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Sample records for canadian nuclear fuel

  1. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1983 are described in this report

  2. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the status of the research and development program, under rsponsibility of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), for assessing the concept of nuclear fuel waste disposal deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A passive multi-barrier concept has been adopted for disposal that combines the containment provided by the structural, hydraulic and geochemical characteristics of the rock mass with a series of engineered barriers. The conceptual disposal vault consists of an array of disposal rooms excavated in plutonic rock at a depth between 500 and 1000 m. Prior to disposal, the waste would be placed in cylindrical containers surrounded by a buffer, which is a mixture of bentonite cla and sand. The rooms would be backfilled with mixture of clay, and crushed granite or san. Bulkheads would seal the entrances. Closure would be achieved by backfilling the access tunnels in the same manner as the rooms and than backfilling the shafts with compacted clay and crushed granite separated by a series of supporting bulkheads. Very preliminary results from the case study indicate that the good rock provides the most effective barrier to movement of radionuclides to the surface. The most significant pathways through the geosphere involve diffusion through the good rock to the major fracture intersecting the vault, convection upward along the fracture, and discharge either at topographic lows or through a domestic water supply well used by the critical group. Long-lived non-sorbing radionuclides, available in the gaps between the fuel pellets and the fuel cladding or at the grain boundaries, contribute most to the radiological dose. With appropriate constraints on the location of the waste packages relative to the major fracture zones, radiological risk is expected to satisfy the regulatory criteria. (H.W.) 5 figs

  3. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction; used fuel storage and transportation; immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste; geoscience research related to deep underground disposal; environmental research; and environmental and safety assessment

  4. What Canadians say about management of used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the canadian public attitudes towards management of used nuclear fuels. The approach adopted is ground in values and ethics such as safety, responsibility, adaptability, stewardship, accountability and transparency, knowledge and inclusion, respect for life and future generations, as well as justice and sensitivity to difference

  5. Status of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fifth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The major objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are well established

  6. Documentation and post-irradiation examination of Canadian nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadian nuclear fuels includes fuels irradiated in CANDU power stations by our utilities and experimental fuels irradiated in the AECL-RC research reactors. Both types of fuel are documented with fabrication records, irradiation histories and power burnup logs. Many of these documents are generated by computer allowing individual fuel bundles and elements to be tracked from their delivery at the reactor to their final storage. Post-irradiation examination of our fuels takes place in underwater bays near the reactors and in shielded hot cells at AECL-Research Company (AECL-RC) laboratories using specialized equipment and techniques. Included in the fuel inspection procedures is a computer file for keeping examination records and a quality control system for shielded cell work. Most of the techniques, systems, codes and equipment used in documentation and in post-irradiation examination are illustrated in the report by three actual fuel irradiations, an experimental test in our research reactors, high burnup fuel from the Bruce reactor and fuel from a failed Pickering fuel channel

  7. Nuclear fuel waste disposal: The Canadian consultative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past two decades society has demanded more public participation and public input into decision-making governments. Accordingly, development of the Canadian concept for deep geological disposal of used nuclear fuel has taken into account the requirements for social acceptability as well as technical excellence. As the agency responsible for developing the disposal concept, AECL Research, the research and development arm of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., has included, in its program, consultation with the various publics that have an interest in the concept. This interactive and consultative process, which has been underway for some 14 years, has attempted to ensure that the public has had the opportunity to become familiar with the technical development of the concept and to provide input into it. This process will continue throughout the concept assessment and review currently in progress

  8. Corrosion of copper under Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion of copper was studied under Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal conditions. The groundwater in a Canadian waste vault is expected to be saline, with chloride concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0 mol/l. The container would be packed in a sand/clay buffer, and the maximum temperature on the copper surface would be 100C; tests were performed up to 150C. Radiation fields will initially be around 500 rad/h, and conditions will be oxidizing. Sulfides may be present. The minimum design lifetime for the container is 500 years. Most work has been done on uniform corrosion, although pitting has been considered. It was found that the rate of uniform corrosion in aerated NaCl at room temperature is limited by the rate of the anodic reaction, which is controlled mainly by the rate of transport of dissolved metal species away from the copper surface. The rate of corrosion should become controlled by the transport of oxygen to the copper surface only at very low oxygen concentrations. In the presence of gamma radiation the corrosion rate may never become cathodically transport limited. In compacted buffer material, the corrosion rate appears to be limited by the rate of transport of copper species away from the corroding surface. The authors recommend that long-term predictions of container lifetime should be based on the known rate-determining step for the overall corrosion process. 8 refs

  9. Vault submodel for the second interim assessment of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences to man and the environment of the disposal of nuclear fuel waste are being studied within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The concept being assessed is that of a sealed disposal vault at a depth of 1000 m in plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. To determine the consequences, the vault and its environment are simulated using a SYstem Variability Analysis Code (SYVAC), a stochastic model of the disposal system. SYVAC contains three submodels that represent the three major parts of the disposal system: the vault, the geosphere and the biosphere. This report documents the conceptual and mathematical framework of the vault submodel

  10. Guide to the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program. 2.ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the administrative structure and major research and development components of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It outlines the participating organizations, summarizes the program statistics, and describes the international cooperation and external review aspects of the program

  11. Second interim assessment of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel waste disposal concept chosen for development and assessment in Canada involves the isolation of corrosion-resistant containers of waste in a vault located deep in plutonic rock. As the concept and the assessment tools are developed, periodic assessments are performed to permit evaluation of the methodology and provide feedback to those developing the concept. The ultimate goal of these assessments is to predict what impact the disposal system would have on man and the environment if the concept were implemented. The second assessment was performed in 1984 and is documented in the Second Interim assessment of the Canadian Concept for Nuclear Fuel Waste Disposal Volumes 1 to 4. This volume, entitled Summary, is a condensation of Volumes 2, 3 and 4. It briefly describes the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal concept, and the methods and results of the second interim pre-closure and post-closure assessments of that concept. 46 refs

  12. Microbial studies in the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for permanent geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste in Canada. An accelerated program was initiated in 1991 to address and quantify the potential effects of microbial action on the integrity of the disposal concept's multiple barrier system. This microbial program focuses on answering specific questions in areas such as the survival of bacteria in compacted clay-based buffer materials under relevant radiation and desiccation conditions; mobility of microbes in compacted buffer materials; the potential for microbially-influenced corrosion of containers; microbial gas production in backfill material; introduction of nutrients as a result of vault excavation and operation; the presence and activity of microbes in deep granitic groundwaters; and the effects of biofilms on radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This paper summarizes the current research activities at AECL in these areas. (author)

  13. Human health considerations in the assessment of Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1978, AECL was mandated by the government of Ontario and the federal government to find a permanent disposal solution for spent nuclear fuels. Canada opted for disposal in plutonic rocks of the Canadian shield. The Canadian concept calls for disposal in crystalline rocks at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the surface. The spent fuel would be contained in a canister, the canister would be emplaced in a vault containing clay-based buffer materials, and the cavity would be backfilled and sealed with natural materials. A Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel was formed in 1992 to assess the concept for disposal of the spent fuel. In this paper a brief discussion of the human health impacts of the proposed concept is presented. Our assessment is based on the information provided by AECL, namely, the main EIS document, a summary and nine other supporting documents

  14. Second interim assessment of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel waste disposal concept chosen for development and assessment in Canada involves the burial of corrosion-resistant containers of waste in a vault located deep in plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. As the concept and the assessment tools are developed, periodic assessments are performed to permit evaluatin of the methodology and provide feedback to those developing the concept. The ultimate goal of these assessments is to predict what impact the disposal system would have if the concept were implemented. The second assessment was performed in 1984 and is documented in Second Interim Assessment of the Canadian Concept for Nuclear Fuel Waste Disposal - Volumes 1 to 4. This volume, entitled Background, discusses Canadian nuclear fuel wastes and the desirable features of a waste disposal method. It outlines several disposal options being considered by a number of countries, including the option chosen for development and assessment in Canada. The reference disposal systems assumed for the second assessment are described, and the approach used for concept assessment is discussed briefly. 79 refs

  15. Post-closure assessment for a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal involves emplacement in a crystalline rock formation in the Canadian Shield. The concept is now being assessed generically. Processes within the vault, the geologic formation and the biosphere are being analyzed by field and laboratory research, and predictive mathematical models. Information from these analyses is being incorporated into a system simulation employing lumped-parameter models of the processes, coupled to yield an estimate of risk for the overall concept in the post-closure phase. The uncertainties in parameters are accounted for by performing a Monte Carlo calculation with the coupled models to give a probability/consequence risk analysis. Results demonstrate that the approach adopted provides a suitable framework for establishing the acceptability of a nuclear waste disposal concept, including a systematic treatment of the uncertainties

  16. Microbial studies in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of the high level radioactive waste is an issue which generates Multifaceted conflicts. These conflicts are multi-determined, but are nonetheless, based on a myriad of associated concerns including but not exclusive to: effects of radiation on public health and safety, uncertainty associated with long-term assessments and effects, confidence in technology and in government and industry to protect public health and safety, and concerns regarding concurrent and intergenerational equity. These concerns are likely to be deeply felt by the many potential actors and stakeholders who will be impacted during the process of site selection for a nuclear waste disposal facility. Because this site selection is sure to be a controversial undertaking, it is in the interests of those who wish to promote the use of the high-level radioactive waste disposal concept, to understand fully the potential for conflict and consider alternative means of proactively preventing and/or resolving conflicts

  17. Second interim assessment of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel waste disposal concept chosen for development and assessment in Canada involves the isolation of corrosion-resistant containers of waste in a vault located deep in plutonic rock. As the concept and the assessment tools are developed, periodic assessments are performed to permit evaluation of the methodology and provide feedback to those developing the concept. The ultimate goal of these assessments is to predict what impact the disposal system would have on man and the environment if the concept were implemented. The second such assessment was completed in 1984 and is documented in the Second Interim Assessment of the Canadian Concept for Nuclear Fuel Waste Disposal - Volumes 1-4. This, the third volume of the report, summarizes the pre-closure environmental and safety assessments completed by Ontario Hydro for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The preliminary results and their sigificance are discussed. 85 refs

  18. Second interim assessment of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel waste disposal concept chosen for development and assessment in Canada involves the isolation of corrosion-resistant containers of waste in a vault located deep in plutonic rock. As the concept and the assessment tools are developed, periodic assessments are performed to permit evaluation of the methodology and provide feedback to those developing the concept. The ultimate goal of these assessments is to predict what impact the disposal system would have on man and the environment if the concept were implemented. The second such assessment was performed in 1984 and is documented in the Second Interim Assessment of the Canadian Concept for Nuclear Fuel Waste Disposal - Volumes 1-4. This volume, entitled Post-Closure Assessment, describes the methods, models and data used to perform the second post-closure assessment. The results are presented and their significance is discussed. Conclusions and planned improvements are listed. 72 refs

  19. Natural analogs in support of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of the long-term safety and performance of the Canadian concept for disposal of nuclear fuel waste is a unique and challenging undertaking, because the predictions have to be made for time periods in the range of 104 to 106 a into the future. The data used for the assessment modelling is in large part based on observations from short-term laboratory and field experiments. Natural analogs can provide a reference for the safety assessment, providing both useful data and a qualitative illustration of the interaction of processes and materials in complex natural systems. This report reviews the available natural analog information used in support of the Canadian concept, with particular emphasis on the disposal of used CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) fuel. The introduction gives a definition of natural analogs and an overview of the various types of analogs and analog studies. The review is broken down into sections pertaining to the major components of the disposal system: the vault, the geosphere and the biosphere. Specific examples are given for each. In addition, a section deals with several comprehensive natural systems that contain a number of features and processes similar to the disposal concept and that are under study by a number of countries as part of their waste management programs. (author). 224 refs., 11 tabs., 2 figs

  20. A summary of the program and progress to 1984 December of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fifth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1984 are described in this report. 74 refs

  1. Microbial issues pertaining to the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research is developing a concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel has issued a set of guidelines to be used by AECL Research in preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for this concept. These guidelines require that the EIS address a number of microbiological factors and their potential to affect the integrity of the multiple barrier system on which the disposal concept is based. This report formulates a number of views and positions on microbiological factors that could influence the performance of a disposal vault in plutonic rock. Microbiological factors discussed include the presence and survival of microbes, biofilms, corrosion, biodegradation (of emplaced materials), gas production, geochemical changes, radionuclides migration, colloid formation, mutation, pathogens and methylation. Not all issues can be fully resolved with the current state of knowledge. Studies being performed to underscore and strengthen current knowledge are briefly discussed. (author). 92 refs., 1 tab

  2. Progress in welding studies for Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the progress in the development of closure-welding technology for Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. Titanium, copper and Inconel 625 are being investigated as candidate materials for fabrication of these containers. Gas-tungsten-arc welding, gas metal-arc-welding, resistance-heated diffusion bonding and electron beam welding have been evaluated as candidate closure welding processes. Characteristic weldment properties, relative merits of welding techniques, suitable weld joint configurations and fit-up tolerances, and welding parameter control ranges have been identified for various container designs. Furthermore, the automation requirements for candidate welding processes have been assessed. Progress in the development of a computer-controlled remote gas-shielded arc welding system is described

  3. Potential effects of climatic change on radiological doses from disposal of Canadian nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental assessment of deep geologic disposal of Canadian nuclear fuel waste considers many processes that could affect radionuclide transport to humans over thousands of years. Climatic change is an important feature that will occur over these long times. Glaciation will likely occur within the next 100,000 years over much of Canada, and its impact on radiological doses has been assessed previously. In the present study, we investigate the potential effect of short- term climatic change, usually associated with global warming caused by increases in atmospheric trace gases. We study the main biosphere transport pathways causing a radiological dose to humans from 129I, which is the most important radionuclide in disposal of Canadian used nuclear fuel. Irrigation of a garden with contaminated well water is the main pathway and it can be affected by changes in temperature and precipitation. A cold, wet climate decreases the need for irrigation, and this decreases the radiological dose. A drastic climatic change, such as an increase in temperature from 10 to 20 degrees C and decrease in precipitation from 0.3 to 0.2 m during the growing season, is estimated to increase the dose by a factor of four. This is a relatively small change compared to the range of doses that arise from the variability and uncertainty in many of the parameters used in the environmental assessment models. Therefore, it is likely that the results of probabilistic dose assessment models can include the consequences of short-term climatic change. 39 refs., 3 figs

  4. The potential for microbial life in a Canadian high-level nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies have concluded that microbial contamination of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault is inevitable. Factors that will affect the development of substantial population of micro-organisms include: physiological tolerance of microbes; fluid movement in a vault; availability of nutrients; and availability of energy sources. It is difficult to resolve whether microbial growth will either positively or negatively affect the performance of a vault. One of the necessary steps towards ultimately answering this question is to assess the potential for microbial growth in a disposal vault, based on a nutrient and energy budget. This report gives a quantitative (but conservative) inventory of nutrients and potential energy sources present in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste vault, which hypothetically could support the growth of micro-organisms. Maximum population densities are calculated based on these inventories and assuming that all conditions for microbial growth are optimal, although this will certainly not be the case. Laboratory studies under the vault-relevant conditions are being performed to put realistic boundaries on the calculated numbers. Initial results from these studies, combined with data from a natural analogue site indicate that the calculated population densities could be overestimated by four to five orders of magnitude. Limited data show no effect of the presence of microbes on the transport of Tc, I, and Sr in backfill sand columns. Additional work is needed to address transport effects on buffer and backfill clay columns

  5. The Canadian approach to site characterization for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of deep disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock. One of the main objectives of the geoscience research programme is to develop and evaluate methods for characterizing potential disposal sites to assess their long term safety. Demonstrations of the successful use of site characterization methods and the successful application of predictive models to real situations are an important component of the programme. A comparison of structural interpretations, based on surface mapping and gravity modelling, with the results from cored boreholes in a gabbroic pluton showed that there was reasonable agreement and that inferences about gross characteristics were not changed substantially when detailed mapping followed reconnaissance mapping. A more complex comparison of groundwater response in the volume of rock surrounding the shaft of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory, as simulated by a three-dimensional groundwater flow model, with measured responses at 171 measuring points during shaft construction showed a generally good agreement. The rate of groundwater inflow to the shaft was overpredicted by a factor of three. (author)

  6. The potential of wind energy to largely displace existing Canadian fossil fuel and nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of wind-generated electricity to displace existing fossil fuel and nuclear generation in Canada is assessed by combining wind turbine power curves with data from the Canadian Wind Energy Atlas. There are many widely-scattered regions with capacity factors (average power output as a fraction of the rated output) greater than 0.4, and some greater than 0.5, that could supply many times the current electricity production from fossil fuel and nuclear powerplants in Canada. By linking multiple high-wind regions to the major demand centres with high voltage direct current transmission lines, the variation in the aggregate electricity output at time scales of one week or less would be greatly reduced, while variations at longer time scales can be largely offset through anti-phase operation of hydro-electric reservoirs. Assuming onshore and offshore wind farm capital costs of about $2000/kW and $3000/kW, respectively, onshore and offshore transmission line costs of $0.5/kW/km and $0.75/kW/km, respectively, and terminal costs of $250/kW, the cost of electricity (financed at a real interest rate of 3%/yr) is 5–7 cents/kWh, which is less than the likely cost of electricity from new coal powerplants equipped to capture CO2 (at least 9 cents/kWh) or from new nuclear powerplants (10–23 cents/kWh). - Highlights: ► Regions of strong wind are widely distributed across Canada. ► Wind combined with hydropower could displace fossil and nuclear. ► Costs including HVDC transmission would be 5–7 cents/kWh at 3% financing

  7. Characteristics of used CANDU fuel relevant to the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Literature data on the characteristics of used CANDU power reactor fuel that are relevant to its performance as a waste form have been compiled in a convenient handbook. Information about the quantities of used fuel generated, burnup, radionuclide inventories, fission gas release, void volume and surface area, fuel microstructure, fuel cladding properties, changes in fuel bundle properties due to immobilization processes, radiation fields, decay heat and future trends is presented for various CANDU fuel designs. (author). 199 refs., 39 tabs., 100 figs

  8. Scenario analysis for the postclosure assessment of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research has developed and evaluated a concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste involving deep underground disposal of the waste in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. The postclosure assessment of this concept focusses on the effects on human health and the environment due to potential contaminant releases into the biosphere after the disposal vault is closed. Both radiotoxic and chemically toxic contaminants are considered. One of the steps in the postclosure assessment process is scenario analysis. Scenario analysis identifies factors that could affect the performance of the disposal system and groups these factors into scenarios that require detailed quantitative evaluation. This report documents a systematic procedure for scenario analysis that was developed for the postclosure assessment and then applied to the study of a hypothetical disposal system. The application leads to a comprehensive list of factors and a set of scenarios that require further quantitative study. The application also identifies a number of other factors and potential scenarios that would not contribute significantly to environmental and safety impacts for the hypothetical disposal system. (author). 46 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs., 2 appendices

  9. Canadian fuel development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU power reactor fuel has demonstrated an enviable operational record. More than 99.9% of the bundles irradiated have provided defect-free service. Defect excursions are responsible for the majority of reported defects. In some cases research and development effort is necessary to resolve these problems. In addition, development initiatives are also directed at improvements of the current design or reduction of fueling cost. The majority of the funding for this effort has been provided by COG (CANDU Owners' Group) over the past 10 to 15 years. This paper contains an overview of some key fuel technology programs within COG. The CANDU reactor is unique among the world's power reactors in its flexibility and its ability to use a number of different fuel cycles. An active program of analysis and development, to demonstrate the viability of different fuel cycles in CANDU, has been funded by AECL in parallel with the work on the natural uranium cycle. Market forces and advances in technology have obliged us to reassess and refocus some parts of our effort in this area, and significant success has been achieved in integrating all the Canadian efforts in this area. This paper contains a brief summary of some key components of the advanced fuel cycle program. (Author) 4 figs., tab., 18 refs

  10. Nuclear fuel activities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel activities in Canada are considered in the presentation on the following directions: Canadian utility fuel performance; CANDU owner's group fuel programs; AECL advanced fuel program (high burnup fuel behaviour and development); Pu dispositioning (MOX) activities. 1 tab

  11. Second annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, the second of a series of annual reports, reviews in general terms the progress which has been achieved in the research and development program for the safe, permanent disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. The report summarizes activities over the past year, in the areas of public interaction, used fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of used fuel and fuel reprocessing wastes, research and development associated with deep underground disposal, and environmental and safety assessment. (auth)

  12. Third annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, the third of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. The report summarizes activities over the past year, in the areas of public interaction, irradiated fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of irradiated fuel and fuel recycle wastes, research and development associated with deep underground disposal, and environmental and safety assessment

  13. Fourth annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, the fourth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction, used fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste, geoscience research associated with deep underground disposal, environmental research, environmental and safety assessment

  14. Canadian used fuel disposal concept review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A federal government environmental assessment review of the disposal concept developed under the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is currently underway. The Canadian concept is, simply stated, the placement of used fuel (or fuel waste) in long-lived containers at a depth between 500 m and 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited submitted an Environmental Impact Statement in 1994 and the public hearing aspect of the concept review is in its final phase. A unique aspect of the Canadian situation is that government has stipulated that site selection can not commence until the concept has been approved. Hence, the safety and acceptability of the concept is being reviewed in the context of a generic site. Some comments and lessons learned to date related to the review process are discussed. (author)

  15. Microbially influenced corrosion of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the potential for microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a Canadian disposal vault is presented. The assessment is based on a consideration of the microbial activity within a disposal vault, the reported cases of MIC of Cu alloys in the literature and the known corrosion behaviour of Cu. Because of the critical role of biofilms in the reported cases of MIC, their formation and properties are discussed in detail. Next, the literature on the MIC of Cu alloys is briefly reviewed. The various MIC mechanisms proposed are critically discussed and the implications for the corrosion of Cu containers considered. In the majority of literature cases, MIC depends on alternating aerated and deaerated environments, with accelerated corrosion being observed when fresh aerated water replaces stagnant water, e.g., the MIC of Cu-Ni heat exchangers in polluted seawater and the microbially influenced pitting of Cu water pipes. Finally, because of the predominance of corrosion by sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the MIC literature, the abiotic behaviour of Cu alloys in sulphide solutions is also reviewed. The effect of the evolving environment in a disposal vault on the extent and location of microbial activity is discussed. Biofilm formation on the container surface is considered unlikely throughout the container lifetime, but especially initially when the environmental conditions will be particularly aggressive. Microbial activity in areas of the vault away from the container is possible, however. Corrosion of the container could then occur if microbial metabolic by-products diffuse to the container surface. Sulphide, produced by the action of SRB are considered to be the most likely cause of container corrosion. It is concluded that the only likely form of MIC of Cu containers will result from sulphide produced by SRB diffusing to the container surface. A modelling procedure for predicting the extent of corrosion is

  16. First annual report of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development program for the safe, permanent disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes has been established. This report, the first of a series of annual reports, reviews in general terms the progress which has been achieved. After briefly reviewing the rationale and organization of the program, the report summarizes activities in the area of public information, used fuel storage and transportation, immobilization of used fuel and fuel reprocessing wastes, research and development associated with deep underground disposal, and environmental and safety assessment. (auth)

  17. Canadian power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following subjects are covered: the basic CANDU fuel design, the history of the bundle design, the significant differences between CANDU and LWR fuel, bundle manufacture, fissile and structural materials and coolants used in the CANDU fuel program, fuel and material behaviour, and performance under irradiation, fuel physics and management, booster rods and reactivity mechanisms, fuel procurement, organization and industry, and fuel costs. (author)

  18. The potential for stress corrosion cracking of copper containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper nuclear fuel waste containers in a conceptual Canadian disposal vault has been assessed through a review of the literature and comparison of those environmental factors that cause SCC with the expected disposal environment. Stress-corrosion cracking appears to be an unlikely failure mode for Cu containers in a Canadian disposal vault because of a combination of environmental factors. Most importantly, there is only a relatively short period during which the containers will be undergoing strain when cracking should be possible at all, and then cracking is not expected because of the absence of known SCC agents, such as NH3, NO2- or organic acids. In addition, other environmental factors will mitigate SCC, namely, the presence of C1- and its effect on film properties and the limited supply of oxidants. These arguments, to greater or lesser extent, apply to the three major mechanisms proposed for SCC of Cu alloys in aqueous solutions: film-rupture/anodic dissolution, tarnish rupture and film-induced cleavage. Detailed reviews of the SCC literature are presented as Appendices. The literature on the SCC of Cu (>99 wt.% Cu) is reviewed, including studies carried out in a number of countries under nuclear waste disposal conditions. Because of similarities with the behaviour of Cu, the more extensive literature on the SCC of α-brass in ammonia solutions is also reviewed. (author). 140 refs., 3 tabs., 25 figs

  19. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 15. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the 15. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society cover a wide range of nuclear topics, but the emphasis is on CANDU reactors and Canadian experience. The 89 papers are arranged in 17 sessions dealing with the following subjects: thermalhydraulics, fuel channels, operations, reactor physics, fuel, new technology, safety, training, waste management. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  20. Considerations in managing the assessment of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that in developing a concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste, AECL has faced challenges because the acceptability of the concept must be established before a site is selected, no agency has been made responsible for implementing the concept if it is selected, and many stakeholders in the review must be satisfied if the concept is to be accepted. The challenges have thus far been met by a program that is well-integrated technically and administratively. However, interactions with stakeholders reviewing the concept present a problem in communication. The authors believe the nature of the nuclear fuel waste disposal issue calls for a cooperative rather than an adversarial approach to problem solving to efficiently deal with the requirements of all the stakeholders

  1. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 12. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the seventeen Technical Sessions from the Twelfth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society held in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, June 9 to 12, 1991. As in previous years, the Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society was held in conjunction with the Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. The major topics of discussion included: reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components; safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining processing

  2. The Canadian nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the Canadian nuclear power program is presented. Domestically developed CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactors account for all of Canada's nuclear electric capacity (5000 MWe in operation and 10,000 MWe under construction or in commissioning) and have also been exported. CANDU reactors are reliable, efficient, and consistently register in the world's top ten in performance. The safety record is excellent. Canada has excess capability in heavy water and uranium production and can easily service export demands. The economic activity generated in the nuclear sector is high and supports a large number of jobs. The growth in nuclear commitments has slowed somewhat as a result of the worldwide recession; however, the nuclear share of expected electricity demand is likely to continue to rise in the next decade. Priorities in the future direction of the program lie in the areas of maintaining high response capability to in-service problems, improving technology, high-level waste management, and advanced fuel cycles. (author)

  3. Conference summaries of the Canadian Nuclear Association 30. annual conference, and the Canadian Nuclear Society 11. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 30. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 11. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: energy needs and challenges facing the Canadian nuclear industry; the environment and nuclear power; the problems of maintaining and developing industrial capacity; the challenges of the 1990's; programmes and issues for the 1990's; thermalhydraulics; reactor physics and fuel management; nuclear safety; small reactors; fuel behaviour; energy production and the environment; computer applications; nuclear systems; fusion; materials handling; and, reactor components

  4. The potential for vault-induced seismicity in nuclear fuel waste disposal: experience from Canadian mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A seismic event which causes damage to an underground opening is called a rockburst. Practical experience indicates that these damaging seismic events are associated with deep mines where extraction ratios are greater than 0.6. For the arrangement being considered by AECL for nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults, extraction ratios, for the room and pillar design, will be less than 0.3. At this extraction ratio the stress magnitudes will not be sufficient to induce seismic events that can damage the underground openings. Documented world-wide experience shows that unless the underground opening is very close to the source of a naturally occurring seismic event, such as an earthquake, the opening will also not experience any significant damage. Backfilling a disposal vault will improve its resistance to earthquake damage. Backfilling a disposal vault will also reduce the total convergence of the openings caused by thermal loads and hence minimize the potential for thermally-induced seismic events. (author)

  5. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  6. Canadian fusion fuels technology project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project was launched in 1982 to coordinate Canada's provision of fusion fuels technology to international fusion power development programs. The project has a mandate to extend and adapt existing Canadian tritium technologies for use in international fusion power development programs. 1985-86 represents the fourth year of the first five-year term of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP). This reporting period coincides with an increasing trend in global fusion R and D to direct more effort towards the management of tritium. This has resulted in an increased linking of CFFTP activities and objectives with those of facilities abroad. In this way there has been a continuing achievement resulting from CFFTP efforts to have cooperative R and D and service activities with organizations abroad. All of this is aided by the cooperative international atmosphere within the fusion community. This report summarizes our past year and provides some highlights of the upcoming year 1986/87, which is the final year of the first five-year phase of the program. AECL (representing the Federal Government), the Ministry of Energy (representing Ontario) and Ontario Hydro, have given formal indication of their intent to continue with a second five-year program. Plans for the second phase will continue to emphasize tritium technology and remote handling

  7. The role of colloids and suspended particles in radionuclide transport in the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research is developing a concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste in a deep engineered vault in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield and is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to document its case for the acceptability of the disposal concept. This report, one in a series of supporting documents for the EIS, addresses the role of particles in radionuclide transport. It summarizes our studies of natural particles in groundwater and presents the arguments used to justify the omission of particle-facilitated transport in the geosphere model that is based on the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) and used in the postclosure assessment study case. Because radiocolloids formed in the vault will not be able to migrate through the clay buffer, radiocolloid formation in the geosphere will be determined by the sorption of radionuclides onto particles in groundwater. These particles consist of typical fracture-lining minerals, such as clays, micas and quartz; precipitated particles, such as colloidal silica and Fe-Si oxyhydroxides; and organic particles. In groundwater from the WRA, the average concentrations of colloids and suspended particles are 0.34 and 1.4 mg/L respectively. Particle-facilitated transport is not included in the geosphere model because the concentrations of particles in groundwater from the WRA are too low to have a significant impact on radionuclide transport. (author). 92 refs., 11 tabs., 13 figs

  8. Nuclear regulation - the Canadian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the Atomic Energy Control Board was established 35 years ago the basic philosophy of nuclear regulation in Canada and the underlying principles of the regulatory process remain essentially unchanged. This paper outlines the Canadian approach to nuclear regulation and explains in practical terms how the principles of regulation are applied. (author)

  9. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society sixth annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the Sixth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society comprise 103 papers on the following subjects: fuel technology, nuclear plant safety, instrumentation, public and regulatory matters, fusion, fuel behaviour under normal and accident conditions, nuclear plant design and operations, thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, accelerators, waste management, new reactor concepts

  10. Advanced containment research for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document outlines the program on the development of advanced containment systems for the disposal of used fuel in a vault deep in plutonic rock. Possible advanced containment concepts, the strategy adopted in selecting potential container materials, and experimental programs currently underway or planned are presented. Most effort is currently directed toward developing long-term containment systems based on non-metallic materials and massive metal containers. The use of additional independent barriers to extend the lifetime of simple containment systems is also being evaluated. 58 refs

  11. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

  12. 'When you use the term 'long term', how long is that term'. Risk, Exclusion, and the Politics of Knowledge Production in Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Policy Making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk operates within Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste (NFW) management policy making as a heuristic for knowledge production about its effects which reconciles the knowledge of the nuclear industry with the outcomes of the NFW management process. In so doing it marginalizes the present and historical experiences of Aboriginal peoples with the nuclear industry, and removes from view the ways in which they have been implicated in the geography and political economy of the nuclear industry. Risk is a discursive form that protects a particular group's claims about the effects of NFW by providing it a universalizing epistemological structure with which to obscure its connection to context. Further risk discourse provides the nuclear industry with a conceptual vocabulary that deliberately casts all competing knowledge as perceptions, values, or as an object of inquiry. The arguments of Aboriginal peoples about the residual effects of radiation in their lands which hosted nuclear activities, such as uranium mining and disposal, have no representation in how the discourse of risk defines and represents knowledge, and thus no purchase in the policy debate. As a result the challenge they present to the nuclear industry's claims are contained. The arrangements which permit the unloading of the negative effects of nuclear power generation onto Aboriginal peoples are thus reproduced (both materially and conceptually), but not shown, by the policy making process and likely, its outcome. In order to raise critical questions about the democratic abilities of risk, this paper has examined the role of 'risk' in Canadian NFW policy making. I have shown how when the politics of knowledge production within the philosophy of risk is analyzed, and the use and role of the notion of risk are interrogated, difficult questions are posed for the democratic potential of risk. I have suggested, through an analysis of the NWMO's representations of Aboriginal content in their process, that in this

  13. Proceedings of the seventeenth annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventeenth annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, presented in Fredericton, New Brunswick. The conference includes papers on general topics of interest on the nuclear community, waste management and the environment, instrumentation and design of Candu reactors, safety analysis, thermal hydraulics, fuel channels, plant operations and in-core instrumentation

  14. Nuclear communications : A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Times have changed since the early days of nuclear energy when it was a symbol of a brave new world, Public information strategies have evolved to meet increasing public concerns, and have shifted from being a largely unfocused attempt at publicity to being more concerned with managing issues and solving problems. This paper describes some of the salient features of the Canadian experience in nuclear communications and examines four key aspects: opinion and attitude research; media relations; coeducation; and advertising. It also addresses the challenge of responding to the allegations and tactics of those who are actively hostile to nuclear energy, and recommends that the principles of Total Quality Management and of organizational effectiveness be applied more thorough and more consistently to the public affairs function

  15. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association 34. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the thirty-fourth annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association contain 23 complete papers and three speeches organized in the following sessions: opening, plenary, new environmental regulations and their effect on the energy industry, CANDU update, life cycle management of nuclear power plants, evolution of nuclear technology, technologies for tomorrow, nuclear used fuel and disposal of low-level waste, world economics and energy consumption. The complete papers have been abstracted separately

  16. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are necessary. The solution of the capital risk for the construction of the second reprocessing plant is the main problem. Japan must develop waste disposal techniques with all-out efforts. (Kako, I.)

  17. Canadian CANDU fuel development programs and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the performance and operating experience of CANDU fuel in Canadian CANDU reactors in 1999 and 2000. The extremely low rate of fuel defects continues to demonstrate that CANDU fuel is performing exceptionally well. Over the 2-year period, the fuel bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, between 0.011% (suspected defects) and 0.007% (confirmed defects). On a fuel element basis, this represents a rate of confirmed defects of about 0.0002%; this rate is approaching 2 defects per million fuel elements! This successful performance is the result of a number of contributing factors, including a simple and robust fuel design with conservative design margins, reliable and specialized manufacturing processes that have been developed over the years, and fuel operations that conform to the fuel operating limits. Strong linkages between plant operation, designers, and Canadian fuel research and development programs also contribute to the high performance of the current CANDU fuel. The Fuel Design and Performance program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, addresses licensing and operational issues that are common to the Canadian CANDU utilities. In addition, AECL's Fuel and Fuel Cycles working group directs R and D to support evolutionary improvements to the fuel products, as well as longer-term R and D for advanced fuel concepts. This paper describes the development programs in 1999/2000. (author)

  18. Canadian CANDU fuel development programs and recent fuel operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the performance and operating experience of CANDU fuel in Canadian CANDU reactors in 1999 and 2000. The extremely low rate of fuel defects continues to demonstrate that CANDU fuel is performing exceptionally well. Over the 2-year period, the fuel bundle defect rate for all bundles irradiated in Canadian CANDU reactors has remained very low, between 0.011% (suspected defects) and 0.007% (confirmed defects). On a fuel element basis, this represents a rate of confirmed defects of about 0.0002%; this rate is approaching 2 defects per million fuel elements. This successful performance is the result of a number of contributing factors, including a simple and robust fuel design with conservative design margins, reliable and specialized manufacturing processes that have been developed over the years, and fuel operations that conform to the fuel operating limits. Strong linkages between plant operation, designers, and Canadian fuel research and development programs also contribute to the high performance of the current CANDU fuel. The Fuel Design and Performance program, funded by the CANDU Owners Group, addresses licensing and operational issues that are common to the Canadian CANDU utilities. In addition, AECL's Fuel and Fuel Cycles working group directs R and D to support evolutionary improvements to the fuel products, as well as long-term R and D for advanced fuel concepts. This paper describes the development programs in 1999/2000. (author)

  19. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All stages of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed with respect to the present situation and future perspectives of supply and demand of services; the prices and the unitary cost estimation of these stages for the international fuel market are also mentioned. From the world resources and projections of uranium consumption, medium-and long term analyses are made of fuel availability for several strategies of use of different reactor types. Finally, the cost of nuclear fuel in the generation of electric energy is calculated to be used in the energetic planning of the electric sector. (M.A.)

  20. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under

  1. How Canadians feel about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey conducted by Decima Research in April 1989 showed that 50% of Canadians were somewhat or strongly in favour of nuclear energy, the percentage varying from 37% in British Columbia to 65% in Ontario. A majority (56%) questioned the nuclear industry's ability to handle its waste safely, but 45% believed that it was working hard to solve the problem. It was evident that an advertising campaign by the Canadian Nuclear Association had an effect

  2. Semi-annual status report of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, April 1--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, E.D. [comp.

    1992-02-01

    This report is the eleventh in a series of semi-annual status reports on the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. it describes progress achieved in the three major subprograms, engineered systems, natural systems and performance assessment, from 1991 April 1 to September 30. It also gives a brief description of the activities being carried out in preparation for the public and governmental review of the disposal concept. Since 1987, this program has been jointly funded by AECL and Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group (COG).

