masks worn during orthopaedic trauma procedures were assessed for blood contamination using computer analysis. This was found to be present on 86% of masks, of which only 15% was recognized by the surgeon intraoperatively. Of the blood splashes 80% were less than 0.6mm in diameter. We conclude that power instrumentation produces a blood particulate mist causing considerable microscopic, facial contamination which is a significant risk to the surgeon.

  7. Mentoring surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    From time immemorial mentoring has been the angular stone sustaining the building of medical and surgical education. Good teachers are not necessarily good mentors, and good mentors are not always good teachers. A combination of both is very plausible and should be encouraged. Today, the qualities of a good mentor, in our case the surgeon-mentor, should include respect, time, commitment, trust, determination, encouragement, patience, and opportunity for independence. The mentee would need to respond to similar virtues of trust, encouragement, and respect. The reciprocal consideration of equally divided roles would be clearly desirable. Recognizing the importance of a good mentor and making this role the priority of medical schools would enhance our ability to form better professionals. It would certainly promote professionalism, better patient care, and research.

  8. Orthopaedic Footwear Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Although the need for orthopaedic shoes is increasing, the number of skilled shoemakers has declined. This has led to the development of a CAD/CAM system to design and fabricate, orthopaedic footwear. The NASA-developed RIM database management system is the central repository for CUSTOMLAST's information storage. Several other modules also comprise the system. The project was initiated by Langley Research Center and Research Triangle Institute in cooperation with the Veterans Administration and the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Later development was done by North Carolina State University and the University of Missouri-Columbia. The software is licensed by both universities.

  9. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Stefano; Coccolini, Federico; Manfredi, Roberto; Piazzalunga, Dario; Agazzi, Roberto; Arici, Claudio; Barozzi, Marco; Bellanova, Giovanni; Belluati, Alberto; Berlot, Giorgio; Biffl, Walter; Camagni, Stefania; Campanati, Luca; Castelli, Claudio Carlo; Catena, Fausto; Chiara, Osvaldo; Colaianni, Nicola; De Masi, Salvatore; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dodi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Andrea; Faustinelli, Giovanni; Gambale, Giorgio; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Lotti, Marco; Marchesi, Gianmariano; Massè, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Tiziana; Nardi, Giuseppe; Niola, Raffaella; Nita, Gabriela Elisa; Pisano, Michele; Poiasina, Elia; Poletti, Eugenio; Rampoldi, Antonio; Ribaldi, Sergio; Rispoli, Gennaro; Rizzi, Luigi; Sonzogni, Valter; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2014-03-07

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  10. Improvement of research quality in the fields of orthopaedics and trauma—a global perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fayaz, Hangama C.; Haas, Norbert; Kellam, James; Bavonratanavech, Suthorn; Parvizi, Javad; Dyer, George; Pohlemann, Tim; Jerosch, Jörg; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; Pape, Hans Christoph; Smith, Malcolm; Vrahas, Marc; Perka, Carsten; Siebenrock, Klaus; Elhassan, Bassem

    2013-01-01

    The international orthopaedic community aims to achieve the best possible outcome for patient care by constantly modifying surgical techniques and expanding the surgeon’s knowledge. These efforts require proper reflection within a setting that necessitates a higher quality standard for global orthopaedic publication. Furthermore, these techniques demand that surgeons acquire information at a rapid rate while enforcing higher standards in research performance. An international consensus exists...

  11. Using PubMed effectively to access the orthopaedic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, J F Myles; Hitchcock, Kristin; Nelson, David L

    2011-01-01

    PubMed is the free public Internet interface to the US National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE database of citations to medical scientific articles. Many orthopaedic surgeons use PubMed on a regular basis, but most orthopaedic surgeons have received little or no training in how to use PubMed effectively and express frustration with the experience. Typical problems encountered are data overload with very large numbers of returns to look through, failure to find a specific article, and a concern that a search has missed important papers. It is helpful to understand the system used to enter journal articles into the database and the classification of the common types of searches and to review suggestions for the best ways to use the PubMed interface and find sources for search teaching and assistance.

  12. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie N Hofstede

    Full Text Available International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA recommend to start with (a combination of non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands.We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments.Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included "People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery" (facilitator for education about OA, and "Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving" (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice. For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were "Lack of knowledge about guideline" (barrier for lifestyle advice, "Agreements/ deliberations with primary care" and "Easy communication with a dietician" (facilitators for dietary therapy. Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription.Strategies to improve non-surgical treatment use in orthopaedic

  13. Nanobiotechnology Perspectives on Prevention and Treatment of Ortho-paedic Implant Associated Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, Vivek; Pawar, Vaishali; Shetty, Gautam; Mullaji, Arun; Srivastava, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Implants are an inevitable part of orthopaedic surgery. However, implant associated infection remains a major challenge for orthopaedic surgeons and researchers. This review focuses on current options available for prevention of implant associated infection, their drawbacks and future promising applications of nanotechnology-based approaches. Nanobiotechnology has shown remarkable progress in recent years especially in biomaterials, diagnostics, and drug delivery system. Although several applications of nanobiotechnology in orthopaedics have been described, few have elaborated their role in the prevention of implant related infection in orthopaedics. Novel "smart" drug delivery systems that release antibiotics locally in response to stimuli such as pH, temperature, enzymes or antigens; implant surface modification on a nanoscale to inhibit bacterial adhesion and propagation at the surgical site and biological approaches such as gene therapy to neutralize bacterial virulence and biomolecules to inhibit the quorum sensing adhesion of bacteria and disruption of biofilms can be used effectively to prevent orthopaedic implant related bacterial infection.

  14. Chinese medicine and the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ping-Chung; Biji, Sreedhar; Yeung, Chung-Kwong

    2011-07-01

    The surgeon aims at a direct, complete removal of the pathology. In spite of the modern advancements of imaging facilities and precision instrumentations, unsatisfactory results and recurrences are not uncommon. This paper provides a general review of the four specific areas in surgery that would benefit from Chinese medicine. Extensive searches were made on four surgical areas based on available English language journals, viz. low-back pain, chronic ulcers, renal calculus, and enuresis in children, in the past 10 years. The quoted communications are mainly related to clinical evidences, while a smaller number of crucial laboratory reports are also included. Low-back pain, a most frequent orthopaedic problem, would benefit from acupuncture treatment. Chronic leg ulcers could achieve better results of healing using herbal supplements. Problems of renal stones, besides the conventional methods of removal, could be further supplemented with herbal drinks that aim at prevention of recurrences. Enuresis in children, an untreatable common condition, may respond well to acupuncture. Surgeons should keep an open mind. In case of difficulties, they could seriously consider options of traditional treatment.

  15. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchard Maryse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct

  16. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher

  17. Thromboembolism prophylaxis practices in orthopaedic arthroplasty patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2010-10-01

    Thromboembolic events are a post-operative complication of arthroplasty surgery for up to 3 months. The incidence however, is not fully known. Some form of prophylaxis should be provided to all arthroplasty patients. Clinicians are wary of side effects, compliance profile and the associated cost. The objective of this study is to investigate practice patterns and their relevance to 3 risk groups. Ninety questionnaires were sent to orthopaedic surgeons with 3 hypothetical clinical scenarios and 10 prophylaxis regimes for thromboembolism across different risk groups. The response rate was 81\\/90 (90%). The most popular options in all 3 cases were early mobilisation, thrombo-embolism deterrant (TED) stockings and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (51\\/81, 62% of all cases). An inconsistent relationship exists between preferred practice and relevant guidelines. Preferred practice does not correlate with each level of risk.

  18. The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association 2010 traveling fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh A; Cheng, Ivan; Yao, Jeffrey; Huffman, G Russell

    2011-12-21

    We started this journey excited by the prospects of visiting Japan, a country with a proud and historic past. We ended the fellowship accomplishing those goals, and we left with a great deal of admiration for our orthopaedic colleagues halfway around the world for their excellence in education, clinical care, and research. Their hospitality and attention to the details of our visit were exemplary and a lesson to us as we host visiting fellows in the future. Japan reflects its past, but it also offers a preview into our own nation's future: an aging population, a shrinking workforce, a stagnant economy, nationalized health care, and a mushrooming national debt. Of all of these factors, it is the aging population that we, as orthopaedic surgeons, will be most acutely aware of and involved with. The degenerative disorders that affect elderly patients dominate the landscape of surgical care in Japan. Osteoporosis and osteopenia permeate many aspects of care across orthopaedic subspecialties. The surgeons in Japan are developing innovative and cost-effective means of treating the large volume of older patients within the fiscal constraints of a nationalized health-care system. We learned, and will continue to learn more, from Japan about the management of this growing patient population with its unique pathologies and challenges. With the recent natural disaster and ongoing safety concerns in Japan, the character and will of the people of Japan have been on display. Their courage and resolve combined with order and compassion are a testament to the nation's cultural identity. The seeds of the Traveling Fellowship were planted shortly after Japan's last wide-scale reconstruction, and the ties that have bound the JOA and the AOA together are strengthened through this trying time. We strongly urge our colleagues in the U.S. to help support the people, the physicians, and the health-care system of Japan through its most recent tribulations and offer them the same care and

  19. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Lu; WANG Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors. They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army. However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy? It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can't possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  20. Military Surgeon and Humanity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU; Lu; WANG; Yiran

    2015-01-01

    Military surgeons are a special group of doctors.They are both medical workers and soldiers.Their mission is to serve the wounded on the battlefield.And there is no doubt that military surgeons will save our comrades in the army.However,should a military surgeon save the wounded enemy?It is indeed a dilemma.Some may save the wounded enemy because military surgeons are doctors after all and they can’t possibly abandon anybody to his fate,but some refuse to do so because military surgeons are soldiers.Therefore,some situations on the battlefield are discussed and advice is suggested for military surgeons,with heartfelt anticipation for there being less casualties on the battlefield as well as alleviating human suffering caused by war.

  1. Competency-based education: a new model for teaching orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alman, Benjamin A; Ferguson, Peter; Kraemer, William; Nousiainen, Markku T; Reznick, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    The current methods used to train residents to become orthopaedic surgeons are based on tradition, not evidence-based models. Educators have only a limited ability to assess trainees for competency using validated tests in various domains. The reduction in resident work hours limits the time available for clinical training, which has resulted in some calls for lengthening the training process. Another approach to address limited training hours is to focus training in a program that allows residents to graduate from a rotation based on demonstrated competency rather than on time on a service. A pilot orthopaedic residency curriculum, which uses a competency-based framework of resident training and maximizes the use of available training hours, has been designed and is being implemented.

  2. Variation in use of non-surgical treatments among osteoarthritis patients in orthopaedic practice in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives National and international evidence-based guidelines for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with non-surgical treatments, followed by surgical intervention if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatments, but there are indications that these are not optimally used. The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which all recommended non-surgical treatments were used by patients with hip or knee OA who receive(d) a total hip or knee replacement, as reported by patients and orthopaedic surgeons. Setting We performed two cross-sectional internet-based surveys among patients and orthopaedic surgeons throughout the Netherlands. Participants 195 OA patients either have undergone total knee arthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty no longer than 12 months ago or being on the waiting list for surgery with a confirmed date within 3 months and 482 orthopaedic surgeons were invited to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures The use of recommended non-surgical treatments including education about OA/treatment options, lifestyle advice, dietary therapy, physical therapy, acetaminophen, NSAIDs and glucocorticoid injections. Results 174 OA patients (93%) and 172 orthopaedic surgeons (36%) completed the surveys. Most recommended non-surgical treatments were given to the majority of patients (eg, 80% education about OA, 73% physical therapy, 72% acetaminophen, 80% NSAIDs). However, only 6% of patients and 10% of orthopaedic surgeons reported using a combination of all recommended treatments. Dietary therapy was used least frequently. Only 11% of overweight and 30% of obese participants reported having received dietary therapy and 28% of orthopaedic surgeons reported to prescribe dietary therapy to overweight patients. Conclusions While most recommended non-surgical treatments were used frequently as single therapy, the combination is used in only a small percentage of OA patients. Especially, use of dietary therapy

  3. Wilfred Trotter: surgeon, philosopher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Irving B

    2006-08-01

    There is no significant biography that records the accomplishments of Sir Wilfred Trotter, who was a general surgeon in its pure sense at a time when surgical specialization was in its infancy. Trotter was born in the 1870s in England. Despite being bedridden during his childhood with a musculoskeletal condition he was able to study medicine at London University, and eventually became Professor and Chair of Surgery at the University College Hospital, a position he held until his death in November 1939. He made many contributions to surgical care, particularly in the field of oncology. He attended to many famous people, including King George V and Sigmund Freud and was greatly honoured in his own milieu. He was named honorary surgeon and Sargent Surgeon to the king. In addition, he was a thoughtful individual who addressed problems in human behaviour, contradicting the stereotype of the contemporary surgeon.

  4. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care for You How to Use Apps and Social Media for Your Practice Why Participation in the STS ... STS_CTsurgery Surgeons Residents & Students Allied ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society ...

  5. Civil Surgeon Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — USCIS designates certain doctors (also known as civil surgeons) to perform the medical exam required for most Green Card applicants. This data set represents the...

  6. Searching for Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Scholars in Residence Clinical Trials Methods Course Health Services Research Methods Course Surgeon Specific Registry NSQIP Annual ... Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Gaza Strip Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey ...

  7. The role of other stakeholders than the surgeon in relation to surgical site infections following total joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuyts, Bart; Van den Eeden, Elke; Fennema, Peter

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary orthopaedics, surgical site infections (SSIs) can have significant negative consequences for both patients and the healthcare system overall. To date, most efforts at combating the risk of SSIs have focused on the role of the surgeon, yet recent data suggest that a more expansive approach is warranted. The current review offers an overview of the most-relevant factors associated with SSIs in orthopaedic surgery, and the crucial role that the full surgical staff can play in addressing them.

  8. Richard von Volkmann: surgeon and Renaissance man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Schneider, Peter; Engelhardt, Michael; Hargens, Alan R; Mubarak, Scott J

    2008-02-01

    Richard von Volkmann (1830-1889), one of the most important surgeons of the 19(th) century, is regarded as one of the fathers of orthopaedic surgery. He was a contemporary of Langenbeck, Esmarch, Lister, Billroth, Kocher, and Trendelenburg. He was head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Halle, Germany (1867-1889). His popularity attracted doctors and patients from all over the world. He was the lead physician for the German military during two wars. From this experience, he compared the mortality of civilian and war injuries and investigated the general poor hygienic conditions in civilian hospitals. This led him to introduce the "antiseptic technique" to Germany that was developed by Lister. His powers of observation and creativity led him to findings and achievements that to this day bear his name: Volkmann's contracture and the Hueter-Volkmann law. Additionally, he was a gifted writer; he published not only scientific literature but also books of children's fairy tales and poems under the pen name of Richard Leander, assuring him a permanent place in the world of literature as well as orthopaedics.

  9. Computational radiology for orthopaedic interventions

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a cohesive overview of the current technological advances in computational radiology, and their applications in orthopaedic interventions. Contributed by the leading researchers in the field, this volume covers not only basic computational radiology techniques such as statistical shape modeling, CT/MRI segmentation, augmented reality and micro-CT image processing, but also the applications of these techniques to various orthopaedic interventional tasks. Details about following important state-of-the-art development are featured: 3D preoperative planning and patient-specific instrumentation for surgical treatment of long-bone deformities, computer assisted diagnosis and planning of periacetabular osteotomy and femoroacetabular impingement, 2D-3D reconstruction-based planning of total hip arthroplasty, image fusion for  computer-assisted bone tumor surgery, intra-operative three-dimensional imaging in fracture treatment, augmented reality based orthopaedic interventions and education, medica...

  10. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  11. Orthopaedic Injuries in Equestrian Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason David; Gelbs, Jared Craig; Zhu, David Shiyu; Gallacher, Stacey Elisa; Sutton, Karen Michelle; Blaine, Theodore Alton

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the common nature of orthopaedic injuries in equestrian sports, there is no published review to specifically characterize orthopaedic injuries in equestrian athletes. Purpose: To characterize orthopaedic injury patterns in equine sports–related injuries and their treatment. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This review was performed through a PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus query (from 1978 to June 2014) in the English literature using search terms “(equine-related OR equestrian-related OR horse-related OR equestrian OR equestrians) AND (injury OR injuries).” Only full-text studies reporting on orthopaedic injury patterns pertinent to equestrian sports in the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) were included. Orthopaedic injuries were defined as those resulting in a fracture or dislocation. In all, 182 studies were excluded, leaving a total of 27 studies for evaluation. The studies included were analyzed for demographic and epidemiological data for orthopaedic injuries, including fractures and dislocations. Cranial and facial injuries were excluded from analysis. Results: The majority of those injured in the US were female (64.5%). The leading cause of injury in the US was falling from a horse. The use of protective equipment seemed to vary widely, with helmet use ranging from less than 6% up to 66.7%. In the UK, fractures were found to account for 17.4% of reported injures, compared with 33.6% of injuries in the US. The majority of fractures in US riders occurred in the upper extremities (50.7%). Conclusion: This review helps characterize the epidemiology of equestrian injuries based on currently available data. PMID:26535400

  12. Musculoskeletal ultrasound education: orthopaedic resident ability following a multimedia tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piposar, Jonathan R; Easley, Mark; Nunley, James A; DeOrio, James K; Talusan, Paul G; Gubler, Kyle E; Reach, John S

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK-US) is a quick and effective imaging tool that can be utilized by orthopaedic surgeons to identify common musculoskeletal pathology such as ankle tendinopathy. This study evaluated the ability of 15 orthopaedic surgery residents to identify and measure ankle tendons after attending a multimedia tutorial on MSK-US. Afterwards, proficiency of usage was assessed by identification and quantification of three ankle tendons (Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus) in a cadaver limb. Resident comfort level and plan for future use were also assessed. After completing the tutorial, accuracy measuring the Achilles, tibialis posterior, and flexor hallucis longus tendons was 94.8%, 90.2%, and 90.1%, respectively. Resident comfort level improved from a level of 2.3 before the tutorial to 6.8 afterwards. Seventy-one percent of residents plan to use ultrasound in clinical practice. These results show that orthopaedic surgery residents can identify and assess tendon size via MSK-US with sufficient accuracy after a multimedia tutorial.

  13. Neoprene Orthopaedic Supports: An Underrecognised Cause of Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkey, S; Ghaffar, S

    2015-01-01

    Thioureas, often contained within neoprene to provide water resistance, are an important cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in those who use neoprene products. We wish to present three cases of thiourea-induced ACD from three different orthopaedic supports containing neoprene. The first case was a 67-year-old woman who developed an itchy rash on her heel three weeks after using a neoprene insole for plantar fasciitis. The second case was a 47-year-old man who developed an itchy rash on his wrist after wearing neoprene wrist splints for psoriatic arthropathy. The third case was a 77-year-old woman who experienced a severe erythematous rash with blistering from a neoprene elbow brace she received following a humeral fracture. All patients were patch tested to the British Society of Cutaneous Allergy Standard and rubber series and a cut piece from all the relevant supports. At 96 hours, all patients had a + reaction to mixed dialkylthiourea, diethylthiourea, and the supports' material. No other positive patch test reactions were identified. As neoprene is fast becoming one of the most popular materials used for orthopaedic supports, awareness of this reaction and close liaison between dermatologists and orthopaedic surgeons are therefore essential to allow for early recognition of this complication.

  14. Neoprene Orthopaedic Supports: An Underrecognised Cause of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hawkey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thioureas, often contained within neoprene to provide water resistance, are an important cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD in those who use neoprene products. We wish to present three cases of thiourea-induced ACD from three different orthopaedic supports containing neoprene. The first case was a 67-year-old woman who developed an itchy rash on her heel three weeks after using a neoprene insole for plantar fasciitis. The second case was a 47-year-old man who developed an itchy rash on his wrist after wearing neoprene wrist splints for psoriatic arthropathy. The third case was a 77-year-old woman who experienced a severe erythematous rash with blistering from a neoprene elbow brace she received following a humeral fracture. All patients were patch tested to the British Society of Cutaneous Allergy Standard and rubber series and a cut piece from all the relevant supports. At 96 hours, all patients had a + reaction to mixed dialkylthiourea, diethylthiourea, and the supports’ material. No other positive patch test reactions were identified. As neoprene is fast becoming one of the most popular materials used for orthopaedic supports, awareness of this reaction and close liaison between dermatologists and orthopaedic surgeons are therefore essential to allow for early recognition of this complication.

  15. Surgical hand scrub practices in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adnan; McLaren, Sandra G; Nelson, Carl L

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the practice of surgical hand scrubbing among orthopaedic surgeons, faculty, residents, and nurses met the institution's recommended 5-minute scrub policy and how often a 2-minute surgical hand scrub was used. Forty-eight subjects' hand scrub times were recorded discreetly for a total of 125 observations. All individuals scrubbed for a mean of 2.54 minutes and all scrubbed less than the 5-minute institutionally recommended policy. We found that 35.2% scrubbed less than 2 minutes and 64.8% scrubbed greater than 2 minutes. The subjects studied were polled to determine whether they knew the scrub policy, the minimum effective scrub time, and their perception of how long they scrub. Three of the 16 respondents correctly answered the question regarding the hospital's recommended policy regarding scrub time of 5 minutes. All stated they thought they scrubbed at least 2 minutes and all agreed that at least a 2-minute scrub should be done.

  16. Surgical advances during the First World War: the birth of modern orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Arul; Eardley, W G P; Edwards, D S; Clasper, J C; Stewart, M P M

    2016-02-01

    The First World War (1914-1918) was the first truly industrial conflict in human history. Never before had rifle fire and artillery barrage been employed on a global scale. It was a conflict that over 4 years would leave over 750,000 British troops dead with a further 1.6 million injured, the majority with orthopaedic injuries. Against this backdrop, the skills of the orthopaedic surgeon were brought to the fore. Many of those techniques and systems form the foundation of modern orthopaedic trauma management. On the centenary of 'the War to end all Wars', we review the significant advances in wound management, fracture treatment, nerve injury and rehabilitation that were developed during that conflict.

  17. A Clinical Practice Update on the Latest AAOS/ADA Guideline (December 2012) on Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Dental Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hamedani Sh. DDS, MSc

    2013-01-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association (ADA), along with 10 other academic associations and societies recently (December 2012) published their mutual clinical practice guideline “Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.” This evidence-based guideline ,detailed in 325 pages, has three recommendations and substitutes the previous AAOS guideline. The new published clinical guideline is a protocol to pre...

  18. Analysis of the basic science section of the orthopaedic in-training examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibani-Rad, Shahin; Arnoczky, Steven Paul; Walter, Norman E

    2012-08-01

    Since 1963, the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE) has been administered to orthopedic residents to assess residents' knowledge and measure the quality of teaching within individual programs. The OITE currently consists of 275 questions divided among 12 domains. This study analyzed all OITE basic science questions between 2006 and 2010. The following data were recorded: number of questions, question taxonomy, category of question, type of imaging modality, and recommended journal and book references. Between 2006 and 2010, the basic science section constituted 12.2% of the OITE. The assessment of taxonomy classification showed that recall-type questions were the most common, at 81.4%. Imaging modalities typically involved questions on radiographs and constituted 6.2% of the OITE basic science section. The majority of questions were basic science questions (eg, genetics, cell replication, and bone metabolism), with an average of 26.4 questions per year. The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (American Volume) and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons' Orthopaedic Basic Science were the most commonly and consistently cited journal and review book, respectively. This study provides the first review of the question content and recommended references of the OITE basic science section. This information will provide orthopedic trainees, orthopedic residency programs, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Evaluation Committee valuable information related to improving residents' knowledge and performance and optimizing basic science educational curricula.

  19. Extending the role of a healthcare digital library environment to support orthopaedic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Board, Timothy; Carr, Leslie; Wills, Gary; Power, Guillermo; Bailey, Christopher; Hall, Wendy; Stenning, Matthew; Grange, Simon

    2006-06-01

    A digital archive, together with its users and its contents, does not exist in isolation; there is a cycle of activities which provides the context for the archive's existence. In arguing for the broadening of the traditional view of digital libraries as merely collections towards the processes of collecting and deploying, we have developed an extend ed digital library environment for orthopaedic surgeons which bridges the gap between the undertaking of experimental work and the dissemination of its results through electronic publication.

  20. Prophylactic antibiotics in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokuski, Laura; Clyburn, Terry A; Evans, Richard P; Moucha, Calin S

    2011-01-01

    The use of prophylactic antibiotics in orthopaedic surgery has been proven effective in reducing surgical site infections after hip and knee arthroplasty, spine procedures, and open reduction and internal fixation of fractures. To maximize the beneficial effect of prophylactic antibiotics, while minimizing any adverse effects, the correct antimicrobial agent must be selected, the drug must be administered just before incision, and the duration of administration should not exceed 24 hours.

  1. [The robotic surgeon training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crestani, Alessandro; Rossanese, Marta; Abbinante, Maria; Calandriello, Mattia; Kungulli, Afrovita; Giannarini, Gianluca; Ficarra, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    The widespread robotic surgery in the world highlighted the relevance of the training programs for young urologists and residents. In the last years, urologic societies and some independent robotic surgeons strongly worked to standardize some general and specific training modules. Theoretical and practical sections of robotic training programs have been recently specified. The role of simulators, dry and wet laboratories, bedside assistance, and modular (step-by-step) training at console represent the most relevant elements of robotic surgeon training. Ideally, these didactic tools should be available in modern training centers. The development of structured robotic training programs should be considered as one of the priorities that the urologic community must take into account in the near future.

  2. Therapists, Trainers, and Acupuncturists: Focused Review for the Orthopedic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Christopher M; Kruger, Cori L

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of orthopedic injuries requires a multidisciplinary team, including physical and occupational therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, and acupuncturists. Orthopedic surgeons commonly encounter these practitioners but may not be familiar with the training, credentialing, and most importantly, the appropriate use of members of this team. There are general similarities in practice locations as well as types of symptoms addressed by the providers discussed, which include the treatment of physical pain, evaluation and treatment of physical impairment, and some facilitation of adaptation to the limitations caused by injuries. Across the 5 types of providers discussed there are widely varying training and licensing requirements, specializations, and continuing education requirements to maintain licensure. This article provides a focused review of these members of the multidisciplinary team and highlights the current American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommendations for the use of occupational and physical therapists for orthopedic conditions, including hip fractures, total hip arthroplasty, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  3. Orthopaedic Problems of the Mentally Retarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Anthony

    1972-01-01

    Problems encountered by orthopedic surgeons treating the mentally retarded are identified, and cooperation among pediatricians, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and orthopedic surgeons is recommended. (GW)

  4. [The singular story of Doctor Worm -Nicholas Andry de Boisregard- and of his daughters Parasitology and Orthopaedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Walter

    2012-10-01

    Homini verminoso or Dr. Worm were the nicknames that Nicholas Aindry won in life for his consecration to the study of intestinal worms and for his bad temper, which led him to fiercely attack the surgeons. The article reassumes the studies and contributions that gave Andry the title of Father of Parasitology and the candidacy to Father of Orthopaedics, and mentions some other candidates to this honor. Quite a man, he had -besides his biological one- two famous daughters, growing till our days; wrote at least three valuable books; and planted the immortal "tree of Andry", the symbol of Orthopaedics.

  5. International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies: A model for international collaboration to promote orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Miclau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In October 2013, the International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies (ICORS; http://i-cors.org was founded with inaugural member organisations from the previous Combined Orthopaedic Research Society, which had sponsored combined meetings for more than 2 decades. The ICORS is dedicated to the stimulation of orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research in fields such as biomedical engineering, biology, chemistry, and veterinary and human clinical research. The ICORS seeks to facilitate communication with member organisations to enhance international research collaborations and to promote the development of new international orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research organisations. Through new categories of membership, the ICORS represents the broadest coalition of orthopaedic research organisations globally.

  6. Pudendal nerve palsy in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of pudendal nerve palsy following routine trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery procedures ranges from 1.9% to 27.6%. Excessive and/or prolonged traction against the perineal post of a traction table, leading to direct compression and localised ischaemia to the nerve are suggested mechanisms of injury. Misuse of traction and the inappropriate placement of the perineal post, leading to crushing and stretching of the pudendal nerve, are two main contributing factors leading to its postoperative palsy. The sequelae may be sensory, motor or mixed. In most cases, these injuries are transient and tend to resolve within several weeks or months. However, complete neurological recovery may be unpredictable and the effects of ongoing dysfunction potentially disastrous for the individual. In terms of preventative measures, magnitude and duration of traction time should be minimised; traction should be limited to the critical operative steps only. Additionally, the perineal post should be placed between the genitalia and the contralateral leg. A well-padded, large-diameter perineal post should be used (>10cm). Adequate muscle relaxation during anaesthesia is particularly important in young men who have strong muscles and thus require larger traction forces when compared to elderly patients. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology behind the development of this palsy and the measures that can be employed to reduce its occurrence. In procedures where a traction table is employed, consenting for pudendal nerve palsy should be considered by the surgical team.

  7. The need for research training in orthopaedic residency education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert W

    2006-08-01

    Orthopaedic surgery residents should be exposed during their clinical training to the processes of creativity and innovation that are the basis of research. The definition of a research experience for surgery residents should be broad and include not only traditional bench research in a basic science environment but also translational and clinical research to move innovation from bench to bedside and validate its value in a scientific manner. Additionally, there are enormous opportunities for surgeons to study healthcare delivery and policy and to develop new approaches to educating colleagues, other medical personnel, and patients. The question that must be addressed is how can the knowledge and human resources residing in orthopaedic surgery best be used to meet the challenges future residents will face as healthcare undergoes profound changes? How these issues are managed in a rapidly changing environment is the critical issue and the challenge faced by surgical training programs wishing to remain viable and provide trainees with the opportunity to adapt and be successful in the future. What is state of the art today will not be tomorrow and unless trainees are encouraged and taught to be creative and innovative they risk becoming surgical dinosaurs.

  8. [The surgeon at retirement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández del Castillo-Sánchez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Our vocation has called us to become physicians and we have learned and practiced surgery as part of our medical training and knowledge. Surgery is an art expressed during each intervention carried out with effectiveness and devotion; enjoying the pleasure to perform it without hurry, with harmony, fluency and cleanness. Therefore, medicine and surgery belong to the same vocation being at service of people with the clear mission to heal patients and if we favor it, this activity will get our attention firmly and forever. A physician is a sensitive person that understands the sadness and happiness consequence of his actions at the office, operating room, research and relationships with colleagues. This provides him a pleasant experience of practicing medicine and especially surgery. Medical and surgical professions produce an irresistible attraction and they are very rewarding experiences; however, as time goes by there are effects over physician's health. Surgeons will switch from an active professional role into a passive agent and will need to assess himself and answer if he is still in optimal conditions to practice medicine. Therefore, every surgeon must be prepared to grow old from the start and preserve his Faith once retirement has been accepted as the next step in his career.

  9. European Working Time Directive and the use of simulators and models in Irish orthopaedics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, C

    2011-09-07

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the perceptions of a group of orthopaedic trainees and trainers on perceived effects of the proposed introduction of European Working Time Directive (EWTD) restrictions into Ireland and on the use of simulators in training orthopaedic skills. METHODS: A structured questionnaire was developed to evaluate the opinions of a group of orthopaedic surgeons and trainees at the annual national orthopaedic conference. RESULTS: There were 44 participants [12 consultants, 32 trainees (15 specialist registrars, 8 registrars, 9 senior house officers)]. Seventy-five percent of participants felt that both the quality of patient care and training would be negatively affected. A higher proportion of consultants than trainees felt that quality of life would be affected. A high proportion of participants (81.8%) had used a simulator or model to learn a surgical skill and 100% would consider using them again. CONCLUSIONS: While we wait for the full introduction of the EWTD hours the perception is that both quality of patient care and training will be affected. Models and simulators are well perceived as a method of training.

  10. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the risks and trust a board-certified plastic surgeon to perform your cosmetic or reconstructive surgery. ASPS member surgeons have the training and experience that ... 1300 Chain Bridge Road McLean, VA 22101 (703) 790-5454 Timothy Germain ...

  11. Smartphones and the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadithy, Nada; Ghosh, Sudip

    2013-06-01

    Surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities since the introduction of the European Working Time Directive. Smartphone sales are increasing and have usurped computer sales for the first time. In this context, smartphones are an important portable reference and educational tool, already in the possession of the majority of surgeons in training. Technology in the palm of our hands has led to a revolution of accessible information for the plastic surgery trainee and surgeon. This article reviews the uses of smartphones and applications for plastic surgeons in education, telemedicine and global health. A comprehensive guide to existing and upcoming learning materials and clinical tools for the plastic surgeon is included. E-books, podcasts, educational videos, guidelines, work-based assessment tools and online logbooks are presented. In the limited resource setting of modern clinical practice, savvy plastic surgeons can select technological tools to democratise access to education and best clinical care.

  12. Effect of clinical specialist physiotherapists in orthopaedic diagnostic setting - A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Jeanette; Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Juhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Trøstrup J1, Mikkelsen LR1, Juhl CB2 1 Center for Planlagt Kirurgi, Regionshospitalet Silkeborg 2 Forskningsenheden for Muskuloskeletal Funktion og Fysioterapi (FoF), Institut for idræt og biomekanik, Syddansk Universitet Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of clinical assessment of patients...... with musculoskeletal complaint performed by Clinical Specialist Physiotherapists (CSP) compared to Orthopaedic Surgeons (OS) on diagnostic agreement, economic cost and patient satisfaction. Methods: A systematic review was performed by searching in MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL......), EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro and reference lists of included studies and previously published systematic reviews. Studies evaluating 1) adults (18+) with a musculoskeletal complaint referred to orthopaedic outpatient assessment and 2) patient assessment performed by CSP were included. Studies conducted...

  13. Physiotherapy following elective orthopaedic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kleijn, P; Blamey, G; Zourikian, N; Dalzell, R; Lobet, S

    2006-07-01

    As haemophilic arthropathy and chronic synovitis are still the most important clinical features in people with haemophilia, different kinds of invasive and orthopaedic procedures have become more common during the last decades. The availability of clotting factor has made arthroplasty of one, or even multiple joints possible. This article highlights the role of physiotherapy before and after such procedures. Synovectomies are sometimes advocated in people with haemophilia to stop repetitive cycles of intra-articular bleeds and/or chronic synovitis. The synovectomy itself, however, does not solve the muscle atrophy, loss of range of motion (ROM), instability and poor propriocepsis, often developed during many years. The key is in taking advantage of the subsequent, relatively safe, bleed-free period to address these important issues. Although the preoperative ROM is the most important variable influencing the postoperative ROM after total knee arthroplasty, there are a few key points that should be considered to improve the outcome. Early mobilization, either manual or by means of a continuous passive mobilization machine, can be an optimal solution during the very first postoperative days. Muscle isometric contractions and light open kinetic chain exercises should also be started in order to restore the quadriceps control. Partial weight bearing can be started shortly after, because of quadriceps inhibition and to avoid excessive swelling. The use of continuous clotting factor replacement permits earlier and intensive rehabilitation during the postoperative period. During the rehabilitation of shoulder arthroplasty restoring the function of the rotator cuff is of utmost importance. Often the rotator cuff muscles are inhibited in the presence of pain and loss of ROM. Physiotherapy also assists in improving pain and maintaining ROM and strength. Functional weight-bearing tasks, such as using the upper limbs to sit and stand, are often discouraged during the first 6

  14. Exploring Canadian Identity through Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2001-01-01

    Considers what commonplaces of culture and identity are being, could be, transmitted through the use of children's literature in classrooms. Explores what is Canadian about Canadian children's literature. Describes a study which involved Canadian elementary school children who read Canadian children's books. Concludes that literature plays a…

  15. Workers' compensation status: does it affect orthopaedic surgery outcomes? A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Ynoe de Moraes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Previous reviews have demonstrated that patient outcomes following orthopaedic surgery are strongly influenced by the presence of Workers' Compensation. However, the variability in the reviews' methodology may have inflated the estimated strength of this association. The main objective of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the influence of Workers' Compensation on the outcomes of orthopaedic surgical procedures. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the literature published in this area from 1992-2012, with no language restrictions. The following databases were used MEDLINE (Ovid, Embase (Ovid, CINAHL, Google Scholar, LILACS and Pubmed. We also hand-searched the reference sections of all selected papers. We included all prospective studies evaluating the effect of compensation status on outcomes in adult patients who had undergone surgery due to orthopaedic conditions or diseases. Outcomes of interest included disease specific, region specific and/or overall quality of life scales/questionnaires and surgeons' personal judgment of the results. We used an assessment tool to appraise the quality of all included studies. We used Review Manager to create forest plots to summarize study data and funnel plots for the assessment of publication bias. RESULTS: Twenty studies met our eligibility criteria. The overall risk ratio for experiencing an unsatisfactory result after orthopaedic surgery for patients with compensation compared to non-compensated patients is 2.08 (95% CI 1.54-2.82. A similar association was shown for continuous data extracted from the studies using assessment scales or questionnaires (Standard Mean Difference = -0.70 95% CI -0.97- -0.43. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients who undergo orthopaedic surgical procedures, those receiving Workers' Compensation experience a two-fold greater risk of a negative outcome. Our findings show a considerably lower estimate of risk compared to previous reviews that include retrospective

  16. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  17. Bioceramic Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2003-11-02

    During the past century, man-made materials and devices have been developed to the point at which they have been used successfully to replace and/or restore function to diseased or damaged tissues. In the field of orthopaedics, the use of metal implants has significantly improved the quality of life for countless individuals. Critical factors for implant success include proper design, material selection, and biocompatibility. While early research focused on the understanding biomechanical properties of the metal device, recent work has turned toward improving the biological properties of these devices. This has lead to the introduction of calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics as a bioactive interface between the bulk metal impart and the surrounding tissue. The first calcium phosphate coatings where produced via vapor phase routes but more recently, there has been the emergence of solution based and biomimetic methods. While each approach has its own intrinsic materials and biological properties, in general CaP coatings have the promise to improve implant biocompatibility and ultimately implant longevity.

  18. Daniel Mollière (1848-1890): the French anatomist-surgeon who introduced Robin's pioneering osteoclast for the genu valgum observed in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Sgantzos, Markos; Androutsos, George

    2015-08-01

    Inside the pages of the French medical treatises of the 19th century a forgotten osteoclast apparatus for the genu valgum observed in adolescents remained hidden waiting to be unearthed. It was Victor Robin's osteoclast, which has been used by the supreme French anatomist and surgeon Daniel Mollière. With the purpose to share a significant heritage on orthopaedics, a thorough research of the literature of the era was conducted. Our study resulted in the illumination of both Mollière's prolific figure and osteoclast's impact on orthopaedic surgery at that time. Having in mind Mollière's perseverance towards surgical apparatuses, his antiseptic measures inside his operating theatre, his published treatises, his surgical skills, we may effortlessly conclude that he stands among Lyon's best surgeons with an important contribution to orthopaedics.

  19. Damage control orthopaedics in 53 cases of severe polytrauma who have mainly sustained orthopaedic trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ai-min; YIN Xiang; SUN Hong-zhen; DU Quan-yin; WANG Zi-ming

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To discuss damage control orthopaedics in 53 cases of severe polytrauma who have mainly sustained orthopaedic trauma.Methods: The data of 53 cases of severe polytrauma who had mainly sustained orthopaedic trauma were retrospectively analyzed.And the methods and timing of damage control orthopaedics were discussed in this study.Results: We succeeded in rescuing the lives of all the 53 patients,and 38 patients returned to their former work.Conclusions: Injury Severity Seore (ISS90) should be 17 in severe polytrauma patients,but in severe polytrauma patients who have mainly sustained orthopaedic trauma,the ISS90 of bone and joint injuries should be 16.We recommend that primary minimally-invasive external fracture stabilization should be made for extremities and pelvis in these patients to avoid additional surgical trauma and that definitive secondary fracture care should be performed after medical stabilization for these patients in intensive care unit (ICU).

  20. 15th Chapter of Surgeons Lecture: Surgeon of the new millennium--surgeon, scientist and scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S K

    2004-11-01

    The surgeon of the new millennium has come a long way from his humble beginnings in the Middle Ages as the lowly barber-surgeon. The skills and techniques developed by outstanding surgeons like Astley Cooper of the 19th century have withstood the test of time and have been refined by subsequent generations of surgical masters. The scientific basis of modern surgery was put on a firm footing in the early 19th century through the discovery of anaesthesia and microorganisms as a cause of many diseases and surgical complications. The 20th century brought about rapid progress in medicine, information technology (IT) and the life sciences, and closed with a big bang with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. For the surgeon of the 21st century to remain relevant, he must embrace the concept of the Total Surgeon. Not doing so will render him irrelevant in the course of time, for having good surgical technique alone is insufficient. He must also lead in scientific endeavours to push the frontiers of the life sciences in attempts to solve the insoluble, and be scholarly in thought, attitude and behaviour. In other words, he must be a Surgeon-Scientist-Scholar.

  1. I Am Canadian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joe

    2011-01-01

    "I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness......."I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness....

  2. Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Device Actuated with Pneumatic Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Petre

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an innovative constructive solution for such orthopaedic rehabilitation equipment, designed to ensure a swift reintegration of patients at as low a cost as possible. The absolute novelty consists in the utilization of the linear pneumatic muscle as actuator of the orthopaedic rehabilitation equipment, thus achieving a light and highly compliant construction that satisfies safety requirements related to man-machine interaction. Pneumatic muscles are bio-inspired actuation systems characterized by a passive variable compliant behaviour. This property, deployed in rehabilitation systems, enables the development of human friendly devices, which are comfortable for the patients, and capable of safe interaction. This paper presents the constructive schematic of the orthopaedic rehabilitation equipment, the structure of the actuation and positioning system, and several of its functional characteristics.

  3. Radiation safety knowledge and practices among Irish orthopaedic trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, M

    2014-04-23

    Fluoroscopy is frequently used in orthopaedic surgery, particularly in a trauma setting. Exposure of patients and staff to ionising radiation has been studied extensively; however, little work has been done to evaluate current knowledge and practices among orthopaedic trainees.

  4. Inpatient consultations to an orthopaedic service: the hidden workload.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, N T

    2011-12-01

    While the quality and efficiency of out-patient orthopaedic referrals are well documented in the literature, there is little on the standard and appropriateness of inpatient orthopaedic consultations.

  5. Current status and progress of digital orthopaedics in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Xian Pei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the development of digital medicine and digital anatomy, the concept of “digital orthopaedics” was raised by Pei Guo-Xian in China in 2006. The most striking feature of digital orthopaedics is the combination of basic and clinical orthopaedic knowledge with digital technology. In this review, we summarised the development of digital orthopaedics in China in recent years with respect to: the foundation of the Chinese Association of Digital Orthopedics, virtual human project (VHP, three-dimensional (3D reconstruction, finite element simulation, navigation in orthopaedic operations, and robot-assisted orthopaedic operations. In addition, we briefly reviewed digital orthopaedics in world leading institutes. We also looked into the future of digital orthopaedics in China and proposed the major challenges in digital technology and application in orthopaedics.

  6. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy could be a Potential Adjuvant Treatment for Orthopaedic Implant-associated Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-feng Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past half-century, biomaterials have been used in orthopaedic surgery world widely, but orthopaedic implant-associated infections (OIAIs are still a puzzle for orthopaedic surgeons, which may result in prolonged hospitalisation, poor functional status and high costs. The presence of implants increases the risk of microbial infection; moreover, the formation of bacterial biofilm leads to a higher resistance to antibiotics and local immune response. In such cases, conventional systemic delivery of drugs seems to be fairly inefficient and out-dated. Owing to this, debridement and/or removing the implant always become the only solution. Hence, it needs a simple, minimally invasive and effective therapy to eradicate the problem. There are abundant evidences showing that extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT has favourable effects on stimulating callus formation, inducing angiogenesis, promoting osteogenesis and relieving pain. Studies also indicated that ESWs have a significant bactericidal effect on bacterial strains of bone- and implant-associated infections. Therefore, a hypothesis proposed herein is that ESWT may well be an effective adjuvant treatment for OIAI by controlling infection, inducing bone regeneration and promoting re-osseointegration.

