WorldWideScience

Sample records for canadian hydrogen safety

  1. Canadian hydrogen safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIntyre, I.; Tchouvelev, A.V.; Hay, D.R.; Wong, J.; Grant, J.; Benard, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes and Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates trade through fair insurance policies and rates, effective and efficient regulatory approval procedures and accommodation of the interests of the general public. The Program integrates a consistent quantitative risk assessment methodology with experimental (destructive and non-destructive) failure rates and consequence-of-release data for key hydrogen components and systems into risk assessment of commercial application scenarios. Its current and past six projects include Intelligent Virtual Hydrogen Filling Station (IVHFS), Hydrogen clearance distances, comparative quantitative risk comparison of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) refuelling options; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling validation, calibration and enhancement; enhancement of frequency and probability analysis, and Consequence analysis of key component failures of hydrogen systems; and fuel cell oxidant outlet hydrogen sensor project. The Program projects are tightly linked with the content of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety. (author)

  2. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  3. Canadian Hydrogen Association workshop on building Canadian strength with hydrogen systems. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Association workshop on 'Building Canadian Strength with Hydrogen Systems' was held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada on October 19-20, 2006. Over 100 delegates attended the workshop and there were over 50 presentations made. The Canadian Hydrogen Association (CHA) promotes the development of a hydrogen infrastructure and the commercialization of new, efficient and economic methods that accelerate the adoption of hydrogen technologies that will eventually replace fossil-based energy systems to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This workshop focused on defining the strategic direction of research and development that will define the future of hydrogen related energy developments across Canada. It provided a forum to strengthen the research, development and innovation linkages among government, industry and academia to build Canadian strength with hydrogen systems. The presentations described new technologies and the companies that are making small scale hydrogen and hydrogen powered vehicles. Other topics of discussion included storage issues, hydrogen safety, competition in the hydrogen market, hydrogen fuel cell opportunities, nuclear-based hydrogen production, and environmental impacts

  4. Canadian hydrogen strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlie, M.; Scepanovic, V.; Dube, J.; Hammerli, M.; Taylor, J.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' In May of 2004, industry and government embarked on a process to create a strategic plan for development of the 'hydrogen economy' in Canada. The process was undertaken to determine how the development and commercialization of hydrogen technologies could be accelerated to yield a 'visible' reduction in greenhouse gases within the timeframe of Kyoto, while establishing a direction that addresses the necessity of far greater reductions in the future. Starting with a meeting of twenty seven experts drawn from the hydrogen technology, energy and transportation industries and government, a vision and mission for the planning process was developed. Two months later a second meeting was held with a broader group of stakeholders to develop hydrogen transition strategies that could achieve the mission, and from identifying the barriers and enablers for these strategies, an action plan was created. This paper reviews the results from this consultation process and discusses next steps. (author)

  5. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  6. HySTAR: the hydrogen safety training and risk workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows the output of the software package HySTAR, the Hydrogen Safety, Training and Risk Workplace. This is the software output of the CTFA, Canadian Hydrogen Safety Program projects. It shows the Hydrogen Virtual Interactive Expert Workplace, a guide for permitting and code enforcement for officials and other parties involved in approving hydrogen energy facilities. It also shows the Hydrogen Codes and Standards Report (Site Level) as well as Hydrogen Distances and Clearances Report

  7. Hydrogen peroxide safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors

  8. Canadian approach to nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, R.J.; Boyd, F.C.; Domaratzki, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the Canadian nuclear power safety philosophy and practice is traced from its early roots at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories to the licensing of the current generation of power reactors. Basic to the philosophy is a recognition that the licensee is primarily responsible for achieving a high standard safety. As a consequence, regulatory requirements have emphasized numerical safety goals and objectives and minimized specific design or operating rules. In this article the Canadian licensing process is described with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered. Examples of specific licensing considerations for each phase of a project are included

  9. The Canadian approach to nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, R.J.; Boyd, F.C.; Domaratski, Z.

    1983-07-01

    The development of the Canadian nuclear power safety philosophy and practice is traced from its early roots at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory to the licensing of the current generation of power reactors. Basic to the philosophy is a recognition that the primary responsibility for achieving a high standard of safety resides with the licensee. As a consequence, regulatory requirements have emphasized numerical safety goals and objectives and minimized specific design or operating rules. The Canadian licensing process is described along with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered. Examples of specific licensing considerations for each phase of a project are included

  10. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's intern program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Intern Program was introduced at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Canada's Nuclear Regulator in response to the current competitive market for engineers and scientists and the CNSC's aging workforce. It is an entry level staff development program designed to recruit and train new engineering and science graduates to eventually regulate Canada's nuclear industry. The program provides meaningful work experience and exposes the interns to the general work activities of the Commission. It also provides them with a broad awareness of the regulatory issues in which the CNSC is involved. The intern program is a two-year program focusing on the operational areas and, more specifically, on the generalist functions of project officers. (author)

  11. Hydrogen mitigation systems - a Canadian regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosla, J.K.; Rizk, M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a discussion paper to examine the regulatory requirements that may be necessary for the design, operation and maintenance of the hydrogen mitigation systems. These systems (if deemed necessary to maintain the containment function), may be considered to be a part of the containment systems. Therefore, these requirements are derived mostly from the AECB Regulatory Document R-7, which specifies the requirements for containment systems for CANDU nuclear power plants. Some additional requirements, which are specific to these systems have also been included. These requirements relate to a systematic examination of the hazards of hydrogen, the design basis for the mitigation systems, their functional and design requirements, analytical support to justify their selection, and operating and testing requirements. The requirements for severe accident have not yet been developed. It is, however, anticipated that the design of the hydrogen mitigation system would be such that future requirement can be accommodated. These requirements are intended for application to the new reactors in Canada. For the existing reactors, their application will be subjected to practicability. (author)

  12. IEA HIA Task 37 - Hydrogen Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank

    The work plan and objectives of this task are designed to support the acceleration of safe implementation of hydrogen infrastructure through coordinated international collaborations and hydrogen safety knowledge dissemination.......The work plan and objectives of this task are designed to support the acceleration of safe implementation of hydrogen infrastructure through coordinated international collaborations and hydrogen safety knowledge dissemination....

  13. Hydrogen aircraft and airport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtchen, U.; Behrend, E.; Pohl, H.-W.; Rostek, N.

    1997-01-01

    First flight tests with a hydrogen demonstrator aircraft, currently under investigation in the scope of the German-Russia Cryoplane project, are scheduled for 1999. Regular service with regional aircraft may begin around 2005, followed by larger Airbus-type airliners around 2010-2015. The fuel storage aboard such airliners will be of the order of 15 t or roughly 200 m 3 LH 2 . This paper investigates a number of safety problems associated with the handling and air transport of so much hydrogen. The same is done for the infrastructure on the airport. Major risks are identified, and appropriate measures in design and operation are recommended. It is found that hydrogen aircraft are no more dangerous than conventional ones - safer in some respects. (author)

  14. Knowledge Translation and Patient Safety: The Canadian Adverse Events Study

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, G. Ross; Norton, Peter; Flintoft, Virginia

    2006-01-01

    The Canadian Adverse Events Study was the first national study of adverse events in Canadian hospitals. Learning from the controversy surrounding similar studies in other countries, the team engaged in extensive knowledge translation activities throughout the life of the project. Using meetings, Web-based communication and other tools, the team successfully prepared most Canadian stakeholders for the study’s release, allowing them to develop anticipatory patient safety initiatives. However, u...

  15. Safety considerations for compressed hydrogen storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleason, D.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of the safety considerations for various hydrogen storage options, including stationary, vehicle storage, and mobile refueling technologies. Indications of some of the challenges facing the industry as the demand for hydrogen fuel storage systems increases. (author)

  16. Hydrogen problems in reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, H.

    1984-01-01

    The BMFT and BMI have initiated a workshop 'Hydrogen Problems in Reactor Safety Research' that took place October 3./4., 1983. The objective of this workshop was to present the state of the art in the main areas - Hydrogen-Production - Hydrogen-Distribution - Hydrogen-Ignition - Hydrogen-Burning and Containment Behaviour - Mitigation Measures. The lectures on the different areas are compiled. The most important results of the final discussion are summarized as well. (orig.) [de

  17. Canadian contributions to the safety and environmental aspects of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasko, R.; Wong, K.

    1987-05-01

    Since next-step fusion devices will be fuelled with mixtures of tritium and deuterium, the knowledge base and tritium handling experience associated with the operation of CANDU reactors is viewed as relevant to the development of safe fusion technology. Fusion safety issues will be compared with fission safety experience, after which specific Canadian activities in support of fusion safety will be overviewed. In addition, recommendations for appropriate fusion safety criteria will be summarized. 18 refs

  18. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's financial guarantee requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferch, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety and Control Act gives the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) the legal authority to require licensees to provide financial guarantees in order to meet the purposes of the Act. CNSC policy and guidance with regard to financial guarantees is outlined, and the current status of financial guarantee requirements as applied to various CNSC licensees is described. (author)

  19. Transition to a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus fleet for Canadian urban transit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducharme, P.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Canadian Transportation Fuel Cell Alliance (CTFCA), created by the Canadian Government as part of its 2000 Climate Change Action Plan, has commissioned MARCON-DDM's Hydrogen Intervention Team (HIT) to provide a roadmap for urban transit systems that wish to move to hydrogen fuel cell-powered bus fleets. HIT is currently in the process of gathering information from hydrogen technology providers, bus manufacturers, fuelling system providers and urban transit systems in Canada, the US and Europe. In September, HIT will be in a position to provide a preview of its report to the CTFCA, due for October 2004. The planned table of contents includes: TOMORROW'S FUEL CELL (FC) URBAN TRANSIT BUS - Powertrain, on-board fuel technologies - FC engine system manufacturers - Bus technical specifications, performances, operating characteristics - FC bus manufacturers TOMORROW'S FC TRANSIT PROPERTY - Added maintenance, facilities and fuelling infrastructure requirements - Supply chain implications - Environmental and safety issues - Alternative operational concepts PATHWAYS TO THE FUTURE - Choosing the future operational concept - 'Gap' assessment - how long from here to there? - Facilities and fleet adjustments, including fuelling infrastructure - Risk mitigation, code compliance measures TRANSITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS - Cost implications - Transition schedule (author)

  20. Canadian Consumer Food Safety Practices and Knowledge: Foodbook Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Regan; Glass-Kaastra, Shiona; Gardhouse, Christine; Marshall, Barbara; Ciampa, Nadia; Franklin, Kristyn; Hurst, Matt; Thomas, M Kate; Nesbitt, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Understanding consumers' food safety practices and knowledge supports food safety education for the prevention of foodborne illness. The objective of this study was to describe Canadian consumer food safety practices and knowledge. This study identifies demographic groups for targeted food safety education messaging and establishes a baseline measurement to assess the effectiveness of food safety interventions over time. Questions regarding consumer food safety practices and knowledge were included in a population-based telephone survey, Foodbook, conducted from November 2014 to March 2015. The results were analyzed nationally by age group and by gender. The results showed that approximately 90% of Canadians reported taking the recommended cleaning and separating precautions when handling raw meat to prevent foodborne illness. Only 29% of respondents reported using a food thermometer when cooking any meat, and even fewer (12%) reported using a food thermometer for small cuts of meat such as chicken pieces. The majority (>80%) of Canadians were aware of the foodborne illness risks related to chicken and hamburger, but fewer (poultry.