  3. Finally, nuclear engineering textbooks with a Canadian flavour!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for nuclear engineering textbooks more appropriate to the Canadian nuclear industry context and the CANDU nuclear reactor program has long been felt not only among the universities offering nuclear engineering programs at the graduate level, but also within the Canadian nuclear industry itself. Coverage of the CANDU reactor system in the textbooks presently supporting teaching is limited to a brief description of the concept. Course instructors usually complement these textbooks with course notes written from their personal experience from past employment within the nuclear industry and from their research interests In the last ten years, the Canadian nuclear industry has been involved on an increasing basis with the issue of the technology transfer to foreign countries which have purchased CANDU reactors or have been in the process of purchasing one or several CANDUs. For some of these countries, the 'turn key' approach is required, in which the Canadian nuclear industry looks after everything up to the commissioning of the nuclear power plant, including the education and training of local nuclear engineers and plant personnel. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in particular has dispatched some personnel tasked to prepare and give short courses on some specific aspects of CANDU design and operation, but a lack of consistency was observed as different persons prepared and gave the courses rather independently. To address the many problems tied with nuclear engineering education, the CANTEACH program was set up involving major partners of the Canadian nuclear industry. Parts of the activities foreseen by CANTEACH consist in the writing of nuclear engineering textbooks and associated computer-based pedagogical material. The present paper discusses the main parts of two textbooks being produced, one in reactor physics at steady state and the other on nuclear fuel management. (author)

  4. Proceedings of the 32. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference proceedings comprise 34 papers, arranged under the following sessions: Plenary; The international CANDU program; Canadian used fuel management program; Public information advocates; Fuel and electricity supply; In which direction should reactors advance?; Canadian advanced nuclear research programs; International cooperation in operations; Safety in design, operation, regulation; Renovation of operating stations; CNS/CNA luncheon addresses. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  5. The Canadian fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the sixth in the series of annual reports on the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes progress in 1984 for the following activities: storage and transportation of used fuel, immobilization of nuclear fuel waste, geotechnical research, environmental research, and environmental and safety assessment. 186 refs

  6. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a period of about 10 years AECL had a significant program looking into the possibility of developing U3Si as a high density replacement for the UO2 pellet fuel in use in CANDU power reactors. The element design consisted of a Zircaloy-clad U3Si rod containing suitable voidage to accommodate swelling. We found that the binary U3Si could not meet the defect criterion for our power reactors, i.e., one month in 300 degree C water with a defect in the sheath and no significant damage to the element. Since U3Si could not do the job, a new corrosion resistant ternary U-Si-Al alloy was developed and patented. Fuel elements containing this alloy came close to meeting the defect criterion and showed slightly better irradiation stability than U3Si. Shortly after this, the program was terminated for other reasons. We have made much of this experience available to the Low Enrichment Fuel Development Program and will be glad to supply further data to assist this program

  7. The Canadian approach to nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the Canadian nuclear power safety philosophy and practice is traced from its early roots at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory to the licensing of the current generation of power reactors. Basic to the philosophy is a recognition that the primary responsibility for achieving a high standard of safety resides with the licensee. As a consequence, regulatory requirements have emphasized numerical safety goals and objectives and minimized specific design or operating rules. The Canadian licensing process is described along with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered. Examples of specific licensing considerations for each phase of a project are included

  8. Fuel condition in Canadian CANDU 6 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cornerstone of the CANDU concept is its natural uranium fuel, and the success of its reactor operation hinges on the fuel condition in the reactor. Neutron economy, on power refuelling, and simple fuel design are among the unique characteristics of CANDU fuel. In Canadian CANDU 6 reactors (Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau), the 37-element fuel has provided an enviable record of safe, economic and reliable plant operation for 29 reactor years to date. The fuelling cost is among the lowest in the world - a corollary of high neutron economy, simple fuel design, and judicial fuelling scheme. The reliability of fuel is high: only 21 of the 60000 bundles discharged from Gentilly 2 were confirmed defective and the five-year period from March 1992 to February 1997 saw no defect at all at Gentilly-2. Also, thanks to the inherent on-power refuelling capability and an effective defect detection and removal system, the primary coolant loops are kept extremely clean (very low activity level) - benefiting both maintenance and safety. Moreover, the inventories of fission products in the core and in the channel are maintained within the safety analysis envelope, due to on-power fuelling and sophisticated fuel management. In this paper, CANDU 6 fuel performance is reviewed against the feedback from post-irradiation examinations, and the findings from our ongoing R and D program. The results suggest that the fuel behavior m reactor are basically as originally anticipated, despite an evolutionary 3% increase in bundle uranium mass in the 1980's. For operating conditions within the CANDU 6 37-element experience, the average strains are typically 0.09%; and fission gas release, 2.7%. The UO2 fuel remains stoichiometric after irradiation. In-core measurements of pressure tube fitting are generally low. All these observations are consistent with the excellent fuel performance statistics coming out of the two Canadian CANDU 6 reactors. Additionally, this paper will briefly discuss our

  9. Nuclide inventory for nuclear fuel waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assist research projects in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Prgram, a compilation has been made of all the nuclides that are likely to be present in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault and that are potentially hazardous to man during the post-closure phase. The compilation includes radiologically toxic and chemically toxic nuclides

  10. Development of a fuel performance model for evaluating conceptual Th-based Canadian SCWR fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel assembly for the Canadian Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR) is in the conceptual design phase. The proposed fuel pellets are made of ceramic Th-Pu mixed oxide ((Th,Pu)O2). Neutronics and thermal hydraulics calculations are being undertaken by the nuclear industry to optimize the fuel assembly within a pressure tube. The SCWR working group shave established two conceptual fuel element designs (outer diameter, fuel composition, cladding material, exit burnup etc.) within an assembly for performance assessment. A detailed fuel element performance assessment under in-reactor conditions could be used to determine cladding material thickness/suitability and to optimize the fuel pellet geometry. This work reports the development of a fuel performance model to predict the behaviour of the Canadian SCWR fuel using the finite element method. An initial approach is to develop a thorium-uranium mixed-oxide ((Th,U)O2) model.Preliminary results from this model agree with fuel irradiation data . Uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel, under the same conditions, is also being modeled and compared. A plan to model (Th, Pu)O2 SCWR fuel is briefly presented here. (author)

  11. The Canadian nuclear scene - a 1983 perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the previous year's performance and future prospects for the Canadian nuclear industry. Continued economic difficulties have meant continued streamlining of the industry. Basic strength is still the year-after-year record performance of the Ontario Hydro CANDU units. Given this performance, flexibility in the structure of the industry, and strong government support commercial success can be achieved eventually

  12. Assessment of the long-term risks of inadvertent human intrusion into a proposed Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in deep plutonic rock -revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada has conducted an extensive research program on a concept of safe disposal of nuclear fuel wastes deep In plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. An essential goal of this program has been to develop and demonstrate a methodology to evaluate the performance of the facility against safety criteria established by Canada's regulatory agency, the Atomic Energy Control Board. These criteria are expressed in terms of risk, where risk is defined as the sum, over all significant scenarios, of the product of the probability of the scenario, the magnitude of the resultant dose, and the probability of a health effect per unit dose. This report describes the methodology developed to assess the long-term risk from inadvertent human intrusion into such a facility, and the results of its application to the proposed facility. Four intrusion scenarios were analysed, all initiated by a drilling operation. These scenarios are exposure of a member of the drilling crew, of a technologist conducting a core examination, of a construction worker and of a resident. The consequence of each scenario was estimated using standard computer codes for environmental pathways analysis and radiation dosimetry. For comparison with the risk criterion, an estimate of the probability of each scenario is also required. An event-tree methodology was used to estimate these probabilities. The estimated risks from these intrusion scenarios are several orders of magnitude below the established risk criterion. The event-tree methodology has the advantages of explicity displaying the assumptions made, of permitting easy testing of the sensitivity of the risk estimates to assumptions, and of combining technical and sociological information. (author). 53 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs

  13. Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project was formally established in 1982. The project is directed toward the further development of Canadian capabilities in five major areas: tritium technology, breeder technology, materials technology, equipment development and safety and the environment. The project is funded by three partners - Government of Canada (50%), Ontario Provincial Government (25%) and Ontario Hydro (25%). The fiscal year 1984/85 represents the third year of operation of the project. In 1984/85, 108 contracts were awarded totalling $4 million. Supplementary funding by subcontractors added approximately $1.9 million to the total project value. More than 200 people participated in the technical work involved in the project. Sixteen people were on attachment to foreign facilities for terms ranging from 1 month to 2.5 years. Five patents were applied for including a tritium discrimination monitor, a new radio-chemical tritium separation method, a new variation of fuel cleanup by gas chromatography, a passive tritium permeation system using bimetallic membranes, and a new breeder process using lithium salts dissolved in heavy water

  14. Proceedings of the 11th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the thirteen technical sessions at the 11. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. The 68 papers presented at this conference cover the areas of programmes and issues for the 90's; thermalhydraulics; reactor physics and fuel management; nuclear safety; small reactors; fuel behaviour; energy production and the environment; computer applications; nuclear systems; fusion; reactor decommissioning, irradiated fuel and materials handling; and reactor components, (L.L.)

  15. Forecasting Canadian nuclear power station construction costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the huge volume of capital required to construct a modern electric power generating station, investment decisions have to be made with as complete an understanding of the consequences of the decision as possible. This understanding must be provided by the evaluation of future situations. A key consideration in an evaluation is the financial component. This paper attempts to use an econometric method to forecast the construction costs escalation of a standard Canadian nuclear generating station (NGS). A brief review of the history of Canadian nuclear electric power is provided. The major components of the construction costs of a Canadian NGS are studied and summarized. A database is built and indexes are prepared. Based on these indexes, an econometric forecasting model is constructed using an apparently new econometric methodology of forecasting modelling. Forecasts for a period of 40 years are generated and applications (such as alternative scenario forecasts and range forecasts) to uncertainty assessment and/or decision-making are demonstrated. The indexes, the model, and the forecasts and their applications, to the best of the author's knowledge, are the first for Canadian NGS constructions. (author)

  16. The Canadian nuclear power industry. Background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power, the production of electricity from uranium through nuclear fission, is by far the most prominent segment of the nuclear industry. The value of the electricity produced, $3.7 billion in Canada in 1992, far exceeds the value of any other product of the civilian nuclear industry. Power production employs many more people than any other sector, the capital investment is much greater, and nuclear power plants are much larger and more visible than uranium mining and processing facilities. They are also often located close to large population centres. This paper provides an overview of some of the enormously complex issues surrounding nuclear power. It describes the Canadian nuclear power industry, addressing i particular its performance so far and future prospects. (author). 1 tab

  17. The selection and use of a sorption database for the geosphere model in the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensively characterized intrusive granitic formation, the Lac du Bonnet batholith, is being used as a test case for environmental and safety assessment calculations of the impact of a hypothetical disposal vault. The conceptual vault has dimensions of 2 x 2 km and is located at a depth of 500 m, near the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE) (CANADA). Hydraulic investigations of the batholith have shown that the bulk of the groundwater flow will be limited to the existing network of water-bearing fractures. Groundwater flow and contaminant transport modelling is based on a porous-medium concept for both the fracture systems and the rock matrix. Geochemical investigations have identified a number of alteration minerals in these fracture systems. The geochemistry encountered along the flow field is too complex to allow the interaction of radionuclides with the geological material to be represented by a single sorption coefficient for each radionuclide on a single rock type. However, the level of understanding of radionuclide interaction with geological materials is not sufficiently well developed to calculate radionuclide transport using models based on chemical thermodynamics or on advanced sorption models based on surface complexation or mass action. Instead, a parametric model has been developed using the total dissolved solids and radionuclide concentrations as independent variables. The mineralogical complexity of the flow field is addressed by selecting sorption data on the nine most commonly occurring fracture infilling minerals in this batholith, four common rock-forming minerals, and on altered and unaltered granite. This approach produces two polynomial equations for each radionuclide/mineral combination, one under oxic and one under anoxic conditions. Where insufficient information is available, these polynomial expressions are reduced to an equation with one variable or to a single sorption coefficient. 48 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Canadian rock is solid enough for nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on the disposal of nuclear waste have been conducted in Canada for more than 17 years. The research and development programme on nuclear waste management has now reached an important intermediate goal. The safety criteria has been developed for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and submitted to the authorities for evaluation. The plan has been presented in the form of environmental impact assessment. The next step in Canada is the selection of the disposal site. More detailed site investigations will be conducted and a repository will be built deep in the Canadian bedrock during the next 25 years. It has been estimated that implementation of the disposal will take between 60 and 120 years. The Canadian disposal plan resembles the principles adopted in Finland, too. The waste cylinders will be buried at a depth of 500 to 1000 meters in the bedrock. The repository will need no supervision after the waste has been placed there. Canadians have wanted to ensure that citizens have an opportunity to influence waste disposal decisions. A summary of the environmental impact assessment has been made for the general public. (orig.) (2 figs.)

  19. Proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 1 of the proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society includes sessions on the following topics: reactor physics, new concepts and technology, fuel behaviour, reactor design, safety analysis, fuel channel behaviour, equipment and design qualification. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  20. 'When you use the term 'long term', how long is that term'. Risk, Exclusion, and the Politics of Knowledge Production in Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Policy Making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Anna [Univ. of Guelph (Canada). Dept. of Geography

    2006-09-15

    Risk operates within Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste (NFW) management policy making as a heuristic for knowledge production about its effects which reconciles the knowledge of the nuclear industry with the outcomes of the NFW management process. In so doing it marginalizes the present and historical experiences of Aboriginal peoples with the nuclear industry, and removes from view the ways in which they have been implicated in the geography and political economy of the nuclear industry. Risk is a discursive form that protects a particular group's claims about the effects of NFW by providing it a universalizing epistemological structure with which to obscure its connection to context. Further risk discourse provides the nuclear industry with a conceptual vocabulary that deliberately casts all competing knowledge as perceptions, values, or as an object of inquiry. The arguments of Aboriginal peoples about the residual effects of radiation in their lands which hosted nuclear activities, such as uranium mining and disposal, have no representation in how the discourse of risk defines and represents knowledge, and thus no purchase in the policy debate. As a result the challenge they present to the nuclear industry's claims are contained. The arrangements which permit the unloading of the negative effects of nuclear power generation onto Aboriginal peoples are thus reproduced (both materially and conceptually), but not shown, by the policy making process and likely, its outcome. In order to raise critical questions about the democratic abilities of risk, this paper has examined the role of 'risk' in Canadian NFW policy making. I have shown how when the politics of knowledge production within the philosophy of risk is analyzed, and the use and role of the notion of risk are interrogated, difficult questions are posed for the democratic potential of risk. I have suggested, through an analysis of the NWMO's representations of Aboriginal content in their

  1. Canadian Nuclear laboratorie's Thoria road map project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of thorium as a fuel in current water-cooled power reactors has been assessed in numerous studies for decades. Thorium dioxide could be deployed as a fertile fuel matrix in current reactors, for consuming plutonium or transmuting nuclides. Thoria-based fuels for LWRs and HWRs show potential for improved in-core fuel performance in terms of reduced fission product release and reduced erosion, if defected. Test programmes (out-reactor and in-reactor) of thoria fuels have been carried out in the past, are currently ongoing, or are planned to determine key properties, performance, and behaviour of thorium dioxide fuels. These efforts have been essential to consider extensive use of thoria in existing reactors. Nevertheless, thorium-based fuels require further characterization and their behaviour must be well understood to ensure their safe performance under normal operating conditions and accident scenarios; processes must be further developed for manufacturing and reprocessing thorium-based fuels on an industrial scale. Computer codes for design, safety analyses and core following must be developed and validated; and challenges in radiation protection, waste management and safeguards must be addressed. The Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Thoria Road Map Project looks at eleven technological areas and defines gaps to be addressed. Specific examples of current experimental and modelling work to address these gaps will be discussed. (author)

  2. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's intern program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Intern Program was introduced at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Canada's Nuclear Regulator in response to the current competitive market for engineers and scientists and the CNSC's aging workforce. It is an entry level staff development program designed to recruit and train new engineering and science graduates to eventually regulate Canada's nuclear industry. The program provides meaningful work experience and exposes the interns to the general work activities of the Commission. It also provides them with a broad awareness of the regulatory issues in which the CNSC is involved. The intern program is a two-year program focusing on the operational areas and, more specifically, on the generalist functions of project officers. (author)

  3. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reduce the probability of stress corrosion cracks in a zirconium alloy fuel can even when tensile stresses are resulted to the fuel can. Constitution: Sintered nuclear fuel pellets composed of uranium dioxide or a solid solution of gadolinium as a burnable poison in uranium dioxide are charged in a tightly sealed zirconium alloy fuel can. The nuclear fuel pellets for the nuclear fuel element are heat-treated in a gas mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Further, a charging gas containing a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is charged within a zirconium alloy fuel can packed with the nuclear fuel pellets and tightly sealed. (Aizawa, K.)

  4. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association 35. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the thirty-fifth annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association contain 22 papers organized in the following sessions: update on the status of the Canadian nuclear industry, non-proliferation and related political issues, nuclear waste disposal perspectives, regulatory issues, trade development, new markets, economics of nuclear electricity, public acceptance or rejection. In addition one paper from a CNA/CNS special session on nuclear diffraction is included. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  5. Canadian Experience in Nuclear Power Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology transfer has and will continue to play a major role in the development of nuclear power programs. From the early beginnings of the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear power by just a few nations in the mid-1940s there has been a considerable transfer of technology and today 34 countries have nuclear programs in various stages of development. Indeed, some of the major nuclear vendors achieves their present position through a process of technology transfer and subsequent development. Canada, one of the early leaders in the development of nuclear power, has experience with a wide range of programs bout within its own borders and with other countries. This paper briefly describes this experience and the lessons learned from Canada's involvement in the transfer of nuclear power technology. Nuclear technology is complex and diverse and yet it can be assimilated by a nation given a fire commitment of both suppliers and recipients of technology to achieve success. Canada has reaped large benefits from its nuclear program and we believe this has been instrumentally linked to the sharing of goals and opportunity for participation over extended periods of time by many interests within the Canadian infrastructure. While Canada has accumulated considerable expertise in nuclear technology transfer, we believe there is still much for US to learn. Achieving proficiency in any of the many kinds of nuclear related technologies will place a heavy burden on the financial and human resources of a nation. Care must be taken to plan carefully the total criteria which will assure national benefits in industrial and economic development. Above all, effective transfer of nuclear technology requires a long term commitment by both parties

  6. Nuclear knowledge management at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), like most other organizations in the nuclear industry, faces the challenge of capturing and managing its nuclear knowledge due to an ageing workforce. The CNSC is actively addressing this challenge in several ways, including ongoing development of its regulatory framework and regulatory documents; its research and support programme; through its human resources management and information, records and document management; and its management system. In addition to these internal activities, the CNSC also contributes externally to nuclear knowledge management. The paper presents an overview of these activities and identifies some of the broader lessons learned. (author)

  7. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear power reactor fuel element is described which consists of fuel rods, rod guide tubes and an end plate. The system allows direct access to an end of each fuel rod for inspection purposes. (U.K.)

  8. Canadian capabilities in fusion fuels technology and remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes Canadian expertise in fusion fuels technology and remote handling. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP) was established and is funded by the Canadian government, the province of Ontario and Ontario Hydro to focus on the technology necessary to produce and manage the tritium and deuterium fuels to be used in fusion power reactors. Its activities are divided amongst three responsibility areas, namely, the development of blanket, first wall, reactor exhaust and fuel processing systems, the development of safe and reliable operating procedures for fusion facilities, and, finally, the application of these developments to specific projects such as tritium laboratories. CFFTP also hopes to utilize and adapt Canadian developments in an international sense, by, for instance, offering training courses to the international tritium community. Tritium management expertise is widely available in Canada because tritium is a byproduct of the routine operation of CANDU reactors. Expertise in remote handling is another byproduct of research and development of of CANDU facilities. In addition to describing the remote handling technology developed in Canada, this report contains a brief description of the Canadian tritium laboratories, storage beds and extraction plants as well as a discussion of tritium monitors and equipment developed in support of the CANDU reactor and fusion programs. Appendix A lists Canadian manufacturers of tritium equipment and Appendix B describes some of the projects performed by CFFTP for offshore clients

  9. Nuclear fuel transporting container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent the failure of nuclear fuel rods constituting a nuclear fuel assembly contained to the inside of a container upon fire accidents or the likes. Constitution: The nuclear fuel transportation container comprises a tightly sealed inner vessel made of steels for containing a nuclear fuel assembly consisting of bundled nuclear fuel rods, a heat shielding material surrounding the inner vessel, shock absorber and an outer vessel. A relief safety valve is disposed to the inner vessel that actuates at a specific pressure higher than the normal inner pressure for the nuclear fuel rods of the fuel assembly and lower than the allowable inner pressure of the inner vessel. The inside of the inner vessel is pressurized by way of the safety valve such that the normal inner pressure in the inner vessel is substantially equal to the normal inner pressure for the nuclear fuel rods. (Aizawa, K.)

  10. Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project annual report 93/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project exists to develop fusion technologies and apply them worldwide in today's advanced fusion projects and to apply these technologies in fusion and tritium research facilities. CFFTP concentrates on developing capability in fusion fuel cycle systems, in tritium handling technologies and in remote handling. This is an annual report for CFFTP and as such also includes a financial report

  11. Coal and nuclear electricity fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative economic analysis is used to contrast the economic advantages of nuclear and coal-fired electric generating stations for Canadian regions. A simplified cash flow method is used with present value techniques to yield a single levelized total unit energy cost over the lifetime of a generating station. Sensitivity analysis illustrates the effects of significant changes in some of the cost data. The analysis indicates that in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia nuclear energy is less costly than coal for electric power generation. In the base case scenario the nuclear advantage is 24 percent in Quebec, 29 percent in Ontario, 34 percent in Manitoba, and 16 percent in British Columbia. Total unit energy cost is sensitive to variations in both capital and fuel costs for both nuclear and coal-fuelled power stations, but are not very sensitive to operating and maintenance costs

  12. Canadians, nuclear weapons, and the Cold War security dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation provides a history of Canadian ideas about nuclear weapons from the late 1950s until the end of the Trudeau era in 1984. Throughout this period, Canadians reacted to the insecurity they felt in the world around them by expressing many conflicting, often irreconcilable views about a range of nuclear weapon issues, including Canada's acquisition of nuclear warheads in 1963, the U.S. ABM program in the 1960s and early 1970s, the role of Canadian nuclear technology in the development of India's first nuclear explosion, and the Trudeau government's decision to allow the U.S. military to test cruise missiles in northern Canada The dissertation concludes with an examination of the emergence of a broadly-based, increasingly mainstream and influential anti-nuclear movement in the early 1980s, the clearest manifestation of the insecurity Canadians experienced at the time. .The nuclear debates examined in this dissertation reveal that Canadians were divided over nuclear weapons, nuclear strategy, the arms race, proliferation, and arms control and disarmament. In particular, they came to fundamentally different conclusions about how Canada's nuclear weapon policies, and its support for the nuclear policies of its alliances, would contribute to international stability and order. Some believed that their security rested on the maintenance of a strong Western nuclear deterrent and supported Canada contributing to its credibility; others believed that the constant modernisation of nuclear arsenals fuelled by the superpower arms race posed a serious threat to their security. This conceptual dilemma-the security through nuclear strength argument versus the fear that the quest for security through quantitative and qualitative improvements of nuclear stockpiles increased the likelihood of nuclear war-left Canadians divided over the value and utility of nuclear weapons and the strategies developed around them. At the same time, Canadians' ideas about nuclear weapons

  13. Canadian fuel development program in 1997/98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the CANDU fuel development activities in Canada during 1997 through 1998. The activities include those of the Fuel Technology Program sponsored by the CANDU Owners Group. The goal of the Fuel Technology Program is to maintain and improve the reliability, economics and safety of CANDU fuel in operating reactors. These activities, therefore, concentrate on the present designs of 28-element and 37-element fuel bundles. The Canadian fuel development activities also include those of the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycle Technology Program at AECL. These activities concentrate on the development of advanced fuel designs and advanced fuel cycles, which among other advantages, can reduce the capital and fuelling costs, maintain operating margins in aging reactors, improve natural-uranium utilization, and reduce the amount of spent fuel. (author)

  14. Nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source of energy in the nuclear reactors in fission if a heavy nuclei by absorbing a neutron and giving fission products, few neutrons and gamma radiation. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle may be broadly defined as the set of process and operations needed to manufacture nuclear fuels, to irradiate them in nuclear reactors and to treat and store them, temporarily or permanently, after irradiation. Several nuclear fuel cycles may be considered, depending on the type of reactor and the type of fuel used and whether or not the irradiated fuel will be reprocessed. The nuclear fuel cycle starts with uranium exploration and ends with final disposal of the material used and generated during the cycle. For practical reasons the process has been further subdivided into the front-end and the back-end. The front-end of the cycle occurs before irradiation and the back-end begins with the discharge of spent fuel from the reactor

  15. Nuclear fuel lease accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of nuclear fuel lease accounting is a controversial one that has received much attention over the years. This has occurred during a period when increasing numbers of utilities, seeking alternatives to traditional financing methods, have turned to leasing their nuclear fuel inventories. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current accounting treatment of nuclear fuel leases as prescribed by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC's) Uniform System of Accounts. Cost accounting for leased nuclear fuel during the fuel cycle is also discussed

  16. Ecknomic benefits arising from the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a collection of surveys of the Canadian nuclear industry, with forecasts covering a number of possible scenarios. Topics covered include uranium mining and processing; economic benefits arising from the design, manufacture and construction of CANDU generating stations; employment and economic activity in the Canadian nqclear industry; and an overview of the remainder of the industry

  17. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association 31. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the technical sessions from the 31. Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Topics of discussion include: the role of nuclear energy in the global energy future, public participation in energy policy making, CANDU 3 in Saskatchewan, new technologies, perspectives on global warming, components of successful nuclear programs, and Canada's nuclear challenges

  18. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association 25th annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The twenty addresses presented in this volume celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Canadian Nuclear Association. They reflect upon evolving world electricity patterns, the nuclear power option, Canada's position as a supplier of uranium and nuclear technology, the future of the nuclear industry in Canada, and the position of the industry in the United States and Britain

  19. The nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short introduction about nuclear power in the world, fission physics and the French nuclear power plants, this brochure describes in a digest way the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle: uranium prospecting, mining activity, processing of uranium ores and production of uranium concentrates (yellow cake), uranium chemistry (conversion of the yellow cake into uranium hexafluoride), fabrication of nuclear fuels, use of fuels, reprocessing of spent fuels (uranium, plutonium and fission products), recycling of energetic materials, and storage of radioactive wastes. (J.S.)

  20. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association 28. annual conference held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, June 12-15, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the 28. CNA (Canadian Nuclear Association) conference contain 28 papers under the following headings: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; and, applications of nuclear technology. CANDU reactors are emphasized. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  1. Research and Production Corporation Radiy activities within Canadian nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents key results of RPC Radiy activities within Canadian nuclear market. RPC Radiy (located in Kirovograd, Ukraine) is a vendor which designs and produces digital safety I and C platform as well as turnkey applications, based on the platform, for NPPs (safety systems). The main feature of the Radiy Platform is the application of Field Programmable Gates Arrays (FPGA) as programmable components for logic control operations. Since 2009 RPC Radiy started to explore the possibility to conduct the expansion to Canadian nuclear market. The activities performed by RPC Radiy related to this direction are resulted in several joint projects with Canadian companies. (author)

  2. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The siting, design, construction, operation, decommissioning, and closure of a geological facility for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste is a complex undertaking that will span many decades. Both technical and social issues must be taken into account simultaneously and many factors must be considered. Based on studies carried out in Canada and elsewhere, it appears that these factors can be accommodated and that geological disposal is both technically and socially feasible. But throughout the different stages of implementing disposal, technical and social issues will continue to arise and these will have to be dealt with successfully if progress is to continue. This paper discusses these issues and a proposed approach for dealing with them. (author)

  3. The influence of the presence of sulphate on methanogenesis in the backfill of a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault: a laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial gas production in the clay-based buffer and backfill materials of a nuclear waste disposal vault could produce gas bubbles or a separate gas phase, depending on quantities produced and the kinetics of the process. Gas production may affect the performance of the clay-based barriers. Results from previous laboratory experiments suggested that the presence of backfill or backfill clay prevented methane production in groundwater systems, likely because of inherently high sulphate concentrations in the clay. The work presented here shows that methane production in groundwater/clay systems is possible, but only at sulphate concentrations <35 mg/L. Sulphate concentrations in laboratory systems were lowered by the addition of Ba, and also by natural (microbiological or chemical) processes occurring over time (almost 700 d). Nutrient additions (acetate, diesel fuel) appeared to increase the magnitude of methane production but not necessarily speed the onset of methanogenesis. A high pH did not reduce or enhance methanogenesis, and the role of Fe in creating suitable conditions was not clear. Methane production rates in laboratory systems containing groundwater and backfill or backfill clay ranged from 0.1 to 0.125 mole%/d. In the presence of Ba-acetate, a rate as high as 0.7 mole%/d was observed. It is recommended that all microbial gas production experiments be continued for an adequate period of time, because of the considerable time required to develop suitable conditions for methanogenesis in laboratory systems. Methane production rates in water-limited clay environments, such as those expected in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault, are needed as well as modelling of methane production for incorporation into vault performance optimization and safety assessments. (author)

  4. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain a nuclear fuel assembly having a function of eliminating corrosion products exfoliating from the surface of a fuel can, thereby reduce the radioactive crud in primary sodium coolant during operation of a FBR type reactor. Constitution: Nickel plates or grids made of metal plate with a nickel coated on the surface thereof are inserted in the upper blanket of a nuclear fuel element and between nuclear fuel element corresponding to the gas plenum. The nickel becomes helpful at high temperature in adsorbing Mn-54 which accounts for a major portion of the corrosion products. (J.P.N.)

  5. Safeguards and security aspects of a potential Canadian used-fuel disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large quantities of highly radioactive used fuel have been produced by Canadian nuclear generating stations. Conceptual design and development is under way to assess a means of disposing of this used fuel within a vault located 500 to 1000 m deep in plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. In parallel with this work, the safeguards and physical security measures that will be required for this used fuel during transportation, packaging, and containment in a disposal vault are being studied in Canada, in several other countries that have similar requirements and by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Canadian commitments and regulations applicable to used-fuel transportation and disposal are described. The experience gained from applying safeguards and physical security measures at similar facilities is considered together with the availability of equipment that might be used in applying these measures. Possible safeguards and physical security measures are outlined and considered. These measures are based on the conceptual design studies for a reference Used-Fuel Disposal Centre and associated transportation systems undertaken by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and Ontario Hydro. These studies show that effective and practical safeguards, which meet present IAEA objectives, can be applied to the used fuel in transportation and at a disposal facility. They also show that physical security measures can be employed that have a high probability of preventing theft or sabotage. 27 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs., glossary, 2 appendices

  6. The management of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Select Committee of the Legislature of Ontario was established to examine the affairs of Ontario Hydro, the provincial electrical utility. The Committee's terms of reference included examination of the waste management program being carried out jointly by the Ontario provincial government and the Canadian federal government. Public hearings were held which included private citizens as well as officials of organizations in the nuclear field and independent experts. Recommendations were made concerning the future direction of the Canadian fuel waste management program. (O.T.)

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor a fuel element spacer formed of an array of laterally positioned cojoined tubular ferrules each providing a passage for one of the fuel elements, the elements being laterally supported in the ferrules between slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops

  8. Detecting, locating and identifying failed fuel in Canadian power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes how defected fuel elements are detected, located and identified in Canadian CANDU power reactors. Fuel defects are detected by monitoring the primary coolant for gaseous fission products and radioiodines, while location in core is usually performed on-power by delayed neutron monitoring of coolant samples from individual fuel channels or off-power by gamma-ray monitoring of the channel feeder pipes. The systems and techniques used to detect and locate defected fuel in both Ontario Hydro and CANDU 6 power stations are described, along with examples provided by station experience. The ability to detect and locate defected fuel in power stations was greatly enhanced by a fundamental R and D program, which provided an understanding and models of fission-product release and transport, and the post-defect deterioration of failed fuel. Techniques and equipment used to identify and store defected fuel after it has been discharged from the reactor are briefly reviewed

  9. Women and nuclear issues: Comments in a Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the Canadian Nuclear industry launched its information program, it was found that women were less supportive of nuclear power. Reasons were difficult to pin-point and hovered around individual perceptions and misunderstandings. The basis of the Canadian Nuclear Association Public Information program lies with its target: men and women equally. The Program Takes Into Consideration The major characteristics and nuances of these two groups. Female Characteristics from Canadian Perspective are: Strong sense of generation continuity; Detail and task oriented; Nontechnical training; Strong sense of individuality (local). Patterns of behavoiur in relation to nuclear industry for women in Canada are: not prone to take risks; micro-economic approach to decisions (local); little confidence in technology; pragmatic and balanced in their choices (local). Major concerns of Canadian women are: Safety of power plants; disposal of waste; peace and environment versus growth and energy need; trustworthiness of the industry. Canadian nuclear association public information program communirations -approach covers: the right message, down to earth language, factual and real information for real choices, effective reach: spokespeople and media buy. Results of polls: show thtt women are less in favour of Nuclear energy in Canada today than men, consider NPPs less important in Meeting Canada's energy need in the years ahead; and think that Nuclear Energy is not a choice for Canada of all sources of energy available for large scale use

  10. The Canadian research reactor spent fuel situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the present research reactor spent fuel situation in Canada. The research reactors currently operating are listed along with the types of fuel that they utilize. Other shut down research reactors contributing to the storage volume are included for completeness. The spent fuel storage facilities associated with these reactors and the methods used to determine criticality safety are described. Finally the current inventory of spent fuel and where it is stored is presented along with concerns for future storage. (author). 3 figs

  11. Nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste and is submitting it for review under the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. During this review, AECL intends to show that careful, controlled burial 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield is a safe and feasible way to dispose of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The concept has been assessed without identifying or evaluating any particular site for disposal. AECL is now preparing a comprehensive report based on more than 10 years of research and development

  12. Evolution of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel is the primary energy source for sustaining the nuclear fission chain reactions in a reactor. The fuels in the reactor cores are exposed to highly aggressive environment and varieties of advanced fuel materials with improved nuclear properties are continuously being developed to have optimum performance in the existing core conditions. Fabrications of varieties of nuclear fuels used in diverse forms of reactors are mainly based on two naturally occurring nuclear source elements, uranium as fissile 235U and fertile 238U, and thorium as fertile 232Th species. The two metals in the forms of alloys with specific elements, ceramic oxides like MOX and ceramic non-oxide as mixed carbide and nitride with suitable nuclear properties like higher metal density, thermal conductivity, etc. are used as fuels in different reactor designs. In addition, efficiency of various advanced fuels in the forms of dispersion, molten salt and other types are also under investigations. The countries which have large deposits of thorium but limited reserves of uranium, are trying to give special impetus on the development of thorium-based fuels for both thermal and fast reactors in harnessing nuclear energy for peaceful uses of atomic energy. (author)

  13. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a submission for the Encyclopedia of Sustainable Technology on the subject of Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel. Nuclear reprocessing is the chemical treatment of spent fuel involving separation of its various constituents. Principally, it is used to recover useful actinides from the spent fuel. Radioactive waste that cannot be re-used is separated into streams for consolidation into waste forms. The first known application of nuclear reprocessing was within the Manhattan Project to recover material for nuclear weapons. Currently, reprocessing has a peaceful application in the nuclear fuel cycle. A variety of chemical methods have been proposed and demonstrated for reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The two most widely investigated and implemented methods are generally referred to as aqueous reprocessing and pyroprocessing. Each of these technologies is described in detail in Section 3 with numerous references to published articles. Reprocessing of nuclear fuel as part of a fuel cycle can be used both to recover fissionable actinides and to stabilize radioactive fission products into durable waste forms. It can also be used as part of a breeder reactor fuel cycle that could result in a 14-fold or higher increase in energy utilization per unit of natural uranium. Reprocessing can also impact the need for geologic repositories for spent fuel. The volume of waste that needs to be sent to such a repository can be reduced by first subjecting the spent fuel to reprocessing. The extent to which volume reduction can occur is currently under study by the United States Department of Energy via research at various national laboratories and universities. Reprocessing can also separate fissile and non-fissile radioactive elements for transmutation.

  14. Spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

  15. Transportation of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipment of used fuel from nuclear reactors to a central fuel management facility is discussed with particular emphasis on the assessment of the risk to the public due to these shipments. The methods of transporting used fuel in large shipping containers is reviewed. In terms of an accident scenario, it is demonstrated that the primary risk of transport of used fuel is due to injury and death in common road accidents. The radiological nature of the used fuel cargo is, for all practical purposes, an insignificant factor in the total risk to the public. (author)

  16. Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just over a month ago, on July 1, Japan Nuclear Fuel Industries (JNFI) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Services (JNFS) merged to form the integrated nuclear fuel cycle company, Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd. (JNFL). The announcement in mid-January that the country's two major fuel cycle firms intended to merge had long been anticipated and represents one of the most significant restructuring events in Japan's nuclear industry. The merger forming JNFL was a logical progression in the evolution of Japan's fuel cycle, bringing complementary technologies together to encourage synergism, increased efficiency, and improved community relations. The main production facilities of both JNFI and JNFS were located near the village of Rokkashomura, on the northern end of the main island of Honshu, and their headquarters were in Tokyo. The former JNFS was responsible for spent fuel reprocessing and also was building a high-level waste (HLW) management facility. The former JNFI focused on uranium enrichment and low-level waste (LLW) disposal. It was operating the first stage of a centrifuge enrichment plant and continuing to construct additional capacity. These responsibilities and activities will be assumed by JNFL, which now will be responsible for all JNFI and JNFS operations, including those at Rokkashomura

  17. Nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologies used to manufacture nuclear fuel from uranium ore are outlined, with particular reference to the light water reactor fuel cycle. Capital and operating cost estimates for the processing stages are given, and the relevance to a developing uranium industry in Australia is discussed

  18. Nuclear fuel transportation containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention discloses an inner container for a nuclear fuel transportation flask for irradiated fuel elements comprising a cylindrical shell having a dished end closure with a drainage sump and means for flushing out solid matter by way of the sump prior to removing a cover

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  20. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel assembly comprises a cluster of elongated fuel, retained parallel and at the nodal points of a square network by a bottom supporting plate and by spacing grids. The supporting plate is connected to a top end plate via tie-rods which replace fuel pins at certain of the nodal points of the network. The diameter of the tie-rods is equal to that of the pins and both are slidably received in the grids

  1. Nuclear at Niagara. 32nd Annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference and 35th CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 32nd Annual Canadian Nuclear Society Conference and 35th CNS/CNA Student Conference was held in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada on June 5-8, 2011. The theme of the conference, 'Nuclear at Niagara', brought together scientists, engineers, technologists, senior management, government officials, and students interested in all aspects of nuclear science and technology and its applications, including nuclear power generation, fuel production, uranium mining and refining, management of radioactive wastes and used fuel. Other topics include medical and industrial uses of radionuclides, occupational and environmental radiation protection, the science and technology of nuclear fusion, and associated activities in research and development. and applications of energy from the atom. The central objective of this conference was to exchange views on how nuclear science and technology can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. Over 400 delegates from across Canada and other nuclear countries were in attendance.