  7. International surgery: definition, principles and Canadian practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, Ronald

    2003-10-01

    This article is dedicated to the Canadian international surgeon, Norman Bethune (1890-1939). International surgery is defined as a humanitarian branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of bodily injuries or disorders by incision or manipulations, emphasizing cooperation and understanding among nations and involving education, research, development and advocacy. In this article I review the colonial past, the dark ages following the Declaration of Alma-Ata, the progress made and the present challenges in international surgery. I present a definition of international surgery that recognizes the current era of surgical humanitarianism, validates a global understanding of surgical issues and promotes cooperation among nations. Included are the principles of international surgery: education, research, infrastructure development and advocacy. International surgical projects are classified according to type (clinical, relief, developmental) and integration strategy (vertical or horizontal). Also reviewed are the Canadian practice of international surgery by nongovernmental, professional and academic organizations and the requirements of international and Canadian funding agencies, the development concepts basic to all projects, including results-based management and the cross-cutting themes of gender equity, environmental protection and human safety. I recommend formalizing international surgery into a discipline as a means of promoting surgical care in low-income countries. If international surgery is to be sustained in Canada, infrastructure and support from Canadian surgeons is particularly important. An understanding of the history, definition and classification of international surgery should promote surgical care in low-income countries.

  8. The Orthopaedically Handicapped and Computer Usage: The Case of TRNC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincyurek, Sibel; Arsan, Nihan; Caglar, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Although various studies have been conducted in the field of orthopaedic impairment, research regarding computer education for orthopaedically impaired individuals remains insufficient. This study aimed to evaluate the use of computers by orthopaedically impaired individuals from a wider perspective. The findings of the study emphasise the…

  9. Review of the current literature as a preparatory tool for the trauma content of the Orthopaedic in-Training Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjoodi, Payam; Marker, David R; McCallum, Jeremy R; Frassica, Frank J; Mears, Simon C

    2011-05-18

    Currently, the only standardized evaluation of trauma knowledge throughout orthopedic training is found in the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination, which is administered annually to all residents by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Our goals were to assess the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination to (1) determine the content of the trauma questions, (2) identify the content of the 3 most frequently referenced journals on the answer keys, and (3) evaluate the correlation between those contents.We reviewed the trauma-related Orthopaedic In-Training Examination questions and answer keys for 2002 through 2007. Content for test questions and cited literature was assessed with the same criteria: (1) category type, (2) anatomic location, (3) orthopedic focus, and (4) treatment type. For each of the 3 most frequently referenced journals, we weighted content by dividing the number of times it was referenced by the number of its trauma-related articles. We then compared the journal data individually and collectively to the data from the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination trauma questions. A chi-square analysis with Yates correction was used to determine differences. Questions and literature were similar in the most frequently addressed items in each of the 4 areas: category type (taxonomy 3, treatment), 52.4% and 60.7%, respectively; anatomic location (femur), 23.3% and 27.7%, respectively; orthopedic focus (fracture), 51.0% and 56.5%, respectively; and treatment type (multiple/nonspecific), 39.0% and 35.4%, respectively.The content correlation found between the questions and literature supports the idea that reviewing current literature may help prepare for the trauma content on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination.

  10. [The surgeons civil responsibility insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santovito, D

    2004-10-01

    After a short research in the field national insurances, the author analyses the professional physician insurance policy; the ambiguity and difficulty of contracts concerning the professional health activity of surgeon, whether as state employee or as independent professional are pointed put. With the introduction of the ministerial decree dated January 29,1992, the new labour agreement, the privacy law, the evolution of ''informed consent'', the esthetic injury concept, the safety regulations law and the administrative liability, surgeons must pay attention to draw up an insurance policy suitable to their profession.

  11. Irish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Banks, L N

    2012-02-01

    British Trainees have gradually had their working week curtained over the last 8 years. The Republic of Ireland Trainees have not been subjected to the European Working Time Directive prior to 2009 and have therefore worked on average, more hours than their British counterparts. We wanted to see if the differing schemes had an impact on recruiting and training orthopaedic surgeons. We surveyed Republic of Ireland orthopaedic specialist registrars (SpRs) and North West (NW) British SpRs\\/specialist trainees (ST3 and above) to see if there were any discernable differences in working patterns and subsequent training exposure. A standard proforma was given to Irish Trainees and to NW SpRs\\/STs at their National or regional teaching (January\\/February 2009). 62% of Irish and 47% of British NW Trainees responded. Irish trainees were more likely to have obtained a post-graduate degree (p = 0.03). The Irish worked more hours per week (p < 0.001) doing more trauma operative lists (p = 0.003) and more total cases per 6 months than the NW British (p = 0.003). This study suggests that more hours worked, equals more operative exposure, without detriment to the academic side of training. Obviously it is not possible to say whether fewer operations make for a poorer surgeon, but the evidence suggests that it may be true.

  12. Orthopaedic Considerations for the Adult With Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Timothy T; Cepela, Daniel J; Uhl, Richard L; Lozman, Jeffery

    2016-05-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable group of collagen-related disorders that affects up to 50,000 people in the United States. Although the disease is most symptomatic in childhood, adults with osteogenesis imperfecta also are affected by the sequelae of the disease. Orthopaedic manifestations include posttraumatic and accelerated degenerative joint disease, kyphoscoliosis, and spondylolisthesis. Other manifestations of abnormal collagen include brittle dentition, hearing loss, cardiac valve abnormalities, and basilar invagination. In general, nonsurgical treatment is preferred for management of acute fractures. High rates of malunion, nonunion, and subsequent deformity have been reported with both closed and open treatment. When surgery is necessary, surgeons should opt for load-sharing intramedullary devices that span the entire length of the bone; locking plates and excessively rigid fixation generally should be avoided. Arthroplasty may be considered for active patients, but the procedure frequently is associated with complications in this patient population. Underlying deformities, such as malunion, bowing, rotational malalignment, coxa vara, and acetabular protrusio, pose specific surgical challenges and underscore the importance of preoperative planning.

  13. Kant and the cosmetic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, J S

    1989-07-01

    Philosophers know that modern philosophy owes a great debt to the intellectual contributions of the 18th century philosopher Immanuel Kant. This essay attempts to show how cosmetic surgeons, and all surgeons at that, could learn much from his work. Not only did Kant write about the structure of human reasoning and how it relates to appearances but he also wrote about the nature of duties and other obligations. His work has strongly influenced medical ethics. In a more particular way, Kant wrote the most important work on aesthetics. His theory still influences how philosophers understand the meaning of the beautiful and how it pertains to the human figure. This essay presents an exercise in trying to apply Kantian philosophy to aesthetic plastic surgery. Its intention is to show cosmetic surgeons some of the implicit and explicit philosophical principles and potential arguments undergirding their potential surgical evaluations. It is meant to challenge the surgeon to reconsider how decisions are made using philosophical reasoning instead of some of the more usual justifications based on psychology or sociology.

  14. Prevalence of answers to orthopaedic in-training examination questions in 3 commonly used orthopedic review sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Chad A; Shakir, Irshad; Fuller, Brian C

    2012-09-01

    One of the greatest predictors for resident success on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE) is reviewing previous OITE questions. However, no studies have examined which review sources contain the most answers to previously asked OITE questions. The goal of this study was to determine which review source contains the most answers to previously asked OITE questions. Each question from the 2006 to 2010 OITEs was examined. The questions were placed into 1 of 13 categories based on their topic. The publication date of the recommended readings associated with each question was recorded. The answer to each question was then searched for in 3 commonly used review sources: Miller's Review of Orthopaedics, 5th edition (MRO), American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Comprehensive Orthopaedic Review (COR), and www.orthobullets.com (OB). Searchable electronic versions of each textbook were used, and each question had a 12-minute time limit. Of 1358 questions, 665 (49%) were found in all 3 sources. Significantly more answers were found on OB (99.4%) compared with MRO (60%) and COR (62%) (P<.0001). Significantly more answers to questions in each question category were found on OB compared with MRO or COR (P<.0001). More than 50% of all recommended readings for OITE questions were published within 5 years of the OITE. Residents using OB to review for the OITE will be exposed to significantly more answers of previously asked OITE questions than residents using MRO or COR (P<.0001).

  15. Health care delivery and the training of surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, L D

    1993-09-01

    Most countries have mastered the art of cost containment by global budgeting for public expenditure. It is not as yet clear whether the other option, managed care, or managed competition will accomplish cost control in America. Robert Evans, a Canadian health care expert, remains skeptical. He says, "HMO's are the future, always have been and always will be." With few exceptions, the amount spent on health care is not a function of the system but of the gross domestic product per person. Great Britain is below the line expected for expenditure, which may be due to truly impressive waiting lists. The United States is above the line, which is probably related to the overhead costs to administer the system and the strong demand by patients for prompt and highly sophisticated diagnostic measures and treatments. Canada is on the line, but no other country has subscribed to the Canadian veto on private insurance. Reform or changes are occurring in all countries and will continue to do so. For example, we are as terrified of managed care in Canada as you are of our brand of socialized insurance. We distrust practice by protocol just as you abhor waiting lists. From my perspective as a surgeon, I envision an ideal system that would cover all citizens, would maintain choice of surgeon by patients, would provide mechanisms for cost containment that would have the active and continuous participation of the medical profession, and would provide for research and development. Any alteration in health care delivery in the United States that compromises biomedical research and development will be a retrogressive, expensive step that could adversely affect the health of nations everywhere. Finally, a continuing priority of our training programs must be to ensure that the surgeon participating in this system continues to treat each patient as an individual with concern for his or her own needs.

  16. Contribution of biomechanics to clinical practice in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Savio L-Y

    2004-01-01

    Biomechanics is a field that has a very long history. It was described in ancient Chinese and Greek literature as early as 400-500 BC. The foundation of biomechanics, however, was laid during a period between the 1500's to 1700's by renowned personalities, da Vinci, Galileo, Borelli, Hooke, Newton, and so (Fung, Y.C., Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, 2nd Ed. Springer Verlag, Chapter 1, 1993). Beginning in the 1950's, Muybridge, Steindler, Inman, Lissner, and Hirsch performed the pioneering work on musculoskeletal biomechanics and the foundation of orthopaedic biomechanics was formed. For the following two decades, the field has blossomed and significant contributions in the biomechanics of bone, articular cartilage, soft tissues, upper and lower extremities, spine and so on has been made. More sophisticated equipment, coupled with mathematical modeling and better engineering design, has enabled us to make great strides. Bioengineers, in collaboration with orthopaedic surgeons, have translated many laboratory discoveries into clinical practice, leading to improved patient treatment and outcome. In the past 30 years, my colleagues and I have focused our research on the biomechanics of musculoskeletal soft tissues, ligaments and tendons, in particular. Therefore, in this lecture, the function of knee ligaments, the associated homeostatic responses secondary to immobilization and exercise, and healing of the ligaments will be reviewed. Examples of scientific findings that help to guide the surgical management of injury to ligaments will be given. New ideas on functional tissue engineering to improve the healing of knee ligaments and tendons will be presented. We have learned that tendons and ligaments are indeed complex biological tissues. To fully understand their behavior, healing and remodelling processes, this author advocates major efforts be made to bring molecular biologists, morphologists, biochemists, bioengineers, physical therapists and

  17. 21 CFR 878.4460 - Surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4460 Surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. A surgeon's glove is a device made of natural or synthetic rubber intended to be worn by... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's glove. 878.4460 Section 878.4460...

  18. ARE LEFT HANDED SURGEONS LEFT OUT?

    OpenAIRE

    SriKamkshi Kothandaraman; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2012-01-01

    Being a left-handed surgeon, more specifically a left-handed ENT surgeon, presents a unique pattern of difficulties.This article is an overview of left-handedness and a personal account of the specific difficulties a left-handed ENT surgeon faces.

  19. Outlier analysis in orthopaedics: use of CUSUM: the Scottish Arthroplasty Project: shouldering the burden of improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Gavin J; Brenkel, Ivan J; Smith, Rik; Howie, Colin R

    2011-12-21

    National joint registries have become well established across the world. Most registries track implant survival so that poorly performing implants can be removed from the market. The Scottish Arthroplasty Project was established in 1999 with the aim of encouraging continual improvement in the quality of care provided to joint replacement patients in Scotland. This aim has been achieved by using statistics to engage surgeons in the process of audit. We monitor easily identifiable end points of public concern and inform surgeons if they breach our statistical limits and become "outliers." Outlier status is often associated with poor implants, and our methods are therefore applicable for indirect implant surveillance. The present report describes the evolution of our statistical methodology, the processes that we use to promote positive changes in practice, and the improvements in patient outcomes that we have achieved. Failure need not be fatal, but failure to change almost always is. We describe the journey of both the Scottish Arthroplasty Project and the orthopaedic surgeons of Scotland to this realization.

  20. Sutures versus staples for wound closure in orthopaedic surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantz Jesse A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recently published meta-analysis comparing metallic staples to sutures in orthopaedic procedures revealed three fold increase in risk for infection in stapled wounds. The studies included in the meta-analysis are at risk of bias due to experimental design limitations. A large randomized controlled trial is proposed to direct orthopaedic surgeons in their choice of wound closure material. Methods/Design A parallel group randomized controlled trial with institutional review board approval will be conducted. Patients will be randomized intraoperatively to have skin wounds closed with sutures or staples. Dressings will be used to maintain blinding outcome assessors. The primary outcome measure will be a composite all-cause wound complication outcome measure composed of: infection, wound drainage, wound necrosis, blistering, dehiscence, suture abscess and material sensitivity reaction. An independent review board blinded to treatment assignment will adjudicate suspected complications based on clinical data. All deceased patients will also be reviewed. An interim analysis of complications will take place after half of the patients have been recruited. All data will be analyzed by a blinded statistician. Dichotomous primary and secondary outcome measures will be analyzed using the Chi-squared statistic. Continuous outcome measures will be analyzed using Student's t-test. Subgroup analysis will compare infection rates using sutures versus staples in each anatomic area (upper extremity, pelvis/acetabulum, hip/femur, knee, ankle. A further subgroup analysis will be conducted comparing trauma patients to elective surgery patients. Non-infected revision surgery will also be compared to primary surgery. Discussion Wound closure material is an afterthought for many orthopaedic surgeons. The combined results of several comparative trials suggests that the choice of wound closure materials may have an impact on the rate of surgical site

  1. Harvey Cushing's Canadian connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feindel, William

    2003-01-01

    During his surgical career between 1896 and 1934, Harvey Cushing made eight visits to Canada. He had a broad impact on Canadian medicine and neurosurgery. Cushing's students Wilder Penfield and Kenneth McKenzie became outstanding leaders of the two major centers in Canada for neurosurgical treatment and training. On his first trip to Canada, shortly after completing his surgical internship in August 1896, Cushing traveled with members of his family through the Maritime Provinces and visited hospitals in Quebec and Montreal. Eight years later, in February 1904, as a successful young neurosurgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, he reported to the Montreal Medico-Chirurgical Society on his surgical experience in 20 cases of removal of the trigeminal ganglion for neuralgia. In 1922, as the Charles Mickle Lecturer at the University of Toronto, Cushing assigned his honorarium of $1000 to support a neurosurgical fellowship at Harvard. This was awarded to McKenzie, then a general practitioner, for a year's training with Cushing in 1922-1923. McKenzie returned to initiate the neurosurgical services at the Toronto General Hospital, where he developed into a master surgeon and teacher. On Cushing's second visit to McGill University in October 1922, he and Sir Charles Sherrington inaugurated the new Biology Building of McGill's Medical School, marking the first stage of a Rockefeller-McGill program of modernization. In May 1929, Cushing attended the dedication of the Osler Library at McGill. In September 1934, responding to the invitation of Penfield, Cushing presented a Foundation Lecture-one of his finest addresses on the philosophy of neurosurgery-at the opening of the Montreal Neurological Institute. On that same trip, Cushing's revisit to McGill's Osler Library convinced him to turn over his own treasure of historical books to Yale University.

  2. Surgeons' non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Steven; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2012-02-01

    The importance of non-technical skills to surgical performance is gaining wide acceptance. This article discusses the core cognitive and social skills categories thought to underpin medical knowledge and surgical expertise, and describes the rise of non-technical skill models of assessment in surgery. Behavior rating systems such as NOTSS (Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons) have been developed to support education and assessment in this regard. We now understand more about these critical skills and how they impact surgery. The challenge in the future is to incorporate them into undergraduate teaching, postgraduate training, workplace assessment, and perhaps even selection.

  3. The "Canadian" in Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Wolodko, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Notes that a rich body of Canadian children's literature exists that reflects the country's literary and socio-cultural values, beliefs, themes and images, including those of geography, history, language and identity. Discusses how Canadians tend to identify themselves first by region or province and then by nation. (SG)

  4. Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Libraries in Canada, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes 15 articles that relate to Canadian children's literature, including the power of literature; using Canadian literature in Canada; the principal's role in promoting literacy; Canadian Children's Book Centre; the National Library of Canada's children's literature collection; book promotion; selection guide; publisher's perspective; and…

  5. [Hospitals and surgeons: Madrid 1940].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quevedo, Francisco Vázquez

    2007-01-01

    The history of the hospitals and general surgeons that best represent the centres in Madrid are here in reviewed, comprising the period between 1940 and the closure of the Hospital Clinico (1957) as well as the Hospital General (General Hospital) (1967), both in Atocha. Other hospitals which are reviewed and highlighted are: the H. de la Princesa (the Princess Hospital), the H. del Nifio Jesus (Hospital of the Child Jesus), the H. Militar (Military Hospital) and the Cruz Roja (Red Cross). Data is provided on the permanent surgeons in the following centres: H. General: J. Goyanes, J. Die, J. de la Villa, T. Rodriguez, E. Diaz, G. Bueno e H. Huerta; H. Clinico: L. de la Peña, L. Cardenal, L. Olivares, R. Argüelles, J. Estella y M. F. Zumel; H. Militar: M. G. Ulla, M. Bastos, M. G. Durán, J. S. Galindo, y A. G. Durán; Hospital de la Cruz Roja: V. M. Noguera, L. Serrada, F. Luque y L. L. Durán; H. de la Princesa: P. Cifuentes, P. G. Duarte, L. Estella y R. Aiguabella; H. del Niño Jesús: J. Garrido Lestache; H. Clinico, last time, Atocha: F. M. Lagos, R. Vara y A. de la Fuente.

  6. Publication Productivity of Early-Career Orthopedic Trauma Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hake, Mark E; Lee, John J; Goulet, James A

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were to: (1) define the publication productivity of early-career orthopedic trauma surgeons over time; (2) compare the early-career publication productivity of recent orthopedic trauma fellowship graduates vs their more senior colleagues; and (3) determine the proportion of fellowship graduates who meet the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) publication criteria for active membership early in their careers. Orthopedic trauma fellowship graduates from 1982 to 2007 were analyzed. A literature search was performed for each fellow's publications for the 6-year period beginning the year of fellowship graduation. Publication productivity was compared between early and recent groups of graduates, 1987 to 1991 and 2003 to 2007, respectively. Fulfillment of OTA publication criteria was determined. Seventy-nine percent of graduates contributed to 1 or more publications. The recent group produced more total publications per graduate (4.06 vs 3.29, P=.01) and more coauthor publications (2.60 vs 2.04, P=.019) than the early group. The number of first-author publications did not differ between groups (1.46 vs 1.25, P=.26). A greater percentage of the recent group met current OTA publication criteria compared with the early group (51% vs 35%, P=.04). The findings showed that recent orthopedic trauma graduates had increased publication productivity compared with their more senior colleagues, although a proportion had not qualified for active OTA membership 6 years into their career. Overall, these data are encouraging and suggest that young orthopedic trauma surgeons remain committed to sustaining a high level of academic excellence.

  7. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  8. Robotics as a Support Tool for Experimental Optimisation of Surgical Strategies in Orthopaedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Frigola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotics has shown its potential not only in assisting the surgeon during an intervention but also as a tool for training and for surgical procedure's evaluation. Thus, robotics can constitute an extension of simulators that are based on the high capabilities of computer graphics. In addition, haptics has taken a first step in increasing the performance of current virtual reality systems based uniquely on computer simulation and their corresponding interface devices. As a further step in the field of training and learning in surgery, this work describes a robotic experimental workstation composed of robots and specific measuring devices, together with their corresponding control and monitoring strategies for orthopaedic surgery. Through a case study, humerus arthroplasty, experimental evaluation shows the possibilities of having a test bed available for repetitive and quantifiable trials, which make a reliable scientific comparison between different surgical strategies possible.

  9. A review of the use of common antiplatelet agents in orthopaedic practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dineen, P F

    2010-09-01

    Antiplatelet agents are widely prescribed for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. A common clinical problem facing orthopaedic and trauma surgeons is how to manage patients receiving these agents who require surgery, either electively or following trauma. The dilemma is to balance the risk of increased blood loss if the antiplatelet agents are continued peri-operatively against the risk of coronary artery\\/stent thrombosis and\\/or other vascular event if the drugs are stopped. The traditional approach of stopping these medications up to two weeks before surgery appears to pose significant danger to patients and may require review. This paper covers the important aspects regarding the two most commonly prescribed antiplatelet agents, aspirin and clopidogrel.

  10. Orthopaedic health status of horses from 8 riding schools - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egenvall Agneta

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orthopaedic injury is the most common reason for lameness and wastage in sport and leisure horses. Studies on racehorses have shown differences in injury risk between trainers and training strategies. The aim was to study between riding school variation in orthopaedic health status by clinical examination and horses age, and control for change of examiner, in schools with previous high (n = 4 and low (n = 4 insurance utilisation. Methods Horses (n = 99 at 8 riding schools were examined for conformation, movement in all gaits, standing flexion tests and palpation by two veterinary surgeons (in some schools only one. Indexes of findings were created for total health, movements, limbs, conformation and back palpation. Results Logistic regression analyses showed that findings increased with age (walk, trot, canter, conformation left hind limb, palpation fore limbs, hooves and flexion tests or decreased with age (conformation right fore limb. Significant differences in findings were found between riding schools and examiner for seven and eight criteria each (partly overlapping. Increasing indexes were significantly associated with one examiner (total health, movements, back palpation, increasing age (total health, movements or more time at the school (limbs. The back palpation index was highest at 5 Conclusion The age distribution differed markedly between riding schools and age affected several types of findings. This, combined with the two opposite groups of insurance use, shows that schools with low insurance utilisation had previously been able to "avoid" using the insurance, maybe even on similar types of cases if these were more promptly/differently handled indicating differential coverage of disease data in the insurance database. The examiner effect was clearly demonstrated. For some findings, the amount of clinical observations differed by school, even when examiner and age was adjusted for. Most findings were of minor

  11. Users′ guide to the orthopaedic literature: What is a cost-effectiveness analysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As the cost of healthcare continue to rise, orthopaedic surgeons are being pressured to practice cost-effective healthcare. Consequently, economic evaluation of treatment options are being reported more commonly in medical and surgical literature. As new orthopaedic procedures and treatments may improve patient outcome and function over traditional treatment options, the effect of the potentially higher costs of new treatments should be formally evaluated. Unfortunately, the resources available for healthcare spending are typically limited. Therefore, cost-effectiveness analyses have become an important and useful tool in informing which procedure or treatment to implement into practice. Cost-effectiveness analysis is a type of economic analysis that compares both the clinical outcomes and the costs of new treatment options to current treatment options or standards of care. For a clinician to be able to apply the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis to their practice, they must be able to critically review the available literature. Conducting an economic analysis is a challenging process, which has resulted in a number of published economic analyses that are of lower quality and may be fraught with bias. It is important that the reader of an economic analysis or cost-effectiveness analysis have the skills required to properly evaluate and critically appraise the methodology used before applying the recommendations to their practice. Using the principles of evidence-based medicine and the questions outlined in the Journal of the American Medical Association′s Users′ Guide to the Medical Literature, this article attempts to illustrate how to critically appraise a cost-effectiveness analysis in the orthopaedic surgery literature.

  12. Optimization of Orthopaedic Drilling: A Taguchi Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh Kumar Pandey

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone drilling is a common procedure to prepare an implant site during orthopaedic surgery. An increase in temperature during such a procedure can result in thermal ostenecrosis which may delay healing or reduce the stability of the fixation. Therefore it is important to minimize the thermal invasion of bone during drilling. The Taguchi method has been applied to investigate the optimal combination of drill diameter, feed rate and spindle speed in dry drilling of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA for minimizing the temperature produced.

  13. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catledge, S A; Thomas, V; Vohra, Y K

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties.

  14. Capturing orthopaedic surgical site infection data and assessing dental recommendations with respect to total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florschutz, Anthony V; Parsley, Brian S; Shapiro, Irving M

    2015-04-01

    Greater documentation of patient history and clinical course is crucial for identifying factors that can influence surgical outcomes. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have already begun public reporting of hospital data on readmission, complication, and infection rates and will soon launch a website to make physician-specific outcomes data public. The orthopaedic community has the opportunity to lead the way in ensuring that adequate and accurate data is collected to facilitate appropriate comparisons that are based on patients' true risk of complications and the complexity of treatment. Several studies have reported a link between oral pathogens and periprosthetic infection, although it remains unclear whether organisms unique to dental tissues are also present in osteoarthritic joints and tissues affected by periprosthetic joint infection. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Dental Association are aware of these concerns and have created guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis in patients who have undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty and require high-risk dental procedures. Because these guidelines have received considerable criticism, recommendations that are based on scientific and case-controlled clinical studies and provide effective guidance on this important subject are needed.

  15. An audit of consent for allograft use in elective orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, C J; Pagoti, R; Davison, H; McAlinden, M G

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Patients receiving musculoskeletal allografts may be at risk of postoperative infection. The General Medical Council guidelines on consent highlight the importance of providing patients with the information they want or need on any proposed investigation or treatment, including any potential adverse outcomes. With the increased cost of defending medicolegal claims, it is paramount that adequate, clear informed patient consent be documented. Methods We retrospectively examined the patterns of informed consent for allograft bone use during elective orthopaedic procedures in a large unit with an onsite bone bank. The initial audit included patients operated over the course of 1 year. Following a feedback session, a re-audit was performed to identify improvements in practice. Results The case mix of both studies was very similar. Revision hip arthroplasty surgery constituted the major subgroup requiring allograft (48%), followed by foot and ankle surgery (16.3%) and revision knee arthroplasty surgery (11.4%) .On the initial audit, 17/45 cases (38%) had either adequate preoperative documentation of the outpatient discussion or an appropriately completed consent form on the planned use of allograft. On the re-audit, 44/78 cases (56%) had adequate pre-operative documentation. There was little correlation between how frequently a surgeon used allograft and the adequacy of consent (Correlation coefficient -0.12). Conclusions Although the risk of disease transmission with allograft may be variable, informed consent for allograft should be a routine part of preoperative discussions in elective orthopaedic surgery. Regular audit and feedback sessions may further improve consent documentation, alongside the targeting of high volume/low compliance surgeons.

  16. Robotics and the pediatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Attila; Langenburg, Scott; Klein, Michael D

    2003-06-01

    Surgical robots are enabling devices for minimally invasive (laparoscopic) surgery (MIS). They use a computer to enhance a surgeon's skills as hand movements are transmitted to robotic arms. The computer filters tremor, which becomes important at high magnifications of 10 to 15 times available in MIS. It also provides motion scaling so that large hand movements are converted to very small movements of the robotic arm. The robotic arms also have wrists that make suturing and knot tying far more accurate and efficient. Surgical robots are currently used clinically for procedures such as MIS Nissen fundoplication, cholecystectomy, and splenectomy. Laboratory experience indicates that they may provide advantages for newborn procedures such as portoenterostomy for biliary atresia and repair of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. They have a potential for making possible MIS procedures, which can only be done open now, and for introducing entirely new procedures as well as for the performance of procedures by operators distant from the patient.

  17. Working night shifts affects surgeons' biological rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic sleep deprivation combined with work during the night is known to affect performance and compromise residents' own safety. The aim of this study was to examine markers of circadian rhythm and the sleep-wake cycle in surgeons working night shifts. METHODS: Surgeons were monitored...... and on PC1. For all subjective measures, a marked deterioration was seen on PC1. CONCLUSION: Surgeons' circadian rhythm was affected by working night shifts....

  18. The advent of the restorative plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Matthew J; Pribaz, Julian J; Talbot, Simon G; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    Plastic surgery is presently typified by the existence of discrete clinical identities, namely that of the cosmetic plastic surgeon and the reconstructive plastic surgeon. The emergence of vascularized composite allotransplantation has been accompanied by the development of a third distinct clinical identity, that of the restorative plastic surgeon. The authors describe the core competencies that characterize this new identity, and discuss the implications of the advent of this new professional paradigm.

  19. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds. Mother…

  20. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds.…

  1. American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Assessment and Safety Committee Initiatives Past Presidents Healthcare Economics Committee 2017 Tripartite Meeting Search form Search Login Join Now Find a Surgeon ASCRS Patients Members Physicians Latest ...

  2. Computer Assisted Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, Niels Willem Luitzen

    2003-01-01

    To create an environment where surgeons receive real-time feedback about their instrument position, computer technologies were integrated in surgical procedures. This type of surgical technology is referred to as Computer Assisted Surgery (CAS). CAS offers the possibility to continuously monitor the

  3. Orthopaedic nurses' perception of research utilization - A cross sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical...... knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire....... The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack...

  4. Computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery and robotic surgery in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Various systems of computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) were reviewed. The first clinically applied system was an active robotic system (ROBODOC), which performed femoral implant cavity preparation as programmed preoperatively. Several reports on cementless THA with ROBODOC showed better stem alignment and less variance in limb-length inequality on radiographic evaluation, less incidence of pulmonary embolic events on transesophageal cardioechogram, and less stress shielding on the dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis than conventional manual methods. On the other hand, some studies raise issues with active systems, including a steep learning curve, muscle and nerve damage, and technical complications, such as a procedure stop due to a bone motion during cutting, requiring re-registration and registration failure. Semi-active robotic systems, such as Acrobot and Rio, were developed for ease of surgeon acceptance. The drill bit at the tip of the robotic arm is moved by a surgeon's hand, but it does not move outside of a milling path boundary, which is defined according to three-dimensional (3D) image-based preoperative planning. However, there are still few reports on THA with these semi-active systems. Thanks to the advancements in 3D sensor technology, navigation systems were developed. Navigation is a passive system, which does not perform any actions on patients. It only provides information and guidance to the surgeon who still uses conventional tools to perform the surgery. There are three types of navigation: computed tomography (CT)-based navigation, imageless navigation, and fluoro-navigation. CT-based navigation is the most accurate, but the preoperative planning on CT images takes time that increases cost and radiation exposure. Imageless navigation does not use CT images, but its accuracy depends on the technique of landmark pointing, and it does not take into account the individual uniqueness of the anatomy

  5. Danish surgeons' views on minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Hellen; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    that the risk was equal to traditional laparoscopy (3%). The fraction of surgeons willing to learn SILS and NOTES was 44.6% and 32.7%, respectively. The desire to learn was higher among less experienced and surgically active surgeons. Of the responders, 68.8% considered SILS and 43.2% considered NOTES would...

  6. [Michel Latarjet (1913-1999), surgeon explorer!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, T; Liverneaux, P

    2010-05-01

    In 1954, Michel Latarjet, anatomist and surgeon of Lyon, developed an original surgical technique to treat the unstable shoulder . This technique since kept his name: "Latarjet". He was a character in 1000 facets: highly skilled anatomist, skillful surgeon, talented sportsman, accomplished musician, big traveler, and many others... An eclectic life, symbol of an abundant XXth century.

  7. William Cheselden: anatomist, surgeon, and medical illustrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M A

    1999-11-01

    William Cheselden was Great Britain's foremost surgeon/scientist in the first half of the 18th century. Cheselden directly challenged the Company of Barber-Surgeons' exclusive right to control dissection in London by being the first to conduct a regular series of anatomy lectures and demonstrations outside of the Company's Hall. He incorporated his lecture syllabus into a handbook of anatomy, The Anatomy of the Humane Body, which was used by students for nearly 100 years. Cheselden also wrote the text and drew the illustrations for a majestic atlas of comparative osteology, the Osteographia, or the Anatomy of the Bones. Cheselden used his superior knowledge of anatomy to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with perineal lithotomy, one of the few operations possible in his era. Sagacious and pragmatic, Cheselden recognized that the enlightened practice of surgery beginning to take root in 18th-century London could flourish only under an autonomous body of surgeons. Cheselden used his personal funds and political skills to urge Parliament to pass legislation for the dissolution of the combined Company of Barber-Surgeons and the establishment of separate and distinct Surgeons' and Barbers' Companies. After disjoinder of the two groups on May 2, 1745, Cheselden served as one of the Wardens of the new Company of Surgeons--a predecessor of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. In 1746, Cheselden, who helped design the first Surgeons' Hall, served as the Company's Master.

  8. Orthopaedic Surgery Under National Health Reform: An Analysis of Power, Process, Adaptation, and Leadership: AOA Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Charles D; Adair, Daniel; Bozic, Kevin J; Manning, Blaine T; Saleh, Jamal K; Saleh, Khaled J

    2014-07-01

    Morrison argued that demography, economy, and technology drive the evolution of industries from a formative first-generation state ("First Curve") to a radically different way of doing things ("Second Curve") that is marked by new skills, strategies, and partners. The current health-reform movement in the United States reflects these three key evolutionary trends: surging medical needs of an aging population, dramatic expansion of Medicare spending, and care delivery systems optimized through powerful information technology. Successful transition from a formative first-generation state (First Curve) to a radically different way of doing things (Second Curve) will require new skills, strategies, and partners. In a new world that is value-driven, community-centric (versus hospital-centric), and prevention-focused, orthopaedic surgeons and health-care administrators must form new alliances to reduce the cost of care and improve durable outcomes for musculoskeletal problems. The greatest barrier to success in the Second Curve stems not from lack of empirical support for integrated models of care, but rather from resistance by those who would execute them. Porter's five forces of competitive strategy and the behavioral analysis of change provide insights into the predictable forms of resistance that undermine clinical and economic success in the new environment of care. This paper analyzes the components that will differentiate orthopaedic care provision for the Second Curve. It also provides recommendations for future-focused orthopaedic surgery and health-care administrative leaders to consider as they design newly adaptive, mutually reinforcing, and economically viable musculoskeletal care processes that drive the level of orthopaedic care that our nation deserves-at a cost that it can afford.

  9. PCR IN TRAUMATOLOGY AND ORTHOPAEDICS: METHOD DESCRIPTION AND APPLICABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Polyakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Review brief presents description of polymerase chain reaction method (PCR and its most common variants. Three PCR-based lines of research, carried out in the traumatology and orthopaedics, include identifying a causative agents of the implant-associated infection after orthopaedic surgery; detection of antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm forming genes. It was shown that PCR can be used as additional method for detection of genetic disorders, significant for traumatology and orthopaedics, and for investigation of cartilage and bone regeneration.

  10. The Future of Plastic Surgery: Surgeon's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin; Zor, Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Since the days of Sushruta, innovation has shaped the history of plastic surgery. Plastic surgeons have always been known as innovators or close followers of innovations. With this descriptive international survey study, the authors aimed to evaluate the future of plastic surgeons by analyzing how plastic surgery and plastic surgeons will be affected by new trends in medicine. Aesthetic surgery is the main subclass of plastic surgery thought to be the one that will change the most in the future. Stem cell therapy is considered by plastic surgeons to be the most likely "game changer." Along with changes in surgery, plastic surgeons also expect changes in plastic surgery education. The most approved assumption for the future of plastic surgery is, "The number of cosmetic nonsurgical procedures will increase in the future." If surgeons want to have better outcomes in their practice, they must at least be open minded for innovations if they do not become innovators themselves. Besides the individual effort of each surgeon, international and local plastic surgery associations should develop new strategies to adopt these innovations in surgical practice and education.

  11. The surgeon and human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jens; Kalangu, Kazadi K N

    2003-08-01

    The moral dilemmas faced by surgeons worldwide who treat patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be viewed against the background of experience in sub-Saharan countries, where the community prevalence is in excess of 25% (90% of hospital inpatients). When seeking consent for an HIV test before surgery, frank communication regarding the surgeons' perspective of risks to themselves and the patient is helpful. When consent for a test must be obtained from a substitute decision-maker, the surgeon should consider if the patient would want the decision-maker to know the result. Understanding the natural history of HIV in the surgical setting can help deal with the uncertainties encountered and should be a research priority for developing countries. International professional organizations are useful platforms for the exchange of ideas when surgeons encounter uncertainty by increasing access to journals and creating opportunities for discussion. Although supervisory bodies in some parts of the world prevent HIV-infected surgeons from putting patients at risk by offering surgery, the withdrawal of their services in developing countries can cause more harm than good. Surgeons in that position may be entitled to offer surgery but only with full disclosure of the risk of HIV infection to the patient. The decision-making process known as "accountability for reasonableness" allows surgeons to determine fairness, legitimacy, and acceptability when making resource allocation decisions involving patients with HIV.

  12. [General surgeons and varicose vein surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cuenca, Germán; Moreno-Egea, Alfredo; Aguayo-Albasini, Jose Luis

    2009-04-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a highly prevalent condition, with significant health and economic repercussions. Although important therapeutic developments have been introduced in recent years, the majority are dealt with by general surgeons in national health hospitals. These surgeons do not have the required and continuous training, and continue to perform classic surgery techniques. Also, their presence at scientific, organisational meetings and training is almost nil. We present an update on developments in phlebology, and tapping into the preliminary results of a national survey, we reflect on the current status of phlebology and beyond for those general surgeons who should have a role in this field.

  13. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    Background: A large proportion of surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience musculoskeletal pain in the upper body possibly due to awkward and long-term static positions. This can be detrimental for workability and health. The objective of the present review is to sum up...... in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...

  14. Validation of the Osteopenia Sheep Model for Orthopaedic Biomaterial Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Danielsen, C.C.; Cheng, L.;

    2009-01-01

    Validation of the Osteopenia Sheep Model for Orthopaedic Biomaterial Research +1Ding, M; 2Danielsen, CC; 1Cheng, L; 3Bollen, P; 4Schwarz, P; 1Overgaard, S +1Dept of Orthopaedics O, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, 2Dept of Connective Tissue Biology, University of Aarhus, Denmark, 3Biomedicine...... Lab, University of Southern Denmark, 4Dept of Geriatrics, Glostrup University Hospital, Denmark ming.ding@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk   Introduction:  Currently, majority orthopaedic prosthesis and biomaterial researches have been based on investigation in normal animals. In most clinical situations, most...... resemble osteoporosis in humans. This study aimed to validate glucocorticoid-induced osteopenia sheep model for orthopaedic implant and biomaterial research. We hypothesized that a 7-month GC treatment together with restricted diet but without OVX would induce osteopenia. Materials and Methods: Eighteen...

  15. Battlefield Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0138 TITLE: "Battlefield-Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome." PRINCIPAL...Orthopaedic Implant Outcome." 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Nadim James Hallab, PhD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...battlefield injuries resulting in increased exposure to metal may sensitize individuals and lead to excessive immune responses to orthopedic implants

  16. Nutritional assessment of orthopaedic patients: knowledge test for nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Hristozova, Kalina

    2015-01-01

    Adequate nutrition during hospitalization is essential for the avoidance of postoperative complications and the overall improved patient outcome. Studies show high prevalence of malnutrition among orthopaedic patients. Nurses play key role in nutritional assessment and are responsible for the provision of good quality nutritional care. The purpose of this final project was to produce a knowledge test for nurses working in orthopaedic wards. The final project answered the study question: Wh...

  17. Bone Adaptation Around Orthopaedic Implants of Varying Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Mette

    1998-01-01

    The bone adaptation around orthopaedic implants is simulated using a three-dimensional finite element model. The remodeling scheme has its origin in optimization methods, and includes anisotropy and time-dependent loading......The bone adaptation around orthopaedic implants is simulated using a three-dimensional finite element model. The remodeling scheme has its origin in optimization methods, and includes anisotropy and time-dependent loading...

  18. The Sheep as an Animal Model in Orthopaedic Research

    OpenAIRE

    J.C. Potes; Reis, J.; Capela e Silva, Fernando; Relvas, C; A.S. Cabrita; Simões, J A

    2008-01-01

    The use of sheep as model in remodeling process in cancelous and cortical bone for the assessment of new orthopaedic biomaterials and implants, in biomechanical studies and as model for tissue-engineered bone constructs has been described in the literature. Sheep are a well accepted model for in vivo studies in orthopaedic research to address the biomechanical, biochemical and histological processes of bone biology, due to similarities with humans in weight, size, bone and joint structure and...

  19. Sir Donald Ross, pioneer aortic valve surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, David

    2015-06-01

    Tribute to Sir Donald Ross by David Wheatley, as read by Robert Kleinloog, President, Society of Cardiothoracic Surgeons of South Africa at the Annual Congress of the South African Heart Association 19 October 2014.

  20. Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Research Foundation of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) and the Society of American ... W. OIympic Blvd Suite 600 Los Angeles, CA 90064 USA webmaster@sages.org Tel: (310) 437- ...

  1. The orthopaedic trauma literature: an evaluation of statistically significant findings in orthopaedic trauma randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tornetta Paul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based medicine posits that health care research is founded upon clinically important differences in patient centered outcomes. Statistically significant differences between two treatments may not necessarily reflect a clinically important difference. We aimed to quantify the sample sizes and magnitude of treatment effects in a review of orthopaedic randomized trials with statistically significant findings. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search (PubMed, Cochrane for all randomized controlled trials between 1/1/95 to 12/31/04. Eligible studies include those that focused upon orthopaedic trauma. Baseline characteristics and treatment effects were abstracted by two reviewers. Briefly, for continuous outcome measures (ie functional scores, we calculated effect sizes (mean difference/standard deviation. Dichotomous variables (ie infection, nonunion were summarized as absolute risk differences and relative risk reductions (RRR. Effect sizes >0.80 and RRRs>50% were defined as large effects. Using regression analysis we examined the association between the total number of outcome events and treatment effect (dichotomous outcomes. Results Our search yielded 433 randomized controlled trials (RCTs, of which 76 RCTs with statistically significant findings on 184 outcomes (122 continuous/62 dichotomous outcomes met study eligibility criteria. The mean effect size across studies with continuous outcome variables was 1.7 (95% confidence interval: 1.43–1.97. For dichotomous outcomes, the mean risk difference was 30% (95%confidence interval:24%–36% and the mean relative risk reduction was 61% (95% confidence interval: 55%–66%; range: 0%–97%. Fewer numbers of total outcome events in studies was strongly correlated with increasing magnitude of the treatment effect (Pearson's R = -0.70, p Conclusion Our review suggests that statistically significant results in orthopaedic trials have the following implications-1 On average

  2. Transplant surgeon formation: vocation, incentives, between old and new surgeon generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaria, G; Cardillo, A

    2006-05-01

    The training of the transplant surgeon is one of the most difficult paths in medicine. The transplant surgeon must be trained as a general and a vascular surgeon; he has to be skilled and upgraded in transplant surgical technique; he has to decide the suitability of the donor and of the organs as well as the immunosuppressive therapy for each recipient; he must know the intensive care unit, hepatology, and nephrology. The transplant surgeon has to deal with surgical, infectious, and metabolic complications after organ transplantation. Thus, clinical formation of the transplant surgeon is multifactorial and always upgraded. However, transplants never happen in the morning; retrivals are more likely to be in the night (especially the holidays ones). "Weekend" is a word not frequently used by transplant surgeons. Moreover, when the transplant procedure happens, the normal activity of the ward and of the outpatient clinic were have to be done. The transplant surgeon must have a sort of "vocation" for such a job. Organ harvesting setting is a good proof of adaptability, always during nighttime, often in small hospitals with operating room nurses unfamiliar with the procedure, sometimes waiting for some colleagues or delaying the surgery. This vocation is enhanced by enthusiasm, but incentives are necessary to feed this love. Incentives should be professional and economic; transplant surgeons should be allowed to make clinical decisions, to choose the surgical technique of transplantation, to control the decision process. Lastly, due to the "total on call," the surgeon should profit from a right salary avoiding extramural activities.