  1. Safety issues of nuclear production of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piera, Mireia; Martinez-Val, Jose M.; Jose Montes, Ma

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is not an uncommon issue in Nuclear Safety analysis, particularly in relation to severe accidents. On the other hand, hydrogen is a household name in the chemical industry, particularly in oil refineries, and is also a well known chemical element currently produced by steam reforming of natural gas, and other methods (such as coal gasification). In the not-too-distant future, hydrogen will have to be produced (by chemical reduction of water) using renewable and nuclear energy sources. In particular, nuclear fission seems to offer the cheapest way to provide the primary energy in the medium-term. Safety principles are fundamental guidelines in the design, construction and operation both of hydrogen facilities and nuclear power plants. When these two technologies are integrated, a complete safety analysis must consider not only the safety practices of each industry, but any interaction that could be established between them. In particular, any accident involving a sudden energy release from one of the facilities can affect the other. Release of dangerous substances (chemicals, radiotoxic effluents) can also pose safety problems. Although nuclear-produced hydrogen facilities will need specific approaches and detailed analysis on their safety features, a preliminary approach is presented in this paper. No significant roadblocks are identified that could hamper the deployment of this new industry, but some of the hydrogen production methods will involve very demanding safety standards

  2. Safety issues in urban transit facilities for hydrogen-fueled buses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, R.H.; Ducharme, P.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Canadian Transportation Fuel Cell Alliance (CTFCA), created by the Canadian Government as part of its 2000 Climate Change Action Plan, has commissioned MARCON-DDM's Hydrogen Intervention Team (HIT) to provide a roadmap for urban transit systems that wish to move to hydrogen fuel cell-powered bus fleets. HIT is currently in the process of gathering information from hydrogen technology providers, bus manufacturers, fuelling system providers and urban transit systems in Canada, the US and Europe. In September, HIT will be in a position to provide a hands-on perspective of the introduction of fuel-cell buses in the Canadian environment. Part of the process of adding hydrogen-fueled busses to urban transit systems involves phasing in the new technology to minimize the economic cost. This involves substituting hydrogen buses into the normal bus procurement life cycle and maximizing the use of existing facilities for garaging, maintenance and fueling. Using a schematic outline of an urban transit system, this presentation will outline the safety issues specific to hydrogen in such systems, particularly for garaging, maintenance and fueling components. It will then outline how safety of these component is addressed in current and proposed codes, standards and recommended practices. Based on these requirements the impact of the introduction of hydrogen-fueled buses on each component of the transit system will be addressed in terms of the adaptations of current facilities and practices or the requirements for new facilities and practices. (author)

  3. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  4. Safety analysis of the proposed Canadian geologic nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prowse, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Canadian program for development and qualification of a geologic repository for emplacement of high-level and long-lived, alpha-emitting waste from irradiated nuclear fuel has been inititiated and is in its initial development stage. Fieldwork programs to locate candidate sites with suitable geological characteristics have begun. Laboratory studies and development of models for use in safety analysis of the emplaced nuclear waste have been initiated. The immediate objective is to complete a simplified safety analysis of a model geologic repository by mid-1978. This analysis will be progressively updated and will form part of an environmental Assessment Report of a Model Fuel Center which will be issued in mid-1979. The long-term objectives are to develop advanced safety assessment models of a geologic repository which will be available by 1980

  5. Safety distances for hydrogen filling stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthijsen, A J C M; Kooi, E S

    2006-01-01

    In the context of spatial planning the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment asked the Centre for External Safety of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) to advice on safe distances pertaining to hydrogen filling stations. The RIVM made use of

  6. Safety Distances for hydrogen filling stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthijsen, A. J. C. M.; Kooi, E. S.

    2005-07-01

    In the Netherlands there is a growing interest in using natural gas as a transport fuel. The most important drivers behind this development are formed by poor inner city air quality and the decision to close several LPG filling stations. Dwellings are not allowed within the safety distances of 45 or 110 meters from the tanker filling point of these LPG stations, depending on the capacity of the station. Another driver is global warming. We are carrying out a study on station supply, compression, storage and filling for natural gas stations, and a similar, simultaneous study on hydrogen as a followup to our risk analysis for the hydrogen filling station in Amsterdam. Here, three buses drive on hydrogen as part of the European CUTE project. Driving on natural gas is an important step in the transition to cars on hydrogen. This study was commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Spatial Planning, Housing and the Environment to advise on external safety aspects of future hydrogen filling stations. According to Dutch law homes may not be built within an individual risk contour of 10-6 per year of a dangerous object, such as a plant with hazardous materials or a filling station. An individual risk contour of 10-6 is represented by a line around a dangerous object that connects locations with an individual risk level of 10-6 per year. An individual 'located' within this contour line has a chance of one per million per year or more to be killed as a result of an accident caused by this object. The longest distance between the object and such a contour is called a 'safety distance'. A study on safety distances is now in progress for different kinds of hydrogen filling stations (e. g. gaseous and liquid hydrogen) and for different capacities, such as big, medium and small stations. The focus is on different kinds of hydrogen production and the hydrogen supply of the filling station. To decide on the design and supply of the hydrogen station, we examined the

  7. Canadian fuel cell commercialization roadmap update : progress of Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filbee, S.; Karlsson, T.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen and fuel cells are considered an essential part of future low-carbon energy systems for transportation and stationary power. In recognition of this, Industry Canada has worked in partnership with public and private stakeholders to provide an update to the 2003 Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap to determine infrastructure requirements for near-term markets. The update includes technology and market developments in terms of cost and performance. This presentation included an overview of global hydrogen and fuel cell markets as background and context for the activities of the Canadian industry. Approaches toward commercial viability and mass market success were also discussed along with possible scenarios and processes by which these mass markets could develop. Hydrogen and fuel cell industry priorities were outlined along with recommendations for building a hydrogen infrastructure

  8. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

    1999-09-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  9. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

    1999-10-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  10. Hydrogen systems : a Canadian strategy for greenhouse gas reduction and economic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Rising concerns about the depletion of fossil fuels and climate change have led to the search for new energy sources. This paper outlines the mission of the Canadian Hydrogen Association, which is to build on Canada's energy resource base and expertise in hydrogen technologies in order to deploy sustainable hydrogen energy systems. Basic strategies needed to develop hydrogen systems in Canada were outlined, with specific reference to the establishment of low cost energy sources with low life-cycle emissions. The current hydrogen infrastructure produces marginal life-cycle emissions benefits, particularly when compared with improvements in technologies expected in the next 10 years. It was noted that regional development of hydrogen systems was likely to be an effective strategy, due to high transportation costs. Several potential locations were discussed for the development of a hydrogen energy infrastructure. Opportunities arising from hydrogen vehicle penetration of consumer markets and the broad commercialization of fuel cells were examined. Feasible transition strategies were reviewed, to be built in the near term around pathways such as hydrogen internal combustion engines and fuel cell vehicles designed for high-value niche applications. Strategies addressing the preparation of the market to express the value proposition for hydrogen were discussed, with reference to the fact that the existing energy market places no value on environmental factors. Several recommendations were made to conclude the discussion, and included: the necessity of government action to establish national goals; the creation of a stakeholder base for hydrogen systems; a government and industry partnership towards the development of a near-term commercialization plan; and the establishment of a long-term direction for the development of hydrogen systems in terms of advancing technology and public education. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane and Propane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogen economy is not possible if the safety standards currently applied to liquid hydrogen and hydrogen gas by many laboratories are applied to devices that use either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary people without the special training. This report asks, 'How is hydrogen different from flammable gasses that are commonly being used all over the world?' This report compares the properties of hydrogen, methane and propane and how these properties may relate to safety when they are used in both the liquid and gaseous state. Through such an analysis, sensible safety standards for the large-scale (or even small-scale) use of liquid and gaseous hydrogen systems can be developed. This paper is meant to promote discussion of issues related to hydrogen safety so that engineers designing equipment can factor sensible safety standards into their designs

  12. Hydrogen Safety Issues Compared to Safety Issues with Methane andPropane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Michael A.

    2005-08-20

    The hydrogen economy is not possible if the safety standards currently applied to liquid hydrogen and hydrogen gas by many laboratories are applied to devices that use either liquid or gaseous hydrogen. Methane and propane are commonly used by ordinary people without the special training. This report asks, 'How is hydrogen different from flammable gasses that are commonly being used all over the world?' This report compares the properties of hydrogen, methane and propane and how these properties may relate to safety when they are used in both the liquid and gaseous state. Through such an analysis, sensible safety standards for the large-scale (or even small-scale) use of liquid and gaseous hydrogen systems can be developed. This paper is meant to promote discussion of issues related to hydrogen safety so that engineers designing equipment can factor sensible safety standards into their designs.

  13. An approach for risk informed safety culture assessment for Canadian nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important components of effective safety and risk management for nuclear power stations is a healthy safety culture. DNV has developed an approach for risk informed safety culture assessment that combines two complementary paradigms for safety and risk management: loss prevention - for preventing and intervening in accidents; and critical function management - for achieving safety and performance goals. Combining these two paradigms makes it possible to provide more robust systems for safety management and to support a healthy safety culture. This approach is being applied to safety culture assessment in partnership with a Canadian nuclear utility. (author)

  14. Hydrogen and water reactor safety: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for papers presented in the following areas of interest: 1) hydrogen research programs; 2) hydrogen behavior during light water reactor accidents; 3) combustible gas generation; 4) hydrogen transport and mixing; 5) combustion modeling and experiments; 6) accelerated flames and detonations; 7) combustion mitigation and control; and 8) equipment survivability

  15. Hydrogen and water reactor safety: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for papers presented in the following areas of interest: 1) hydrogen research programs; 2) hydrogen behavior during light water reactor accidents; 3) combustible gas generation; 4) hydrogen transport and mixing; 5) combustion modeling and experiments; 6) accelerated flames and detonations; 7) combustion mitigation and control; and 8) equipment survivability.

  16. A preliminary CATHENA thermalhydraulic model of the Canadian SCWR for safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D.F.; Wang, S., E-mail: wangd@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of six reactor concepts under development in the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). As a member of GIF, Canada is developing a pressure-tube type SCWR, which has the potential to fulfill all major GIF goals on enhanced safety, sustainability, economics, and proliferation resistance. The system thermalhydraulics code CATHENA will be used in the safety analyses for the Canadian SCWR. Based on the current conceptual design of the Canadian SCWR, a CATHENA idealization has been developed. This model includes all 336 fuel channels with a detailed model of heat transfer in the reactor core. Also modeled are the main pumps, inlet plenum, outlet plenum, turbines, and heavy water moderator. In this paper, the CATHENA idealization of the Canadian SCWR conceptual design is described. Simulation results for steady-state normal operations are also presented for the current Canadian SCWR conceptual design. (author)

  17. Handbook of advanced nuclear hydrogen safety. 1st edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Takegami, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Toru

    2017-03-01

    In the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear accident, safety measures against hydrogen in severe accident has been recognized as a serious technical problem in Japan. Therefore, efforts have begun to form a common knowledge base between nuclear engineers and experts on combustion and explosion, and to secure and improve future nuclear energy safety. As one of such activities, we have prepared the 'Handbook of Advanced Nuclear Hydrogen Safety'. A handbook committee consisting of Japanese experts in the fields of nuclear and combustion-explosion in universities, nuclear companies, electric companies and research institutes was established in 2012. The objective and consents of the handbook were determined, and the outline of the contents was decided. The concepts of the handbook are as follows: to show advanced nuclear hydrogen safety technologies that nuclear engineers should understand, to show hydrogen safety points to make combustion-explosion experts cooperate with nuclear engineers, to expand information on water radiolysis considering the situation from just after the Fukushima accidents and to the waste management necessary for decommissioning after the accident etc. Many experts have participated to manuscript preparation, which was the first step of forming a hydrogen community across the boundaries of fields. The hydrogen community is expected to grow along with its improvement to the knowledge base on nuclear hydrogen safety. (author)