  2. A literature review of methods for handling solid residues arising from fuel dissolution in a nuclear fuel recycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the literature on the management of solid residues, principally Zircaloy fuel hulls, arising from fuel dissolution in nuclear fuel recycle plants. Emphasis is placed on information likely to be relevant to possible future recycling of CANDU fuel. The report was prepared as part of the supporting documentation for the evaluation of fuel-waste treatment and disposal options in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

  3. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel assembly includes and upper yoke, a base, an elongated, outer flow channel disposed substantially along the entire length of the fuel assembly and an elongated, internal, central water cross, formed by four, elongated metal angles, that divides the nuclear fuel assembly into four, separate, elongated fuel sections and that provides a centrally disposed path for the flow of subcooled neutron moderator along the length of the fuel assembly. A separate fuel bundle is located in each of the four fuel sections and includes an upper tie plate, a lower tie plate and a plurality of elongated fuel rods disposed therebetween. Preferably, each upper tie plate is formed from a plurality of interconnected thin metal bars and includes an elongated, axially extending pin that is received by the upper yoke of the fuel assembly for restraining lateral motion of the fuel bundle while permitting axial movement of the fuel bundle with respect to the outer flow channel. The outer flow channel is fixedly secured at its opposite longitudinal ends to the upper yoke and to the base to permit the fuel assembly to be lifted and handled in a vertical position without placing lifting loads or stresses on the fuel rods. The yoke, removably attached at the upper end of the fuel assembly to four structural ribs secured to the inner walls of the outer flow channel, includes, as integrally formed components, a lifting bail or handle, laterally extending bumpers, a mounting post for a spring assembly, four elongated apertures for receiving with a slip fit the axially extending pins mounted on the upper tie plates and slots for receiving the structural ribs secured to the outer flow channel. Locking pins securely attach the yoke to the structural ribs enabling the fuel assembly to be lifted as an entity

  4. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides data and assessments of the status and prospects of nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle. The report discusses the economic competitiveness of nuclear electricity generation, the extent of world uranium resources, production and requirements, uranium conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel treatment and radioactive waste management. A review is given of the status of nuclear fusion research

  5. Proceedings of the 29th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and 10th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. V. 1-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The symposium was designed to highlight how the technical information for nuclear energy came to Canada, the effect this information had in Canada in the fields of Physics, Chemistry, Medicine and Nuclear Power. Volume 1 is the combined proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association twenty-ninth annual conference and the Canadian Nuclear Society tenth annual conference. Volume 2 is the proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association twenty-ninth annual conference, and volume 3 is the proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society tenth annual conference

  6. Romanian nuclear fuel program: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budan, O.; Rotaru, I. [RENEL-GEN, Romanian Electricity Authority, Nuclear Power Group (Romania); Galeriu, C.A. [RENEL-FCN, Romanian Electricity Authority, Nuclear Fuel Plant (Romania)

    1997-07-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. In this paper the word 'past' refers to the period before 1990 and 'present' to the 1990-1997 period. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. - ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian

  7. The private sector's role in Canadian nuclear marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large engineering consultant firms, such as Canatom Inc., are called architect engineers in the U.S.A., but in Canada are known as EPCM companies (engineering, procurement and construction management). The role of such companies in nuclear trade is explained, and particularly the role of Canatom in Canadian nuclear sales to India, Argentina, Korea and Romania, and in the Mexican proposal. Using an EPCM company can reduce the commercial risk involved in nuclear exports

  8. All about nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for energy continues to rise while natural resources are depleted day after day and the planet chokes on greenhouse gas emissions. It is not easy to strike a balance, yet these issues must be resolved. The nuclear revival in a number of countries may be the beginning of a solution. This is a good time to take a closer look at this industry and learn about the different 'lives' of nuclear fuel: uranium mining and conversion (new deposits to be mined, evenly distributed reserves), uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication: continually evolving technologies), recycling, waste management: multiple solutions. In an inset, Dr Dorothy R. Davidson, nuclear fuel specialist, presents her expert opinion on the future of the fuel cycle in the United States

  9. Nuclear fuel deformation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel encounters severe thermomechanical environments. Its mechanical response is profoundly influenced by an underlying heterogeneous microstructure but also inherently dependent on the temperature and stress level histories. The ability to adequately simulate the response of such microstructures, to elucidate the associated macroscopic response in such extreme environments is crucial for predicting both performance and transient fuel mechanical responses. This chapter discusses key physical phenomena and the status of current modelling techniques to evaluate and predict fuel deformations: creep, swelling, cracking and pellet-clad interaction. This chapter only deals with nuclear fuel; deformations of cladding materials are discussed elsewhere. An obvious need for a multi-physics and multi-scale approach to develop a fundamental understanding of properties of complex nuclear fuel materials is presented. The development of such advanced multi-scale mechanistic frameworks should include either an explicit (domain decomposition, homogenisation, etc.) or implicit (scaling laws, hand-shaking,...) linkage between the different time and length scales involved, in order to accurately predict the fuel thermomechanical response for a wide range of operating conditions and fuel types (including Gen-IV and TRU). (authors)

  10. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society ninth annual conference, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 74 papers presented at this conference covered the following topics: operational enhancements of existing nuclear power plants; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in CANDU reactor fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning and decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation of CANDU reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and, medical and industrial radiation applications

  11. Nuclear worries of Canadian youth: Replication and extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A national survey of Canadian adolescents assessed concern, anxiety, and sources of information about the threat of nuclear war. Results indicated few geographical or gender differences in overall levels of concern, although females were more likely to admit fear and anxiety, and students with activist parents showed more concern. Family ranked below all media as a source of information

  12. Severe accident considerations in Canadian nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a current study on severe accidents being sponsored by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) and provides background on other related Canadian work. Scoping calculations are performed in Phase I of the AECB study to establish the relative consequences of several permutations resulting from six postulated initiating events, nine containment states, and a selection of meteorological conditions and health effects mitigating criteria. In Phase II of the study, selected accidents sequences would be analyzed in detail using models suitable for the design features of the Canadian nuclear power reactors

  13. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To increase the fuel assembly rigidity while making balance in view of the dimension thereby improving the earthquake proofness. Constitution: In a nuclear fuel assembly having a control rod guide thimble tube, the gap between the thimble tube and fuel insert (inner diameter of the guiding thimble tube-outer diameter of the fuel insert) is made greater than 1.0 mm. Further, the wall thickness of the thimble tube is made to about 4 - 5 % of the outer diameter, while the flowing fluid pore cross section S in the thimble tube is set as: S = S0 x A0/A where S0: cross section of the present flowing fluid pore, A: effective cross section after improvement, = Π/4(d2 - D2) in which d is the thimble tube inner diameter and the D is the fuel insert outer diameter. A0: present effective cross section. (Seki, T.)

  14. Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Deborah J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-28

    These slides will be presented at the training course “International Training Course on Implementing State Systems of Accounting for and Control (SSAC) of Nuclear Material for States with Small Quantity Protocols (SQP),” on November 3-7, 2014 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The slides provide a basic overview of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This is a joint training course provided by NNSA and IAEA.

  15. The nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at the International Conference on The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, held at Stockholm, 28 to 31 October 1975, are reviewed. The meeting, organised by the U.S. Atomic Industrial Forum, and the Swedish Nuclear Forum, was concerned more particularly with economic, political, social and commercial aspects than with tecnology. The papers discussed were considered under the subject heading of current status, uranium resources, enrichment, and reprocessing. (U.K.)

  16. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold F. McFarlane; Terry Todd

    2013-11-01

    Reprocessing is essential to closing nuclear fuel cycle. Natural uranium contains only 0.7 percent 235U, the fissile (see glossary for technical terms) isotope that produces most of the fission energy in a nuclear power plant. Prior to being used in commercial nuclear fuel, uranium is typically enriched to 3–5% in 235U. If the enrichment process discards depleted uranium at 0.2 percent 235U, it takes more than seven tonnes of uranium feed to produce one tonne of 4%-enriched uranium. Nuclear fuel discharged at the end of its economic lifetime contains less one percent 235U, but still more than the natural ore. Less than one percent of the uranium that enters the fuel cycle is actually used in a single pass through the reactor. The other naturally occurring isotope, 238U, directly contributes in a minor way to power generation. However, its main role is to transmute into plutoniumby neutron capture and subsequent radioactive decay of unstable uraniumand neptuniumisotopes. 239Pu and 241Pu are fissile isotopes that produce more than 40% of the fission energy in commercially deployed reactors. It is recovery of the plutonium (and to a lesser extent the uranium) for use in recycled nuclear fuel that has been the primary focus of commercial reprocessing. Uraniumtargets irradiated in special purpose reactors are also reprocessed to obtain the fission product 99Mo, the parent isotope of technetium, which is widely used inmedical procedures. Among the fission products, recovery of such expensive metals as platinum and rhodium is technically achievable, but not economically viable in current market and regulatory conditions. During the past 60 years, many different techniques for reprocessing used nuclear fuel have been proposed and tested in the laboratory. However, commercial reprocessing has been implemented along a single line of aqueous solvent extraction technology called plutonium uranium reduction extraction process (PUREX). Similarly, hundreds of types of reactor

  17. Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US

  18. Canadian involvement in international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1945 Canada has been actively involved in the development of an international consensus on measures to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. In parallel with this involvement, Canada has entered into cooperative agreements with several countries under which nuclear materials, equipment and facilities have been supplied in connection with the medical, industrial, agricultural and electrical power applications of nuclear energy. This paper summarizes the actions taken by Canada to encourage the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to avoid the spread of nuclear weapons. (author)

  19. The Thai-Canadian nuclear human resources development linkage project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thai-Canadian Nuclear Human Resources Development Linkage Project (the Project) was initiated in 1994 in order to develop the engineering and scientific expertise needed for Thailand to decide whether and how the country can best benefit from the establishment of a nuclear power program. The Project was designed to upgrade current academics and people in industry, and to develop an adequate supply of new technical personnel for academic, industry, utility, regulatory and other government institutions. The key Project objectives included the establishment of a Chair in Nuclear Engineering at Chulalongkorn University, the upgrading of the current Masters level curriculum, the establishment of undergraduate and doctorate level curricula, development and delivery of an industrial training program for people in industry and government, exchanges of Thai and Canadian academics and industry experts to establish common research programs and teaching interests, and a public education program that was to test in Thailand some of the techniques that have been successfully used in Canada. (author)

  20. Marginalization and challenge: the production of knowledge and landscape in Canadian nuclear waste management policy making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboriginal peoples have recently become politically significant in Canadian nuclear fuel waste (NFW) management policy making. Their newfound significance comes on the heels of an important challenge to the knowledge and authority of the nuclear industry with respect to its plans for NFW lead by a number of public groups and Aboriginal peoples from across Canada, including the Serpent River First Nation. This dissertation examines the relationships between the discourses of the Serpent River First Nation (SRFN) about their experiences of the nuclear fuel chain and the discourses of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) about the management of NFW. Two trends are found to characterize these relationships: marginalization and challenge. The discourses of the NWMO marginalize the SRFN, excluding their experiences of the nuclear fuel chain, radioactivity, and the effects of nuclear industries from the policy making process. The discourses of the SRFN challenge the claims of the NWMO about the effects of nuclear wastes and radioactivity, as well as about the safe and beneficial development of the nuclear fuel chain. I identify discourses of 'modern risk' and 'citizenship' found in the work of the NWMO as instrumental for maintaining the nuclear industry's control over the production of knowledge about NFW and its effects and subjugating the knowledge of the SRFN. I also identify discourses of identity, oppression, and 'situated knowledge' as important challenges to the content, method and premises of the claims of the nuclear industry about the management of NFW. While I conclude that the NWMO's discourses of risk and citizenship constitute a colonial politics of exclusion, I note that their discourses are contingent on the exclusion of the experiences of the SRFN with the fuel chain. For their accounts to be coherent, the NWMO need to maintain a strategic silence on the overwhelming implication Aboriginal peoples, as a category, in the nuclear fuel chain

  1. nuclear fuel design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel design is strictly dependent on reactor type and experiences obtained from performance of nuclear fuels. The objectives of the design are reliability, and economy. Nuclear fuel design requires an interdisciplinary work which has to cover, at least nuclear design, thermalhydraulic design, mechanical design, and material properties.The procedure of design, as describe in the quality assurance, consist of a number of steps. The most important parts are: Design description or inputs, preliminary design, detailed design and design output, and design verification. The first step covers objectives and requirements, as defined by the customer and by the regulatory authority for product performance,environmental factors, safety, etc. The second describes assumptions and alternatives, safety, economy and engineering analyses. The third covers technical specifications, design drawings, selection of QA program category, etc. The most important form of design verification is design review by qualified independent internal or external reviewers. The scope of the review depends on the specific character of the design work. Personnel involved in verification and review do not assume prime responsibility for detecting errors. Responsibility for the design remains with the personnel involved in the design work

  2. Nuclear fuel element cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite cladding for a nuclear fuel element containing fuel pellets is formed with a zirconium metal barrier layer bonded to the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The composite tube is sized by a cold working tube reduction process and is heat treated after final reduction to provide complete recrystallization of the zirconium metal barrier layer and a fine-grained microstructure. The zirconium alloy tube is stress-relieved but is not fully recrystallized. The crystallographic structure of the zirconium metal barrier layer may be improved by compressive deformation such as shot-peening. (author)

  3. Technology transfer from Canadian nuclear laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada has developed a unique nuclear power system, the CANDU reactor. AECL - Research Company (AECL-RC) has played a key role in the CANDU program by supplying its technology to the reactor's designers, constructors and operators. This technology was transferred from our laboratories to our sister AECL companies and to domestic industries and utilities. As CANDUs were built overseas, AECL-RC made its technology available to foreign utilities and agencies. Recently the company has embarked on a new transfer program, commercial R and D for nuclear and non-nuclear customers. During the years of CANDU development, AECL-RC has acquired the skills and technology that are especially valuable to other countries embarking on their own nuclear programs. This report describes AECL-RC's thirty years' experience with the transfer of technology

  4. Organizing the Canadian nuclear industry to meet the challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor is struggling for a share of the dwindling reactor market against formidable and well-established competition. The Canadian nuclear industry has historically depended upon two crown corporations, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. and Ontario Hydro, which have taken the lead in designing and engineering the reactor. Crown corporations are not notably successful in marketing, however, and the time has come for the industry to organize itself in preparation for an aggressive export drive

  5. Nuclear industry prospects: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada, with its proven, safe and versatile CANDU reactor is well poised for the second half-century of nuclear fission. Canada's nuclear pedigree goes back to the turn-of-the-century work of Ernest Rutherford in Montreal. This year, Canada's nuclear industry celebrates the 50th anniversary of the start-up of its first research reactor at Chalk River. Last year, the pioneering work of Bert ram Blockhouse in Physics was honoured with a Nobel Prize. Future international success for the nuclear industry, such as has been achieved here in Korea, depends on continued cooperative and collaborative team work between the public and private sectors, continued strong research and development backing by the government, and new strategic partnerships. The biggest challenge is financing for the emerging markets. The brightness or dimness of future prospects are relative to the intensity of the lessons learned from history. In Canada we have a fairly long nuclear pedigree, It goes back almost a century to 1898, when Ernest Rutherford set up a world centre at McGill University in Montreal for research into the structure of the atom and into radioactivity

  6. Nuclear fuel reprocessing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear fuel reprocessing method for supplying nitrogen oxides used for driving out iodine and for oxidizing plutonium, according to the present invention, nitric acid is decomposed in a nitrogen oxide production step to form nitrogen oxides. The nitrogen oxides formed are supplied to the reprocessing step described above. Excess nitric acid recovered from the reprocessing step is recycled to the nitrogen oxide production step. Accordingly, the amount of wastes discharged from the reprocessing step is remarkably reduced. (T.M.)

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer for use in a fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor having thin, full-height divider members, slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops and wherein the total amount of spacer material, the amount of high neutron cross section material, the projected area of the spacer structure and changes in cross section area of the spacer structure are minimized whereby neutron absorption by the spacer and coolant flow resistance through the spacer are minimized

  8. Research and development for Canadian nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid expansion of the successful CANDU reactor system offers immediate substitution for scarce oil and gas, combined with long-term security of energy supplies. A continuing large and vigorous R and D program on nuclear power is essential to achieve these objectives. The program, described here, consists of tactical R and D in support of the current CANDU reactor system, strategic R and D to develop and demonstrate advanced CANDU systems, and exploratory R and D to put Canada in a position to exploit any fusion opportunities. Two support activities, management of radioactive wastes and techniques to safeguard nuclear materials against diversion, although integral components of the nuclear power programs, are identified separately because they are currently of special public interest. (author)

  9. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear fuel assembly comprising a nuclear fuel bundle in which a plurality of nuclear rods are bond by an upper tie plate, spacers and lower tie plate and a channel box containing them, the inner surface of the channel box and the surface of the lower tie plate opposing thereto are fabricated into step-like configuration respectively and the two fabricated surfaces are opposed to each other to constitute a step-like labyrinth flow channel. With such a configuration, when a fluid flows from higher pressure to lower pressure side, pressure loss is caused due to fluid friction in proportion with the length of the flow channel, due to the change of the flowing direction and, further, in accordance with deceleration or acceleration at each of the stepped portions. The total for each of the pressure loses constitutes the total pressure loss in the labyrinth. That is, if the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the channel box is identical, the amount of leakage is reduced by so much as the increase of the total pressure loss, to thereby improve the stability of the reactor core and fuel economy. (T.M.)

  10. Developing new products from Canadian nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By 1990, the Federal Government will have reduced its support for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's nuclear R and D from the 1985 level of $200 million, to $100 million (1985 dollars). To meet the need for a broadened funding base, AECL Research Company has been restructured to become more responsive to our sponsors and customers. Although supporting the CANDU nuclear power program remains by far our largest R and D activity, we have put in place a comprehensive process for generating new business and commercial activities. Examples of such business opportunities are presented in the paper

  11. Regulation of the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the nuclear regulatory process in Canada in the following context. First, the pertinent factors in the present political and economic environment are identified, including both domestic and international matters. Second, the basis for current Atomic Energy Control Board operations is considered, with reference to both the Atomic Energy Control Act (1946) and the proposed Nuclear Control and Administration Act (Bill C-14, 1977). Some specific areas of the regulatory process are discussed in detail to show where ambiguity or uncertainty may arise: these areas are uranium exploration and mining, occupational health and safety, environmental protection, waste management, heavy water plants and transportation

  12. Restructuring of the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues of structural change pertaining to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) are discussed. AECL is responsible for the CANDU design, construction and engineering program as well as Canada's nuclear research and development programs, along with Ontario Hydro, a provincially owned electric power utility. Restructuring of these two organizations will have significant impacts on the entire nuclear industry because of the major role they play in the industry. The roles and structures of AECL and Ontario Hydro are described, the trends forcing restructuring of these two organizations and efforts underway to adapt them to the 'new realities'. (R.P.)

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel element splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for removing nuclear fuel from a clad fuel element. The fuel element is power driven past laser beams which simultaneously cut the cladding lengthwise into at least two longitudinal pieces. The axially cut lengths of cladding are then separated, causing the nuclear fuel contained therein to drop into a receptacle for later disposition. The cut lengths of cladding comprise nuclear waste which is disposed of in a suitable manner. 6 claims, 10 drawing figures

  14. South Korea's nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March 1990 marked a major milestone for South Korea's nuclear power program, as the country became self-sufficient in nuclear fuel fabrication. The reconversion line (UF6 to UO2) came into full operation at the Korea Nuclear Fuel Company's fabrication plant, as the last step in South Korea's program, initiated in the mid-1970s, to localize fuel fabrication. Thus, South Korea now has the capability to produce both CANDU and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. This article covers the nuclear fuel industry in South Korea-how it is structures, its current capabilities, and its outlook for the future

  15. Nuclear fuel structure and fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research has been to produce information on structural properties of nuclear fuel and their effects on the fuel behaviour. The research subjects were new fuel fabrication and quality control methods, the effects of as-fabricated pellets properties on the behaviour of fuel rods, behaviour of cladding materials and irradiated cladding and structural materials. At the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) the nuclear fuel structure and behaviour programme has produced data which have been utilized in procurement, behavioural analysis and surveillance of the fuel used in the Finnish nuclear power stations. In addition to our own research, data on fuel behaviour have been received by participating in the international cooperation projects, such as OECD/Halden, Studsvik-Ramp-programmes, IAEA/BEFAST II and VVER-fuel research projects. The volume of the research work financed by the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland in the years 1987-1989 has been about 8 man years. The report is the summary report of the research work conducted in the KTM-financed nuclear fuel structure and fuel behaviour programme in the years 1987-1989

  16. Success in nuclear technology transfer: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technology transfer has played a significant part in the expansion of nuclear power to many countries of the world. Canada's involvement in nuclear technology transfer spans four decades. The experience gained through technology transfer, initially to Canadian industry and then to other countries in association with the construction of CANDU nuclear power plants, forms a basis from which to assess the factors which contribute to successful technology transfer. A strong commitment from all parties, in terms of both financial and human resources, is essential to success. Detailed planning of both the scope and timing of the technology transfer program is also required together with an assessment of the impact of the introduction of nuclear power on other sectors of the economy. (author)

  17. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising fuel elements arranged in a supporting frame composed of two end pieces, one at the top and the other at the bottom, on which are secured the ends of a number of vertical tubes, each end piece comprising a plane bottom on which two series of holes are made for holding the tubes and for the passage of the coolant. According to the invention, the bottom of each end piece is fixed to an internal plate fitted with the same series of holes for holding the tubes and for the fluid to pass through. These holes are of oblong section and are fitted with fixing elements cooperating with corresponding elements for securing these tubes by transversal movement of the inside plate

  18. Romanian nuclear fuel fabrication and in-reactor fuel operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the Romanian nuclear program since mid 60's is made. After 1990, the new Romanian nuclear power authority, RENEL-GEN, elaborated a realistic Nuclear Fuel Program. This program went through the Romanian nuclear fuel plant qualification with the Canadian (AECL and ZPI) support, restarting in January 1995 of the industrial nuclear fuel production, quality evaluation of the fuel produced before 1990 and the recovery of this fuel. This new policy produced good results. FCN is since 1995 the only CANDU fuel supplier from outside Canada recognised by AECL as an authorised CANDU fuel manufacturer. The in-reactor performances and behaviour of the fuel manufactured by FCN after its qualification have been excellent. Very low - more then five times lesser than the design value - fuel defect rate has been recorded up to now and the average discharge of this fuel was with about 9% greater than the design value. Since mid 1998 when SNN took charge of the production of nuclear generated electricity, FCN made significant progresses in development and procurement of new and more efficient equipment and is now very close to double its fuel production capacity. After the completion of the recovery of the fuel produced before June 1990, FCN is already prepared to shift its fuel production to the so-called 'heavy' bundle containing about 19.3 kg of Uranium per bundle

  19. Swelling-resistant nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenlis, Athanasios; Satcher, Jr., Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei O.

    2011-12-27

    A nuclear fuel according to one embodiment includes an assembly of nuclear fuel particles; and continuous open channels defined between at least some of the nuclear fuel particles, wherein the channels are characterized as allowing fission gasses produced in an interior of the assembly to escape from the interior of the assembly to an exterior thereof without causing significant swelling of the assembly. Additional embodiments, including methods, are also presented.

  20. The nuclear fuel waste act: context, public confidence, social considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Like any energy source, nuclear energy generates some waste, in this case mostly low-level radioactive waste and nuclear fuel waste. In Canada, nuclear fuel waste refers to the irradiated fuel bundles that come out of domestic nuclear reactors and includes those bundles discharged from twenty-two Canadian CANDU reactors. Twenty of these reactors are owned by Ontario Power Generation Inc (OPG), and the other two are owned by Hydro-Quebec and New Brunswick Power. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), a federal Crown corporation, produces a small amount of such waste from its prototype and research reactors. OPG produces about 90% of the total amount of waste, the other two nuclear utilities about 8%, and AECL 2%. Other waste owners, e.g., universities, produce a much smaller quantity of nuclear fuel waste. About 1 million bundles of nuclear fuel waste are currently stored at nuclear reactor sites in Canada; 60 000 bundles are expected to be produced annually. A cornerstone of Canada approach to addressing radioactive waste management issues is the Government of Canada 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste, which has set general policy for dealing with all radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel waste, low-level radioactive waste, and uranium mine and mill waste). The Policy Framework defines the respective roles of the Government and waste owners. It also sets the stage for developing institutional and financial arrangements to implement long-term waste management solutions in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective, and integrated manner. The challenge is to ensure that the public is confident that the Policy Framework is being carried out in the best interest of Canadians. Part of the answer to this challenge was the development of the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act which entered into force on November 15, 2002. (author)

  1. Nuclear fuel waste policy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste established the approach in Canada for dealing with all radioactive waste, and defined the respective roles of Government and waste producers and owners. The Policy Framework sets the stage for the development of institutional and financial arrangements to implement long-term waste management solutions in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated manner. For nuclear fuel waste, a 10-year environmental review of the concept to bury nuclear fuel waste bundles at a depth of 500 m to 1000 m in stable rock of the Canadian Shield was completed in March 1998. The Review Panel found that while the concept was technically safe, it did not have the required level of public acceptability to be adopted at this time as Canada's approach for managing its nuclear fuel waste. The Panel recommended that a Waste Management Organization be established at arm's length from the nuclear industry, entirely funded by the waste producers and owners, and that it be subject to oversight by the Government. In its December 1998 Response to the Review Panel, the Government of Canada provided policy direction for the next steps towards developing Canada's approach for the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste. The Government chose to maintain the responsibility for long-term management of nuclear fuel waste close with the producers and owners of the waste. This is consistent with its 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste. This approach is also consistent with experience in many countries. In addition, the federal government identified the need for credible federal oversight. Cabinet directed the Minister of NRCan to consult with stakeholders, including the public, and return to ministers within 12 months with recommendations on means to implement federal oversight. (author)

  2. Canadian public and leadership attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surveys of the Canadian public and leadership were carried out to determine levels of knowledge, perceptions and attitudes toward the use of nuclear power in Canada. The public sample included population over 18 years broken down by region, age, sex and education. The leadership study sampled businessmen, politicians, civil servants, academics and environmentalists. Only 56 % of the public indicated a knowledge of the use of nuclear power: 68 % were in favour, and of these, 39 % were unsure of its safety. Environmentalits were the most knowledgealbe of all the leadership groups, with academics second, and the remaining groups having low levels of information. Fear-producing aspects defined by the survey should be used as the basis for providing information. All leadership groups except environmentalists favoured nuclear power development. Leadership groups identified the same disadvantages as the public (radiation, waste management, pollution and explosions) but added cost. (J.T.A.)

  3. Risk-informed decision-making in Canadian nuclear regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of concepts pertaining to risk management and risk-informed decision-making, in order to promote the understanding of their application in the Canadian nuclear regulatory climate. As stated in the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), the CNSC is required to protect the Canadian public against 'unreasonable risk' posed by activities it regulates. Additionally, the CNSC is expected to respect findings given in reports from the Office of the Auditor General (OAG), and to follow directives issued by the Government of Canada through Cabinet, hence, the Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulation (CDSR). The CNSC applies an approach that strives to be easily understandable, adaptable to many situations, supported by tools to gather information, is defensible, respects stakeholder consultations and is founded on open communication. The CNSC's conformance to the NSCA is broken into categories depending on the nature of the regulated facility: Class I power reactor facilities, non-power-reactor Class I facilities and Class II facilities. Internationally, different countries have different perspectives on risk. The paper argues that the CNSC's approach is consistent with practices of other nuclear regulatory bodies, which factor risk into their decision-making process. (author)

  4. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization maintains an ongoing assessment of the world's nuclear technology developments, as a core activity of its Strategic Plan. This publication reviews the current status of the nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle in Australia and around the world. Main issues discussed include: performances and economics of various types of nuclear reactors, uranium resources and requirements, fuel fabrication and technology, radioactive waste management. A brief account of the large international effort to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power is also given. 11 tabs., ills

  5. Reactor Structure Materials: Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress and achievements in 1999 in SCK-CEN's programme on applied and fundamental nuclear fuel research in 1999 are reported. Particular emphasis is on thermochemical fuel research, the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel as well as on integral experiments

  6. A new global regime of civil nuclear liability: Canadian membership in the international conventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is three-fold: (i) to provide information on the Canadian regime for third party nuclear liability; (ii) to provide an overview of current efforts to revise and update Canadian legislation in this area; and (iii) to present Canada's perspective on international nuclear liability and the prospect of joining one of the international conventions in the area. (author)

  7. Nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns an improvement for corrosion resistance of the welded portion of materials which constitutes a reprocessing plant of spent nuclear fuels. That is, Mo-added austenite stainless steel is used for a plant member at the portion in contact with a nitric acid solution. Then, laser beams are irradiated to the welded portion of the plant member and the surface layer is heated to higher than 1,000degC. If such a heat treatment is applied, the degradation of corrosion resistance of the welded portion can be eliminated at the surface. Further, since laser beams are utilized, heating can be limited only to the surface. Accordingly, undesired thermal deformation of the plant members can be prevented. As a result, the plant member having high pit corrosion resistance against a dissolution solution for spent fuels containing sludges comprising insoluble residue and having resistance to nitric acid solution also in the welded portion substantially equal to that of the matrix can be attained. (I.S.)

  8. MAPLE: a Canadian multipurpose reactor concept for national nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, following an investigation of Canadian and international needs and world-market prospects for research reactors, has developed a new multipurpose concept, called MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental). The MAPLE concept combines H2O- and D2O-moderated lattices within a D2O calandria tank in order to achieve the flux advantages of a basic H2O-cooled and moderated core along with the flexibility and space of a D2O-moderated core. The SUGAR (Slowpoke Uprated for General Applied Research) MAPLE version of the conept provides a range of utilization that is well suited to the needs of countries with nuclear programs at an early stage. The higher power MAPLE version furnishes high neutron flux levels and the variety of irradiation facilities that are appropriate for more advanced nuclear programs

  9. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey on hand aims at analysing in an unbiassed way the great number of recently issued inconsistent statements on pros and cons of prompt disposal of spent fuel from German nuclear power plants by reprocessing it according to the PUREX principle. Nuclear energy opponents emphatically doubt the technical feasability. Discussions on the issue were actually initiated by the official inquiry commission ''future energy policies'' of the 8sup(th) Bundestag of the FRG; in its final report on June 27, 1980 the commission also made suggestions concerning the erection of a demonstration reprocessing plant. On the authority of the Federal Minister of Research and Technology, Professor Wolf Haefele did a survey determining the ideal size of a demonstration reprocessing plant which the Federal Bundestag's Committee of Research and Technology approved in its meeting of December 7, 1981. When said survey was published, controversial discussion concerning contents and statements of the ''Haefele-paper'' began. Replies and independent statements were made, yet these have only in part been made available for the general public. (orig.)

  10. Improving Safety, Economic, Substantiality, and Security of Nuclear Energy with Canadian Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Holly; Pencer, Jeremy; Yetisir, Metin; Leung, Laurence [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor is one of the six design concepts being developed under the Generation IV International Forum. It is the only concept evolving from the water-cooled reactors and taking advantages of the balance-of-plant design and operation experience of the fossil-power plants. Canada is developing the SCR concept from the well-established pressure-tube reactor technology. The Canadian SCWR maintains modular design approach using relative small fuel channels with the separation of coolant and moderator. It is equipped with an advanced fuel channel design that is capable to transfer decay heat from the fuel to the moderator under the long-term cooling stage. Coupled with the advanced passive-moderator cooling system, cooling of fuel and fuel channel is continuous even without external power or operator intervention. The Canadian SCWR is operating at a pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 625 deg. C. This has led to a drastic increase in thermal efficiency to 48% from 34% of the current fleet of reactors (a 40% rise in relative efficiency). With the high core outlet temperature, a direct thermal cycle has been adopted and has led to simplification in plant design attributing to the cost reduction compared to the current reactor designs. The Canadian SCWR adopts the advanced Thorium fuel cycle to enhance the substantiality, economic, and security. than uranium in the world (estimated to be three times more). This provides the long-term fuel supply. Thorium's price is stable compared to uranium and is consistently lower than uranium. This would maintain the predictability and economic of fuel supply. Thorium itself is a non-fissile material and once irradiated requires special handling. This improves proliferative resistance. The objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements in generating nuclear energy with the Canadian SCWR.

  11. Improving Safety, Economic, Substantiality, and Security of Nuclear Energy with Canadian Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor is one of the six design concepts being developed under the Generation IV International Forum. It is the only concept evolving from the water-cooled reactors and taking advantages of the balance-of-plant design and operation experience of the fossil-power plants. Canada is developing the SCR concept from the well-established pressure-tube reactor technology. The Canadian SCWR maintains modular design approach using relative small fuel channels with the separation of coolant and moderator. It is equipped with an advanced fuel channel design that is capable to transfer decay heat from the fuel to the moderator under the long-term cooling stage. Coupled with the advanced passive-moderator cooling system, cooling of fuel and fuel channel is continuous even without external power or operator intervention. The Canadian SCWR is operating at a pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 625 deg. C. This has led to a drastic increase in thermal efficiency to 48% from 34% of the current fleet of reactors (a 40% rise in relative efficiency). With the high core outlet temperature, a direct thermal cycle has been adopted and has led to simplification in plant design attributing to the cost reduction compared to the current reactor designs. The Canadian SCWR adopts the advanced Thorium fuel cycle to enhance the substantiality, economic, and security. than uranium in the world (estimated to be three times more). This provides the long-term fuel supply. Thorium's price is stable compared to uranium and is consistently lower than uranium. This would maintain the predictability and economic of fuel supply. Thorium itself is a non-fissile material and once irradiated requires special handling. This improves proliferative resistance. The objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements in generating nuclear energy with the Canadian SCWR

  12. Canadian development program for off-gas management in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian program for the development and evaluation of processes and technology for the separation and containment of radioactive species in off-gases is directed towards the following specific aspects: 1) assessment of available treatment technology and evaluation of future clean-up requirements; 2) development and engineering evaluation, under realistic conditions, of promising new processes that would be inherently simpler and safer; and 3) specification of off-gas emission control systems for future nuclear facilities based on the most favourable technology. The program is being carried out by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in collaboration with the electrical utility, Ontario Hydro, and selected Canadian universities. A brief description is presented of methods for removing tritium and carbon-14 from the moderator systems of CANDU power reactors, methods for removing iodine from the off-gases of a molybdenum-99 production facility at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, and procedures for monitoring the off-gas effluent composition in the Thorium Fuel Reprocessing Experiment (TFRE) facility at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment

  13. Nuclear fuel tax in court

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides the 'Nuclear Energy Moratorium' (temporary shutdown of eight nuclear power plants after the Fukushima incident) and the legally decreed 'Nuclear Energy Phase-Out' (by the 13th AtG-amendment), also the legality of the nuclear fuel tax is being challenged in court. After receiving urgent legal proposals from 5 nuclear power plant operators, the Hamburg fiscal court (4V 154/13) temporarily obliged on 14 April 2014 respective main customs offices through 27 decisions to reimburse 2.2 b. Euro nuclear fuel tax to the operating companies. In all respects a remarkable process. It is not in favour of cleverness to impose a political target even accepting immense constitutional and union law risks. Taxation 'at any price' is neither a statement of state sovereignty nor one for a sound fiscal policy. Early and serious warnings of constitutional experts and specialists in the field of tax law with regard to the nuclear fuel tax were not lacking. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100th nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U3O8 were replaced by U3Si2-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to fulfill its mission that is to

  15. Review of the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress over the previous year in the nuclear fuel waste management program is reviewed. Universities, industry and consultants have become increasingly involved, and the work is being overseen by a Technical Advisory Committee. The program has also been investigated by Ontario's Porter Commission and Select Committe on Ontario Hydro Affairs. A public information program has been extended to cover most of the Canadian Shield region of Ontario. Ontario Hydro is studying spent fuel storage and transportation, while AECL is covering immobilization of spent fuel or processing wastes, geotechnical and geochemical research in the laboratory and in the field, design of disposal facilities, and environmental and safety assessments. (L.L.)

  16. Cranes, trains and nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the technology which backs up the various remote handling operations necessary for the removal of spent fuels from nuclear reactors, its transport to reactor ponds and finally to interim storage at British Nuclear Fuels Ltd.'s Sellafield reprocessing plant. Spent fuels are first loaded into stainless steel multi-element bottles (MEBs) and then into flasks. The design and construction of the flasks aims to prevent contamination during transport and ensure safe handling. The interim fuel storage of MEBs is also described. (UK)

  17. Nuclear energy: a world of service to humanity. 27th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 30th Canadian Nuclear Society/Canadian Nuclear Association student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 27th Annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society was held on June 11-14, 2006 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The conference gathered close to 400 scientists, engineers, technologists and students interested in all aspects and applications of energy from the atom. The central objective of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of views on how this technical enterprise can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. The plenary sessions addressed broad industrial and commercial developments in the field. Over eighty papers were presented in 15 technical sessions on the following topics: safety analysis; plant refurbishment; control room operation; nuclear chemistry and materials; advanced reactor design; plant operation; reactor physics; safety analysis; nuclear instrumentation; and, nuclear general topics. Embedded in the conference was the 30th student conference, sponsored by the Canadian Nuclear Society and the Canadian Nuclear Association. Over thirty-five papers were presented in five sessions on the following topics: corrosion processes; control systems / physics / modelling; and, chemistry / chemical engineering

  18. Nuclear criticality safety at global nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear criticality safety is the art and science of preventing or terminating an inadvertent nuclear chain reaction in non-reactor environment. Nuclear criticality safety as part of integrated safety program in the nuclear industry is the responsibility of regulators, management and operators. Over the past 36 years, Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF) has successfully developed an integrated nuclear criticality safety program for its BWR fuel manufacturing business. Implementation of this NRC-approved program includes three fundamental elements: administrative practices, controls and training. These elements establish nuclear criticality safety function responsibilities and nuclear criticality safety design criteria in accordance with double contingency principle. At GNF, a criticality safety computational system has been integrated into nuclear criticality safety program as an incredibly valuable tool for nuclear criticality safety design and control applications. This paper describes select elements of GNF nuclear criticality safety program with emphasis being placed on need for clear criticality safety function responsibilities, nuclear safety design criteria and associated double contingency implementation, as well as advanced Monte Carlo neutron transport codes used to derive subcritical safety limits. (authors)

  19. Nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus for the storage of fuel in a stainless steel egg crate structure within a storage pool are described. Fuel is initially stored in a checkerboard pattern or in each opening if the fuel is of low enrichment. Additional fuel (or fuel of higher enrichment) is later stored by adding stainless steel angled plates within each opening, thereby forming flux traps between the openings. Still higher enrichment fuel is later stored by adding poison plates either with or without the stainless steel angles. 8 claims

  20. Nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable a wider range of output fluctuation by reducing the stress in the way of the connection between the lower end plug and the cladding tubes and thus increase the stress corrosion life. Constitution: Plurality of uranium dioxide pellets are filled in the zirconium alloy cladding tubes and the upper and lower ends are closed by zirconium alloy plugs to form nuclear fuel rods. The lower plug is provided with a hole from the inner side and in the axial direction of the plug. A structure of thermally conductive material, the conductivity of which is higher than that of the zirconium used for forming the plug, is provided in such a way that it has some clearance with the side of the said hole. By providing a hole on the lower plug and by installing a highly thermally conductive structure in it, the average temperature differential between the lower plug and the cladding tube is reduced thus reducing the thermal stress on the lower plug. (Yoshihara, Y.)