  3. Justifications and needs for diversity in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A A

    1999-05-01

    America is founded on high humanitarian, democratic ideals. The historic facts of slavery, discrimination, and segregation challenge and taint these democratic principles. Although progress has been made, serious racial problems remain. In 1997, the United States had 474 active hate groups, up 20% from 1996. African American males who have the same education as white males doing the same work earn approximately 75% of what their white counterparts earn. America, as predicted by the Kerner Commission Report, is two societies: black and white, separate, and unequal. Some astonishing disparities in healthcare exist. Peer reviewed medical literature documents that African Americans have higher infant mortality rates, shorter life expectancies, fewer joint replacements, and more amputations than whites. Communications within a diverse group of students and teachers enriches the educational experience. The late Supreme Court Justice Lewis Powell, LLD, asserted that a medical student from a particular background may enrich classmates' understanding of people whose cultures are different from their own, and improve their ability to serve a heterogeneous patient population. Diversity on clinical teams can enhance rapport between patient and physician, and can diminish unthinking insults to patients, born of physician ethnic insensitivity. Healthcare facilities with diverse staffs are more likely than homogeneous facilities to attract and successfully serve the nation's diverse population. A University of California at Davis School of Medicine study showed that diversity can be achieved without compromising quality of patient care. Clinically and ideologically, diversity in orthopaedics is good for patients and for the country.

  4. Orthopaedic tissue engineering and bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Glenn; Buchanan, Fraser; Marsh, David; Harkin-Jones, Eileen; Little, Uel; McCaigue, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Orthopaedic tissue engineering combines the application of scaffold materials, cells and the release of growth factors. It has been described as the science of persuading the body to reconstitute or repair tissues that have failed to regenerate or heal spontaneously. In the case of bone regeneration 3-D scaffolds are used as a framework to guide tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal cells obtained from the patient via biopsy are grown on biomaterials in vitro and then implanted at a desired site in the patient's body. Medical implants that encourage natural tissue regeneration are generally considered more desirable than metallic implants that may need to be removed by subsequent intervention. Numerous polymeric materials, from natural and artificial sources, are under investigation as substitutes for skeletal elements such as cartilage and bone. For bone regeneration, cells (obtained mainly from bone marrow aspirate or as primary cell outgrowths from bone biopsies) can be combined with biodegradable polymeric materials and/or ceramics and absorbed growth factors so that osteoinduction is facilitated together with osteoconduction; through the creation of bioactive rather than bioinert scaffold constructs. Relatively rapid biodegradation enables advantageous filling with natural tissue while loss of polymer strength before mass is disadvantageous. Innovative solutions are required to address this and other issues such as the biocompatibility of material surfaces and the use of appropriate scaffold topography and porosity to influence bone cell gene expression.

  5. A systematic review of the methodological quality and extent to which evaluation studies measure the usability of orthopaedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, MJA; van Dijk, H; de Vries, J; Groothoff, JW; Lankhorst, GJ

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the methodological quality of studies evaluating orthopaedic shoes and orthopaedic shoe provisions. To what extent do studies evaluating orthopaedic shoes prescribed for patients with degenerative disorders of the foot, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus and neurological

  6. Do Surgeons Treat Their Patients Like They Would Treat Themselves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, S.J.; Teunis, T.; Guitton, T.G.; Ring, D.; Biert, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial unexplained geographical and surgeon-to-surgeon variation in rates of surgery. One would expect surgeons to treat patients and themselves similarly based on best evidence and accounting for patient preferences. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are surgeons more likely to reco

  7. Orthopaedic admissions due to sports and recreation injuries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, R A

    2009-02-01

    The health benefits of exercise may be attenuated by sports and recreation related injury (SRI). Though the majority of SRI are mild and self-limiting, a significant number are serious and require orthopaedic intervention. The aims of this study were to assess the burden of these serious injuries on the orthopaedic inpatient service, and to investigate potential target areas for injury prevention. All 1,590 SRI seen in the ED over a 3-month period were analysed using the Patient Information Management System to determine which patients received inpatient orthopaedic care. The medical records of those 63 patients who required inpatient care under orthopaedics were reviewed and data collected on demographic features, history, operative procedure and theatre resources, and length of hospital stay. Data were analyzed using SPSS. SRI accounted for 12.3% of all ED presentations. The principal activities resulting in injury requiring orthopaedic care were soccer, hurling and informal play e.g. trampoline. Falls made up 37% of the overall mechanism of injury but 68% of the injuries severe enough to require operative management. Most operative procedures were performed as part of a routine day trauma list but 20% were performed out of hours. This group of injuries places a significant burden on a busy trauma service. Injury prevention measures such as public education regarding falls in sport may have a role in reducing this burden.

  8. A Bariatric Surgery Primer for Orthopedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsberg, Jessica G; Halpern, Alan A; Hill, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery are now presenting to orthopedic surgeons for elective arthroplasties. In addition, orthopedic surgeons themselves are referring more patients for consideration of bariatric surgery in anticipation of future elective procedures. Although the full effects of bariatric surgery on metabolism are not yet known, the altered digestion associated with these surgeries poses several issues for orthopedic surgeons. In this article, we address 3 aspects of care of this class of patient: review of the most commonly performed procedures and their metabolic consequences; suggested preoperative assessment of bariatric patients for any conditions that should be corrected before surgery; and evaluation of outcomes of elective procedures performed after bariatric surgery. Awareness of the unique characteristics of this group of patients helps minimize the potential for complications of planned orthopedic surgeries.

  9. An Osteoconductive, Osteoinductive, and Osteogenic Tissue-Engineered Product for Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery: How Far Are We?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasim S. Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of large bone defects due to trauma, degenerative disease, congenital deformities, and tumor resection remains a complex issue for the orthopaedic reconstructive surgeons. The requirement is for an ideal bone replacement which is osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic. Autologous bone grafts are still considered the gold standard for reconstruction of bone defects, but donor site morbidity and size limitations are major concern. The use of bioartificial bone tissues may help to overcome these problems. The reconstruction of large volume defects remains a challenge despite the success of reconstruction of small-to-moderate-sized bone defects using engineered bone tissues. The aim of this paper is to understand the principles of tissue engineering of bone and its clinical applications in reconstructive surgery.

  10. Surgeons agree more on treatment recommendations than on classification of proximal humeral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brorson Stig

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orthopaedic surgeons disagree considerably when classifying fractures of the proximal humerus. However, the clinical implications of low observer agreement remain unclear. The purpose of the study was to compare the agreement on Neer classification with the agreement on treatment recommendations. Methods We conducted a multi-centre observer-study. Five experienced shoulder surgeons independently assessed a consecutive series of 193 radiographs at two occasions three months apart. All pairs of radiographs were classified according to Neer. Subsequently, the observers were asked to recommend one of three treatment modalities for each case: non-operative treatment, locking plate osteosynthesis, or hemiarthroplasty. Results At both classification rounds mean kappa-values for inter-observer agreement on treatment recommendations (0.48 and 0.52 were significantly higher than the agreement on Neer classification (0.33 and 0.36 (p  Conclusions We found a significantly higher agreement on treatment recommendations compared to agreement on fracture classification. The low observer agreement on the Neer classification reported in several observer studies may have less clinical importance than previously assumed. However, inter-observer agreement did not exceed moderate levels.

  11. Patients’ expectations and actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, van Jaap J.; Jannink, Michiel J.A.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Geertzen, Jan H.B.; Postema, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between patients’ expectations and the actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes. - Design: A prospective cohort study with internal comparison. - Setting: Twelve orthopaedic shoe companies. - Patients: During six months, consecutive patients who were p

  12. The Prevalence of Accidental Needle Stick Injury and their Reporting among Healthcare Workers in Orthopaedic Wards in General Hospital Melaka, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accidental needle-stick injuries (NSIs are a hazard for health-care workers and general public health. Orthopaedic surgeons may be more prone to NSIs due to the prevalence of bone spikes in the operative field and the use of sharp orthopaedic instruments such as drills, saws and wires. A hospital-based cross sectional study was conducted in the orthopedic wards of Melaka General Hospital. The prevalence of NSIs was 32 (20.9% and majority of it occurred during assisting in operation theatre 13(37.4%. Among them six (18.8% were specialist, 12(37.5% medical officer, 10 (31.2% house officer and four staff nurses (12.5%. Among the respondents 142 (92.8% had been immunized against Hepatitis B and 148 (96.7% participants had knowledge regarding universal precaution. The incidence of NSI among health care workers at orthopaedics ward was not any higher in comparison with the similar studies and it was found out that the prevalence was more in junior doctors compared with specialist and staff nurses and it was statistically significant.

  13. Robotic surgery in trauma and orthopaedics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, K; Colegate-Stone, T; Dasgupta, P; Tavakkolizadeh, A; Sinha, J

    2015-03-01

    The use of robots in orthopaedic surgery is an emerging field that is gaining momentum. It has the potential for significant improvements in surgical planning, accuracy of component implantation and patient safety. Advocates of robot-assisted systems describe better patient outcomes through improved pre-operative planning and enhanced execution of surgery. However, costs, limited availability, a lack of evidence regarding the efficiency and safety of such systems and an absence of long-term high-impact studies have restricted the widespread implementation of these systems. We have reviewed the literature on the efficacy, safety and current understanding of the use of robotics in orthopaedics.

  14. Closing the gap: bone health education in orthopaedic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhe, Mellissa

    2008-01-01

    Bone health education in an orthopaedic office and hospital setting is uncommon, yet essential. Many benefits are possible for patients by preventing future fractures and improving quality of life in those afflicted with osteoporosis and osteopenia. Ninety percent of hip fractures are due to osteoporosis; only stroke occupies more hospital bed days than hip fracture each year. Clinical time constraints, physician unawareness, cost-effectiveness, and patient noncompliance include some of the obstacles to education. Orthopaedic nurses can be a vital part of the challenging solution to removing barriers and bridging the educational gap for physicians and patients.

  15. The nature of surgeon human capital depreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockenberry, Jason M; Helmchen, Lorens A

    2014-09-01

    To test how practice interruptions affect worker productivity, we estimate how temporal breaks affect surgeons' performance of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Examining 188 surgeons who performed 56,315 CABG surgeries in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010, we find that a surgeon's additional day away from the operating room raised patients' inpatient mortality by up to 0.067 percentage points (2.4% relative effect) but reduced total hospitalization costs by up to 0.59 percentage points. Among emergent patients treated by high-volume providers, where temporal distance is most plausibly exogenous, an additional day away raised mortality risk by 0.398 percentage points (11.4% relative effect) but reduced cost by up to 1.4 percentage points. This is consistent with the hypothesis that as temporal distance increases, surgeons are less likely to recognize and address life-threatening complications. Our estimates imply additional intraprocedural treatment intensity has a cost per life-year preserved of $7871-18,500, well within conventional cost-effectiveness cutoffs.

  16. Contemporary social media engagement by breast surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekatah, Gregory E; Walker, Stephanie G; McDonald, James J; Dixon, J Michael; Brady, Richard R W

    2016-12-01

    There continues to be a steady rise in the use of social media among healthcare professionals. We present an overview of social media use among breast surgeons within the United Kingdom including demographic variations and some of the factors that underpin these trends. The benefits and drawbacks of open social media platforms are also considered.

  17. How helpful is capsule endoscopy to surgeons?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Osman Ersoy; Bulent Sivri; Yusuf Bayraktar

    2007-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a new technology that, for the first time, allows complete, non-invasive endoscopic imaging of the small bowel. The efficacy of capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis of suspected small bowel diseases has been established. Important applications for surgeons include observations of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and small bowel neoplasms.

  18. The Study of Canadian Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Eli

    1971-01-01

    Discussed are Canadian novels, short stories, poems and a film which revolve around man's confrontation with nature, the depression, the problem of isolation, realism in Canadian literature. (Author/AF)

  19. [Surgeons in Krakow between WWI and WWII].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, A; Dolecki, M

    2001-01-01

    During the war time when Polish borders had not been established yet, apart from having two surgical departments Jagiellonian University, Krakow had surgical departments in the Bonifratow, Izraelicki and Military Hospitals. More surgical departments were opened up in later years in pubic Health System Hospitals, among them were Narutowicz at near Pradnicka street and Sisters of Mercy at Lea street. Other well-known Krakow surgeons operated in smaller, private surgeries, such as: Dom Zdrowia (House of Health) or Zwiazkowy (Union) Clinic. At that time only 30 Surgeons worked in Kraków. They were outstanding specialists with a broad practice. Among them were Maksymilian Rutkowski, Jan Glatzel, Stanislaw Nowicki, Michal Hladij. Gradually, younger surgeons started to join them. they were: Jan Kowalczyk, Jerzy Jasienski, Stanislaw Kania, Wladyslaw Laszczak, Jozef Bugusz, Jozef Gasinski. Many of them who worked in the surgical hospitals in Krakow, left the city after obtaining a professorship (like Kornel Michejda, professor at the University of Wilno) or became heads of wards, like Zygmunt Drobniewicz, Alfons Mackowski and Tadeusz Guschlbauer. All of these surgeons were highly respected by the medical community as well as by the general public in their respective town and surrounding areas. A large income allowed that best of them to fund and supply their own wards. Occasionally, however, among the less successful surgeons, an uncompromising competition for patients developed. These events were disapproved and condemned by the medical establishment. Many surgeons led an active life outside of their profession. A surgeon with an exceptionally colorful personality was Jan Glatzel: witty, highly intelligent, a connoisseur of fine art, book lover with an active social life. Maksymilian Rutkowski was active in charitable organizations, helping to support Bratnia Pomoc Medykow. Michal Hladij, president of KS Cracovia, vice president of Krakowski Klub Automobilowy rendered his

  20. Measuring temperature rise during orthopaedic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoogian, Sarah; Lee, Adam K; Widmaier, James C

    2016-09-01

    A reliable means for measuring temperatures generated during surgical procedures is needed to recommend best practices for inserting fixation devices and minimizing the risk of osteonecrosis. Twenty four screw tests for three surgical procedures were conducted using the four thermocouples in the bone and one thermocouple in the screw. The maximum temperature rise recorded from the thermocouple in the screw (92.7±8.9°C, 158.7±20.9°C, 204.4±35.2°C) was consistently higher than the average temperature rise recorded in the bone (31.8±9.3°C, 44.9±12.4°C, 77.3±12.7°C). The same overall trend between the temperatures that resulted from three screw insertion procedures was recorded with significant statistical analyses using either the thermocouple in the screw or the average of several in-bone thermocouples. Placing a single thermocouple in the bone was determined to have limitations in accurately comparing temperatures from different external fixation screw insertion procedures. Using the preferred measurement techniques, a standard screw with a predrilled hole was found to have the lowest maximum temperatures for the shortest duration compared to the other two insertion procedures. Future studies evaluating bone temperature increase need to use reliable temperature measurements for recommending best practices to surgeons.

  1. Comparison of patient and surgeon expectations of total hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jourdan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Analysis of discrepancies between patient and surgeon expectations before total hip arthroplasty (THA should enable a better understanding of motives of dissatisfaction about surgery, but this question has been seldom studied. Our objectives were to compare surgeons' and patients' expectations before THA, and to study factors which affected surgeon-patient agreement. METHODS: 132 adults (mean age 62.8+/-13.7 years, 52% men on waiting list for THA in three tertiary care centres and their 16 surgeons were interviewed to assess their expectations using the Hospital for Special Surgery Total Hip Replacement Expectations Survey (range 0-100. Patients' and surgeons' answers were compared, for the total score and for the score of each item. Univariate analyses tested the effect of patients' characteristics on surgeons' and patients' expectations separately, and on surgeon-patient differences. RESULTS: Surgeon and patient expectations' mean scores were high (respectively 90.9+/-11.1 and 90.0+/-11.6 over 100. Surgeons' and patients' expectations showed no systematic difference, but there was little agreement on Bland and Altman graph and correlation coefficient was low. Patients had higher expectations than surgeons for sports. Patients rated their expectations according to trust in physician and mental quality of life, surgeons considered disability. More disabled patients and patients from a low-income professional category were often "more optimistic" than their surgeons. CONCLUSION: Surgeons and patients often do not agree on what to expect from THA. More disabled patients expect better outcomes than their surgeons.

  2. The Vienna and German heritage of orthopaedics from the first half of the twentieth century: Adolf Lorenz, Lorenz Böhler, Friedrich Pauwels, Gerhard Küntscher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    In the last part of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century surgeons at the University of Vienna helped transform the practice of surgery. They developed new more effective procedures, analyzed the results of their operations, promoted the emergence and growth of surgical specialties and sought understanding of tissue structure, physiology and pathophysiology. Their efforts made Vienna one of the world's most respected centres for operative treatment, basic and clinical research and surgical education. Two individuals, Adolf Lorenz (1854-1946) and Lorenz Böhler (1885-1973) focused their research and clinical practice on orthopaedics. During the same period in Germany Friedrich Pauwels (1885-1980) founded an orthopaedic institute and an engineering workshop in Aachen in 1913 and rapidly developed a lifelong interest in biomechanical influences: Using these theories, he achieved in 1927 healing of a non-union of the femoral neck by a re-orientation osteotomy, a condition considered to be incurable until this osteotomy and created his famous classification of fracture angles at the hip into Pauwels types I, II and III. The German orthopaedist Gerhard Küntscher (1900-1972) remained the most popular surgeon after the second war with his famous nail.

  3. Teaching Canadian Literature: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, W. John

    1984-01-01

    Suggests granting greater recognition to the artistic integrity of Canadian literature by removing it from the broader context of Canadian studies. Indicates that understanding and appreciation of Canadian literature as a representation of reality filtered through the perception of an author should be focus of literature in schools. (NEC)

  4. [What's new in orthopaedic surgery: hopes and facts in total hip and spine arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, P

    2007-01-01

    Progress in implant design and surface properties have improved long-term survival of total hip prosthesis and lowered the incidence of dislocation. New materials, particularly ceramics and metals, decrease the risk for implant loosening because they induce less particle disease than polyethylene debris. These new materials have been submitted to simulator studies before being released for clinical use. They have been used since a sufficient amount of time in clinical practice to consider them as being part of our current armamentarium. They enable the orthopaedic surgeon to tailor the optimal hip prosthesis to each patient's need, depending on his/her bone stock, activity level and life expectancy. Disk prostheses and the general concept of non fusion surgery in spine surgery seems attractive, since intervertebral fusion carries a number of drawbacks, particularly at the level of adjacent segments. However, the documented follow-up of non-fusion spine surgery is at present insufficient to consider a widespread use of these new technologies. Their own possible complications are largely unknown and they do not replace bone fusion in the most clear-cut accepted indications for spine surgery. The use of disk prostheses should therefore be strictly limited according to present knowledge.

  5. Beyond "medical tourism": Canadian companies marketing medical travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Leigh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite having access to medically necessary care available through publicly funded provincial health care systems, some Canadians travel for treatment provided at international medical facilities as well as for-profit clinics found in several Canadian provinces. Canadians travel abroad for orthopaedic surgery, bariatric surgery, ophthalmologic surgery, stem cell injections, “Liberation therapy” for multiple sclerosis, and additional interventions. Both responding to public interest in medical travel and playing an important part in promoting the notion of a global marketplace for health services, many Canadian companies market medical travel. Methods Research began with the goal of locating all medical tourism companies based in Canada. Various strategies were used to find such businesses. During the search process it became apparent that many Canadian business promoting medical travel are not medical tourism companies. To the contrary, numerous types of businesses promote medical travel. Once businesses promoting medical travel were identified, content analysis was used to extract information from company websites. Company websites were analyzed to establish: 1 where in Canada these businesses are located; 2 the destination countries and health care facilities that they market; 3 the medical procedures they promote; 4 core marketing messages; and 5 whether businesses market air travel, hotel accommodations, and holiday tours in addition to medical procedures. Results Searches conducted from 2006 to 2011 resulted in identification of thirty-five Canadian businesses currently marketing various kinds of medical travel. The research project began with what seemed to be the straightforward goal of establishing how many medical tourism companies are based in Canada. Refinement of categories resulted in the identification of eighteen businesses fitting the category of what most researchers would identify as medical tourism

  6. Detection of biomaterial-associated infections in orthopaedic joint implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, D; van Horn, [No Value; van Kooten, TG; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infection of orthopaedic joint replacements is the second most common cause of implant failure. Yet, the microbiologic detection rate of infection is relatively low, probably because routine hospital cultures are made only of swabs or small pieces of excised tissue and not of

  7. Reading the Small Print – Labelling Recommendations for Orthopaedic Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haene, Roger A; Sandhu, Ranbir S; Baxandall, Richard

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There exist, currently, no clear guidelines regarding standards for surgical implant labelling. Dimensions of the laminar flow canopies in orthopaedic use fixes the distance at which implant labels can be read. Mistakes when reading the label on an implant box can pose health risks for patients, and financial consequences for medical institutions. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Using scientifically validated tools such as the Snellen Chart Formula, a theoretical minimum standard for text on implant labels was reached. This theoretical standard was then tested under real operating conditions. After discovering a minimum practical standard for implant labels, the authors then audited current labels in use on a wide range of orthopaedic implant packages. Furthermore, other non-text-related labelling problems were also noted. RESULTS There is a definite minimum standard which should be observed when implant labels are manufactured. Implants in current use bear labels on the packaging that are of an insufficient standard to ensure patient safety in theatre. CONCLUSIONS The authors have established text parameters that will increase the legibility of implant labels. In the interests of improving risk management in theatre, therefore, the authors propose a standard for orthopaedic implant labelling, and believe this will provide a useful foundation for further discussion between the orthopaedic community and implant manufacturers. PMID:19686615

  8. Infections in orthopaedic surgery : clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogely, Henri Charles

    2001-01-01

    The diagnostic difficulties, variability in outcome and the heterogeinity of the problem of orthopaedic infections stimulated the author to a study of the literature, and several clinical and experimental studies. The diagnosis prosthesis-related infection can only be reached with an acceptable d

  9. 99m Tc-labeled heparin test in orthopaedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvier, J.F.; Lafon, J.C.; Colin, M.; Chatelut, J.; Beaubatie, F. (Hopital Universitaire Dupuytren, Limoges (France))

    1983-06-30

    99m Tc-labeled heparin test was performed for early detection of phlebitis or pulmonary embolism after orthopaedic prothesis. Heparinic treatment and surgery per se were demonstrated to have no effect on the results. If this test demonstrates a statistical difference for pathologic patients, it is of greater value to consider ratio between rates before and after intervention.

  10. Twitter and Canadian Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Max

    2012-01-01

    An emerging group of leaders in Canadian education has attracted thousands of followers. They've made Twitter an extension of their lives, delivering twenty or more tweets a day that can include, for example, links to media articles, research, new ideas from education bloggers, or to their own, or simply a personal thought. At their best,…

  11. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  12. Ethics and the facial plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    The facial plastic surgeon potentially has a conflict of interest when confronted with the patients requesting surgery, due to the personal gain attainable by agreeing to perform surgery. The aim of this review is to discuss the potential harm the surgeon can inflict by carrying out facial plastic surgery, beyond the standard surgical complications of infection or bleeding. It will discuss the desire for self-improvement and perfection and increase in the prevalence facial plastic surgery. We address the principles of informed consent, beneficence and non-maleficence, as well as justice and equality and how the clinician who undertakes facial plastic surgery is at risk of breaching these principles without due care and diligence.

  13. Professionalism and Commercialism on Cosmetic Surgeons' Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Yeon; Park, SangHee

    2016-07-15

    This study analyzed the homepages of 250 cosmetic surgeons' websites by focusing on the representation of cosmetic surgery providers, cosmetic surgery recipients, and cosmetic surgery practice itself. Based on a literature review, some common elements of the webpages were preidentified as the indicators of professionalism or commercialism. Subsequently, each homepage was scrutinized for their presence and salience. Overall, cosmetic surgeons' websites were high in professionalism and low in commercialism in their representation of the service providers. In depicting the recipients, the websites were moderate in both professionalism and commercialism. The representation of practice was low in professionalism and moderate in commercialism. Implications of these findings for doctors, regulators, and consumer advocates are discussed and directions for future research are proposed.

  14. Smart apps for the smart plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniketh Venkataram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones have the ability to benefit plastic surgeons in all aspects of patient care and education. With the sheer number of applications available and more being created everyday, it is easy to miss out on apps which could be of great relevance. Moreover, the range of android applications available has not been extensively discussed in the literature. To this end, we have compiled an exhaustive list of android smartphone applications, which we feel can help our day to day functioning. The apps have been extensively reviewed and neatly described along with all their potential uses. In addition, we have made an effort to highlight ′non-medical′ or efficiency apps which can improve departmental functioning. These apps have not been described in prior articles, and their functionality might not be known to all. We believe that the technology savvy plastic surgeon can make maximum use of these apps to his benefit.

  15. Think small: nanotechnology for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Amir R; Brenner, Sara A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the topic of nanotechnology to plastic surgeons and to discuss its relevance to medicine in general and plastic surgery in particular. Nanotechnology will be defined, and some important historical milestones discussed. Common applications of nanotechnology in various medical and surgical subspecialties will be reviewed. Future applications of nanotechnology to plastic surgery will be examined. Finally, the critical field of nanotoxicology and the safe use of nanotechnology in medicine and plastic surgery will be addressed.

  16. Paying surgeons less has cost more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joseph; Derman, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 mandated reductions in physician reimbursement. This reduction in payments could be envisioned to limit expenditures on 2 counts: first, individual fees would be lower, producing inherent savings. Furthermore, reducing fees should depress the incentive to work, thereby generating additional savings from reduced output. A rival point of view holds that lower fees might paradoxically lead to greater spending because surgeons compensate for per-case reductions by performing more cases. If this income-targeting hypothesis is correct, lower per-case fees leads to increased volume. Increased work output has particularly sizable economic effects in fields like orthopedic surgery because the total cost of orthopedic interventions is usually many times larger than the physician's fee (largely owing to the cost of implants). As such, increases in work volume more than negate the potential savings from lower surgeon's fees.This phenomenon was studied in the context of total knee arthroplasty. In the decade spanning 1996 to 2005, inflation-adjusted physician reimbursement decreased by approximately 5% per year, leading to a cumulative drop in reimbursement from $2847 to $1685. Nonetheless, because the number of procedures performed increased from 253,841 to 498,169 and because payments to hospitals far exceeded payments to surgeons, total expenditures for total knee arthroplasty increased dramatically: more than $7.1 billion additional was spent on hospital payments. Continuing to pay surgeons less is apt to continue to cost more. Counter to intuition, the best strategy for controlling overall spending might be higher, not lower, surgical fees.

  17. [The first woman surgeons in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; De Jong, E

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the position of woman surgeons in the Netherlands. In 1913 the first woman, Heleen Robert, was accepted as member of the Dutch Society of Surgery. Three others, Jeanne Knoop, Frieda van Hasselt and Rosalie Wijnberg, followed during the next ten years. The nomination of Rosalie Wijnberg caused a turbulent discussion as she was working as a gynaecologist and not as a surgeon. One can wonder about this argument as other members were gynaecologists too. It seems that the male attitudes towards women were changing as more women entered the male dominated field. Nevertheless, from 1931 on, the year in which the registration of specialists was created, a number of women succeeded in obtaining a registration in surgery. Four of them were interviewed: dr. D.A.E. Norel, A.G. Wiersum-de Kwaadsteniet, J. Leeksma-Lievense and A.A. Fierstra. The general opinion still is that surgery is not a female profession. At the moment there are some twenty women working as general surgeon compared to a seven hundred men.

  18. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons' non-technical skills. METHODS: Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non......-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4470 - Surgeon's gloving cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgeon's gloving cream. 878.4470 Section 878.4470...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4470 Surgeon's gloving cream. (a) Identification. Surgeon's gloving cream is an ointment intended to be used to lubricate the...

  20. Reduction in Surgical Wound Infection Rates Associated with Reporting Data to Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GD Taylor

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that wound infection (surgical site infection [ ssi ] rates fall when surgeons are provided with data on their performance. Since 1987, the authors have been performing concurrent surveillance of surgical patients and confidentially reporting surgeon-specific ssi rates to individual surgeons and their clinical directors, and providing surgeons with the mean rates of their peers. The program has been gradually refined and expanded. Data are now collected on wound infection risk and report risk adjusted rates compared with the mean for hospitals in the United States National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (nnis data bank. Since inception through to December 1993, ssi rates have fallen 68% in clean contaminated general surgery cases (relative risk [rr] 0.36, 95% ci 0.2 to 0.6, P=0.0001, 64% in clean plastic surgery cases (rr 0.35, 95% ci 0.06 to 1.8, 72% in caesarean section cases (rr 0.23, 95% ci 0.03 to 1.96 and 42% in clean cardiovascular surgery cases (rr 0.59, 95% ci 0.34 to 1.0. In clean orthopedic surgery the ssi rate remained stable from 1987 through 1992. In 1993 a marked increase was experienced. Reasons for this are being explored. Overall there was a 32% decrease in ssi rate between the index year and 1993 or, in percentage terms, 2.8% to 1.9% (rr 0.65, 95% ci 0.51 to 0.86, P=0.002. ssi surveillance should become standard in Canadian hospitals interested in improving the quality of surgical care and reducing the clinical impact and cost associated with nosocomial infection.

  1. CANLIT (Canadian Literature) Teachers' Crash Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CANLIT, Toronto (Ontario).

    As a result of a study of the situation of Canadian literature in Canadian high schools and universities, this course was developed to provide teachers with useful information about Canadian literature. Included in this kit are sections on Canadian literature (the great debate about the importance of Canadian content), history and sources…

  2. Australia's female military surgeons of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    The war service of Lilian Violet Cooper, the first female surgeon of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, is well recognized. Not so well known however, are the other pioneering female doctors who also undertook work as military surgeons during World War I. At least four of the 14 Australian female doctors that undertook overseas war service during World War I were engaged as surgeons and treated Australian, British and Allied casualties. These women operated in London, in Egypt and on the frontlines of the Macedonian campaign. While none of these other women became Fellows of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, their war efforts deserve recognition.

  3. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  4. Canadian identity: Implications for international social work by Canadians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    This paper is in response to recent calls to conceptualize and articulate Canadian perspectives and experiences in international social work, given that the Canadian standpoint has been lacking in international social work literature. This paper contends that it is imperative, first of all......, to critically examine and unpack our ‘Canadian’ identity in order to practice international work that is socially just and anti-imperialist. Drawing on the work of post-colonial authors, critical race theorists, and those who study national myth-making, this essay revisits Canadian identity because...... it is this identity that Canadian social workers often carry into their international work....

  5. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  6. Discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ian A; Harris, Anita M; Naylor, Justine M; Adie, Sam; Mittal, Rajat; Dao, Alan T

    2013-05-01

    We surveyed 331 patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty pre-operatively, and patients and surgeons were both surveyed 6 and 12 months post-operatively. We identified variables (demographic factors, operative factors and patient expectations) as possible predictors for discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction. At 12 months, 94.5% of surgeons and 90.3% of patients recorded satisfaction with the outcome. The discordance between patient and surgeon satisfaction was mainly due to patient dissatisfaction-surgeon satisfaction. In an adjusted analysis, the strongest predictors of discordance in patient-surgeon satisfaction were unmet patient expectations and the presence of complications. Advice to potential joint arthroplasty candidates regarding the decision to proceed with surgery should be informed by patient reported outcomes, rather than the surgeon's opinion of the likelihood of success.

  7. Computer-assisted Orthopaedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyan eZheng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopaedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined.

  8. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many...... the risk of bacterial contamination and disease transmission as well as non-union and poor bone quality. Other bone graft and substitutes have been considered as alternative in order to improve implant fixation. Hydroxyapatite and collagen type I composite (HA/Collagen) have the potential in mimicking...... bone and includes bone collagen, morphogenetic proteins and growth factors. The combination of DBM with CB and with allograft might improve the healing potential of these grafts around non-cemented orthopaedic implants and thereby the implant fixation. Study I investigates the effect of HA...

  9. [The cardiovascular surgeon and the Syntax score].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sánchez, Mario; Soulé-Egea, Mauricio; Herrera-Alarcón, Valentín; Barragán-García, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The Syntax score has been established as a tool to determine the complexity of coronary artery disease and as a guide for decision-making among coronary artery bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary intervention. The purpose of this review is to systematically examine what the Syntax score is, and how the surgeon should integrate the information in the selection and treatment of patients. We reviewed the results of the SYNTAX Trial, the clinical practice guidelines, as well as the benefits and limitations of the score. Finally we discuss the future directions of the Syntax score.

  10. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    nerve regeneration and nerve grafting, and after many years of devoted research, he devised successful operations for facial nerve paralysis. For this and early vascular work, he is often credited as the first English surgeon to reintroduce classical Hunterian methods of experiment into surgery. He was honored as the founder and President of The Society of British Neurological Surgeons in 1926. Perhaps best known as a general and aural surgeon, Ballance was second only to Horsley in reputation as a pioneer British neurological surgeon. Described as a painstakingly slow but delicate and meticulous operator, Ballance made a contribution to neurosurgery and temporal bone surgery that was immense.

  11. Postcardiotomy centrifugal assist: a single surgeon's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Wagner-Mann, Colette C

    2002-11-01

    Because of the infrequent application of cardiac assist devices for postcardiotomy heart failure, most published reports include the results of learning curves from multiple surgeons. Between October 1986 and June 2001, a single surgeon used 35 Sarns Centrifugal Pumps as ventricular assist devices in 21 patients with severe hemodynamic compromise after open heart surgery (0.88% incidence). Patients' ages ranged from 39 to 77 (mean, 59.6 years). Three patients required right ventricular assist devices, 4 left ventricular assist devices, and 14 had biventricular assist devices. For all, the indication for application was inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass despite multiple inotropes and intraaortic balloon pumping. All were expected to be intraoperative deaths without further mechanical assistance. Patients were assisted from 2 to 434 h (median, 48 h). Fifteen patients (71.4%) were weaned from device(s), and 11 patients (52.4%) were hospital survivors. Actuarial survival in those dismissed from the hospital was 78% at 5 years and 39% at 10 years. Patients facing certain demise after cardiac surgery can be salvaged with temporary centrifugal mechanical assist. Results are competitive with that achieved with more sophisticated devices. Hospital survivors enjoy reasonable longevity.

  12. Training cardiac surgeons: the Indiana University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W

    2016-12-01

    In this article, I will outline the origin of cardiothoracic surgical (CTS) training at Indiana University (IU) and its evolution to the present. I will describe my educational background, surgical training in this specialty, and my role as an educator of CT surgeons. I will describe our faculty and the structure of the CTS residency. Finally, I will describe a newly adopted smart phone "App" called SIMPL, which allows the resident and faculty to quickly (50% of the most critical aspects of each surgical procedure, the resident's performance during the critical portion of the operation from poor to excellent, and the degree of difficulty of the operation from simple to complex. The attending surgeon and the resident data are then forwarded to the SIMPL database where the SIMPL software aggregates data for each resident and procedure producing a report at the end of the rotation of the resident's performance relative to his peers. This additional evaluation process will better ensure that our CTS residents are "practice ready" when they complete their training.

  13. Emergency surgeon-performed hepatobiliary ultrasonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Acute hepatobiliary pathology is a common general surgical emergency referral. Diagnosis requires imaging of the biliary tree by ultrasonography. The accuracy and impact of surgeon-performed ultrasonography (SUS) on the diagnosis of emergent hepatobiliary pathology was examined. METHODS: A prospective study, over a 6-month period, enrolled all patients with symptoms or signs of acute hepatobiliary pathology. Patients provided informed consent and underwent both SUS and standard radiology-performed ultrasonography (RUS). SUS was performed using a 2-5-MHz broadband portable ultrasound probe by two surgeons trained in ultrasonography, and RUS using a 2-5-MHz fixed unit. SUS results were correlated with those of RUS and pathological diagnoses. RESULTS: Fifty-three consecutive patients underwent 106 ultrasonographic investigations. SUS agreed with RUS in 50 (94.3 per cent) of 53 patients. SUS accurately detected cholelithiasis in all but two cases and no patient was inaccurately diagnosed as having cholelithiasis at SUS (95.2 per cent sensitivity and 100 per cent specificity). As an overall complementary diagnostic tool SUS provided the correct diagnosis in 96.2 per cent of patients. Time to scan was significantly shorter following SUS (3.1 versus 12.0 h, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: SUS provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of emergency hepatobiliary pathology and may contribute to the emergency management of hepatobiliary disease.

  14. Herniation of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo

    2012-12-01

    Herniations of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons are far more common in practice than the paucity of reported cases would indicate. A likely explanation may be the peculiar, nonergonomic positions that plastic surgeons must hold during surgery while wearing a headlight and loupes. From January 2003 to December 2006, at Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan, 4 plastic surgeons experienced herniations of the cervical disk. Magnetic resonance imaging study indicated there was disk herniation or bulging with spinal cord impingement. Two plastic surgeons received cervical diskectomy, corpectomy with strut reconstruction using titanium cages. These 2 surgeons were symptom-free 2 years after their operations. The other 2 plastic surgeons were under conservative physical therapy with persistent symptoms. The clinical evidence indicated that cervical disk herniation is an occupational hazard in plastic surgeons. To prevent prolonged hyperflexion and twisting of the neck, we proposed wearing a cervical brace during surgery for the plastic surgeons at Tri-Service-General Hospital since January 2008. No more plastic surgeons have experienced herniation of the cervical disk since then. The results indicated that wearing a cervical brace may be an effective measure to protect plastic surgeons from cervical disk disease.

  15. Adaptive Meshing Technique Applied to an Orthopaedic Finite Element Contact Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Roarty, Colleen M; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2004-01-01

    Finite element methods have been applied extensively and with much success in the analysis of orthopaedic implants.6,7,12,13,15 Recently a growing interest has developed, in the orthopaedic biomechanics community, in how numerical models can be constructed for the optimal solution of problems in contact mechanics. New developments in this area are of paramount importance in the design of improved implants for orthopaedic surgery. Finite element and other computational techniques are widely ap...

  16. SURVEY OF SHORT-TERM ORAL CORTICOSTEROID ADMINISTRATION BY ORTHOPAEDIC PHYSICIANS IN COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert W. Pearsall IV

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of oral corticosteroid (OCS drugs is advocated because of their potent anti-inflammatory effects. They also possess many potential adverse effects. No study has assessed physician prescribing practices of OCS therapy in high school (HS or college (COL athletes. This paper reports the prescribing patterns of sports medicine physicians who used short-term OCS therapy and to describe associated complications in HS and COL athletes within a 24- month period. An internet link to a descriptive epidemiology survey was included in an e-mail to all members of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. Descriptive statistics and correlation analysis were used to examine responses. Total response rate was 32% (615/1,928. Sixty-six percent of the physicians indicated prescribing OCS to both groups of athletes, while 29% reported prescribing OCS to COL athletes and 5% to HS athletes for musculoskeletal injuries. Physicians who prescribed multiple OCS regimens to the same athlete within the same season (P = 0.01 and physicians who prescribed OCS to the skeletally immature athlete (P = 0.009 reported more complications than other physicians. Among the 412 physicians who did not prescribe OCS in the treatment of athletic induced musculoskeletal injury, 251 (61% cited a risk of developing medical complications as the primary reason for avoiding use. The reported number of medical complications was low with no cases of avascular necrosis reported for the 2-year recall period. Orthopaedic surgeons who treated athletic induced musculoskeletal injuries with a short-term course of oral corticosteroids reported that high school and college athletes benefited with few medical complications

  17. William Fulton Gillespie, 1891-1949: transitional figure in western Canadian academic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeth, R A

    1998-01-01

    The professional life of William Fulton Gillespie, third professor of surgery at the University of Alberta (1939-49) and tenth president of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (1947-49), exemplifies a critical transitional period in Canadian postgraduate surgical training and in western Canadian academic surgery. This article explores the background, the training, the professional career, and the personal character of a surgical scholar and student of the humanities and arts, a man who was thrust into the professorship of surgery in a maturing western Canadian medical school following the financial restraints of the Great Depression and during the challenges faced as a result of the World War II.

  18. The efficacy of an extended scope physiotherapy clinic in paediatric orthopaedics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Mir, Marie

    2016-04-01

    The demand for paediatric orthopaedic care is growing, and providing the service required is an increasingly challenging task. Physiotherapist-led triage clinics are utilised in adult orthopaedics to enable the provision of care to patients who may not require a surgical consult. The Physiotherapy Orthopaedic Triage Clinic (POTC) was established in Our Lady\\'s Children\\'s Hospital Crumlin in response to increasing demands on the paediatric orthopaedic service. The clinic is run by physiotherapists working in an advanced practice role (APP), and is the first paediatric clinic of its type and scale in the Republic of Ireland.

  19. On Realities of Canadian Multiculturalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦辰

    2013-01-01

    Canada is a multicultural country which was mainly established by immigrants. Just because of that, Canadian govern⁃ment has carried out the policy of multiculturalism since1970s. However, it has encountered many problems such as policy con⁃flicts, national identity, democracy-inquiry and racial discrimination, etc. Hence the Canadian multiculturalism has been in a di⁃lemma.

  20. Mapping a surgeon's becoming with Deleuze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra; Fenwick, Tara

    2015-12-01

    The process of 'becoming' shapes professionals' capability, confidence and identity. In contrast to notions of rugged individuals who achieve definitive status as experts, 'becoming' is a continuous emergent condition. It is often a process of struggle, and is always interminably linked to its environs and relationships. 'Becoming' is a way of understanding the tensions of everyday practice and knowledge of professionals. In this paper, we explore the notion of 'becoming' from the perspective of surgeons. We suggest that 'becoming', as theorised by Deleuze, offers a more nuanced understanding than is often represented using conventional vocabularies of competence, error, quality and improvement. We develop this conception by drawing from our Deleuze-inspired study of mapping experience in surgery. We argue for Deleuzian mapping as a method to research health professionals' practice and experience, and suggest the utility of this approach as a pedagogical tool for medical education.

  1. Canadian construction industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, M.

    2001-07-01

    The principal sectors of the Canadian construction industry - commercial, industrial, institutional and residential - are examined with regard to their technical considerations concerning the subject of sustainability. Apart from the different needs of each of the sectors of the industry there are also regional differences caused by population distribution, and differences in climate, that have to be identified and accommodated in considering attitudes to recycling and sustainable development. Some indications that there is growing awareness of recycling and reuse are: the increasing frequency of life cycle costing in the commercial and institutional sectors, the use of recycled or otherwise waste materials in concrete, examples of using steel supporting structures and roof joists salvaged from previous uncompleted projects in the industrial sector, improved building envelope and indoor air quality concerns, collective ground source heating, and new basement and framing technologies and construction materials in the residential sector. These improvements notwithstanding, there remains much to be done. The new objective-based National Building Code, for which comments are now being solicited across the country, is expected to identify new and innovative solutions and to kick-start serious efforts to come up with solutions towards increasing overall sustainability in all sectors of the Canadian construction industry.

  2. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients.

  3. [Management abilities of the head surgeon: essential for survival!].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähne, J

    2012-04-01

    Due to increased economic challenges in the management of hospitals head surgeons do not only need excellent surgical expertise but also significant management qualities. The personality of head surgeons should include authenticity, sincerity, fairness and the ability to cooperate. Visionary leadership, strategic thinking and strategic management of the personnel are further prerequisites for success. Besides good abilities in communication head surgeons need knowledge of the operating figures for interpretation. To keep up with the own capabilities time and self-management is essential. A survival as head surgeon is likely if these qualities and abilities exist.

  4. Emergence of coryneforms in osteomyelitis and orthopaedic surgical site infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meher Rizvi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCoryneform species other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae are coming up as important pathogens with the potential to cause serious and life-threatening infections not only in immunocompromised but in immunocompetent individuals as well. The exact infectious potential of these bacteria and their rational antimicrobial treatment is a challenging but essential task.Method The study was conducted in the Department of Microbiology and the Department of Orthopaedics, JNMCH, AMU, Aligarh between August 2007 and May 2009. Pus samples were collected from patients of osteomyelitis and other bone infections including orthopaedic surgical site infections. The Corynebacterium species isolated in the study was identified using standard microbiological techniques and antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by Kirby bauer disc diffusion method.ResultsA total of 312 Corynebacterium species were isolated. The majority of the coryneforms were isolated from the immunocompetent patients 270 (86.54%. C.jeikium was the most common coryneform isolated. Nearly half of the patients 153 (49.04% had acute infection caused by Corynebacterium species after orthopaedic surgery, a quarter 66 (21.15% had chronic infection and 72 (23.08% patients had device-related infection. Coryneforms exhibited maximum resistance to aminoglycosides (58.65% and β-lactams (penicillin group- 57.55%. C.jeikium was found to be the most resistant amongst all the Corynebacterium species.ConclusionThe study highlights the fact that the coryneforms are no longer just opportunistic pathogens but they are also becoming important pathogens among immunocompetent individuals as well. The emergence of drug resistance amongst these isolates is of most concern. More studies should be done on identification and on antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms for the proper treatment of patients with such infections.