  18. Safety improvements at Canadian nuclear power plants in the aftermath of Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzentkowski, G.; Khouaja, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the safety review of operating nuclear power plants undertaken by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission in light of the March 11, 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The review confirmed that the Canadian NPPs are robust and have a strong design relying on multiple layers of defence to protect the public from credible external events. Nevertheless, in the spirit of continuous safety improvements, the review identified a number of recommendations to further strengthen reactor defence-in-depth in preventing and mitigating the consequences of beyond design basis accidents, enhance onsite and offsite emergency response, and improve the CNSC regulatory framework. Progress achieved to date, in implementing these measures, is described in this paper along with a summary of safety benefits for each level of the reactor defence-in-depth. (author)

  19. Safety improvements at Canadian nuclear power plants in the aftermath of Fukushima accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rzentkowski, G.; Khouaja, H. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the safety review of operating nuclear power plants undertaken by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission in light of the March 11, 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The review confirmed that the Canadian NPPs are robust and have a strong design relying on multiple layers of defence to protect the public from credible external events. Nevertheless, in the spirit of continuous safety improvements, the review identified a number of recommendations to further strengthen reactor defence-in-depth in preventing and mitigating the consequences of beyond design basis accidents, enhance onsite and offsite emergency response, and improve the CNSC regulatory framework. Progress achieved to date, in implementing these measures, is described in this paper along with a summary of safety benefits for each level of the reactor defence-in-depth. (author)

  20. Resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-48, ''Hydrogen control measures and effects of hydrogen burns on safety equipment''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrell, C.M.; Soffer, L.

    1989-09-01

    Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-48 arose as a result of the large amount of hydrogen generated and burned within containment during the Three Mile Island accident. This issue covers hydrogen control measures for recoverable degraded-core accidents for all boiling-water reactors (BWRs) and those pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) with ice-condenser containments. The Commission and the nuclear industry have sponsored extensive research in this area, which has led to significant revision of the Commission's hydrogen control regulations, given in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50 (10 CFR 50), Section 50.44. BWRs having Mark I and II containments are presently required to operate with inerted containment atmospheres that effectively prevent hydrogen combustion. BWRs with Mark III containments and PWRs with ice-condenser containments are now required to be equipped with hydrogen control systems to protect containment integrity and safety systems inside containment. Industry has chosen to use hydrogen igniter systems to burn hydrogen produced in a controlled fashion to prevent damage. An independent review by a Committee of the National Research Council concluded that, for most accident scenarios, current regulatory requirements make it highly unlikely that hydrogen detonation would be the cause of containment failure. On the basis of the extensive research effort conducted and current regulatory requirements, including their implementation, the staff concludes that no new regulatory guidance on hydrogen control for recoverable degraded-core accidents for these types of plants is necessary and that USI A-48 is resolved

  1. Promotion of good safety culture at a Canadian HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curle, B.

    1996-01-01

    People work at a nuclear plant within a structured environment. It is the programs, procedures and other ''tools'' that are used in the workplace that actually guide behaviours, and behaviours then guide performance. The safety culture in the workplace is ''the way we do things around here''. This culture is created by structures, behaviours and performance, and is characterized by three attributes: A questioning attitude; a rigorous and prudent approach; open 2-way communication. This paper discusses a model of safety culture which puts the operating experience or learning cycle program at the heart of the endeavor. This cycle also consists of three elements: Observation; reporting; learning. It is more of a theoretical paper than a report of success at this stage. However, the ideas presented are being used to design and implement a strong safety culture at Ontario Hydro's Darlington Nuclear Station (4 x 932 Mwe CANDU units), and are beginning to show results. Programs designed for excellence in human performance have to provide clear simple structure, and draw people into alignment with the required behaviours. By making the structural elements and the alignment activities explicit an attempt can be made to ''design'' programs that will create and reinforce the required safety culture. The paper places the learning cycle at the heart of safety culture because the cycle aligns with the three attributes of safety culture. If an organization cannot learn from experience (i.e. change behaviours based on experience) it is doubtful whether it can build a strong safety culture. 2 refs

  2. Panel discussion: Building Canadian companies and capabilities in the transition to the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, N.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Moderated by Nick Beck from Natural Resources Canada, this panel discussion will be prefaced by a keynote address by Dr. Arthur Carty, Canada's National Science Advisor and former President of the National Research Council of Canada, who will discuss technology commercialization in Canada and how the Government of Canada and industry collaborate to achieve their respective priorities. This session will illustrate innovative government and industry partnerships from early research and development to project demonstration, and adoption into the market-place. Panelists from across the Canadian hydrogen and fuel cell innovation spectrum will provide an overview of their respective company's partnerships with the Government of Canada and speak to how these alliances have helped their company to pioneer new technology, move technology from the lab to the marketplace, and/or become more competitive. Opportunities and challenges that companies have faced in their partnerships with government will be shared with the audience. The Panel Members are: Mr. Stephen Kukucha, Mr. Chris Reid, Mr. Robb Thompson, Mr. Pierre Rivard, Mr. John Shen, Mr. R. Randall MacEwen, Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson. Companies will also be showcasing their contribution in advancing Canada's and the world's transition to the hydrogen economy. (author)

  3. Proceedings of the 2010 Canadian Dam Association's public safety around dams workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Nearly 30 people have drowned in dam-related incidents over the last 10 years in Canada. The Canadian public is now calling for improved safety guidelines. Public interaction with dams is increasing as a result of interest in extreme sports and perceived rights of access. However, many members of the public are not aware of the dangers posed by dams. This workshop provided a forum to discuss proposals for a draft publication of the Canadian Dam Association (CDA) guidelines for public safety and security around dams. Issues related to current legislation and liability were discussed. Methods of increasing public awareness of the hazards posed by dams included increased signage in dam locations, the use of audible and visual alert systems, and the use of booms and buoys. The responsibilities of dam owners in ensuring the safety of dams were also discussed. The conference featured 5 presentations, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  4. Promotion of good safety culture at a Canadian HWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curle, B [Darlington NPP (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    People work at a nuclear plant within a structured environment. It is the programs, procedures and other ``tools`` that are used in the workplace that actually guide behaviours, and behaviours then guide performance. The safety culture in the workplace is ``the way we do things around here``. This culture is created by structures, behaviours and performance, and is characterized by three attributes: A questioning attitude; a rigorous and prudent approach; open 2-way communication. This paper discusses a model of safety culture which puts the operating experience or learning cycle program at the heart of the endeavor. This cycle also consists of three elements: Observation; reporting; learning. It is more of a theoretical paper than a report of success at this stage. However, the ideas presented are being used to design and implement a strong safety culture at Ontario Hydro`s Darlington Nuclear Station (4 x 932 Mwe CANDU units), and are beginning to show results. Programs designed for excellence in human performance have to provide clear simple structure, and draw people into alignment with the required behaviours. By making the structural elements and the alignment activities explicit an attempt can be made to ``design`` programs that will create and reinforce the required safety culture. The paper places the learning cycle at the heart of safety culture because the cycle aligns with the three attributes of safety culture. If an organization cannot learn from experience (i.e. change behaviours based on experience) it is doubtful whether it can build a strong safety culture. 2 refs.

  5. Electronic Safety Resource Tools -- Supporting Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barilo, Nick F.

    2014-09-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program conducted a planning session in Los Angeles, CA on April 1, 2014 to consider what electronic safety tools would benefit the next phase of hydrogen and fuel cell commercialization. A diverse, 20-person team led by an experienced facilitator considered the question as it applied to the eight most relevant user groups. The results and subsequent evaluation activities revealed several possible resource tools that could greatly benefit users. The tool identified as having the greatest potential for impact is a hydrogen safety portal, which can be the central location for integrating and disseminating safety information (including most of the tools identified in this report). Such a tool can provide credible and reliable information from a trustworthy source. Other impactful tools identified include a codes and standards wizard to guide users through a series of questions relating to application and specific features of the requirements; a scenario-based virtual reality training for first responders; peer networking tools to bring users from focused groups together to discuss and collaborate on hydrogen safety issues; and a focused tool for training inspectors. Table ES.1 provides results of the planning session, including proposed new tools and changes to existing tools.

  6. Validation of CFD models for hydrogen safety application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaeva, Anna; Skibin, Alexander; Krutikov, Alexey; Golibrodo, Luka; Volkov, Vasiliy; Nechaev, Artem; Nadinskiy, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    Most accidents involving hydrogen begin with its leakage and spreading in the air and spontaneous detonation, which is accompanied by fire or deflagration of hydrogen mixture with heat and /or shocks, which may cause harm to life and equipment. Outflow of hydrogen in a confined volume and its propagation in the volume is the worst option because of the impact of the insularity on the process of detonation. According to the safety requirements for handling hydrogen specialized systems (ventilation, sprinklers, burners etc.) are required for maintaining the hydrogen concentration less than the critical value, to eliminate the possibility of detonation and flame propagation. In this study, a simulation of helium propagation in a confined space with different methods of injection and ventilation of helium is presented, which is used as a safe replacement of hydrogen in experimental studies. Five experiments were simulated in the range from laminar to developed turbulent with different Froude numbers, which determine the regime of the helium outflow in the air. The processes of stratification and erosion of helium stratified layer were investigated. The study includes some results of OECD/NEA-PSI PANDA benchmark and some results of Gamelan project. An analysis of applicability of various turbulence models, which are used to close the system of equations of momentum transport, implemented in the commercial codes STAR CD, STAR CCM+, ANSYS CFX, was conducted for different mesh types (polyhedral and hexahedral). A comparison of computational studies results with experimental data showed a good agreement. In particular, for transition and turbulent regimes the error of the numerical results lies in the range from 5 to 15% for all turbulence models considered. This indicates applicability of the methods considered for some hydrogen safety problems. However, it should be noted that more validation research should be made to use CFD in Hydrogen safety applications with a wide

  7. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  8. The role of CFD computer analyses in hydrogen safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komen, E.M.J; Visser, D.C; Roelofs, F.; Te Lintelo, J.G.T

    2014-01-01

    The risks of hydrogen release and combustion during a severe accident in a light water reactor have attracted considerable attention after the Fukushima accident in Japan. Reliable computer analyses are needed for the optimal design of hydrogen mitigation systems, like e.g. passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs), and for the assessment of the associated residual risk of hydrogen combustion. Traditionally, so-called Lumped Parameter (LP) computer codes are being used for these purposes. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in the development, validation, and application of more detailed, three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for hydrogen safety analyses. The objective of the current paper is to address the following questions: - When are CFD computer analyses needed complementary to the traditional LP code analyses for hydrogen safety management? - What is the validation status of the CFD computer code for hydrogen distribution, mitigation, and combustion analyses? - Can CFD computer analyses nowadays be executed in practical and reliable way for full scale containments? The validation status and reliability of CFD code simulations will be illustrated by validation analyses performed for experiments executed in the PANDA, THAI, and ENACCEF facilities. (authors)

  9. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  10. Safety-barrier diagrams as a tool for modelling safety of hydrogen applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan; Markert, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Safety-barrier diagrams have proven to be a useful tool in documenting the safety measures taken to prevent incidents and accidents in process industry. Especially during the introduction of new hydrogen technologies or applications, as e.g. hydrogen refuelling stations, safety-barrier diagrams...... are considered a valuable supplement to other traditional risk analysis tools to support the communication with authorities and other stakeholders during the permitting process. Another advantage of safety-barrier diagrams is that they highlight the importance of functional and reliable safety barriers in any...... system and here is a direct focus on those barriers that need to be subject to safety management in terms of design and installation, operational use, inspection and monitoring, and maintenance. Safety-barrier diagrams support both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The paper will describe...