  1. Lessons learned in planning the Canadian Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2006, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) began implementing a $7B CDN, 70-year Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) to deal with legacy decommissioning and environmental issues at AECL nuclear sites. The objective of the NLLP is to safely and cost-effectively reduce the nuclear legacy liabilities and associated risks based on sound waste management and environmental principles in the best interest of Canadians. The liabilities include shutdown research and prototype power reactors, fuel handling facilities, radiochemical laboratories, support buildings, radioactive waste storage facilities, and contaminated lands at several sites located across eastern Canada from Quebec to Manitoba. The largest site, Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in Ontario, will continue as an operational nuclear site for the foreseeable future. Planning and delivery of the Program is managed by the Liability Management Unit (LMU), a group that was formed within AECL for the purpose. The composition and progress of the NLLP has been reported in recent conferences. The NLLP comprises a number of interlinked decommissioning, waste management and environmental restoration activities that are being executed at different sites, and by various technical groups as suppliers to the LMU. Many lessons about planning and executing such a large, diverse Program have been learned in planning the initial five-year 'start-up' phase (which will conclude 2011 March), in planning the five-year second phase (which is currently being finalized), and in planning individual and interacting activities within the Program. The activities to be undertaken in the start-up phase were planned by a small group of AECL technical experts using the currently available information on the liabilities. Progress in executing the Program was slower than anticipated due to less than ideal alignment between some planned technical solutions and the actual requirements, as well as the

  2. Disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1978, the governments of Canada and Ontario established the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management program. As of the time of the conference, the research performed by AECL was jointly funded by AECL and Ontario Hydro through the CANDU owners' group. Ontario Hydro have also done some of the research on disposal containers and vault seals. From 1978 to 1992, AECL's research and development on disposal cost about C$413 million, of which C$305 was from funds provided to AECL by the federal government, and C$77 million was from Ontario Hydro. The concept involves the construction of a waste vault 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield. Used fuel (or possibly solidified reprocessing waste) would be sealed into containers (of copper, titanium or special steel) and emplaced (probably in boreholes) in the vault floor, surrounded by sealing material (buffer). Disposal rooms might be excavated on more than one level. Eventually all excavated openings in the rock would be backfilled and sealed. Research is organized under the following headings: disposal container, waste form, vault seals, geosphere, surface environment, total system, assessment of environmental effects. A federal Environmental Assessment Panel is assessing the concept (holding public hearings for the purpose) and will eventually make recommendations to assist the governments of Canada and Ontario in deciding whether to accept the concept, and how to manage nuclear fuel waste. 16 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  3. Underlying chemistry research for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the underlying chemistry research part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, carried out in the Research Chemistry Branch. This research is concerned with developing the basic chemical knowledge and under-standing required in other parts of the Program. There are four areas of underlying research: Waste Form Chemistry, Solute and Solution Chemistry, Rock-Water-Waste Interactions, and Abatement and Monitoring of Gas-Phase Radionuclides

  4. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  5. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 8. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference contains papers under the major topics of plant life extension, safety and the environment, reactor physics, thermohydraulics I, development and deployment, thermohydraulics II, operations I, safety r and d post chernobyl, fuel channels, operations II, and nuclear technology developments

  6. LOFT nuclear fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the calculational models used to predict fuel rod response for Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) data from the first LOFT nuclear test is presented and discussed and a comparison of predictions with experimental data is made

  7. Nuclear fuel waste disposal. Canada's consultative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past two decades, society has increasingly demanded more public participation and public input into decision-making by governments. Development of the Canadian concept for deep geological disposal of used nuclear fuel has proceeded in a manner that has taken account of the requirements for social acceptability as well as technical excellence. As the agency responsible for development of the disposal concept, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has devoted considerable effort to consultation with the various publics that have an interest in the concept. This evolutionary interactive and consultative process, which has been underway for some 14 years, has attempted to keep the public informed of the technical development of the concept and to invite feedback. This paper describes the major elements of this evolutionary process, which will continue throughout the concept assessment and review process currently in progress. (author)

  8. Romanian-Canadian joint program for qualification of FCN as a CANDU fuel supplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RENEL (Romania Power Authority), the co-ordinator of Romanian Nuclear Program, have decided to improve, starting 1990 the existing capability to produce CANDU nuclear fuel at FCN Pitesti. The objective of the program was defined with AAC (AECL - ANSALDO Consortium) for the qualification of FCN fuel plant according to Canadian Z299.2 standard. The Qualification Program was performed under AAC Work Order C-003. The co-ordination was assumed by AECL, as overall Design Authority. ZPI (Zircatec Precision Industries Inc., Canada), were designated to supply technical assistance, equipments and know how where necessary. After a preliminary verification of the FCN fuel plant, including the processes and system investigation, performed under AECL and ZPI assistance, the Qualification Program was defined in all details. The upgrading of documentation on all aspects required by Z299.2 was performed. Few processes needed to be reconsidered and equipment was delivered by ZPI or other suppliers. This includes mainly welding equipments and special inspection equipments. Health Physics was practically fully reconsidered. New equipment and practice were adapted to provide adequate control on health conditions. Every manufacturing and inspection process was checked to determine their performance during a Qualification Run based on acceptance criteria which have been established in the Qualification Plan. Manufacturing Demonstration Run was an important step to prove that all plant functions have been accomplished during the fabrication of 200 fuel bundles. These bundles have been fully accepted and 66 of them have been loaded in the first charge of Unit 1 Cemavoda NPS. The surveillance and audit actions made by AECL and ZPI during this period confirmed the FCN capability to operate an adequate system meeting the to required quality assurance standard. The very open attitude of AECL, Zircatec and FCN staff have stimulated the progress of the project and a successful achievement of the

  9. Nuclear fuel rod supporting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A grid structure for holding a number of nuclear fuel rods is described. The grid structure is of the type having walls including rigidly interconnected generally rectangular metal strips, forming passageways and adapted to support nuclear fuel rods within some of the passageways. The improvement provides elongated slots intermediate and normal to the longitudinal edges of each of the strips at each intersection of the strips. The slots form openings in each corner of each passageway

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, C.W.; Baumeister, E.B.

    1961-09-01

    A reactor fuel element utilizing fissionable fuel materials in plate form is described. This fuel element consists of bundles of fuel-bearing plates. The bundles are stacked inside of a tube which forms the shell of the fuel element. The plates each have longitudinal fins running parallel to the direction of coolant flow, and interspersed among and parallel to the fins are ribs which position the plates relative to each other and to the fuel element shell. The plate bundles are held together by thin bands or wires. The ex tended surface increases the heat transfer capabilities of a fuel element by a factor of 3 or more over those of a simple flat plate.

  11. Alternatives for nuclear fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel is one of the most important issues in the nuclear industry, currently spent fuel management is been cause of great amount of research, investments in the construction of repositories or constructing the necessary facilities to reprocess the fuel, and later to recycle the plutonium recovered in thermal reactors. What is the best solution? or, What is the best technology for a specific solution? Many countries have deferred the decision on selecting an option, while other works actively constructing repositories and others implementing the reprocessing facilities to recycle the plutonium obtained from nuclear spent fuel. In Mexico the nuclear power is limited to two reactors BWR type and medium size. So the nuclear spent fuel discharged has been accommodated at reactor's spent fuel pools. Originally these pools have enough capacity to accommodate spent fuel for the 40 years of designed plant operation. However, currently is under process an extended power up rate to 20% of their original power and also there are plans to extend operational life for 20 more years. Under these conditions there will not be enough room for spent fuel in the pools. So this work describes some different alternatives that have been studied in Mexico to define which will be the best alternative to follow. (Author)

  12. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Nuclear Engineering has shown expertise in the field of nuclear and energy systems ad correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained over decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in the design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in the production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. The Nuclear Fuel Center is responsible for the production of the nuclear fuel necessary for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor. Development of new fuel technologies is also a permanent concern

  13. Development opportunities for communities: a point of view from the Canadian association of nuclear host communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. Kraemer, Chairperson, Canadian Association for Nuclear Host Communities (CANHC), and Mayor of Kincardine, the host community of the Bruce nuclear power station, brought forward some 'grass roots ideals' of elected officials. The CANHC was recently created in recognition of the need for nuclear host communities to come together to engage not only the nuclear industry, but provincial and federal government as well, in a public dialogue. This association will champion host community needs as the new option-weighing process goes forward. It was a disappointment that the association did not receive a seat on the WMO board. With the new NFW Act, geological disposal of spent fuel waste is no longer a foregone conclusion, and the communities woke up to the possibility that waste now cooling within the nuclear power station area may potentially remain there for a much longer term. Even if these wastes are one day transported away from reactor sites, long-term storage on site needs attention. Mayor Kraemer views that a community not currently hosting a nuclear installation would volunteer to receive waste only on economic motives. Current host communities concentrate knowledge of nuclear operations and issues. Mayor Kraemer then recounted his own constituents' perceptions of the ongoing siting process for a low- and intermediate-level nuclear waste storage facility in Kincardine. He highlighted the importance of mutual co-operation between the nuclear industry and the municipality to 'debunk public hysteria', characterising 'fear' as 'False Expectations Appearing Real'. A Memorandum of Understanding has been developed between his municipal government and the local nuclear station, foreseeing elements of public education, safety and management methodology. In Mayor Kraemer's view, making an active investment in waste management solutions at the local level can realize the economic aspirations of both the community and the nuclear sector. (author)

  14. IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation discussing the IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle reviews the following issues: organizational charts of IAEA, division of nuclear power and the fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle and materials section; 1997 budget estimates; budget trends; the nuclear fuel cycle programme

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  17. Emergency Mitigating Equipments - Post Fukushima Actions at Canadian Nuclear Power Plants - Portable AC Power Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident in 2011, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission set up a Task Force to evaluate operational, technical and regulatory implications on Canadian NPPs. While accepting that the risk from beyond-design-basis accidents (BDBA) at Canadian NPPs is very low, the Task Force identified a number of areas where additional improvements or confirmatory assessments would further enhance safety. As a result, a set of 36 Fukushima Action Items (FAIs) were assigned to the licensees. This paper focuses on the FAI related to electrical power system enhancements to address a total loss of all AC Power leading to a possibility of loss of heat sinks (i.e. Station Blackout). This required the licensees to implement the following: - Additional back up power supplied by portable diesel generator(s) to allow key instrumentation and control equipment and key electrical loads to remain operable; - Provisions for a storage and timely transportation and connection of the portable generator(s) to the applicable units; - Provisions for testing of the portable generator; - Provisions for fuelling of portable generators; - Provisions such as panels, receptacles, and connectors to quickly deploy the portable generators to plant system, and separate feeder cables route to avoid a common mode failure; - Load shedding strategy to extend the existing station's battery life to ensure that the connection of portable generators can be completed before the batteries are depleted; - Provisions to supply water to steam generators and Irradiated Fuel Bay using portable pumps; The paper will also provide a brief description of Electrical power systems of the Canadian NPPs designed to satisfy the high safety and reliability requirements for nuclear systems, which are based on the following: - 2 group design philosophy (Group 1 and Group 2 Electrical Power Systems) - 2 separate groups of onsite emergency generators (Class III Standby generators and Emergency

  18. Argumentation in the Canadian House of Commons on the Issue of Nuclear Weapons for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John Alfred

    The Cuban missile crisis of October 1962 forced the Canadian House of Commons to consider whether Canadian forces in NORAD and NATO were effective without nuclear warheads on special weapons systems. This paper provides an overview of the debates and their milieu, identifies the issues involved, and analyzes the effects of the argumentation. The…

  19. Nuclear fuel cycle. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle information in some countries that develop, supply or use nuclear energy is presented. Data about Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Netherlands, Italy, Denmarmark, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Finland, Spain and India are included. The information is presented in a tree-like graphic way. (C.S.A.)

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle information in the main countries that develop, supply or use nuclear energy is presented. Data about Japan, FRG, United Kingdom, France and Canada are included. The information is presented in a tree-like graphic way. (C.S.A.)

  1. Nuclear fuel materials research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research has been to produce information and develop our own testing resources related to new fuel designs, behaviour of present fuel designs, fuel inspection methods and control rod materials. At the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) the nuclear fuel materials programme has produced data which have been utilized in procurement, behavioural analysis and surveillance of the fuel used in the Finnish nuclear power stations. In addition to our own experience, data on fuel behaviour have been received by participating in the international cooperation projects, such as OECD/Halden, Studsvik-Ramp-programmes, IAEA/BEFAST and VVER-fuel research projects. The volume of the research work financed by the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland in the years 1984-1986 has been about 9 man years. The report is the summary report of the research work conducted in the KTM-financed nuclear fuel materials programme in the years 1984-1986

  2. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Regulation of Uranium Mines and Mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible to the public as its primary stakeholder for carrying out the mandate of the Nuclear Safety Control Act (NSCA). The CNSC regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment and to respect Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. One of the areas of control from the NSCA stipulates that no person shall mine or process uranium except in accordance with a licence issued by the CNSC. The NSCA further stipulates that the CNSC may not issue a licence unless it is of the opinion that the applicant is qualified to carry out the activity that the licence authorizes, and that in carrying out the activity, the applicant will make adequate provision for the protection of the environment, the health and safety of persons, the maintenance of national security and measures to implement international obligations to which Canada has agreed. In order to safely manage the uranium mine facility and monitor compliance with regulatory requirements, the CNSC: 1) sets and documents clear requirements, using a process that includes public consultation; 2) verifies that the operator's processes and programmes satisfy regulatory requirements; 3) provides stakeholders with the opportunity to be heard; 4) bases decisions on thorough, unbiased assessments performed by CNSC staff of objective, factual evidence; and 5) assesses the performance of licensees with respect to their protection of the environment, as well as the health and safety of persons and security. The paper will describe these activities in the context of best environmental protection practices and the CNSC licensing and compliance processes for existing, new or historical legacy uranium mine facilities. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grid-shaped spacer for PWR fuel elements consists of flat, upright metal bars at right angles to the fuel rods. In one corner of a grid mesh it has a spring with two end parts for the fuel rod. The cut-outs for the end parts start from an end edge of the metal bar parallel to the fuel rods. The transverse metal bar is one of four outer metal bars. Both end parts of the spring have an extension parallel to this outer metal arm, which grips a grid mesh adjacent to this grid mesh at the side in one corner of the spacer and forms an end part of a spring for the fuel rod there on the inside of the outer metal bar. (HP)

  4. Nuclear fuel procurement management at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The market situation of nuclear fuel cycles is highlighted. It also summarises the possible contract models and the elements of effective management for nuclear fuel procurement at nuclear power station based upon the nuclear fuel procurement practice of Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS)

  5. Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel are being developed to meet safeguards and materials managment requirements at nuclear facilities. Spent-fuel measurement technology and its applications are reviewed

  6. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation.

  7. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation

  8. Rack for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed spent fuel elements. Each fuel element is supported at the lower end thereof by a respective support that rests on the floor of the spent fuel pool for a nuclear power plant. An open rack frame is employed as an upright support for the enclosures containing the spent fuel elements. Legs at the lower corners of the frame rest on the floor of the pool to support the frame. In one exemplary embodiment, the support for the fuel element is in the form of a base on which a fuel element rests and the base is supported by legs. In another exemplary embodiment, each fuel element is supported on the pool floor by a self-adjusting support in the form of a base on which a fuel element rests and the base rests on a ball or swivel joint for self-alignment. The lower four corners of the frame are supported by legs adjustable in height for leveling the frame. Each adjustable frame leg is in the form of a base resting on the pool floor and the base supports a threaded post. The threaded post adjustably engages a threaded column on which rests the lower end of the frame. 16 claims, 14 figures

  9. Fuel alternatives for oil sands development - the nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently natural gas is the fuel of choice in all oil sand developments. Alberta sources of hydrocarbon based fuels are large but limited. Canadian nuclear technology was studied as a possible alternative for providing steam for the deep commercial in situ oil sand projects which were initiated over ten years ago. Because the in situ technology of that time required steam at pressures in excess of 10 MPa, the nuclear option required the development of new reactor technology, or the use of steam compressors, which was not economical. The current SAGD (steam assisted gravity drainage) technology requires steam at pressures of less than 5 MPa, which is in the reach of existing Canadian nuclear technology. The cost of supplying steam for a SAGD in situ project using a CANDU 3 nuclear reactor was developed. The study indicates that for gas prices in excess of $2.50 per gigajoule, replacing natural gas fuel with a nuclear reactor is economically feasible for in situ projects in excess of 123 thousand barrels per day. (author). 9 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs

  10. Material input of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Material Input (MI) of nuclear fuel, expressed in terms of the total amount of natural material needed for manufacturing a product, is examined. The suitability of the MI method for assessing the environmental impacts of fuels is also discussed. Material input is expressed as a Material Input Coefficient (MIC), equalling to the total mass of natural material divided by the mass of the completed product. The material input coefficient is, however, only an intermediate result, which should not be used as such for the comparison of different fuels, because the energy contents of nuclear fuel is about 100 000-fold compared to the energy contents of fossil fuels. As a final result, the material input is expressed in proportion to the amount of generated electricity, which is called MIPS (Material Input Per Service unit). Material input is a simplified and commensurable indicator for the use of natural material, but because it does not take into account the harmfulness of materials or the way how the residual material is processed, it does not alone express the amount of environmental impacts. The examination of the mere amount does not differentiate between for example coal, natural gas or waste rock containing usually just sand. Natural gas is, however, substantially more harmful for the ecosystem than sand. Therefore, other methods should also be used to consider the environmental load of a product. The material input coefficient of nuclear fuel is calculated using data from different types of mines. The calculations are made among other things by using the data of an open pit mine (Key Lake, Canada), an underground mine (McArthur River, Canada) and a by-product mine (Olympic Dam, Australia). Furthermore, the coefficient is calculated for nuclear fuel corresponding to the nuclear fuel supply of Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) company in 2001. Because there is some uncertainty in the initial data, the inaccuracy of the final results can be even 20-50 per cent. The value

  11. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly of PWR comprises a fuel bundle portion supported by a plurality of support lattices and an upper and lower nozzles each secured to the upper and lower portions. Leaf springs are attached to the four sides of the upper nozzle for preventing rising of the fuel assembly by streams of cooling water by the contact with an upper reactor core plate. The leaf springs are attached to the upper nozzle so that four leaf springs are laminated. The uppermost leaf spring is bent slightly upwardly from the mounted portion and the other leaf springs are extended linearly from the mounted portion without being bent. The mounted portions of the leaf springs are stacked and secured to the upper nozzle by a bolt obliquely relative to the axial line of the fuel assembly. (I.N.)

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel element for a BWR known from the patent application DE 2824265 is developed so that the screw only breaks on the expansion shank with reduced diameter if the expansion forces are too great. (HP)

  14. Dry spent nuclear fuel transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newport News Shipbuilding, (NNS), has been transferring spent nuclear fuel in a dry condition for over 25 years. It is because of this successful experience that NNS decided to venture into the design, construction and operation of a commercial dry fuel transfer project. NNS is developing a remote handling system for the dry transfer of spent nuclear fuel. The dry fuel transfer system is applicable to spent fuel pool-to-cask or cask-to-cask or both operations. It is designed to be compatible with existing storage cask technology as well as the developing multi-purpose canister design. The basis of NNS' design is simple. It must be capable of transferring all fuel designs, it must be capable of servicing 100 percent of the commercial nuclear plants, it must protect the public and nuclear operators, it must be operated cost efficiently and it must be transportable. Considering the basic design parameters, the following are more specific requirements included in the design: (a) Total weight of transfer cask less than 24 tons; (b) no requirement for permanent site modifications to support system utilization; (c) minimal radiation dose to operating personnel; (d) minimal generation of radioactive waste; (e) adaptability to any size and length fuel or cask; (f) portability of system allowing its efficient movement from site to site; (g) safe system; all possible ''off normal'' situations are being considered, and resultant safety systems are being engineered into NNS' design to mitigate problems. The primary focus of this presentation is to provide an overview of NNS' Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Transfer System. (author). 5 refs

  15. Life cycle assessment of camelina oil derived biodiesel and jet fuel in the Canadian Prairies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the environmental impact of biodiesel and hydroprocessed renewable jet fuel derived from camelina oil in terms of global warming potential, human health, ecosystem quality, and energy resource consumption. The life cycle inventory is based on production activities in the Canadian Prairies and encompasses activities ranging from agricultural production to oil extraction and fuel conversion. The system expansion method is used in this study to avoid allocation and to credit input energy to co-products associated with the products displaced in the market during camelina oil extraction and fuel processing. This is the preferred allocation method for LCA analysis in the context of most renewable and sustainable energy programs. The results show that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 1 MJ of camelina derived biodiesel ranged from 7.61 to 24.72 g CO2 equivalent and 3.06 to 31.01 kg CO2/MJ equivalent for camelina HRJ fuel. Non-renewable energy consumption for camelina biodiesel ranged from 0.40 to 0.67 MJ/MJ; HRJ fuel ranged from − 0.13 to 0.52 MJ/MJ. Camelina oil as a feedstock for fuel production accounted for the highest contribution to overall environmental performance, demonstrating the importance of reducing environmental burdens during the agricultural production process. Attaining higher seed yield would dramatically lower environmental impacts associated with camelina seed, oil, and fuel production. The lower GHG emissions and energy consumption associated with camelina in comparison with other oilseed derived fuel and petroleum fuel make camelina derived fuel from Canadian Prairies environmentally attractive. - Highlights: • LCA of camelina-derived biodiesel and jet fuel was based on the Canadian Prairies. • Overall, camelina-derived biodiesel had lower GHG emissions than is biojet fuel. • Camelina jet fuel had lower non-renewable energy (NRE) use than its biodiesel. • Camelina biofuels reduced GHG emissions and NRE use relative

  16. Life cycle assessment of camelina oil derived biodiesel and jet fuel in the Canadian Prairies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xue; Mupondwa, Edmund, E-mail: Edmund.Mupondwa@agr.gc.ca

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the environmental impact of biodiesel and hydroprocessed renewable jet fuel derived from camelina oil in terms of global warming potential, human health, ecosystem quality, and energy resource consumption. The life cycle inventory is based on production activities in the Canadian Prairies and encompasses activities ranging from agricultural production to oil extraction and fuel conversion. The system expansion method is used in this study to avoid allocation and to credit input energy to co-products associated with the products displaced in the market during camelina oil extraction and fuel processing. This is the preferred allocation method for LCA analysis in the context of most renewable and sustainable energy programs. The results show that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 1 MJ of camelina derived biodiesel ranged from 7.61 to 24.72 g CO{sub 2} equivalent and 3.06 to 31.01 kg CO{sub 2}/MJ equivalent for camelina HRJ fuel. Non-renewable energy consumption for camelina biodiesel ranged from 0.40 to 0.67 MJ/MJ; HRJ fuel ranged from − 0.13 to 0.52 MJ/MJ. Camelina oil as a feedstock for fuel production accounted for the highest contribution to overall environmental performance, demonstrating the importance of reducing environmental burdens during the agricultural production process. Attaining higher seed yield would dramatically lower environmental impacts associated with camelina seed, oil, and fuel production. The lower GHG emissions and energy consumption associated with camelina in comparison with other oilseed derived fuel and petroleum fuel make camelina derived fuel from Canadian Prairies environmentally attractive. - Highlights: • LCA of camelina-derived biodiesel and jet fuel was based on the Canadian Prairies. • Overall, camelina-derived biodiesel had lower GHG emissions than is biojet fuel. • Camelina jet fuel had lower non-renewable energy (NRE) use than its biodiesel. • Camelina biofuels reduced GHG emissions and NRE

  17. Executive brief to federal government 'the Canadian nuclear industry - a national asset'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over a period of 40 years Canada has developed a remarkable nuclear industry. In keeping with our mining heritage, we are the world's leading uranium producer, with the highest grade orebodies in existence still waiting to be tapped. In the realm of high technology development, our CANDU reactor is second to none. Year after year Canadian CANDUs dominate the 'top 10' performance records world-wide. The nuclear industry has created direct employment for over 30,000 Canadians. The 'high tech' sectors of the industry are now vigorously seeking export markets for their products and services. As the world recovers from the recent prolonged recession, electricity demand is rising. Once again electricity is the engine of growth. Already utilities are planning to add new generating capacity. Canadian nuclear resources, technology and skilled people are proven and available. By seizing the opportunities which are opening up for us, a properly recognized nuclear industry can make a vital contribution to Canada's economic renewal. This brief has been prepared by the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA) in response to the challenge issued to Canadians in Finance Minister Michael Wilson's document 'A New Direction for Canada'. This brief responds in terms of the major policy issues and opportunities as seen by the Canadian nuclear industry

  18. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  19. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and

  20. Inspection of nuclear fuel transport in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience acquired in inspecting nuclear fuel shipments carried out in Spain will serve as a basis for establishing the regulations wich must be adhered to for future transports, as the transport of nuclear fuels in Spain will increase considerably within the next years as a result of the Spanish nuclear program. The experience acquired in nuclear fuel transport inspection is described. (author)

  1. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: public involvement and social aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities undertaken to provide information to the public about the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program as well as the opportunities for public involvement in the direction and development of the disposal concept through government inquiries and commissions and specific initiatives undertaken by AECL. Public viewpoints and the major issues identified by the public to be of particular concern and importance in evaluating the acceptability of the concept are described. In addition, how the issues have been addressed during the development of the disposal concept or how they could be addressed during implementation of the disposal concept are presented. There is also discussion of public perspectives of risk, the ethical aspects of nuclear fuel waste disposal, and public involvement in siting a nuclear fuel waste disposal facility. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is funded jointly by AECL and Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group. (author)

  2. Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation: medicine, materials, energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the establishment of the Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation Inc for medicine, materials, energy and the environment. Its objectives are to capture the full potential of the uranium value chain in Saskatchewan, create an R&D network for nuclear science and launch a new centre for research in nuclear medicine and materials science.

  3. Regulating nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act in 1946, it erected the framework for nuclear safety in Canada. Under the Act, the government created the Atomic Energy Control Board and gave it the authority to make and enforce regulations governing every aspect of nuclear power production and use in this country. The Act gives the Control Board the flexibility to amend its regulations to adapt to changes in technology, health and safety standards, co-operative agreements with provincial agencies and policy regarding trade in nuclear materials. This flexibility has allowed the Control Board to successfully regulate the nuclear industry for more than 40 years. Its mission statement 'to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment' concisely states the Control Board's primary objective. The Atomic Energy Control Board regulates all aspects of nuclear energy in Canada to ensure there is no undue risk to health, safety, security or the environment. It does this through a multi-stage licensing process

  4. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  5. Nuclear fuel cycle studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the metal-matrix encapsulation of radioactive waste, brittle-fracture, leach-rate, and migration studies are being conducted. For fuel reprocessing, annular and centrifugal contactors are being tested and modeled. For the LWBR proof-of-breeding project, the full-scale shear and the prototype dissolver were procured and tested. 5 figures

  6. Contracting for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with uranium sales contracts, i.e. with contractual arrangements in the first steps of the fuel cycle, which cover uranium production and conversion. The various types of contract are described and, where appropriate, their underlying business philosophy and their main terms and conditions. Finally, the specific common features of such contracts are reviewed. (NEA)

  7. Nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable a tight seal in fuel rods while keeping the sealing gas pressure at an exact predetermined pressure in fuel rods. Constitution: A vent aperture and a valve are provided to the upper end plug of a cladding tube. At first, the valve is opened to fill gas at a predetermined pressure in the fuel can. Then, a conical valve body is closely fitted to a valve seat by the rotation of a needle valve to eliminate the gap in the engaging thread portion and close the vent aperture. After conducting the reduced pressure test for the fuel rod in a water tank, welding joints are formed between the valve and the end plug through welding to completely seal the cladding tube. Since the welding is conducted after the can has been closed by the valve, the predetermined gas pressure can be maintained at an exact level with no efforts from welding heat and with effective gas leak prevention by the double sealing. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Grid for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer grid for nuclear fuel rods is formed of generally identical metal straps arranged in crossed relation to define a multiplicity of cells adapted to receive elongated fuel elements or the like. The side walls of each cell have openings for intercell mixing of coolant and tabs from edges of the openings defining helical coolant deflectors in the cells. Tabs from adjacent side walls are fixedly secured together to provide rigidifying flanges for the grid. Spring fingers at the ends of the cells provide for holding fuel rods against fixed stops

  9. Country nuclear fuel cycle profiles. Second ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication presents an overall review of worldwide nuclear fuel cycle activities, followed by country specific nuclear fuel cycle information. This information is presented in a concise form and focuses on the essential activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in each country operating commercial nuclear power reactors or providing nuclear fuel cycle services. It also includes country specific diagrams which illustrate the main material flow in the nuclear fuel cycle. These illustrations are intended to help clarify understanding of both the essential nuclear fuel cycle activities in each country and international relationships. Section 1 provides an introduction and Section 2 a review of worldwide nuclear fuel cycle activities, dealing with mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, heavy water production, spent fuel management, and the dismantling of facilities. Individual country profiles are then given in Section 3

  10. The status of the Canadian nuclear power program and possible future strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present Canadian nuclear power program based on the CANDU-PHW reactor, future commitments, and the status of heavy water production, are discussed, together with short term prospects over the next 20 years. The longer term favours fuels with higher fissile content than natural uranium. Possible future strategies are discussed, which include consideration of a number of different fuel cycles for the different types of CANDU reactor, i.e. CANDU-PHW, CANDU-BLW, CANDU-PLW and CANDU-OCR. It is concluded that: CANDU-PHW reactor is fully reliable and competative; organic and boiling water cooled variations promise savings of 15 to 20% in both capital and unit energy costs; the CANDU concept offers the opportunity for large improvements in uranium conservation whilst remaining economically competitive, by use of plutonium recycle and/or thorium; using the CANDU concept with thorium it is possible to limit the total uranium requirement for a given nuclear power capacity; and finally a system based on CANDU-PHW reactors could introduce FBR reactors more quickly and efficiently than one based on LWR reactors. (U.K.)

  11. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for Fuel Cladding in Canadian SCWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yimin; Guzonas, David

    2016-02-01

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is an innovative next generation reactor that offers many promising features, but the high-temperature high-pressure coolant introduces unique challenges to the long-term safe and reliable operation of in-core components, in particular the fuel cladding. To achieve high thermal efficiency, the Canadian SCWR concept has a coolant core outlet temperature of 625°C at 25 MPa with a peak cladding temperature as high as 800°C. International and Canadian research programs on corrosion issues in supercritical water have been conducted to support the SCWR concept. This paper provides a brief review of corrosion in supercritical water and summarizes the Canadian corrosion assessment work on potential fuel cladding materials. Five alloys, SS 347H, SS310S, Alloy 800H, Alloy 625 and Alloy 214, have been shown to have sufficient corrosion resistance to be used as the fuel cladding. Additional work, including tests in an in-reactor loop, is needed to confirm that these alloys would work as the fuel cladding in the Canadian SCWR.

  12. Nuclear Technology and Canadian Oil Sands: Integration of Nuclear Power with In-Situ Oil Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report analyzes the technical aspects and the economics of utilizing nuclear reactors to provide the energy needed for a Canadian oil sands extraction facility using Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) technology. The energy from the nuclear reactor would replace the energy supplied by natural gas, which is currently burned at these facilities. There are a number of concerns surrounding the continued use of natural gas, including carbon dioxide emissions and increasing gas prices. Three scenarios for the use of the reactor are analyzed:(1) using the reactor to produce only the steam needed for the SAGD process; (2) using the reactor to produce steam as well as electricity for the oil sands facility; and (3) using the reactor to produce steam, electricity, and hydrogen for upgrading the bitumen from the oil sands to syncrude, a material similar to conventional crude oil. Three reactor designs were down-selected from available options to meet the expected mission demands and siting requirements. These include the Canadian ACR- 700, Westinghouse's AP 600 and the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). The report shows that nuclear energy would be feasible, practical, and economical for use at an oil sands facility. Nuclear energy is two to three times cheaper than natural gas for each of the three scenarios analyzed. Also, by using nuclear energy instead of natural gas, a plant producing 100,000 barrels of bitumen per day would prevent up to 100 mega-tonnes of CO2 per year from being released into the atmosphere. (authors)

  13. Nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent eutectic reaction between coil spring material and end plug material at the welding work of fuel fabrication. Constitution: Close-contact windings are formed at the end of a coil spring, and base end of a stainless steel supporting member is screwed to the close-contact winding portion of the coil spring. The other end of the supporting member is formed in a conical shape whose apex is in contact with the center of the bottom surface of a zirconium alloy end plug of a cladding tube. In the fuel rod thus constructed, the heating temperature of the end contact portion of the supporting member, at the time of welding the end plug to the cladding tube, can be somewhat lower than the eutectic temperatures of iron, chromium, nickel (the main ingredients of the stainless steel) and zirconium (the main ingredient of the end plug), and accourdingly no eutectic reaction occurs. (Yoshihara, H.)

  14. Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term wide development of nuclear power requires new approaches towards the realization of nuclear fuel cycle, namely, closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with respect to fission materials. Plant nuclear fuel cycle (PNFC), which is in fact the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel unloaded from the reactor and the production of new nuclear fuel (NF) at the same place together with reactor plant, can be one variant of CNFC. Developing and projecting of PNFC is a complicated high-technology innovative process that requires modern information support. One of the components of this information support is developed by the authors. This component is the programme conducting calculations for various variants of process flow sheets for reprocessing SNF and production of NF. Central in this programme is the blocks library, where the blocks contain mathematical description of separate processes and operations. The calculating programme itself has such a structure that one can configure the complex of blocks and correlations between blocks, appropriate for any given flow sheet. For the ready sequence of operations balance calculations are made of all flows, i.e. expenses, element and substance makeup, heat emission and radiation rate are determined. The programme is open and the block library can be updated. This means that more complicated and detailed models of technological processes will be added to the library basing on the results of testing processes using real equipment, in test operating mode. The development of the model for the realization of technical-economic analysis of various variants of technologic PNFC schemes and the organization of 'operator's advisor' is expected. (authors)

  15. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Compliance Program for Uranium Mines and Mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is the principal nuclear regulator in Canada. The CNSC is empowered through the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and its associated regulations, to regulate the entire nuclear cycle which includes: uranium mining and milling, uranium refining and processing, fuel fabrication, power generation and nuclear waste management. A CNSC uranium mine licence is required by a proponent to site, prepare, construct, operate, decommission and abandon this nuclear facility. The CNSC licence is the legal instrument that authorizes the regulated activities and incorporates conditions and regulatory controls. Following a favourable Commission Tribunal decision to issue a licence to authorize the licensed activities, CNSC develops and executes a compliance plan of the licensee’s programs and procedures. The CNSC compliance plan is risk-informed and applies its resources to the identified higher risk areas. The compliance program is designed to encourage compliance by integrating three components: promotion, verification and enforcement and articulates the CNSC expectations to attain and maintain compliance with its regulatory requirements. The licensee performance is assessed through compliance activities and reported to the Commission to inform the licensing process during licence renewal. The application of the ongoing compliance assessment and risk management model ensures that deviations from impact predictions are addressed in a timely manner. The Uranium Mines and Mills Division of the CNSC are preparing to meet the challenges of the planned expansion of their Canadian uranium mining industry. The presentation will discuss these challenges and the measures required to address them. The Uranium Mines and Mills Division (UMMD) have adopted a structured compliance framework which includes formal procedures to conduct site inspections. New UMMD staff are trained to apply the regulations to licensed sites and to manage non

  16. Training nuclear watchdogs: Safeguards and nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a Swedish fuel fabrication plant the IAEA inspectors learn the ins and outs of the powder and the pellets which are key parts of the nuclear fuel process under IAEA safeguards. They learn about a variety of plant configurations so they can detect indications to divert sensitive material. Closed circuit TV cameras zoom in on gauges giving the operator critical indicators from the control room. Enrichment levels in cylinders have to be determined by germanium detectors. Inspectors attach IAEA metallic seals which provide evidence of any unauthorized attempt to gain access to secured material. The pellet's enrichment has to be verified by a Mini-Multichannel Analyzer. Once fully trained, the inspector team spend over 100 days a year at various sites throughout the world to help make sure that peaceful nuclear materials and activities stay peaceful

  17. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste

  18. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  19. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, ''burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel element box for a BWR is situated with a corner bolt on the inside in one corner of its top on the top side of the top plate. This corner bolt is screwed down with a bolt with a corner part which is provided with leaf springs outside on two sides, where the bolt has a smaller diameter and an expansion shank. The bolt is held captive to the bolt head on the top and the holder on the bottom of the corner part. The holder is a locknut. If the expansion forces are too great, the bolt can only break at the expansion shank. (HP)

  1. Fully ceramic nuclear fuel and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of a nuclear fuel for use in various types of nuclear reactors and/or waste disposal systems are disclosed. One exemplary embodiment of a nuclear fuel may include a fuel element having a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix. An exemplary method of manufacturing a nuclear fuel is also disclosed. The method may include providing a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles, mixing the plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles with silicon carbide powder to form a precursor mixture, and compacting the precursor mixture at a predetermined pressure and temperature.

  2. Method and facility for reprocessing nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For reprocessing of nuclear fuels used in fuel elements with several metallic cladding tubes that are especially applied for light water reactors, the cladding tubes separated from the fuel element structure are individually cut in longitudinal direction so that the nuclear fuel can be removed from the metal parts. The nuclear fuel then is filled into an acid bath for further treatment, whereas the metal parts are conditioned in solid form for ultimate storage by embedding them in a binder. (orig./RW)

  3. Environmental sciences: general. 4. Radiological and Chemical Risks in the Canadian Uranium Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium fuel cycle activities are continuously being challenged as representing 'unacceptable' risks to people and the environment. The usual focus is on 'radiological' risks; however, depending on the actual fuel cycle activity, the risks from conventional accidents or from chemicals used in the fuel cycle may in fact be of greater concern. The risks from normal operations and from accidents must both be considered. Moreover, under their new mandate, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has an expanded jurisdiction that includes the prevention of 'unreasonable' risk to the environment in addition to their traditional responsibility for the health and safety of people. The front end of the Canadian fuel cycle includes uranium mining, milling, refining, and conversion. Consideration of the potential risks from these activities and the ways they are managed provides a convenient way to examine the safety cultures in the nuclear and chemical industries and conveys the importance of a strong safety culture to the continued viability of the industry. This paper describes the hazards. In the context of this paper, the term 'mining' includes not only the mining of uranium ores but also the initial purification of the ores in uranium mills and the management of the mill tailings. Today, the high-grade uranium mines in northern Saskatchewan are the only operating mines in Canada. Key radiological concerns with exposures to workers include exposure to gamma radiation, radioactive dust, and radon daughters. In the underground environment, the control of radon-rich mine water is an important management tool as is the widespread use of remote mining methods. In the mill, the ore is ground to a sand-like consistency and leached to recover uranium. In the high-grade mills, two important issues are the management of gamma radiation and the prevention of, and response to, spills of mill solutions that might occur. The leached tailings are neutralized and sent to the tailings

  4. Apparatus for locating defective nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasonic search unit for locating defective fuel elements within a fuel assembly used in a water cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The unit is capable of freely traversing the restricted spaces between the fuel elements

  5. Nuclear propulsion technology advanced fuels technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Walter A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on advanced fuels technology are presented. Topics covered include: nuclear thermal propulsion reactor and fuel requirements; propulsion efficiency and temperature; uranium fuel compounds; melting point experiments; fabrication techniques; and sintered microspheres.

  6. Development situation about the Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor is the most versatile commercial power reactor in the world. The acronym 'CANDU', a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, stands for 'CANada Deuterium Uranium'. CANDU uses heavy water as moderator and uranium (originally, natural uranium) as fuel. All current power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU type. Canada exports CANDU type reactor in abroad. CANDU type is used as the nuclear power plants to produce electrical. Today, there are 41 CANDU reactors in use around the world, and the design has continuously evolved to maintain into unique technology and performance. The CANDU-6 power reactor offers a combination of proven, superior and state-of-the-art technology. CANDU-6 was designed specifically for electricity production, unlike other major reactor types. One of its characteristics is a very high operating and fuel efficiency. Canada Nuclear Power Generating Stations were succeeded in a commercial reactor of which the successful application of heavy water reactor, natural uranium method and that on-power fuelling could be achieved. It was achieved through the joint development of a major project by strong support of the federal government, public utilities and private enterprises. The potential for customization to any country's needs, with competitive development and within any level of domestic industrial infrastructure, gives CANDU technology strategic importance in the 21st century

  7. Nuclear fuel stress corrosion prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the operation of nuclear reactors employing sintered fuel tablets sheathed in zirconium alloy sheaths it has been found that, during irradiation, cadmium is released from the fuel and migrates outwardly to the inner surface of the sheath, where it can create an embrittlement phenomenon, resulting in sheath failure due to stress corrosion cracking. In accordance with the present disclosure copper is provided as a barrier or partial barrier between the fuel and the sheath inner surface, to facilitate the formation of a stable copper-cadmium alloy during the irradiation life of the fuel, to thereby impede the formation of a concentration of cadmium or active compounds thereof on the sheath inner surface. (auth)

  8. Compositions and methods for treating nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; Johnsen, Amanda M; McNamara, Bruce K; Hanson, Brady D; Smith, Steven C; Peper, Shane M

    2014-01-28

    Compositions are provided that include nuclear fuel. Methods for treating nuclear fuel are provided which can include exposing the fuel to a carbonate-peroxide solution. Methods can also include exposing the fuel to an ammonium solution. Methods for acquiring molybdenum from a uranium comprising material are provided.