  5. Pragmatic approach to the clinical work-up of patients with putative allergic disease to metallic orthopaedic implants before and after surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Menné, T; Schalock, P C;

    2011-01-01

    on in the work-up of patients with putative allergic complications following surgery. Few studies have investigated whether subjects with metal contact allergy have increased risk of developing complications following orthopaedic implant insertion. Metal allergy might in a minority increase the risk......, and as surgeons may refer patients with complications following total joint arthroplasty for diagnostic work-up, there is a continuous need for updated guidelines. This review presents published evidence for patch testing prior to surgery and proposes tentative diagnostic criteria which clinicians can rely...... testing prior to surgery unless the patient has already had implant surgery with complications suspected to be allergic or has a history of clinical metal intolerance of sufficient magnitude to be of concern to the patient or a health provider. The clinical work-up of a patient suspected of having...

  6. Grade 3 Students Explore the Question, "What's Canadian about Canadian Children's Literature?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2000-01-01

    Explores third graders' responses to the question "What's Canadian about Canadian Children's Literature?" Describes 6 picture books and summarizes students' responses to each. Finds students mentioned geographical aspects as characteristic of Canadian literature, and they felt Canadian children's literature should reflect Canadian "experiences."…

  7. Neoprene Orthopaedic Supports: An Underrecognised Cause of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkey, S.; S. Ghaffar

    2015-01-01

    Thioureas, often contained within neoprene to provide water resistance, are an important cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in those who use neoprene products. We wish to present three cases of thiourea-induced ACD from three different orthopaedic supports containing neoprene. The first case was a 67-year-old woman who developed an itchy rash on her heel three weeks after using a neoprene insole for plantar fasciitis. The second case was a 47-year-old man who developed an itchy rash o...

  8. Mechanical properties of cellulose in orthopaedic devices and related environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poustis, J; Baquey, C; Chauveaux, D

    1994-01-01

    The authors have undertaken a series of mechanical tests in order to assess the performance of regenerated cellulose under either static or dynamic conditions, and to evaluate its long-term behaviour under mechanical stress. In this respect, bending stiffness, resistance to compression, creep under compressive stress, in vitro and in vivo ageing and fatigue resistance were studied. It appears that this material demonstrates mechanical properties which depend upon its density, which is itself related to its water content. Moreover, this material is very stable under dynamic stress. This could be an interesting property for use in orthopaedic devices.

  9. Problems in the Study of Canadian Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Barry

    1980-01-01

    Considers reasons for studying Canadian literature. Notes the relative infancy of Canadian literature and the need for maintaining objectivity in the study of Canadian literature. Proposes that teachers of Canadian literature focus on individual, contemporary works, examining language, form, and craftsmanship. (RL)

  10. [Canadian Literature. "Featuring: CanLit."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock, Ken, Ed.; Haycock, Carol-Ann, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The feature articles in this journal issue deal with various aspects of Canadian literature. The articles include: (1) a discussion of who's who and what's what in Canadian literature; (2) reviews of worthwhile but overlooked Canadian children's literature; (3) a list of resource guides to Canadian literature and a short quiz over famous first…

  11. The Impact of Individual Surgeon Volume on Hysterectomy Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.; Kantartzis, Kelly L.; Lee, Ted; Bonidie, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Hysterectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures women will undergo in their lifetime. Several factors affect surgical outcomes. It has been suggested that high-volume surgeons favorably affect outcomes and hospital cost. The objective is to determine the impact of individual surgeon volume on total hospital costs for hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort of women undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications from 2011 to 2013 at 10 hospitals within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center System. Cases that included concomitant procedures were excluded. Costs by surgeon volume were analyzed by tertile group and with linear regression. Results: We studied 5,961 hysterectomies performed by 257 surgeons: 41.5% laparoscopic, 27.9% abdominal, 18.3% vaginal, and 12.3% robotic. Surgeons performed 1–542 cases (median = 4, IQR = 1–24). Surgeons were separated into equal tertiles by case volume: low (1–2 cases; median total cost, $4,349.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] [$3,903.54–$4,845.34]), medium (3–15 cases; median total cost, $2,807.90; 95% CI [$2,693.71–$2,926.93]) and high (>15 cases, median total cost $2,935.12, 95% CI [$2,916.31–$2,981.91]). ANOVA analysis showed a significant decrease (P < .001) in cost from low-to-medium– and low-to-high–volume surgeons. Linear regression showed a significant linear relationship (P < .001), with a $1.15 cost reduction per case with each additional hysterectomy. Thus, if a surgeon performed 100 cases, costs were $115 less per case (100 × $1.15), for a total savings of $11,500.00 (100 × $115). Conclusion: Overall, in our models, costs decreased as surgeon volume increased. Low-volume surgeons had significantly higher costs than both medium- and high-volume surgeons.

  12. New orthopaedic implant management tool for computer-assisted planning, navigation, and simulation: from implant CAD files to a standardized XML-based implant database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagbo, S; Blochaou, F; Langlotz, F; Vangenot, C; Nolte, L-P; Zheng, G

    2005-01-01

    Computer-Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) has made much progress over the last 10 years. Navigation systems have been recognized as important tools that help surgeons, and various such systems have been developed. A disadvantage of these systems is that they use non-standard formalisms and techniques. As a result, there are no standard concepts for implant and tool management or data formats to store information for use in 3D planning and navigation. We addressed these limitations and developed a practical and generic solution that offers benefits for surgeons, implant manufacturers, and CAS application developers. We developed a virtual implant database containing geometrical as well as calibration information for orthopedic implants and instruments, with a focus on trauma. This database has been successfully tested for various applications in the client/server mode. The implant information is not static, however, because manufacturers periodically revise their implants, resulting in the deletion of some implants and the introduction of new ones. Tracking these continuous changes and keeping CAS systems up to date is a tedious task if done manually. This leads to additional costs for system development, and some errors are inevitably generated due to the huge amount of information that has to be processed. To ease management with respect to implant life cycle, we developed a tool to assist end-users (surgeons, hospitals, CAS system providers, and implant manufacturers) in managing their implants. Our system can be used for pre-operative planning and intra-operative navigation, and also for any surgical simulation involving orthopedic implants. Currently, this tool allows addition of new implants, modification of existing ones, deletion of obsolete implants, export of a given implant, and also creation of backups. Our implant management system has been successfully tested in the laboratory with very promising results. It makes it possible to fill the current gap

  13. Demographics, nature and treatment of orthopaedic trauma injuries occurring in an agricultural context in the West of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, F J

    2011-03-01

    Farming is a major industry in the West of Ireland. This prospective study examined the age profile, nature and treatment of orthopaedic injuries occurring in agricultural surroundings presenting at the Orthopaedic Unit of Merlin Park Hospital, Galway.

  14. Patients' expectations and actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between patients' expectations and the actual use of custom-made orthopaedic shoes. Design: A prospective cohort study with internal comparison. Setting: Twelve orthopaedic shoe companies. Patients: During six months, consecutive patients who were provided w

  15. Burnout and quality of life among orthopaedic trainees in a modern educational programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vendeloo, S. N.; Brand, P. L. P.; Verheyen, C. C. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine quality of life and burnout among Dutch orthopaedic trainees following a modern orthopaedic curriculum, with strict compliance to a 48-hour working week. We also evaluated the effect of the clinical climate of learning on their emotional wellbeing. We assessed burnout, quality

  16. Organism Encumbrance of Cardiac Surgeon During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabdic, Ilirijana Haxhibeqiri; Veljovic, Fikret; Straus, Slavenka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most everyday activities, performed over a long period leads to performance degradation of skeletal muscles as well as spinal column which is reflected in the reduction of maximum force, reduction of the speed of response, reducing control of the movement etc. Although until now many mathematical models of muscles are developed, very small number takes into account the fatigue, and those models that take into account changes in the characteristics of muscles for extended activities, generally considered tiring under certain conditions. Given that the current models of muscle fatigue under arbitrary conditions of activation and load are very limited, this article presents a new model that includes scale of muscles overload. Material and Methods: There are three female cardiac surgeons working performing these surgeries in operating rooms, and their average anthropometric measures for this population is: a) Weight: 62 kg; b) Height: 166 cm. Age: 45 taken in the calculation within the CATIA software, that entity is entitled to 50% of healthy female population that is able to execute these and similar jobs. During the surgery is investigated the two most common positions: position “1” and “2”. We wish to emphasize that the experiment or surgical procedure lasted for two positions for five hours, with the position “1” lasted 0.5 hours, and position “2” lasted about 4.5 hours. The additional load arm during surgery is about 1.0 kg. Results: The analysis was done in three positions: “Operating position 1”, “Operating position 2 ‘, and each of these positions will be considered in its characteristic segments. These segments are: when the body takes the correct position, but is not yet burdened with external load, then when the surgeon receives the load and the third position when the load is lifted at the end of the position. Calculation of internal energy used on the joints is carried out in the context of software analysis of this

  17. Patients' Opinions about Polish Surgeons and Surgical Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakowski, Marek; Hładoń, Aleksandra; Seweryn, Mariusz; Ciosek, Jakub; Świątkiewicz, Wojciech

    2016-10-01

    In Polish society Stereotypes about the surgeons are deeply rooted, which could really affect their relationship with the patient and the entire treatment process. The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of an opinion survey on the image of the surgeon and operative treatment.

  18. Decreased heart rate variability in surgeons during night shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Toftegård Andersen, Lærke; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used as a measure of stress and mental strain in surgeons. Low HRV has been associated with death and increased risk of cardiac events in the general population. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of a 17-hour night shift on surgeons'...

  19. Palliative care: a challenge for orthopaedic nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Carol L; Harvey, Carol V; Meehan, Anita J; Schoenly, Lorry

    2005-01-01

    Patients who face chronic, incurable, or life-ending musculoskeletal conditions often receive inadequate care either due to a lack of caregiver awareness or inattention to maintaining the highest quality at the end of life. Palliative care focuses on the comprehensive physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential needs of patients with life-threatening or debilitating illness. Orthopaedic nurses and all nurses in general are challenged to incorporate palliative care principles into care planned with patients and families facing end-of-life issues. This article addresses the leadership role the National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses (NAON) has taken to develop a consensus document which endorses the Last Acts Precepts of Palliative Care and affirms the need for palliative care with patients who experience life-threatening illness. A case study is used to illustrate the opportunity a multidisciplinary team has to center care on the individual, while remaining sensitive to the holistic needs of the patient for self-determination at the end of life.

  20. Orthopaedic applications for PLA-PGA biodegradable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, K A; Agrawal, C M; Barber, F A; Burkhart, S S

    1998-10-01

    Biodegradable polymers, especially those belonging to the family of polylactic acid (PLA) and polyglycolic acid (PGA), play an increasingly important role in orthopaedics. These polymers degrade by hydrolysis and enzymatic activity and have a range of mechanical and physical properties that can be engineered appropriately to suit a particular application. Their degradation characteristics depend on several parameters including their molecular structure, crystallinity, and copolymer ratio. These biomaterials are also rapidly gaining recognition in the fledging field of tissue engineering because they can be fashioned into porous scaffolds or carriers of cells, extracellular matrix components, and bioactive agents. Although their future appears to be bright, several questions regarding the biocompatibility of these materials linger and should be addressed before their wide-scale use. In the context of musculoskeletal tissue, this report provides a comprehensive review of properties and applications of biodegradable PLA/PGA polymers and their copolymers. Of special interest are orthopaedic applications, biocompatibility studies, and issues of sterilization and storage of these versatile biomaterials. Also discussed is the fact that terms such as PLA, PGA, or PLA-PGA do not denote one material, but rather a large family of materials that have a wide range of differing bioengineering properties and concomitant biological responses. An analysis of some misconceptions, problems, and potential solutions is also provided.

  1. The effect of inclement weather on trauma orthopaedic workload.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, J P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Climate change models predict increasing frequency of extreme weather. One of the challenges hospitals face is how to make sure they have adequate staffing at various times of the year. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of this severe inclement weather on hospital admissions, operative workload and cost in the Irish setting. We hypothesised that there is a direct relationship between cold weather and workload in a regional orthopaedic trauma unit. METHODS: Trauma orthopaedic workload in a regional trauma unit was examined over 2 months between December 2009 and January 2010. This corresponded with a period of severe inclement weather. RESULTS: We identified a direct correlation between the drop in temperature and increase in workload, with a corresponding increase in demand on resources. CONCLUSIONS: Significant cost savings could be made if these injuries were prevented. While the information contained in this study is important in the context of resource planning and staffing of hospital trauma units, it also highlights the vulnerability of the Irish population to wintery weather.

  2. Changing perceptions of beauty: a surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Peter A; Zavod, Matthew B

    2006-08-01

    Beauty is a mystery that has been with us for ages. Scholars and scientists have investigated its roots and effects, and its presence is ubiquitous. Has the construct of beauty changed over time? Is our sense of beauty learned or innate? What IS beauty, and can we quantify it? A substantial amount of work supports a Darwinian theory of selection, which predicts a survival advantage based on physical attractiveness. However, there is evidence that certain perceptions of beauty change with time. Indeed, the recent globalization of modern society has wrought changes in our perceptions of beauty. Are patients electing cosmetic surgery procuring a survival advantage, or are they bypassing genetics and setting a new standard for beauty? As facial plastic surgeons, we must be poised to respond to this metamorphosis and understand its roots. Although there is some equivocation and debate about this elusive subject, it is our duty to stay abreast of the current dynamic to make sound judgments that are in the best interests of our patients.

  3. Canadian National Vegetation Classification (CNVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The mandate of the CNVC is to comprehensively classify and describe natural and semi-natural Canadian vegetation in an ecologically meaningful manner. The...

  4. Canadian Literature Is Comparative Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, E. D.

    1988-01-01

    Argues that the way out of worn out analogies of Canadian literature is found not only by acquiring knowledge of other cultures, but also by abandoning the deceptive parallelisms that overcome differences only by hiding them. (RAE)

  5. Quality of life of indian pediatric surgeons: Results of a survey (of indian association of pediatric surgeons members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Zameer

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study which objectively highlights that most surgeons are happy professionally and financially in due course of time and demolishes the common belief that pediatric surgeons are unsatisfied. It also acts as a point of reference and encouragement to newer aspirants in pediatric surgery.

  6. Comparison of operator radiation exposure between C-arm and O-arm fluoroscopy for orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Boram; Min, Eunki; Kim, Youhyun; Jeon, Sungchae; Huh, Young; Lee, Kisung

    2012-03-01

    The O-arm system has recently been introduced and has the capability of combined two-dimensional (2-D) fluoroscopy imaging and three-dimensional computed tomography imaging. In this study, an orthopaedic surgical procedure using C-arm and O-arm systems in their 2-D fluoroscopy modes was simulated and the radiation doses to susceptible organs to which operators can be exposed were investigated. The experiments were performed in four configurations of the location of the X-ray source and detector. Shielding effects on the thyroid surface and the direct exposure delivered to the surgeon's hands were also compared. The results obtained show that the O-arm delivered higher doses to the sensitive organs of the operator in all configurations. The thyroid shield cut-off 89 % of the dose in the posteroanterior configuration of both imaging systems. Thus, the operators need to pay more attention to managing radiation exposure, especially when using the O-arm system.

  7. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, T Sean; Parker, Richard D; Patel, Ronak M; Andrish, Jack T; Spindler, Kurt P; Amendola, Annunziata; Brophy, Robert H; Dunn, Warren R; Flanigan, David C; Huston, Laura J; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; McCarty, Eric C; Pedroza, Angela D; Reinke, Emily K; Wolf, Brian R; Wright, Rick W

    2015-03-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  8. Ethical challenges in surgery as narrated by practicing surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordam Ann

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore the ethical challenges in surgery from the surgeons' point of view and their experience of being in ethically difficult situations. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a university hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of nurses and physicians about being in such situations. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No differences in ethical reasoning between male and female surgeons were found. They reasoned in both action and relational ethical perspectives. Surgeons focused on their relationships with patients and colleagues and their moral self in descriptions of the ethical challenges in their work. Dialogue and personal involvement were important in their relationships with patients. The surgeons emphasized the importance of open dialogue, professional recognition, and an inclusive and accepting environment between colleagues. Conclusion The surgeons are personally challenged by the existential realities of human life in their relationships with patients. They realized that ethical challenges are an inherent part of performing surgery and of life itself, and say that they have to learn to "live with" these challenges in a way that is confirmed both socially and by their inner moral self. This means accepting their personal and professional limitations, being uncertain, being fallible, and being humble. Living with the ethical challenges of surgery seems to contribute to the surgeons' confidence and vulnerability in their professional identity.

  9. Overview of Implant Infections in Orthopaedics Department: Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Bulut

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, our aim was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated from orthopedic implant infections. Within two years operated 1996 patients in an orthopedics and traumatology clinic were retrospectively investigated. Seventy-six (76/1996, 3.8% orthopedic implant infections were detected. Isolated bacteria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns were analyzed. The bacteries isolated from implant related infections and antibiotic sensitivity patterns were evaluated retrospectively in our orthopaedics and traumatology clinic. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant organism (30.3%. Gram negative bacterias were isolated in 65.8% of our patients. No resistance was determined against vancomycin and linezolid in gram positive bacterias. Imipenem, amicasin and cefepim was seen as the most effective antibiotics for gram negative bacterias.

  10. Perioperative Vision Loss in Spine Surgery and Other Orthopaedic Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Alvin W; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Larson, A Noelle

    2016-10-01

    Perioperative vision loss is a rare complication of orthopaedic surgery and has been documented after spine, knee, hip, and shoulder procedures. It is associated with several ophthalmologic diagnoses, most commonly ischemic optic neuropathy. Although the pathophysiology remains unclear, current evidence suggests that systemic hemodynamic compromise and altered balance of intraocular perfusion contribute to the development of ischemic optic neuropathy. Although vision recovery has been reported, the prognosis of perioperative vision loss is poor, and no proven effective treatment is available. Perioperative vision loss is unpredictable and can occur in healthy patients. Associated risk factors include pediatric or elderly age, male sex, obesity, anemia, hypotension or hypertension, perioperative blood loss, prolonged surgical time, and prone positioning. Preventive strategies include avoiding direct pressure to the eye, elevating the head, optimizing perioperative hemodynamic status, and minimizing surgical time with staged surgical procedures as appropriate.

  11. Nonspinal orthopaedic problems in familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplaza, F J; Turajane, T; Axelrod, F B; Burke, S W

    2001-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease occurring in Ashkenazi Jews. It affects the autonomic, central, and peripheral nervous systems. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of orthopedic deformities, other than spinal deformities, in this population. A retrospective review of the medical records and radiographs of 182 patients was made. Three main groups of orthopaedic conditions were evaluated: (a) Fractures: 60% of the patients had one or more fractures; the average fracture rate was 1.4/patient. (b) Neuropathic joints: 11% of the cases had one or more neuropathic joints, the knee being the most common. (c) Other musculoskeletal deformities: 26% of the patients had one or more deformities. Lower extremity rotational problems and foot anomalies accounted for most of these deformities. Patients with FD have a higher prevalence of fractures and neuropathic joints than do their peers. The fracture pattern also is different, with a higher incidence of proximal femoral fractures.

  12. 'Ready-access' CT imaging for an orthopaedic trauma clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2011-03-01

    \\'Ready-Access\\' to CT imaging facilities in Orthopaedic Trauma Clinics is not a standard facility. This facility has been available at the regional trauma unit, in Merlin Park Hospital, Galway for the past four years. We reviewed the use of this facility over a 2-year period when 100 patients had CT scans as part of their trauma clinic assessment. The rate of CT scan per clinic was 0.6. The mean waiting time for a CT scan was 30 minutes. 20 (20%) new fractures were confirmed, 33 (33%) fractures were out-ruled, 25 (25%) fractures demonstrated additional information and 8 (8%) had additional fractures. 20 (20%) patients were discharged and 12 (12%) patients were admitted as a result of the CT scan. It adds little time and cost to CT scanning lists.

  13. International Patients on Operation Vacation – Perspectives of Patients Travelling to Hungary for Orthopaedic Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Kovacs

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The importance of cross-border healthcare, medical and health tourism plays a significant role in the European health policy and health management. After dentistry, orthopaedic treatments are the leading motivation for seeking care in Hungary, as patients with rheumatic and motion diseases are drawn to the thermal spas and well-established orthopaedic centres. This paper aims to gain insight into foreign patients’ perspectives on their experience of having sought medical tourism in orthopaedic care in Hungary. Methods A patient survey was conducted in 2012 on motivations for seeking treatment abroad, orthopaedic care received and overall satisfaction. In addition, health professionals’ interviews, and 17 phone interviews were conducted in 2013 with Romanian patients who had orthopaedic treatment in Hungary. Finally, medical records of foreign patients were analysed. Results The survey was completed by 115 participants – 61.1% females, mean age= 41.9, 87% Romanian origin. Most of the patients came to Hungary for orthopaedic surgeries, e.g. arthroscopy, knee/hip prosthesis or spinal surgery. 72.6% chose Hungary because of related to perceived better quality and longstanding culture of Hungarian orthopaedic care. Over 57% of patients reported being ‘very satisfied’ with care received and 41.6% ‘satisfied’. The follow-up interviews further reflected this level of satisfaction, therefore many respondents stating they have already recommended the Hungarian healthcare to others. Conclusion Based on the findings, patients from neighbouring regions are increasingly seeking orthopaedic care in Hungary. Patients having orthopaedic care are highly satisfied with the quality of care, the whole treatment process from the availability of information to discharge summaries and would consider returning for further treatments.

  14. Effects of a modified maxillary orthopaedic splint: a cephalometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uner, O; Yücel-Eroğlu, E

    1996-06-01

    Taking the presence of an interplay between the vertical and sagittal components of craniofacial development into consideration, the beneficial therapeutic potential impacts of controlling vertical development on the correction of Class II discrepancies has been previously investigated. In the present study, a modified maxillary orthopaedic splint combined with an anterior high-pull headgear was used for early correction of the vertical and consequently sagittal dentoskeletal discrepancy as the initial stage of treatment. The aim was to evaluate its effects on the maxillary and mandibular dentoskeletal development, as well as rotational growth pattern. In order to compare with and distinguish from the uninterrupted growth changes, a control group was formed by matching each one of the control subjects to a subject in the treatment group according to certain criteria. The initial and second standardized lateral cephalograms of each subject was evaluated by means of an adopted and biologically more substantial cephalometric analysis. Evaluation of the changes induced by the splint in comparison with the uninterrupted growth changes revealed that the splint had both orthopaedic and orthodontic effects on the growth pattern of the dentoskeletal structures. There seemed to exist a relationship between the direction of total mandibular and maxillary rotations. In addition, it was believed that in order to cause a forward mandibular rotation, i.e. to change the rotational mandibular growth pattern from a backward into a forward direction, the posterior vertical maxillary development should be restrained, but anterior vertical maxillary development should be relatively more restrained or reversed and, thereby, the rotational growth pattern of the maxilla should be changed from a backward into a forward direction. Moreover, the bite block effect of the splint seemed to cause a favourable change in the condylar growth direction from a backward to an upward direction.

  15. Helical rosette nanotubes: a more effective orthopaedic implant material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ai Lin; Moralez, Jesus G.; Fenniri, Hicham; Webster, Thomas J.

    2004-04-01

    Due to the nanometric properties of some physiological components of bone, nanomaterials have been proposed as the next generation of improved orthopaedic implant materials. Yet current efforts in the design of orthopaedic materials such as titanium (Ti) are not aimed at tailoring their nanoscale features, which is now believed to be one reason why Ti sometimes fails clinically as a bone implant material. Much effort is thus being dedicated to developing improved bioactive nanometric surfaces and nanomaterials for biospecificity. Helical rosette nanotubes (HRN) are a new class of self-assembled organic nanotubes possessing biologically-inspired nanoscale dimensions. Because of their chemical and structural similarity with naturally-occurring nanostructured constituent components in bone such as collagen and hydroxyapatite, we anticipated that an HRN-coated surface may simulate an environment that bone cells are accustomed to interacting with. The objective of the present in vitro study is therefore to determine the efficacy of HRN as a bone prosthetic material. Results of this study clearly show that both HRN-K1 and HRN-Arg coated Ti displayed enhanced cell adhesion when compared to uncoated Ti. Enhanced cell adhesion was observed even at concentrations as low as 0.005 mg ml-1. These results point towards new possibilities in bone tissue engineering as they serve as a starting point for further mechanistic studies as well as future manipulation of the outer chemistries of HRN to improve the results beyond those presented here. One such effort is the incorporation of peptide sequences on the outer surface of HRN and/or growth factors known to enhance bone functions.

  16. Research on the Influence of Orthopaedic Inserts on Pressure Distribution in the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignas Rutulys

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the influence of individual orthopaedic inserts on pressure distribution in the foot. Feet deformations, types of orthopaedic inserts, materials and pressure in the foot testing methods are discussed. Experimental computer measurements of pressure in the foot before and after the use of inserts have been done. During research, the inserts made of different kinds of materials selected according to human weight, pathology, skin sensitivity and many other reasons has been used. It has been determinated that orthopaedic inserts have a more noticeable impact on children whose feet is adjusted easier if compared with those of adults.Article in Lithuanian

  17. The effects of surgeons and anesthesiologists on operating room efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nessa Timoney

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: In some procedures types a significant part of the variability in operative time is due to the interaction between the surgeon and anesthesiologist. Reviewing operative records should allow identification of efficient/inefficient combinations.

  18. A Methodological Critique of the ProPublica Surgeon Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; Pronovost, Peter J; Shahian, David M; Safran, Dana Gelb; Bilimoria, Karl Y; Elliott, Marc N; Damberg, Cheryl L; Dimick, Justin B; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2016-05-09

    On July 14, 2015, ProPublica published its Surgeon Scorecard, which displays "Adjusted Complication Rates" for individual, named surgeons for eight surgical procedures performed in hospitals. Public reports of provider performance have the potential to improve the quality of health care that patients receive. A valid performance report can drive quality improvement and usefully inform patients' choices of providers. However, performance reports with poor validity and reliability are potentially damaging to all involved. This article critiques the methods underlying the Scorecard and identifies opportunities for improvement. Until these opportunities are addressed, the authors advise users of the Scorecard-most notably, patients who might be choosing their surgeons-not to consider the Scorecard a valid or reliable predictor of the health outcomes any individual surgeon is likely to provide. The authors hope that this methodological critique will contribute to the development of more-valid and more-reliable performance reports in the future.

  19. [Andreas Vesalius, distinguished surgeon of the 16th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, R

    1996-01-01

    The author gives here some considerations about A. Vesalius through his life and his works as a surgeon. He was the father of the anatomical revolution against Galen but was also an eminent clinician and surgeon. He was immediately able to adapt his surgical practice whenever the promising methodology was identified (see Consilia). The author concludes with a critical analysis of the Chirurgia magna in septem libros digesta attributed to A. Vesalius.

  20. The surgeon and self-harm: at the cutting edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, James C; MacHale, Siobhan

    2014-12-01

    Surgeons frequently treat the consequences of self-harm. Self-harm is a common problem and presentations to Irish hospitals are increasing. It increases the risk of suicide and is associated with long term morbidity. Appropriate management can improve the prognosis. Surgeons require a number of skills to appropriately manage patients who self-harm. In this review we outline those skills including diagnosis, communication, capacity and risk assessment.

  1. Surgeons' Emotional Experience of Their Everyday Practice - A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Orri

    Full Text Available Physicians' emotions affect both patient care and personal well-being. Surgeons appear at particularly high risk, as evidenced by the high rate of burnout and the alarming consequences in both their personal lives and professional behavior. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the emotional experiences of surgeons and their impact on their surgical practice.27 purposively selected liver and pancreatic surgeons from 10 teaching hospitals (23 men, 4 women participated. Inclusion took place until data saturation was reached. Data were collected through individual interviews and thematically analyzed independently by 3 researchers (a psychologist, a psychiatrist, and a surgeon. 7 themes emerged from the analysis, categorized in 3 main or superordinate themes, which described surgeons' emotional experience before, during, and after surgery. Burdensome emotions are present throughout all 3 periods (and invade life outside the hospital-surgeons' own emotions, their perception of patients' emotions, and their entwinement. The interviewees described the range of emotional situations they face (with patients, families, colleagues, the influence of the institutional framework (time pressure and fatigue, cultural pressure to satisfy the ideal image of a surgeon, as well as the emotions they feel (including especially anxiety, fear, distress, guilt, and accountability.Emotions are ubiquitous in surgeons' experience, and their exposure to stress is chronic rather than acute. Considering emotions only in terms of their relations to operative errors (as previous studies have done is limiting. Although complications are quite rare events, the concern for possible complications is an oppressive experience, regardless of whether or not they actually occur.

  2. How Should Canadian Literature Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colborne, Garnet

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for and several approaches to teaching Canadian literature, including a cultural and regional approach to Canadian literature, a comparative approach, and a language study approach. (HTH)

  3. Depth Perception of Surgeons in Minimally Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, Rositsa; Boulanger, Pierre; Zheng, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) poses visual challenges to the surgeons. In MIS, binocular disparity is not freely available for surgeons, who are required to mentally rebuild the 3-dimensional (3D) patient anatomy from a limited number of monoscopic visual cues. The insufficient depth cues from the MIS environment could cause surgeons to misjudge spatial depth, which could lead to performance errors thus jeopardizing patient safety. In this article, we will first discuss the natural human depth perception by exploring the main depth cues available for surgeons in open procedures. Subsequently, we will reveal what depth cues are lost in MIS and how surgeons compensate for the incomplete depth presentation. Next, we will further expand our knowledge by exploring some of the available solutions for improving depth presentation to surgeons. Here we will review the innovative approaches (multiple 2D camera assembly, shadow introduction) and devices (3D monitors, head-mounted devices, and auto-stereoscopic monitors) for 3D image presentation from the past few years.

  4. A change in opinion on surgeon's performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytham, Gary; Kessaris, Nicos

    2011-04-01

    Individual performance indicators for cardiac surgeons in the UK were published in 2004. A comprehensive update published in 2009 reported statistically significant decreases in mortality rates suggesting that the publication of this data may have contributed to this improvement in outcomes. In view of this, the authors present an assessment of the attitudes of cardiac surgeons to individual performance tables, having performed this by sending questionnaires exploring the surgeon's views on performance tables to UK cardiac surgeons in 2005 and 2009. The responses demonstrated that whilst the majority of cardiac surgeons (68.8%) were initially opposed to performance tables, the number welcoming their introduction increased significantly (22.9-48.5%) over the four-year period. The attitude of the consultants towards the possible effect of this data on the management of high-risk patients also changed, with fewer consultants believing they would (P=0.0001) or may (P=0.023) avoid these patients. The observed change in attitude of cardiac surgeons may be due to acclimatization to an established system of audit, improved mortality rates, a desire for more transparency following the Bristol Enquiry, or improved risk stratification. These findings may be of benefit to those tasked with initiating these indicators elsewhere.

  5. Responsible Canadian energy progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) represents oil and gas companies throughout Canada; its members produce over 90% of Canada's natural gas and crude oil output. The aim of the Association is to improve the economics of the Canadian upstream petroleum sector in an environmentally and socially responsible way. The aim of this Responsible Canadian Energy report is to present the performance data of CAPP's members for the year 2009. Data, trends, and performance analyses are provided throughout the document. This analysis makes it possible to determine where progress has been made and where performance improvement is necessary. It also presents success stories and best practices so that other companies can learn from them how to improve their own performance. This paper provides useful information on the performance of the upstream petroleum industry in Canada and highlights where the focus should be for further improvement in its performance.

  6. Birth of the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Ivan T.

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Digestive Disease Foundation, renamed the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation -- Fondation canadienne pour la promotion de la santé digestive -- in December 2001, is the culmination of ongoing efforts by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology to establish an independent charitable organization. In February 2001, it was officially endorsed as the Foundation for the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. The initial efforts to establish this Foundation, led by Dr Richa...

  7. Preventing infection in general surgery: improvements through education of surgeons by surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Surgical patients are at particular risk of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) due to the presence of a surgical site leading to surgical site infection (SSI), and because of the need for intravascular access resulting in catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI). A two-year initiative commenced with an initial audit of surgical practice; this was used to inform the development of a targeted educational initiative by surgeons specifically for surgical trainees. Parameters assessed during the initial audit and a further audit after the educational initiative were related to intra- and postoperative aspects of the prevention of SSIs, as well as care of peripheral venous catheters (PVCs) in surgical patients. The proportion of prophylactic antibiotics administered prior to incision across 360 operations increased from 30.0% to 59.1% (P<0.001). Surgical site dressings were observed in 234 patients, and a significant decrease was found in the percentage of dressings that were tampered with during the initial 48h after surgery (16.5% vs 6.2%, P=0.030). In total, 574 PVCs were assessed over the two-year period. Improvements were found in the proportion of unnecessary PVCs in situ (37.9% vs 24.4%, P<0.001), PVCs in situ for >72h (10.6% vs 3.1%, P<0.001) and PVCs covered with clean and intact dressings (87.3% vs 97.6%, P<0.001). Significant improvements in surgical practice were established for the prevention of SSI and CRBSI through a focused educational programme developed by and for surgeons. Potentially, other specific measures may also be warranted to achieve further improvements in infection prevention in surgical practice.

  8. Motivado por cirujanos Motivated by Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salazar-Vargas

    2010-12-01

    interrogate and to examine those individuals, and every gesture, every question, every maneuver they did, was jealously kept in our minds. However even at an early stage, we clearly perceived, the differences between medical branches and practitioners, and involuntarily, every one was leaning towards this or that specialty. It was during those years when 7 wonderful persons and excellent surgeons, crossed the path of my life, inspiring me to follow their steps and to embrace a surgical career. Two were classic academicians, Dr. Manuel Aguilar Bonilla and Dr. Andres Vesalio Guzman Calleja, 3 were determined, tireless and highly skilled, Dr. Longino Soto Pacheco, Dr. Claudio Orlich Carranza, y el Dr. Carlos Prada Diaz, and 2 were, although well prepared, unassuming, practical and openly friendly, Dr. Fernando Valverde Soley y el Dr. Randall Ferris Iglesias....

  9. Quality of Life of Indian Pediatric Surgeons: Results of a Survey (of Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons Members)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameer, M. M.; Rao, Sanjay; Vinay, C.; D’Cruz, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Much is debated on the quality of life of pediatric surgeons practicing in India, all based on anecdotal and personal experiences. There is no systematic study on this. This study addresses this and attempts to glean a clearer picture of the life as a pediatric surgeon in India. Methodology: This questionnaire-based study was administered via an online survey to all Indian Association of Pediatric Surgeons members. The responses were anonymous and investigators blinded. Data were collated and analyzed using STAT11.1. Results: A total of 173 pediatric surgeons responded. Eighty-six percent were men. About 73.7% of the surgeons were between 31 and 50 years of age. Almost 63.4% practiced in urban areas, whereas 36% in other smaller towns. About 0.6% reported that their practice was rural. Almost 26.4% were in private/solo practices, whereas 53.4% were in institution-based practice. Almost 80% felt that they were adequately trained while starting their practice. About 78% are professionally satisfied with their work. Only 44.5% of surgeons felt that they were compensated adequately financially. Reading was the favorite pass time. Almost 40% of the surgeons felt that they were either overweight or obese. About 41% of the surgeons exercise more than 3 times a week. Only 11.4% smoke, whereas 36% drink. Fifty-three percent of surgeons felt that their personal savings were adequate. Seventy-six percent use Facebook. Sixty-eight percent were satisfied with their quality of life. Age was significantly associated with professional satisfaction, financial satisfaction, and quality of life and all improve as one's age progresses. None were affected with one's gender, type of practice, and the place of practice. Age, weight, exercise, and one's savings significantly affected ones quality of life. Conclusion: This is the first study which objectively highlights that most surgeons are happy professionally and financially in due course of time and demolishes the common

  10. Experience with Emergency Ultrasound Training by Canadian Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Starting in 2008, emergency ultrasound (EUS was introduced as a core competency to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (Royal College emergency medicine (EM training standards. The Royal College accredits postgraduate EM specialty training in Canada through 5-year residency programs. The objective of this study is to describe both the current experience with and the perceptions of EUS by Canadian Royal College EM senior residents. Methods: This was a web-based survey conducted from January to March 2011 of all 39 Canadian Royal College postgraduate fifth-year (PGY-5 EM residents. Main outcome measures were characteristics of EUS training and perceptions of EUS. Results: Survey response rate was 95% (37/39. EUS was part of the formal residency curriculum for 86% of respondents (32/37. Residents most commonly received training in focused assessment with sonography for trauma, intrauterine pregnancy, abdominal aortic aneurysm, cardiac, and procedural guidance. Although the most commonly provided instructional material (86% [32/37] was an ultrasound course, 73% (27/37 of residents used educational resources outside of residency training to supplement their ultrasound knowledge. Most residents (95% [35/37] made clinical decisions and patient dispositions based on their EUS interpretation without a consultative study by radiology. Residents had very favorable perceptions and opinions of EUS. Conclusion: EUS training in Royal College EM programs was prevalent and perceived favorably by residents, but there was heterogeneity in resident training and practice of EUS. This suggests variability in both the level and quality of EUS training in Canadian Royal College EM residency programs.

  11. Do developmental orthopaedic disorders influence future jumping performances in Warmblood stallions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verwilghen, Denis; Janssens, S; Busoni, V

    2013-01-01

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: Few reports are available on the relationship between developmental orthopaedic diseases (DOD) and future performances in Warmblood horses. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between performance and the presence of DOD lesions. METHODS: Records of Warmbl...

  12. Bioactive Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants—Recent Trends in Development of Implant Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill G. X. Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint replacement is a major orthopaedic procedure used to treat joint osteoarthritis. Aseptic loosening and infection are the two most significant causes of prosthetic implant failure. The ideal implant should be able to promote osteointegration, deter bacterial adhesion and minimize prosthetic infection. Recent developments in material science and cell biology have seen the development of new orthopaedic implant coatings to address these issues. Coatings consisting of bioceramics, extracellular matrix proteins, biological peptides or growth factors impart bioactivity and biocompatibility to the metallic surface of conventional orthopaedic prosthesis that promote bone ingrowth and differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts leading to enhanced osteointegration of the implant. Furthermore, coatings such as silver, nitric oxide, antibiotics, antiseptics and antimicrobial peptides with anti-microbial properties have also been developed, which show promise in reducing bacterial adhesion and prosthetic infections. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in coatings for orthopaedic implants.

  13. Significance of nano- and microtopography for cell-surface interactions in orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, M; Zilkens, C; Zanger, K; Krauspe, R

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically.

  14. A Topography for Canadian Curriculum Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Cynthia

    1999-01-01

    Presents challenges to Canadian curriculum theorists: (1) to create curriculum languages and genres that represent all of Canada; (2) to use Canadian scholars and indigenous languages to find these curriculum languages and genres; (3) to seek interpretive tools to understand what it means to be Canadian; and (4) to create curriculum theory that…

  15. Canadian Children's Literature: An Alberta Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Carbonaro, Mike; Green, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an online survey administered to Alberta elementary school teachers in 2000-2001. The survey explored the teachers' knowledge and use of Canadian children's literature and their thoughts about the role of Canadian literature in elementary school classrooms. Canadian children's trade books espouse particular…

  16. The Ideological Orientations of Canadian University Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaie, M. Reza; Brym, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the ideological orientations of Canadian university professors based on a unique 2000 study of a representative sample of Canadian academics (n=3,318). After summarizing methodological problems with extant research on this subject, and tentatively comparing the political views of Canadian and American academics, the paper…

  17. Transnational archives: the Canadian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Creet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the concept of the transnational archive as a counterpoint to the idea that a national archive is necessarily a locus of a static idea of nation. The Canadian national archives is used as a case study of an archives that was transnational in its inception, and one that has continued to change in its mandate and materials as a response to patterns in migration and changing notions of multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy. It introduces the most recent formation of the transnational archive and its denizens: the genealogical archive inhabited by family historians.

  18. Are shoulder surgeons any good at diagnosing rotator cuff tears using ultrasound?: A comparative analysis of surgeon vs radiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeyam Muthu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasound has gained increasing popularity as an aid in the diagnosis of rotator cuff pathology. With the advent of portable machines, ultrasound has become accessible to clinicians. Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of ultrasound in diagnosing rotator cuff tears by a shoulder surgeon and comparing their ability to that of a musculoskeletal radiologist. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff pathology underwent preoperative ultrasonography (US. All patients were of similar demographics and pathology. The surgeon used a Sonosite Micromax portable ultrasound machine with a 10-MHz high frequency linear array transducer and the radiologist used a 9-12 MHz linear array probe on a Siemens Antares machine. Arthroscopic diagnosis was the reference standard to which ultrasound findings were compared. Results: The sensitivity in detecting full thickness tears was similar for both the surgeon (92% and the radiologist (94%. The radiologist had 100% sensitivity in diagnosing partial thickness tears, compared to 85.7% for the surgeon. The specificity for the surgeon was 94% and 85% for the radiologist. Discussion: Our study shows that the surgeons are capable of diagnosing rotator cuff tears with the use of high-resolution portable ultrasound in the outpatient setting. Conclusion: Office ultrasound, by a trained clinician, is a powerful diagnostic tool in diagnosing rotator cuff tears and can be used effectively in running one-stop shoulder clinics.

  19. Ethics as an important determinant of success of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzseid, E E

    1989-01-01

    Ethical aspects of orthopaedic dental care for debilitated and elderly patients--the most complex and the least studied aspects of dentistry--are discussed here. Many articles on dental ethics, as a rule, do not cover the essential ethical aspects of orthopaedic care for the elderly or cover them only partially without reflecting on the problem at large. Understanding of the problem may help to provide more efficient dental care for the elderly population thus improving their quality of life.

  20. Biodegradable Magnesium Alloys for Orthopaedic Applications: A Review on Corrosion, Biocompatibility and Surface Modifications.

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Sankalp; Curtin, James; Duffy, Brendan; Jaiswal, Swarna

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys an...

  1. Does a "Level I Evidence" rating imply high quality of reporting in orthopaedic randomised controlled trials?

    OpenAIRE

    Sierevelt Inger N; Krips Rover; Struijs Peter AA; Poolman Rudolf W; Lutz Kristina H; Bhandari Mohit

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The Levels of Evidence Rating System is widely believed to categorize studies by quality, with Level I studies representing the highest quality evidence. We aimed to determine the reporting quality of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) published in the most frequently cited general orthopaedic journals. Methods Two assessors identified orthopaedic journals that reported a level of evidence rating in their abstracts from January 2003 to December 2004 by searching the instr...

  2. Mechanical compatibility of sol–gel annealing with titanium for orthopaedic prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, Andrew I.M.; Lim, Teoh S.; Brydone, Alistair S.; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    Sol–gel processing is an attractive method for large-scale surface coating due to its facile and inexpensive preparation, even with the inclusion of precision nanotopographies. These are desirable traits for metal orthopaedic prostheses where ceramic coatings are known to be osteoinductive and the effects may be amplified through nanotexturing. However there are a few concerns associated with the application of sol–gel technology to orthopaedics. Primarily, the annealing stage required to tra...

  3. The link between texting and motor vehicle collision frequency in the orthopaedic trauma population

    OpenAIRE

    Neil M. Issar; Kadakia, Rishin J.; James M. Tsahakis; Zachary T. Yoneda; Sethi, Manish K.; Mir, Hassan R.; Kristin Archer; Obremskey, William T.; A. Alex Jahangir

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Background: This study will evaluate whether or not texting frequency while driving and/or texting frequency in general are associated with an increased risk of incurring a motor vehicle collision (MVC) resulting in orthopaedic trauma injuries. Methods: All patients who presented to the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Orthopaedic Trauma Clinic were administered a questionnaire to determine background information, mean phone use, texting frequency, texting frequency while drivin...