  11. HySafe - The Network of Excellence for Hydrogen Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, T.

    2006-01-01

    Safety always has been a critical issue for innovations as it influences the economic attractiveness and public acceptance of any new idea. Furthermore, a fair market for trading innovative products has to be based on homogenized legal regulations, which usually refer commonly accepted standards. Ideally, these standards should be the unique outcome of safety assessments, based on profound and concerted pre-normative research work. However, in Europe the research related to hydrogen safety is still fragmented. This was the reason for the European Commission to support the needed integration and focusing of the related efforts with the help of a new instrument, the so-called Networks of Excellence NoE. So, the goal of NoE HySafe is to provide the basis to facilitate the safe introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier, by removing the described safety related obstacles. The network is constituted by 24 partners from 12 European countries and from Canada, representing private industries, especially from the automotive sector, universities and research institutions. More than 120 scientists perform integrative work in 15 work packages. A biennial report on Hydrogen Safety is going to be published, the available experimental facilities have been catalogued and qualified, educational programs are designed. After the first successful International Conference on Hydrogen Safety the second will be organized 2007 in San Sebastian, Spain. The European codes and standards activities will be supported by scientifically based information formulated in the HySafe position papers. The web-site www.hysafe.net offers a versatile platform for internal and external communication. The further work program is orientated not only at the results of a state-of-the-art report and a PIRT analysis performed within the NoE but also complies with the needs identified in the external network including other European projects related to hydrogen like StorHy, HyWays and NATURALHY. By shifting

  12. Hydrogen Safety Sensor Performance and Use Gap Analysis: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, Robert M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schmidt, Kara [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartmann, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wright, Hannah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weidner, Eveline [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Cebolla, Rafael O. [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Bonato, Christian [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Moretto, Pietro [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands

    2017-11-15

    Hydrogen sensors are recognized as an important technology for facilitating the safe implementation of hydrogen as an alternative fuel, and there are numerous reports of a sensor alarm successfully preventing a potentially serious event. However, gaps in sensor metrological specifications, as well as in their performance for some applications, exist.The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technology Office published a short list of critical gaps in the 2007 and 2012 multiyear project plans; more detailed gap analyses were independently performed by the JRC and NREL. There have been, however, some significant advances in sensor technologies since these assessments, including the commercial availability of hydrogen sensors with fast response times (t90 less than 1 s, which had been an elusive DOE target since 2007), improved robustness to chemical poisons, improved selectivity, and improved lifetime and stability. These improvements, however, have not been universal and typically pertain to select platforms or models. Moreover, as hydrogen markets grow and new applications are being explored, more demands will be imposed on sensor performance. The hydrogen sensor laboratories at NREL and JRC are currently updating the hydrogen safety sensor gap analysis through direct interaction with international stakeholders in the hydrogen community, especially end-users. NREL and the JRC are currently organizing a series of workshops (in Europe and the U.S.) with sensor developers, end-users, and other stakeholders in 2017 to identify technology gaps and to develop a path forward to address them. One workshop is scheduled for May 10 in Brussels, Belgium at the Headquarters of the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking. A second workshop is planned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, CO, USA. This presentation will review improvements in sensor technologies in the past 5 to 10 years, identify gaps in sensor performance and use requirements, and identify

  13. The Road to Psychological Safety: Legal, Scientific, and Social Foundations for a Canadian National Standard on Psychological Safety in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shain, Martin; Arnold, Ian; GermAnn, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    In Part 1 of this article, the legal and scientific origins of the concept of psychological safety are examined as background to, and support for, the new Canadian National Standard on Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace (CSA Z1003/BNQ 9700). It is shown that five factors influencing psychological safety can be identified as being…

  14. Proceedings of a Canadian Hydrogen Association workshop in support of the transition to the hydrogen age : Greening the fleet : the status of hydrogen-powered vehicles for fleet applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Association (CHA) endorses hydrogen as an energy carrier and promotes the development of a supporting hydrogen infrastructure. It promotes the research, development and commercialization of innovative ways to accelerate the application of hydrogen technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The presentations at this conference described new technologies and the companies that are developing hydrogen-powered vehicles, including hybrid-electric powered vehicles for fleet application. Some international activities were also covered, including lessons learned from the California experience and European fuel cell fleets. The benefits of fuel cell hybrids were highlighted along with methods to overcome the barriers to the introduction of new vehicle fuels. A review of current and future hydrogen supply infrastructure systems was also provided. The conference featured 14 presentations, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  15. Safety considerations for continuous hydrogen production test apparatus with capacity of 50 N-litter hydrogen per hour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuki, Kaoru; Akino, Norio; Shimizu, Saburo; Nakajima, Hayato; Higashi, Shunichi; Kubo, Shinji

    2001-03-01

    Since the thermochemical hydrogen production Iodine-Sulfur process decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen using toxic chemicals such as sulfuric acid, iodine and hydriodic acid, safety considerations are very important in its research and development. Therefore, before construction of continuous hydrogen production test apparatus with capacity of 50 N-litter hydrogen per hour, comprehensive safety considerations were carried out to examine the design and construction works of the test apparatus, and the experimental plans using the apparatus. Emphasis was given on the safety considerations on prevention of breakage of glasswares and presumable abnormalities, accidents and their countermeasures. This report summarizes the results of the considerations. (author)

  16. Lessons learned from recent safety related incidents at A Canadian uranium conversion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaferi, Jafir

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) regulatory requirements for nuclear fuel facility licensees to report any situation or incident that results or is likely to result in a hazard to the health or safety of any person or the environment and to submit its incident investigation report with cause(s) of the incident and corrective actions taken or planned. In addition, the paper presents two recent safety-related incidents that occurred at a uranium conversion facility in Canada along with their consequences, causes, corrective actions and any lessons learned. The first incident resulted in a release of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) inside the UF6 cylinder filling station and the second one resulted in a spill of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) slurry inside the UF6 plant. Both incidents had no impact on the workers or the environment. (authors)

  17. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  18. Accident Journalism and Traffic Safety Education: A Three-Phase Investigation of Accident Reporting in the Canadian Daily Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Gerald J. S.; Ackersviller, Melody J.

    A study examined the potential for development of a traffic accident-reporting form in the Canadian daily press that strengthens concern for road safety in the general population and enhances knowledge, attitudes, and behavior leading to greater safety. The investigation was conducted on three levels: a content analysis, a readership analysis, and…

  19. Infectious respiratory disease outbreaks and pregnancy: occupational health and safety concerns of Canadian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen P; O'Sullivan, Tracey L; Dow, Darcie; Amaratunga, Carol A

    2011-04-01

    This paper is a report of a qualitative study of emergency and critical care nurses' perceptions of occupational response and preparedness during infectious respiratory disease outbreaks including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and influenza. Healthcare workers, predominantly female, face occupational and personal challenges in their roles as first responders/first receivers. Exposure to SARS or other respiratory pathogens during pregnancy represents additional occupational risk for healthcare workers. Perceptions of occupational reproductive risk during response to infectious respiratory disease outbreaks were assessed qualitatively by five focus groups comprised of 100 Canadian nurses conducted between 2005 and 2006. Occupational health and safety issues anticipated by Canadian nurses for future infectious respiratory disease outbreaks were grouped into four major themes: (1) apprehension about occupational risks to pregnant nurses; (2) unknown pregnancy risks of anti-infective therapy/prophylaxis; (3) occupational risk communication for pregnant nurses; and (4) human resource strategies required for pregnant nurses during outbreaks. The reproductive risk perceptions voiced by Canadian nurses generally were consistent with reported case reports of pregnant women infected with SARS or emerging influenza strains. Nurses' fears of fertility risks posed by exposure to infectious agents or anti-infective therapy and prophylaxis are not well supported by the literature, with the former not biologically plausible and the latter lacking sufficient data. Reproductive risk assessments should be performed for each infectious respiratory disease outbreak to provide female healthcare workers and in particular pregnant women with guidelines regarding infection control and use of anti-infective therapy and prophylaxis.

  20. Radiation and Heterogeneous processes and hydrogen safety of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agayev, T.N.; Eyubov, K.T.; Aliyev, S.M.; Faradjzade, I.A.; Imanova, G.T.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the development of the quantitative and probabilistic analysis of safety of atomic power stations, interest in major accidents which can lead to overheating and fusion of an active zone has increased now. One of the major processes from the point of view of assessment of accident consequences with damage of an active zone is process of hydrogen formation. In the real work sources of hydrogen formation at various stages of accident with loss of the coolant of water-to-water power reactors are considered. The role of different processes of hydrogen formation depends on temperature, an amount of water and steam in an active zone and some other parameters. In this regard we have tried to formulate approach to creation of mathematical model of dynamics of hydrogen formation at accident in which the factors mentioned above would be considered. At the first stage of accident which lasted several tens of seconds depressurization of the first contour and loss of pressure took place. Water of the first contour under normal conditions of operation contained radiolytic hydrogen which concentration significantly exceeded its solubility with an atmospheric pressure. Therefore the dissolved hydrogen was emitted in a gas phase at a rupture of the pipeline. The second stage of accident is characterized by water vaporization from the first contour. During this period the amount of water in an active zone is constant and also water temperature in an active zone is constant. At last, at the third stage of accident there is water vaporization from an active zone also a warming up of the heat allocating assembly and constructional materials of an active zone.

  1. The costs of uncertainty: regulating health and safety in the Canadian uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.

    1982-04-01

    Federalism, and particularly federal/provincial jurisdictional relationships, have led to considerable uncertainty in the regulation of occupational health and safety and of environmental protection in the Canadian uranium mining industry. The two principal uranium producing provinces in Canada are Saskatchewan and Ontario. Since 1978, in an attempt to avoid constitutional issues, both these provinces and the federal government as well have proceeded unilaterally with health and safety reforms for the industry. In Saskatchewan this has resulted in areas of overlapping jurisdiction, which have led to uncertainty over the legal enforceability of the provincial regulations. In Ontario, the province has left significant gaps in the protection of both workers and the environment. Little progress can be expected in eliminating these gaps and overlaps until the current administrative and jurisdictional arrangements are understood

  2. Low level radiation: how does the linear without threshold model provide the safety of Canadian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    The linear without threshold model is a model of risk used worldwide by the most of health organisms of nuclear regulation in order to establish dose limits for workers and public. It is in the heart of the approach adopted by the Canadian commission of nuclear safety (C.C.S.N.) in matter of radiation protection. The linear without threshold model presumes reasonably it exists a direct link between radiation exposure and cancer rate. It does not exist scientific evidence that chronicle exposure to radiation doses under 100 milli sievert (mSv) leads harmful effects on health. Several scientific reports highlighted scientific evidences that seem indicate a low level of radiation is less harmful than the linear without threshold predicts. As the linear without threshold model presumes that any radiation exposure brings risks, the ALARA principle obliges the licensees to get the radiation exposure at the lowest reasonably achievable level, social and economical factors taken into account. ALARA principle constitutes a basic principle in the C.C.S.N. approach in matter of radiation protection; On the radiation protection plan, C.C.S.N. gets a careful approach that allows to provide health and safety of Canadian people and the protection of their environment. (N.C.)