  9. Canadian--American relations and the nuclear weapons controversy, 1958--1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study attempts to explain the nuclear weapons controversy as it developed between 1958 and 1963. The nuclear controversy centered around Canada's acceptance of a nuclear role, within the American alliance system, for the Canadian armed forces. In the period 1958-1959, when the critical weapons decisions were being taken, Canadian political authorities lost control of the policy-making process, permitting the Canadian and American military bureacracies to initiate nuclear plans suited to their common needs and objectives. Prime Minister Diefenbaker's reluctance to arm the systems acquired by transborder bureaucratic coalition is also re-examined. Previous analysts have regarded the government's hesitations over nuclear weapons as the product of Diefenbaker's personal antagonism towards President Kennedy or as a futile attempt to reverse the process of continental integration. The opening of the Kennedy papers reveals the degree to which Diefenbaker was committed to close Canadian-American cooperation and the effort he made to overcome the president's hostility towards him. This study emphasizes the importance of Diefenbaker's sensitivity to public, parliamentary, and cabinet opposition to nuclear arms. The secret U.S. demand for nuclear bases in Labrador and Newfoundland is revealed. Thus the question of nuclear storage in Canada for Canadian forces was complicated by U.S. insistence that Canada simultaneously provide nuclear storage for the strategic forces of the U.S. Finally, the extent of American responsibility for Diefenbaker's demise is re-assessed, and the conclusion is reached that the U.S., through Canadian-American military interaction and the initiative of the ambassador in Ottawa, did in fact help to bring down the government of Canada

  10. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount

  11. Spent nuclear fuel sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes a strategy for sampling the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in the 105-K Basins (105-K East and 105-K West). This strategy will support decisions concerning the path forward SNF disposition efforts in the following areas: (1) SNF isolation activities such as repackaging/overpacking to a newly constructed staging facility; (2) conditioning processes for fuel stabilization; and (3) interim storage options. This strategy was developed without following the Data Quality Objective (DQO) methodology. It is, however, intended to augment the SNF project DQOS. The SNF sampling is derived by evaluating the current storage condition of the SNF and the factors that effected SNF corrosion/degradation

  12. Grids for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to grids for nuclear fuel assemblies with the object of providing an improved grid, tending to have greater strength and tending to offer better location of the fuel pins. It comprises sets of generally parallel strips arranged to intersect to define a structure of cellular form, at least some of the intersections including a strip which is keyed to another strip at more than one point. One type of strip may be dimpled along its length and another type of strip may have slots for keying with the dimples. (Auth.)

  13. Nuclear fuel microsphere gamma analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Willey, Melvin G.

    1977-01-01

    A gamma analyzer system is provided for the analysis of nuclear fuel microspheres and other radioactive particles. The system consists of an analysis turntable with means for loading, in sequence, a plurality of stations within the turntable; a gamma ray detector for determining the spectrum of a sample in one section; means for analyzing the spectrum; and a receiver turntable to collect the analyzed material in stations according to the spectrum analysis. Accordingly, particles may be sorted according to their quality; e.g., fuel particles with fractured coatings may be separated from those that are not fractured, or according to other properties.

  14. Proceedings of the 30. Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nineteen papers presented at this conference discuss the energy needs and challenges facing the Canadian nuclear industry, the environment and nuclear power, the problems of maintaining and developing industrial capacity, and the challenges of the 1990's. (L.L.)

  15. The development of lower enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the world wide move to proliferation resistant fuels, new fuels which use reduced enrichment uranium are being developed for use in the NRX and NRU reactors. A fuel consisting of particles of a USiAl alloy dispersed in an Al matrix has been selected for development along with Al-37 wt% U alloy and Al-U3O8 cermet as backup fuels. This report outlines the progress made in the development of the Al-USiAl and Al-37 wt% U. Results show that good quality extruded rods containing either fuel can be made with techniques similar to those used to fabricate the current NRX and NRU fuels. However, the new fuels will be more expensive to make. Although the oxidation behaviour of the Al-USiAl is not as good as that of the Al-U alloys, its corrosion behaviour in high temperature water does not seem much worse. The oxidation and aqueous corrosion of A-37 wt% U are not much different from those of the Al-U alloys currently used. (author)

  16. Development of lower enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the worldwide move to proliferation resistant fuels, new fuels which use reduced enrichment uranium are being developed for use in the NRX and NRU reactors. A fuel consisting of particles of a USiAl alloy dispersed in an Al matrix has been selected for development along with Al-37 wt % U alloy and Al-U3O8 cermet as backup fuels. This report outlines the progress made in the development of the Al-USiAl and Al-37 wt % U. Results show that good quality extruded rods containing either fuel can be made with techniques similar to those used to fabricate the current NRX and NRU fuels. However, the new fuels will be more expensive to make. Although the oxidation behavior of the Al-USiAl is not as good as that of the Al-U alloys, its corrosion behavior in high temperature water does not seem much worse. The oxidation and aqueous corrosion of Al-37 wt % U are not much different from those of the Al-U alloys currently used

  17. Closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally the case for closing the nuclear fuel cycle is based on the strategic value of the uranium and plutonium recovered by reprocessing spent fuel. The energy content of 1 t of spent fuel varies from 10,000 to 40,000 t of coal equivalent depending on the reactor type from which the spent fuel arises. Recycling in fast reactors would increase these values by a factor or roughly 40. Reprocessing in the UK has its roots in the technology developed during and after the 1939-45 war to provide plutonium for defence purposes. At BNFL's Sellafield site in northern England the commercial reprocessing of spent fuel has been undertaken for over 30 years with a cumulative throughput of over 30,000 tU. Over 15,000 tU of the uranium recovered has been recycled and some 70% of all the UK's AGR fuel has been produced from this material. As a consequence the UK's bill for imported uranium has been reduced by several hundred million pounds sterling. This report discusses issues associated with reprocessing, uranium, and plutonium recycle

  18. Nuclear Fuels: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Olander

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The important new developments in nuclear fuels and their problems are reviewed and compared with the status of present light-water reactor fuels. The limitations of these fuels and the reactors they power are reviewed with respect to important recent concerns, namely provision of outlet coolant temperatures high enough for use in H2 production, destruction of plutonium to eliminate proliferation concerns, and burning of the minor actinides to reduce the waste repository heat load and long-term radiation hazard. In addition to current oxide-based fuel-rod designs, the hydride fuel with liquid metal thermal bonding of the fuel-cladding gap is covered. Finally, two of the most promising Generation IV reactor concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor and the Sodium Fast Reactor, and the accompanying reprocessing technologies, aqueous-based UREX and pyrometallurgical, are summarized. In all of the topics covered, the thermodynamics involved in the material's behavior under irradiation and in the reprocessing schemes are emphasized.

  19. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a nuclear fuel pellet, which has low water content and adequate density of sintering and is less liable to shrinkage of sintering. Constitution: To manufacture an uranium dioxide fuel pellet for the nuclear reactor, uranium dioxide powder and 1 to 10 weight % of uranium oxide powder of coarser grain size than the uranium dioxide powder and with U3O8 or O/U ratio of 2.3 to 2.7 are mixed together and uniformly blended by a blender. This mixture is press molded with a high pressure above 0.5 t/cm2. This molding is sintered in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen gas or cracking ammonia gas at a high temperature above 1,5000C to obtain a uranium dioxide pellet. This pellet has comparatively large pores which are uniformly distributed, low water content and adequate density of sintering and is less liable to shrinkage. (Aizawa, K.)

  20. Heat transfer effectiveness for cooling of Canadian SCWR fuel assembly under the LOCA/LOECC scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A two-dimensional heat conduction model is developed for SCTRAN code. • A radiation heat-transfer model has been incorporated into the SCTRAN code. • Cladding temperature of fuel rods stays below melting point under LOCA/LOECC. • The heat transfer effectiveness of Canadian SCWR under LOCA/LOECC is demonstrated. • Sensitivity analyses on the predicted MCST have been performed. - Abstract: The effectiveness of heat transfer from the fuel rods to the moderator in a Canadian, pressure-tube type, Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) has been assessed for the postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) coupled with the total loss of emergency core cooling (LOECC) event using the safety analysis code “SCTRAN”. A radiation heat-transfer model, including a two-dimensional heat conduction solution scheme, has been incorporated into the SCTRAN code for this assessment. The assessment result shows that the combined radiation heat transfer from the fuel rods to the fuel channel and natural convective heat transfer from the fuel rods to the steam are effective in removing decay heat for the LOCA/LOECC scenario. Maximum cladding temperatures of fuel rods in inner and outer rings of the fuel assembly in the highest-power channel are predicted at 1278 °C and 1192 °C respectively, which are lower than the melting point of the modified stainless-steel cladding. Sensitivity analyses of several analytical parameters on the predicted maximum cladding temperatures have been performed

  1. Marking method for nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Akira; Yoshimuta, Hideharu.

    1991-06-28

    Nuclear fuels are molded by dispersing coated fuel particles in a matrix mainly composed of graphite. Printing is applied by using an ink containing a colorant and a binder resin. As the colorants pigments and dyes, or organic metal chelates and various kinds of ceramics are used. The printed products are heated in an inert gas or under vacuum, to thermally decompose the binder resin, and then they are sintered under vacuum, during which organic ingredients in the ink are carbonized so that volatile materials are removed completely. With such procedures, the color tones are made different due to the residue of metal ingredients in the colorants, the difference of the density of carbonization layers and the protrusion of carbon layers, to enable easy identificaiton. Accordingly, printing can be conducted clearly on the surface of the products without damaging the coated fuel particles. (I.N.).

  2. Marking method for nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuels are molded by dispersing coated fuel particles in a matrix mainly composed of graphite. Printing is applied by using an ink containing a colorant and a binder resin. As the colorants pigments and dyes, or organic metal chelates and various kinds of ceramics are used. The printed products are heated in an inert gas or under vacuum, to thermally decompose the binder resin, and then they are sintered under vacuum, during which organic ingredients in the ink are carbonized so that volatile materials are removed completely. With such procedures, the color tones are made different due to the residue of metal ingredients in the colorants, the difference of the density of carbonization layers and the protrusion of carbon layers, to enable easy identificaiton. Accordingly, printing can be conducted clearly on the surface of the products without damaging the coated fuel particles. (I.N.)

  3. Antineutrino monitoring of spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel eleme...

  4. Joint submission of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manufacturing company members of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries are proud to have played their part in the development of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in Ontario, and the achievement of the very real benefits discussed in this paper, which greatly outweigh the hypothetical risks

  5. Nuclear fuel element and container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention is based on the discovery that a substantial reduction in metal embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking from fuel pellet-cladding interaction can be achieved by the use of a copper layer or liner in proximity to the nuclear fuel, and an intermediate zirconium oxide barrier layer between the copper layer and the zirconium cladding substrate. The intermediate zirconia layer is a good copper diffusion barrier; also, if the zirconium cladding surface is modified prior to oxidation, copper can be deposited by electroless plating. A nuclear fuel element is described which comprises a central core of fuel material and an elongated container using the system outlined above. The method for making the container is again described. It comprises roughening or etching the surface of the zirconium or zirconium alloy container, oxidizing the resulting container, activating the oxidized surface to allow for the metallic coating of such surfaces by electroless deposition and further coating the activated-oxidized surface of the zirconium or zirconium alloy container with copper, iron or nickel or an alloy thereof. (U.K.)

  6. Determination of internationally controlled materials according to provisions of the law for the regulations of nuclear source materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This rule is established under the provisions of the law concerning the regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors, and the former notification No. 26, 1961, is hereby abolished. Internationally regulated goods under the law are as follows: nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and moderator materials transferred by sale or other means from the governments of the U.S., U.K., Canada, Australia and France or the persons under their jurisdictions according to the agreements concluded between the governments of Japan and these countries, respectively, the nuclear fuel materials recovered from these materials or produced by their usage, nuclear reactors, the facilities and heavy water transferred by sale or other means from these governments or the persons under their jurisdictions, the nuclear fuel materials produced by the usage of such reactors, facilities and heavy water, the nuclear fuel materials sold by the International Atomic Energy Agency under the contract between the Japanese government and the IAEA, the nuclear fuel materials recovered from these materials or produced by their usage, the heavy water produced by the facilities themselves transferred from the Canadian government, Canadian governmental enterprises or the persons under the jurisdiction of the Canadian government or produced by the usage of these facilities, etc. (Okada, K.)

  7. New postgraduate programs in nuclear engineering to meet the needs of the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the current state of nuclear engineering postgraduate education in Canada, with emphasis on the new courses and programs that have been introduced since PBNC2006. The importance of these developments is presented against a background of the aging of the reactor fleet that came into operation in the 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s, along with the changing training needs and demographics of the nuclear industry. The demand for nuclear engineers continues to grow in order to operate, maintain, upgrade and refurbish the existing units, as well as to design, construct, commission and operate the new reactors that are being proposed in Canada and abroad. Responding to this demand, a consortium of key Canadian nuclear companies, and universities that conduct research and offer postgraduate courses in nuclear engineering, have formed UNENE (University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering). In addition to funding research chairs at seven universities in Ontario, UNENE offers a course-based master of nuclear engineering program. In this way, industry funding has effectively revitalized existing, and initiated new, nuclear programs at established universities. In addition, one of the UNENE partners, the newly established University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), is offering both research and course-based master of nuclear engineering programs as of September 2008. Based on the experiences of UNENE and UOIT the paper explores the gap between the mandates of universities and the nuclear industry, collectively and individually. It is shown that by recognizing the differences and capitalizing on their respective strength, the graduate and postgraduate educational programs conducted by universities can be effective to complement the training and experience that only the industry can offer. (author)

  8. Growing beyond oil delivering our energy future - a report card on the Canadian renewable fuels industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-11-15

    The Canadian Renewable Fuels Association (CRFA) has overseen dynamic growth in the domestic biofuels sector. It is guided by the following principles: support for advanced biofuels; building a sustainable industry; building a competitive industry; fiscal responsibility; feedstock neutrality; investment in technology; quality and safety. The development of renewable fuels is also supported by the federal and provincial governments. Some solid results have been achieved in the industry sector: job creation and economic growth; reductions in GHG emissions; agricultural benefits; rural development and forestry benefits; energy security/diversity; and social benefits to Canadians. The federal government has been clear in its commitment to implement the 2% renewable diesel requirement in 2011. The CRFA and member organizations look forward to a continuing dialogue with federal and provincial policy makers to realize our full potential in the clean energy economy of tomorrow.

  9. Post-irradiation neutron emissions from CANDU fuels and their nuclear forensics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissile materials within a fuel pellet can be discerned rapidly and non-destructively via the analysis of post-irradiation delayed neutron emissions. The delayed neutron counting technique is well established within the Canadian nuclear industry, and uses include the detection of defective CANDU fuel. This work discusses these neutron emissions from CANDU fuel in the context of detection and attribution. Monte Carlo simulations of these emissions from current and proposed CANDU fuels (thoria and mix oxide based) have been performed. These simulations are compared to measurements of delayed neutron emissions from 233U and 235U, and the feasibility of CANDU fuel characterization is discussed. (author)

  10. 11. annual report of the technical advisory committee on the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Eleventh Annual Report of the Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) assesses the scientific and technical progress made within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (NFWMP) during the period July 1989 to June 1990. The Committee notes that the general concept of a multibarrier system involving geologic media and engineered systems is based on known technologies and current scientific knowledge, and has gained strong international scientific and engineering support as currently the most feasible and practical. TAC continues to endorse the full investigation of the concept of nuclear waste disposal deep in plutonic formations, such as those in the Canadian Shield

  11. Canada's imminent decision on nuclear fuel management: decision making at the intersection of science, politics, and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the science, politics and the decision making process in implementing a nuclear fuel management program. It discusses the issues in the light of Canada's imminent decision on nuclear fuel management. The paper discusses the technical as well as the institutional challenge in nuclear waste management. It discusses some of the key elements of the Canadian approach and concludes with some key recommendation in the way forward

  12. A university course in nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A graduate course currently offered as part of the Nuclear Engineering curriculum at MIT and Purdue University develops the reactor physics and engineering skills essential for the effective managing of the nuclear fuel in reactor power systems. Maximum use is made of computer codes to demonstrate methods of analyzing in-core fuel performance and the various ex-core fuel cycle activities. The course in Nuclear Fuel Management helps the student integrate the wide range of engineering disciplines necessary to insure the nuclear fuel is being utilized as safely and economically as possible

  13. Life cycle assessment of camelina oil derived biodiesel and jet fuel in the Canadian Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Mupondwa, Edmund

    2014-05-15

    This study evaluated the environmental impact of biodiesel and hydroprocessed renewable jet fuel derived from camelina oil in terms of global warming potential, human health, ecosystem quality, and energy resource consumption. The life cycle inventory is based on production activities in the Canadian Prairies and encompasses activities ranging from agricultural production to oil extraction and fuel conversion. The system expansion method is used in this study to avoid allocation and to credit input energy to co-products associated with the products displaced in the market during camelina oil extraction and fuel processing. This is the preferred allocation method for LCA analysis in the context of most renewable and sustainable energy programs. The results show that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 1 MJ of camelina derived biodiesel ranged from 7.61 to 24.72 g CO2 equivalent and 3.06 to 31.01 kg CO2/MJ equivalent for camelina HRJ fuel. Non-renewable energy consumption for camelina biodiesel ranged from 0.40 to 0.67 MJ/MJ; HRJ fuel ranged from -0.13 to 0.52 MJ/MJ. Camelina oil as a feedstock for fuel production accounted for the highest contribution to overall environmental performance, demonstrating the importance of reducing environmental burdens during the agricultural production process. Attaining higher seed yield would dramatically lower environmental impacts associated with camelina seed, oil, and fuel production. The lower GHG emissions and energy consumption associated with camelina in comparison with other oilseed derived fuel and petroleum fuel make camelina derived fuel from Canadian Prairies environmentally attractive. PMID:24572928

  14. Addressing ethical considerations about nuclear fuel waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethical considerations will be important in making decisions about the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste. Public discussions of nuclear fuel waste management are dominated by questions related to values, fairness, rights and responsibilities. To address public concerns, it is important to demonstrate that ethical responsibilities associated with the current management of the waste are being fulfilled. It is also important to show that our responsibilities to future generations can be met, and that ethical principles will be applied to the implementation of disposal. Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept, as put forward in an Environmental Impact Statement by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), is currently under public review by a Federal Environmental Assessment Panel. Following this review, recommendations will be made about the direction that Canada should take for the long-term management of this waste. This paper discusses the ethical principles that are seen to apply to geological disposal and illustrates how the Canadian approach to nuclear fuel waste management can meet the challenge of fulfilling these responsibilities. The author suggests that our ethical responsibilities require that adaptable technologies to site, design, construct, operate decommission and close disposal facilities should de developed. We cannot, and should not, present future generations from exercising control over what they inherit, nor control whether they modify or even reverse today's decisions if that is what they deem to be the right thing to do. (author)

  15. The nuclear fuel cycle business in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the development and use of nuclear power are considered key building blocks of safe energy supply in the 21st century. Closing the nuclear fuel cycle so as to utilize uranium and plutonium from spent fuel elements is to establish nuclear power as a quasi-domestic energy source in Japan. Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. is the only private enterprise in Japan to offer nuclear fuel cycle services. At Rokkasho, the company operates plants for reprocessing (under construction), uranium enrichment, treatment of radioactive waste, and a repository for low level radioactive materials. Consequently, an important sector of Japan's future energy supply is ensured on this location. (orig.)

  16. An introduction to the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work;second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity;and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US. 34 figs., 10 tabs

  17. Graphite coating of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an account of work conducted on graphite coating of (1) zircaloy fuel tubes for CANDU type power reactors and (2) stainless steel bearing plates for S3F vault structure commissioned at Tarapur for storage of radioactive waste. Graphite has been chosen as a coating material because it is not only an excellent lubricating material but also can withstand severe radiation from nuclear fuel or radioactive waste up to fairly high temperatures. The paper first describes in detail the equipments and experimental procedure standardised to achieve an adherent graphite coating of 5 to 9 μm thickness by using alcohol based suspension of graphite. Graphite coated tubes were evaluated by subjecting it to various destructive and nondestructive testing. Thousands of fuel tubes were coated so far and loaded in RAPP-2 for studying their inpile behaviour. Finally a flowsheet is presented to achieve the graphite coating on fuel tubes as per specifications. The second part of the paper deals with the various techniques examined to obtain the graphite coating on 450 mm square stainless steel plates with alcohol based graphite suspension. An unique spray coating procedure involving both graphite suspension and lacquor was evolved for carrying out the coating operation at site. Co-efficient of friction between graphite coated SS plates was found to be as low as 6.77 per cent. A batch of 280 SS bearing plates were coated with graphite and utilised for commissioning the vault structure at Tarapur. (author). 5 figures

  18. Nuclear fuel assembly debris filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel assembly having fuel rods held in a spaced array by grid assemblies, guide tubes extending through the grid assemblies and attached at their upper and lower ends to an upper end fitting and a lower end fitting, the end fittings having openings therethrough for coolant flow, and a debris filter. The debris filter comprises: a plate attached to the bottom periphery of and spanning the lower end fitting; and the plate having substantially triangular-shaped flow holes therethrough that each measure approximately 0.181 inch from the base to the apex with the majority of the triangular- shaped flow holes arranged in groups of four to define square clusters that each measure approximately 0.405 inch on each side whereby the portions of the plate between the flow holes in each cluster are diagonally oriented relative to the sides of the plate

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel rod spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer for positioning at least the four corner fuel rods in a tubular flow channel of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The spacer comprises a support member having four side bands interconnected by four corner bands to form a unitary structure. Each of the side bands has a L-shaped lobe adjacent to each of its ends with one leg of each lobe extending to the adjacent end of its side band. Each of the corner bands is narrower than the side bands and is offset so as to be spaced from the lobe. One leg of each lobe is positioned to engage the tubular flow channel to maintain proper spacing between the flow channel and the adjacent corner fuel rod and to improve the thermal-hydraulic performance of the spacer

  20. Nuclear fuel control in fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic control problems of measuring uranium and of the environment inside and outside nuclear fuel fabrication plants are reviewed, excluding criticality prevention in case of submergence. The occurrence of loss scraps in fabrication and scrap-recycling, the measuring error, the uranium going cut of the system, the confirmation of the presence of lost uranium and the requirement of the measurement control for safeguard make the measurement control very complicated. The establishment of MBA (material balance area) and ICA (item control area) can make clearer the control of inventories, the control of loss scraps and the control of measuring points. Besides the above basic points, the following points are to be taken into account: 1) the method of confirmation of inventories, 2) the introduction of reliable NDT instruments for the rapid check system for enrichment and amount of uranium, 3) the introduction of real time system, and 4) the clarification of MUF analysis and its application to the reliability check of measurement control system. The environment control includes the controls of the uranium concentration in factory atmosphere, the surface contamination, the space dose rate, the uranium concentration in air and water discharged from factories, and the uranium in liquid wastes. The future problems are the practical restudy of measurement control under NPT, the definite plan of burglary protection and the realization of the disposal of solid wastes. (Iwakiri, K.)

  1. Radioecology of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides information to help assess the environmental impacts and certain potential human hazards associated with nuclear fuel cycles. A data base is being developed to define and quantify biological transport routes, which will permit credible predictions and assessment of routine and potential large-scale releases of radionuclides and other toxic materials. These data, used in assessment models, will increase the accuracy of estimating radiation doses to man and other life forms. Results will provide information to determine if waste management procedures on the Hanford site have caused ecological perturbations, and, if so, to determine the source, nature and magnitude of such disturbances

  2. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 7. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference had as its major topics of coverage: fuel and fuel channel materials, reactor physics and radiation, safety and the environment, fusion, thermohydraulics, economic and social issues and operations

  3. Reduced enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors - Fabrication and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our facilities have been upgraded to manufacture fuel rods comprising dispersions of U3Si in aluminum, to complement the dispersions of U3Si alloyed with 1.5 and 3.0 wt% Al fabricated and tested previously. Further advances have been made in process optimization particularly in core extrusion where production rate has been doubled while maintaining high quality standards. Our mini-element irradiations of Al-61.5 wt% (U,3.5 wt% Si, 1.5 wt% Al) and Al-62.4 wt% (U,3.2 wt% Si, 30 wt% Al) have been completed successfully up to the terminal burnup of 93 atomic percent. Fuel core swelling remained marginally below 1% per 10 atomic percent burnup over the whole irradiation. Also mini-elements containing Al-72.4 wt% USiAl and Al-73.4 wt% USi*Al have been irradiated to 82 atomic percent burnup, their swelling rate marginally exceeding 1% per 10 atomic percent burnup. Three full-size 12-element NRU assemblies containing Al-62.4 wt% USi*Al have been fabricated and installed in the NRU reactor where they have performed normally without problems. The cores for four more full-size 12-element NRU assemblies containing Al-61.0 wt% U3Si have been manufactured. (author)

  4. Method of assembling nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films are formed to the surface of a fuel rod for preventing the occurrence of injuries at the surface of the fuel rod. That is, in a method of assembling a nuclear fuel assembly by inserting fuel rods into lattice cells of a support lattice, thin films of polyvinyl alcohol are formed to a predetermined thickness at the surface of each of the fuel rods and, after insertion of the fuel rods into the lattice cells, the nuclear fuel assemblies are dipped into water or steams to dissolve and remove the thin films. Since polyvinyl alcohol is noncombustible and not containing nuclear inhibitive material as the ingredient, they cause no undesired effects on plant facilities even if not completely removed from the fuel rods. The polyvinyl alcohol thin films have high strength and can sufficiently protect the fuel rod. Further, scraping damages caused by support members of the support lattice upon insertion can also be prevented. (T.M.)

  5. Update on Canada's nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) was launched in 1978 as a joint initiative by the governments of Canada and Ontario. Under the program, AECL has been developing and assessing a generic concept to dispose of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The disposal concept has been referred for review under the Environmental Assessment and Review Process. AECL will submit an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to an Environmental Assessment Panel, which was appointed in late 1989. Hearings will be held in areas that have a particular interest in the concept and its application. At the end of the review, the Panel will make recommendations as to the acceptability of the concept and the course of future action. The federal government will decide on the next steps to be taken. In the spring of 1990 public open houses were held to tell prospective participants how to enter the process. Sessions designed to assist the Panel in determining the scope of the EIS took place in the autumn of 1990. In June 1991 the Panel issued for comment a set of draft guidelines for the EIS. More than 30 groups and individuals submitted comments. The final guidelines were issued in March 1992, and AECL expects to submit its EIS to the Panel in 1993. If the concept review is completed by 1995 and if the concept is approved, disposal could begin some time after 2025. (L.L.) (12 refs.)

  6. Baseline concentrations of nuclear fuel waste nuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of the environment is a key issue in the disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes. To assess the implications of undergound disposal, transport models are commonly used to predict radionuclide concentrations in soil and water. However, an appropriate framework needs to be established to ensure that the predicted concentrations do not impose unacceptable environmental impacts. Here, we suggest baseline environmental concentrations of the most important radionuclides in nuclear fuel waste. We summarize background concentrations of the nuclides in soil and surface water, and suggest Environmental Increments (EI) that could be added to soil and water without causing detectable effects. The EI values are based mostly on natural variability, but some alternative methods are used for radionuclides that are very rare in nature. The background concentrations and EI values are most useful as a screening tool to help identify potentially unacceptable concentrations arising from a disposal concept. When available, we also report data on concentrations that have been measured in the environment without causing an observable effect. This review focuses especially on concentrations applicable to the Canadian Precambrian Shield, as part of the Canadian concept of nuclear fuel waste disposal in a deep, stable geological formation

  7. Proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society includes sessions on the following topics: compliance and licensing, fusion science and technology, Darlington assessment, plant aging and life assessment, thermalhydraulic modelling and analysis, diagnostics and data management, operator training and certification. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  8. An overview of heat exchanger technology in the Canadian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of the Canadian approach to the reliability and serviceability of heat exchange equipment used in nuclear power stations and heavy water plants. Current work in vibration and fretting predictions, thermal-hydraulic analyses, and corrosion research is described. Procedures developed for in-service inspection, in situ tube replacment and chemical cleaning of corrosion products are also outlined

  9. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Its purpose is to identify existing and planned nuclear fuel cycle facilities throughout the world and to indicate their main parameters. It includes information on facilities for uranium ore processing, refining, conversion and enrichment, for fuel fabrication, away-from-reactor storage of spent fuel and reprocessing, and for the production of zirconium metal and Zircaloy tubing. NFCIS currently covers 271 facilities in 32 countries and includes 171 references

  10. Fuel development program of the nuclear fuel element centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel technology development program pf the nuclear fuel element centre is still devised into two main pillars, namely the research reactors fuel technology and the power reactor fuel technology taking into account the strategic influencing environment such as better access to global market of fuel cycle services, the state of the art and the general trend of the fuel technology in the world. Embarking on the twenty first century the fuel development program has to be directed toward strengthening measure to acquire and self-reliance in the field of fuel technology in support to the national energy program as well as to the utilisation of research reactor. A more strengthened acquisition of fuel cycle technology, in general, and particularly of fuel technology would improve the bargaining power when negotiation the commercial fuel technology transfer in the future

  11. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  12. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  13. International Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  14. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants

  15. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Kim, Yeanjin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei-Hun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants.

  16. Radioactive waste disposal - ethical and environmental considerations - A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with ethical and environmental considerations of radioactive waste disposal in Canada. It begins with the canadian attitudes toward nature and environment. Then are given the canadian institutions which reflect an environmental ethic, the development of a canadian radioactive waste management policy, the establishment of formal assessment and review process for a nuclear fuel waste disposal facility, some studies of the ethical and risk dimensions of nuclear waste decisions, the canadian societal response to issues of radioactive wastes, the analysis of risks associated with fuel waste disposal, the influence of other energy related environmental assessments and some common ground and possible accommodation between the different views. (O.L.). 50 refs

  17. Variants of closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianova, E. A., E-mail: Andrianova-EA@nrcki.ru; Davidenko, V. D.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.; Tsibulskiy, S. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Influence of the nuclear energy structure, the conditions of fuel burnup, and accumulation of new fissile isotopes from the raw isotopes on the main parameters of a closed fuel cycle is considered. The effects of the breeding ratio, the cooling time of the spent fuel in the external fuel cycle, and the separation of the breeding area and the fissile isotope burning area on the parameters of the fuel cycle are analyzed.

  18. Variants of closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of the nuclear energy structure, the conditions of fuel burnup, and accumulation of new fissile isotopes from the raw isotopes on the main parameters of a closed fuel cycle is considered. The effects of the breeding ratio, the cooling time of the spent fuel in the external fuel cycle, and the separation of the breeding area and the fissile isotope burning area on the parameters of the fuel cycle are analyzed

  19. Reactor Physics and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Minhaj Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Questions regarding the feasibility of fusion power are examined, taking into account fuel cycles and breeding reactions, energy balance and reactor conditions, approaches to fusion, magnetic confinement, magneto hydro dynamic instabilities, micro instabilities, and the main technological problems which have to be solved. Basic processes and balances in fusion reactors are considered along with some aspects of the neutronics in fusion reactors, the physics of neutral beam heating, plasma heating by relativistic electrons, radiofrequency heating of fusion plasmas, adiabatic compression and ignition of fusion reactors, dynamics and control of fusion reactors, and aspects of thermal efficiency and waste heat. Attention is also given to fission-fusion hybrid systems, inertial-confinement fusion systems, the radiological aspects of fusion reactors, design considerations of fusion reactors, and a comparative study of the approaches to fusion power. The nuclear fuel cycle, also called nuclear fuel chain, is the progression of nuclear fuel through a series of differing stages. It consists of steps in the front end, which are the preparation of the fuel, steps in the service period in which the fuel is used during reactor operation, and steps in the back end, which are necessary to safely manage, contain, and either reprocess or dispose of spent nuclear fuel. If spent fuel is not reprocessed, the fuel cycle is referred to as an open fuel cycle (or a once-through fuel cycle; if the spent fuel is reprocessed, it is referred to as a closed fuel cycle..

  20. AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste and the importance of its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, Canada has been investigating a concept for permanently dealing with the nuclear fuel waste from Canadian CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear generating stations. The concept is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. AECL Research will soon be submitting an environmental impact statement (EIS) on the concept for review by a Panel through the federal environmental assessment and review process (EARP). In accordance with AECL Research's mandate and in keeping with the detailed requirements of the review Panel, AECL Research has conducted extensive studies on a wide variety of technical and socio-economic issues associated with the concept. If the concept is accepted, we can and should continue our responsible approach and take the next steps towards constructing a disposal facility for Canada's used nuclear fuel waste

  1. Spent nuclear fuel disposal liability insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examines the social efficiency of nuclear power when the risks of accidental releases of spent fuel radionuclides from a spent fuel disposal facility are considered. The analysis consists of two major parts. First, a theoretical economic model of the use of nuclear power including the risks associated with releases of radionuclides from a disposal facility is developed. Second, the costs of nuclear power, including the risks associated with a radionuclide release, are empirically compared to the costs of fossil fuel-fired generation of electricity. Under the provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the federally owned and operated spent nuclear fuel disposal facility is not required to maintain a reserve fund to cover damages from an accidental radionuclide release. Thus, the risks of a harmful radionuclide release are not included in the spent nuclear fuel disposal fee charged to the electric utilities. Since the electric utilities do not pay the full, social costs of spent fuel disposal, they use nuclear fuel in excess of the social optimum. An insurance mechanism is proposed to internalize the risks associated with spent fueled disposal. Under this proposal, the Federal government is required to insure the disposal facility against any liabilities arising from accidental releases of spent fuel radionuclides

  2. Sustainability Features of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Passerini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear fuel cycle is the series of stages that nuclear fuel materials go through in a cradle to grave framework. The Once Through Cycle (OTC is the current fuel cycle implemented in the United States; in which an appropriate form of the fuel is irradiated through a nuclear reactor only once before it is disposed of as waste. The discharged fuel contains materials that can be suitable for use as fuel. Thus, different types of fuel recycling technologies may be introduced in order to more fully utilize the energy potential of the fuel, or reduce the environmental impacts and proliferation concerns about the discarded fuel materials. Nuclear fuel cycle systems analysis is applied in this paper to attain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of fuel cycle alternatives. Through the use of the nuclear fuel cycle analysis code CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycle Analysis, the impact of a number of recycling technologies and the associated fuel cycle options is explored in the context of the U.S. energy scenario over 100 years. Particular focus is given to the quantification of Uranium utilization, the amount of Transuranic Material (TRU generated and the economics of the different options compared to the base-line case, the OTC option. It is concluded that LWRs and the OTC are likely to dominate the nuclear energy supply system for the period considered due to limitations on availability of TRU to initiate recycling technologies. While the introduction of U-235 initiated fast reactors can accelerate their penetration of the nuclear energy system, their higher capital cost may lead to continued preference for the LWR-OTC cycle.

  3. Handling and inspection of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides improvements in the handling and inspection of nuclear fuel elements. A mobile bridge is mounted astraddle over a water tank, and from said bridge is suspended and immersed insulating plate capable of vertically receiving a fuel element and of taking a horizontal position for inspecting the latter. This can be applied to nuclear power stations

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities

  5. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEROY, P.G.

    2000-11-03

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

  6. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System. A directory of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 2009 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities, published online as part of the Integrated Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (iNFCIS: http://www-nfcis.iaea.org/). This is the fourth hardcopy publication in almost 30 years and it represents a snapshot of the NFCIS database as of the end of 2008. Together with the attached CD-ROM, it provides information on 650 civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities in 53 countries, thus helping to improve the transparency of global nuclear fuel cycle activities

  7. The safety of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle covers the procurement and preparation of fuel for nuclear power reactors, its recovery and recycling after use and the safe storage of all wastes generated through these operations. The facilities associated with these activities have an extensive and well documented safety record accumulated over the past 40 years by technical experts and safety authorities. This report constitutes an up-to-date analysis of the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle, based on the available experience in OECD countries. It addresses the technical aspects of fuel cycle operations, provides information on operating practices and looks ahead to future activities

  8. Nuclear fuel burn-up economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period 1981-1985, for the needs of Utility Organization, Beograd, and with the support of the Scientific Council of SR Srbija, work has been performed on the study entitled 'Nuclear Fuel Burn-up Economy'. The forst [phase, completed during the year 1983 comprised: comparative analysis of commercial NPP from the standpoint of nuclear fuel requirements; development of methods for fuel burn-up analysis; specification of elements concerning the nuclear fuel for the tender documentation. The present paper gives the short description of the purpose, content and results achieved in the up-to-now work on the study. (author)

  9. A review of glass-ceramics for the immobilization of nuclear fuel recycle wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the status of the Canadian, German, U.S., Japanese, U.S.S.R. and Swedish programs for the development of glass-ceramic materials for immobilizing the high-level radioactive wastes arising from the recycling of used nuclear fuel. The progress made in these programs is described, with emphasis on the Canadian program for the development of sphene-based glass-ceramics. The general considerations of product performance and process feasibility for glass-ceramics as a category of waste form material are discussed. 137 refs

  10. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  11. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  12. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  13. System for assembling nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automatic system is described for assembling nuclear fuel elements, in particular those employing mixed oxide fuels. The system includes a sealing mechanism which allows movement during the assembling of the fuel element along the assembly stations without excessive release of contaminants. (U.K.)

  14. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle is substantially more complicated than the energy production cycles of conventional fuels because of the very low abundance of uranium 235, the presence of radioactivity, the potential for producing fissile nuclides from irradiation, and the risk that fissile materials will be used for nuclear weapons. These factors add enrichment, recycling, spent fuel storage, and safeguards to the cycle, besides making the conventional steps of exploration, mining, processing, use, waste disposal, and transportation more difficult

  15. Canada's nuclear fuel industry: An overview. Background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada was among the first countries to mine and process uranium-bearing ores. Such ores contain trace amounts of radium, which was in great demand for medical treatment and for use by research laboratories in the early part of the century. For the last half century, the same basic processes have been used to extract uranium from its ores and convert it to a form suitable for use in nuclear reactors. The process described here is that currently in use in Canada. Mining can take a variety of forms, from open-pit to deep, hard-rock. Mining is typically the most costly step in the process, particularly for lower-grade ores. The ore is crushed and ground in the mill to the consistency of fine sand from which the uranium is extracted chemically to produce the impure concentrate known as yellowcake. In the next step, the impure uranium concentrate is chemically refined into highly purified, nuclear-grade, uranium trioxide (UO3). Uranium trioxide is then converted, in two separate chemical processes, into uranium dioxide (UO2) which is destined for domestic consumption and uranium hexafluoride (UF6) which is exported. In Canada, fabrication is the final step of the fuel production process. Uranium dioxide powder is compressed and sintered into very dense ceramic pellets which are then sealed in zirconium tubes and assembled into fuel bundles for Candu reactors. This background paper will review the Canadian nuclear fuels industry. 1 fig

  16. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 2. international conference on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain 136 papers on waste management from 19 countries. An index of the delegates and their affiliations is included. Emphasis was laid on the Canadian program for geologic disposal in hard rock. Sessions dealt with the following: storage and disposal, hydrogeology and geochemistry, transportation, buffers and backfill, public attitudes, tailings, site investigations and geomechanics, concrete, economics, licensing, matrix materials and container design, durability of fuel, biosphere modelling, radioactive waste processing, and future options

  17. Selection of nuclear fuel evaluation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel performance parameters, such as nuclear efficiency, are defined by the design of the bundle. The metrics used to evaluate fuel capability are often fuel cycle cost, thermal margin, cycle length flexibility and hot-to-cold reactivity swing. These metrics emerge from a nuclear fuel cycle analysis, which must be properly posed to evaluate a fuel's performance within the application space of interest. When viewed in terms of the goals and constraints, the selection of fuel design characteristics takes on the form of a constrained optimization problem. As with any such problem, definition of the constraints can strongly influence what constitutes an optimum fuel design. As the complexity increases, the accuracy and relevance of the boundary conditions becomes more critical. Presented in this paper is a survey of fuel cycle analysis methodologies for BWRs and the corresponding metrics that can be observed. (author)

  18. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

  19. Investigation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool Coolability

    OpenAIRE

    Nimander, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    The natural catastrophe at Fukushima Dai-ichi 2011 enlightened the nuclear community. This master thesis reveals the non-negligible risks regarding the short term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The thesis has also investigated the possibility of using natural circulation of air in a passive safety system to cool the spent nuclear fuel pools. The results where conclusive: The temperature difference between the heated air and ambient air is far too low for natural circulation of air to remove a...