  4. Suction drain tip culture in orthopaedic surgery: a prospective study of 214 clean operations

    OpenAIRE

    Sankar, B.; P Ray; Rai, J.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted a prospective cohort study in order to determine whether suction drain specimen cultures from orthopaedic surgery predicted an early wound infection. We included 218 consecutive clean orthopaedic operations requiring drains in one unit over a period of 1 year. The suction drain tip, drain fluid and wound discharge specimens were cultured, and the surgical wound was followed up for 3 months. There were six deep and two superficial wound infections. Wound infection was significantl...

  5. Bioactive Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants—Recent Trends in Development of Implant Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bill G. X.; Myers, Damian E.; Gordon G. Wallace; Milan Brandt; Choong, Peter F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Joint replacement is a major orthopaedic procedure used to treat joint osteoarthritis. Aseptic loosening and infection are the two most significant causes of prosthetic implant failure. The ideal implant should be able to promote osteointegration, deter bacterial adhesion and minimize prosthetic infection. Recent developments in material science and cell biology have seen the development of new orthopaedic implant coatings to address these issues. Coatings consisting of bioceramics, extracell...

  6. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many orthopaedic procedures, whereas allograft is the gold standard by replacement of extensive bone loss. However, the use of autograft is associated with donor site morbidity, especially chronic pain. In addition, the limited supply is a significant clinical challenge. Limitations in the use of allograft include the risk of bacterial contamination and disease transmission as well as non-union and poor bone quality. Other bone graft and substitutes have been considered as alternative in order to improve implant fixation. Hydroxyapatite and collagen type I composite (HA/Collagen) have the potential in mimicking skeletal bones. The osteoconductive properties of the composite might be improved by adding bone marrow aspirate (BMA), which can be harvested during surgery. Other alternatives to bone graft are demineralised bone matrix (DBM) and human cancellous bone (CB). DBM is prepared by acid extraction of human bone and includes bone collagen, morphogenetic proteins and growth factors. The combination of DBM with CB and with allograft might improve the healing potential of these grafts around non-cemented orthopaedic implants and thereby the implant fixation. Study I investigates the effect of HA/Collagen composite alone and in combination with BMA on the early fixation of porous coated titanium implants. In addition, the study compares also the effect of autograft with the gold standard allograft. By using a sheep model, the implants were inserted in the trabecular bone of femoral condyles. The test biomaterials were placed in a well defined peri-implant gap. After the observation period, the bone-implant specimens were harvested and evaluated mechanically by a destructive push

  7. A remembrance of Victoria and the Canadian Army Medical Corps in the Great War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Preston L

    2008-05-01

    The North Pacific Surgical Association first met in Victoria in December, 1917, in the midst of World War I, or as it was known then, the Great War. On all sides, the toll in human life was staggering. Canada alone lost more than 60,000 men in the war. Our Association now returns to Victoria as the very last survivors of that generation pass into history. We honor the great sacrifice of the Canadian Army, recall the horrific conditions they endured, and honor the doctors and nurses who attended the countless wounded through the experiences of a Canadian surgeon from Calgary, Dr. Harold McGill, who served for 3 years in the thick of action on the Western Front.

  8. Musculoskeletal disorders among robotic surgeons: A questionnaire analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Giberti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Robotic surgical systems offer better workplace in order to relieve surgeons from prolonged physical efforts and improve their surgical outcomes. However, robotic surgery could produce musculoskeletal disorders due to the prolonged sitting position of the operator, the fixed position of the console viewer and the movements of the limbs. Until today, no one study has been reported concerning the association between robotics and musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this work was verify the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Italian robotic surgeons. Material and methods: Between July 2011 and April 2012 a modified Standardized Nordic Questionnaire was delivered to thirty-nine Italian robotic centres. Twentytwo surgeons (56% returned the questionnaires but only seventeen questionnaires (43.5% were evaluable. Results: Seven surgeons (41.2% reported musculoskeletal disorders, by since their first use of the robot which significantly persisted during the daily surgical activity (P < 0.001. Regarding the body parts affected, musculoskeletal disorders were mainly reported in the cervical spine (29.4% and in the upper limbs (23.5%. Six surgeons (35.3% defined the robotic console as less comfortable or neither comfortable/uncomfortable with a negative influence on their surgical procedures. Conclusions: In spite of some important limitations, our data showed musculoskeletal disorders due to posture discomfort with negative impact on daily surgical activity among robotic surgeons. These aspects could be due to the lack of ergonomic seat and to the fixed position of the console viewer which could have produced an inadequate spinal posture. The evaluation of these postural factors, in particular the development of an integrated and more ergonomic chair, could further improve the comfort feeling of the surgeon at the console and probably his surgical outcomes.

  9. Orthopaedic jack for scoliosis surgery purposes: Concept and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriadi, Sugeng; Radhana, Rakha M.; Hidayanto, Taufik Eko; Whulanza, Yudan; Ali, Notario, Nanda; Rahyussalim

    2017-02-01

    Scoliosis surgery is one of the most difficult orthopedic surgery that have been committed today as the failure rate of orthopedic surgery for adult patients is 15%. Aside from the long duration of surgery, this surgical failure is caused by failure in biomedical instrumentation. Furthermore, this kind of failure is causing inefficiency of the surgery. With current known orthopedic surgery method, three surgeons are needed in a single orthopedic surgery. In fact, a single surgery can take up to 8 hours to be done, which increases the risk of surgical failure. Based on this problem, authors hope that our orthopedic jacks could solve the problem.

  10. Canadian contributions studies for the WFIRST instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, J.-F.; Rowlands, N.; Grandmont, F. J.; Lafrenière, D.; Marois, C.; Daigle, O.; Thibault, S.; Schade, D.; Artigau, É.; Brousseau, D.; Maire, J.; Cretot-Richert, G.; Ducharme, M.-È.; Levesque, L. E.; Laurin, D.; Dupuis, J.

    2016-07-01

    WFIRST-AFTA is the NASA's highest ranked astrophysics mission for the next decade that was identified in the New World, New Horizon survey. The mission scientific drivers correspond to some of the deep questions identified in the Canadian LRP2010, and are also of great interest for the Canadian scientists. Given that there is also a great interest in having an international collaboration in this mission, the Canadian Space Agency awarded two contracts to study a Canadian participation in the mission, one related to each instrument. This paper presents a summary of the technical contributions that were considered for a Canadian contribution to the coronagraph and wide field instruments.

  11. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  12. Universal values of Canadian astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brcic, Jelena; Della-Rossa, Irina

    2012-11-01

    Values are desirable, trans-situational goals, varying in importance, that guide behavior. Research has demonstrated that universal values may alter in importance as a result of major life events. The present study examines the effect of spaceflight and the demands of astronauts' job position as life circumstances that affect value priorities. We employed thematic content analysis for references to Schwartz's well-established value markers in narratives (media interviews, journals, and pre-flight interviews) of seven Canadian astronauts and compared the results to the values of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Russian Space Agency (RKA) astronauts. Space flight did alter the level of importance of Canadian astronauts' values. We found a U-shaped pattern for the values of Achievement and Tradition before, during, and after flight, and a linear decrease in the value of Stimulation. The most frequently mentioned values were Achievement, Universalism, Security, and Self-Direction. Achievement and Self Direction are also within the top 4 values of all other astronauts; however, Universalism was significantly higher among the Canadian astronauts. Within the value hierarchy of Canadian astronauts, Security was the third most frequently mentioned value, while it is in seventh place for all other astronauts. Interestingly, the most often mentioned value marker (sub-category) in this category was Patriotism. The findings have important implications in understanding multi-national crew relations during training, flight, and reintegration into society.

  13. Canadian Government Electronic Information Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Kirsti

    1993-01-01

    Examines development and evolution of Canadian government information policy in response to issues of preservation of data, information industry involvement in government data development and marketing, role of Crown copyright, and public access to government information in electronic formats. Six key information policy instruments are also…

  14. Canadian Literature in American Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. Robert

    1973-01-01

    Acquisition of Canadian literature by American libraries was investigated in three ways: questionnaires were sent to selected large libraries, titles were checked against the National Union Catalog'' and published literature describing major collections was examined. With the exception of the Library of Congress, American libraries purchase…

  15. Treating Wisely: The Surgeon's Role in Antibiotic Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeds, Ira L; Fabrizio, Anne; Cosgrove, Sara E; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2016-10-04

    Antibiotic resistance continues to receive national attention as a leading public health threat. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a National Action Plan to Combat Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria to curb the rise of "superbugs," bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort. Whereas many antibiotics are prescribed appropriately to treat infections, there continue to be a large number of inappropriately prescribed antibiotics. Although much of the national attention with regards to stewardship has focused on primary care providers, there is a significant opportunity for surgeons to embrace this national imperative and improve our practices. Local quality improvement efforts suggest that antibiotic misuse for surgical disease is common. Opportunities exist as part of day-to-day surgical care as well as through surgeons' interactions with nonsurgeon colleagues and policy experts. This article discusses the scope of the antibiotic misuse in surgery for surgical patients, and provides immediate practice improvements and also advocacy efforts surgeons can take to address the threat. We believe that surgical antibiotic prescribing patterns frequently do not adhere to evidence-based practices; surgeons are in a position to mitigate their ill effects; and antibiotic stewardship should be a part of every surgeons' practice.

  16. Musculoskeletal pain among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons. In this ......BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons......, and comparative data on surgeons' physical workload with robotic-assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy. Studies only describing a single surgical modality were excluded. We applied the checklist, STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE), to assess the quality...... fulfilled the criteria of STROBE, with an average score of 13 (range 10-16) out of 18. DISCUSSION: Results, mainly self-reported measures, suggest that robotic-assisted laparoscopy is less strenuous compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, results are limited by the large methodological...

  17. Renal profile in patients with orthopaedic trauma: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ashish; John, Bobby; Pawar, Basant; Sadiq, Shalinder

    2009-08-01

    This prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence of acute renal failure (ARF) and to identify factors contributing to development of ARF in orthopaedic trauma patients. A total of 55 patients who presented over a period of one year with trauma to upper and lower limbs were studied. Patients with renal injury, chest or abdominal injury, isolated fractures of the hands, feet and axial skeleton involvement were excluded. Out of these, five developed acute renal failure, three recovered and two died. The overall incidence of ARF in this study was 9.1%. Patients with lower limb injuries are at higher risk of developing ARF. Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) > or = 7, higher age, patient presenting with shock, increased myoglobin levels in urine and serum have been correlated with a greater risk of patients developing ARF and a higher mortality. This study attempts to determine the magnitude of crush injury causing renal failure and the incidence of renal failure in patients with injuries affecting the appendicular skeleton exclusively.

  18. Thermoplastic polymeric adhesive for structural bonding applications for orthopaedic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, D.; King, R.; Swarts, D.; Lin, S. [Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN (United States); Ramani, K.; Tagle, J. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    The orthopaedics industry has witnessed tremendous growth in recent years primarily due to the introduction of high performance, porous coated implants. These devices have eliminated the need for the use of bone cement for in vivo implant fixation, replacing it with the ingrowth of bone into the porous surfaces. The metallurgical bonding processes used for attaching the porous to the implant body introduce some undesirable effect i.e., the reduction of the fatigue strength of the implant due to the ``notches`` created and also due to the high temperature exposure during the sintering operations. This paper describes the development of a thermoplastic polymeric adhesive based structural bonding technique. The high performance polymeric adhesive is fully characterized with respect to its intended application. The design of the porous layer is optimized to achieve a reliable bond to the implant. A thermal heating/cooling process was developed to control the final polymer morphology. Static and fatigue tests were conducted to fully characterize the adhesive bond strength. A ring shear test method was developed to determine the shear strength of the bond interface. Besides the characterization of the adhesive bond, the joints will be analyzed using finite element models. The correlation between the analytical models and the

  19. Thermal cycling can extend tool life in orthopaedic operating rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchky, Ryan N; McLachlin, Stewart D; Wong, Edwin K Y; Finkelstein, Joel; Kreder, Hans J; Whyne, Cari M

    2016-03-01

    Thermal cycling is a temperature modulation process developed to improve the performance, durability and longevity of materials. This process has been successfully utilized in the automotive, aeronautic and manufacturing industries. Surgical cutting tools undergo cyclical loading and generally fail by dulling, suggesting that thermal cycling may improve their performance and longevity. Ten 2.5 mm orthopaedic drill bits were randomized, with five undergoing thermal cycling within their sterile packaging and five serving as untreated controls. Using a servohydraulic testing machine, 100 drilling cycles were performed with each drill bit into the diaphyseal region of bovine femurs. After every 25 cycles, data was collected by performing identical drilling cycles into simulated human cortical bone material. Maximum force, maximum normalized torque and drilling work were measured, and a scanning electron microscope was used to measure outer corner wear. After 100 drilling cycles, the maximum drilling force, maximum normalized torque, drilling work and microscopic outer corner wear were all significantly lower for the treated drill bits (p cutting tools. Application of this technology may also be relevant to surgical cutting tools such as saw blades, burrs and reamers.

  20. [Regenerative medicine: orthopaedical applications and medico legal questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, S; Ricci, O; Tucci, C E; Massoni, F; Sarra, M V; Ricci, S

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decades, the increase in the global population's mean age has implied a corresponding increase in degenerative disease affecting various anatomical areas and tissues, including bones and cartilages, thus provoking a rising number of disabilities and a wider usage of drugs, mostly anti-inflammatory and cortisone. New developments in technologic and biomedical fields gave birth to new subjects, such as tissue engineering, cell therapy, gene therapy that, by and large, create a knowledge network falling under the concept of Regenerative Medicine. This science is essentially based on the usage of stem cells that can replicate and renovate themselves originating, if adequately stimulated, a number of cell types. Inter alia, in orthopaedic field a particular type of adult stem cells is used, the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). If combined with synthetic material produced in laboratories, the usage of these cells has provided inspiration for new study interests; today, it can be applied in various degenerative and post-traumatic pathologies, with great therapeutic benefits for the patient. Actually, many studies write about an improvement in patients' life quality. In this sense appear significant reflections on legal medicine, both in accidents and insurance, of this innovative therapeutic alternative and is hopefully an equally valid process of improvement of regulatory and case law.

  1. Computer assisted orthopaedic surgery: present status and future perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwok Sui Leung

    2010-01-01

    @@ The principle of navigation surgery was first adopted in neurosurgery where a mechanical rigid frame was used in the stereotactic surgery to locate a deep ganglia and tract in the brain by Clark and Horsley1 in 1906. The planning was based on anatomical atlas of the brain and was not patient specific. The navigation procedure was possible with a rigid mechanical frame to define the trajectory with a rigid instrument holder on a rigid fixation of the operating structure, i.e. the skull. With the advancements in 3-D medical imaging, i.e. CT in 1971,MR imaging in 1973, general stereotaxis was possible and became specific to anatomy of each individual patient.Together with the advancement of computer technology:VAX in 1976, Apple in 1977, IBM personal computer in 1981, computer assisted stereotaxis was possible and in 1985, the term computer assisted surgery (CAS) was proposed by Sohn and Robins.2 With further development of 3-D tracking by NDI with Optotrak 1990, computer assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) developed and gradually became widely applicable in clinical practice.

  2. Diversity of patients microflora on orthopaedic and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, Ursula; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Niessner, Christoph; Hartwig, Erich; Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diversity of microbial colonization on implant material from different individuals. Eubacterial DNA was extracted, separated and sequenced from orthopaedic metallic implant material, tissues or body fluids, and skin of 4 patients as well as from identical dental cement material from 10 individuals after revision and routine removal. Additionally, the composition of the bacterial population of the dental cement and the oral swab sample from one individual after direct extraction of bacterial DNA was compared to extraction after conventional microbiological enrichment. The latter investigation proved that the commonly used cultivation technique gave different results than direct extraction of DNA, especially as regards the detection of anaerobes. Comparing the bacterial colonization of implant materials from different patients showed significant individual diversity. The common focus on a constricted pathogen spectrum may have to be expanded toward a multispecies population. Moreover, the dependence of the bacterial population on the individual host has to be integrated in discussing implant colonization and infection.

  3. Strategic planning in a highly specialized orthopaedic institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Institute for Orthopaedic Surgery 'Banjica' in Belgrade provides tertiary healthcare services on national level. After decades of constant development, a recent decline coincided with the decade of great social and governmental disturbance, the transition period after the dissociation of former Yugoslavia. Objective. In order to overcome the crisis, we used modern management methods to define problems in the institution management, and to propose appropriate strategies. Methods. A survey that included 100 employees (17.67% was carried out, followed by descriptive statistical analysis, PEST and SWOT analyses. Results The impact of political fluctuations, ageing of population, financing model, obsolete medical technology was evaluated. Various personal and interpersonal factors were assessed: the quality of medical service (3.59±0.76, mark 1-5; relations among health service participants (3.39±0.78; occupational conditions (not good-91%; human, financial and other resources; professional cooperation, stimulation; rivalry and mobbing (declared in 56%; public informing, institution image (rank 3.70±0.88 and PR activities (new to 78%. 93% declared to give maximum effort at work. Conclusion. Using these results, we defined several strategic objectives. These include strengthening scientific activities, general orientation to specific and exclusive pathological conditions and treatment methods, improvement of management transparency, introduction of quality-based stimulation of workers, support of promotional and PR activities.

  4. Biodegradable injectable polyurethanes: synthesis and evaluation for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Raju; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A; Griffiths, Ian; Tatai, Lisa; Wickramaratna, Malsha; Houshyar, Shadi; Moore, Tim; Mayadunne, Roshan T M; Field, John; McGee, Margaret; Carbone, Tania

    2008-10-01

    Biodegradable polyurethanes offer advantages in the design of injectable or preformed scaffolds for tissue engineering and other medical implant applications. We have developed two-part injectable prepolymer systems (prepolymer A and B) consisting of lactic acid and glycolic acid based polyester star polyols, pentaerythritol (PE) and ethyl lysine diisocyanate (ELDI). This study reports on the formulation and properties of a series of cross linked polyurethanes specifically developed for orthopaedic applications. Prepolymer A was based on PE and ELDI. Polyester polyols (prepolymer B) were based on PE and dl-lactic acid (PEDLLA) or PE and glycolic acid (PEGA) with molecular weights 456 and 453, respectively. Several cross linked porous and non-porous polyurethanes were prepared by mixing and curing prepolymers A and B and their mechanical and thermal properties, in vitro (PBS/37 degrees C/pH 7.4) and in vivo (sheep bi-lateral) degradation evaluated. The effect of incorporating beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP, 5 microns, 10 wt.%) was also investigated. The cured polymers exhibited high compressive strength (100-190 MPa) and modulus (1600-2300 MPa). beta-TCP improved mechanical properties in PEDLLA based polyurethanes and retarded the onset of in vitro and in vivo degradation. Sheep study results demonstrated that the polymers in both injectable and precured forms did not cause any surgical difficulties or any adverse tissue response. Evidence of new bone growth and the gradual degradation of the polymers were observed with increased implant time up to 6 months.

  5. The Effect of Surgeon Empathy and Emotional Intelligence on Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui-Ching; Steed, James F.; Yu, Shang-Won; Liu, Yi-Ten; Hsu, Chia-Chang; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Chen, Wency

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the associations of surgeons' emotional intelligence and surgeons' empathy with patient-surgeon relationships, patient perceptions of their health, and patient satisfaction before and after surgical procedures. We used multi-source approaches to survey 50 surgeons and their 549 outpatients during initial and follow-up visits.…

  6. Simulation-based education and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsness, Katherine

    2014-08-01

    Education in the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for a surgeon to perform at an expert level in the operating room, and beyond, must address all potential cognitive and technical performance gaps, professionalism and personal behaviors, and effective team communication. Educational strategies should also seek to replicate the stressors and distractions that might occur during a high-risk operation or critical care event. Finally, education cannot remain fixed in an apprenticeship model of "See one, do one, teach one," whereby patients are exposed to the risk of harm inherent to any learning curve. The majority of these educational goals can be achieved with the addition of simulation-based education (SBE) as a valuable adjunct to traditional training methods. This article will review relevant principles of SBE, explore currently available simulation-based educational tools for pediatric surgeons, and finally make projections for the future of SBE and performance assessments for pediatric surgeons.

  7. [How much business management does a surgeon need?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, U; Koch, M; Büchler, M W; Weitz, J

    2010-08-01

    The present day healthcare system in Germany is rapidly changing, even more so after the introduction of diagnosis-related groups. The basic requirements for every surgeon remain manual skills, a profound clinical knowledge and the ability for clinical decision-making even in difficult situations. However, these key elements of surgical education no longer fulfill the requirements for today's leaders in surgery. New requirements, consisting of administrative duties, strategic decision-making and department management are too complex to be made only intuitively. Nowadays surgeons also need a profound education in management skills and knowledge of economic mechanisms in order to run an efficient, profitable, patient-oriented surgical department. Every surgeon who aims at obtaining a leadership position should acquire the necessary knowledge and skills.

  8. Reporting sharp injuries among Surgeons in Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Mohamed Mortada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and rationale of the study: Although Sharps injuries are a preventable hazard faced by medical personnel in the operating room yet it continues to be one of the hidden problems among HCP. The potential consequence of such injuries includes transmission of blood-borne pathogens with detrimental effects. Despite the advances in technology and increased awareness of medical staff, annually around 600 thousand to one million workers are affected thus considered as one of the most serious threats facing health care workers specially surgeon.Methodology: a cross sectional study of Zagazig University Hospitals surgical departments. Using a sample composed of 287 surgeons randomly chosen from different surgical departments. A questionnaire assessed in addition to personal and professional characteristics, the history of sharp injuries, types of instrument causing the injury, their post exposure prophylaxis including reporting. The results: There were total 287 surgeons participated in this study. (47% of the respondent surgeons had been exposed to at least one episode of sharp injury in the preceding 3 months and most of the exposures (68% occurred in the operation room. The injury was mainly caused during suturing (83%. The commonest devices, accused in most of the injuries were suturing needle and scalpel (74 and 59%. The majority of the surgeons (62% didn’t report the SI and it was largely explained by the majority of the sampled respondents (89% were not aware of the reporting system existing in their hospital.Conclusions: The most common reason of underreporting  in our study was the lack of awareness that all injuries must be reported.Recommendations: The observed high level of under reporting reflects the need for education on prevention. Our results can guide in planning an education program for the surgeons to increase awareness about dangers of sharp injuries and help improve the reporting strategy  and other potential

  9. Cosmetic surgery in times of recession: macroeconomics for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Lloyd M

    2002-10-01

    Periods of economic downturn place special demands on the plastic surgeon whose practice involves a large amount of cosmetic surgery. When determining strategy during difficult economic times, it is useful to understand the macroeconomic background of these downturns and to draw lessons from businesses in other service industries. Business cycles and monetary policy determine the overall environment in which plastic surgery is practiced. Plastic surgeons can take both defensive and proactive steps to maintain their profits during recessions and to prepare for the inevitable upturn. Care should also be taken when selecting pricing strategy during economic slowdowns.

  10. Genitourinary Prosthetics: A Primer for the Non-urologic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavien, Garjae; Zaid, Uwais; Peterson, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary prosthetics are used for correction of functional deficits and to improve the quality of lives of affected patients. General surgeons must evaluate patients scheduled for nonurologic surgery with urologic devices that can impact their perioperative management. Lack of recognition of these prosthetics preoperatively can lead to unnecessary morbidity for the patient and have legal implications for the surgeon. Close consultation with a urologist may avoid common complications associated with these devices and allows for surgical assistance when operative misadventures do occur. This article reviews 3 common urologic prosthetics: testicular prosthesis, artificial urinary sphincter, and penile prosthesis.

  11. Patient-specific hip prostheses designed by surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coigny Florian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patient-specific bone and joint replacement implants lead to better functional and aesthetic results than conventional methods [1], [2], [3]. But extracting 3D shape information from CT Data and designing individual implants is demanding and requires multiple surgeon-to-engineer interactions. For manufacturing purposes, Additive Manufacturing offers various advantages, especially for low volume manufacturing parts, such as patient specific implants. To ease these new approaches and to avoid surgeon-to-engineer interactions a new design software approach is needed which offers highly automated and user friendly planning steps.

  12. Can the surgical checklist reduce the risk of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics? - can the checklist help? Supporting evidence from analysis of a national patient incident reporting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleary Kevin

    2011-04-01

    incidents. Discussion Orthopaedic surgery is a high volume specialty with major technical complexity in terms of equipment demands and staff training and familiarity. There is therefore an increased propensity for errors to occur. Wrong-site surgery still occurs in this specialty and is a potentially devastating situation for both the patient and surgeon. Despite the limitations of inclusion and reporting bias, our study highlights the need to match technical precision with patient safety. Tools such as the WHO surgical checklist can help us to achieve this.

  13. The wear of two orthopaedic biopolymers against each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, T J

    2005-01-01

    The potential for all-polymer prostheses has not been widely investigated. It might be expected that the wear of such biomaterial combinations would be excessive, but an in vivo study of all polymer knee prostheses reported that there were no failures due to wear, even after ten years of clinical use. This design of knee prosthesis used polyacetal and ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as the biopolymers. Similarly, an earlier in vitro study of polyacetal and UHMWPE hip prostheses indicated lower wear than for a cobalt chrome and UHMWPE combination. Therefore this study set out to test the poly-acetal and UHMWPE combination in a wear screening rig which had previously been validated against clinical data for artificial hip joints. Two different motion conditions were applied to the test samples and each biopolymer was tested as both pin and plate. Interestingly it was found that, whatever the contribution from pin or plate, the total mean wear factors were 1.5 10 -6 mm 3/Nm under reciprocation-only, and 4.1 10 -6 mm 3 /Nm under multi-directional motion. These wear factors were greater than those found when a conventional metal-on-UHMWPE couple was tested under the same loading, motion and lu-bricant conditions. A comparison was also undertaken with the wear of other orthopaedic biopolymer combinations, namely cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) against itself, and UHMWPE against itself. The XLPE pairing showed somewhat lower wear than the polyacetal and UHMWPE couple, while the UHMWPE pairing showed the highest wear of all, approximately an or-der of magnitude greater than the polyacetal and UHMWPE combination.

  14. Multiscale Inorganic Hierarchically Materials: Towards an Improved Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Juan M; Sartuqui, Javier; Messina, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a biologically and structurally sophisticated multifunctional tissue. It dynamically responds to biochemical, mechanical and electrical clues by remodelling itself and accordingly the maximum strength and toughness are along the lines of the greatest applied stress. The challenge is to develop an orthopaedic biomaterial that imitates the micro- and nano-structural elements and compositions of bone to locally match the properties of the host tissue resulting in a biologically fixed implant. Looking for the ideal implant, the convergence of life and materials sciences occurs. Researchers in many different fields apply their expertise to improve implantable devices and regenerative medicine. Materials of all kinds, but especially hierarchical nano-materials, are being exploited. The application of nano-materials with hierarchical design to calcified tissue reconstructive medicine involve intricate systems including scaffolds with multifaceted shapes that provides temporary mechanical function; materials with nano-topography modifications that guarantee their integration to tissues and that possesses functionalized surfaces to transport biologic factors to stimulate tissue growth in a controlled, safe, and rapid manner. Furthermore materials that should degrade on a timeline coordinated to the time that takes the tissues regrow, are prepared. These implantable devices are multifunctional and for its construction they involve the use of precise strategically techniques together with specific material manufacturing processes that can be integrated to achieve in the design, the required multifunctionality. For such reasons, even though the idea of displacement from synthetic implants and tissue grafts to regenerative-medicine-based tissue reconstruction has been guaranteed for well over a decade, the reality has yet to emerge. In this paper, we examine the recent approaches to create enhanced bioactive materials. Their design and manufacturing procedures as well

  15. Investigation on Alteration of Compression of Knitted Orthopaedic Supports during Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana ALIŠAUSKIENĖ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the areas of medical textile is the spacer knitted orthopaedic products. The concept of compression therapy of orthopaedic supports lies on a simple and efficient mechanical principle – it consists of applying elastic garment around the limb. Spacer orthopaedic supports are knitted on flat knitting machines equipped with especial elastomeric thread feeder. Compression made by the support depends on the support area, shape and characteristics of knitting. Because of orthopaedic supports are intended for durable wearing and need to vouchsafe compression of fixed value, it is very important to known how processes acting during exploitation influence alteration of compression values. The aim of this study was to establish the alteration of compression of knitted support during exploitation, i. e. after multifold extension, washing and drying. The samples were knitted on a flat double needle bed knitting machine in combined jacquard-laid-in pattern with elastomeric weft threads. It was established that compressive properties of knits after cyclic tensile load changed slightly, i. e. range between margins of error. It was measured that knitted orthopaedic supports dimensions and density after washing and drying cycles changes significant, i. e. knitted supports shrinks and thickens and their compression decreases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3097

  16. Canadian Content in Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    THEME: Internationalism: Worlds at Play Topics: Internationalism, Identity in Gaming and Learning to Play Abstract: How does Canada fit into the global cultural context of video games? This paper investigates the culture being reflected in video games being produced in Canada as Canada is one of the world's leading producers of video games. It examines the how Canadian culture is represented in current new media artistic output against the culture, or lack of culture, being represented in vid...

  17. Surgeon's view of the skull base from the lateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, R A

    1984-12-01

    This paper presents the surgical anatomy of the skull base and infratemporal fossa. The information has been derived from the author's own experience in surgical and cadaver dissection, standard anatomical references, and selected experience of other skull base surgeons. Because the lateral approach has become the utilitarian method of exposure, the intricate detailed anatomy is demonstrated from this view at five levels of dissection, so the surgeon may gain a practical understanding of the surgical relationship of critical structures. Consistent anatomical landmarks can be used by the surgeon in the location of these critical structures. The styloid process, sphenoidal spine, and middle meningeal artery identify the internal carotid artery as it enters the carotid canal. The bony or fibrous septum that divides the jugular foramen into neural and vascular compartments may be used to better identify nerves IX, X, and XI. The zygomatic root is useful for location of the middle fossa dura. The lateral pterygoid plate leads directly to the foramen ovale. The increased precision of dissection permitted by use of the microscope requires an increased level of knowledge of anatomical structures in this area. It is hoped that the information presented in this paper will assist surgeons in the meticulous and thorough removal of skull base tumors and in the preservation of neural and vascular structures that are presently being sacrificed.

  18. Burnout syndrome in oral and maxillofacial surgeons: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, G G; Carneiro, S C; Vasconcelos, B C; Nascimento, M M; Leal, J L F

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome among Brazilian oral and maxillofacial surgeons and its relationship with socio-demographic, clinical, and habit variables. The sample of this study comprised 116 surgeons. The syndrome was quantified using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (General Survey), which defines burnout as the triad of high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. The criteria of Grunfeld et al. were used to evaluate the presence of the syndrome (17.2%). No significant differences between the surgeons diagnosed with and without the syndrome were observed according to age (P=0.804), sex (P=0.197), marital status (P=0.238), number of children (P=0.336), years of professional experience (P=0.102), patients attended per day (P=0.735), hours worked per week (P=0.350), use of alcohol (P=0.148), sports practice (P=0.243), hobbies (P=0.161), or vacation period per year (P=0.215). Significant differences occurred in the variables sex in the emotional exhaustion subscale (P=0.002) and use or not of alcohol in the personal accomplishment subscale (P=0.035). Burnout syndrome among Brazilian surgeons is average, showing a low personal accomplishment.

  19. Body Dysmorphia, the Plastic Surgeon, and the Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Domeena C.

    2003-01-01

    Misperceived ugliness is called body dysmorphia or dysmorphophobia, often only diagnosed after several discontented return visits to a plastic surgeon who refers the patient for counseling--rarely welcome referrals by the patient when they are convinced the problem is physical and not psychological. Careful listening and patient acceptance are…

  20. Optimal Brain Surgeon on Artificial Neural Networks in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye; Job, Jonas Hultmann; Klyver, Katrine;

    2012-01-01

    It is shown how the procedure know as optimal brain surgeon can be used to trim and optimize artificial neural networks in nonlinear structural dynamics. Beside optimizing the neural network, and thereby minimizing computational cost in simulation, the surgery procedure can also serve as a quick...

  1. Leadership theory: implications for developing dental surgeons in primary care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, S

    2011-02-12

    The development of leadership in healthcare has been seen as important in recent years, particularly at the clinical level. There have been various specific initiatives focusing on the development of leadership for doctors, nurses and other health care professions: for example, a leadership competency framework for doctors, the LEO programme and the RCN clinical leadership programme for nurses. The NHS has set up a Leadership Council to coordinate further developments. However, there has not been the same focus in dentistry, although the recent review of NHS dental services (Steele review) has proposed a need for leadership initiatives in NHS dentistry as a medium-term action. Central to this will be a need to focus on the leadership role for dental surgeons. Leadership is all the more important in dentistry, given the change of government and the policy of retrenchment, major public sector reform, the emergence of new organisations such as new commissioning consortia, possible changes to the dental contract, new ways of working, and changes to the profession such as the requirements for the revalidation of dental surgeons. The question is: which leadership theory or approach is best for dental surgeons working in primary care? This paper builds on earlier work exploring this question in relation to doctors generally, and GPs, in particular, and planned work on nurses. It will seek to address this question in relation to dental surgeons working in primary care.

  2. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    perform valid abdominal ultrasound examinations of patients referred with acute abdominal pain. METHODS: Patients referred with acute abdominal pain had an ultrasound examination by a surgeon in training as well as by an experienced consultant radiologist whose results served as the gold standard. All...

  3. H1N1 Message from the Acting Surgeon General

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-13

    In this podcast, Acting Surgeon General Dr. Steven Galson discusses what you can do to protect yourself from H1N1 flu.  Created: 5/13/2009 by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/13/2009.

  4. Designing Wearable Personal Assistants for Surgeons: An Egocentric Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalaliniya, Shahram; Pederson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    it in the design of a wearable personal assistant (WPA) for orthopedic surgeons. The result is a Google Glass-based prototype system aimed at facilitating touchless interaction with x-ray images, browsing of electronic patient records (EPR) when on the move, and synchronized ad hoc remote collaboration...

  5. Contexts for Ethnic Identity of Japanese Canadians

    OpenAIRE

    浦田, 葉子; Yoko, URATA

    1997-01-01

    In this paper I reviewed the literature in order to gain a broad understanding of the contexts for ethnic identity of Japanese Canadians guided by the premise that ethnic identity is a situational as well as a primordial phenomenon. Two main areas were reviewed - the pattern of distribution of resources in Canadian society and the particular situation in which Japanese Canadians are placed. In the distribution of material resources, individual meritocracy for mass and social closure for elite...

  6. Improving surgeon utilization in an orthopedic department using simulation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simwita YW

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yusta W Simwita, Berit I Helgheim Department of Logistics, Molde University College, Molde, Norway Purpose: Worldwide more than two billion people lack appropriate access to surgical services due to mismatch between existing human resource and patient demands. Improving utilization of existing workforce capacity can reduce the existing gap between surgical demand and available workforce capacity. In this paper, the authors use discrete event simulation to explore the care process at an orthopedic department. Our main focus is improving utilization of surgeons while minimizing patient wait time.Methods: The authors collaborated with orthopedic department personnel to map the current operations of orthopedic care process in order to identify factors that influence poor surgeons utilization and high patient waiting time. The authors used an observational approach to collect data. The developed model was validated by comparing the simulation output with the actual patient data that were collected from the studied orthopedic care process. The authors developed a proposal scenario to show how to improve surgeon utilization.Results: The simulation results showed that if ancillary services could be performed before the start of clinic examination services, the orthopedic care process could be highly improved. That is, improved surgeon utilization and reduced patient waiting time. Simulation results demonstrate that with improved surgeon utilizations, up to 55% increase of future demand can be accommodated without patients reaching current waiting time at this clinic, thus, improving patient access to health care services.Conclusion: This study shows how simulation modeling can be used to improve health care processes. This study was limited to a single care process; however the findings can be applied to improve other orthopedic care process with similar operational characteristics. Keywords: waiting time, patient, health care process

  7. The First World War and its influence on the development of orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, T

    2014-01-01

    By December 1914, overwhelming numbers of soldiers with infected musculoskeletal wounds had filled hospitals in France and Britain. Frequently initial management had been inadequate. In 1915, patients with orthopaedic wounds were segregated for the first time when Robert Jones established an experimental orthopaedic unit in Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool. In 1916 he opened the first of 17 orthopaedic centres in Britain to surgically treat and rehabilitate patients. Henry Gray from Aberdeen emerged as the leading authority in the management of acute musculoskeletal wounds in casualty clearing stations in France and Flanders. Gray had particular expertise in dealing with compound fractures of the femur for which he documented an 80% mortality rate in 1914-15.

  8. A distributed health data network analysis of survival outcomes: the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Samprit; Cafri, Guy; Isaacs, Abby J; Graves, Stephen; Paxton, Elizabeth; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-12-17

    The International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries is a multinational initiative established by the United States Food and Drug Administration to develop a health data network aimed at providing a robust infrastructure to facilitate evidence-based decision-making on performance of medical devices. Through the International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries, individual data holders have complete control of their data and can choose to participate in studies of their choice. In this article, we present an overview of the data extraction process and the analytic strategy employed to answer several device performance-related questions in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. In the process, we discuss some nuances pertinent to International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries data that pose certain statistical challenges, and we briefly suggest strategies to be adopted to address them.

  9. [The Development and Application of the Orthopaedics Implants Failure Database Software Based on WEB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiahua; Zhou, Hai; Zhang, Binbin; Ding, Biao

    2015-09-01

    This article develops a new failure database software for orthopaedics implants based on WEB. The software is based on B/S mode, ASP dynamic web technology is used as its main development language to achieve data interactivity, Microsoft Access is used to create a database, these mature technologies make the software extend function or upgrade easily. In this article, the design and development idea of the software, the software working process and functions as well as relative technical features are presented. With this software, we can store many different types of the fault events of orthopaedics implants, the failure data can be statistically analyzed, and in the macroscopic view, it can be used to evaluate the reliability of orthopaedics implants and operations, it also can ultimately guide the doctors to improve the clinical treatment level.

  10. Effect of surgeon experience on femoral component size selection during total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sumon; Bono, James V; Froimson, Mark; Jones, Morgan; Bershadsky, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Femoral component size selection during total knee arthroplasty should not vary from surgeon to surgeon for patients with the same bone size. This study explored if systematic variations in femoral component size selection exist. Thirteen surgeons' choices of femoral component size (Duracon, n = 1388; Triathlon, n = 740) were analyzed using a generalized linear model with femoral component size as the dependent variable and surgeon identification, years in practice, and adult reconstruction fellowship training as the independent variables. The model adjusted for differences in bone size. It was found that more experienced surgeons implant larger femoral components. New instruments and training protocols may be necessary to adjust for surgeon experience.

  11. The Malaysian Orthopaedic Association humanitarian mission to Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, I; Saw, A; Hyzan, Y; Sivananthan, K S

    2005-07-01

    The tsunami which occurred off the west coast of North Sumatra on December 26, 2004 devastated the coastal areas of North Sumatra, South-West Thailand, South-East India and Sri Lanka killing more than a quarter of a million people. The destruction was enormous with many coastal villages destroyed. The other countries affected were Malaysia, Myanmar, Maldives, Bangladesh, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania and the Seychelles. In January 2005, volunteers went in weekly rotation to Banda Aceh in collaboration with Global Peace Mission. These were Dr Hyzan Yusof, Dr Suryasmi Duski, Dr Sharaf Ibrahim, Dr Saw Aik, Dr Kamariah Nor and Dr Nor Azlin. In Banda Aceh, the surgical procedures that we could do were limited to external fixation of open fractures and debriding infected wounds at the Indonesian Red Crescent field hospital. In February, a team comprising Dato Dr K S Sivananthan, Dr T Kumar and Dr S Vasan spent a week in Sri Lanka. In Sri Lanka, Dato Sivananthan and his team were able to perform elective orthopaedic operations in Dr Poonambalam Memorial Hospital. We appealed for national and international aid and received support from local hospitals and the orthopaedic industry. International aid bound for Banda Aceh arrived in Kuala Lumpur from the Philippine Orthopaedic Association, the Chiba Children's Hospital in Japan and the Chinese Orthopaedic Association. The COA donated 1.5 tons of orthopaedic equipments. A special handing over ceremony from the COA to the Indonesian Orthopaedic Association was held in Putrajaya in March. Malaysia Airlines flew in the donated equipment to Kuala Lumpur while the onward flight to Aceh was provided by the Royal Malaysian Air Force. In April, Dr Saw Aik and Dr Yong Su Mei joined the Tsu-Chi International Medical Association for volunteer services on Batam Island, Indonesia. The MOA acknowledges the many individuals and organizations, both governmental and non-governmental, for their contributions in the humanitarian efforts.

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCIBILITY OF A SHORT QUESTIONNAIRE TO MEASURE USE AND USABILITY OF CUSTOM-MADE ORTHOPAEDIC SHOES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To develop it short and easy to use questionnaire to measure use and usability of custom-made orthopaedic shoes, and to investigate its reproducibility. Design: Development of the questionnaire (Monitor Orthopaedic Shoes) was based on a literature search. expert interviews. 2 expert meetin

  13. Development and reproducibility of a short questionnaire to measure use and usability of custom-made orthopaedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, van Jaap J.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Jannink, Michiel J.A.; Geertzen, Jan H.B.; Postema, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To develop a short and easy to use questionnaire to measure use and usability of custom-made orthopaedic shoes, and to investigate its reproducibility. Design: Development of the questionnaire (Monitor Orthopaedic Shoes) was based on a literature search, expert interviews, 2 expert meetin

  14. Tribology considerations for hip joint articulations in relation to the "new orthopaedic patient".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, C B

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine alternative bearings used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and discuss the specific tribologic needs of the "New Orthopaedic Patient". As orthopaedic patients today are younger and more active, there is a clear need for hip joint implants and articulations minimising the amount of wear and guarantying better stability. Recent modern developments in tribology with highly cross-linked polyethylenes and hard-on-hard bearings allow the safe and effective use of larger diameter articulations in THA.

  15. Orthopaedics in China:its past and present%中国骨科的过去与现在

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯传汉

    2005-01-01

    Orthopaedics in china originated chinese medicine and Western medicine. In the first half of twentieth century , Dr. meng chimao(Beijing),New Way Sung (Shanghai),Fang Hsienchi, and others contributed a great deal to development of modern orthopaedics in china. The orthopaedic group was organized under the auspecies of Chinese Medical Association in 1937. The chinese Medical Association Orthopaedic Society was wstablished in 1980. The main achievements of Orthopaedics in China include replantation of severed limb or fingres,toe teansplantation for thumb and fonger reconstruction, nerve teansfer for brachial plexus avulsion, resrarch and manufacturing of domestic prostheses and the techniques of artifival joint replacement, surgical treatment of severe scoliosis and classification of idiopathic scoliosis, operative tireatment of bone tumor, and basic research on giant cell tumor of bone.

  16. A Cross-Sectional Study to Compare Caregiver Distress Among Korean Canadian, Chinese Canadian, and Other Canadian Home Care Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Wook Chang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the health of elderly Korean Canadians in home care and investigates the risk factors for caregiver distress of families caring for their elderly relatives. Korean Canadians, Chinese Canadians, and other Canadian home care clients were compared using the Resident Assessment Instrument–Home Care (RAI-HC. The assessments were done as a part of normal clinical practice between January 2002 and December 2010 within Ontario. A sample of 58,557 home care clients was analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis at the bivariate level and multiple logistic regression models. The major finding of the present study is that Korean clients had higher physical impairments and higher prevalence of major chronic diseases, but they were less likely to receive personal support or nursing services. Moreover, the results provide clear evidence of the importance of language barriers for all linguistic minorities, including Korean Canadians.

  17. Medication use among Canadian seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Mark; Ji, Hong; Hunt, Jordan; Ranger, Rob; Gula, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    As they age, many seniors develop a progressively more complex mix of health conditions. Multiple prescription medications are often required to help manage these conditions and control symptoms, with the goal of maintaining seniors' health for as long as possible. This article explores trends in the number and types of medications used by seniors on public drug programs in Canada. Our findings suggest that a high proportion of Canadian seniors are taking several medications, highlighting the need for medication management systems focusing on this population.