  3. Prohibiting Headgear for Safety in Amateur Boxing? Opinion of the Canadian Boxing Community: an Online Poll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Philip; Rempel, Philip

    In 2013, the Amateur International Boxing Association (AIBA) introduced a rule banning headgear for male-senior open class boxers during competition. The AIBA has defended the rule change as motivated by safety and supported by internal unpublished studies. As a result, in 2018, the AIBA plans to universally prohibit headgear in competition: for all competitors (male and female), all ages and all levels. Within Canada, this ruling has generated controversy in the boxing community, yet there has been no overall measure of opinion. To address this, we instituted a voluntary, anonymous, online open-access poll to allow members of the boxing community to express their stance on headgear use in competition. In total, 636 responses were received. A total of 71.5 % of Canadian respondents believed headgear should be mandatory at all levels. Only 5.8 % agreed that headgear should be prohibited, as planned for 2018. Estimating results on a representative breakdown of boxing membership in Canada, a similar pattern emerged, whereby 68.2 % concurred with mandatory headgear while only 4.95 % supported its prohibition. Parents of boxers were almost unanimously against banning headgear, stating they would change sports as a result. Similarly, only 1.7 % of women believed headgear should be prohibited. The consensus of the Canadian boxing community largely opposes the rule changes that the AIBA has implemented. The results highlight risks posed to the long-term viability of the sport, if significant grassroots safety concerns are disregarded.

  4. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  5. Crevice corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of grades-2 and -12 titanium under Canadian nuclear waste vault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Bailey, M.G.; Clarke, C.F.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    Results on the corrosion of titanium grades 2 and 12 under the saline conditions anticipated in Canadian nuclear waste vaults are presented. The experimental approach included short-term electrochemical experiments to determine corrosion mechanisms, the susceptibility of titanium to crevice corrosion under a variety of conditions, and the extent of hydrogen uptake under controlled conditions; medium-term corrosion tests lasting a few weeks to a few months; and long-term immersion tests to provide rates for uniform corrosion, crevice corrosion, and hydrogen pickup. Results indicated that propagation, not initiation, is important in establishing susceptibility to crevice corrosion. Increasing the iron content of Ti-2 to 0.13 weight percent prevents crevice corrosion by causing repassivation. Crevice corrosion initiates on Ti-12, but repassivation is rapid. The supply of oxidant is essential to maintain crevice propagation. Hydrogen embrittlement is unlikely unless oxide film breakdown occurs. Film breakdown occurs under crevice conditions, and hydrogen pickup is to be expected. Film breakdown could occur if the strain or creep rate is fast enough to compete with repassivation reactions, a highly unlikely situation

  6. Overview of the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards Program. Part 4: Hydrogen Sensors; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J.; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Brosha, Eric; Mukundan, Rangachary; James, C. Will; Keller, Jay

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen sensors are recognized as a critical element in the safety design for any hydrogen system. In this role, sensors can perform several important functions including indication of unintended hydrogen releases, activation of mitigation strategies to preclude the development of dangerous situations, activation of alarm systems and communication to first responders, and to initiate system shutdown. The functionality of hydrogen sensors in this capacity is decoupled from the system being monitored, thereby providing an independent safety component that is not affected by the system itself. The importance of hydrogen sensors has been recognized by DOE and by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Safety and Codes Standards (SCS) program in particular, which has for several years supported hydrogen safety sensor research and development. The SCS hydrogen sensor programs are currently led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current SCS sensor program encompasses the full range of issues related to safety sensors, including development of advance sensor platforms with exemplary performance, development of sensor-related code and standards, outreach to stakeholders on the role sensors play in facilitating deployment, technology evaluation, and support on the proper selection and use of sensors.

  7. Safety Implementation of Hydrogen Igniters and Recombiners for Nuclear Power Plant Severe Accident Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jianjun; ZHOU Zhiwei; JING Xingqing

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen combustion in a nuclear power plant containment building may threaten the integrity of the containment. Hydrogen recombiners and igniters are two methods to reduce hydrogen levels in containment buildings during severe accidents. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the safety implementation of hydrogen igniters and recombiners. This paper analyzes the risk of deliberate hydrogen ignition and investigates three mitigation measures using igniters only, hydrogen recombiners only or a combination of recombiners and igniters. The results indicate that steam can effectively control the hydrogen flame acceleration and the deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  8. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission regulatory process for decommissioning a uranium mining facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scissons, K.; Schryer, D.M.; Goulden, W.; Natomagan, C.

    2002-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates uranium mining in Canada. The CNSC regulatory process requires that a licence applicant plan for and commit to future decommissioning before irrevocable decisions are made, and throughout the life of a uranium mine. These requirements include conceptual decommissioning plans and the provision of financial assurances to ensure the availability of funds for decommissioning activities. When an application for decommissioning is submitted to the CNSC, an environmental assessment is required prior to initiating the licensing process. A case study is presented for COGEMA Resources Inc. (COGEMA), who is entering the decommissioning phase with the CNSC for the Cluff Lake uranium mine. As part of the licensing process, CNSC multidisciplinary staff assesses the decommissioning plan, associated costs, and the environmental assessment. When the CNSC is satisfied that all of its requirements are met, a decommissioning licence may be issued. (author)

  9. A proposal for safety design philosophy of HTGR for coupling hydrogen production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Tazawa, Yujiro; Imai, Yoshiyuki; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been conducting research and development for hydrogen production utilizing heat from High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Towards the realization of nuclear hydrogen production, coupled hydrogen production plants should not be treated as an extension of a nuclear plant in order to open the door for the entry of non-nuclear industries as well as assuring reactor safety against postulated abnormal events initiated in the hydrogen production plants. Since hydrogen production plant utilizing nuclear heat has never been built in the world, little attention has been given to the establishment of a safety design for such system including the High Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). In the present study, requirements in order to design, construct and operate hydrogen production plants under conventional chemical plant standards are identified. In addition, design considerations for safety design of nuclear facility are suggested. Furthermore, feasibility of proposed safety design and design considerations are evaluated. (author)

  10. Canada's regulatory framework: The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper will discuss the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and Canada's Regulatory Framework with respect to Low- and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Waste. The management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste must be ensured in a consistent, environmentally responsible and economical manner throughout its lifecycle -- from its production to the final disposal option. Radioactive waste has been produced in Canada since the early 1930s when the first radium/uranium mine began operating at Port Radium in the Northwest Territories. Pitchblende ore was transported from the Port Radium mine to Port Hope, Ontario where it was refined to produce radium for medical purposes. At present, radioactive waste is generated in Canada from the various stages and uses associated with the nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining/milling to nuclear reactor operations to radioisotope manufacture and use. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians and the environment; and to implement Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The CNSC was established in 2000 under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources. The CNSC was created to replace the former Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), which was founded in 1946. Under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, CNSC's mandate involves four major areas: regulation of the development, production and use of nuclear energy in Canada to protect health, safety and the environment; regulation of the production, possession, use and transport of nuclear substances, and the production, possession and use of prescribed equipment and prescribed information; implementation of measures respecting international control of the development, production, transport and use of nuclear energy and substances, including measures respecting the

  11. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Compliance Program for Uranium Mines and Mills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schryer, D., E-mail: denis.schryer@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is the principal nuclear regulator in Canada. The CNSC is empowered through the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and its associated regulations, to regulate the entire nuclear cycle which includes: uranium mining and milling, uranium refining and processing, fuel fabrication, power generation and nuclear waste management. A CNSC uranium mine licence is required by a proponent to site, prepare, construct, operate, decommission and abandon this nuclear facility. The CNSC licence is the legal instrument that authorizes the regulated activities and incorporates conditions and regulatory controls. Following a favourable Commission Tribunal decision to issue a licence to authorize the licensed activities, CNSC develops and executes a compliance plan of the licensee’s programs and procedures. The CNSC compliance plan is risk-informed and applies its resources to the identified higher risk areas. The compliance program is designed to encourage compliance by integrating three components: promotion, verification and enforcement and articulates the CNSC expectations to attain and maintain compliance with its regulatory requirements. The licensee performance is assessed through compliance activities and reported to the Commission to inform the licensing process during licence renewal. The application of the ongoing compliance assessment and risk management model ensures that deviations from impact predictions are addressed in a timely manner. The Uranium Mines and Mills Division of the CNSC are preparing to meet the challenges of the planned expansion of their Canadian uranium mining industry. The presentation will discuss these challenges and the measures required to address them. The Uranium Mines and Mills Division (UMMD) have adopted a structured compliance framework which includes formal procedures to conduct site inspections. New UMMD staff are trained to apply the regulations to licensed sites and to manage non

  12. Safety assessment of envisaged systems for automotive hydrogen supply and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landucci, Gabriele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Chimica Industriale e Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Pisa, via Diotisalvi n.2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Tugnoli, Alessandro; Cozzani, Valerio [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Mineraria e delle Tecnologie Ambientali, Alma Mater Studiorum - Universita di Bologna, via Terracini n.28, 40131 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    A novel consequence-based approach was applied to the inherent safety assessment of the envisaged hydrogen production, distribution and utilization systems, in the perspective of the widespread hydrogen utilization as a vehicle fuel. Alternative scenarios were assessed for the hydrogen system chain from large scale production to final utilization. Hydrogen transportation and delivery was included in the analysis. The inherent safety fingerprint of each system was quantified by a set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Rules for KPIs aggregation were considered for the overall assessment of the system chains. The final utilization stage resulted by large the more important for the overall expected safety performance of the system. Thus, comparison was carried out with technologies proposed for the use of other low emission fuels, as LPG and natural gas. The hazards of compressed hydrogen-fueled vehicles resulted comparable, while reference innovative hydrogen technologies evidenced a potentially higher safety performance. Thus, switching to the inherently safer technologies currently under development may play an important role in the safety enhancement of hydrogen vehicles, resulting in a relevant improvement of the overall safety performance of the entire hydrogen system. (author)

  13. Outreach at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission - An Aboriginal Peoples' Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lojk, R.; Ben Belfakhel, M.

    2006-01-01

    Established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) that came into force in May 2000, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is an independent federal agency that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources. The CNSC regulates all uses of nuclear energy and nuclear materials from the production, to use, to the final disposition of any nuclear substances. Under the NSCA, the CNSC has the mandate to: - Regulate the development, production and use of nuclear energy and materials to protect the health, safety, security and environment; - Regulate production, possession and use of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information; - Implement measures respecting international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy and substances; - Disseminate scientific, technical and regulatory information concerning CNSC activities. The main regulatory activities include setting regulatory standards, issuing licenses, verifying compliance and communicating with stakeholders and the public. These activities are accomplished by the work of two independent entities: a commission of up to seven members and a staff of about 500 employees. The Commission is an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal that provides licensing decisions on nuclear-related activities in a public forum. The President of the tribunal is the CEO of the CNSC staff organization. CNSC's regulatory philosophy is based on two principles: - Those persons and organizations subject to the NSCA and its Regulations are directly responsible for ensuring that the regulated activities that they engage in are managed so as to protect health, safety, security and the environment and to respect Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. - The CNSC is responsible to the public for regulating persons and organisations subject to the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and regulations to assure that they are properly discharging their obligations

  14. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

  15. Device for removing hydrogen gas from the safety containment vessel of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiefel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The safe processing of all concentrations of gas mixtures should be possible with such a device using a thermal recombiner of compact construction. A recombiner consisting of a metal case and diverter sheets situated in it is heated by induction. The incoming pipe for the gas mixture enriched with hydrogen and the outgoing pipe for the gas mixture with low hydrogen content are connected together by a three way valve. The third connection to the safety valve takes the larger port of the gas mixture with low hydrogen content back to the safety containment vessel. Sufficient amount of the gas mixture with low hydrogen content is taken via the three way valve to the safety containment vessel to ensure that the hydrogen content of the gas mixture taken to the recombiner remains below the 4% by volume limit. (orig./PW)

  16. The importance of safety in achieving the widespread use of hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edeskuty, F.J.