  20. Establishment of China Nuclear Fuel Assembly Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENPeng; ZHANGYing-chao; LIUTing-jin; JINYong-li

    2003-01-01

    During researching, designing, manufacturing and post irradiation, a large amount of data on fuel assembly of China nuclear power plants has been accumulated. It is necessary to collect the data together,so that the researchers, designers, manufactures and managers could use the data conveniently. It was proposed to establish a China Nuclear Fuel Assembly Database through the Internet on workstations during the year of 2003 to 2006, so the data would be shared in China nuclear industry.

  1. Studies of Nuclear Fuel by Means of Nuclear Spectroscopic Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The increasing demand for characterization of nuclear fuel, both from an operator and authority point of view, motivates the development of new experimental and, preferable, non-destructive methods. In this thesis, some methods based on nuclear spectroscopic techniques are presented. Various parameters of irradiated fuel are shown to be determined with high accuracy and confidence by utilizing gamma-ray scanning, tomography and passive neutron assay. Specifically, fuel parameters relevant for...

  2. Canadian nuclear power principles for beyond design basis events - supporting rationale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the following principles and their rationale began during a special Chief Nuclear Engineers forum held on March 25th, 2013 in Toronto. These principles are intended to provide guidance to the Canadian Nuclear Power Industry in developing responses to the lessons learned from the Fukushima event of March 2011. These principles were accepted and signed off by the Chief Nuclear Officers of each of the three utilities in August 2013 and were presented to the CNSC at a public hearing on August 21, 2013. This document provides the underlying rationale for the principles. (author)

  3. Risk management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If nuclear fuel is the answer to the future energy crisis, more must be done in the area of protecting financial interests. This paper discusses what has been done in the area of insurance to protect the owner, processor, vendors, etc. What is available in the insurance market is reviewed; the Nuclear Energy Liability Property Insurance Association is virtually the only nuclear insuror, except for the mutual company Nuclear Mutual Limited in Bermuda. Methods being used today to insure each phase of the processing for nuclear fuel are reviewed next. There are basically three (overlapping) types of primary insurance for the fuel cycle: conventional insurance, nuclear insurance pools, and Price-Anderson indemnification. There is no clearcut assumption of risk because the contract between owner, converter, fabricator or reprocessor is usually completed before insurance is considered. The need to educate the insurors about nuclear matters is emphasized

  4. Environmental assessment review of the concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental assessment review of the concept of geologic disposal of nuclear fuel waste is likely the most challenging public review Canadians have faced to date. The Environmental Assessment and Review Process provides the vehicle to bring all the facts and viewpoints on long-term management of nuclear fuel waste into a single context, so that a group of independent citizens, the panel, can make recommendations to the Federal and Ontario governments reflecting public opinion. This process attempts to ensure that sound thinking and good ideas are not isolated from the review, and conversely, that vested interests and narrow perspectives do not dominate

  5. National Policy on Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National policy on nuclear fuel cycle is aimed at attaining the expected condition, i.e. being able to support optimality the national energy policy and other related Government policies taking into account current domestic nuclear fuel cycle condition and the trend of international nuclear fuel cycle development, the national strength, weakness, thread and opportunity in the field of energy. This policy has to be followed by the strategy to accomplish covering the optimization of domestic efforts, cooperation with other countries, and or purchasing licences. These policy and strategy have to be broken down into various nuclear fuel cycle programmes covering basically assesment of the whole cycle, performing research and development of the whole cycle without enrichment and reprocessing being able for weapon, as well as programmes for industrialization of the fuel cycle stepwisery commencing with the middle part of the cycle and ending with the edge of the back-end of the cycle

  6. Nuclear fuel cycle and legal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle is regulated as a whole in Japan by the law concerning regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors (hereafter referred to as ''the law concerning regulation of reactors''), which was published in 1957, and has been amended 13 times. The law seeks to limit the use of atomic energy to peaceful objects, and nuclear fuel materials are controlled centering on the regulation of enterprises which employ nuclear fuel materials, namely regulating each enterprise. While the permission and report of uses are necessary for the employment of nuclear materials under Article 52 and 61 of the law concerning regulation of reactors, the permission provisions are not applied to three kinds of enterprises of refining, processing and reprocessing and the persons who install reactors as the exceptions in Article 52, when nuclear materials are used for the objects of the enterprises themselves. The enterprises of refining, processing and reprocessing and the persons who install reactors are stipulated respectively in the law. Accordingly the nuclear material regulations are applied only to the users of small quantity of such materials, namely universities, research institutes and hospitals. The nuclear fuel materials used in Japan which are imported under international contracts including the nuclear energy agreements between two countries are mostly covered by the security measures of IAEA as internationally controlled substances. (Okada, K.)

  7. A Path Forward to Advanced Nuclear Fuels: Spectroscopic Calorimetry of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal is to relieve the shortage of thermodynamic and kinetic information concerning the stability of nuclear fuel alloys. Past studies of the ternary nuclear fuel UPuZr have demonstrated constituent redistribution when irradiated or with thermal treatment. Thermodynamic data is key to predicting the possibilities of effects such as constituent redistribution within the fuel rods and interaction with cladding materials

  8. The management strategy of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of management strategy of spent nuclear fuel has been carried out. Spent nuclear fuel is one of the by-products of nuclear power plant. The technical operations related to the management of spent fuel discharged from reactors are called the back-end fuel cycle. It can be largely divided into three option s : the once-through cycle, the closed cycle and the so-called ‟wait and see” policy. Whatever strategy is selected for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, Away-from-Reactor (AFR) storage facilities has to be constructed. For the once through cycle, the entire content of spent fuel is considered as waste, and is subject to be disposed of into a deep underground repository. In the closed cycle, however, can be divided into: (1) uranium and plutonium are recovered from spent fuel by reprocessing and recycled to manufacture mixed oxide (MOX) fuel rods, (2) waste transmutation in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, (3) DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In CANDU) concept. In wait and see policy, which means first storing the spent fuel and deciding at a later stage on reprocessing or disposal. (author)

  9. Spent fuel management options and nuclear fuel supplies in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel management pathway adopted has a direct bearing on the supply of nuclear fuel. Compared to direct disposal, reprocessing is able to reduce the consumption of uranium, thus making nuclear power a quasi-indigenous source of power. The breeder technology was developed to make use of as many fuel constituents of natural uranium as possible, especially Pu-239. When used in mixed oxide fuel assemblies, plutonium can be burnt even in light water reactors. On the basis of three different scenarios for the development of the installed nuclear generating capacity, the annual uranium requirement up to 2030 is simulated in a computer model. The parameters influencing the calculation are the time, final storage, reprocessing, the use of mixed oxide fuel, and a higher fuel burnup. The service life of a nuclear power plant is assumed to be 35 years throughout. All steps of the nuclear fuel cycle are modeled, from purchasing the natural uranium to final storage. In each of the three scenarios, the model calculations arrive at clearly lower prices of natural uranium, of approx. US Dollar 65/kg of U, than actually prevailed in the second half of the seventies, i.e. more than US Dollar 190/kg of U. (orig.)

  10. Childhood leukaemia around Canadian nuclear facilities. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompted by findings of increased occurrence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of some nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom, this study aimed to investigate whether the frequency of leukaemia among children born to mothers living near nuclear facilities in Ontario differed from the provincial average. The Ontario Cancer Registry was used to identify 1894 children aged 0 to 14 years who died from leukaemia between 1950 and 1987, and 1814 children who were diagnosed with leukaemia between 1964 and 1986. Residence at birth and death was obtained from birth and death certificates. Analyses were performed separately for nuclear research and development facilities; uranium mining, milling and refining facilities; and, nuclear generating stations; and for areas within the same county as the facility and 'nearby' - within a 25-km radius of the facility. Risk estimates were calculated as the ratio of the observed (O) number of events over the expected (E) number. In the vicinity of nuclear research and development facilities the rate of leukaemia was less than expected and within the bound of chance variation. In the areas around the uranium mining, milling and refining facilities and nuclear power plants leukaemia occurred slightly more frequently than expected, but due to small frequencies these differences may have arisen due to chance. Large differences between observed and expected rates were not detected around any of the Ontario facilities. This study was large enough to detect excess risks of the magnitude reported in the United Kingdom, but it was not large enough to discriminate between the observed relative risks and a chance finding. Levels of leukaemia detected near nuclear generating stations indicate the need for further investigation. (20 tabs., 15 figs., 32 refs.)

  11. Method for making nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of manufacturing a nuclear rod is described. It comprises only partially filling a mold cavity with nuclear fuel particles, closing the mold cavity and reducing the volume thereof such that the fuel particles substantially fill the mold cavity, injecting a fluid solidifiable binder into the particle-filled mold cavity to fill the interstices between the fuel particles. The volume of particle-filled mold cavity is reduced by applying pressure to the contents thereof via a movable portion of mold cavity, and solidifying binder in cavity to form a fuel rod

  12. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: engineered barriers alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste involves emplacing the waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The solid waste would be isolated from the biosphere by a multibarrier system consisting of engineered barriers, including long-lived containers and clay and cement-based sealing materials, and the natural barrier provided by the massive geological formation. The technical feasibility of this concept and its impact on the environment and human health are being documented in an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), which will be submitted for review under the federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. This report, one of nine EIS primary references, describes the various alternative designs and materials for engineered barriers that have been considered during the development of the Canadian disposal concept and summarizes engineered barrier concepts being evaluated in other countries. The basis for the selection of a reference engineered barrier system for the EIS is presented. This reference system involves placing used CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) fuel bundles in titanium containers, which would then be emplaced in boreholes drilled in the floor of disposal rooms. Clay-based sealing materials would be used to fill both the space between the containers and the rock and the remaining excavations. In the section on waste forms, the properties of both used-fuel bundles and solidified high-level wastes, which would be produced by treating wastes resulting from the reprocessing of used fuel, are discussed. Methods of solidifying the wastes and the chemical durability of the solidified waste under disposal conditions are reviewed. Various alternative container designs are reviewed, ranging from preliminary conceptual designs to designs that have received extensive prototype testing. Results of structural performance, welding and inspection studies are also summarized. The corrosion of

  13. AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste and the importance of its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, Canada has been investigating a concept for permanently dealing with the nuclear fuel waste from Canadian CANDU nuclear generating stations. The concept is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. AECL will soon be submitting an environmental impact statement on the concept to a federal environmental assessment review panel. In accordance with AECL's mandate, and in keeping with the detailed requirements of the panel, AECL has conducted extensive studies on a wide variety of technical and socio-economic issues associated with the concept. If the concept is accepted, we can and should continue our responsible approach, and take the next steps towards constructing a disposal facility for Canada's used fuel wastes. 16 refs

  14. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  15. Annotated Bibliography for Drying Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebecca E. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Internationally, the nuclear industry is represented by both commercial utilities and research institutions. Over the past two decades many of these entities have had to relocate inventories of spent nuclear fuel from underwater storage to dry storage. These efforts were primarily prompted by two factors: insufficient storage capacity (potentially precipitated by an open-ended nuclear fuel cycle) or deteriorating quality of existing underwater facilities. The intent of developing this bibliography is to assess what issues associated with fuel drying have been identified, to consider where concerns have been satisfactorily addressed, and to recommend where additional research would offer the most value to the commercial industry and the U. S. Department of Energy.

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  17. Method for fabricating ceramic nuclear fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To fabricate ceramic nuclear fuel pellets with ease and efficiently capable of preventing deformation failures in cladding tubes due to thermal deformation of pellets. Method: Nuclear fuel pellets are arranged in one layer while incorporating grinding material in the inner wall of a cylindrical vessel and the end face of the nuclear fuel pellets are rounded to a predetermined shape by rotating the cylindrical vessel. Since the pellets do not form a saddle-like shape (expanded at both ends) upon thermal deformation the surface of the cladding tube less tends to form bamboo node-like ridges, thus to reduce the deformation failure of the cladding tube. (Aizawa, K.)

  18. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  19. Nuclear fuel conversion and fabrication chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following irradiation and reprocessing of nuclear fuel, two operations are performed to prepare the fuel for subsequent reuse as fuel: fuel conversion, and fuel fabrication. These operations complete the classical nuclear fuel cycle. Fuel conversion involves generating a solid form suitable for fabrication into nuclear fuel. For plutonium based fuels, either a pure PuO2 material or a mixed PuO2-UO2 fuel material is generated. Several methods are available for preparation of the pure PuO2 including: oxalate or peroxide precipitation; or direct denitration. Once the pure PuO2 is formed, it is fabricated into fuel by mechanically blending it with ceramic grade UO2. The UO2 can be prepared by several methods which include direct denitration. ADU precipitation, AUC precipitation, and peroxide precipitation. Alternatively, UO2-PuO2 can be generated directly using coprecipitation, direct co-denitration, or gel sphere processes. In coprecipitation, uranium and plutonium are either precipitated as ammonium diuranate and plutonium hydroxide or as a mixture of ammonium uranyl-plutonyl carbonate, filtered and dried. In direct thermal denitration, solutions of uranium and plutonium nitrates are heated causing concentration and, subsequently, direct denitration. In gel sphere conversion, solutions of uranium and plutonium nitrate containing additives are formed into spherical droplets, gelled, washed and dried. Refabrication of these UO3-PuO2 starting materials is accomplished by calcination-reduction to UO2-PuO2 followed by pellet fabrication. (orig.)

  20. Childhood leukaemia around Canadian nuclear facilities. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ninefold excess risk of leukaemia, as observed in vicinity of the Sellafield facility, was not observed amongst children born to mothers residing in the areas around nuclear research facilities and uranium mining, milling and refining facilities in Ontario. In the vicinity of nuclear research facilities, the rate of leukaemia was, in fact, less than expected. In the areas around the uranium mining, milling and refining facilities; leukaemia occurred slightly more frequently than expected; however, due to small frequencies these results may have risen by chance. A slightly greater than expected occurrence of leukaemia was also detected, which may well have been due to chance, in an exploratory study of the areas around nuclear power generating stations in Ontario

  1. Radioecology of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sites where radioactive wastes are found are solid waste burial grounds, soils below liquid stoage areas, surface ditches and ponds, and the terrestrial environment around chemical processing facilities that discharge airborne radioactive debris from stacks. This study provides information to help assess the environmental impacts and certain potentiall human hazards associated with nuclear fuel cycles. A data base is being developed to define and quantify biological transport routes which will permit credible predictions and assessment of routine and potential large-scale releases of radionuclides and other toxic materials. These data, used in assessment models, will increase the accuracy of estimating radiation doses to man and other life forms. Information obtained from existing storage and disposal sites will provide a meaningful radioecological perspective with which to improve the effectiveness of waste management practices. Results will provide information to determine if waste management procedures on the Hanford Site have caused ecological perturbations, and if so, to determine the source, nature, and magnitude of such disturbances

  2. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under two nuclear supply scenarios. These two scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries in the World Outside Centrally Planned Economic Areas (WOCA). A No New Orders scenarios is also presented for the Unites States. This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the WOCA projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel; discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2020 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2036, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case

  3. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity

  4. Country nuclear fuel cycle profile: Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four WWER-440/213 reactors are in operation at the Paks nuclear power plant with a total capacity of 1866 MW(e). The first reactor started operation in 1983. Nuclear generation accounted for 37% of the country's total electricity production in 2002. Hungary has not yet decided about its nuclear fuel cycle. Prior to its closure, the Mecsekuran Lic/Cserkut mining and ore processing facility produced up to 500 t U/a, or half the requirements of the Paks nuclear power plant. The mine was closed in 1997 and production at the milling facility was phased out in 1999. There is no domestic fuel fabrication. At present, nuclear fuel is flown in from the Russian Federation. Westinghouse has developed advanced fuel designs for the Paks nuclear power plant in conjunction with TVO (Finland). Between 1989 and 1998 spent fuel was sent back to the Mayak facility (RT-1) in the Russian Federation without U, Pu or high level waste from reprocessing needing to be returned. At the Paks nuclear power plant, the AFR dry storage facility (modular vault dry storage) is in operation. The capacity of the first phase (11 vaults) is 4950 fuel assemblies (574 t HM)

  5. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society fifth annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The twenty papers presented at this conference covered the areas of: modeling and analysis, emphasizing thermalhydraulics in CANDU primary heat transport systems; Nuclear technologies in general, particularly relating to the operation and performance of CANDU reactors; and tailings and reactor waste disposal

  6. Proceedings of the 19. Canadian Nuclear Society simulation symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A majority of the 31 papers in this symposium on nuclear simulation deal with CANDU reactors. The sessions were organized according to the following subjects: reactor physics, hydrogen behaviour, thermalhydraulics, reactor safety and operation. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  7. Thermochemistry of nuclear fuels in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a large number of elements, accompanied with steep temperature gradient results in dynamic chemistry during nuclear fuel burn-up. Understanding this chemistry is very important for efficient and safe usage of nuclear fuels. The radioactive nature of these fuels puts lot of constraint on regulatory bodies to ensure their accident free operation in the reactors. One of the common aims of advanced fuels is to achieve high burn-up. As burn-up of the fuel increases, chemistry of fission-products becomes increasingly more important. To understand different phenomenon taking place in-pile, many out of-pile experiments are carried out. Extensive studies of thermodynamic properties, phase analysis, thermophysical property evaluation, fuel-fission product clad compatibility are carried out with relevant compounds and simulated fuels (SIMFUEL). All these data are compiled and jointly evaluated using different computational methods to predict fuel behaviour during burn-up. Only when this combined experimental and theoretical information confirms safe operation of the pin, a test pin is prepared and burnt in a test reactor. Every fuel has a different chemistry and different constraints associated with it. In this talk, various thermo-chemical aspects of some of the advanced fuels, mixed carbide, mixed nitride, 'Pu' rich MOX, 'Th' based AHWR fuels and metallic fuels will be discussed. (author)

  8. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association 26. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference is being held near an imposing array of some of the world's finest nuclear reactors but in a climate for nuclear energy that poses considerable challenge for the future. Recent events at Chernobyl have deflected public attention from the reality that nuclear energy from CANDU reactors is the safest, cleanest and most economic energy option available in several parts of our country. One might well ask 'Will the Chernobyl accident result in a serious long term set-back to global recognition of the need for nuclear power?' Technically it shouldn't do so but politically it may unless the industry takes an innovative and aggressive stand towards providing the necessary assurances to the public of the excellence and safety of well designed reactors such as CANDU. The them of this conference is 'Innovation Leads the Way'. During the next two day we will hear about and discuss innovations in our activities ranging all the way from scientific, technological and market development to the concluding session on what we must now do to dissipate the cloud of Chernobyl. 'Innovation Leads the Way' is a provocative title. We all know what innovation means --changing for the better -- finding new and better ways of doing things. But where are we going? Are we innovative enough to find our way? Exploring the answers to these questions is what this conference is all about. We are seeking the way not only to maintain but to improve the world class performance of our many-facetted industry and the contribution which it can make to meeting the world's energy needs. The process should be assisted through the meaningful communication we will all engage in with friends and colleagues during these next few days. If there is one lesson the nuclear industry world-wide has learned from the events of the past few weeks it is the need for international cooperation and exchange of knowledge and information

  9. Limitation of the EIA Process for the assessment of nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian environmental impact assessment process for the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management and Disposal Concept was completed in 1994. Almost four years later, in February 1998, the Review Panel released its report. The viewpoints of those who participated in the assessment process is archived in the thousands of pages of hearing testimony, meeting transcripts and written briefs. One of the most contentious issues raised, and one that continues to plague management in Canada, is the debate surrounding how the problem of NFW waste management should be defined. The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the problem frame of the Canadian NFW management disposal concept EIS. This will be accomplished through an analysis of stakeholder participation and views, and through an evaluation of the range and nature of the information considered legitimate or constrained in the Canadian process

  10. Limitation of the EIA Process for the assessment of nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, B.L.; Kuhn, R.G. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography

    1999-12-01

    The Canadian environmental impact assessment process for the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management and Disposal Concept was completed in 1994. Almost four years later, in February 1998, the Review Panel released its report. The viewpoints of those who participated in the assessment process is archived in the thousands of pages of hearing testimony, meeting transcripts and written briefs. One of the most contentious issues raised, and one that continues to plague management in Canada, is the debate surrounding how the problem of NFW waste management should be defined. The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the problem frame of the Canadian NFW management disposal concept EIS. This will be accomplished through an analysis of stakeholder participation and views, and through an evaluation of the range and nature of the information considered legitimate or constrained in the Canadian process.

  11. fuel cost analysis in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel cycle typically extends over a period of between 50 to 100 years, from mining the uranium ore to finally disposing of the high level waste. These operations are divided in two as front-end and back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Accordingly, fuel cycle costs comprise front-end costs and back-end costs. Fuel cycle cost take full account of the investment and operating experience in meeting the strict regulatory requirement for environmental protection and public safety. They cover all expected costs over the 50 to 100 year period of the entire nuclear fuel cycle. The investment appraisal method of deriving the lifetime levelised fuel cost requires the examination of the entire fuel cycle cash outflow based on component prices. The cash outflows are discounted to a base date using the selected discount rate which was set for the reference case at 5% p.a. (real). The unit costs for the different stages of the fuel cycle are discounted back to a selected base date and added together in order to arrive at a total fuel cost in present value terms. In this paper, fuel cycle cost of a reference PWR and CANDU nuclear reactors has investigated using 'Levelised Cost Method'

  12. Levelized nuclear fueling cost in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic nuclear fuel cycle mode options are discussed as they apply to PWR-type reactors. Forecast fueling costs have been computed and are reported for the two main choices - basic front-end cost supplemented by either a throw- away mode option or a reprocessing mode option. It is concluded that reprocessing could result in total unit fueling costs ranging from a minimum slightly lower, through a maximum about 30% higher than the total unit fueling cost using the throw-away mode option. Moreover, in massive breeder development the total unit fueling cost can extend even below the numerically calculated limit. (H.K.)

  13. New Nuclear Fuel-Management Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new course on in-core fuel management in nuclear reactors. The course concentrates mostly on nuclear fuel management in CANDU reactors, but it does touch on fuel management in Light-Water Reactors also. I have given this course at both McMaster Univ. and the Univ. Institute of technology. The course over all aspects of the use of nuclear fuel. In addition to shorter conventional assignments, students are asked to complete significant hands-on projects for CANDU reactors using computer codes. A fundamental philosophy of the course, which is to have students carry out typical calculations with both lattice codes and full-core diffusion codes. A basic objective of the course is to give students a strong flavour of the type of fuel-management work actually done in industry

  14. Continental glaciation and its potential impact on a used-fuel disposal vault in the Canadian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has been assessing the concept of nuclear fuel waste disposal in a vault excavated at a depth ranging between 500 m and 1000 m in a plutonic rock mass of the Canadian Shield. Glaciation is a natural process that has occurred in the past, and is likely to occur in the future, thus causing changes in the loading conditions on the rock mass hosting the disposal vault. Because the rock mass is a natural barrier to the migration of radionuclides, it is important to evaluate its integrity under load changes caused by the glaciation process. Assuming that the magnitude and extent of the future glaciation will be similar to those of the past, we have reviewed published data pertaining to the last continental ice sheet that covered a large area of North America. Estimates have been made for the magnitude of stresses due to ice sheet loading for a vault located at depths of 500 to 1000 m. These analyses have shown that the uniform loading of a continental ice sheet would reduce the deviatoric stresses in the Canadian Shield, creating more favourable conditions than those existing at the present time, namely, high horizontal stresses. The effects of surface erosion and increase in the in-situ shear stresses have also been examined. Based on the existing data and structural modelling studies, there would be no significant structural effect on a disposal vault located at 1000-m depth in a plutonic rock. At its maximum size, an ice sheet comparable to the Laurentide ice sheet could reactivate the faults and fracture zones along the perimeter areas. Our analyses have been based on fully drained conditions only. At a potential disposal site, it would be important also to consider the potential for excess pore pressure in the analyses. (author)

  15. New developments in nuclear fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been over thirty years since the initiation of the commercial electricity with nuclear reactors. Significant operational experience has been gained with various reactor types during this period. Countries with their own national strategies and continued to improve these designs. Especially Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents resulted in significant design changes in reactors from the safety point of view. As a consequence of this, advanced reactor concepts have been developed. In such designs,changes in fuel assemblies are observed in addition to the changes in safety systems. Besides increasing safety margins, the desire of decreasing energy production cost has motivated the development of new fuel design. The use of burnable absorber with fuel has been initiated and it has been a common practice in current applications. The most important development in the context of nuclear fuels in recent years is the use of plutonium which is covered from nuclear weapons in nuclear reactor

  16. Perspective of nuclear fuel cycle for sustainable nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power, on a life-cycle basis, emits about the same level of carbon per unit of electricity generated as wind and solar power. Long-term energy demand and supply analysis projects that global nuclear capacities will expand substantially, i.e. from 350 GW today to more than 1,500 GW by 2050. Uranium supply, spent fuel and waste management, and a non-proliferation nuclear fuel cycle are essential factors for sustainable nuclear power growth. An analysis of the uranium supply up to 2050 indicates that there is no real shortage of potential uranium available if based on the IIASA/WEC scenario on medium nuclear energy growth, although its market price may become more volatile. With regard to spent fuel and waste management, the short term prediction foresees that the amount of spent fuel will increase from the present 145,000 tHM to more than 260,000 tHM in 2015. The IPCC scenarios predicted that the spent fuel quantities accumulated by 2050 will vary between 525 000 tHM and 3 210 000 tHM. Even according to the lowest scenario, it is estimated that spent fuel quantity in 2050 will be double the amount accumulated by 2015. Thus, waste minimization in the nuclear fuel cycle is a central tenet of sustainability. The proliferation risk focusing on separated plutonium and resistant technologies is reviewed. Finally, the IAEA Project INPRO is briefly introduced. (author)

  17. An approach for risk informed safety culture assessment for Canadian nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important components of effective safety and risk management for nuclear power stations is a healthy safety culture. DNV has developed an approach for risk informed safety culture assessment that combines two complementary paradigms for safety and risk management: loss prevention - for preventing and intervening in accidents; and critical function management - for achieving safety and performance goals. Combining these two paradigms makes it possible to provide more robust systems for safety management and to support a healthy safety culture. This approach is being applied to safety culture assessment in partnership with a Canadian nuclear utility. (author)

  18. An approach for risk informed safety culture assessment for Canadian nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R. [Det Norske Veritas (U.S.A.), Inc., Katy, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    One of the most important components of effective safety and risk management for nuclear power stations is a healthy safety culture. DNV has developed an approach for risk informed safety culture assessment that combines two complementary paradigms for safety and risk management: loss prevention - for preventing and intervening in accidents; and critical function management - for achieving safety and performance goals. Combining these two paradigms makes it possible to provide more robust systems for safety management and to support a healthy safety culture. This approach is being applied to safety culture assessment in partnership with a Canadian nuclear utility. (author)

  19. The Canadian Experience with Fukushima: Response to an Off-Shore Nuclear Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss Canada's response to the March 2011 events at Fukushima, from a nuclear regulatory point of view, including emergency management. We will also describe the actions taken by the Government of Canada and the challenges with obtaining timely and complete information. Finally, three specific actions taken by the CNSC, namely the establishment of a Fukushima Task Force, the creation of an External Advisory Committee and the results of an IA EA review of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) response to the events at Fukushima are summarized.

  20. Spacer for fuel rods in nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spacers for fuel rods in nuclear reactor fuel elements are described, especially for use aboard ships. Spacers are used in a grid formed by web plates orthogonally intersecting and assembled together in a tooth-comb fashion forming a plurality of channels. The web plates are joined together and each of the web plates includes apertures through which resilient and separator members are joined. The resilient and separator members are joined. The resilient and separator members are in adjacent channels and with other similar members in the same channel, contact a fuel rod in the channel. The contact pressure between the members and fuel rod is radially directed

  1. Sustainable development through nuclear technology : 29th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 32nd CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 29th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 32nd CNS/CNA Student Conference on Sustainable Development through Nuclear Technology was held on June 1-4, 2008 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The theme of the conference was 'Nuclear Sustainability'. The central objective of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of views on how this technical enterprise can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. The renewed global interest in nuclear technology is based on a recognition of its potential to meet economic and environmental targets more favourably than competing technologies. Although many of these attractions are short-term in nature, they stem from a broader potential of nuclear technology to drive all aspects of development (social, environmental, economic) in a sustainable in this area. (author) a terial in support of fuel resources themselves. The conference drew a record attendance of over 450 delegates. Over 100 technical papers were presented within 15 technical sessions, as well as over 30 student papers in 5 sessions. The following list of session titles indicates the diversity of the technical papers: advanced reactors; plant and components; process systems; thermalhydraulics; safety and licensing; hydrogen; human factors; physics; instrumentation and control; environment and waste management; and plant operation. (author)

  2. Protest: The Canadian pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This popularly written article compares Canadian attitudes to protests against nuclear power to those in the United States. Canadian protesters are more peaceful, expressing their opinions within the law. The article describes the main anti-nuclear groups in Canada and presents the results of public opinion surveys of Canadians on the use of nuclear power for generating electricity. (TI)

  3. Implications of occupational exposure distributions in the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is the nuclear regulator agency in Canada. Its mandate includes controlling the development, application and use of atomic energy. A major consideration in meeting this mandate is radiological safety. Careful recording and analysis of dose data are important in the regulatory process. AECB objectives in analysing this data include: studying the degree of compliance with regulations and provisions outlined in the licences; identifying the most exposed occupational groups, comparing exposures and studying exposure trends and informing the public as well as provincial, federal and international organizations. The National Dose Registry is operated by the Bureau of Radiation and Medical Devices of the Department of National Health and Welfare (DNHW). It is a centralized dose record keeping system which maintains dose information on all monitored radiation workers in Canada, that is, those in both the AECB regulated nuclear industry as well as the provincially regulated X-ray facilities. The nuclear industry workers constitute about 20% of the total. The Department maintains the Registry to: undertake epidemiological studies and health surveillance; assist the AECB and provincial authorities in controlling occupational radiation exposure; undertake dose trend analysis; and provide information for compensatory and legal purposes. The AECB and DNHW have established an interdepartmental working group to determine how DNHW can best meet AECB requirements for dose data analysis. Typical analyses include: dose distributions and average doses by job category and by area in a facility; trends in dose distributions or averages for each job category; trends in collective dose and determination of factors causing these trends. Additional analyses include intercomparison of data for similar jobs but at different facilities and different sectors of the nuclear industry, and the determination of radiation dose per unit of production. 3 refs

  4. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as...

  5. Country nuclear fuel cycle profile: Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovenia has one 676 MW(e) PWR unit (imported from the USA) in operation. Nuclear power generation accounted for 39.8% of the country's total electricity production in 2002. Slovenia has not yet decided about its nuclear fuel cycle policy. Between 1982 and 1990, 362 t of uranium were produced at the Zirovski VRH mine and processing plant. This plant is now being decommissioned. A spent fuel storage pool (capacity 690 t HM) is in operation at the plant site

  6. Nuclear fuel resources: enough to last?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to meet ever-growing energy demands in an environmentally sustainable manner has turned attention to the potential for nuclear energy to play an expanded role in future energy supply mixes. One of the key aspects in defining the sustainability of any energy source is the availability of fuel resources. This article shows that available nuclear energy fuel resources can meet future needs for hundreds, even thousands, of years

  7. Nuclear fuel irradiation in ACPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Negut, G.; Costescu, C.; Georgescu, D.; Pop, I. (Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors, Pitesti (Romania))

    1984-07-01

    For our fuel program, experiments were proposed on CANDU fuel in ACPR in pulsing regimes. These experiments were intended to determine the fuel behavior during large deposition of heat, fuel-clad interaction mechanisms, and failure thresholds. The fuel is 159 mm long, 6.5% enriched UO{sub 2}. The capsule used for irradiation is an atmospheric capsule assembled in the central dry tube. The capsule is 1 m long, 12 cm i.d., and is locked on the lead ballast through a locking device. The fuel is instrumented with three thermocouples (for clad temperature) and a fission gas transducer. The coolant pressure and temperature are also measured. During irradiation, the data are recorded by a high-speed magnetic tape recorder. For the first campaign, three fuel elements will be irradiated. (orig.)

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Technical Databook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Technical Databook is developed for use as a common authoritative source of fuel behavior and material parameters in support of the Hanford SNF Project. The Technical Databook will be revised as necessary to add parameters as their Databook submittals become available

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel elements charging tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assist the loading of nuclear reactor fuel elements in a reactor core, positioning blocks with a pyramidal upper face charged to guide the fuel element leg are placed on the lower core plate. A carrier equipped with means of controlled displacement permits movement of the blocks over the lower core plate

  10. Pyrolytic carbon-caoted nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear fuel kernel having at least one pyrolytic carbon coating and a silicon carbon layer is provided in which extensive interaction of fission product lanthanides with the silicon carbon layer is avoided by providing sufficient UO2 to maintain the lanthanides as oxides during in-reactor use of said fuel

  11. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to an assembly mechanism for nuclear power reactor fuel bundles using a novel, simple and inexpensive means. The mechanism is readily operable remotely, avoids separable parts and is applicable to fuel assemblies in which the upper tie plate is rigidly mounted on the tie rods which hold it in place. (UK)

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designs of nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids for supporting and spacing fuel elements are described which do not utilize resilient grid plate protrusions in the peripheral band but retain the advantages inherent in the combination resilient and rigid protrusion cells. (U.K.)