  18. REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Modern English is an international language inthe world.Besides Great Britain,English is spokenas first language in 39 countries.These countries arelocated in different regions with different naturalfeatures,history development and cultural character-istics.Thus,English used in these different regionscarries its own regional character—forming Englishregional varieties.The main English regional varieties are:BritishEnglish,American English,Canadian English andSouth African English.Canada is a rich country inNorth America with its own characteristics,which of

  19. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database 2016 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Shahian, David M; Prager, Richard L; Edwards, Fred H; McDonald, Donna; Han, Jane M; D'Agostino, Richard S; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kozower, Benjamin D; Badhwar, Vinay; Thourani, Vinod H; Gaissert, Henning A; Fernandez, Felix G; Wright, Cameron D; Paone, Gaetano; Cleveland, Joseph C; Brennan, J Matthew; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Brothers, Leo; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Habib, Robert H; O'Brien, Sean M; Peterson, Eric D; Grover, Frederick L; Patterson, G Alexander; Bavaria, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The art and science of outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety continue to evolve, and cardiothoracic surgery leads many of these advances. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Database is one of the principal reasons for this leadership role, as it provides a platform for the generation of knowledge in all of these domains. Understanding these topics is a professional responsibility of all cardiothoracic surgeons. Therefore, beginning in January 2016, The Annals of Thoracic Surgery began publishing a monthly series of scholarly articles on outcomes analysis, quality improvement, and patient safety. This article provides a summary of the status of the STS National Database as of October 2016 and summarizes the articles about the STS National Database that appeared in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery 2016 series, "Outcomes Analysis, Quality Improvement, and Patient Safety."

  20. [Gastrointestinal surgeons should master the adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jin; Chen, Pengju

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is one of the main diseases of gastrointestinal surgeons. It is very important to master the adjuvant chemotherapy of colorectal cancer for gastrointestinal surgeons. In recent years, with the development of a number of clinical trials and the appearance of new drugs, fluorouracil combined with oxaliplatin had been established as the standard regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. In the current guidelines, stage III( colon cancer is the indication for adjuvant chemotherapy, while stage II( colon cancer should receive adjuvant chemotherapy is uncertain. Unlike colon cancer, adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer is not evidence-based. Especially, the indication and duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy remain controversial. Adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer still needs further investigation.

  1. Rural Canadian Youth Exposed to Physical Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laye, Adele M.; Mykota, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to physical violence is an unfortunate reality for many Canadian youth as it is associated with numerous negative psychosocial effects. The study aims to assist in understanding resilience in rural Canadian youth exposed to physical violence. This is accomplished by identifying the importance of protective factors, as measured by the…

  2. DATA MINING IN CANADIAN LYNX TIME SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Karnaboopathy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper sums up the applications of Statistical model such as ARIMA family timeseries models in Canadian lynx data time series analysis and introduces the method of datamining combined with Statistical knowledge to analysis Canadian lynx data series.

  3. A Boost for Sino-Canadian Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU XUECHENG

    2010-01-01

    @@ If Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper's visit to China last December led to a thaw in the frozen Sino-Canadian relations in recent years, Chinese President Hu Jintao's latest trip to Ottawa appeared to usher in yet another warm period for these deep-rooted relations.

  4. Canadian Library Integrated Systems: Second Annual Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilees, Bobbie

    1988-01-01

    Reports the results of a survey of the Canadian integrated library systems market. The analysis includes comparisons of large versus microcomputer-based installations by type of library and across all libraries, foreign sales by Canadian vendors, and trends in the library systems market. (CLB)

  5. U.S. Surgeon General Calls for Crackdown on E-Cig Use in Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162443.html U.S. Surgeon General Calls for Crackdown on E-Cig ... product among American teens, according to a new U.S. Surgeon General's report that calls for a crackdown ...

  6. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Reconstructive Breast Surgery: Survey of Current Practice among Plastic Surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. S. Ibrahim, MD

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Plastic surgeons currently use ADM in breast reconstruction for both immediate and staged procedures. Of those responding, a majority of plastic surgeons will incorporate drains and use postoperative antibiotics for more than 48 hours.

  7. Online reviews of orthopedic surgeons: an emerging trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Chelsea; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-04-01

    Various websites are dedicated to rating physicians. The goals of this study were to: (1) evaluate the prevalence of orthopedic surgeon ratings on physician rating websites in the United States and (2) evaluate factors that may affect ratings, such as sex, practice sector (academic or private), years of practice, and geographic location. A total of 557 orthopedic surgeons selected from the 30 most populated US cities were enrolled. The study period was June 1 to July 31, 2013. Practice type (academic vs private), sex, geographic location, and years since completion of training were evaluated. For each orthopedic surgeon, numeric ratings from 7 physician rating websites were collected. The ratings were standardized on a scale of 0 to 100. Written reviews were also collected and categorized as positive or negative. Of the 557 orthopedic surgeons, 525 (94.3%) were rated at least once on 1 of the physician rating websites. The average rating was 71.4. The study included 39 female physicians (7.4%) and 486 male physicians (92.6%). There were 204 (38.9%) physicians in academic practice and 321 (61.1%) in private practice. The greatest number of physicians, 281 (50.4%), practiced in the South and Southeast, whereas 276 (49.6%) practiced in the West, Midwest, and Northeast. Those in academic practice had significantly higher ratings (74.4 vs 71.1; P<.007). No significant difference based on sex (72.5 male physicians vs 70.2 female physicians; P=.17) or geographic location (P=.11) were noted. Most comments (64.6%) were positive or extremely positive. Physicians who were in practice for 6 to 10 years had significantly higher ratings (76.9, P<.01) than those in practice for 0 to 5 years (70.5) or for 21 or more years (70.7).

  8. Introduction to concepts in leadership for the surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkonjic, Linda; Grondin, Sean C

    2011-08-01

    As surgeons progress through their careers, they are often entrusted with leadership roles in administration, education, research, and patient management. Insights into one's own personality type and leadership style as well as an understanding of the value of emotional intelligence are critical for success. Knowledge of group dynamics and team leading; networking; techniques in leading, changing, and innovation; as well as proficiency in negotiation and conflict resolution are also essential to the development of leadership skills.

  9. Left-handed surgical instruments - a guide for cardiac surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Clare; Theakston, Maureen; Dunning, Joel; Goodwin, Andrew; Kendall, Simon William Henry

    2016-08-19

    For ease of use and to aid precision, left-handed instruments are invaluable to the left-handed surgeon. Although they exist, they are not available in many surgical centres. As a result, most operating theatre staff (including many left-handers) have little knowledge of their value or even application. With specific reference to cardiac surgery, this article addresses the ways in which they differ, why they are needed and what is required - with tips on use.

  10. Surgeon-Based 3D Printing for Microvascular Bone Flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Erin M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2017-03-04

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) printing has developed as a revolutionary technology with the capacity to design accurate physical models in preoperative planning. We present our experience in surgeon-based design of 3D models, using home 3D software and printing technology for use as an adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Methods Home 3D printing techniques were used in the design and execution of vascularized bone flap transfers to the upper extremity. Open source imaging software was used to convert preoperative computed tomography scans and create 3D models. These were printed in the surgeon's office as 3D models for the planned reconstruction. Vascularized bone flaps were designed intraoperatively based on the 3D printed models. Results Three-dimensional models were created for intraoperative use in vascularized bone flaps, including (1) medial femoral trochlea (MFT) flap for scaphoid avascular necrosis and nonunion, (2) MFT flap for lunate avascular necrosis and nonunion, (3) medial femoral condyle (MFC) flap for wrist arthrodesis, and (4) free fibula osteocutaneous flap for distal radius septic nonunion. Templates based on the 3D models allowed for the precise and rapid contouring of well-vascularized bone flaps in situ, prior to ligating the donor pedicle. Conclusions Surgeon-based 3D printing is a feasible, innovative technology that allows for the precise and rapid contouring of models that can be created in various configurations for pre- and intraoperative planning. The technology is easy to use, convenient, and highly economical as compared with traditional send-out manufacturing. Surgeon-based 3D printing is a useful adjunct in vascularized bone transfer. Level of Evidence Level IV.

  11. [Consolidating the medical model of disability: on poliomyelitis and constitution of orthopedic surgery and orthopaedics as a speciality in Spain (1930-1950)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, José

    2009-01-01

    At the beginning of the 1930s, various factors made it necessary to transform one of the institutions which was renowned for its work regarding the social reinsertion of the disabled, that is, the Instituto de Reeducación Profesional de Inválidos del Trabajo (Institute for Occupational Retraining of Invalids of Work). The economic crisis of 1929 and the legislative reform aimed at regulating occupational accidents highlighted the failings of this institution to fulfill its objectives. After a time of uncertainty, the centre was renamed the Instituto Nacional de Reeducación de Inválidos (National Institute for Retraining of Invalids). This was done to take advantage of its work in championing the recovery of all people with disabilities.This work aims to study the role played in this process by the poliomyelitis epidemics in Spain at this time. It aims to highlight how this disease justified the need to continue the work of a group of professionals and how it helped to reorient the previous programme to re-educate the "invalids." Thus we shall see the way in which, from 1930 to 1950, a specific medical technology helped to consolidate an "individual model" of disability and how a certain cultural stereotype of those affected developed as a result. Lastly, this work discusses the way in which all this took place in the midst of a process of professional development of orthopaedic surgeons.

  12. Team Work on Burn And Surgeon as a Team Leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Karagoz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Burn traumas are a type of trauma that causes adverse changes in all the functions of the organism. Multi-disciplinary approaches are of great importance in the treatment of burn traumas. Among those involved in the treatment of burns are people of many branches such as surgeons, infection specialists, rehabilitation specialists, psychiatrists, and nurses. And there is a need for a single specialist in charge to coordinate the disciplines in the stage of organizing to treatment. The person to take on this task is often a surgeon specialized in burns. Research has shown that auxiliary personnel involved in burn treatment in Turkey are in need of training on up-to-date information. The surgeon in charge should actively participate in research and training activities, and train the relevant personnel through knowledge transfer so that burn treatment could remain effective in the light of current developments, which would be the fundamental way for burn centers to take their technique- and skill-based practices further. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(1.000: 111-114

  13. Sarcoidosis in a dental surgeon: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Daniele

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although the causes of sarcoidosis are still unknown, past and current studies have provided evidence that this disease may be associated with occupational exposure to specific environmental agents. We describe a case of sarcoidosis in a dental surgeon with long exposure to inorganic dusts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind in the literature. Case presentation At the beginning of 2000, a 52-year-old Caucasian man, who worked as a dental surgeon, presented with shortness of breath during exercise, cough and retrosternal pain. After diagnosis of sarcoidosis, a scanning electronic microscopy with X-ray microanalysis of biopsy specimens was used in order to determine whether the disease could be traced to an occupational environmental agent. Results showed the presence of inorganic dust particles within sarcoidotic granulomas, and demonstrated that the material detected was identical to that found in a powder used by our patient for several years. Conclusions Although these results cannot be considered as definitive proof, they do however provide strong evidence that this disease may be associated with material used by dental surgeons.

  14. Shouldice Herniorrhaphy Technique: Surgeons Need to Remember It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Dervişoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hernia surgery is the second most common surgical intervention performed by general surgeons following emergent surgeries. Shouldice herniorraphy is a classical surgery which is in the high tension repair group. This technique should be known by every surgeon. Also being an alternative method, it can be a necessity in cases in which tension free methods can not be performed. In the present study we investigated the advantages, disadvantages and complications of the Shouldice herniorraphy and Lichtenstein technique with the review of the technical literature. Material and Method: We compared 75 patients who were diagnosed with inguinal hernia and treated with Lichtenstein herniorraphy with 33 patients who were treated with Shouldice herniorraphy in Samsun Bafra Public Hospital between April 2007 and May 2008. Age, sex, hernia type, anesthesia method, mean hospitalisation length, early and late post operative complications were recorded. Result: Early post operative complications were urinary retention, wound infection and hematoma. The patients under spinal anesthesia with urinary retention were treated with urinary catheterization. Superficial wound infection was treated with drainage and antibiotic threapy. Among late postoperative complications; we observed paresthesia in the thigh in one patient in the Shouldice group and relapse hernia in one patient in the Lichtenstein group. Discussion: We suggest that this surgical technique which should be known by every surgeon should be taught to new surgery attenders as an alternative technique. This technique can be an alternative method and also may be the first choice in patients in whom tension free methods can not be applicated.

  15. Project Muskan : Social responsibility of the plastic surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Yogesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exact statistics are not available, Indian plastic surgeons see around 7,00,000-8,00,000 burn admissions annually with around 10,00,000 cleft patients yet to be operated. In spite of this voluminous load, India does not have national health programs for the various deformities Indian plastic surgeons typically treat. As Plastic Surgeons, it is our social responsibility to treat these patients and bring ′ muskan ′ (smile in Hindi back into their lives. Project Muskan was initiated as an innovative model for targeting these patients and is probably one of its kind in the field of plastic surgery in our country. It is unique because it is a perfect collaboration of government institutions, a Non Government Organization (NGO, and cooperative sectors providing free health care at the doorstep. Identification of the patients was done with the help of the extensive milk dairy network in the state of Gujarat. Provision of transport and other facilities was done by the NGOs and quality health care provision was taken care of by the government hospital. Project Muskan started from a single village but now covers around 3000 villages and tribal areas of Gujarat. It is a system that can be easily reproducible in all hospitals and has reestablished the faith of the common man in government institutes.

  16. Laparoscopic Skills and Cognitive Function are not Affected in Surgeons During a Night Shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amirian, Ilda; Andersen, Lærke T; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To monitor surgeons' performance and cognition during night shifts. DESIGN: Surgeons were monitored before call and on call (17-hour shift). Psychomotor performance was assessed by laparoscopic simulation and cognition by the d2 test of attention. The surgeons performed the laparoscopi...... compared with on-call values. The d2 test of attention showed significantly improved values on call compared with before call. CONCLUSION: Sleep deprivation during a 17-hour night shift did not impair surgeons' psychomotor or cognitive performance....

  17. 78 FR 20328 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of Postponement of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is postponing the meeting of...

  18. 76 FR 17422 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and...

  19. Level of Perception of Individualized Care and Satisfaction With Nursing in Orthopaedic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Fatma; Findik, Ummu Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    Lately, individualized nursing care and patient satisfaction are important and current issues being discussed. But there is not enough information for patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the individualized care perception and satisfaction in nursing care levels in orthopaedic surgery patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 156 patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery. Data were collected using the personal information form, the Individualized Care Scale, and the Newcastle Satisfaction With Nursing Scale. The Spearman correlation analysis and descriptive statistics were performed. The mean individualized care and satisfaction with nursing care scores were found to be close to the preset maximum value, and it was determined that an increase in the level of awareness about nursing interventions and the level of perceived individualized care caused an increase in satisfaction levels regarding nursing care. Nurses should recognize the importance of performing individualized care in order to increase the level of satisfaction with nursing care in orthopaedic surgery patients.

  20. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury A multidisciplinary review by the Dutch Orthopaedic Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuffels, D.E.; Poldervaart, M.T.; Diercks, R.L.; Fievez, A.W.F.M.; Patt, T.W.; van der Hart, C.P.; Hammacher, E.R.; van der Meer, F.; Goedhart, E.A.; Lenssen, A.F.; Muller-Ploeger, S.B.; Pols, M.A.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steer

  1. Groningen orthopaedic exit strategy : Validation of a support program after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Groothoff, Johan W.; van Horn, Jim R.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Stevens, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Validation of the program theory of the Groningen orthopaedic exit strategy (GOES), a theory-driven program aiming to improve the rehabilitation of total hip and knee arthroplasty patients after shortened hospital stay. First part of the program theory is the action theory, hypothesising

  2. What influences a patient's decision to use custom-made orthopaedic shoes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite potential benefits, some patients decide not to use their custom-made orthopaedic shoes (OS). Factors are known in the domains 'usability', 'communication and service', and 'opinion of others' that influence a patient's decision to use OS. However, the interplay between these fac

  3. Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Peptides, Murine model, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...of host defense peptides on macrophages in vitro and on implants infected with Staph. aureus or Acinetobacter baumannii in our murine model of implant...osseointegration. 2. KEYWORDS: Orthopaedic infections Host Defense Peptides Murine model Staphylococcus aureus Acinetobacter baumannii 3. OVERALL

  4. The Contributions of Kenelm Hutchinson Digby to Orthopaedics in Hong Kong Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-tai Louis Fu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As the first professor of surgery in Hong Kong, Kenelm Hutchinson Digby had the tremendous task of building a new clinical department in the infant University of Hong Kong from scratch. Despite his heavy commitments in clinical, administrative, and teaching responsibilities, he pioneered novel orthopaedic treatment principles and techniques, in addition to that of general surgery.

  5. Evaluation of the PROMIS physical function item bank in orthopaedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Man; Clegg, Daniel O; Greene, Tom; Saltzman, Charles L

    2011-06-01

    The patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS) physical function item bank v1 (PPFIB) contains 124 item response theory (IRT) calibrated items (Rose et al. 2008. J Clin Epidemiol 61:17–33).We report the psychometric properties of these items within an outpatient, orthopaedic patient population. In particular, we investigated whether a single unidimensional IRT scale can adequately define physical function of patients presenting with primarily upper or lower extremity orthopaedic complaints. We conducted a prospective study at an orthopaedic outpatient clinic to collect data from 865 adult patients with all 124 PROMIS physical function items and seven demographic items. Items were evaluated by a Rasch model. Total variance (60.6%) across the 124 items was explained by a single Rasch dimension. The variance explained by the second dimension was 7.7%, reflecting differential item functioning in the upper and lower extremity patients. The upper extremity physical function items had a pronounced ceiling effect. A single physical function dimension accounts for most of the item variance in the PPFIB, suggesting that the items are measuring predominantly one single construct. Separate subscales for lower versus upper extremities, especially with additional items at the upper trait level of the upper extremity subscale, may further enhance evaluation of physical function in orthopaedic patients.

  6. Presurgical Infant Orthopaedics in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Törün Özer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Presurgical infant orthopaedics has been employed for the last fifty years. Traditional approaches failed to address the deformity of the nasal tissues and focus only to correct the alveolar deformities. In this review, our aim is to describe a new technique which is used to mold nasal cartilages with alveolar segments.

  7. Presurgical Infant Orthopaedics in Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Törün Özer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this present study is to present presurgical maxillary orthopaedics method. By means of this method lip, nose and alveolar molding reduces the severity of the deformity. Therefore, the result after the sugery is done more sucessfully.

  8. Management of skeletal metastases: An orthopaedic surgeon′s guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish G Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal metastasis is a common cause of severe morbidity, reduction in quality of life (QOL and often early mortality. Its prevalence is rising due to a higher rate of diagnosis, better systemic treatment, longer lives with the disease and higher disease burden rate. As people with cancer live longer and with rising sensitivity of body imaging and surveillance, the incidence of pathological fracture, metastatic epidural cord compression is rising and constitutes a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon to maintain their QOL. Metastatic disease is no longer a death sentence condemning patients to "terminal care." In the era of multidisciplinary care and effective systemic targeted and nontargeted therapy, patient expectations of QOL, even during palliative end of care period is high. We lay emphasis on proving the diagnosis of metastasis by biopsy and histopathology and discuss imaging modalities to help estimate fracture risk and map disease extent. This article discusses at length the evidence and decision-making process of various modalities to treat skeletal metastasis. The modalities range from radiation including image-guided, stereotactic and whole body radiation, systemic targeted or hormonal therapy, spinal decompression with or without stabilization, extended curettage with stabilization, resection in select cases with megaprosthetic or biological reconstruction, percutaneous procedures using radio frequency ablation, cementoplasties and discusses the role of emerging modalities like high frequency ultrasound-guided ablation, cryotherapy and whole body radionuclide therapy. The focus lies on the role of multidisciplinary care, which considers complex decisions on patient centric prognosis, comorbidities, cost, feasibility and expectations in order to maximize outcomes on QOL issues.

  9. Plastic Surgeons' Opinions of Facial Surgery for Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Deborah C.; Turnbull, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    One hundred plastic surgeons responded to a survey on opinions toward facial plastic surgery for individuals with Down's syndrome. Twenty-four of the surgeons had performed the surgery. Surgeons indicated appropriate circumstances for the surgery, consent requirements, degree of understanding expected of the patient, and degree of discomfort…

  10. [What do orthopedic surgeons need to know from radiologists?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portabella, F; Pablos, O; Agulló, J L

    2012-09-01

    The diagnosis of tumors and pseudotumors depends on three pillars: the clinician, the radiologist, and the pathologist. The first two can establish a presumptive diagnosis on the basis of the clinical presentation and findings on complementary tests, whereas the pathologist will have to reach the definitive diagnosis after analyzing the biopsy specimens. Obviously, the clinician and radiologist should reach a consensus regarding the diagnostic orientation; however, for this to happen there must be a relationship between the two professionals and they must work together for the benefit of the patient. Orthopedic surgeons, like any other group of specialists, would like to have radiologists working in their own center who are dedicated to the organ/system they treat, in this case the locomotor apparatus, and who can provide them with their opinion about the different images obtained. This point is very important and especially so for tumors, because this type of disease is uncommon and few specialists are dedicated to it. For this reason, when faced with a lesion that has the characteristics of a tumor, orthopedic surgeons would like radiologists to give the most accurate description of the images as possible, defining the characteristics of benignity or malignancy of the process as well as indicating the risk of fracture in a metastatic lesion. On the other hand, orthopedic surgeons would ask for a clear and comprehensible description of the images obtained in complementary tests, because orthopedic surgeons have less experience in this type of images and they are often difficult to interpret. Another aspect that is often mentioned in discussions among orthopedic surgeons is the importance of having a radiology department that performs interventional procedures. Radiologists that perform interventional procedures can facilitate our work very much, both in the diagnosis and in the treatment of certain bone tumors. Finally, we would like to stress the importance of

  11. Malpractice awareness among surgeons at a teaching hospital in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Asfandyar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The duty of a doctor to take care presumes the person who offers medical advice and treatment to unequivocally possess the skills and knowledge to do so. However, a sense of responsibility cannot be guaranteed in the absence of accountability, which in turn requires a comprehensive medical law system to be in place. Such a system is almost non-existent in Pakistan. Keeping the above in mind, we designed this study to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of surgeons regarding malpractice at a tertiary care center in Pakistan. Methods This was an observational, cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted during a three month period from 31st March, 2012 to 30th June, 2012 at Civil Hospital, Karachi. Surgeons who were available during the period of our study and had been working in the hospital for at least 6 months were included. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed after seeking informed, written consent. The specialties included were general surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery and gynecology and obstetrics. The study questionnaire comprised of four sections. The first section was concerned with the demographics of the surgeons. The second section analyzed the knowledge of the respondents regarding professional negligence and malpractice. The third section assessed the attitudes surgeons with regard to malpractice. The last section dealt with the general and specific practices and experiences of surgeons regarding malpractice. Results Of the 319 surgeons interviewed, 68.7% were oblivious of the complete definition of malpractice. Leaving foreign objects inside the patient (79.6% was the most commonly agreed upon form of malpractice, whereas failure to break news in entirety (43.9% was most frequently disagreed. In the event of a medical error, majority (67.7% were ready

  12. Canadian vascular surgery residents' perceptions regarding future job opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joel A; Dubois, Luc; Power, Adam H; DeRose, Guy; MacKenzie, Kent S; Forbes, Thomas L

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to determine the employment environment for graduates of Canadian vascular surgery training programs. A cross-sectional survey of residents and graduates (2011-2012) was used. Thirty-seven residents were invited with a response rate of 57%, and 14 graduates with a response rate of 71%; 70% of graduates felt the job market played an important role in their decision to pursue vascular surgery as a career compared to 43% of trainees. The top three concerns were the lack of surgeons retiring, the overproduction of trainees, and saturation of the job market. The majority (62%) of trainees see themselves extending their training due to lack of employment. All of the graduates obtained employment, with 50% during their second year (of two years) of training and 30% after training was completed. Graduates spent an average of 12 ± 10.6 months seeking a position and applied to 3.3 ± 1.5 positions, with a mean of 1.9 ± 1.3 interviews and 2 ± 1.2 offers. There was a discrepancy between the favorable employment climate experienced by graduates and the pessimistic outlook of trainees. We must be progressive in balancing the employment opportunities with the number of graduates. Number and timing of job offers is a possible future metric of the optimal number of residents.

  13. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was…

  14. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena Felicia; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all...

  15. A perspective on Canadian shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mike; Davidson, Jim; Mortensen, Paul

    2010-09-15

    In a relatively new development over just the past few years, shale formations are being targeted for natural gas production. Based on initial results, there may be significant potential for shale gas in various regions of Canada, not only in traditional areas of conventional production but also non-traditional areas. However, there is much uncertainty because most Canadian shale gas production is currently in experimental or early developmental stages. Thus, its full potential will not be known for some time. If exploitation proves to be successful, Canadian shale gas may partially offset projected long-term declines in Canadian conventional natural gas production.

  16. Chinese Feelings Cherished By Canadians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>On March 30, "The Chinese Feelings Across the Pacific-The Century Exhibition of the Old Photos Treasured by the Canadians" was open in the Lu Xun Museum in Beijing. The exhibition lasted for one week. At the exhibition some old photos taken in the early 20th century were on display, showing James G. Endicott, envoy of world peace, together with Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai; the family of O. L. Kilborn, one of the founders of West China Union University, together with Chinese women with bound feet: O. L. Kilborn treating the wounded soldiers during the Revolution of 1911; Leslie Earl Willmott in Chinese tunic suit and his wife reluctant to bid farewell to China, as well as photos of Ashley Woodward Lindesay, founder of China’s modern

  17. THE CANADIAN POLITICAL BUSINESS CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Libby

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss the existence of a Canadian Political Business Cycle (PBC during the period 1946-1989. Logit analysis was used to determine if changes in the unemployment rate, growth of real GNE and the rate of inflation are significantly different in the period before an election than during the rest of the electoral term. It was found that the rate of growth in the unemployment rate declines and the rate of growth of real GNP increases in the four quarters before an election. The behavior of these variables reverses in the period after an election. These findings are consistent with a political business cycle. Policy variables, under a majority government, also behave in a manner associated with a PBC, with the government stimulating the economy approximately two years into its term so that good economic news will occur before it has to call an election. Minority governments tend to simulate the economy immediately after taking office.

  18. Posttraumatic stress disorder: a primer for trauma surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jennifer C; deRoon-Cassini, Terri A; Brasel, Karen J

    2010-07-01

    In 1980, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) officially became classified as an anxiety disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition. Since then, there has been increasing recognition that PTSD is a prevalent disorder that may have significant impact on the quality of life for survivors of traumatic events. More recently, methodologically sound research has begun to provide important insight into this disorder. The following review serves to provide the trauma surgeons information on PTSD in terms of its diagnosis, prevalence, risk factors, treatment strategies, and outcomes, with the goal of minimizing the sequelae of PTSD and maximizing postinjury quality of life.

  19. Designing Wearable Personal Assistants for Surgeons: An Egocentric Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalaliniya, Shahram; Pederson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The design of general-purpose wearable computers demands particular care for how human perception, cognition, and action work and work together. The authors propose a human body-and-mind centric (egocentric as opposed to device-centric) design framework and present initial findings from deploying...... it in the design of a wearable personal assistant (WPA) for orthopedic surgeons. The result is a Google Glass-based prototype system aimed at facilitating touchless interaction with x-ray images, browsing of electronic patient records (EPR) when on the move, and synchronized ad hoc remote collaboration...

  20. Improvised explosive devices and the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksel, Tamer

    2005-08-01

    Improvised explosive devices have created a new class of casualties that presents a unique surgical challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The injury pattern and severity are different from those seen in conventional trauma patients. Because of battlefield circumstances, patients are sometimes delayed significantly in their transport to a trauma center, and they frequently arrive at a trauma center with hypotension, hypothermia, and acidosis. Definitive care is delayed while the hemodynamic status and life-threatening injuries are stabilized. Hospital triage protocols must be well established in advance to prepare a timely response to the mass casualty event. Proper resource use is an ever-evolving challenge for hospital staff during these times.

  1. Global plastic surgeons images depicted in motion pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Se Jin; Park, Sowhey; Hwang, Kun

    2013-03-01

    Motion pictures are made to entertain and enlighten people, but they are viewed differently by different people. What one considers to be a tearjerker may induce giggles in another. We have gained added interest in this because our professional pictures contain plastic surgery in their venue. We have recently reviewed 21 motion pictures that were made from 1928 to 2006 and that includes plastic surgical procedures in their content. As a habit, we tried to analyze them from a surgical point of view. About one third (35.7%) of the patients were criminals, whereas 14.3% of them were spies. One third of the procedures were done by illegitimate "surgeons," whereas a quarter of the procedures (25%) were performed by renowned surgeons. Surgeons who were in love with the patients did the rest (25%) of the operations. The complication rate was 14.3%; the surgery was successful in 85.7% of cases, but were the patients happy with the results? This was not the case in the movies. Only 7.7% were happy; 14.5 % of them were eminently unhappy. Why the discrepancy? It is difficult to analyze the minds of the people in the film, but considering that the majority of the characters in the films were rather unsavory, one may deduce that a crooked mind functions differently. Motion pictures have advanced greatly in the past several decades with the advent of improved mechanical and electronic devices, and plastic surgery as also advanced in tandem. This surgical field has become a common procedure in our daily life. It is readily available and mostly painless. However, the public sees it in only one way, that is, that the performing physicians are highly compensated. Very few consider the efforts and the suffering that accompanies each and every surgical procedure as it is performed. Perhaps, it is too much to hope for a day that will come when we will see a film that portrays the mental anguish that accompanies each and every procedure the plastic surgeon makes.

  2. Canadian national nuclear forensics capability project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.; Dimayuga, I., E-mail: joanne.ball@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Summerell, I. [Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Totland, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Jonkmans, G. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Whitlock, J. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); El-jaby, A. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Inrig, E. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Following the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, Canada expanded its existing capability for nuclear forensics by establishing a national nuclear forensics laboratory network, which would include a capability to perform forensic analysis on nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as on traditional evidence contaminated with radioactive material. At the same time, the need for a national nuclear forensics library of signatures of nuclear and radioactive materials under Canadian regulatory control was recognized. The Canadian Safety and Security Program, administered by Defence Research and Development Canada's Centre for Security Science (DRDC CSS), funds science and technology initiatives to enhance Canada's preparedness for prevention of and response to potential threats. DRDC CSS, with assistance from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, formerly Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is leading the Canadian National Nuclear Forensics Capability Project to develop a coordinated, comprehensive, and timely national nuclear forensics capability. (author)

  3. Canadian Law Schools: In Search of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakman, Leon E.

    1980-01-01

    Academically, Canadian education is at the crossroads between formalism and functionalism, with the latter prevailing in recent years. There now arises a demand for a more integrated approach, linking legal theory with legal practice. (MSE)

  4. Facts about Canadian musk-oxen

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses the historical and current status of the Canadian musk-oxen. The musk-oxen's distribution, social structure, food and range, and breeding...

  5. Canadian Business Schools: Going out of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobni, Dawn; Dobni, Brooke

    1996-01-01

    Using Porter's five-forces model (potential entrants, suppliers, buyers, rivalry, substitutes) to analyze competition in Canadian university business schools, the authors conclude that schools are becoming increasingly vulnerable to competitive pressures and that strategic reorientation is necessary. (SK)

  6. An evaluation of orthopaedic nurses’ participation in an educational intervention promoting research utilization – A triangulation convergence model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2016-01-01

    A triangulation convergence model was applied through a mixed methods design to combine quantitative results and qualitative findings for evaluation. Methods Data were collected from 2013–2014 from 32 orthopaedic nurses in a Danish regional hospital through a newly developed 21-item questionnaire and two focus......Aims and objectives To describe the orthopaedic nurses' experiences regarding the relevance of an educational intervention and their personal and contextual barriers to participation in the intervention. Background One of the largest barriers against nurses' research usage in clinical practice...... is the lack of participation. A previous survey identified 32 orthopaedic nurses as interested in participating in nursing research. An educational intervention was conducted to increase the orthopaedic nurses' research knowledge and competencies. However, only an average of six nurses participated. Design...

  7. Canadian National Identity and Anti-Americanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭万宏

    2015-01-01

    Canadian national identity is closely related to antiAmericanism and for Canadians,comparing with America has become the main way to identify themselves.So some scholars argue that Canada lacks a real national identity and this is the main reason of its anti-American tradition.However,the author remarks Canada has its national identity.In this paper,the author will present three reasons to support her view.

  8. Canadian National Identity and Anti-Americanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭万宏

    2015-01-01

    Canadian national identity is closely related to anti-Americanism and for Canadians,comparing with America has become the main way to identify themselves.So some scholars argue that Canada lacks a real national identity and this is the main reason of its anti-American tradition.However,the author remarks Canada has its national identity.In this paper,the author will present three reasons to support her view.

  9. Hip resurfacing: a large, US single-surgeon series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, P J

    2016-01-01

    Hip resurfacing has been proposed as an alternative to traditional total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients. Much has been learned following the introduction of metal-on-metal resurfacing devices in the 1990s. The triad of a well-designed device, implanted accurately, in the correct patient has never been more critical than with these implants. Following Food and Drug Administration approval in 2006, we studied the safety and effectiveness of one hip resurfacing device (Birmingham Hip Resurfacing) at our hospital in a large, single-surgeon series. We report our early to mid-term results in 1333 cases followed for a mean of 4.3 years (2 to 5.7) using a prospective, observational registry. The mean patient age was 53.1 years (12 to 84); 70% were male and 91% had osteoarthritis. Complications were few, including no dislocations, no femoral component loosening, two femoral neck fractures (0.15%), one socket loosening (0.08%), three deep infections (0.23%), and three cases of metallosis (0.23%). There were no destructive pseudotumours. Overall survivorship at up to 5.7 years was 99.2%. Aseptic survivorship in males under the age of 50 was 100%. We believe this is the largest United States series of a single surgeon using a single resurfacing system.

  10. Imaging of bone tumors for the musculoskeletal oncologic surgeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errani, C., E-mail: costantino.errani@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Kreshak, J., E-mail: j.kreshak@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Ruggieri, P., E-mail: pietro.ruggieri@ior.it [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M., E-mail: marco.alberghini@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Picci, P., E-mail: piero.picci@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Research, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Vanel, D., E-mail: daniel.vanel@ior.it [Department of Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Research, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    The appropriate diagnosis and treatment of bone tumors requires close collaboration between different medical specialists. Imaging plays a key role throughout the process. Radiographic detection of a bone tumor is usually not challenging. Accurate diagnosis is often possible from physical examination, history, and standard radiographs. The location of the lesion in the bone and the skeleton, its size and margins, the presence and type of periosteal reaction, and any mineralization all help determine diagnosis. Other imaging modalities contribute to the formation of a diagnosis but are more critical for staging, evaluation of response to treatment, surgical planning, and follow-up.When necessary, biopsy is often radioguided, and should be performed in consultation with the surgeon performing the definitive operative procedure. CT is optimal for characterization of the bone involvement and for evaluation of pulmonary metastases. MRI is highly accurate in determining the intraosseous extent of tumor and for assessing soft tissue, joint, and vascular involvement. FDG-PET imaging is becoming increasingly useful for the staging of tumors, assessing response to neoadjuvant treatment, and detecting relapses.Refinement of these and other imaging modalities and the development of new technologies such as image fusion for computer-navigated bone tumor surgery will help surgeons produce a detailed and reliable preoperative plan, especially in challenging sites such as the pelvis and spine.

  11. Can double gloves improve surgeon-patient barrier efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Ali, Mir; Al-Habdan, Ibrahim; AlBluwi, Mohammed; Corea, J Ran; Al-Othman, Abdallah; Shriyan, Devidas; Moussa, Mohammed; AlDhakheel, Dhakheel; AlOmran, Abdallah

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare double gloves (DGs) with single gloves (SGs) during orthopedic and trauma surgery in prevention of blood contact between patients and surgeons. DGs and SGs were collected after orthopedic operations, tested for size, site, and number of perforations. Medical records were reviewed for age, sex, type of operation, duration, and postoperative wound infection. Data were compared using t-test with level of statistical significance at P < 0.05. Five hundred seven operations yielded 1204 DGs and 830 pairs SGs. In DGs, perforations were detected in 220 outer glove and 39 inner glove (10.7%). In SGs, 226 perforations were detected (13.3%). The incidence of perforations in inner gloves of the double indicator glove was 1.6% (P < 0.001). During surgery, perforations were recognized in DGs in 67% compared with 12% in SGs (P < 0.005). This study confirms that DGs form an efficient barrier between patients and surgeons.

  12. John M. T. Finney: distinguished surgeon and Oslerphile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    John Finney (1863–1942) was born near Natchez, Mississippi. After receiving his medical degree from Harvard, he interned at Massachusetts General Hospital and then went to Baltimore to become one of the first interns at the new Johns Hopkins Hospital. He met William Osler the day the hospital opened and became a lifelong admirer of “the Chief.” Finney specialized in gastrointestinal surgery and was recognized for his expertise in the field. Osler recommended Finney to a physician colleague, writing, “You could not be in better hands…. Finney has been most successful and his judgment is so good.” Finney served for 33 years under William Halsted at Hopkins. After Halsted's death, Finney was offered the chair of surgery at Johns Hopkins but declined. He was a founder and first president of the American College of Surgeons. He also served as president of the American Surgical Association and the Society of Clinical Surgery. Finney became chief surgical consultant for the Allied Expeditionary Forces in World War I. He was decorated by the United States, France, and Belgium. Finney was a master surgeon and a role model for generations of students and physicians. PMID:26722185

  13. Arthur Rainsford Mowlem (1902-1986), plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Richard W

    2013-08-01

    Arthur Rainsford Mowlem, the junior of the 'big four' plastic surgeons, with Harold Delf Gillies, Thomas Pomfret Kilner and Archibald Hector McIndoe, came to prominence managing casualties of the Second World War. Rainsford Mowlem's ancestor was John Mowlem, the creator of the construction firm. Rainsford worked his passage to the United Kingdom from New Zealand in 1927 and did not return to New Zealand but retired at the age of 60 to enjoy 23 more years in Spain. He was the driving force between 1934 and 1939 at the Plastic Surgery Unit at St James's Hospital, Balham, and instigated the North London Plastic Surgery Unit at Hill End, St Albans, from 1939 to 1953 and subsequently developed the Unit after moving to Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex. After successfully hosting the International Meeting of Plastic Surgeons in London in 1959, he received recognition and honours in America but soon afterwards he surprised colleagues by retiring in 1962. Despite his significant contributions, he did not receive national honours but his life outside surgery was active including Trusteeship of the Mowlem Estate at Swanage in Dorset for 40 years.

  14. The Affordable Care Act: a primer for plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenny T; Israel, Jacqueline S; Poore, Samuel O; Rao, Venkat K

    2014-11-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, sometimes referred to as Obamacare, was signed into law on March 23, 2010. It represents the most extensive overhaul of the country's health care system since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. The Affordable Care Act has two goals. The first goal is to reduce the uninsured population in the United States. Key elements to covering the uninsured include the following: (1) expanding Medicaid coverage for low-income individuals and (2) establishing health insurance marketplaces for moderate-income individuals with subsidies and tax cuts in an effort to make health insurance more affordable. The second goal of the Affordable Care Act is to address concerns about quality and the overall cost of U.S. health care. It is imperative that plastic surgeons thoroughly understand the impact that the Affordable Care Act will undoubtedly have on the country, on our patients, and on our clinical practices. Plastic surgery will see many changes in the future. This will include an overall increase in the number of insured patients, a push toward joining accountable care organizations, and a shift in payment systems to bundled reimbursement for episodes of care. In this article, the authors describe how these changes are likely to occur and what plastic surgeons must do to be part of the change.

  15. Vascular injuries during gynecological laparoscopy: the vascular surgeon's advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Barbosa Barros

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Iatrogenic vascular problems due to laparoscopy are a well recognized problem and lead to significant repercussions. In this context, a ten-year review of cases topic is presented, based on experience gained while heading two important vascular surgery services. CASES: Five patients with vascular injuries during elective laparoscopy are described. These patients presented with seven lesions of iliac vessels. All cases were evaluated immediately and required laparotomy, provisional hemostasis and urgent attendance by a vascular surgeon. Direct suturing was performed in three cases. One aortoiliac bypass and one ilioiliac reversed venous graft were made. Venous lesions were sutured. One case of a point-like perforation of the small bowel was found. There were no deaths and no complications during the postoperative period. DISCUSSION: Important points on this subject are made, and advice is given. There needs to be immediate recognition of the vascular injury, and expert repair by a vascular surgeon is recommended, in order to significantly reduce the degree of complications.

  16. Minimally invasive techniques in the management of orthopaedic trauma%创伤骨科中微创技术的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭庆山; 沈岳

    2011-01-01

    The application of minimally invasive techniques in treating orthopaedic trauma includes two aspects: on the one hand, minimally invasive technique is an effective means of damage control orthopaedics in the treatment of patients with serious multiple traumatic injuries, aiming to reduce surgical morbidity, improve postoperative care and rehabilitation; on the other hand, minimally invasive technique is widely used in the treatment of fractures around the joints, pelvic and acetabular fractures, spine fracture, with advantages of minor operation injury,smaller incision ,less muscle rupture ,lower bone blood supply damage, better local hematoma protection, rapid fracture recovery. Minimally invasive technique is not a concept that it possesses lower operational risk, more easy operation procedure, and smaller incision. The surgeon should grasp the concept and operation indications, learn and improve the surgical methods.%创伤骨科中微创技术的应用包括两方面的内容,一方面,在严重多发伤病人的骨折治疗中,微创外科技术可被作为损害控制骨科的有效手段,以降低早期确定性手术治疗的死亡率,创伤越严重,越应该受益于该技术;另一方面,微创技术广泛应用于关节周围骨折、骨盆和髋臼骨折、脊柱骨折等,以更小的创伤达到与传统骨折治疗相同或更佳的疗效,病人受益于更小的切口,更少的肌肉损伤,更低的骨血供破坏,更好的骨折端血肿保护,骨折愈合加速,病人恢复加快.关于创伤骨科微创技术,仍然有很多需要研究学习之处,也对创伤骨科医师提出了更高的要求.微创并不意味着手术危险性的降低和操作更容易,也不能简单理解为"小切口",应正确理解其理念,掌握手术适应证,学习和改善手术方法.

  17. Salespeople in the Surgical Suite: Relationships between Surgeons and Medical Device Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Bonnie; Pollner, Fran; Fugh-Berman, Adriane

    2016-01-01

    Background Industry payments to surgeons have received public attention, but little is known about the relationships between surgeons and medical device representatives. Medical device representatives ("device reps") have become an integral part of operating room personnel. The effect of their presence on patient care deserves discussion. Study Design We conducted a qualitative, ethnographic study to explore relationships between surgeons and medical device representatives, and characterize industry involvement in the training of surgeons. We used group and individual open-ended interviews to gain insight into the beliefs, values, and perspectives of surgeons and device reps. We conducted two focus groups, one with ear, nose, and throat surgeons, and one with hospital-based attending orthopedic surgeons. We also conducted individual interviews with three former or current medical device representatives, a director of a surgical residency program at an academic medical center, and a medical assistant for a multi-physician orthopedic practice. Results While surgeons view themselves as indisputably in charge, device reps work hard to make themselves unobtrusively indispensable in order to establish and maintain influence, and to imbue the products they provide with personalized services that foster a surgeon's loyalty to the reps and their companies. Surgeons view industry-funded training opportunities as a necessary service. Device reps and some surgeons believe that reps benefit patient care, by increasing efficiency and mitigating deficiencies among operating room personnel (including the surgeons themselves). Conclusions Our study raises ethical questions about the reliance of surgeons on device reps and device companies for education and surgical assistance and practical concerns regarding existing levels of competence among OR personnel. PMID:27486992

  18. Cost-effectiveness analyses of elective orthopaedic surgical procedures in patients with inflammatory arthropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osnes-Ringen, H.; Kvamme, M. K.; Sønbø Kristiansen, Ivar;

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for surgical interventions in patients with inflammatory arthropathies, and to compare the costs per QALY gained for replacement versus non-replacement surgical interventions. Methods: In total, 248 patients [mean age 57...... 800 for non-replacement surgical procedures measured by EQ-5D (SF-6D: EUR 67 500). Conclusions: Elective orthopaedic surgery in patients with inflammatory arthropathies was cost-effective when measured with EQ-5D, and some procedures were also cost-effective when SF-6D was used in the economic...... (SD 13) years, 77% female] with inflammatory arthropathies underwent orthopaedic surgical treatment and responded to mail surveys at baseline and during follow-up (3, 6, 9, and 12 months). Questionnaires included the quality-of-life EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) and Short Form-6D (SF-6D) utility scores...