    1997-09-01

    The advantages of hydrogen fuel have been adequately demonstrated on numerous occasions. However, two major disadvantages have prevented any significant amount of corresponding development. These disadvantages have been in the economics of producing sufficient quantities of hydrogen and in the safety (both real and perceived) of its use. To date work has mostly been properly centered on solving the economic problems. However, a greater effort on the safety of new hydrogen systems now being proposed also deserves consideration. To achieve the greatest safety in the expansion of the use of hydrogen into its wide-spread use as a fuel, attention must be given to four considerations. These are, obtaining knowledge of all the physical principles involved in the new uses, having in place the regulations that allow the safe interfacing of the new systems, designing and constructing the new systems with safety in mind, and the training of the large number of people that will become the handlers of the hydrogen. Existing organizations that produce, transport, or use hydrogen on a large scale have an excellent safety record. This safety record comes as a consequence of dedicated attention to the above-mentioned principles. However, where these principles were not closely followed, accidents have resulted. Some examples can be cited. As the use of hydrogen becomes more widespread, there must be a mechanism for assuring the universal application of these principles. Larger and more numerous fleet operations with hydrogen fuel may be the best way to begin the indoctrination of the general public to the more general use of hydrogen fuel. Demonstrated safe operation with hydrogen is vital to its final acceptance as the fuel of choice.

  17. The importance of safety in achieving the widespread use of hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edeskuty, F.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The advantages of hydrogen fuel have been adequately demonstrated on numerous occasions. However, two major disadvantages have prevented any significant amount of corresponding development. These disadvantages have been in the economics of producing sufficient quantities of hydrogen and in the safety (both real and perceived) of its use. To date, work has mostly been properly centered on solving the economic problems. However, a greater effort on the safety of new hydrogen systems now being proposed also deserves consideration. To achieve the greatest safety in the expansion of the use of hydrogen into its wide-spread use as a fuel, attention must be given to four considerations. These are, obtaining knowledge of all the physical principles involved in the new uses, using that knowledge to put in place the regulations that allow the safe interfacing of the new systems, designing and constructing the new systems with safety in mind, and the training of the large number of people that will become the handlers of the hydrogen. Existing organizations that produce, transport, or use hydrogen on a large scale have an excellent safety record. This safety record comes as a consequence of dedicated attention to the above-mentioned principle. However, where these principles were not closely followed, accidents have resulted. Some examples are cited. As the use of hydrogen becomes more wide-spread, there must be a mechanism for assuring the universal application of these principles. Larger and more numerous fleet operations with hydrogen fuel may be the best way to begin the indoctrination of the general public to the more general use of hydrogen fuel. Demonstrated safe operation with hydrogen is vital to its final acceptance as the fuel of choice. 18 refs.

  18. Safety and operations of hydrogen fuel infrastructure in northern climates : a collaborative complex systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    "This project examined the safety and operation of hydrogen (H2) fueling system infrastructure in : northern climates. A multidisciplinary team lead by the University of Vermont (UVM), : combined with investigators from Zhejiang and Tsinghua Universi...

  19. Organizational and safety culture in Canadian intensive care units: relationship to size of intensive care unit and physician management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodek, Peter M; Wong, Hubert; Jaswal, Danny; Heyland, Daren K; Cook, Deborah J; Rocker, Graeme M; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J; Dale, Craig; Fowler, Robert; Ayas, Najib T

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of this study are to describe organizational and safety culture in Canadian intensive care units (ICUs), to correlate culture with the number of beds and physician management model in each ICU, and to correlate organizational culture and safety culture. In this cross-sectional study, surveys of organizational and safety culture were administered to 2374 clinical staff in 23 Canadian tertiary care and community ICUs. For the 1285 completed surveys, scores were calculated for each of 34 domains. Average domain scores for each ICU were correlated with number of ICU beds and with intensivist vs nonintensivist management model. Domain scores for organizational culture were correlated with domain scores for safety culture. Culture domain scores were generally favorable in all ICUs. There were moderately strong positive correlations between number of ICU beds and perceived effectiveness at recruiting/retaining physicians (r = 0.58; P organizational and safety culture. Differences in perceptions between staff in larger and smaller ICUs highlight the importance of teamwork across units in larger ICUs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university: results of an online survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Courtney

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foodborne diseases are an important public health issue, and young adults are an important demographic to target with food safety education. Our objective was to assess the food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university, to identify potential areas for such education. Methods In February 2015, we conducted an online survey of 485 undergraduate students at a university in Ontario, Canada. We assessed various food-related factors, including cooking frequency and prior food handling or preparation education. We then modeled the relationship between ‘overall knowledge score’ and the demographic and food skills/cooking experience predictors using multivariable log-binomial regression, to determine factors associated with relatively higher proportions of correct responses. Results Respondents were, on average, 20.5 years old, and the majority (64.8 % lived off campus. Students cooked from basic ingredients infrequently, with 3 in 4 doing so a few times a year to never. Students averaged 6.2 correct answers to the 11 knowledge questions. Adjusting for other important covariates, older age and being a current food handler were associated with relatively higher knowledge, whereas working/volunteering in a hospital and infrequent cooking were associated with relatively lower knowledge. Males in the Faculty of Science had relatively higher knowledge than females in the Faculty of Science, both of whom had relatively higher knowledge than all students in other Faculties. Among students who had never taken a food preparation course, knowledge increased with self-reported cooking ability; however, among students who had taken such a course, knowledge was highest among those with low self-reported cooking ability. Conclusions Consistent with other similar studies, students in Faculties outside of the Faculty of Science, younger students, and those who cook infrequently could benefit from food safety education

  1. Food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university: results of an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Sarah M; Majowicz, Shannon E; Dubin, Joel A

    2016-11-09

    Foodborne diseases are an important public health issue, and young adults are an important demographic to target with food safety education. Our objective was to assess the food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university, to identify potential areas for such education. In February 2015, we conducted an online survey of 485 undergraduate students at a university in Ontario, Canada. We assessed various food-related factors, including cooking frequency and prior food handling or preparation education. We then modeled the relationship between 'overall knowledge score' and the demographic and food skills/cooking experience predictors using multivariable log-binomial regression, to determine factors associated with relatively higher proportions of correct responses. Respondents were, on average, 20.5 years old, and the majority (64.8 %) lived off campus. Students cooked from basic ingredients infrequently, with 3 in 4 doing so a few times a year to never. Students averaged 6.2 correct answers to the 11 knowledge questions. Adjusting for other important covariates, older age and being a current food handler were associated with relatively higher knowledge, whereas working/volunteering in a hospital and infrequent cooking were associated with relatively lower knowledge. Males in the Faculty of Science had relatively higher knowledge than females in the Faculty of Science, both of whom had relatively higher knowledge than all students in other Faculties. Among students who had never taken a food preparation course, knowledge increased with self-reported cooking ability; however, among students who had taken such a course, knowledge was highest among those with low self-reported cooking ability. Consistent with other similar studies, students in Faculties outside of the Faculty of Science, younger students, and those who cook infrequently could benefit from food safety education. Supporting improved hand hygiene, in particular clarifying hand

  2. Artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy inference systems as virtual sensors for hydrogen safety prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karri, Vishy; Ho, Tien [School of Engineering, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252-65, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Madsen, Ole [Department of Production, Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 16, DK-9220 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2008-06-15

    Hydrogen is increasingly investigated as an alternative fuel to petroleum products in running internal combustion engines and as powering remote area power systems using generators. The safety issues related to hydrogen gas are further exasperated by expensive instrumentation required to measure the percentage of explosive limits, flow rates and production pressure. This paper investigates the use of model based virtual sensors (rather than expensive physical sensors) in connection with hydrogen production with a Hogen 20 electrolyzer system. The virtual sensors are used to predict relevant hydrogen safety parameters, such as the percentage of lower explosive limit, hydrogen pressure and hydrogen flow rate as a function of different input conditions of power supplied (voltage and current), the feed of de-ionized water and Hogen 20 electrolyzer system parameters. The virtual sensors are developed by means of the application of various Artificial Intelligent techniques. To train and appraise the neural network models as virtual sensors, the Hogen 20 electrolyzer is instrumented with necessary sensors to gather experimental data which together with MATLAB neural networks toolbox and tailor made adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) were used as predictive tools to estimate hydrogen safety parameters. It was shown that using the neural networks hydrogen safety parameters were predicted to less than 3% of percentage average root mean square error. The most accurate prediction was achieved by using ANFIS. (author)

  3. A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liess, Martin [Rhein Main University of Applied Sciences, Rüsselsheim, Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2014-03-24

    Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

  4. Safety characteristics of hydrogen at super ambient conditions: lubricant contamination influencing the auto ignition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebner, C.; Schroder, V.; Holtappels, K.

    2006-01-01

    Inventing hydrogen as a commonly used future energy carrier the long term social acceptance as well as the clean energy image strongly depends upon the safety of its applications. The safety characteristics of hydrogen build a special challenge e.g. in the field of combustion engine development. Small impurities from lubricants used in motors and pumps, may serve as radical source, strongly influencing the auto ignition temperature of hydrogen. Auto Ignition Temperature (AIT) of Hydrogen-Air mixtures were measured in closed autoclaves made from stainless steel, similar to the closed bomb method described in the European standard EN 1839. Initial pressures of 10 bar(a) and 30 bar(a) of a premixed stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture were investigated. Auto ignition can be obtained about 100 K below the standard AIT (560 deg C, atmospheric pressure) and 300 K below the standard AIT when contaminated through motor oil. (authors)

  5. Safety risks of hydrogen fuel for applications in transportation vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels in many practical applications produces pollutants that are harmful to human health and environment. Hydrogen fuel is considered to be a potential answer to the clean energy demands, especially with the advances in fue...

  6. Addressing issues raised by stakeholders: evolving practices at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavelle, Peter

    2004-01-01

    request of community groups, in 1994 the AECB began to publish the Radiation Index to provide information to the public on radiation exposure from Canadian nuclear generating stations. The proliferation of environmental assessment documents has lead the CNSC to develop EA summaries to simplify information for interested stakeholders and to direct them to where more detailed information can be found. The CNSC created Report Cards on Nuclear Power Plants in response to a recommendation of the Auditor General of Canada for a more transparent reporting of the status of nuclear power plants. Extensive stakeholder consultation is an integral part of developing new or amending existing regulations. It took three years of consultations to develop the regulations pursuant to the Nuclear Safety and Control Act. Subsequent amendments to those regulations also receive stakeholder scrutiny, and in some instances the implementation of regulations is modified in response to stakeholder consultation. Furthermore, the drafting of every Regulatory Policy, Standard and Guide includes stakeholder review and formal dispositioning of stakeholder comments as part of the Regulatory Documents Development Process. In summary, operations and practices at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission have been evolving in response to changing societal expectations and in response to issues and concerns expressed by stakeholders about the nuclear industry and nuclear regulation in Canada

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Adalimumab in Canadian Patients with Moderate to Severe Crohn’s Disease: Results of the Adalimumab in Canadian SubjeCts with ModErate to Severe Crohn’s DiseaSe (ACCESS Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remo Panaccione

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate open-label adalimumab therapy for clinical effectiveness, fistula healing, patient-reported outcomes and safety in Canadian patients with moderate to severe Crohn’s disease (CD who were either naive to or previously exposed to antitumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy.