  13. Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

    2009-09-01

    Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

  14. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  15. Regulatory oversight strategy for chemistry program at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry program is one of the essential programs for the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It helps to ensure the necessary integrity, reliability and availability of plant structures, systems and components important to safety. Additionally, the program plays an important role in asset preservation, limiting radiation exposure and environmental protection. A good chemistry program will minimize corrosion of materials, reduce activation products, minimize of the buildup of radioactive material leading to occupational radiation exposure and it helps limit the release of chemicals and radioactive materials to the environment. The legal basis for the chemistry oversight at Canadian NPPs is established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its associated regulations. It draws on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework and NPP operating license conditions that include applicable standards such as CAN/CSA N286-05 Management System Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants. This paper focuses on the regulatory oversight strategy used in Canada to assess the performance of chemistry program at the nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensed by CNSC. The strategy consists of a combination of inspection and performance monitoring activities. The activities are further supported from information gathered through staff inspections of cross-cutting areas such as maintenance, corrective-action follow-ups, event reviews and safety related performance indicators. (authors)

  16. Nuclear fuel pellet collating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a system for collating nuclear fuel pellets. The system consists of: (a) a pellet collating line including serially-arranged pellet input, work and output stations; (b) a plurality of mobile carts, some supporting pellet supply trays and others supporting pellet storage trays, the trays adapted to support pellets in multiple rows thereof, the pellets on a given one tray being of the same enrichment with enrichments of pellets on some trays behind different from on other trays; (c) a tray positioning station located adjacent to the pellet collating line and defining positions in which are lodged the mobile carts; (d) tray transfer robot located between the pellet collating line and the try positioning station, the robot being operable to transfer supply and storage trays one at a time between the respective carts at the tray positioning station and respective input and output stations; (e) an input sweep head disposed adjacent the input station and being operable for sweeping pellets resting in multiple rows on a given one of the supply trays at the input station from the supply tray onto the work station; (f) a gripping and measuring head disposed adjacent the work station and being operable for measuring a desired length of pellets in the multiple rows thereof on the work station and then separating the measured desired length of pellets from the remaining pellets, if there be any; (g) an output sweep head disposed adjacent to the output station and operable for sweeping the measured lengths of pellets from the work station onto a given one of the storage trays at the output station; (h) one the input sweep head, the gripping and measuring head and the output sweep head being operable for sweeping the remaining pellets, if any, in the multiple rows thereof from the work station back onto the given one of the supply trays at the input station

  17. The status of the Canadian nuclear power program and possible future strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    no need for undue haste in implementing these. Therefore we can contemplate an orderly research and development program which will put us in a position to adopt one or more of the many options in 10-20 yr time. Since our major uncertainties are in the areas of fuel reprocessing and active fuel fabrication these will be an important part of this program. It is not clear how our experience relates to U.S. problems. Certainly there are many conditions which are quite different in the two countries. The two most important are: (i) We have developed heavy water power reactors and the U.S. has not. (ii) The U.S. has a fast breeder program and we do not. I would like to stress the fact though that we really believe our program is a fully valid alternative (at least for us). We are quite willing then to explore with you the question of whether Canadian experience has any pertinence to problems associated with the U.S. nuclear power program. (author)

  18. Human factors in the Canadian nuclear industry: future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently the industry is facing refurbishment and new builds. At present most licensees in Canada do not have sufficient numbers of Human Factors staff. As a result, the activities of the CNSC are too often focused on providing guidance regarding the application of Human Factors, in addition to reviewing work submitted by the licensee. Greater efficiencies for both the licensee and the CNSC could be realized if licensee staff had greater Human Factors expertise. Strategies for developing Human Factors expertise should be explored through cooperative partnerships with universities, which could be encouraged to include Human Factors courses specific to nuclear. (author)

  19. Fuels for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuels for advanced nuclear reactors differ greatly from conventional light water reactor fuels and vary widely between the different concepts, due differences in reactor architecture and deployment. Functional requirements of all fuel designs include (1) retention of fission products and fuel nuclides, (2) dimensional stability, and (3) maintaining a coolable geometry. In all cases, the anticipated fuel performance under normal or off-normal conditions is the limiting factor in reactor system design, and cumulative effects of increased exposure to higher burnup degrades fuel performance. In high-temperature (thermal) gas reactor systems, fuel particles of uranium dioxide or uranium oxycarbide particles are coated with layers of carbon and SiC (or ZrC). Such fuels have been used successfully to very high burnup (10-20% of heavy-metal atoms) and can withstand transient temperatures up to 1600 C. Oxide (pellet-type) and metal (pin-type) fuels clad in stainless steel tubes have been successfully used in liquid metal cooled fast reactors, attaining burnup of 20% or more of heavy-metal atoms. Those fuel designs are being adapted for actinide management missions, requiring greater contents of minor actinides (e.g. Am, Np, Cm). The current status of each fuel system is reviewed and technical challenges confronting the implementation of each fuel in the context of the entire advanced reactor fuel cycle (fabrication, reactor performance, recycle) are discussed

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle simulation system (VISTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System (VISTA) is a simulation system which estimates long term nuclear fuel cycle material and service requirements as well as the material arising from the operation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and nuclear power reactors. The VISTA model needs isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel in order to make estimations of the material arisings from the nuclear reactor operation. For this purpose, in accordance with the requirements of the VISTA code, a new module called Calculating Actinide Inventory (CAIN) was developed. CAIN is a simple fuel depletion model which requires a small number of input parameters and gives results in a very short time. VISTA has been used internally by the IAEA for the estimation of: spent fuel discharge from the reactors worldwide, Pu accumulation in the discharged spent fuel, minor actinides (MA) accumulation in the spent fuel, and in the high level waste (HLW) since its development. The IAEA decided to disseminate the VISTA tool to Member States using internet capabilities in 2003. The improvement and expansion of the simulation code and the development of the internet version was started in 2004. A website was developed to introduce the simulation system to the visitors providing a simple nuclear material flow calculation tool. This website has been made available to Member States in 2005. The development work for the full internet version is expected to be fully available to the interested parties from IAEA Member States in 2007 on its website. This publication is the accompanying text which gives details of the modelling and an example scenario

  1. Innovative training techniques in the Canadian nuclear regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the contributors to the safety of nuclear installations is properly-trained personnel. This applies equally to the staff of a regulatory agency, as they are charged with the task of evaluating the safety of installations and operations involving radioactive materials. In 1990, the nuclear regulatory agency of Canada, the Atomic Energy Control Board, set up a Training Center to train AECB staff and to provide assistance to foreign regulatory agencies who had asked for such assistance. In setting up the Training Centre, the authors considered factors which adversely affect the efficacy of training courses. The technical content must, of course, be of sufficiently high quality, but there are other, significant factors which are independent of the content: consider a presentation in which the lecturer shows a slide which is unreadable from the back of the room. The training value of this slide is zero, even though the content may be sound. Pursuing this thought, they decided to examine the mechanics of presentations and the form of training materials, with a view to optimizing their effectiveness in training. The results of this examination were that they decided to use three technologies as the basis for production of training, support and presentation materials. This paper briefly describes these technologies and their advantages. The technologies are: desktop publishing, video and multimedia

  2. Fuel rod for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel or breeder element with fission gas plenum has hollow spaces on the central part of the fuel or breeder material volume, which are filled with sodium. During operation, this sodium provides a second heat transport mechanism, as the sodium evaporates, rises into the fission gas plenum, condenses on the metal sleeve there and returns to the fuel or breeding zone under gravity or capillary effect. (DG)

  3. Integrated spent nuclear fuel database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Distributed Information Systems software Unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has designed and developed an Integrated Spent Nuclear Fuel Database System (ISNFDS), which maintains a computerized inventory of all US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Commercial SNF is not included in the ISNFDS unless it is owned or stored by DOE. The ISNFDS is an integrated, single data source containing accurate, traceable, and consistent data and provides extensive data for each fuel, extensive facility data for every facility, and numerous data reports and queries

  4. Waste management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present lecture deals with energy needs and nuclear power, the importance of waste and its relative place in the fuel cycle, the games of controversies over nuclear waste in the strategies of energy and finally with missions and functions of the IAEA for privileging the rational approach and facilitating the transfer of technology. (RW)

  5. Nuclear fuel treatment facility for 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new fixed mooring harbor in Sekinehama and surrounding land facilities to accommodate a test voyage for the nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu' in 1990 were constructed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Kobe Steel took part in the construction of the nuclear fuel treatment process in various facilities, beginning in October, 1988. This report describes the outline of the facility. (author)

  6. The nuclear fuel cycle in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the introduction of the peaceful uses of nuclear power it has been the objective of the French Government and the French nuclear power industry to create a self-sufficient closed nuclear fuel cycle. This objective was attained many years ago, with the only exception of the final storage of high level radioactive waste for which, however, at least the problem of conditioning to a state fit for final storage was solved and has been employed in practice for many years. The French nuclear fuel cycle has assumed special importance within the use of nuclear power in Europe and, especially, in the Federal Republic of Germany, in terms both of competition and cooperation. Driven also by specific developments in the Federal Republic of Germany, the German power economy decided in the summer of 1989 to have spent nuclear fuel elements from German nuclear power plants reprocessed to a considerable extent, and on a long term basis, in France. This includes not only the awarding and acceptance of commercial contracts, but also close cooperation based on a government agreement. This cooperation, which initially has been focused on reprocessing, may give rise to various joint steps in research and development also in other sectors of the fuel cycle and thus make important contributions to putting the peaceful uses of nuclear power on a broader European base. (orig.)

  7. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  8. The management of carbon-14 in Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Canada, Derived Emission Limits (DELs) for the release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities are set to ensure that the dose to a member of a critical group from one year's release does not exceed the limit on annual dose to a member of the public set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. The Advisory Committee on Radiological Protection (ACRP) has expressed concerns as to whether this procedure provides adequate protection to members of the public, including future generations, for certain radionuclides such as a carbon-14 (14C), which can accumulate in the environment and which can be dispersed, through environmental processes, beyond the local region where the critical group is assumed to live. The ACRP subsequently established a Working Group to review the production, release, environmental levels, and waste management of 14C arising in CANDU power reactors. The ACRP recommendations resulting from this review can be summarized as · Given the current levels of emissions from CANDU nuclear power stations resulting from the use of a carbon dioxide annulus gas and the limitations in the calculation and use of collective dose, the ACRP sees no need for and additional collective dose limit to be applied to these sources. · The AECB should require licensees of power reactors and waste management sites to provide an annual inventory of 14C held within reactor buildings and waste management sites; to provide information on the stability of the ion exchange resins and their continuing ability to retain the 14C; to demonstrate on an ongoing basis that releases of 14C are maintained at a small fraction of the emission limits; and to report annually the critical group and local collective doses arising from releases of 14C. 61 refs., 25 tabs., 4 figs

  9. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  10. Vertical integration in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical integration in the nuclear fuel cycle and its contribution to market power of integrated fuel suppliers were studied. The industry subdivision analyzed is the uranium raw materials sector. The hypotheses demonstrated are that (1) this sector of the industry is trending toward vertical integration between production of uranium raw materials and the manufacture of nuclear fuel elements, and (2) this vertical integration confers upon integrated firms a significant market advantage over non-integrated fuel manufacturers. Under microeconomic concepts the rationale for vertical integration is the pursuit of efficiency, and it is beneficial because it increases physical output and decreases price. The Market Advantage Model developed is an arithmetical statement of the relative market power (in terms of price) between non-integrated nuclear fuel manufacturers and integrated raw material/fuel suppliers, based on the concept of the ''squeeze.'' In operation, the model compares net profit and return on sales of nuclear fuel elements between the competitors, under different price and cost circumstances. The model shows that, if integrated and non-integrated competitors sell their final product at identical prices, the non-integrated manufacturer returns a net profit only 17% of the integrated firm. Also, the integrated supplier can price his product 35% below the non-integrated producer's price and still return the same net profit. Vertical integration confers a definite market advantage to the integrated supplier, and the basic source of that advantage is the cost-price differential of the raw material, uranium

  11. CNSC staff annual report for 2001 on the Canadian nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) staff assessments of the Canadian nuclear power industry's operational performance in 2001. The report presents the CNSC staff score card of licensee programs and performance in nine safety areas. In addition, the report makes comparisons where possible, shows trends and highlights significant issues that pertain to the industry at large. More detailed information on issues can be found in the licensing Commission Member Documents (CMD) for each facility. The report's conclusions are supported by information gathered by CNSC staff inspections and document reviews, event reviews and studies of performance indicators.Through these activities, CNSC staff identifies strengths and weaknesses in licensees' performance and raise issues requiring attention or corrective action. Of the 22 CANDU reactors that have been issued operating licences by the CNSC, eight have produced no electric power since 1998. The Bruce A reactors are defuelled and in a layed-up state. The Pickering A reactors are fuelled, but remain in a drained guaranteed shutdown state. The Bruce B reactors are currently limited to operating at or below 90% of full power. The Darlington reactors are limited to 98% of full power. The remaining reactors are nominally operating at full power. Figure 2 shows the location of each site, the number and generating capacity of the reactors, and the initial start-up date, licence holders and licence expiry date (at the time of the production of the report). To meet the legal requirements of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and Regulations licensees must implement programs which ensure that station operation has adequate provisions for the protection of the environment, the health and safety of persons and the maintenance of national security and measures required to implement international obligations to which Canada has agreed. CNSC staff assesses every stations' performance against legal

  12. Fuel element for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to avoid a can box or an adjacent fuel element sitting on the spacer of a fuel element in the corner during assembly, the top and bottom edges of the outer bars of the spacers are provided with deflector bars, which have projections projecting beyond the outside of the outer bars. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Real Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Havlíček

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this paper describes the nuclear fuel cycle. It is divided into three parts. The first part, called Front-End, covers all activities connected with fuel procurement and fabrication. The middle part of the cycle includes fuel reload design activities and the operation of the fuel in the reactor. Back-End comprises all activities ensuring safe separation of spent fuel and radioactive waste from the environment. The individual stages of the fuel cycle are strongly interrelated. Overall economic optimization is very difficult. Generally, NPV is used for an economic evaluation in the nuclear fuel cycle. However the high volatility of uranium prices in the Front-End, and the large uncertainty of both economic and technical parameters in the Back-End, make the use of NPV difficult. The real option method is able to evaluate the value added by flexibility of decision making by a company under conditions of uncertainty. The possibility of applying this method to the nuclear fuel cycle evaluation is studied. 

  14. Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olander, D.R.

    1976-01-01

    The book presented is designed to function both as a text for first-year graduate courses in nuclear materials and as a reference for workers involved in the materials design and performance aspects of nuclear power plants. The contents are arranged under the following chapter headings: statistical thermodynamics, thermal properties of solids, crystal structures, cohesive energy of solids, chemical equilibrium, point defects in solids, diffusion in solids, dislocations and grain boundaries, equation of state of UO/sub 2/, fuel element thermal performance, fuel chemistry, behavior of solid fission products in oxide fuel elements, swelling due to fission gases, pore migration and fuel restructuring kinetics, fission gas release, mechanical properties of UO/sub 2/, radiation damage, radiation effects in metals, interaction of sodium and stainless steel, modeling of the structural behavior of fuel elements and assemblies. (DG)

  15. Discovery and design of nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Stan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on properties such as thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on ceramic fuels, with a focus on predictions of point defect concentration, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, and gas bubble formation and evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. The second part of the paper is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. Four initiatives are proposed to accelerate the discovery and design of new materials: (a Create Institutes for Materials Discovery and Design, (b Create an International Knowledgebase for experimental data, models (mathematical expressions, and simulations (codes, (c Improve education and (d Set up international collaborations.

  16. Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presented is designed to function both as a text for first-year graduate courses in nuclear materials and as a reference for workers involved in the materials design and performance aspects of nuclear power plants. The contents are arranged under the following chapter headings: statistical thermodynamics, thermal properties of solids, crystal structures, cohesive energy of solids, chemical equilibrium, point defects in solids, diffusion in solids, dislocations and grain boundaries, equation of state of UO2, fuel element thermal performance, fuel chemistry, behavior of solid fission products in oxide fuel elements, swelling due to fission gases, pore migration and fuel restructuring kinetics, fission gas release, mechanical properties of UO2, radiation damage, radiation effects in metals, interaction of sodium and stainless steel, modeling of the structural behavior of fuel elements and assemblies

  17. Fuel sub-assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly for a liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor comprises a bundle of spaced fuel pins within a tubular wrapper or sleeve. The wrapper is extended at one end by a tubular neutron shield of massive steel and the other end, has a spike extension whereby the sub-assembly can be located by plugging into a support structure. The invention provides that lateral displacement of individual fuel pin-containing wrappers to accommodate dimensional changes within the fuel assembly is effected by movement of each wrapper relative to its spike extension. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention involves a technique to quickly, inexpensively and rigidly attach a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. The invention also allows for the repeated non-destructive removal and replacement of the fuel rod. The proposed fuel rod and support member attachment and removal system consists of a locking cap fastened to the fuel rod and a locking strip fastened to the support member or vice versa. The locking cap has two or more opposing fingers shaped to form a socket. The fingers spring back when moved apart and released. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion

  19. Thermographic imaging of nuclear fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldberg, S. Jr. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA); Honey, R.C.; Falconer, D.G.; Zebroski, E.L.

    1977-04-01

    A method has been demonstrated for imaging details of the fuel-cladding gap region in nuclear fuel rods. The method exploits the geometry-sensitive variation in fuel-cladding gap conductance. After rapid electric resistance heating of the cladding tube by discharge of a capacitor bank, those regions of cladding cool first that have narrow fuel-cladding gaps. The cladding surface temperature is recorded by an infrared camera with a cathode ray tube display. Potential is seen for the measurement technique as a research tool and as a receiving inspection method.

  20. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH

  1. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  2. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been compiled in an effort to provide current data concerning fuel cycle and waste management facilities, R ampersand D programs and key personnel on 23 countries, including the US, four multi-national agencies, and 21 nuclear societies. The Fact Book is organized as follows: National summaries-a section for each country which summarizes nuclear policy, describes organizational relationships, and provides addresses and names of key personnel and information on facilities. International agencies-a section for each of the international agencies which has significant fuel cycle involvement and a listing of nuclear societies. Glossary-a list of abbreviations/acronyms of organizations, facilities, technical and other terms. The national summaries, in addition to the data described above, feature a small map for each country as well as some general information. The latter presented from the perspective of the Fact Book user in the United States

  3. Significant incidents in nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to nuclear power plants, events in nuclear fuel cycle facilities are not well documented. The INES database covers all the nuclear fuel cycle facilities; however, it was developed in the early 1990s and does not contain information on events prior to that. The purpose of the present report is to collect significant events and analyze them in order to give a safety related overview of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Significant incidents were selected using the following criteria: release of radioactive material or exposure to radiation; degradation of items important to safety; and deficiencies in design, quality assurance, etc. which include criticality incidents, fire, explosion, radioactive release and contamination. This report includes an explanation, where possible, of root causes, lessons learned and action taken. 4 refs, 4 tabs

  4. Abundant thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has long been known that thorium-232 is a fertile radioactive material that can produce energy in nuclear reactors for conversion to electricity. Thorium-232 is well suited to a variety of reactor types including molten fluoride salt designs, heavy water CANDU configurations, and helium-cooled TRISO-fueled systems. Among contentious commercial nuclear power issues are the questions of what to do with long-lived radioactive waste and how to minimize weapon proliferation dangers. The substitution of thorium for uranium as fuel in nuclear reactors has significant potential for minimizing both problems. Thorium is three times more abundant in nature than uranium. Whereas uranium has to be imported, there is enough thorium in the United States alone to provide adequate grid power for many centuries. A well-designed thorium reactor could produce electricity less expensively than a next-generation coal-fired plant or a current-generation uranium-fueled nuclear reactor. Importantly, thorium reactors produce substantially less long-lived radioactive waste than uranium reactors. Thorium-fueled reactors with molten salt configurations and very high temperature thorium-based TRISO-fueled reactors are both recommended for priority Generation IV funding in the 2030 time frame. - Highlights: • Thorium is an abundant nuclear fuel that is well suited to three advanced reactor configurations. • Important thorium reactor configurations include molten salt, CANDU, and TRISO systems. • Thorium has important nuclear waste disposal advantages relative to pressurized water reactors. • Thorium as a nuclear fuel has important advantages relative to weapon non-proliferation

  5. Fuel composition generation techniques of nuclear fuel cycle simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle simulators track the flow of materials through the facilities that comprise a nuclear energy system. The composition of these materials, which simulators specify at the elemental or isotopic level, is driven by the neutronic characteristics of the reactors in the system. Therefore, all simulators include a method for generating input and output compositions for the reactor fuel they track, widely known as recipes. This paper surveys the recipe generation approaches taken by five simulators, which range from pre-computed reactor physics modeling to on-the-fly calculations. It concludes with an illustrative example of the canonical parametric recipe generation problem simulators are called upon to solve. (author)

  6. Elements of nuclear reactor fueling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with a review of the simple batch size effect, a more general theory of nuclear fueling is derived to describe the behavior and physical requirements of operating cycle sequences and fueling strategies having practical use in the management of nuclear fuel. The generalized theory, based on linear reactivity modeling, is analytical and represents the effects of multiple-stream, multiple-depletion-batch fueling configurations in systems employing arbitrary, non-integer batch size strategies, and containing fuel with variable energy generation rates. Reactor operating cycles and cycle sequences are represented with realistic structure that includes the effects of variable cycle energy production, cycle lengths, end-of-cycle operating extensions and maneuvering allowances. Results of the analytical theory are first applied to the special case of degenerate equilibrium cycle sequences, yielding several fundamental principles related to the selection of refueling strategy, and which govern fueling decisions normally made by the fuel manager. It is also demonstrated in this application that the simple batch size effect is not valid for non-integer fueling strategies, even in the simplest sequence configurations, and that it systematically underestimates the fueling requirements of degenerate sequences in general

  7. Waste Stream Analyses for Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. R. Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    A high-level study was performed in Fiscal Year 2009 for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) to provide information for a range of nuclear fuel cycle options (Wigeland 2009). At that time, some fuel cycle options could not be adequately evaluated since they were not well defined and lacked sufficient information. As a result, five families of these fuel cycle options are being studied during Fiscal Year 2010 by the Systems Analysis Campaign for the DOE NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. The quality and completeness of data available to date for the fuel cycle options is insufficient to perform quantitative radioactive waste analyses using recommended metrics. This study has been limited thus far to qualitative analyses of waste streams from the candidate fuel cycle options, because quantitative data for wastes from the front end, fuel fabrication, reactor core structure, and used fuel for these options is generally not yet available.

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly with fuel rod removal means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly is described for a nuclear reactor. The assembly has a bottom nozzle, at least one longitudinally extending control rod guide thimble attached to and projecting upwardly from the bottom nozzle and transverse grids spaced along the thimble. An organized array of elongated fuel rods are transversely spaced and supported by the grids and axially captured between the bottom nozzle and a top nozzle. The assembly comprises: (a) a transversely extending adapter plate formed by an arrangement of integral cross-laced ligaments defining a plurality of coolant flow openings; (b) means for mounting the adapter plate on an upper end portion of the thimble and spaced axially above and disposed transversely over the upper ends of all of the fuel rods present in the fuel assembly such that ones of the ligaments overlie corresponding ones of the fuel rods so as to prevent the fuel rods from moving upwardly through the coolant flow openings; and (c) removable plug means confined within the adapter plate and positioned over and spaced axially above selected ones of the fuel rods in providing access to at least one fuel rod for removal thereof upwardly through the axially spaced adapter plate without removing the top nozzle from the fuel assembly

  9. Innovative Nuclear Fuels: Results and Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials discovery involves exploring and identifying existing (natural) materials with desirable properties and functionality. Materials design aims at creating new (artificial) materials with predefined properties and functionality. Nuclear fuels are often developed using both methods, with a certain advantage given to discovery. To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on the thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion of oxide fuels. The scientific method used in this approach covers a large spectrum of time and space scales, from electronic structure to atomistic levels, through meso-scale and all the way to continuum phenomena. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on UO2/PuO2 fuels with a focus on predictions of point defect concentrations, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, gas bubble formation and temperature evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. Uncertainty evaluation reveals that ignoring the composition dependence of fuel properties in the simulations can lead to large errors (>100 k) in the calculations of the centerline temperature. The second part of the talk is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. It starts with a brief review of the international status of nuclear fuels research, including results from American, European, and Japanese national laboratories and universities. In an effort to improve collaborative work, the status of thermo-chemical databases is used as an example of outstanding opportunities and exciting scientific programs that require better synchronization to advance the research and to avoid excessive redundancy. The presentation ends with a discussion of existing and emerging

  10. Panorama 2010: Nuclear fuel resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abundance of projects to build nuclear power plants, the desire of new countries to acquire civil atomic power, contracts sometimes deemed fantastically high for the operation of uranium mines, etc. All of these signals indicate a return to nuclear power in a context dominated by the fight against global warming. But can nuclear power make a durable contribution to the effort to meet the ever-increasing demand for energy? (author)

  11. Deep borehole testing techniques developed for Canada's nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic energy of Canada Limited's nuclear fuel waste management program is presently centred around the concept of deep burial of immobilized fuel waste within igneous plutons of the Archaean Canadian Shield. Contaminant transport within this host medium would be by movement through rock fractures. Consequently, as part of the overall concept assessment phase, hydrogeological research has been initiated to assess potential pathways for contaminant leaks to the biosphere. Determination of accurate rock mass and fracture hydraulic conductivities and travel times are essential to the deep burial concept. The techniques used and the preliminary results are described. (Auth.)

  12. Grid for nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A grid of improved design for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly which includes a multiplicity of interleaved straps enclosed in a peripheral frame which forms a grid of egg-crate configuration is described. Each cell formed by the grid straps, except those containing control rod guide tubes, supports a fuel rod which is held in place by springs projecting laterally inwardly into each cell from the grid straps. The springs extend parallel to the fuel rods and are spaced at 900 intervals around the rod. Further, each of two adjacent springs contact a fuel rod at two points along its length and each of the other two adjacent springs contact the fuel rod at one point thus imparting strength and flexibility to the fuel assembly containing such grids

  13. Nuclear fuel supply view in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission promoted and participated in a unique achievement in the R and D system in Argentina: the integration of science technology and production based on a central core of knowledge for the control and management of the nuclear fuel cycle technology. CONUAR SA, as a fuel manufacturer, FAE SA, the manufacturer of Zircaloy tubes, CNEA and now DIOXITEC SA producer of Uranium Dioxide, have been supply, in the last ten years, the amount of products required for about 1300 Tn of equivalent U content in fuels. The most promising changes for the fuel cycle economy is the Slight Enriched Uranium project which begun in Atucha I reactor. In 1997 seventy five fuel assemblies, equivalent to 900 Candu fuel bundles, will complete its irradiation. (author)

  14. Assessment and balancing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1981 nuclear energy had a share of ca. 17% in the electric power supply of the F.R. of Germany. The amount of nuclear fuels required is equal to ca. 15 million tce. In public technical discussions the economic importance which must be assigned to nuclear energy, e.g. with regard to curbing the energy price development or relieving our balance of payments, is discussed in detail. On the other hand, a number of industrial aspects of nuclear energy utilization - problems of commercial or fiscal law - have been little considered in the technical literature. The following contribution is to present the principles of commercial and fiscal law which have taken shape in connection with the assessment and balancing of the single stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. (orig./UA)

  15. International nuclear fuel cycle evaluation (INFCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study describes and analyzes the structures, the procedures and decision making processes of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE). INFCE was agreed by the Organizing Conference to be a technical and analytical study and not a negotiation. The results were to be transmitted to governments for their consideration in developing their nuclear energy policies and in international discussions concerning nuclear energy cooperation and related controls and safeguards. Thus INFCE provided a unique example for decision making by consensus in the nuclear world. It was carried through under mutual respect for each country's choices and decisions, without jeopardizing their respective fuel cycle policies or international co-operation agreements and contracts for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, provided that agreed safeguards are applied. (orig.)

  16. Sustaining nuclear fuel science and technology base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To fulfil energy demand, the Indonesian Government has made efforts to optimize the use of various-fossil and non fossil-potential energy resources in synergy (energy mix), which is stated in national energy policy. According to national energy policy, Indonesia is going to use nuclear energy for electricity supply, and up to 2025, the use of nuclear energy is projected at about 2% of the total primary energy or 4 to 5% of the national electricity supply. This energy demand is described in NPP road map, which consists of NPP preparation, construction and operation up to 2025. To sustain the activity of nuclear power plants, the continuity of nuclear reactor fuel supply is an absolute necessity; therefore, it will become industrially prospective and have an effect on national industries. As a nuclear research center and guidance in nuclear energy system in Indonesia, Batan also plays a role to promote this prospect and to increase the national content at NPP construction. In this point of view, Batan should have the competency especially in nuclear fuel cycle technology, and in this case PTBN is viewed as the competent center since PTBN's main task is to conduct the development of Nuclear Fuel Technology. This competency is performed as mastering its science and technology base. In this case, PTBN is noticed to have the capability to function suitably since PTBN is equipped with documents for fuel fabrication industry such as bidding, construction and commissioning and qualified man power. Basically, PTBN does not have the mandatory to operate nuclear fuel fabrication commercially. However, PTBN has the capability to prepare competent man power through training and coaching in nuclear fuel fabrication. In fact, the present condition shows that some of the equipments does not function properly or are not utilized optimally or are not operable. Besides, the process documents available have not yet validated and qualified, and the man power is not qualified yet

  17. Assessment of nuclear fuel behavior and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel behaviour assessment is of pronounced importance in the assurance of reactor operational safety and of the ability to manage the hypothetic design basis accidents. In the fuel behaviour analyses, the basic tools are the various computer codes describing the thermal and mechanical behaviour of sigle fuel rods and rod bundles. Material properties and data on operational conditions are required as initial and boundary conditions for these codes. The Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) has carried out research into nuclear fuel behaviour for a number of years. In addition to the fundamental understanding of the phenomena, computer programs and experimental data have been acquired. Computer programs have been developed and extensively validated. The resulting family of codes for fuel steadystate, transient and accident behaviour is in routine use, serving the needs of the Finnish power companies and the regulatory authority. In this report, a summary is given of the significant fuel behaviour phenomena, of the international experimental programs, of fuel models in use in Finland, and of the validation of the models. Examples of code applications are described

  18. The nuclear fuel cycle, an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because uranium is widely distributed on the face of the Earth, nuclear energy has a very large potential as an energy source in view of future depletion of fossil fuel reserves. Also future energy requirements will be very sizeable as populations of developing countries are often growing and make the energy question one of the major challenges for the coming decades. Today, nuclear contributes some 340 GWe to the energy requirements of the world. Present and future nuclear programs require an adequate fuel cycle industry, from mining, refining, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing and the storage of the resulting wastes. The commercial fuel cycle activities amount to an annual business in the 7-8 billions of US Dollars in the hands of a large number of industrial operators. This paper gives details about companies and countries involved in each step of the fuel cycle and about the national strategies and options chosen regarding the back end of the fuel cycle (waste storage and reprocessing). These options are illustrated by considering the policy adopted in three countries (France, United Kingdom, Japan) versed in reprocessing. (J.S.). 13 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Uranium to Electricity: The Chemistry of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settle, Frank A.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a series of industrial processes that produce fuel for the production of electricity in nuclear reactors, use the fuel to generate electricity, and subsequently manage the spent reactor fuel. While the physics and engineering of controlled fission are central to the generation of nuclear power, chemistry…

  20. Leaf spring puller for nuclear fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogg, J.L.

    1981-11-03

    A fuel rod puller in the form of a collet for pulling fuel rods from a storage area into grids of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. The rod puller moves longitudinally through the grids to a storage area where projections on the end of leaf springs grasp onto an end plug in a fuel rod. Drive apparatus then pulls the rod puller and connected fuel rod from the storage area into the fuel assembly grids. The rod puller includes an outer tube having leaf springs on one end thereof in one modification, mounted within the outer tube is a movable plunger which acts to urge the leaf springs outwardly to a position to permit passing or with the end of a end plug. Upon withdrawal of the plunger, the leaf springs move into a groove formed in the end of a fuel rod end plug, and the fuel rod subsequently is pulled into the fuel assembly grids. In another modification, the leaf springs on the outer rod are biased in an outward direction and a longitudinally movable tube on the outer rod is moved in a direction to contract the leaf springs into a position where the projections thereof engage the groove formed in a fuel rod end plug.

  1. Country nuclear fuel cycle profile: Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two BWRs at the Laguna Verde facility, which have a combined capacity of 1308 MW(e), generated 5% of domestic electricity production (9.6 TW.h) in 2002. mexico has not yet decided about its nuclear fuel cycle policy. The Mining Development Commission operated a plant at Villa Aldama, Chihuahua from 1969 to 1971. The facility recovered molybdenum and byproduct uranium from ores mined in the Sierra de Gomez, Domitilia and other localities. A total of 49 t U was produced. At present, there are no plans to resume uranium production. Uranium enrichment is not undertaken domestically, requirements being met by USEC Inc., USA. Fuel fabrication requirements are met by GNF, USA. A fuel fabrication facility (capacity 5 t HM/a) of the Centro Nuclear de Mexico BWR was in operation from 1980 to 1996 when it was shut down for economic reasons. Spent fuel is stored at the reactor site

  2. Intelligent Automated Nuclear Fuel Pellet Inspection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time, nuclear pellet inspection is performed manually using naked eyes for judgment and decisionmaking on accepting or rejecting pellets. This current practice of pellet inspection is tedious and subject to inconsistencies and error. Furthermore, unnecessary re-fabrication of pellets is costly and the presence of low quality pellets in a fuel assembly is unacceptable. To improve the quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication plants, an automated pellet inspection system based on advanced techniques is needed. Such a system addresses the following concerns of the current manual inspection method: (1) the reliability of inspection due to typical human errors, (2) radiation exposure to the workers, and (3) speed of inspection and its economical impact. The goal of this research is to develop an automated nuclear fuel pellet inspection system which is based on pellet video (photographic) images and uses artificial intelligence techniques

  3. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1988-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  4. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  5. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information

  6. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users

  7. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I W; Mitchell, S J

    1990-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  8. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information

  9. Nuclear fuel element having oxidation resistant cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an improved nuclear fuel element of the type including a zirconium alloy tube, a zirconium barrier layer metallurgically bonded to the inside surface of the alloy tube, and a central core of nuclear fuel material partially filling the inside of the tube so as to leave a gap between the sponge zirconium barrier and the nuclear fuel material. The improvement comprising an alloy layer formed on the inside surface of the zirconium barrier layer. The alloy layer being composed of one or more impurities present in a thin layer region of the zirconium barrier in amounts less than 1% by weight but sufficient to inhibit the oxidation of the inside surface of the zirconium barrier layer without substantially affecting the plastic properties of the barrier layer, wherein the impurities are selected from the group consisting of iron, chromium, copper, nitrogen, and niobium

  10. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users

  11. Options for treatment of legacy and advanced nuclear fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Christopher John

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of advanced nuclear fuels is relevant to the stabilisation of legacy spent fuels or nuclear materials and fuels from future nuclear reactors. Historically, spent fuel reprocessing has been driven to recover uranium and plutonium for reuse. Future fuel cycles may also recover the minor actinides neptunium, americium and perhaps curium. These actinides would be fabricated into new reactor fuel to produce energy and for transmutation of the minor actinides. This has the potential t...

  12. Canadian programs on understanding and managing aging degradation of nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintaining adequate safety and reliability of nuclear power plants and nuclear power plant life assurance and life extension are growing in importance as nuclear plants get older. Age-related degradation of plant components is complex and not fully understood. This paper provides an overview of the Canadian approach and the main activities and their results towards understanding and managing age-related degradation of nuclear power plant components, structures and systems. A number of pro-active programs have been initiated to anticipate, detect and mitigate potential aging degradation at an early stage before any serious impact on plant safety and reliability. These programs include Operational Safety Management Program, Nuclear Plant Life Assurance Program, systematic plant condition assessment, refurbishment and upgrading, post-service examination and testing, equipment qualification, research and development, and participation in the IAEA programs on safety aspects of nuclear power plant aging and life extension. A regulatory policy on nuclear power plants is under development and will be based on the domestic as well as foreign and international studies and experience

  13. Safeguarding and Protecting the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International safeguards as applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are a vital cornerstone of the global nuclear nonproliferation regime - they protect against the peaceful nuclear fuel cycle becoming the undetected vehicle for nuclear weapons proliferation by States. Likewise, domestic safeguards and nuclear security are essential to combating theft, sabotage, and nuclear terrorism by non-State actors. While current approaches to safeguarding and protecting the nuclear fuel cycle have been very successful, there is significant, active interest to further improve the efficiency and effectiveness of safeguards and security, particularly in light of the anticipated growth of nuclear energy and the increase in the global threat environment. This article will address two recent developments called Safeguards-by-Design and Security-by-Design, which are receiving increasing broad international attention and support. Expected benefits include facilities that are inherently more economical to effectively safeguard and protect. However, the technical measures of safeguards and security alone are not enough - they must continue to be broadly supported by dynamic and adaptive nonproliferation and security regimes. To this end, at the level of the global fuel cycle architecture, 'nonproliferation and security by design' remains a worthy objective that is also the subject of very active, international focus.

  14. The cost of fuel cycle and competitiveness of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current price of nuclear fuel is rising and changing in international market, which influences the cost and development of nuclear power in China. This thesis suggests a plan to control the cost of the whole fuel cycle, to improve the competitiveness of nuclear power in China, to accelerate the development of both fuel cycle and nuclear power industries. (authors)

  15. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grid having grid straps provided with spring clips bent to widthwise encircle the grid straps and having their two ends welded together. Spring portions compressibly contact the fuel rods. The spring clips may have pairs of separated flat portions, straddling the control rod guide thimble in adjacent thimble cells so as not to interfere with the guide thimbles. The spring clips are made of a material having good radiation stress relaxation properties. (author)

  16. Spent nuclear fuel project integrated schedule plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Schedule Plan establishes the organizational responsibilities, rules for developing, maintain and status of the SNF integrated schedule, and an implementation plan for the integrated schedule. The mission of the SNFP on the Hanford site is to provide safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Hanford SNF in a manner which stages it to final disposition. This particularly involves K Basin fuel

  17. Papers presented by A.E.C.L. to the International Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on May 25-27, 1964. There were six papers presented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The titles were: I. Canada - A Nuclear Power Plant Supplier, by J.L. Gray; II. Nuclear Power Development in Canada and Other Countries, by W.B. Lewis; III. The Development and Some Applications of Cobalt-60 Irradiators, by R.F. Errington; IV. The Definition and Achievement of Development Targets for the Canadian Power Reactor Program, by A.J. Mooradian; V. Recent Applications of Tracers in the Physical Sciences in Canada, by R.H. Betts and J.A. Davies; and, VI. Economic Comparison of Oyster Creek, Nine Mile Point and CANDU-type Stations under Canadian Conditions, by G.A. Pon and R.L. Beck.

  18. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel sintered product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To eliminate various restrictions in view of the production such as addition amount of organic additives and obtain sintered fuels of excellent burning property. Method: Metal oxide powder for use in nuclear fuels is selected from UO2 and Gd2O3. Further, organic material additives are selected from those constituted with carbon and at least one of nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen, such as succinic acid and maleic acid. Further, another metal oxide powder for use in nuclear fuels is selected from U3O8, (Gd,O)3O8 at a higher oxidized state than that of the previously mentioned metal oxide powder for use in nuclear fuels. These materials are mixed and molded into starting powder for nuclear fuels. Then, the molding products are sintered in a reducing atmosphere. It is thus possible to obtain normal fine structures by sintering in a usual reducing atmosphere while eliminating the restrictions for the addition amount of the organic additives or using no particular additive removing furnace. (T.M.)

  19. Nuclear fuel technology - Administrative criteria related to nuclear criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective nuclear criticality-safety programme includes cooperation among management, supervision, and the nuclear criticality-safety staff and, for each employee, relies upon conformance with operating procedures. Although the extent and complexity of safety-related activities may vary greatly with the size and type of operation with fissile material, certain safety elements are common. This International Standard represents a codification of such elements related to nuclear criticality safety. General guidance for nuclear criticality safety may be found in ISO 1709. The responsibilities of management, supervision, and the nuclear criticality-safety staff are addressed. The Objectives and characteristics of operating and emergency procedures are included in this International Standard. ISO 14943 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear energy, Subcommittee SC 5, Nuclear fuel technology

  20. Soreq Nuclear Reactor Fuel Element Flow Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow of cold water through the Soreq Nuclear Reactor fuel element was simulated numerically. The main objective of the present study was to obtain the flow distribution among the rectangular channels of the element. The results of the simulations were compared to the overall pressure drop on the element measured in Soreq Nuclear Reactor. The numerical model chosen has succeeded in predicting the pressure drop on the fuel element of up to 5% from the measured values. Flow through the IPEN IEA-R1 MTR fuel element was also simulated as a part of a model validation procedure. The numerical results were compared to the measurements available in the literature [1]. It was found that the water pool above the fuel element has a significant influence on the flow distribution among the channels of the element. The flow distribution reported in [1] was closely predicted numerically when the water pool was included into the simulated geometry. It can be concluded that flow distribution in the Soreq Nuclear Reactor fuel element is flatter than that in the IPEN IEA-R1 MTR fuel element

  1. World nuclear fuel market. Seventeenth annual meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at the seventeenth World Nuclear Fuels Market meeting are cataloged individually. This volume includes information on the following areas of interest: historical and current aspects of the uranium and plutonium market with respect to supply and demand, pricing, spot market purchasing, and other market phenomena; impact of reprocessing and recycling uranium, plutonium, and mixed oxide fuels; role of individual countries in the market: Hungary, Germany, the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, France, and the US; the impact of public opinion and radioactive waste management on the nuclear industry, and a debate regarding long term versus short term contracting by electric utilities for uranium and enrichment services

  2. Long island to Limerick, nuclear fuel transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue described is: how to move 33 shipments of radioactive nuclear fuel - 200 tons of enriched uranium pellets - on rail cars through the heart of Philadelphia, without upsetting politicians, the media and anti-nuclear activists, after a similar plan to move the fuel through New York City had been rejected in a political disaster. The answer to this is: Strategic Communications Planning. At PECO Energy's department of Corporate and Public Affairs, the research is quite clear that in risk management situations like this, the side that gets out front with the most credible information inevitably wins. That is exactly what was set out to do

  3. Method of making nuclear fuel bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention comprises a method of making fuel bodies for nuclear reactors, for example high temperature gas-cooled reactors, using graphite particles no bigger than 1500 microns in size. The particles are impregnated with a polymerizable organic compound in liquid form (for example, a mixture of furfuryl alcohol and its dicarboxylic acid or anhydride), treated wth a hot aqueous acid solution, and heat treated to cause polymerization. The impregnated particles are blended with partcles of nuclear fuel which may have exterior coatings of pyrolytic carbon, and formed into a cohesive mass using a carbonaceous binder. (LL)

  4. Chemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reprocessing of nuclear fuels from atomic power stations has a twofold goal. On the one hand it is serving for fuel supply by recovering the fissile materials which have not been consumed or which have been freshly generated in the reactor. On the other hand the radioactive waste products from nuclear power generation are pretreated for long-term safe disposal. The core element of the chemical processing is the PUREX Process, a counter-current solvent extraction procedure using tributyl phosphate (TBP) as the solvent for uranium and plutonium. The chemical basis and the technological performance of the process are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Improvements in nuclear fuel transportation containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inner container for use inside a transport flask for irradiated nuclear reactor fuel elements is described. The container comprises a cylindrical shell having a dished closure at one end and a detachable lid at the other end and a partitioning structure defining compartments in the shell each for receiving an elongated nuclear reactor fuel element disposed with axis parallel to the axis of the shell. Sealable ducts extend through the lid for injecting streams of flushing liquid along the axis of each compartment to the dished closure, the dished closure having a drainage sump and ducts arranged for discharging matter through the other end of the inner container. (author)

  6. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts...... of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as fabricated parts are included. The collection contains 158 neutron radiographs, reproduced on photographic paper...