  19. Three-dimensional Intraoperative Imaging Modalities in Orthopaedic Surgery: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Sheeraz; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Baird, Evan

    2014-12-01

    Intraoperative imaging and navigation systems have revolutionized orthopaedic surgery for the spine, joints, and orthopaedic trauma. Imaging modalities such as the isocentric C-arm, O-arm imaging, and intraoperative MRI or navigation systems allow the visualization of surgical instruments and implants relative to a three-dimensional CT image or MRI. Studies show that these technologies lower the rates of implant misplacement and inadequate fracture reduction, thereby improving surgical outcomes and reducing reoperation rates. An additional benefit is reduced radiation exposure compared with that for conventional fluoroscopy. Concerns surrounding adoption of these technologies include cost and increased operating times, but improvements in design and protocol may improve the integration of these imaging modalities into the operating room.

  20. Estimation of properties of a photoinitiated silorane-based composite with potential for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melander, Jennifer R; Weiler, Rachel A; Miller, Bradley D; Schuman, Thomas P; Kilway, Kathleen V; Day, Delbert E; Velez, Mariano; Eick, J David

    2012-01-01

    We have synthesized a filler-reinforced silorane composite that has potential applications in orthopaedic surgery, such as for a bone stabilizer. The purpose of the present work was to develop a method for estimating four properties of this material; namely, maximum exotherm temperature, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness. The method involved the use of mixture design-of-experiments and regression analysis of results obtained using 23 formulations of the composite. We validated the estimation method by showing that, for each of four composite formulations that were not included in the method development, the value of each of the aforementioned properties was not significantly different from that obtained experimentally. Our estimation method has the potential for use in the development of a wide range of orthopaedic materials.

  1. The presentation of rickets to orthopaedic clinics: return of the English disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Haris; Wall, Alun P; Sangster, Marshall; Paton, Robin W

    2011-04-01

    Rickets is a potentially treatable disease of the bone that is most commonly due to deficiency of vitamin D and is increasing in incidence in developed countries. Risk factors include dietary factors, the practice of covering up and darker skin pigmentation. This small retrospective case study set out to examine all cases of rickets presenting to the Paediatric Orthopaedic clinic over a 15-month period. Rickets presented in a bimodal fashion in the 6 cases identified: in males and females aged 3 or less and female adolescents aged 10 and above. This is in keeping with what is known regarding the rapid phases of growth during development. Five cases were from ethnic minority groups. Both female adolescents presented with genu valgum. Rickets can present primarily to Orthopaedic clinics with vague musculoskeletal symptoms. We recommend that biochemical screening be performed on patients from ethnic minorities who may be 'at risk'.

  2. A discharge planning program in orthopaedics: experiences in implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt-Hensrud, N; Severson, M; Hansen, D C; Holland, D E

    2001-01-01

    The acute care orthopaedic registered nurse plays a key role in assessing and communicating the continuing care needs of patient's and their families, coordinating community resources, and formulating a timely discharge plan to maximize rehabilitation and recovery. Developing and maintaining a staff nurse's discharge planning knowledge and skills can be a challenging endeavor. Discharge Planning Coordinators at a tertiary medical center developed and implemented a Discharge Planning Mentorship Program, an educational pilot program designed to enhance the knowledge and skill level of select nurses in the orthopaedic specialty practice, thus maximizing expert resources at the bedside. Program implementation and evaluation of role preparation, practice changes, and actualization challenges are discussed in this article. Overall, participants demonstrated increased skill in articulating and problem solving a patient's postdischarge needs, devised creative strategies to enhance communication between multiple levels of care, and developed a greater knowledge of community resources and reimbursement mechanisms for continuing care.

  3. Prediction of Compression of Knitted Orthopaedic Supports by Inlay-Yarn Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana ALIŠAUSKIENĖ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to find out the possibility to predict the compression properties of orthopaedic knits by inlay-yarn properties. For this purpose, six groups of elastic double covered threads with different raw material were investigated. It was established that in area of low elongation, the covering threads practically don't have significant influence on tensile force values. Also results demonstrate that by increasing the number of tested threads, the elongation value has a higher impact on tensile force. The influence of linear density of elastic PU core on tensile force increases by increasing elongation value of threads. When influence of inlay-yarn linear density and number of threads on tensile force is determined it is possible to predict influence of inlay-yarn properties on compression properties of knitted orthopaedic supports. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4048

  4. Canadian suppliers of mining goods and services: Links between Canadian mining companies and selected sectors of the Canadian economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemieux, A. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Economic links between Canada's minerals and metals industry and Canadian suppliers of mining goods and services are examined to provide an insight into the interdependencies of these two key resource-related components of Canada's economy. The impact of globalization of the mining industry, estimates of its economic potential and the potential for exporting goods and services in conjunction with Canadian mining projects abroad are also assessed. The study concludes that the links between Canadian mining companies and the rest of the economy are difficult to quantify, due to the absence of statistical data that would differentiate supplier transactions with mining companies from those with other areas of the economy. At best, the approaches used in this study give but an imperfect understanding of the complex relationships between mining companies and their suppliers. It is clear, however, that as much of the demand for mining products is global, so is the supply, therefore, globalization of the mining industry, while creating unprecedented opportunities for Canadian suppliers to provide expertise, goods and services to Canadian and other customers offshore, the fact remains that mining multinationals buy a lot of their supplies locally. As a result, only some of the opportunities created by mining companies based in Canada and elsewhere will translate into sales for Canadian suppliers. Nevertheless, Canadian suppliers appear to have considerable depth in products related to underground mining, environment protection, exploration, feasibility studies, mineral processing, and mine automation. There appear to be considerable opportunities to derive further benefits from these areas of expertise. Appendices contain information about methodological aspects of the survey. 8 tabs., 32 figs., 6 appendices.

  5. Microbial colonisation of orthopaedic tourniquets: A potential risk for surgical site infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, S. K.; B Tudu; P K Mall

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatic tourniquets have been used in orthopaedic surgery to get avascular fields. Sixteen such tourniquets were analysed for microbial colonisation. Samples were taken from two inner and two outer areas of each tourniquet and cultured on sheep blood agar. Eight of these were wiped with Savlon and the rest with Sterillium solution. Post-treatment samples from the same sites were again cultured. After incubation, colonies from each site were identified and counted. It was observed that the t...

  6. Characterization of wear in composite material orthopaedic implants. Part II: The implant/bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, K; Schledjewski, R; Harbaugh, M; Bleser, S; Jamison, R; Friedrich, K

    1994-01-01

    Carbon fiber/PEEK polymer (C/PEEK) composite materials are being developed for use as orthopaedic implant materials. Wear is an issue of increasing importance in orthopaedic implants; particulate debris generated by the wearing of biomaterials may be a causal factor leading to osteolysis and implant loosening. Therefore, numerical and experimental studies were completed to characterize the wear of C/PEEK composite materials in comparison to current orthopaedic implant materials. Finite element analyses (FEA) of a composite material hip stem implanted in a femur and loaded at 890 N determined that peak contact stresses will occur at the proximal-medial and distal regions of the implant. These contact stresses were found to be below 1.0 MPa over most of the implant surface; however the peak stress in the proximal-medial region was 1.8 MPa and higher still at the distal portion of the stem. In vivo forces result in contact stress values up to 9.0 MPa. The composite implant exhibited 10-40% lower contact stresses in the distal region compared to a titanium-alloy implant of identical design. Composite material wear samples were slid against porous hydroxylapatite (HA) to simulate the stem/bone interface. An identical series of experiments was run for comparison to a current orthopaedic implant material--Ti6A14V titanium alloy. Two domains of motion were studied; a composite ring-on-HA disc large amplitude sliding wear test; and a composite pin-on-HA disc small amplitude fretting regimen. Nominal contact pressures during testing were 1.4 MPa and 7.6 MPa for sliding and fretting tests, respectively. Fretting and sliding abrasive wear tests resulted in the composite material exhibiting a lower wear rate than the titanium-alloy. The magnitude of the difference was greatly dependent on the contact pressures, sliding amplitudes, and counterface material properties.

  7. Orthopaedic Device Approval Through the Premarket Approval Process: A Financial Feasibility Analysis for a Single Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Brian W; Iorio, Matthew L; Day, Charles S

    2017-03-15

    The 2 main routes of medical device approval through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are the premarket approval (PMA) process, which requires clinical trials, and the 510(k) premarket notification, which exempts devices from clinical trials if they are substantially equivalent to an existing device. Recently, there has been growing concern regarding the safety of devices approved through the 510(k) premarket notification. The PMA process decreases the potential for device recall; however, it is substantially more costly and time-consuming. Investors and medical device companies are only willing to invest in devices if they can expect to recoup their investment within a timeline of roughly 7 years. Our study utilizes financial modeling to assess the financial feasibility of approving various orthopaedic medical devices through the 510(k) and PMA processes. The expected time to recoup investment through the 510(k) process ranged from 0.585 years to 7.715 years, with an average time of 2.4 years; the expected time to recoup investment through the PMA route ranged from 2.9 years to 24.5 years, with an average time of 8.5 years. Six of the 13 orthopaedic device systems that we analyzed would require longer than our 7-year benchmark to recoup the investment costs of the PMA process. With the 510(k) premarket notification, only 1 device system would take longer than 7 years to recoup its investment costs. Although the 510(k) premarket notification has demonstrated safety concerns, broad requirements for PMA authorization may limit device innovation for less-prevalent orthopaedic conditions. As a result, new approval frameworks may be beneficial. Our report demonstrates how current regulatory policies can potentially influence orthopaedic device innovation.

  8. An evidence-based dietary fiber enrichment programme for relieving constipation in elderly orthopaedic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Siu-king, Rosetti; 戴筱荊

    2013-01-01

    Constipation is a multifactorial digestive disorder highly prevailing among the hospitalized elderly Orthopaedic patients. Unlike Western countries, laxative therapy is used to be the first line remedy for constipation in many hospitals of Hong Kong although fiber-rich diet has been proven by numerous studies as the best alternative with low cost and less complications. This dissertation is a translational nursing research which aims at formulating a programme of using fiber-rich food pro...

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell interaction with ultra smooth nanostructured diamond for wear resistant orthopaedic implants

    OpenAIRE

    Clem, William C.; Chowdhury, Shafiul; Catledge, Shane A.; Weimer, Jeffrey J.; Shaikh, Faheem M; Hennessy, Kristin M; Konovalov, Valery V.; Hill, Michael R; Waterfeld, Alfred; Bellis, Susan L.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2008-01-01

    Ultra smooth nanostructured diamond (USND) can be applied to greatly increase the wear resistance of orthopaedic implants over conventional designs. Herein we describe surface modification techniques and cytocompatibility studies performed on this new material. We report that hydrogen (H) -terminated USND surfaces supported robust mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) adhesion and survival, while oxygen (O) and fluorine (F) -terminated surfaces resisted cell adhesion, indicating that USND can be modifi...

  10. Adaptive meshing technique applied to an orthopaedic finite element contact problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roarty, Colleen M; Grosland, Nicole M

    2004-01-01

    Finite element methods have been applied extensively and with much success in the analysis of orthopaedic implants. Recently a growing interest has developed, in the orthopaedic biomechanics community, in how numerical models can be constructed for the optimal solution of problems in contact mechanics. New developments in this area are of paramount importance in the design of improved implants for orthopaedic surgery. Finite element and other computational techniques are widely applied in the analysis and design of hip and knee implants, with additional joints (ankle, shoulder, wrist) attracting increased attention. The objective of this investigation was to develop a simplified adaptive meshing scheme to facilitate the finite element analysis of a dual-curvature total wrist implant. Using currently available software, the analyst has great flexibility in mesh generation, but must prescribe element sizes and refinement schemes throughout the domain of interest. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to predict in advance a mesh spacing that will give acceptable results. Adaptive finite-element mesh capabilities operate to continuously refine the mesh to improve accuracy where it is required, with minimal intervention by the analyst. Such mesh adaptation generally means that in certain areas of the analysis domain, the size of the elements is decreased (or increased) and/or the order of the elements may be increased (or decreased). In concept, mesh adaptation is very appealing. Although there have been several previous applications of adaptive meshing for in-house FE codes, we have coupled an adaptive mesh formulation with the pre-existing commercial programs PATRAN (MacNeal-Schwendler Corp., USA) and ABAQUS (Hibbit Karlson and Sorensen, Pawtucket, RI). In doing so, we have retained several attributes of the commercial software, which are very attractive for orthopaedic implant applications.

  11. Efficacy of epidural administration of morphine with bupivacaine for orthopaedic surgery in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Durej M.; Ledecký V.; Michalák D.; Hluchý M.; Kòazovický D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that epidural administration of morphine with bupivacaine provides more intense and sufficient perioperative analgesia compared with parenterally administrated butorphanol during orthopaedic surgery. Sheep were assigned to group C (control group, 6 sheep) and group E (epidural, 5 sheep). Sheep from group C were pre-medicated with midazolam (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) and butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg, i.m.). Propofol was used ...

  12. Influence of orthopaedic-technical aid on the kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint of patients with neuro-orthopaedic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Renée; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Schrödl, Silvia; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Natrath, Michaela; Gradinger, Reiner

    2004-06-01

    In our gait laboratory, the gait pattern of 18 youths with neurogenic foot deformities as a result of spina bifida or cerebral palsy was examined. The influence of technical orthopaedic devices for the foot and ankle on kinematics and kinetics of the gait and especially of the knee joint were analyzed. Kinematic data were derived from 3D-video analysis, kinetic data from force plates and pressure distribution plates. Muscle activities were measured with eight-channel EMG. The data were examined to see if there were differences when using the technical devices. All patients had already been supported externally with the different devices like orthopaedic shoes, insoles, Nancy Hilton orthoses and orthoses for the lower leg extremity. The devices restricted to the foot and the ankle joint improved the feeling of gait stability of the patients. In this investigation, the different supports had various but little effects on the kinematics and kinetics of the knee joint, depending on the type of orthoses used and the kind of handicap of the youths. Because of the great expenditure, the data obtained in this study were taken from a small number of patients. Therefore, they are individual findings and are of restricted general significance.

  13. Theorizing Gender in Contemporary Canadian Citizenship: Lessons Learned from the CBC's "Greatest Canadian" Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubas, Kaela

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I have used the 2004 Greatest Canadian contest as an example of media's educational function. Contrary to mainstream discourse of gender-neutral citizenship, this contest reiterates a notion of Canadian citizenship as masculinized, classed, and raced. Gramsci's concepts of "hegemony," "ideology", and…

  14. Rehabilitation and restoration: orthopaedics and disabled soldiers in Germany and Britain in the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Julie; Perry, Heather R

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a comparative analysis of the evolution of orthopaedics and rehabilitation within German and British military medicine during the Great War. In it, we reveal how the field of orthopaedics became integral to military medicine by tracing the evolution of the discipline and its practitioners in each nation during the war. In doing so, however, we document not only when and why both medical specialists and military officials realized that maintaining their respective national fighting forces depended upon the efficient rehabilitation of wounded soldiers, but also how these rehabilitative practices and goals reflected the particularities of the military context, civilian society and social structure of each nation. Thus, while our comparison reveals a number of similarities in the orthopaedic developments within each nation as a response to the Great War, we also reveal significant national differences in war-time medical goals, rehabilitation treatments and soldierly 'medical experiences'. Moreover, as we demonstrate, a social and cultural re-conceptualization of the disabled body accompanied the medical advancements developed for him; however, this re-conceptualization was not the same in each nation. Thus, what our article reveals is that although the guns of August fell silent in 1918, the war's medical experiences lingered long thereafter shaping the future of disability medicine in both nations.

  15. Mechanical compatibility of sol-gel annealing with titanium for orthopaedic prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Andrew I M; Lim, Teoh S; Brydone, Alistair S; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2016-01-01

    Sol-gel processing is an attractive method for large-scale surface coating due to its facile and inexpensive preparation, even with the inclusion of precision nanotopographies. These are desirable traits for metal orthopaedic prostheses where ceramic coatings are known to be osteoinductive and the effects may be amplified through nanotexturing. However there are a few concerns associated with the application of sol-gel technology to orthopaedics. Primarily, the annealing stage required to transform the sol-gel into a ceramic may compromise the physical integrity of the underlying metal. Secondly, loose particles on medical implants can be carcinogenic and cause inflammation so the coating needs to be strongly bonded to the implant. These concerns are addressed in this paper. Titanium, the dominant material for orthopaedics at present, is examined before and after sol-gel processing for changes in hardness and flexural modulus. Wear resistance, bending and pull tests are also performed to evaluate the ceramic coating. The findings suggest that sol-gel coatings will be compatible with titanium implants for an optimum temperature of 500 °C.

  16. Barriers and strategies for the clinical translation of advanced orthopaedic tissue engineering protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Madry

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Research in orthopaedic tissue engineering has intensified over the last decade and new protocols continue to emerge. The clinical translation of these new applications, however, remains associated with a number of obstacles. This report highlights the major issues that impede the clinical translation of advanced tissue engineering concepts, discusses strategies to overcome these barriers, and examines the need to increase incentives for translational strategies. The statements are based on presentations and discussions held at the AO Foundation-sponsored symposium "Where Science meets Clinics 2013" held at the Congress Center in Davos, Switzerland, in September, 2013. The event organisers convened a diverse group of over one hundred stakeholders involved in clinical translation of orthopaedic tissue engineering, including scientists, clinicians, healthcare industry professionals and regulatory agency representatives. A major point that emerged from the discussions was that there continues to be a critical need for early trans-disciplinary communication and collaboration in the development and execution of research approaches. Equally importantly was the need to address the shortage of sustained funding programs for multidisciplinary teams conducting translational research. Such detailed discussions between experts contribute towards the development of a roadmap to more successfully advance the clinical translation of novel tissue engineering concepts and ultimately improve patient care in orthopaedic and trauma surgery.

  17. Knowledge and opinions on oncoplastic surgery among breast and plastic surgeons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Lena; Rose, Michael; Bentzon, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    surgeons and 22 plastic surgeons; the response rate was 67%. All breast surgery units had an established cooperation with plastic surgeons. Most breast surgeons used unilateral displacement techniques; plastic surgeons also included breast reduction techniques and replacement with local flaps. Almost all......INTRODUCTION: More than 4,000 Danish women are diagnosed with operable breast cancer annually, and 70% receive breast conserving surgery. Without the use of oncoplastic surgery (OPS), 20-30% will get an unsatisfactory cosmetic result. The aim of this study was to illustrate the level...... of implementation of OPS in Denmark. METHODS: An electronic questionnaire was sent to breast and plastic surgeons performing breast cancer treatment. The questionnaire included demographics, education, experience with operative procedures and opinions on OPS. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 50 breast...

  18. Medical cannabis - the Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gordon D; Bober, Sara L; Mindra, Sean; Moreau, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been widely used as a medicinal agent in Eastern medicine with earliest evidence in ancient Chinese practice dating back to 2700 BC. Over time, the use of medical cannabis has been increasingly adopted by Western medicine and is thus a rapidly emerging field that all pain physicians need to be aware of. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a significant and dose-dependent relationship between neuropathic pain relief and tetrahydrocannabinol - the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. Despite this, barriers exist to use from both the patient perspective (cost, addiction, social stigma, lack of understanding regarding safe administration) and the physician perspective (credibility, criminality, clinical evidence, patient addiction, and policy from the governing medical colleges). This review addresses these barriers and draws attention to key concerns in the Canadian medical system, providing updated treatment approaches to help clinicians work with their patients in achieving adequate pain control, reduced narcotic medication use, and enhanced quality of life. This review also includes case studies demonstrating the use of medical marijuana by patients with neuropathic low-back pain, neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. While significant preclinical data have demonstrated the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating pain in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, and cancer, further studies are needed with randomized controlled trials and larger study populations to identify the specific strains and concentrations that will work best with selected cohorts.

  19. No Circadian Variation in Surgeons' Ability to Diagnose Acute Appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Bech; Amirian, Ilda; Watt, Sara Kehlet;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if there were circadian variations in surgeons' ability to diagnose acute appendicitis. DESIGN: Retrospective database study of all patients admitted to an acute surgical procedure under the potential diagnosis of acute appendicitis in a 4-year period. The day was divided...... patients were included. There were no age limitations or selection in sex. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the ability to diagnose appendicitis in day-evening hours vs night hours (p = 0.391), nor was any significant difference found on weekdays (Monday-Thursday) vs weekends (Friday...... of imaging had no effect on the ability to diagnose appendicitis. Male sex showed a higher probability of the diagnosis being appendicitis compared with other or no pathology (odds ratio: 3.094; p

  20. Ureteral inguinal hernia: an uncommon trap for general surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Zarif; Al-habbal, Yahya; Hassen, Sayed

    2017-01-01

    Inguinal hernias involving the ureter, a retroperitoneal structure, is an uncommon phenomenon. It can occur with or without obstructive uropathy, the latter posing a trap for the unassuming general surgeon performing a routine inguinal hernia repair. Ureteral inguinal hernia should be included as a differential when a clinical inguinal hernia is diagnosed concurrently with unexplained hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract infection particularly in a male. The present case describes a patient with a known ureteroinguinal hernia who proceeded to having a planned hernia repair and ureteric protection. The case is a reminder that when faced with an unexpected finding such an indirect sliding inguinal hernia, extreme care should be taken to ensure that no structures are inadvertently damaged and that a rare possibility is the entrapment of the ureter in the inguinal canal. PMID:28275027

  1. Old Disease…New Location…Surgeons Be Alerted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Ashok

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus granulosus causes a zoonotic infection called Cystic Echinococcosis (CE. Surgeons meet with hydatid cysts of the liver and lungs with reasonable frequency. However hydatid cyst may appear in other parts of the body too.A 30 yrs old lady presented with a smooth slow-growing subcutaneous nodule on the anteromedial side of the right thigh with no detectable primary site in the liver or lung. The case subsequently diagnosed as hydatid cyst of muscle and radical surgery was done under coverage of anihelminthic drug.The common practice in this type of case is to do FNAC taking the lesion to be a soft tissue neoplasm. The aim of this case presentation is to make aware of the fact that in a case of diffuse non-tender swelling with history of gradual increase in size hydatid cyst also has to be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  2. [Surgeon 2.0: the challenge is on the Web].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda Lozano, Ricardo; Ferrer Márquez, Manuel; García Torrecillas, Juan Manuel; Alvarez García, Antonio; Reina Duarte, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Numerous articles and opinions have been published in the last few years on how the Internet is changing clinical practice. In this article we focus on describing 2 aspects that we believe are fundamental in the web 2.0 and Medicine-Surgery inter-relationship: a) web 2.0 conceptualisation and its differences with other pre-existing tools, and b) a description of some of the tools that from a medical-surgical view could be of major interest to the professionals, the patients, and interaction between both. The time has arrived to board train 2.0, where the channels of communication between the professionals, and between them and the patients, are improving disease situations daily, to improve learning through contact with other physicians and surgeons, at the same time providing an excellent resource for maintaining health and to know the disease and its treatment.

  3. Jean Falcon (1491-1541), a great surgeon and anatomist of the 16th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Piagkou, Maria; Skandalakis, Panagiotis; Androutsos, George

    2013-01-01

    Jean Falcon, an Aragon native, became a famous surgeon at the Faculty of Montpellier. He was a Royal physician, wealthy enough to live a luxurious life and treat influential patients. His lectures were legendary, and his works gave him fame among the surgeons' class. Of all his manuscripts stands the "Guidon", which became an anatomical surgeons' handbook, worthy of reference from the scientific community for centuries.

  4. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental surgeons: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rahim Shaik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe the work-related musculoskeletal disorders among on-job dental surgeons. Objectives: To identify the musculoskeletal disorders in terms of perception of pain and stiffness experienced by the dental surgeons due to the rigors of dental work, to determine the prevailing working environment with particular reference to dental work station in relation to musculoskeletal disorders, and to find the association between pain and stiffness experienced by the dental surgeons and the selected socio-demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 30 graduated dental surgeons having a work experience of 1 year or more, post graduates and faculty members of various specialties at Yenepoya Dental College Hospital, Mangalore. The subjects were selected randomly from the hospital and they were given closed-ended questionnaire to find out perception of pain and stiffness experienced in the past 6 months. The observation of the working environment was done by walk-through observational survey. Results: The study showed that 6.6% dental surgeons always experienced shoulder pain, while 83.3% dental surgeons sometimes experienced back pain and 70% sometimes experienced neck pain. Majority of the dental surgeons (73.3% experienced stiffness in the back and 23.3% experienced severe pain in their neck. It was observed that the number of patients attended per day by the dental surgeons had a significant association (P = 0.024 with the pain they experienced in their hip/thigh region. The frequency of pain experienced by the dental surgeons in the hip/thigh and knee joints also showed a significant association (P = 0.037 with the height of the dental surgeons. Conclusion: The study revealed that various socio-demographic variables contributed to the musculoskeletal disorders experienced by the dental surgeons. However, the number of patients attended per day by the dental surgeons vis-à-vis pain experienced in the back, wrist, and

  5. Clinical Core Competency Training for NASA Flight Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, J. D.; Schmid, Josef; Hurst, Victor, IV; Doerr, Harold K.; Doerr, Harold K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The cohort of NASA flight surgeons (FS) is a very accomplished group with varied clinical backgrounds; however, the NASA Flight Surgeon Office has identified that the extremely demanding schedule of this cohort prevents many of these physicians from practicing clinical medicine on a regular basis. In an effort to improve clinical competency, the NASA FS Office has dedicated one day a week for the FS to receive clinical training. Each week, an FS is assigned to one of five clinical settings, one being medical patient simulation. The Medical Operations Support Team (MOST) was tasked to develop curricula using medical patient simulation that would meet the clinical and operational needs of the NASA FS Office. Methods: The MOST met with the Lead FS and Training Lead FS to identify those core competencies most important to the FS cohort. The MOST presented core competency standards from the American Colleges of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine as a basis for developing the training. Results: The MOST identified those clinical areas that could be best demonstrated and taught using medical patient simulation, in particular, using high fidelity human patient simulators. Curricula are currently being developed and additional classes will be implemented to instruct the FS cohort. The curricula will incorporate several environments for instruction, including lab-based and simulated microgravity-based environments. Discussion: The response from the NASA FS cohort to the initial introductory class has been positive. As a result of this effort, the MOST has identified three types of training to meet the clinical needs of the FS Office; clinical core competency training, individual clinical refresher training, and just-in-time training (specific for post-ISS Expedition landings). The MOST is continuing to work with the FS Office to augment the clinical training for the FS cohort, including the integration of Web-based learning.

  6. Gender differences in the professional and private lives of plastic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Terri J; Werler, Martha M; Mulliken, John B

    2010-06-01

    There are over 700 female members in the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The purpose of this study was to assess possible differences between female and male plastic surgeons with respect to their practice characteristics, duration of practice, and some aspects of their private lives. We designed a 41 question survey to compare the practice features and personal demographics of female and male members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. A total of 1498 questionnaires were sent via e-mail to all female members (n = 687) and a random cohort of male members (n = 811). The respondents were age stratified by decade and their responses were compared by gender using chi tests. The overall response rate was 36.3%: 337 females (49%) and 207 males (25.5%) (P plastic surgeons were more than twice as likely as female plastic surgeons to earn an income greater than $400,000 per year (P plastic surgeons are significantly more likely to be unmarried, to postpone having children or be childless, as compared to their male counterparts. Furthermore, female plastic surgeons have a lower income than their male colleagues despite similar hours and practice profile. Nevertheless, female plastic surgeons appear to have similar career satisfaction and are no more likely to retire earlier or more frequently than male plastic surgeons.

  7. The paediatric surgeon and his working conditions in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnassingbé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study described the current conditions of work of paediatric surgeons in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa (FSSA and set the debate at the level of the humanist thinking in medicine. Patients and Methods: This was a multicentre study from 1 st May to 30 th October 2008. The African Society of paediatric surgeons′ directory was used to identify paediatric surgeons in the Francophone′s countries in Sub Saharan Africa. The parameters studied were number of surgeons per country, means of training, working conditions, remunerations, needs for continuous training and the research. Results: A total of 41 paediatric surgeons (68.33% responded. The average number of paediatric surgeons per country was 5. The means of training included government scholarships among 7 paediatric surgeons (17.07%, scholarship from a non-governmental organisations in 14 (34.15% and self-sponsorships in 20 (48.78%. The average salary was 450 Euros (€ (range: 120-1 400 Euros. Most of the paediatric surgeons (68.29% had internet services for continuous update courses and research. Thirty six paediatric surgeons (87.80% had no subscription to specialised scientific journals. Conclusion: The paediatric surgeon in FSSA faces many problems related to his working and living conditions that may have a negative impact on their competences.

  8. JUDGING SELECTION: APPOINTING CANADIAN JUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter McCormick

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s, the appointment of trial judges in Canada has generally involved an arms-length committee of professionals, although the structure of these committees and their role in the process has varied from province to province, as well as evolving over time. Yet these “new” structures and “new” processes did not prevent a major judicial appointment scandal in the province of Quebec in 2010, culminating in the formation of the Bastarache Committee to recommend changes. This paper summarizes the forty-year history of Canadian judicial appointment committees, identifies the major challenges that face those committees, and suggests the basic values toward which reforms to the appointment process might be directed. Depuis les années 1970, la nomination des juges de première instance au Canada a généralement mis à contribution un comité de professionnels indépendants, bien que la structure de ce comité et son rôle dans le processus de nomination aient varié d’une province à l’autre et évolué avec le temps. Ces « nouvelles » structures et « nouveaux » processus n’ont certes pas empêché l’éclatement du scandale sur la nomination des juges au Québec en 2010. Ce scandale a donné lieu à la formation de la Commission Bastarache qui avait notamment le mandat de recommander des changements. La présent document résume les quarante ans d’histoire des comités canadiens de nomination des juges, recense les principaux défis que ces comités doivent relever, et propose les valeurs fondamentales qui devraient inspirer les réformes du processus de nomination.

  9. Society of U.S. Air Force Surgeons’ 2010 State of the Flight Surgeon Survey: The Medical Treatment Facility Commander’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    filling an active billet as a flight surgeon may be very short (i.e., immediate), as in the case of a general medical officer ( GMO ), or very long...Inexperience (9/19) • The two assigned flight surgeons are general medical officers ( GMOs ). It is difficult to complete the necessary training at a...other two are newly assigned GMOs , who are motivated but are still in the learning phase. I have no doubt they will eventually grow into outstanding

  10. A Roadmap for Canadian Submillimetre Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Tracy; Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda; Murray, Norm; Scott, Douglas; Wilson, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We survey the present landscape in submillimetre astronomy for Canada and describe a plan for continued engagement in observational facilities to ~2020. Building on Canada's decadal Long Range Plan process, we emphasize that continued involvement in a large, single-dish facility is crucial given Canada's substantial investment in ALMA and numerous PI-led submillimetre experiments. In particular, we recommend: i) an extension of Canadian participation in the JCMT until at least the unique JCMT Legacy Survey program is able to realize the full scientific potential provided by the world-leading SCUBA-2 instrument; and ii) involvement of the entire Canadian community in CCAT, with a large enough share in the partnership for Canadian astronomers to participate at all levels of the facility. We further recommend continued participation in ALMA development, involvement in many focused PI-led submillimetre experiments, and partnership in SPICA.

  11. Birth of the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ivan T

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Digestive Disease Foundation, renamed the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation--Fondation canadienne pour la promotion de la santé digestive--in December 2001, is the culmination of ongoing efforts by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology to establish an independent charitable organization. In February 2001, it was officially endorsed as the Foundation for the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. The initial efforts to establish this Foundation, led by Dr Richard McKenna in 1963, were unsuccessful. In 1991, Glaxo Canada (now GlaxoSmithKline) became a founding donor, and with the four founding physicians--Drs Ivan T Beck, Richard H Hunt, Suzanne E Lemire and Alan BR Thomson--the expenses to establish the Foundation were met. A charitable number was obtained in 1995 (0997427-11). The second founding donor was Janssen Canada (now Janssen-Ortho), and public education support came from Astra Canada (now AstraZeneca Canada). The Foundation initially relied on corporate donors, but now approaches physicians, patients and the general public. The objectives of the Foundation are to advance the science of gastroenterology and to provide knowledge of digestive diseases and nutrition to the general public, to enhance the quality of life of persons who are afflicted with these disorders. The major achievements of the Foundation are the provision of one-year operating grants to new investigators, which have allowed them to accumulate early data and subsequently obtain support from other major granting organizations. It also provides Fellowships and studentship support grants, in conjunction with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the pharmaceutical industry. The education committee found that there was little research support in this field, considering the large economic burden of digestive disease and the amount of outstanding work done by Canadian researchers. A bilingual Web site, a web-based specialist's discussion program and bilingual

  12. A Course in Canadian Film for U.S. Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenko, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Canadian Film will be a new course in the Communications Studies department at the University of Missouri at Kansas City particularly designed for non-Canadian Midwestern US students. It will not only introduce students to the richness and significance of Canadian film as both art and entertainment (which is virtually unrecognized around here),…

  13. 47 CFR 101.1423 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1423... GHz Band § 101.1423 Canadian and Mexican coordination. Pursuant to § 2.301 of this chapter, MVDDS systems in the United States within 56 km (35 miles) of the Canadian and Mexican border will be...

  14. Management of hereditary angioedema: 2010 Canadian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract C1-inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency is a rare blood disorder resulting in angioedema attacks that are debilitating and may be life-threatening. Prophylaxis and therapy of events has changed since our first Canadian Consensus Conference on the diagnosis, therapy and management of HAE. We have formed the Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'Angioédème Héréditaire (RCAH - http://www.haecanada.com to advance care of patients with this disorder in Canada. We here present a review of management of HAE in Canada.

  15. Statistics in action a Canadian outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Jerald F

    2014-01-01

    Commissioned by the Statistical Society of Canada (SSC), Statistics in Action: A Canadian Outlook helps both general readers and users of statistics better appreciate the scope and importance of statistics. It presents the ways in which statistics is used while highlighting key contributions that Canadian statisticians are making to science, technology, business, government, and other areas. The book emphasizes the role and impact of computing in statistical modeling and analysis, including the issues involved with the huge amounts of data being generated by automated processes.The first two c

  16. 21 CFR 878.4480 - Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's glove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4480 Absorbable powder for lubricating a surgeon's glove. (a) Identification. Absorbable powder...

  17. A First Hard Look at the Surgeon General's Report on Television and Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Douglass; Strickland, Stephen

    In March of 1972 the Aspen Program on Communications and Society convened a meeting which brought together the Surgeon General, staff members connected with the Surgeon General's Report on Television and Violence, and social scientists. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate the Report, which had just been issued. This conference report…

  18. Emergent management of postpartum hemorrhage for the general and acute care surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blankenship Charles L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum hemorrhage is one of the rare occasions when a general or acute care surgeon may be emergently called to labor and delivery, a situation in which time is limited and the stakes high. Unfortunately, there is generally a paucity of exposure and information available to surgeons regarding this topic: obstetric training is rarely found in contemporary surgical residency curricula and is omitted nearly completely from general and acute care surgery literature and continuing medical education. Methods The purpose of this manuscript is to serve as a topic specific review for surgeons and to present a surgeon oriented management algorithm. Medline and Ovid databases were utilized in a comprehensive literature review regarding the management of postpartum hemorrhage and a management algorithm for surgeons developed based upon a collaborative panel of general, acute care, trauma and obstetrical surgeons' review of the literature and expert opinion. Results A stepwise approach for surgeons of the medical and surgical interventions utilized to manage and treat postpartum hemorrhage is presented and organized into a basic algorithm. Conclusion The manuscript should promote and facilitate a more educated, systematic and effective surgeon response and participation in the management of postpartum hemorrhage.

  19. A comparison of surgeon's postural muscle activity during robotic-assisted and laparoscopic rectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Grace P Y; Poon, Jensen T C; Law, Wai-Lun

    2013-09-01

    This study compared the muscular activity in the surgeon's neck and upper limbs during robotic-assisted laparoscopic (R-Lap) surgery and conventional laparoscopic (C-Lap) surgery. Two surgeons performed the same procedure of R-Lap and C-Lap low anterior resection, and real-time surface electromyography was recorded in bilateral cervical erector spinae, upper trapezius (UT) and anterior deltoid muscles for over 60 min in each procedure. In one surgeon, forearm muscle activities were also recorded during robotic surgery. Similar levels of cervical muscle activity were demonstrated in both types of surgery. One surgeon showed much higher activity in the left UT muscle during robotic surgery. In the second surgeon, C-Lap was associated with much higher levels of muscle activity in both UT muscles. This may be related to the bilateral abducted arm posture required in maneuvering the laparoscopic instruments. In the forearm region, the "ulnaris" muscles for wrist flexion and extension bilaterally showed high amplitudes during robotic-assisted surgery. Robotic-assisted surgery seemed to demand a higher level of muscle work in the forearm region while greater efforts of shoulder muscles were involved during laparoscopic surgery. There are also individual variations in postural habits and motor control that can affect the muscle activation patterns. This study demonstrated a method of objectively examining the surgeon's physical workload during real-time surgery in the operating theatre, and further research should explore the surgeon's workload in a larger group of surgeons performing different surgical procedures.

  20. Da Vinci© Skills Simulator™: is an early selection of talented console surgeons possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Mark; Horton, Kevin; John, Hubert

    2016-12-01

    To investigate whether the learning curve of robotic surgery simulator training depends on the probands' characteristics, such as age and prior experience, we conducted a study of six distinct proband groups, using the da Vinci Skills Simulator: experienced urological robotic surgeons, surgeons with experience as da Vinci tableside assistants, urological surgeons with laparoscopic experience, urological surgeons without laparoscopic experience, and complete novices aged 25 and younger and 40 and older. The results showed that all experienced robotic surgeons reached expert level (>90 %, as defined previously in the literature) within the first three repetitions and remained on a high level of performance. All other groups performed worse. Tableside assistants, laparoscopically experienced surgeons, and younger novices showed a better performance in all exercises than surgeons without laparoscopic experience and older novices. A linear mixed-effects model analysis demonstrated no significant difference in learning curves between proband groups in all exercises except the RW1 exercise for the younger proband group. In summary, we found that performance in robotic surgery, measured by performance scores in three virtual simulator modules using the EndoWrist techniques, was dependent on age and prior experience with robotic and laparoscopic surgery. However, and most importantly, the learning curve was not significantly affected by these factors. This suggests that the da Vinci Skills Simulator™ is a useful practice tool for everyone learning or performing robotic surgery, and that early selection of talented surgeons is neither possible nor necessary.

  1. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  2. Surgical management of acute cholecystitis. Results of a nation-wide survey among Spanish surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Josep M; Nve, Esther; Jimeno, Jaime; Guirao, Xavier; Figueras, Joan; Arias-Díaz, Javier

    2014-10-01

    There is a wide variability in the management of acute cholecystitis. A survey among the members of the Spanish Association of Surgeons (AEC) analyzed the preferences of Spanish surgeons for its surgical management. The majority of the 771 responders didn't declare any subspecialty (41.6%), 21% were HPB surgeons, followed by colorectal and upper-GI specialities. Early cholecystectomy during the first admission is the preferred method of management of 92.3% of surgeons, but only 42.7% succeed in adopting this practice. The most frequent reasons for changing their preferred practice were: Patients not fit for surgery (43.6%) and lack of availability of emergency operating room (35.2%). A total of 88.9% perform surgery laparoscopically. The majority of AEC surgeons advise index admission cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis, although only half of them succeed in its actual implementation. There is room for improvement in the management of acute cholecystitis in Spanish hospitals.

  3. Technical modifications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy by the left-handed surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Segura, Antonio; López-Tomassetti Fernández, Eudaldo M; Medina-Arana, Vicente

    2007-10-01

    There is a complete paucity of literature for left-handed surgeons. Some studies revealed that left-handed surgical residents have lesser operating skills and some surgeons have considered leaving surgery at some point in their career owing to laterality-related frustrations. Most important, whereas minimally invasive surgical techniques have had a profound impact on the treatment of diseased gallbladder, these procedures do not eliminate laterality related to the discomfort of left-handed surgeons. Usually, left-handed surgeons must teach themselves a procedure. They must make modifications and learn some technical tips to make a more comfortable, convenient, and safe intervention. The aim of this study was to describe some modifications made by a left-handed surgeon to perform 52 safe laparoscopic cholecystectomies with standard right-handed instruments in our hospital. These surgical steps could be used in a reproducible way to minimize the recurring difficulties of left-handed learners in a surgical residency program.

  4. Diabetic mouse model of orthopaedic implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna B Lovati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic bacterial infections represent one of the most challenging orthopaedic complications that often require implant removal and surgical debridement and carry high social and economical costs. Diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors of implant-related infection and its clinical occurrence is growing worldwide. The aim of the present study was to test a model of implant-related infection in the diabetic mouse, with a view to allow further investigation on the relative efficacy of prevention and treatment options in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. METHODOLOGY: A cohort of diabetic NOD/ShiLtJ mice was compared with non-diabetic CD1 mice as an in vivo model of S. aureus orthopaedic infection of bone and soft tissues after femur intramedullary pin implantation. We tested control and infected groups with 1×10(3 colony-forming units of S. aureus ATCC 25923 strain injected in the implant site. At 4 weeks post-inoculation, host response to infection, microbial biofilm formation, and bone damage were assessed by traditional diagnostic parameters (bacterial culture, C-reactive protein and white blood cell count, histological analysis and imaging techniques (micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Unlike the controls and the CD1 mice, all the diabetic mice challenged with a single inoculum of S. aureus displayed severe osteomyelitic changes around the implant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the diabetic mouse can be successfully used in a model of orthopaedic implant-related infection. Furthermore, the same bacteria inoculum induced periprosthetic infection in all the diabetic mice but not in the controls. This animal model of implant-related infection in diabetes may be a useful tool to test in vivo treatments in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

  5. Aesthetic, urological, orthopaedic and functional outcomes in complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias′s management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertin Dibi Kouame

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative complications are related to the surgical procedures, of failures of initial bladder closure and influence the urological, aesthetical and orthopaedic outcomes. Materials and Methods: We reviewed four patients who underwent complex bladder exstrophy-epispadias repair over a period of 14 years. The outcomes of treatment were assessed using, aesthetic, urological and orthopaedic examination data. Orthopaedic complications were explored by a radiography of the pelvis. Results: Out of four patients who underwent bladder exstrophy surgical management, aesthetic, functional outcomes and complications in the short and long follow-up were achieved in three patients. The first patient is a male and had a good penis aspect. He has a normal erection during micturition with a good jet miction. He has a moderate urinary incontinence, which requires diaper. In the erection, his penis-measures 4 cm long and 3 cm as circumference. The second patient was a female. She had an unsightly appearance of the female external genitalia with bipartite clitoris. Urinary continence could not be assessed; she did not have the age of cleanness yet. The third patient had a significant urinary leakage due to the failure of the epispadias repair. He has a limp, a pelvic obliquity, varus and internal rotation of the femoral head. He has an inequality of limbs length. Pelvis radiograph shows the right osteotomy through the ilium bone, the left osteotomy through the hip joint at the acetabular roof. Conclusion: When, the epispadias repair is performed contemporary to initial bladder closure, its success is decisive for urinary continence. In the female, surgical revision is required after the initial bladder closure for an aesthetic appearance to the external genitalia. Innominate osteotomy must be performed with brilliancy amplifier to avoid osteotomy through to the hip joint to prevent inequality in leg length.