  8. Hydrogen safety in nuclear power - issues and measures. Preparing 'handbook for improved hydrogen safety in nuclear power'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tooru; Nakajima, Kiyoshi; Hino, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    In response to hydrogen explosion at the reactor building of TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, the common understanding among researchers in various fields has been required for the chain of various events surrounding hydrogen in case of the accident of a light water reactor. The group composed of specialists of nuclear power and gas combustion/explosion from universities, nuclear power equipment manufacturers, business interests, and nuclear power institutes is promoting the preparation work of 'Handbook for upgrading the safety of hydrogen measures related to nuclear power,' which is scheduled to be published in the end of 2015. The main themes dealt with in the handbook are as follows; (1) severe accident management and hydrogen control, (2) hydrogen combustion phenomena to be considered, (3) behavior of air - water vapor - hydrogen system, (4) passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) / igniter / containment spray, and (5) water-containing waste management. This paper introduces the outline of these movements and latest achievements. (A.O.)

  9. The assesment on safety distance determination of hydrogen production plant with RGTT200K reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Alimah; Sriyono

    2013-01-01

    The one of the hydrogen production process method coupled to RGTT200K is the utilization of steam reforming with (methane) natural gas as the feedstock. The integration between RGTT200K and hydrogen plant must consider many safety aspects and one of it is separation distance between these two systems. The purpose of this assessment is to study the sources of fires/explosion and to determine the safety distance between the steam reforming hydrogen production plant and RGTT200K reactor. The used methodology was literature assessment and safety distance calculation with equation R = k.W 1/3 . In this studi, safety distance determination in integration between RGTT200K and hydrogen plant was using equation based on reference of the USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.91 and mass on the equation was mass equivalent of TNT (kg). The results of the study show the hydrogen plant produces 160.000 m 3 /day, if requires storage tanks of 400.000 m 3 (based USNRC equal to 1.859 million tons of TNT equivalent) with factor k is 8, based on the equation R = k.W 1/3 , so the requirement for safety distance is 1 km. This distance may be shortened by adding a fire proof wall barrier and requires further assessment. (author)

  10. Safety considerations and countermeasures against fire and explosion at an HTGR-hydrogen production system. Proposal of safety design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, T.; Hada, K.; Shibata, T.; Shiozawa, S.

    1996-01-01

    Establishment of safety design concept and countermeasures against fire and explosion accidents is among key safety-related issues in an HTGR-hydrogen production system. We propose the different safety design concepts depending upon the origin of fire and explosion which may happen in the HTGR-hydrogen production plant. Against fire and explosion originated outside the reactor building (R/B), namely in the area of hydrogen production plant, the safety design concept is primarily to take a safe distance for preventing the damage on safety-related items or a proof wall if necessary. Because the hydrogen production plant is designed in the same safety level as a conventional chemical plant. The safe distance is proposed to limit an incident overpressure to 10 kPa so as not to suffer any damage on the items and to limit a wall-averaged temperature of concrete structures of the R/B to 175degC according to the current regulation. On the other hand, against a potential possibility of explosion originated inside the R/B, the safety design concept is to minimize the possibility of explosion low enough to assume no occurrence inside the R/B. That is, the measure is to exclude a simultaneous failure of a secondary helium piping and an endothermic chemical reactor. Furthermore, in severe accident condition in which the explosion may be postulated a priori, an incidental overpressure of explosion inside the reactor containment vessel (C/V) should be limited so as not to fail the C/V through restricting the amount of combustible gas ingress into the C/V by means of a combination of C/V isolation valve installed in the helium piping and emergency shut off valve in the process feed gas line. (author)

  11. Basic principles on the safety evaluation of the HTGR hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kazutaka; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Tazawa, Yujiro; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2009-03-01

    As HTGR hydrogen production systems, such as HTTR-IS system or GTHTR300C currently being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency, consists of nuclear reactor and chemical plant, which are without a precedent in the world, safety design philosophy and regulatory framework should be newly developed. In this report, phenomena to be considered and events to be postulated in the safety evaluation of the HTGR hydrogen production systems were investigated and basic principles to establish acceptance criteria for the explosion and toxic gas release accidents were provided. Especially for the explosion accident, quantitative criteria to the reactor building are proposed with relating sample calculation results. It is necessary to treat abnormal events occurred in the hydrogen production system as an 'external events to the nuclear plant' in order to classify the hydrogen production system as no-nuclear facility' and basic policy to meet such requirement was also provided. (author)

  12. Safety, codes and standards for hydrogen installations. Metrics development and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Aaron P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dedrick, Daniel E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); San Marchi, Christopher W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Automakers and fuel providers have made public commitments to commercialize light duty fuel cell electric vehicles and fueling infrastructure in select US regions beginning in 2014. The development, implementation, and advancement of meaningful codes and standards is critical to enable the effective deployment of clean and efficient fuel cell and hydrogen solutions in the energy technology marketplace. Metrics pertaining to the development and implementation of safety knowledge, codes, and standards are important to communicate progress and inform future R&D investments. This document describes the development and benchmarking of metrics specific to the development of hydrogen specific codes relevant for hydrogen refueling stations. These metrics will be most useful as the hydrogen fuel market transitions from pre-commercial to early-commercial phases. The target regions in California will serve as benchmarking case studies to quantify the success of past investments in research and development supporting safety codes and standards R&D.

  13. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management-II: Validation based on homogeneous hydrogen-air experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap, E-mail: sathiah@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Haren, Steven van, E-mail: vanharen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Komen, Ed, E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Roekaerts, Dirk, E-mail: d.j.e.m.roekaerts@tudelft.nl [Department of Multi-Scale Physics, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5, 2600 AA Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A CFD based method is proposed for the simulation of hydrogen deflagration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A dynamic grid adaptation method is proposed to resolve turbulent flame brush thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The predictions obtained using this method is in good agreement with the static grid method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TFC model results are in good agreement with large-scale homogeneous hydrogen-air experiments. - Abstract: During a severe accident in a PWR, large quantities of hydrogen can be generated and released into the containment. The generated hydrogen, when mixed with air, can lead to hydrogen combustion. The dynamic pressure loads resulting from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. Therefore, accurate prediction of these pressure loads is an important safety issue. In a previous article, we presented a CFD based method to determine these pressure loads. This CFD method is based on the application of a turbulent flame speed closure combustion model. The validation analyses in our previous paper demonstrated that it is of utmost importance to apply successive mesh and time step refinement in order to get reliable results. In this article, we first determined to what extent the required computational effort required for our CFD approach can be reduced by the application of adaptive mesh refinement, while maintaining the accuracy requirements. Experiments performed within a small fan stirred explosion bomb were used for this purpose. It could be concluded that adaptive grid adaptation is a reliable and efficient method for usage in hydrogen deflagration analyses. For the two-dimensional validation analyses, the application of dynamic grid adaptation resulted in a reduction of the required computational effort by about one order of magnitude. In a second step, the considered CFD approach including adaptive

  14. Fundamental philosophy on the safety design of the HTTR-IS hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Kazutaka; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been conducting an R and D work on the VHTR reactor system and IS hydrogen production system to realize hydrogen production using nuclear heat. As a part of this activity, JAEA is planning to connect an IS test system to the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to demonstrate its technical feasibility. This paper proposes a fundamental philosophy on the safety design of the HTTR-IS hydrogen production system including the methodology to select postulated abnormal events and its event sequences and to define safety functions of the IS system to ensure the reactor safety. Also the measure to clarify the IS system as non-reactor system is proposed. (author)

  15. Safety assessment of VHTR hydrogen production system against fire, explosion and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been developing a nuclear hydrogen production system by using heat from the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). This system will handle a large amount of combustible gas and toxic gas. The risk from fire, explosion and acute toxic exposure caused by an accident involving chemical material release in a hydrogen production system is assessed. It is important to ensure the safety of the nuclear plant, and the risks for public health should be sufficiently small. This report provides the basic policy for the safety evaluation in cases of accident involving fire, explosion and toxic material release in a hydrogen production system. Preliminary safety analysis of a commercial-sized VHTR hydrogen production system, GTHTR300C, is performed. This analysis provides us with useful information on the separation distance between a nuclear plant and a hydrogen production system and a prospect that an accident in a hydrogen production system does not significantly increase the risks of the public. (author)

  16. Safety assessment for the IS process in a hydrogen production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nam Chul

    2005-08-01

    A substitute energy development have been required due to the dry up of the fossil fuel and an environmental problem. Consequently, among substitute energy to be discussed, producing hydrogen from water which does not release carbon is a very promising technology. Also, Iodine-Sulfur(IS) thermochemical water decomposition is one of the promising process which is used to produce hydrogen efficiently using the high temperature gas-cooled reactor(HTGR) as an energy source that is possible to supply heat over 1000 .deg. C. In this study, to make a safety assessment of the hydrogen production using the IS process, an initiating events analysis and an accident scenario modeling considering the relief system were carried out. A method for initiating event identification used the Master Logic Diagram(MLD) that is logical and deductive. As a result, 9 initiating events that cause a leakage of the chemical material were identified. 6 accident scenario based on the initiating event are identified and quantified to the event trees. The frequency of the chemical material leakage produced by IS process is estimated relatively high to the value of 1.22x10 -4 /y. Therefore, it requires more effort on safety of the hydrogen production which can be considered as a part of the nuclear system and safety management research to increase social acceptability. Moreover, these methods will be helpful to the safety assessment of the hydrogen production system of the IS process in general

  17. Preliminary safety analysis of the HTTR-IS nuclear hydrogen production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Tazawa, Yujiro; Tachibana, Yukio; Sakaba, Nariaki

    2010-06-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency is planning to demonstrate hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting IS process utilizing heat from the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor HTTR (HTTR-IS system). The previous study identified that the HTTR modification due to the coupling of hydrogen production plant requires an additional safety review since the scenario and quantitative values of the evaluation items would be altered from the original HTTR safety review. Hence, preliminary safety analyses are conducted by using the system analysis code. Calculation results showed that evaluation items such as a coolant pressure, temperatures of heat transfer tubes at the pressure boundary, etc., did not exceed allowable values. Also, the peak fuel temperature did not exceed allowable value and therefore the reactor core was not damaged and cooled sufficiently. This report compiles calculation conditions, event scenarios and the calculation results of the preliminary safety analysis. (author)

  18. Safety Evaluation for Packaging 101-SY Hydrogen Mitigation Mixer Pump package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1994-10-05

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides analysis and considered necessary to approve a one-time transfer of the 101-SY Hydrogen Mitigation Mixer Pump (HMMP). This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer of the HMMP in a new shipping container will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting US Department of Transportation (DOT)/US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. This fulfills onsite, transportation requirements implemented by WHC-CM-2-14.