  7. Nuclear fuel; recent developments and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies has been concentrated on energy issues for being conscious due to increasing world population, rapidly becoming effective environmental problems, and continuously increasing demand of developing countries like China and India. Nuclear energy is a candidate as an alternative source especially for countries with high energy demand. Safety has always been the primary concern for almost the last fifty years during the commercial utilization of nuclear energy and developed fuel and materials technologies have played key roles in this respect. This study deals with operational problems related with fuel and materials experienced in commercial reactor during recent years and new technological solutions applicable to new generation reactors as well as existing ones.

  8. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savrasov, Sergey [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Haule, Kristjan [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  9. Nuclear fuel performance evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation has been made of the ability of Scandpower's empirical fuel performance model POSHO (''Power Shock'') to predict the probability of fuel pin failures resulting from pellet-clad interaction in commercial nuclear power plants. POSHO provides an analytical method to calculate the failure probabilities associated with power level maneuvers for different fuel assembly designs. Application of the method provides a basis for risk-benefit decisions concerning operational procedures, fuel designs and fuel management strategies. One boiling water reactor (BWR) and one pressurized water reactor (PWR) were selected for study to compare model predictions with actual failures, as determined from post irradiation examination of the fuel and activity release data. The fuel duty cycles were reconstructed from operating records and nodal power histories were created by using Scandpower's FMS computer programs. Nodal power histories, coupled with the relative pin power distribution in each node, were processed by the fuel failure prediction model, which tracks the interaction power level for each pin group in each node and calculates the power shocks and the probability for pellet-clad interaction cracks. The results of these calculations are processed statistically to give the expected number of cracks, the number of failed fuel pins in each assembly and the total number of failed assemblies in the core. Fuel performance in the BWR, Quad Cities Unit Two, was calculated by the model in approximate agreement with the observed performance. Fuel performance in the PWR, Maine Yankee, was calculated in approximate agreement for two of the three fuel designs. The high failure rate in the third design, Type B fuel, was not calculated by the POSHO pellet-clad interaction model

  10. Nuclear fuel element and method of manufacturing it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel pellets incorporating fission products capturing carbonaceous materials are disposed at upper and lower ends of a nuclear fuel element. Further, nuclear fuel pellets incorporating fission product capturing Zr-Cu series materials are disposed at the intermediate portion of the nuclear fuel element respectively. With such a constitution, fission products formed during burning of the nuclear fuel pellets are absorbed and kept by the fission product capturing materials incorporated in the nuclear fuel pellets, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of the fission products released. In addition, stress corrosion cracks caused by pellet/cladding tube interactions and dynamic interactions can be prevented. (T.M.)

  11. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the following reports: Experimental facility for testing and development of pulsed columns and auxiliary devices; Chemical-technology study of the modified 'Purex' process; Chemical and radiometric control analyses; Chromatographic separation of rare earth elements on paper treated by di-n butylphosphate; Preliminary study of some organic nitrogen extracts significant in fuel reprocessing

  12. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer grid for a nuclear fuel assembly is described. It consists of a lattice of grid plates forming multiple cells that are penetrated by fuel elements. Resilient protrusions and rigid protrusions projecting into the cells from the plates bear against the fuel element to effect proper support and spacing. Pairs of intersecting grid plates, in a longitudinally spaced relationship, cooperate with other plates to form a lattice wherein each cell contains adjacent panels having resilient protrusions arranged opposite adjacent panels having rigid protrusions. The peripheral band bounding the lattice is provided solely with rigid protrusions projecting into the peripheral cells. 8 claims

  13. Nuclear fuel assembly identification using computer vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an improved method of remotely identifying irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies. The method uses existing in-cell TV cameras to input an image of the notch-coded top of the fuel assemblies into a computer vision system, which then produces the identifying number for that assembly. This system replaces systems that use either a mechanical mechanism to feel the notches or use human operators to locate notches visually. The system was developed for identifying fuel assemblies from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor, but could be used for other reactor assembly identification, as appropriate

  14. Seismic response of nuclear fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlaváč Z.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling and computer simulation of the seismic response of fuel assembly components. The seismic response is investigated by numerical integration method in time domain. The seismic excitation is given by two horizontal and one vertical synthetic accelerograms at the level of the pressure vessel seating. Dynamic response of the hexagonal type nuclear fuel assembly is caused by spatial motion of the support plates in the reactor core investigated on the reactor global model. The modal synthesis method with condensation is used for calculation of the fuel assembly component displacements and speeds on the level of the spacer grid cells.

  15. Dissolution studies of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain quantitative data on the dissolution of high burnup spent nuclear fuel, dissolution study have been carried out at the Department of Chemistry, JAERI, from 1984 under the contract with STA entitled 'Reprocessing Test Study of High Burnup Fuel'. In this study PWR spent fuels of 8,400 to 36,100 MWd/t in averaged burnup were dissolved and the chemical composition and distribution of radioactive nuclides were measured for insoluble residue, cladding material (hull), off-gas and dissolved solution. With these analyses basic data concerning the dissolution and clarification process in the reprocessing plant were accumulated. (author)

  16. Nuclear fuel fabrication - developing indigenous capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), established in early 70's for production of fuel for PHWRs and BWRs in India, has made several improvements in different areas of fuel manufacturing. Starting with wire-wrap type of fuel bundles, NFC had switched over to split spacer type fuel bundle production in mid 80's. On the upstream side slurry extraction was introduced to prepare the pure uranyl nitrate solution directly from the MDU cake. Applying a thin layer of graphite to the inside of the tube was another modification. The Complex has developed cost effective and innovative techniques for these processes, especially for resistance welding of appendages on the fuel elements which has been a unique feature of the Indian PHWR fuel assemblies. Initially, the fuel fabrication plants were set-up with imported process equipment for most of the pelletisation and assembly operations. Gradually with design and development of indigenous equipment both for production and quality control, NFC has demonstrated total self reliance in fuel production by getting these special purpose machines manufactured indigenously. With the expertise gained in different areas of process development and equipment manufacturing, today NFC is in a position to offer know-how and process equipment at very attractive prices. The paper discusses some of the new processes that are developed/introduced in this field and describes different features of a few PLC based automatic equipment developed. Salient features of innovative techniques being adopted in the area Of UO2 powder production are also briefly indicated. (author)

  17. Nuclear fuel performance: Trends, remedies and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is unacceptable to have nuclear power plants unavailable or power restricted due to fuel reliability issues. 'Fuel reliability' has a much broader definition than just maintaining mechanical integrity and being leaker free - fuel must fully meet the specifications, impose no adverse impacts on plant operation and safety, and maintain quantifiable margins within design and operational envelopes. The fuel performance trends over the last decade are discussed and the significant contributors to reduced reliability experienced with commercial PWR and BWR designs are identified and discussed including grid-to-rod fretting and debris fretting in PWR designs and accelerated corrosion, debris fretting and pellet-cladding interaction in BWR designs. In many of these cases, the impacts have included not only fuel failures but also plant operating restrictions, forced shutdowns, and/or enhanced licensing authority oversight. Design and operational remedies are noted. The more demanding operating regimes and the constant quest to improve fuel performance require enhancements to current designs and/or new design features. Fuel users must continue to and enhance interaction with fuel suppliers in such areas as oversight of supplier design functions, lead test assembly irradiation programs and quality assurance oversight and surveillance. With the implementation of new designs and/or features, such fuel user initiatives can help to minimize the potential for performance problems

  18. Equipment system for advanced nuclear fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the settlement of equipment system for nuclear Fuel Technology Development Facility(FTDF) is to build a seismic designed facility that can accommodate handling of nuclear materials including <20% enriched Uranium and produce HANARO fuel commercially, and also to establish the advanced common research equipment essential for the research on advanced fuel development. For this purpose, this research works were performed for the settlement of radiation protection system and facility special equipment for the FTDF, and the advanced common research equipment for the fuel fabrication and research. As a result, 11 kinds of radiation protection systems such as criticality detection and alarm system, 5 kinds of facility special equipment such as environmental pollution protection system and 5 kinds of common research equipment such as electron-beam welding machine were established. By the settlement of exclusive domestic facility for the research of advanced fuel, the fabrication and supply of HANARO fuel is possible and also can export KAERI-invented centrifugal dispersion fuel materials and its technology to the nations having research reactors in operation. For the future, the utilization of the facility will be expanded to universities, industries and other research institutes

  19. Options contracts in the nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses options trading in the nuclear fuels industry. Although there now exists no formal options market in the nuclear industry, flexibilities, or embedded options, are actually quite common in the long-term supply contracts. The value of these flexibilities can be estimated by applying the methods used to evaluate options. The method used is the Black-Scholes Model, and it is applied to a number of examples

  20. Study of nuclear fuel burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors approach theoretical treatment of isotopic composition changement for nuclear fuel in nuclear reactors. They show the difficulty of exhaustive treatment of burn-up problems and introduce the principal simplifying principles. Due to these principles they write and solve analytically the evolution equations of the concentration for the principal nuclides both in the case of fast and thermal reactors. Finally, they expose and comment the results obtained in the case of a power fast reactor. (author)

  1. Vibratory-compacted (vipac/sphere-pac) nuclear fuels - a comparison with pelletized nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve the packing densities required for nuclear fuel stability, economy and performance, the fuel material must be densified. This has traditionally been performed by high-temperature sintering. (At one time, fuel densification was investigated using cold/hot swaging. However, this fabrication method has become uncommon.) Alternatively, fuel can be densified by vibratory compaction (VIPAC). During the late 1950's and into the 1970's, in the U.S., vibratory compaction fuel was fabricated and test irradiated to evaluate its applicability compared to the more traditional pelletized fuel for nuclear reactors. These activities were primarily focused on light water reactors (LWR) but some work was performed for fast reactors. This paper attempts to summarize these evaluations and proposes to reconsider VIPAC fuel for future use. (author)

  2. Logistics of nuclear fuel production for nuclear submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future acquisition of nuclear attack submarines by Brazilian Navy along next century will imply new requirements on Naval Logistic Support System. These needs will impact all the six logistic functions. Among them, fuel supply could be considered as the one which requires the most important capacitating effort, including not only technological development of processes but also the development of a national industrial basis for effective production of nuclear fuel. This paper presents the technical aspects of the processes involved and an annual production dimensioning for an squadron composed by four units. (author)

  3. Nuclear policies: fuel without the bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essays, developed from studies conducted by the California seminar on arms control and foreign policy, address technical, political, and economic aspects of nonproliferation. How to halt nuclear proliferation commands worldwide attention today. The search for new energy resources by industrial as well as nonindustral nations has led to the spread of nuclear technology and the production of weapons grade fuel materials such as plutonium and enriched uranium in the name of energy independence. The background and consequences of this growing danger and possible solutions to it are the substance of the essays. Conceding the desirability (if not necessity) of developing nuclear power as an energy source, the writers focus on the different reactor technologies; an historical perspective of proliferation through the example of India; the rationales for stringent international monitoring; and finally, the link between proliferation and the spread of nuclear weapons. The chapters are: Nuclear technology: essential elements for decisionmakers, Robert Gillette; Must we decide now for worldwide commerce in plutonium fuel, Albert Wohlstetter; US peaceful aid and the Indian bomb, Roberta Wohlstetter; International discipline over the uses of nuclear energy, Victor Gilinsky; and Nuclear energy and the proliferation of nuclear weapons, Victor Gilinsky

  4. Australia and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear electricity industry based on uranium fuel is now well established in 31 countries. Nuclear's ability to provide large scale base load power at costs competitive with available and politically favoured alternatives is causing it to be increasingly selected for new capacity. The World Nuclear Association data shows that current new construction together with that planned and proposed as of December 2009, will bring world nuclear electricity generating capacity from the present 373 000 MW to 876 000 MWm an increase of 112 per cent. By comparison Australia's total generating capacity (mainly from coal) is 47 000 MW, or one eighth of existing world nuclear capacity. Nuclear growth can be expected to increase further, due to continuing world-wide energy supply security issues and politically driven climate change concerns. Australia has been mining uranium for 60 eventful years, much influenced by government policy changes. Australia's un-mined resources are now the largest in the world and it is already a major supplier to the nuclear fueld cycle, in a growing market. This situation offers long term opportunities for Australia to benefit more fully and at the same time contribute to global security by further participation in the uranium-based nuclear electricity industry fuel cycle

  5. Proceeding of the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology in Third Millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceeding contains papers presented in the Fifth Scientific Presentation on Nuclear Fuel Element Cycle with theme of Development of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology in Third Millennium, held on 22 February in Jakarta, Indonesia. These papers were divided by three groups that are technology of exploration, processing, purification and analysis of nuclear materials; technology of nuclear fuel elements and structures; and technology of waste management, safety and management of nuclear fuel cycle. There are 35 papers indexed individually. (id)

  6. Thorium nuclear fuel cycle technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Tae Yoon; Do, Jae Bum; Choi, Yoon Dong; Park, Kyoung Kyum; Choi, In Kyu; Lee, Jae Won; Song, Woong Sup; Kim, Heong Woo

    1998-03-01

    Since thorium produces relatively small amount of TRU elements after irradiation in the reactor, it is considered one of possible media to mix with the elements to be transmuted. Both solid and molten-salt thorium fuel cycles were investigated. Transmutation concepts being studied involved fast breeder reactor, accelerator-driven subcritical reactor, and energy amplifier with thorium. Long-lived radionuclides, especially TRU elements, could be separated from spent fuel by a pyrochemical process which is evaluated to be proliferation resistance. Pyrochemical processes of IFR, MSRE and ATW were reviewed and evaluated in detail, regarding technological feasibility, compatibility of thorium with TRU, proliferation resistance, their economy and safety. (author). 26 refs., 22 figs

  7. elestres: nuclear fuel analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code ELESTRES models the thermal and mechanical behaviour of an individual fuel element, during its irradiation life under normal operating conditions. The finite element code ELESTRES models the two-dimensional axisymmetric behaviour of a CANDU fuel element during normal operation.The main focus of the code is to estimate temperatures, fission gas release and axial variations of deformation and stresses in the pellet and in the sheath. Thus the code is able to predict details like stresses/strains at circumferential. This paper describes the current version of ELESTRES. The emphasis is on a recent addition: multiaxial stresses in the sheath near circumferential ridges. For accuracy in the critical region, a fine mesh used near the ridge. To keep computing costs low, a coarse mesh is used near the midplane of the pellet

  8. Instrumentation and control in the Canadian nuclear power program -1989 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada currently has 18 CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors in operation and 4 under construction, for an installed nuclear capacity of 15,500 MWe. Most of the reactors are in the province of Ontario where 50% of the electricity is nuclear generated. Atomic Energy of Canada is developing the CANDU-3, a 450 MWe reactor incorporating the latest available technologies, including distributed control. The three Canadian Utilities with CANDU reactors have made a major commitment to full-scope training simulators. In Canada there is a growing commitment to developing major improvements to the interface between the control systems, the field equipment and the operating staff. The development program underway makes extensive use of information technology, particularly expert systems and interactive media tools. Out of this will come an advanced CANDU control concept that should further improve the reliability and availability of CANDU stations. (author). 3 refs

  9. Securing the nuclear fuel cycle: What next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The greatest challenge to the international nuclear non-proliferation regime is posed by nuclear energy's dual nature for both peaceful and military purposes. Uranium enrichment and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing (here after called sensitive nuclear technologies) are critical from the non-proliferation viewpoint because they may be used to produce weapons-grade nuclear materials: highly enriched uranium and separated plutonium. Alongside measures to limit the spread of sensitive nuclear technologies, multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) started to be discussed. Spiralling prices for hydrocarbons and prospects of their imminent extinction are encouraging more and more countries to look at nuclear energy as an alternative means to ensure their sustainable development. To this end, it's becoming increasingly important to link the objective need for an expanded use of nuclear energy with strengthening nuclear non-proliferation by, in particular, preventing the spread of sensitive nuclear technologies and securing access for interested countries to NFC products and services. With this in mind, at the IAEA General Conference in 2003, IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei called for establishing an international experts group on multilateral nuclear approaches. The proposal was supported, and in February 2005 the international experts, headed by Bruno Pellaud, issued a report (published by the IAEA as INFCIRC-640; see www.iaea.org) with recommendations on different multilateral approaches. The recommendations can be generalized as follows: reinforcement of existing market mechanisms; involvement of governments and the IAEA in the assurance of supply, including the establishment of low-enriched uranium (LEU) stocks as reserves; conversion of existing national uranium enrichment and SNF reprocessing enterprises into multilateral ones under international management and control, and setting up new multilateral enterprises on regional and

  10. Advances in nuclear fuel technology. 3. Development of advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycle technology has a technical characteristics flexibly easy to apply to diverse fuel compositions such as plutonium, minor actinides, and so on and fuel configurations. By using this characteristics, various feasibilities on effective application of uranium resources based on breeding of uranium of plutonium for original mission of FBR, contribution to radioactive wastes problems based on amounts reduction of transuranium elements (TRU) in high level radioactive wastes, upgrading of nuclear diffusion resistance, extremely upgrading of economical efficiency, and so on. In this paper, were introduced from these viewpoints, on practice strategy survey study on FBR cycle performed by cooperation of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) with electric business companies and so on, and on technical development on advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems carried out at the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and so on. Here were explained under a vision on new type of fuels such as nitride fuels, metal fuels, and so on as well as oxide fuels, a new recycle system making possible to use actinides except uranium and plutonium, an 'advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology', containing improvement of conventional wet Purex method reprocessing technology, fuel manufacturing technology, and so on. (G.K.)

  11. Nuclear Propulsion using Thin Foiled Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.

    1998-11-01

    A new way to produce plasma for nuclear propulsion is proposed. A thin foiled fuel can be used for converting fission energy to propulsion energy efficiently. The fission products coming out of the thin foil directly ionize the hydrogen molecules which are used for propulsion. Thus very small portion of fission energy deposited in the thin foil, and integrity of the thin foiled fuel can be maintained even in high nuclear power. Fuel material with large thermal fission cross-section is preferable to make thin foiled fuel and the heat deposition in the foil can be reduced. To get high power from the foiled fuel assembly, thermal neutrons which are created out from the assembly can be supplied, or the assembly itself can create the high intensity thermal neutrons by self-multiplication. A flexible design of a highly efficient nuclear propulsion system can be made. The thickness of the foil and the maintenance of the thermo-mechanical integrity can be determined from the fission cross-section and the slowing down power for fission products. The talk discusses the issues related to heat removal from the assembly.

  12. Spent nuclear fuel project product specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document establishes the limits and controls for the significant parameters that could potentially affect the safety and/or quality of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) packaged for processing, transport, and storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in Multi-Canister Overpacks to be transported throughout the SNF Project

  13. Inspecting fuel pellets for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method of controlling the inspection, sorting and classifying of nuclear reactor fuel pellets, including a mechanical handling system and a computer controlled data processing system, is described. Having investigated the diameter, length, surface flaws and weights of the pellets, they are sorted accordingly and the relevant data are stored. (U.K.)

  14. Country nuclear fuel cycle profile: Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2002 Finland's four nuclear power plants, which have a combined capacity of 2.66 GW(e), provided 21.4 TW·h of electricity, equivalent to 26% of total electricity output. Fortum Power and Heat Oy (Fortum) operates two PWR reactors in Olkiluoto. In 2001 the Finnish Parliament ratified the Government's decision-in-principle on building a fifth nuclear power unit in Finland, considering that the construction is 'in the overall interest of society'. TVO, the responsible applicant organization, planned to start construction in 2005 and operation in 2009. Finland produced 30 t U between 1958 and 1961. Currently no mines are in operation. The last return shipment of spent fuel from Loviisa to the Russian Federation took place at the end of 1996. An interim spent fuel storage facility with a capacity of 490 t HM is in operation at the Loviisa nuclear power plant. At the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant a wet storage facility for spent fuel, termed the TVO-KPA store, has a capacity of 1200 t HM. A project for the final disposal of spent fuel was started in the early 1980s. In 2001 Parliament ratified the decision-in-principle of the Government on construction of a final disposal facility at Olkiluoto. Construction of the encapsulation and disposal facility is scheduled to start around 2010, with operation scheduled to commence in 2020

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Program user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this manual is to present procedures to execute the Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Model (SNFSM) program. This manual includes an overview of the model, operating environment, input and output specifications and user procedures. An example of the execution of the program is included to assist potential users

  16. On the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The president of U.S.A. proposed to various countries in his new policy on atomic energy to reevaluate nuclear fuel cycle internationally from the viewpoint of the prevention of nuclear proliferation. It was decided at the summit meeting of seven advanced countries in London from May 7 to 9, 1977, to start the INFCE taking the necessity of promoting atomic energy development and the importance of reducing the danger of nuclear proliferation as the objects. The preliminary conference was held in Paris in June and July, 1977, and the general meeting to establish the INFCE was held in Washington from October 19 to 21, 1977. 40 countries and 4 international organizations took part, and the plan of works to be completed in 2 years thereafter was decided. 8 working groups were set up to carry out the works. The response to these development and the basic concept of Japan are described. Japan was assigned to the chairman country of the 4th working group concerning fuel reprocessing, handling of plutonium and recycle. The state of activities of respective working groups, the intermediate general meeting held from November 27 to 29, 1978, and the technical coordinating committee is reported. As the post-INFCE problems, the concepts of International Plutonium Storage and International Spent Fuel Management and the guarantee system for nuclear fuel supply are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-20

    This document establishes the limits and controls for the significant parameters that could potentially affect the safety and/or quality of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) packaged for processing, transport, and storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in Multi-Canister Overpacks to be transported throughout the SNF Project.

  18. Surrogate Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading encountered during road or rail shipment. ORNL has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve our understanding of the impacts of vibration loading on SNF integrity, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety of SNF storage and transportation operations.

  19. Method for inspecting nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for disassembling a nuclear reactor fuel element without destroying the individual fuel pins and other structural components from which the element is assembled is described. A traveling bridge and trolley span a water-filled spent fuel storage pool and support a strongback. The strongback is under water and provides a working surface on which the spent fuel element is placed for inspection and for the manipulation that is associated with disassembly and assembly. To remove, in a non-destructive manner, the grids that hold the fuel pins in the proper relative positions within the element, bars are inserted through apertures in the grids with the aid of special tools. These bars are rotated to flex the adjacent grid walls and, in this way relax the physical engagement between protruding portions of the grid walls and the associated fuel pins. With the grid structure so flexed to relax the physical grip on the individual fuel pins, these pins can be withdrawn for inspection or replacement as necessary without imposing a need to destroy fuel element components

  20. World Nuclear Association position statement: Safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This WNA Position Statement summarises the worldwide nuclear industry's record, progress and plans in safely managing nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel. The global industry's safe waste management practices cover the entire nuclear fuel-cycle, from the mining of uranium to the long-term disposal of end products from nuclear power reactors. The Statement's aim is to provide, in clear and accurate terms, the nuclear industry's 'story' on a crucially important subject often clouded by misinformation. Inevitably, each country and each company employs a management strategy appropriate to a specific national and technical context. This Position Statement reflects a confident industry consensus that a common dedication to sound practices throughout the nuclear industry worldwide is continuing to enhance an already robust global record of safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel. This text focuses solely on modern civil programmes of nuclear-electricity generation. It does not deal with the substantial quantities of waste from military or early civil nuclear programmes. These wastes fall into the category of 'legacy activities' and are generally accepted as a responsibility of national governments. The clean-up of wastes resulting from 'legacy activities' should not be confused with the limited volume of end products that are routinely produced and safely managed by today's nuclear energy industry. On the significant subject of 'Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities', which is integral to modern civil nuclear power programmes, the WNA will offer a separate Position Statement covering the industry's safe management of nuclear waste in this context. The paper's conclusion is that the safe management of nuclear waste and used nuclear fuel is a widespread, well-demonstrated reality. This strong safety record reflects a high degree of nuclear industry expertise and of industry responsibility toward the well-being of current and future generations. Accumulating

  1. Decision Analysis For Nuclear Fuel Cycle Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prime objective in this talk is to explore the impact of widely different (or hypothetical) fuel cycle requirement rather than to attempt to predict a probable scenario. In the course of preparation of this talk, it was realized that, despite the very speculative nature of this kind of endeavor, studies like these are considered essential to the long-range planning needs of the national nuclear power industry, utilities and those providing supporting services, even though the current presentation are extremely primitive in that purpose. A nuclear electricity utility tries to reduce fuel cycle costs. But the problems have to be approached with a long-term perspective, and the logical conclusion is that utility has to make technical progress. As nuclear generation gradually become great, supplies of the fuel cycle services are responsible for the R and D about the nuclear fuel cycle services which is useful to implement the technical choices they propose. Then it is for the utility to choose according to his knowledge, if necessary by carrying out additional research. But only the utility acquires real operating experience and prototype reactor or laboratory tests offer limited knowledge quantities. One way to ensure a good guarantee of supply is, obviously, to make the order far enough ahead of time to have a stock. But, on the other hand, stocks are expensive and should be kept to a strict minimum. Therefore, a detailed analysis of uncertainties is required, as well as an effort to optimize the handling of the overall problem. As mentioned earlier, in recent years, specifically the right way to handle the back-end of the fuel cycle has been always hotly contested and ultimately it was a question of reprocessing or direct disposal of spent fuel elements. Direct disposal of spent fuel is, at present, the only possibility of spent fuel disposal option available to the Korean utility. Korea, having virtually no indigenous uranium resources, can hardly afford to

  2. International nuclear fuel cycle centers in global nuclear power infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest among the nations of the world to use nuclear energy is increasing due to economic, environmental and energy security reasons. The increase in the number of nations using nuclear energy might raise political risk of non-peaceful use of sensitive nuclear technologies. Therefore, additional measures should be taken in order to minimize risk of proliferation in connection with the awaited renaissance of nuclear power. The problem of nuclear nonproliferation is an extremely complicated one and in order to mitigate it different dimensions should be taken into account: political, technological and institutional. Early in 2006 Russia proposed an initiative on global nuclear power infrastructure which will permit nondiscrimination access to nuclear energy of all interested countries observing requirements of nonproliferation regime. The key element of such infrastructure should be system of International Centers (IC) to provide services of nuclear fuel cycle including at first stage uranium enrichment and later on management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under the IAEA control. For effective management of SNF it is necessary to have developed technologies at least in four areas including fast reactors (FR) and closed fuel cycle technologies, SNF reprocessing, transuranium (TRU) fuel fabrication, nuclear waste management. At present the technology for only one area mentioned above have reached commercial level - LWR SNF aqueous reprocessing. Two other areas - technologies of sodium FR, MOX fuel for FR - have been demonstrated at semi-industrial level. Other technologies are still at R and D level - reprocessing of FR SNF, multi recycling of TRU fuel in FR, and nuclear waste management. Business as usual scenario of ICs establishment for SNF management might be to wait until some nations commercialize all associated with FR and closed fuel cycle areas driven mainly by national interest in addressing uranium resource shortages. Obviously this way needs significant time

  3. MOX technology for new nuclear fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new nuclear fabrication plant MELOX, at Marcoule in the south of France is the first commercial sized plant to supply a new market for mixed uranium/plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel which will allow the plutonium separated by reprocessing to be recycled profitably in light water reactors. An eighteen-month programme of commissioning has started at the site following completion of construction work in the summer of 1993. The programme envisages completion of testing and certification at the end of 1994, production of about 50 tonnes (heavy metal) of MOX fuel in the first year of commercial operation and achievement of the full capacity of 120 tonnes in 1996. The MELOX plant is described. It has been built to high seismic standards and has been expensive to build. However, there is a demand for mixed oxide fuel assemblies for the French nuclear programme. (Author)

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology

  5. Fuel exchanging machine for a nuclear ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent atmospheric contaminations upon fuel exchange thereby keep the environmental circumstance clean in the periphery of the nuclear ship. Constitution: A nuclear reactor container is disposed to the inside of a containing vessel in the ship body and a shutter is mounted to the upper opening of the ship body. Further, a landing container having a bottom opening equipped with shutter for alingning the upper opening equipped with shuuter of the ship is elevatably suspended to the trolley of a crane by way of a wire rope and a winch, and a fuel exchange cask is elevatably disposed to the inside of the landing container. Further, airs in the inside of the container is adapted to be discharged externally through a filter by means of a blower and the inside is kept at a negative pressure. Thus, since the containing vessel is covered with the landing container upon fuel exchanging operation, atmospheric contamination can be prevented sufficiently. (Sekiya, K.)

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

  7. Boron-nitride coated nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenduez, G. [Orta Dogu Teknik Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, I. [Tuerkiye Atom Enerjisi Kurumu, Ankara (Turkey); Durmazucar, H.H. [Cumhuriyet Univ., Sivas (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    Pure urania- and urania-gadolinia-containing fuel pellets were coated with boron nitride (BN) to improve the physical and neutronic properties of the fuel. The BN coating seems to have a technological advantage over zirconium-diboride coating. The BN is chemically inert, corrosion resistant, withstands rapid temperature changes, and has a high thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity, the gadolinia content can be lowered in the fuel by coating it with BN. In fact, the existence of two burnable absorbers in a fuel introduces desired nuclear properties since gadolinia is a fast-burning and boron a slow-burning element. The BN was deposited on fuel from two different sources, (a) from the reaction of boron trichloride (BCl{sub 3}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) at 875 K and (b) from the decomposition of trimethylamine borate complex at 1200 K. The infrared and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of BN from both precursors agreed with the available data in the literature. However BN powder from borane complex had a shifted XRD peak due to the presence of carbonaceous material in the structure. The BN powder-coated fuels were heated to 1400, 1525, and 1600 K to sinter the BN. The examination under scanning electron microscope showed that grainy, rod-shaped and layered BN coatings were achieved. Rod-shaped structures were usually seen on gadolinia fuels. The increased thickness of coating favors the formation of a glassy looking layer. The BN from a borane complex seems to form a layered structure more easily than the BN from BCl{sub 3}. The BN coated the surface of the fuels, and it did not penetrate into the fuels.

  8. Boron-nitride coated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure urania- and urania-gadolinia-containing fuel pellets were coated with boron nitride (BN) to improve the physical and neutronic properties of the fuel. The BN coating seems to have a technological advantage over zirconium-diboride coating. The BN is chemically inert, corrosion resistant, withstands rapid temperature changes, and has a high thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity, the gadolinia content can be lowered in the fuel by coating it with BN. In fact, the existence of two burnable absorbers in a fuel introduces desired nuclear properties since gadolinia is a fast-burning and boron a slow-burning element. The BN was deposited on fuel from two different sources, (a) from the reaction of boron trichloride (BCl3) and ammonia (NH3) at 875 K and (b) from the decomposition of trimethylamine borate complex at 1200 K. The infrared and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of BN from both precursors agreed with the available data in the literature. However BN powder from borane complex had a shifted XRD peak due to the presence of carbonaceous material in the structure. The BN powder-coated fuels were heated to 1400, 1525, and 1600 K to sinter the BN. The examination under scanning electron microscope showed that grainy, rod-shaped and layered BN coatings were achieved. Rod-shaped structures were usually seen on gadolinia fuels. The increased thickness of coating favors the formation of a glassy looking layer. The BN from a borane complex seems to form a layered structure more easily than the BN from BCl3. The BN coated the surface of the fuels, and it did not penetrate into the fuels

  9. Summary of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review of international practices for nuclear fuel reprocessing was prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world. The sources of information are widely varied

  10. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents projections of the domestic and foreign requirements for uranium and enrichment services, as well as spent nuclear fuel discharges. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Four scenarios (high, middle, low, and no new reactor orders) are included for domestic nuclear power capacity and three (high, middle, and low) for countries in the World Outside Planned Economies (WOCA). In addition, 4 sensitivity cases are presented for the US lower capacity factors, reactor aging, lower tails assay, and higher burnup. Six sensitivity cases are analyzed for the WOCA countries: (1) stable, instead of improving, capacity factors for the United States and for countries in the Other country group; (2) reactor aging; (3) recycling of uranium but not plutonium from spent fuel (the three standard scenarios assume recycling of both uranium and plutonium; (4) no recycling of spent fuels; (5) lower uranium enrichment tails assay; and (6) higher fuel burnup levels. The annual US requirements for uranium and for uranium enrichment service are projected to more than double between 1985 and 2020 in the middle case, and the cumulative amount of spent fuel discharged is projected to increase approximately 10-fold. Annual uranium requirements for the WOCA nations are projected to increase by about 60% between 1985 and 2000. In contrast, a 7- to 8-fold increase in U3O8 and enrichment service requirements is projected for the Other WOCA country group during this time period, as its relatively small existing nuclear power capacity undergoes rapid expansion

  11. Fuel choice, nuclear energy, climate and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the second time since the start of commercial nuclear electricity generation, an accident has the world wondering if uranium will be among the future fuel choices in electricity production. Unfortunate when one considers the low-carbon footprint of this energy option. An accident involving a nuclear power plant, or more appropriately the perceived risks associated with an accident at a nuclear power plant, is but one of the issues that makes the impact assessment process related to nuclear energy projects challenging. Other aspects, including the time scales associated with their siting, licensing, operation and decommissioning, also contribute to the challenge. Strategic environmental assessments for future fuel choices in electricity generation, particularly ones that consider the use of life cycle assessment information, would allow for the effective evaluation of the issues identified above. But more importantly from an impact assessment perspective, provide for a comparative assertion for public disclosure on the environmental impacts of fuel choice. This would provide the public and government decision makers with a more complete view of the role nuclear energy may be able to play in mitigating the climate and carbon impacts of increased electricity production, and place issues of cost, complexity and scale in a more understandable context.

  12. Self-organized criticality in evolution of nuclear fuel microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel microstructure has major influence on the fission product release from nuclear fuel matrix. Here we present the self-organized criticality model applied to describe the evolution of nuclear fuel microstructure. It is shown that the behavior of fuel bubbles is similar to that of species in natural ecosystems and their evolution can be characterized as an avalanche process. Modelled bubble size distribution for different fuel burnups is in good agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  13. A present status for dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Park, H. Y.; Seo, K. S

    2003-04-01

    National policy for management of a spent nuclear fuel does not establish in Korea yet. A storage capacity of a storage pool that is to store the spent nuclear fuel will be exceeded an amount of accumulation from the first Woljin nuclear power plant in 2007. Therefore it is necessary that dry storage facility is secured to store safely the spent nuclear fuel on site of the nuclear power plant until national policy for a back-end spent nuclear fuel cycle is established. In order to store safely spent nuclear fuel, it is important that the present status and technology on dry storage of spent nuclear fuel is looked over. Therefore, the present status on dry storage of spent nuclear fuel was analyzed so as to develop dry storage system and choose a proper dry storage method domestic.

  14. International guidelines for fire protection at nuclear installations including nuclear fuel plants, nuclear fuel stores, teaching reactors, research establishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guidelines are recommended to designers, constructors, operators and insurers of nuclear fuel plants and other facilities using significant quantities of radioactive materials including research and teaching reactor installations where the reactors generally operate at less than approximately 10 MW(th). Recommendations for elementary precautions against fire risk at nuclear installations are followed by appendices on more specific topics. These cover: fire protection management and organization; precautions against loss during construction alterations and maintenance; basic fire protection for nuclear fuel plants; storage and nuclear fuel; and basic fire protection for research and training establishments. There are numerous illustrations of facilities referred to in the text. (U.K.)

  15. Process for reprocessing a nuclear reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to separate the nuclear fuel from the can material, the can is heated evenly in the gastight closed state together with the nuclear fuel contained in it, so that the diameter of the can expands, increasing the gap between the nuclear fuel and the can without cracks occurring in the can. The expanded can is then opened at one end and finally the nuclear fuel from the opened can and is treated separately from the can. (orig./HP)

  16. Design considerations for borehole and shaft seals for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste proposes that the waste be emplaced in a vault at a depth of between 500 and 1000 m in plutonic rock. A number of shafts, for waste haulage, access and ventilation will connect the vault level directly to the ground surface. In addition, deep boreholes, drilled to characterize the region in which the vault is sited, will penetrate the vault horizon. After the period of vault operations, the shafts and boreholes, which provide the shortest flowpaths from the vault level to the biosphere or near-surface groundwater regime, must be sealed. A simplified flow chart for the seal design process is shown. The process is one of engineering design and involves an evaluation of appropriate materials and methods that will lead to design concepts that can be examined for performance. This paper describes a performance criterion for shaft and borehole seals for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault, and discusses the progress made in the design of seals for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP)

  17. Thermal analysis of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This work deals with the effect of non-uniform heat generation, non-uniform heat transfer conditions and variable thermophysical properties on the temperature and heat flux distribution in a rod type nuclear fuel element. The behaviour of maximum temperature in the fuel element under these conditions would be examined. Depending on complexity of different special cases, closed form analytical, approximate analytical (such as Poisson's integral, Fourier series and ∫kdT methods) and numerical methods have been employed. It is found that uniform heat generation only within the fuel pellet with constant thermophysical properties yields conservative estimation of fuel center-line temperature. But the temperature distribution predicted under other (more realistic) condition are duly useful for different thermodynamic and structural analyses

  18. Nuclear fuel bundle disassembly and assembly tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear power reactor fuel bundle is described which has a plurality of tubular fuel rods disposed in parallel array between two transverse tie plates. It is secured against disassembly by one or more locking forks which engage slots in tie rods which position the transverse plates. Springs mounted on the fuel and tie rods are compressed when the bundle is assembled thereby maintaining a continual pressure against the locking forks. Force applied in opposition to the springs permits withdrawal of the locking forks so that one tie plate may be removed, giving access to the fuel rods. An assembly and disassembly tool facilitates removal of the locking forks when the bundle is to be disassembled and the placing of the forks during assembly of the bundle. (U.S.)

  19. Supply Security in Future Nuclear Fuel Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seward, Amy M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Thomas W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gitau, Ernest T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ford, Benjamin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-18

    Previous PNNL work has shown the existing nuclear fuel markets to provide a high degree of supply security, including the ability to respond to supply disruptions that occur for technical and non-technical reasons. It is in the context of new reactor designs – that is, reactors likely to be licensed and market ready over the next several decades – that fuel supply security is most relevant. Whereas the fuel design and fabrication technology for existing reactors are well known, the construction of a new set of reactors could stress the ability of the existing market to provide adequate supply redundancy. This study shows this is unlikely to occur for at least thirty years, as most reactors likely to be built in the next three decades will be evolutions of current designs, with similar fuel designs to existing reactors.

  20. Supply Security in Future Nuclear Fuel Markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous PNNL work has shown the existing nuclear fuel markets to provide a high degree of supply security, including the ability to respond to supply disruptions that occur for technical and non-technical reasons. It is in the context of new reactor designs - that is, reactors likely to be licensed and market ready over the next several decades - that fuel supply security is most relevant. Whereas the fuel design and fabrication technology for existing reactors are well known, the construction of a new set of reactors could stress the ability of the existing market to provide adequate supply redundancy. This study shows this is unlikely to occur for at least thirty years, as most reactors likely to be built in the next three decades will be evolutions of current designs, with similar fuel designs to existing reactors.