  6. Resident surgeon efficiency in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittner, Andrew C; Sullivan, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Comparison of resident surgeon performance efficiencies in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification. Patients and methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive patients undergoing phacoemulsification cataract surgery performed by senior ophthalmology residents under the supervision of 1 attending physician during a 9-month period in a large Veterans Affairs medical center. Medical records were reviewed for demographic information, preoperative nucleus grade, femtosecond laser pretreatment, operative procedure times, total operating room times, and surgical complications. Review of digital video records provided quantitative interval measurements of core steps of the procedures, including completion of incisions, anterior capsulotomy, nucleus removal, cortical removal, and intraocular lens implantation. Results Total room time, operation time, and corneal incision completion time were found to be significantly longer in the femtosecond laser group versus the traditional phacoemulsification group (each Pcataract surgery is generally less efficient when trainees have more experience with traditional phacoemulsification. FLACS was found to have a significant advantage in completion of capsulotomy, but subsequent surgical steps were not shorter or longer. Resident learning curve for the FLACS technology may partially explain the disparities of performance. Educators should be cognizant of a potential for lower procedural efficiency when introducing FLACS into resident training. PMID:28203055

  7. Human genomics and microarrays: implications for the plastic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jana; Isik, Frank

    2002-09-01

    The Human Genome Project was launched in 1989 in an effort to sequence the entire span of human DNA. Although coding sequences are important in identifying mutations, the static order of DNA does not explain how a cell or organism may respond to normal and abnormal biological processes. By examining the mRNA content of a cell, researchers can determine which genes are being activated in response to a stimulus. Traditional methods in molecular biology generally work on a "one gene: one experiment" basis, which means that the throughput is very limited and the "whole picture" of gene function is hard to obtain. To study each of the 60,000 to 80,000 genes in the human genome under each biological circumstance is not practical. Recently, microarrays (also known as gene or DNA chips) have emerged; these allow for the simultaneous determination of expression for thousands of genes and analysis of genome-wide mRNA expression. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, to provide the clinical plastic surgeon with a working knowledge and understanding of the fields of genomics, microarrays, and bioinformatics and second, to present a case to illustrate how these technologies can be applied in the study of wound healing.

  8. Day-care hypospadias surgery: Single surgeon experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekharam V.V.S.S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the results of the early discharge of children after hypospadias repair with an indwelling catheter. Materials and Methods: To facilitate early the discharge of children after hypospadias repair, the author adopted the technique of draining the indwelling urinary catheter into diapers in children undergoing this operation. Home catheter care was taught to the mother; the dressings and catheters were subsequently managed in the outpatient clinic. Results: Over a 2-year period, 43 children were managed by this technique and were sent home within 24-48 h after the operation with an indwelling catheter. Minor problems requiring outpatient visits to the surgeon occurred in nine (20% children after discharge from the hospital. All the nine children were successfully managed as outpatients and no child required rehospitalisation. The catheter remained in position for 5 days in all the children. The overall results were satisfactory with an acceptable (7% fistula rate. Conclusions: It is possible to reduce the duration of the hospital stay of children after hypospadias repair without compromising on the final results.

  9. The Role of Plastic Surgeons in Advancing Development Global.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, P Niclas; Jenny, Hillary E; Ng-Kamstra, Joshua S; Juran, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    In September 2015, the international community came together to agree on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a plan of action for people, the planet, and prosperity. Ambitious and far-reaching as they are, they are built on three keystones: the elimination of extreme poverty, fighting climate change, and a commitment to fighting injustice and inequality. Critical to the achievement of the Agenda is the global realization of access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care when needed. The landmark report by the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery estimated that between 28 and 32 percent of the global burden of disease is amenable to surgical treatment. However, as many as five billion people lack access to safe, timely, and affordable surgical care, a burden felt most severely in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Surgery, and specifically plastic surgery, should be incorporated into the international development and humanitarian agenda. As a community of care providers dedicated to the restoration of the form and function of the human body, plastics surgeons have a collective opportunity to contribute to global development, making the world more equitable and helping to reduce extreme poverty. As surgical disease comprises a significant burden of disease and surgery can be delivered in a cost-effective manner, surgery must be considered a public health priority.

  10. Recognizing surgeon's actions during suture operations from video sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Ohya, Jun; Chiba, Toshio; Xu, Rong; Yamashita, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Because of the shortage of nurses in the world, the realization of a robotic nurse that can support surgeries autonomously is very important. More specifically, the robotic nurse should be able to autonomously recognize different situations of surgeries so that the robotic nurse can pass necessary surgical tools to the medical doctors in a timely manner. This paper proposes and explores methods that can classify suture and tying actions during suture operations from the video sequence that observes the surgery scene that includes the surgeon's hands. First, the proposed method uses skin pixel detection and foreground extraction to detect the hand area. Then, interest points are randomly chosen from the hand area so that their 3D SIFT descriptors are computed. A word vocabulary is built by applying hierarchical K-means to these descriptors, and the words' frequency histogram, which corresponds to the feature space, is computed. Finally, to classify the actions, either SVM (Support Vector Machine), Nearest Neighbor rule (NN) for the feature space or a method that combines "sliding window" with NN is performed. We collect 53 suture videos and 53 tying videos to build the training set and to test the proposed method experimentally. It turns out that the NN gives higher than 90% accuracies, which are better recognition than SVM. Negative actions, which are different from either suture or tying action, are recognized with quite good accuracies, while "Sliding window" did not show significant improvements for suture and tying and cannot recognize negative actions.

  11. Association of Surgeons in Training Conference: Cardiff 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, G; Wild, J R L; Fitzgerald, J E F

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is a professional body and registered charity working to promote excellence in surgical training for the benefit of junior doctors and patients alike. With a membership of over 2000 surgical trainees from all ten surgical specialities, the association provides support at both regional and national levels throughout the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. Originally founded in 1976, ASiT is independent of the National Health Service (NHS), Surgical Royal Colleges, and speciality associations. The 2012 Annual Conference in Cardiff City Hall brought together nearly 700 delegates for an educational weekend programme with expert guest speakers. Clinical updates were complimented by debates on current training in surgery, and the weekend included 6 pre-conference courses covering a diverse range of topics including laparoscopic skills, surgical drawing and a masterclass in journal club. A record number of 1168 abstract submissions were received and those successful competed for 18 awards representing £3500 in trainee prizes and bursaries. As the only national surgical trainee meeting for all specialities, ASiT continues to grow and we look forward to an even larger and more successful conference next year.

  12. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Talha Mufeed; Khan, Rabia; Batool, Kanza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of dental surgeons in the city of Karachi providing treatment to pediatric patients. A cluster-sampling technique was used and 200 dental surgeons from six different dental institutions were selected. A self-constructed questionnaire was distributed to the dental surgeons that comprised 20 closed-ended questions. The data was entered and analyzed for frequency and percentages by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19. The results showed that 76 (38%) dental surgeons took the responsibility of managing pediatric patient when given; 68 (34%) dental surgeons allowed the parents in the clinic; 111 (55.5%) dental surgeons are of the view that colorful and fun environment in dental clinic make the child at ease; 59 (29.5%) always demonstrate the dental procedure to the child to eradicate imaginary fears; 94 (47.0%) dental surgeons preferred the child to be treated in general anesthesia (GA) to avoid difficult behavior of the child; 135 (67.5%) dental surgeons did not show syringe needle or any instrument to the child. All the members of dental profession must be aware of patient perceptions, preferences, and fear to meet patient’s needs. Dental studies should include guidelines and techniques to train the upcoming dentists for excellent practice in pediatric dentistry. How to cite this article Wali A, Siddiqui TM, Khan R, Batool K. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Dental Surgeons in managing Child Patients. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):372-378. PMID:28127171

  13. Synthesis and characterisation of core-shell structures for orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusen, Edina; Zaharia, Cătălin; Zecheru, Teodora; Mărculescu, Bogdan; Filmon, Robert; Chappard, Daniel; Bădulescu, Roxana; Cincu, Corneliu

    2007-01-01

    This paperwork deals with the obtaining and characterisation of new acrylic cements for bone surgery. The final mixture of cement contains derivatives of methacryloyloxyethyl phosphate, methacrylic acid or 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid. The idea of using these monomers is sustained by their ability to form ionic bonds with barium, which is responsible for X-ray reflection and by the biocompatibility of these structures. The strategy consists in the obtaining of core-shell structures through heterogeneous polymerisation, which are used for final cement's manufacture. The orthopaedic cements were characterised by SEM, EDX, compression resistance and cytotoxicity assays.

  14. A Target-Orientated Marker Image Binarization Method for Orthopaedic Surgical Navigation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Shi-ju; CHEN Xiao-jun; WANG Cheng-tao; SU Ying-ying; XIA Qing

    2007-01-01

    Camera calibration is the key technique in a C-arm based orthopaedic surgical navigation system. The extraction of marker location information is a necessary step in the calibration process. Ideal marker images should possess uniform background and contain marker shadow only, but in fact marker images always possess nonuniform background and are contaminated by noise and unwanted anatomic information, making the extraction very difficult. A target-orientated marker shadow extraction method was proposed. With this method a proper threshold for marker image binarization can be determined.

  15. DIY 3D printing of custom orthopaedic implants: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Mark; Leach, William

    2014-03-01

    3D printing is an emerging technology that is primarily used for aiding the design and prototyping of implants. As this technology has evolved it has now become possible to produce functional and definitive implants manufactured using a 3D printing process. This process, however, previously required a large financial investment in complex machinery and professionals skilled in 3D product design. Our pilot study's aim was to design and create a 3D printed custom orthopaedic implant using only freely available consumer hardware and software.

  16. Adult onset primary focal dystonia of the foot: an orthopaedic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Loretta; Resseque, Barbara; Dontamsetti, Monica Sakshi

    2016-03-30

    A 54-year-old woman presented to a foot centre with a chief symptom of cramping in her toes, which, she believed, was of a secondary cause originating from a bunion. She was treated conservatively; however, she returned a month later as the symptoms had progressed to painful cramping of toes, toe-curling and instability while walking, due to involuntary movement of her toes. It was believed that the patient presented with a rare case of primary adult onset focal foot dystonia. This case report explains dystonia further in detail and delves into the different treatment and management options available today, including the unique orthopaedic intervention provided for this patient.

  17. Soft Tissue Structure Modelling for Use in Orthopaedic Applications and Musculoskeletal Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Audenaert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our methodology for the three-dimensional anatomical and geometrical description of soft tissues, relevant for orthopaedic surgical applications and musculoskeletal biomechanics. The technique involves the segmentation and geometrical description of muscles and neurovascular structures from high-resolution computer tomography scanning for the reconstruction of generic anatomical models. These models can be used for quantitative interpretation of anatomical and biomechanical aspects of different soft tissue structures. This approach should allow the use of these data in other application fields, such as musculoskeletal modelling, simulations for radiation therapy, and databases for use in minimally invasive, navigated and robotic surgery.

  18. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation: Guidelines on Colon Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Leddin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer affecting both men and women in Canada. Many of these cancers are preventable, and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation (CDHF strongly support the establishment of screening programs for colorectal cancer. These guidelines discuss a number of screening options, listing the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ultimately, the test that is used for screening should be determined by patient preference, current evidence and local resources.

  19. The Canadian Hypertension Education Program – a unique Canadian knowledge translation program

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Touyz, Rhian M.; Campbell, Norm RC

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian Hypertension Education Program annually appraises data from hypertension research and updates clinical practice recommendation for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Enormous effort is devoted to disseminating these recommendations to target groups throughout the country and, through the use of institutional databases, to evaluating their effectiveness in improving the health of Canadians by lowering blood pressure in people with hypertension. The mission of the Canadi...

  20. The effectiveness of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation screening in asymptomatic healthcare workers in an Irish orthopaedic unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Edmundson, S P

    2012-01-31

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are associated with increased mortality, costs and length of stay compared to non-MRSA infections. This observational 4-year study analyses the impact of screening and treating orthopaedic healthcare workers for MRSA colonisation. A total of 1,011 swabs were taken from 566 healthcare workers. Positive healthcare workers were treated with topical mupirocin to both anterior nares. The prevalence of MRSA colonisation on initial testing was 4.77%. The rate of positive MRSA colonisation of those tested on more than one occasion fell from 5.88% to 2.71% (p = 0.055) on subsequent screening. All healthcare workers receiving treatment were successfully cleared of colonisation; however, some required more than one course of treatment. These results show that there could be a role for screening and treating orthopaedic staff for MRSA colonisation as part of a strategy to reduce the prevalence of MRSA infections in orthopaedic units.

  1. Indigenous populations health protection: A Canadian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Katya L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disproportionate effects of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on many Canadian Aboriginal communities have drawn attention to the vulnerability of these communities in terms of health outcomes in the face of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Exploring the particular challenges facing these communities is essential to improving public health planning. In alignment with the objectives of the Pandemic Influenza Outbreak Research Modelling (Pan-InfORM team, a Canadian public health workshop was held at the Centre for Disease Modelling (CDM to: (i evaluate post-pandemic research findings; (ii identify existing gaps in knowledge that have yet to be addressed through ongoing research and collaborative activities; and (iii build upon existing partnerships within the research community to forge new collaborative links with Aboriginal health organizations. The workshop achieved its objectives in identifying main research findings and emerging information post pandemic, and highlighting key challenges that pose significant impediments to the health protection and promotion of Canadian Aboriginal populations. The health challenges faced by Canadian indigenous populations are unique and complex, and can only be addressed through active engagement with affected communities. The academic research community will need to develop a new interdisciplinary framework, building upon concepts from ‘Communities of Practice’, to ensure that the research priorities are identified and targeted, and the outcomes are translated into the context of community health to improve policy and practice.

  2. Canadian Ethnohistory: A Source for Social Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwire, Wendy

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of ethnohistory, a relatively new area of historical investigation that draws on anthropology, geography, and linguistics, as well as history, to document the pasts of predominantly indigenous peoples. Encourages social studies teachers to take notice of a major body of work being produced by Canadian ethnohistorians. (DSK)

  3. Who Are the Players in Canadian Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Geoffrey

    1987-01-01

    Labels range of persons advocating different theoretical positions of Canadian curriculum as "players." Describes players as "managers,""predictors,""transformers,""sleuths,""analysts." Values varied viewpoints for attention to language regarding curriculum, critical review of ideas/concepts, examination of current policies, awareness of history…

  4. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketovuori, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    This article is about a multidisciplinary R&D project in which a Canadian Learning Through The Arts (LTTA) program was imported to Finland in 2003-2004. Cultural differences in arts education in Finland and Canada are discussed. While Finland has a national school curriculum with all the arts included. Canada relies more on partnerships to…

  5. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five…

  6. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this journal's Fall 2009 issue, the Forum section included an article by Gordon Selman and Mark Selman arguing that although Canadian adult education had existed as a social movement in the middle part of the 20th century, it is no longer a social movement. They also speculated about the causes of this change. In the Spring 2011 issue, Tom…

  7. Canadian Children's Perceptions of Spirituality: Diverse Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelsey; Talwar, Victoria; Bosacki, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Few researchers have explored children's understandings of spirituality. Thus, Canadian children from different religious, spiritual and cultural backgrounds were asked open-ended questions concerning their spiritual thoughts, beliefs and experiences. Parents of participants completed a demographic questionnaire and reported children's religious…

  8. Canadian Perspectives on Equity in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlby, Brenda; Komlen, Mile

    2000-01-01

    Canadian school board administrators are increasingly expected to meet the needs of disabled or other students requiring specific types of accommodation. The duty to accommodate arises when otherwise legitimate school rules or policies affect the customs and observances of nonmajoritarian religions. (Contains 12 references.) (MLH)

  9. Asian and Pacific Migration: The Canadian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, T. John

    1994-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of landed immigrants (permanent settlers) from Asia, and explores their settlement, adaptation, and integration experience in Canada. It suggests that access to Canadian land does not always translate into equal opportunity in the economy and society, but notes that Canada may be more successful at assimilating Asian…

  10. Heat exposure in the Canadian workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2010-08-01

    Exposure to excessive heat is a physical hazard that threatens Canadian workers. As patterns of global climate change suggest an increased frequency of heat waves, the potential impact of these extreme climate events on the health and well-being of the Canadian workforce is a new and growing challenge. Increasingly, industries rely on available technology and information to ensure the safety of their workers. Current Canadian labor codes in all provinces employ the guidelines recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) that are Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) based upon Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT). The TLVs are set so that core body temperature of the workers supposedly does not exceed 38.0 degrees C. Legislation in most Canadian provinces also requires employers to install engineering and administrative controls to reduce the heat stress risk of their working environment should it exceed the levels permissible under the WBGT system. There are however severe limitations using the WGBT system because it only directly evaluates the environmental parameters and merely incorporates personal factors such as clothing insulation and metabolic heat production through simple correction factors for broadly generalized groups. An improved awareness of the strengths and limitations of TLVs and the WGBT index can minimize preventable measurement errors and improve their utilization in workplaces. Work is on-going, particularly in the European Union to develop an improved individualized heat stress risk assessment tool. More work is required to improve the predictive capacity of these indices.

  11. Family Business Training: A Canadian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A. B.; Soufani, K.; Lam, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Family firms play an important role in the working of the Canadian economy; despite their importance to the economic activities and job creation it is observed that family businesses have lower survival rates than non-family firms, some argue that this can possibly be attributed (amongst other factors) to the lack of training. Most of the training…

  12. Canadian suicide mortality rates: first-generation immigrants versus Canadian-born.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, J; Johansen, H; Nair, C; Nargundkar, M

    1990-01-01

    This article examines suicide mortality rates and trends in Canada for first-generation immigrants and the Canadian-born population. Data are analyzed by age, sex and country of birth. Since 1950, suicide rates worldwide for both men and women have been increasing. In North America and most of Europe, suicide has been one of the major causes of death for many years. In Canada, suicide rates are also rising. However, this increase is due entirely to a rise in the rate for men; the rate for women has remained relatively stable. Several differences are apparent between the rates for the Canadian-born population and those for first-generation immigrants. For example, three times as many Canadian-born men as women commit suicide. For first-generation immigrants, the ratio is two to one. Suicide mortality rates for the Canadian-born are higher than those for first-generation immigrants in every age group except for the 65 and over groups. Canadian born males have higher ASMR than first generation immigrant males. The rates for women show that first-generation immigrant women have higher suicide mortality rates than their Canadian-born counterparts, and that the highest rate for all women is for immigrants born in Asia.

  13. Current Practice Patterns Regarding the Conduct of Thyroidectomy and Parathyroidectomy amongst Surgeons - A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LR Henry, LB Helou, NP Solomon, A Chang, SK Libutti, A Stojadinovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heterogeneity of surgical care exists among surgeons regarding the conduct of thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy.Aim: To identify the current patterns of technical conduct of operation amongst surgeons performing thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy.Methods: A survey was designed and beta-tested on five surgical oncologists for face validity and usability. The final version of this survey was constructed and disseminated using the professional version of the internet-based survey mechanism Survey Monkey and consisted of two eligibility questions and 22 questions regarding thyroidectomy/parathyroidectomy treatment patterns. The survey was disseminated electronically to American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES and American College of Surgeons (ACS members. Survey results were collected, tabulated and analyzed. Responses among groups were compared using two sample T- tests. Significant responses were subsequently analyzed in generalized linear models to ascertain if significance remained with control of covariates.Results: Of 420 initial web survey visits, 236 (56.2% surveys were completed. The majority of respondents reported being 'fellowship trained', experienced and 'high-volume' surgeons. The most common fellowship trainings were endocrine (46%, oncology (22%, head & neck (13%, or combinations of the three fellowships (14%. Most surgeons reported that they dissect the course of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN without using neuromonitoring. Nearly a third of respondents reported routinely using the Harmonic scalpel during the conduct of the operations. Significant differences emerged regarding operative technique according to residency training type, fellowship training, surgeon volume, and practice setting, but only those associated with residency training type and annual surgeon surgical volume remained significant within generalized linear models.Conclusion: Most surgeons who responded to this survey do not routinely

  14. Pectus excavatum repair from a plastic surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabegger, Anton H

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE) or similar procedures for pectus excavatum (PE) repair, nowadays no longer performed by one single speciality, may not always achieve sufficient aesthetic results, particularly in the infrapectoral or infraxiphoidal region. Reasons for this include the diaphragm inhibiting correct positioning of the bars, as well as asymmetric deformities which may still be present after remodelling attempts. Furthermore, some cases develop a mild recurrence or partial concavity once the correction bar is removed. However, any secondary re-do MIRPE procedure remains risky because of adhesions between the pleura, lung, pericardium, thoracic wall as residuals from the primary intervention. Treatment options as secondary correction for these deformities may include open access surgery, resection or reshaping of deformed costal cartilage. Moreover, augmentation of a residual concave area can be achieved by autologous transplantation of resected over-abundant cartilage, as well as by liposhifting or implantation of customized alloplastics. A physician dealing with PE corrections should be familiar with various shaping and complementary reconstructive techniques in order to provide the best options for a variety of expressions of anterior wall deformities. Among treating surgeons, there is an awareness that no single method can be applied for every kind of funnel chest deformity. An appropriate technique, either as a single approach for the ordinary deformities or in conjunction with ancillary procedures for the intricate cases, should be selected carefully based on the heterogeneity of symptoms, severity, expectations and surgical skill in addition to the available equipment. Out of a variety of such ancillary procedures available and based on experience within general plastic reconstructive surgery, some techniques for PE repair are explained and illustrated here with their advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Mesh Plug Repair of Inguinal Hernia; Single Surgeon Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Serdar Karaca

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Mesh repair of inguinal hernia repairs are shown to be an effective and reliable method. In this study, a single surgeon%u2019s experience with plug-mesh method performs inguinal hernia repair have been reported. Material and Method: 587 patients with plug-mesh repair of inguinal hernia, preoperative age, body / mass index, comorbid disease were recorded in terms of form. All of the patients during the preoperative and postoperative hernia classification of information, duration of operation, antibiotics, perioperative complications, and later, the early and late postoperative complications, infection, recurrence rates and return to normal daily activity, verbal pain scales in terms of time and postoperative pain were evaluated. Added to this form of long-term pain ones. The presence of wound infection was assessed by the presence of purulent discharge from the incision. Visual analog scale pain status of the patients was measured. Results: 587 patients underwent repair of primary inguinal hernia mesh plug. One of the patients, 439 (74% of them have adapted follow-ups. Patients%u2019 ages ranged from 18-86. Was calculated as the mean of 47±18:07. Follow-up period of the patients was found to be a minimum of 3 months, maximum 55 months. Found an average of 28.2±13.4 months. Mean duration of surgery was 35.07±4.00 min (min:22mn-max:52mn, respectively. When complication rates of patients with recurrence in 2 patients (0.5%, hematoma development (1.4% in 6 patients, the development of infection in 11 patients (2.5% and long-term groin pain in 4 patients (0.9% appeared. Discussion: In our experience, the plug-mesh repair of primary inguinal hernia repair safe, effective low recurrence and complication rates can be used.

  16. Action ethical dilemmas in surgery: an interview study of practicing surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordam Ann

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to describe the kinds of ethical dilemmas surgeons face during practice. Methods Five male and five female surgeons at a University hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of physicians and nurses about ethically difficult situations in surgical units. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. Results No gender differences were found in the kinds of ethical dilemmas identified among male and female surgeons. The main finding was that surgeons experienced ethical dilemmas in deciding the right treatment in different situations. The dilemmas included starting or withholding treatment, continuing or withdrawing treatment, overtreatment, respecting the patients and meeting patients' expectations. The main focus in the narratives was on ethical dilemmas concerning the patients' well-being, treatment and care. The surgeons narrated about whether they should act according to their own convictions or according to the opinions of principal colleagues or colleagues from other departments. Handling incompetent colleagues was also seen as an ethical dilemma. Prioritization of limited resources and following social laws and regulations represented ethical dilemmas when they contradicted what the surgeons considered was in the patients' best interests. Conclusion The surgeons seemed confident in their professional role although the many ethical dilemmas they experienced in trying to meet the expectations of patients, colleagues and society also made them professionally and personally vulnerable.

  17. Understanding the culture of antimicrobial prescribing in agriculture: a qualitative study of UK pig veterinary surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. A.; Latham, S. M.; Williams, N. J.; Dawson, S.; Donald, I. J.; Pearson, R. B.; Smith, R. F.; Pinchbeck, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The use of antimicrobials in food-producing animals has been linked with the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial populations, with consequences for animal and public health. This study explored the underpinning drivers, motivators and reasoning behind prescribing decisions made by veterinary surgeons working in the UK pig industry. Methods A qualitative interview study was conducted with 21 veterinary surgeons purposively selected from all UK pig veterinary surgeons. Thematic analysis was used to analyse transcripts. Results Ensuring optimum pig health and welfare was described as a driver for antimicrobial use by many veterinary surgeons and was considered a professional and moral obligation. Veterinary surgeons also exhibited a strong sense of social responsibility over the need to ensure that antimicrobial use was responsible. A close relationship between management practices, health and economics was evident, with improvements in management commonly identified as being potential routes to reduce antimicrobial usage; however, these were not always considered economically viable. The relationship with clients was identified as being a source of professional stress for practitioners due to pressure from farmers requesting antimicrobial prescriptions, and concern over poor compliance of antimicrobial administration by some farmers. Conclusions The drivers behind prescribing decisions by veterinary surgeons were complex and diverse. A combination of education, improving communication between veterinary surgeons and farmers, and changes in regulations, in farm management and in consumer/retailer demands may all be needed to ensure that antimicrobial prescribing is optimal and to achieve significant reductions in use. PMID:27516473

  18. The impact of ice-skating injuries on orthopaedic admissions in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dillon, J P

    2012-02-03

    Since the opening of a temporary ice-rink in our hospital\\'s catchment area, we have observed an increase in patients requiring in-patient treatment for orthopaedic intervention. The authors performed a prospective analysis of all patients admitted to our unit over a one-month period. Epidemiological data, wearing of protective gear and skater experience were collected. Fracture type, treatment required, average length of hospital stay and number of days missed from work was also recorded. Ice-skating injuries accounted for 7.7% of our total admissions over the study period. There was a significant variation noted in the types of fracture sustained ranging from comminuted fractures of the radial head to spiral fractures of the tibia. The average length of hospital stay was 2.6 days and average time missed from work was 6.1 weeks. This paper highlights the potential serious injuries that can occur in ice-skating and their impact on admissions to our orthopaedic unit.

  19. Orthopaedic Aspects of Marfan Syndrome: The Experience of a Referral Center for Diagnosis of Rare Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando De Maio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1. The most important features affect the cardiovascular system, eyes, and skeleton. The aim of this study was to report the most frequent musculoskeletal alterations observed in 146 patients affected by Marfan syndrome. Fifty-four patients (37% underwent cardiac surgery and 11 of them received emergent surgery for acute aortic dissection. Ectopia lentis was found in 68 patients (47% whereas myopia above 3D occurred in 46 patients (32%. Musculoskeletal anomalies were observed in all patients with Marfan syndrome. In 88 patients (60.2%, the associated “wrist and thumb sign” was present; in 58 patients (39.7%, pectus carinatum deformity; in 44 patients (30.1%, pectus excavatum; in 49 patients (33.5%, severe flatfoot; in 31 patients (21.2%, hindfoot deformity; in 54 patients (36.9%, reduced US/LS ratio or increased arm span-height ratio; in 37 patients (25.3%, scoliosis or thoracolumbar kyphosis; in 22 patients (15%, reduced elbow extension (170° or less. Acetabular protrusion was ascertained on radiographs in 27 patients (18.4%. Orthopaedic aspects of the disease are very important for an early diagnosis; however, we have not observed definite correlations between the extent of orthopaedic involvement and aortic complications.

  20. Orthopaedic Aspects of Marfan Syndrome: The Experience of a Referral Center for Diagnosis of Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichera, Alessandro; De Luna, Vincenzo; Mancini, Federico; Caterini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). The most important features affect the cardiovascular system, eyes, and skeleton. The aim of this study was to report the most frequent musculoskeletal alterations observed in 146 patients affected by Marfan syndrome. Fifty-four patients (37%) underwent cardiac surgery and 11 of them received emergent surgery for acute aortic dissection. Ectopia lentis was found in 68 patients (47%) whereas myopia above 3D occurred in 46 patients (32%). Musculoskeletal anomalies were observed in all patients with Marfan syndrome. In 88 patients (60.2%), the associated “wrist and thumb sign” was present; in 58 patients (39.7%), pectus carinatum deformity; in 44 patients (30.1%), pectus excavatum; in 49 patients (33.5%), severe flatfoot; in 31 patients (21.2%), hindfoot deformity; in 54 patients (36.9%), reduced US/LS ratio or increased arm span-height ratio; in 37 patients (25.3%), scoliosis or thoracolumbar kyphosis; in 22 patients (15%), reduced elbow extension (170° or less). Acetabular protrusion was ascertained on radiographs in 27 patients (18.4%). Orthopaedic aspects of the disease are very important for an early diagnosis; however, we have not observed definite correlations between the extent of orthopaedic involvement and aortic complications. PMID:28050285

  1. Prevalence and effect of myths in clinical orthopaedics in Western part of Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Vashisht

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Myths in the field of medicine regarding the treatment of health problems are frequently observed, which may not only retard the recovery but often be harmful for the patients. We were baffled to see lot of patients under the influence of certain myths about treatment of their orthopaedic ailments. The aim of this observational, prospective study was to dispel the misconceptions and to create awareness in the society about the bad effects of these myths. Methods: 1285 patients aged 20-55 years, suffering from fractures, neck pain, backache, osteoarthritis knee, myofascial trigger points, episacroiliac lipomas etc. and being under the influence of one or the other myth about the treatment of their ailments, were included in this study. Results: All Patients were counseled and made to realize the harmful effects of their false beliefs regarding treatment of their orthopaedic ailments. Every patient was treated as necessitated for the ailment. All patients were found satisfied at the end of treatment, and were happy after dispelling their myths. Conclusions: Misconceptions do not have any scientific basis rather these are rooted in the society due to high rate of illiteracy and lack of health education. Being a part and parcel of the health care system, it becomes our duty to create awareness among patients about the harmful effects of the prevailing false beliefs by imparting proper health care advice and treatment to relieve the sufferings of our patients. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2197-2201

  2. Muscle activation and cutaneous reflex modulation during rhythmic and discrete arm tasks in orthopaedic shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundza, Sandra R; Zehr, E Paul

    2007-05-01

    In orthopaedic shoulder instability, muscle activity (EMG) is altered during unconstrained discrete arm movement tasks (e.g. elevation against a load). These findings have been ascribed to deficits in afferent feedback and neural control with glenohumeral instabilities resulting from orthopaedic injury. However, the integrity of neural control during shoulder movements in those with unstable shoulders is unclear. It is not known if there are altered EMG patterns during rhythmic arm movement or during discrete tasks involving no load, as would be experienced in many arm motions performed in daily living. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate neural control of arm movements between those with unstable shoulders and control participants, within a constrained arm movement paradigm involving both rhythmic arm cycling and discrete reaching. To achieve this objective, we determined if the amplitude and timing of EMG related to the movement pattern (background EMG) was significantly different between groups. Cutaneous reflexes were used to simulate a perturbation to the upper limb that would typically evoke a coordinated response. In the elevation phase of the movement path for anterior and posterior deltoid, upper trapezius, infraspinatus and serratus anterior, background EMG during rhythmic arm cycling was significantly (24%, p EMG between the groups during the discrete task. Significant differences (p EMG and the cutaneous reflexes patterns in those with shoulder instabilities suggest that neural control is altered during rhythmic movement.

  3. How to Study Biofilms after Microbial Colonization of Materials Used in Orthopaedic Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Lorenzo; Agrappi, Serse; Bortolin, Monica; Toscano, Marco; Romanò, Carlo Luca; De Vecchi, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, various techniques have been proposed for the quantitative evaluation of microbial biofilms. Spectrophotometry after crystal violet staining is a widespread method for biofilm evaluation, but several data indicate that it does not guarantee a good specificity, although it is rather easy to use and cost saving. Confocal laser microscopy is one of the most sensitive and specific tools to study biofilms, and it is largely used for research. However, in some cases, no quantitative measurement of the matrix thickness or of the amount of embedded microorganisms has been performed, due to limitation in availability of dedicated software. For this reason, we have developed a protocol to evaluate the microbial biofilm formed on sandblasted titanium used for orthopaedic implants, that allows measurement of biomass volume and the amount of included cells. Results indicate good reproducibility in terms of measurement of biomass and microbial cells. Moreover, this protocol has proved to be applicable for evaluation of the efficacy of different anti-biofilm treatments used in the orthopaedic setting. Summing up, the protocol here described is a valid and inexpensive method for the study of microbial biofilm on prosthetic implant materials. PMID:26927075

  4. Fracture liaison service in a non-regional orthopaedic clinic--a cost-effective service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmed, M

    2012-01-01

    Fracture liaison services (FLS) aim to provide cost-effective targeting of secondary fracture prevention. It is proposed that a dedicated FLS be available in any hospital to which a patient presents with a fracture. An existing orthopaedic clinic nurse was retrained to deliver a FLS. Proformas were used so that different nurses could assume the fracture liaison nurse (FLN) role, as required. Screening consisted of fracture risk estimation, phlebotomy and DXA scanning. 124 (11%) of all patients attending the orthopaedic fracture clinic were reviewed in the FLS. Upper limb fractures accounted for the majority of fragility fractures screened n=69 (55.6%). Two-thirds of patients (n=69) had reduced bone mineral density (BMD). An evidence based approach to both non-pharmacological and pharmacotherapy was used and most patients (76.6%) receiving pharmacotherapy received an oral bisphosphonate (n=46). The FLS has proven to be an effective way of delivering secondary prevention for osteoporotic fracture in a non-regional fracture clinic, without increasing staff costs.

  5. Comparison of temperament and character profiles of anesthesiologists and surgeons : a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra S

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the high levels of stress in anesthesiologists and also their close working liaison with surgeons, it may be worthwhile to compare the personality profiles of these two groups of professionals. AIM: To compare the personality profiles of surgeons and anesthesiologists, using a well-standardized and validated instrument. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Survey (cross-sectional on surgeons and anesthesiologists working in several medical institutes in India. MATERIAL & METHODS: The self-report Temperament and Character Inventory, 125-item version (TCI-125 was mailed out to an incidental sample of surgeons and anesthesiologists working in medical institutes in India. Of the 200 questionnaires sent (100 to anesthesiologists and surgeons each, 93 completed responses were returned (46 anesthesiologists, 47 surgeons; return rate 46.5%. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Student′s unpaired ′t′ test; P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The mean scores of anesthesiologists vis-a-vis surgeons on the various temperament dimensions were Novelty seeking: 8.6 vs. 9.2; Harm avoidance: 7.3 vs. 8.1; Reward dependence: 8.1 vs. 8.0; and Persistence: 3.0 vs. 3.1, respectively. Similar scores for the character dimensions were Self-directedness: 16.9 vs. 15.9; Cooperativeness: 17.5 vs. 16.5; and Self-transcendence: 7.0 vs. 6.7, respectively. There was no significant difference between the surgeons and anesthesiologists on any of the temperament and character variables of personality chosen for the study. CONCLUSION: Personality measures did not differ significantly between surgeons and anesthesiologists in this preliminary investigation. If replicated on a larger and more representative sample, the findings have clinical relevance to improve the working relationship between these two groups of closely working professionals.

  6. Reliable assessment of general surgeons' non-technical skills based on video-recordings of patient simulated scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Dieckmann, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Nontechnical skills are essential for safe and efficient surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an assessment tool for surgeons' nontechnical skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk (NOTSSdk), and the effect of rater training.......Nontechnical skills are essential for safe and efficient surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an assessment tool for surgeons' nontechnical skills, Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons dk (NOTSSdk), and the effect of rater training....

  7. Are surgical scrubbing and pre-operative disinfection of the skin in orthopaedic surgery reliable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, M; Chelo, C; Caputo, F; Conte, M; Fontana, C; Peddis, G; Velluti, C

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to establish the actual effectiveness of pre-surgical disinfection of the patient and surgeon's hands. We evaluated bacterial density and composition on the skin of 15 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy and the left hand of two surgeons after standard disinfection with povidone-iodine. Three samples were taken after the first 6-min scrub in the first surgical operation from the periungual space of the 1 degrees finger, from the interdigital space between the 2 degrees and 3 degrees fingers and from the transverse palmar crest of the left hand of two surgeons for seven consecutive surgical sessions, for a total of 42 samples, and two samples from the pre-patellar skin and from the popliteal skin of 15 patients undergoing knee arthroscopy, for a total of 30 samples. Pre-surgical handwashing and disinfection procedures were identical in each case. Pre-surgical disinfection of the patient's skin with povidone-iodine was shown to be completely effective, with 100% of samples negative. Samples taken from the interdigital space and the palmar crest (100% of samples negative) demonstrated the efficacy of disinfection of the surgeon's hands with povidone-iodine, while the periungual space was contaminated in 50% of the samples. The bacterial strains isolated belong to the staphylococcus genus in 100% of the cases, with pathogenic strains in 29.6% of the cases. Standard pre-surgical disinfection of skin in areas easily accessible to the disinfectant is sufficient in itself to guarantee thorough sanitization. Standard scrubbing of the surgeon's hands is insufficient in eliminating bacterial contamination, including pathogenic germs, in the periungual space, where it is probably difficult for the disinfectant to come into contact with the skin.

  8. Bacterial contamination of surgeons' gloves during shunt insertion; a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Preben; Ejlertsen, Tove; Aaen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    antibiotics and double gloving, by surgeons experienced in shunt surgery. Surgical incision, dissection and tunnelling were done. Then the surgeon, the scrub-nurse and, in three cases, the assistant made an imprint of their outer gloves on agar plates. Hereafter, they changed the outer pair of gloves before...... cultured from gloves in all 10 operations and coagulase-negative Staphylococci were found in eight operations. These results are preliminary, but nevertheless they are alarming. Despite the use of recommended precautions to avoid infections we found that a substantial numbers of gloves from surgeon, scrub...

  9. [Coats of arms of the Amsterdam Surgeons' Guild in the dome of the Anatomy Theatre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gulik, Thomas M; Ijpma, Frank F A; Middelkoop, Norbert E

    2014-01-01

    In 1731, Cornelis Troost (1696-1750) painted three wardens of the surgeons' guild in Amsterdam. We know their names from the family coats of arms shown on the wall behind them. The same coats of arms and names are painted in the dome of the Anatomy Theatre in the 'Waag', the former weighing house at the Nieuwmarkt in Amsterdam, which also housed the board room of the surgeons' guild. The 84 coats of arms in the beautifully restored dome are a testimony of the rich history of the surgeons' guild.

  10. The Renaissance and the universal surgeon: Giovanni Andrea Della Croce, a master of traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Tarabella, Vittorio; Filardo, Giuseppe; Viganò, Anna; Tomba, Patrizia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2013-12-01

    All the medical knowledge of all time in one book, the universal and perfect manual for the Renaissance surgeon, and the man who wrote it. This paper depicts the life and works of Giovanni Andrea della Croce, a 16th Century physician and surgeon, who, endowed with true spirit of Renaissance humanism, wanted to teach and share all his medical knowledge through his opus magnum, titled "Universal Surgery Complete with All the Relevant Parts for the Optimum Surgeon". An extraordinary book which truly represents a defining moment and a founding stone for traumatology, written by a lesser known historical personality, but nonetheless the Renaissance Master of Traumatology.

  11. Implementation and evaluation of a novel research education rotation for Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons emergency medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Laban, Riyad B; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Newton, Lana; Chung, Brian

    2013-07-01

    Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (RCPS) emergency medicine (EM) residents must complete a scholarly project; however, significant variation exists in Canadian EM resident research education and facilitation. We developed and implemented a novel mandatory research education rotation for RCPS EM residents intended to increase knowledge, faculty/resident collaborations, and, ultimately, scholarly output. This 4-week rotation took place in the fall of 2011 and consisted of 37 faculty-led didactic, critical appraisal, and workshop seminars. Exposure to faculty research and resulting opportunities and the development of resident research projects were integrated into the rotation. Twelve participating residents completed daily evaluations and took part in an exit focus group analyzed using a constant comparative method. Knowledge acquisition was assessed with a pre/post comprehensive examination instrument evaluated by a paired t-test. Evaluations indicated generally high satisfaction throughout the rotation. Focus group analysis indicated that residents felt two important but competing goals existed: developing a research project and developing critical appraisal skills. The research knowledge of all participants improved significantly (mean/SD examination change +35.4%/+10.4%, range +20.0% to +53.6%, p < 0.001), and several new resident/faculty research collaborations arose from the rotation. A rotation of this nature is an efficient and effective means to increase research and critical appraisal knowledge and faculty/resident collaborations. As a result of our positive experience, the rotation will continue annually and has been expanded to include pediatric EM fellows. Longitudinal tracking of the participating trainee cohort will remain ongoing to assess the scholarly output impact of the rotation.

  12. Seeing Oneself in a Book: The Changing Face of Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Fayjean, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Takes a look at children's literature over time, and its recent emergence as a respected body of literary work. Discusses what is Canadian about Canadian children's literature. Annotates six picture books. Notes that Canadian literature reflects the diversity of the Canadian population, the vast differences in the Canadian landscape, and the…

  13. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  14. Canadian petroleum history bibliography. Release update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2010-01-07

    The petroleum history bibliography was created over several years as a record dedicated to preserving the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. It comprises a list of more than 5000 publications, including books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles and stories of the many companies that have come and gone. It aims to include all publications and audio visual products from the Social Sciences and Humanities on company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry and humour. An author index is included. Most government documents are excluded as they are accessible through Library and Archives Canada. This bibliography is an ongoing piece of work, and welcomes any additions relating to the study and preservation of Canadian petroleum industry history.

  15. Webpages on copyright in Canadian academic libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony G Horava

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic libraries value the web as being a vital channel for communicating information and policies to their user community. Designing a webpage on copyright is a challenging task that requires a consideration of the medium and the message. This article proposes a conceptual model and proactive approach for integrating policy objective and goals into the development of a copyright webpage, based on key elements of the library’s involvement in academia. To complement this theoretical approach, an analysis of Canadian academic library websites was conducted in order to gage the effectiveness of copyright webpages, in the Canadian legal context, according to the model as well as related design issues of visibility and access.

  16. Cation Exchange Resins and colonic perforation. What surgeons need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rita Rodríguez-Luna

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Despite the low incidence of colonic complication and lethal colonic necrosis associated with the CER clinical use, the general surgeon needs a high index of suspicion when dealing with patients treated with CER and abdominal pain.

  17. My Family Health Portrait, A tool from the Surgeon General | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. My Family Health Portrait, A tool from the Surgeon General ... use Why is it important to know my family medical history? Your family medical history is a ...

  18. [The Journey of a Surgeon Begins with a Camera-Holder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui

    2016-06-20

    The techniques of thoracic surgery has undergone evolutionary changes, and currently video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has already been or is going to be the predominant procedure of various thoracic surgeries. The safe and artistic VATS with high quality is closely associated with the cooperation of camera-holder and the surgeon. If an excellent thoracotomy is the result of perfect integral cooperation of the brain, eyes, hands and the body of the surgeon, the camera-holder in VATS procedure, then, is responsible for the eyes of both the surgeons and himself. This is more meticulous and difficult than that for a single person's brain, eyes, hands and body. Meanwhile, an excellent camera-holder will undoubtedly become an excellent surgeon in the foreseeable future.

  19. Psychological and physical stress among experienced and inexperienced surgeons during laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail;

    2012-01-01

    : Surgical procedures are mentally and physically demanding, and stress during surgery may compromise patient safety. We investigated the impact of surgical experience on surgeons' stress levels and how perioperative sleep quality may influence surgical performance....

  20. Recurrences and Ongoing Complaints of Diverticulitis; Results of a Survey among Gastroenterologists and Surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, M. A W; Draaisma, W. A.; Consten, E. C J; Broeders, I. A M J

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the current opinion of gastroenterologists and surgeons on treatment strategies for patients, with recurrences or ongoing complaints of diverticulitis. Background: Treatment of recurrences and ongoing complaints remains a point of debate. No randomized trial