  19. Safety Evaluation for Packaging 101-SY Hydrogen Mitigation Mixer Pump package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) provides analysis and considered necessary to approve a one-time transfer of the 101-SY Hydrogen Mitigation Mixer Pump (HMMP). This SEP will demonstrate that the transfer of the HMMP in a new shipping container will provide an equivalent degree of safety as would be provided by packages meeting US Department of Transportation (DOT)/US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. This fulfills onsite, transportation requirements implemented by WHC-CM-2-14

  20. Employers' perceptions and attitudes toward the Canadian national standard on psychological health and safety in the workplace: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunyk, Diane; Craig-Broadwith, Morgan; Morris, Heather; Diaz, Ruth; Reisdorfer, Emilene; Wang, JianLi

    2016-01-01

    The estimated societal and economic costs of mental illness and psychological injury in the workplace is staggering. Governments, employers and other stakeholders have been searching for policy solutions. This qualitative, exploratory study sought to uncover organizational receptivity to a voluntary comprehensive standard for dealing with psychological health and safety in the workplace. A series of five focus groups were conducted in a large Western Canadian city in November 2013. The seventeen participants were from the fields of healthcare, construction/utilities, manufacturing industries, business services, and finance. They worked in positions of management, consulting, human resources, health promotion, health and safety, mediation, and occupational health and represented organizations ranging in size from 20 to 100,000 employees. The findings confirm and illustrate the critical role that psychological health and safety plays across workplaces and occupations. This standard resonated across the represented organizations and fit with their values. This alignment posed challenges with articulating its added value. There appears to be a need for simplified engagement and implementation strategies of the standard that can be tailored to the nuanced differences between types and sizes of industries. It appears that organizations in the most need of improving psychological health and safety may be the least receptive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogen deflagration simulations under typical containment conditions for nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanez, J., E-mail: jorge.yanez@kit.edu [Institute for Energy and Nuclear Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kotchourko, A.; Lelyakin, A. [Institute for Energy and Nuclear Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lean H{sub 2}-air combustion experiments highly relevant to typical NPP simulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed effect of temperature, concentration of H{sub 2}, and steam concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar conditions and H{sub 2} concentration yielded different combustion regimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Flame instabilities (FIs) were the effect driving divergences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Model developed for acoustic FI in simulations. Agreement experiments obtained. - Abstract: This paper presents the modeling of low-concentration hydrogen deflagrations performed with the recently developed KYLCOM model specially created to perform calculations in large scale domains. Three experiments carried out in THAI facility (performed in the frames of international OECD THAI experimental program) were selected to be analyzed. The tests allow studying lean mixture hydrogen combustion at normal ambient, elevated temperature and superheated and saturated conditions. The experimental conditions considered together with the facility size and shape grant a high relevance degree to the typical NPP containment conditions. The results of the simulations were thoroughly compared with the experimental data, and the comparison was supplemented by the analysis of the combustion regimes taking place in the considered tests. Results of the analysis demonstrated that despite the comparatively small difference in mixture properties, three different combustion regimes can be definitely identified. The simulations of one of the cases required of the modeling of the acoustic-parametric instability which was carefully undertaken.

  2. On the development of an International Curriculum on Hydrogen Safety Engineering and its Implementation into Educational Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahoe, A.E.; Molkov, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper provides an overview of the development of an International Curriculum on Hydrogen Safety Engineering and its implementation into new educational programmes. The curriculum has a modular structure, and consists of five basic, six fundamental and four applied modules. The reasons for this particular structure are explained. To accelerate the development of teaching materials and their implementation in training/educational programmes, an annual European Summer School on Hydrogen Safety will be held (the first Summer School is from 15-24 Aug 2006, Belfast, UK), where leading experts deliver keynote lectures to an audience of researchers on topics covering the state-of-the-art in Hydrogen Safety Science and Engineering. The establishment of a Postgraduate Certificate course in Hydrogen Safety Engineering at the University of Ulster (starting in September 2006) as a first step in the development of a worldwide system of Hydrogen Safety education and training is described. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen research and nuclear safety: a utility perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, W.

    1982-01-01

    The main thrust of this paper is to emphasize that research efforts need to be pursued only after the following steps have been taken: 1) identify clearly what decisions are needed; 2) develop an overall decision logic chart and identify the information required for each of the decisions; 3) distinguish confirmatory research from research needed for decision-making information; 4) recognize that an optimized mitigation system is generally not the objective, neither is minimum risk required; 5) assure that the level of studies be consistent with the risk. After having taken the above steps, the authors concluded that a deliberate and distributed ignition system is a viable solution for the hydrogen problem for certain nuclear power plants

  4. New standard on safety for hydrogen systems in spanish. Keys for understanding and use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luis Aprea, Jose [CNEA, Argentine Atomic Energy Commission - AAH - IRAM - Comahue University, CC 805 - Neuquen (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    The present paper approaches all the preliminary, normative and additional elements observed during the work carried out by the Argentine standardization board to count in the country with a normative document that covers the expectations of the local community of users and other Spanish-speaking user, about the integral safety for the hydrogen systems. The antecedents and the process of adoption of an international standard and its adaptation to the local media are analyzed. The result has been the Standard IRAM/ISO 15916 that intends to offer, to all the users and especially to those who are not familiar with the technology, a base to understand the subject of safety, thus enhancing the education of the general public in hydrogen safety matters. (author)

  5. Recent CFD Simulations of turbulent reactive flows with supercomputing for hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the R and D work performed within the scope of joint project activities concerning the numerical simulation of reacting flow in complex geometries. The aim is the refinement of numerical methods used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) by introducing high-performance computations (HPC) to analyse explosion processes in technical systems in more detail. Application examples concern conventional and nuclear energy systems, especially the safety aspects of future hydrogen technology. The project work is mainly focused on the modelling of the accident-related behaviour of hydrogen in safety enclosures regarding the distribution and combustion of burnable gas mixtures, ranging from slow to fast or even rapid flames. For fire and explosion protection, special models and criteria are being developed for the assessment of adequate safety measures to control deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) processes. Therefore, the physical mixing concept with dilution and inertization media is studied and recommended. (orig.) [de

  6. Commonly used preparations for colonoscopy: Efficacy, tolerability and safety – A Canadian Association of Gastroenterology position paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkun, Alan; Chiba, Naoki; Enns, Robert; Marcon, Margaret; Natsheh, Susan; Pham, Co; Sadowski, Dan; Vanner, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The increased demand for colonoscopy, coupled with the introduction of new bowel cleansing preparations and recent caution advisories in Canada, has prompted a review of bowel preparations by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. METHODS: The present review was conducted by the Clinical Affairs group of committees including the endoscopy, hepatobiliary/transplant, liaison, pediatrics, practice affairs and regional representation committees, along with the assistance of Canadian experts in the field. An effort was made to systematically assess randomized prospective trials evaluating commonly used bowel cleansing preparations in Canada. RESULTS: Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-; sodium phosphate (NaP)-; magnesium citrate (Mg-citrate)-; and sodium picosulphate, citric acid and magnesium oxide (PSMC)-containing preparations were reviewed. Regimens of PEG 2 L with bisacodyl (10 mg to 20 mg) or Mg-citrate (296 mL) are as effective as standard PEG 4 L regimens, but are better tolerated. NaP preparations appear more effective and better tolerated than standard PEG solutions. PSMC has good efficacy and tolerability but head-to-head trials with NaP solutions remain few, and conclusions equivocal. Adequate hydration during preparation and up to the time of colonoscopy is critical in minimizing side effects and improving bowel cleansing in patients receiving NaP and PSMC preparations. All preparations may cause adverse events, including rare, serious outcomes. NaP should not be used in patients with cardiac or renal dysfunction (PEG solution is preferable in these patients), bowel obstruction or ascites, and caution should be exercised when used in patients with pre-existing electrolyte disturbances, those taking medications that may affect electrolyte levels and elderly or debilitated patients. Health Canada’s recommended NaP dosing for most patients is two 45 mL doses 24 h apart. However, both safety and efficacy data on this dosing schedule are lacking

  7. Measures for ensuring hydrogen fire and explosion safety for VVER-440/230

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezlepkin, V.; Semashko, S.; Svetlov, S.; Sidorov, V.; Ivkov, I.; Krylov, Yu.; Kukhtevich, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the findings of calculation analysis as regards the release of mass, energy and hydrogen during beyond-design-basis accident (BDBA) at Kola NPP equipped with VVER-440 reactor (B-230 design) and in respect of distribution of hydrogen throughout NPP tight compartments. The analysis figures out the number and locations of passive catalytic hydrogen recombiners and of the sensors of the hydrogen concentration monitoring system. In order to prove the hydrogen safety of the design, it has been necessary to review accidents accompanied by maximum emissions (both peak and integral ones) of hydrogen into the tight area. During design-basis accident (DBA), no steam/zirconium reactions occur in the reactor core. Out of BDBA, the severe accidents with damage to the core accompanied oxidative reactions between zirconium and steel with emission of hydrogen are regarded as the most dangerous ones. Assessment of additional hydrogen sources shows that the contribution of such sources to the total amount of hydrogen that may emit during a severe accident is insignificant. Calculations have been made for the following scenarios of severe accidents, which seem to be the most important in terms of hydrogen safety analysis: - 20 mm leak from the primary circuit in combination with a failure of the emergency makeup system; - 500 mm PCP rupture in the vicinity of reactor inlet branch with bi-lateral leakage of coolant. Releases of mass and energy during the aforesaid scenarios, changes of medium parameters within the tight compartments and analysis of possible fire conditions have been analyzed by means of Russian computer codes RATEG/SVECHA/HEFEST, KUPOL-M and LIMITS. The said analysis shows that the large break accident (500 mm), i.e. PCP rupture in the vicinity of the reactor branch with bi-lateral leakage of coolant is of the keen interest in terms of hydrogen safety. This accident typifies powerful short-term release of hydrogen at a significantly lesser

  8. PALLADIUM DOPED TIN OXIDE BASED HYDROGEN GAS SENSORS FOR SAFETY APPLICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, Upendra; Nadig, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a hazardous gas since it forms a flammable mixture between 4 to 75% by volume in air. Hence, the safety aspects of handling hydrogen are quite important. For this, ideally, highly selective, fast response, small size, hydrogen sensors are needed. Although sensors based on different technologies may be used, thin-film sensors based on palladium (Pd) are preferred due to their compactness and fast response. They detect hydrogen by monitoring the changes to the electrical, mechanical or optical properties of the films. We report the development of Pd-doped tin-oxide based gas sensors prepared on thin ceramic substrates with screen printed platinum (Pt) contacts and integrated nicrome wire heaters. The sensors are tested for their performances using hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to a maximum of 4%H 2 in N 2 . The sensors detect hydrogen and their response times are less than a few seconds. Also, the sensor performance is not altered by the presence of helium in the test gas mixtures. By the above desired performance characteristics, field trials of these sensors have been undertaken. The paper presents the details of the sensor fabrication, electronic circuits, experimental setup for evaluation and the test results.

  9. Spatio-temporal assessment of food safety risks in Canadian food distribution systems using GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Beni, Leila; Villeneuve, Sébastien; LeBlanc, Denyse I; Côté, Kevin; Fazil, Aamir; Otten, Ainsley; McKellar, Robin; Delaquis, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    While the value of geographic information systems (GIS) is widely applied in public health there have been comparatively few examples of applications that extend to the assessment of risks in food distribution systems. GIS can provide decision makers with strong computing platforms for spatial data management, integration, analysis, querying and visualization. The present report addresses some spatio-analyses in a complex food distribution system and defines influence areas as travel time zones generated through road network analysis on a national scale rather than on a community scale. In addition, a dynamic risk index is defined to translate a contamination event into a public health risk as time progresses. More specifically, in this research, GIS is used to map the Canadian produce distribution system, analyze accessibility to contaminated product by consumers, and estimate the level of risk associated with a contamination event over time, as illustrated in a scenario. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety requirements in the design of research reactors: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Langman, V.J.

    2000-01-01

    In Canada, the formal development of safety requirements for the design of research reactors in general began under an inter-organizational Small Reactor Criteria Committee. This committee developed safety and licensing criteria for use by several small reactor projects in their licensing discussions with the Atomic Energy Control Board. The small reactor projects or facilities represented included the MAPLE-X10 reactor, the proposed SES-10 heating reactor and its prototype, the SDR reactor at the Whiteshell Laboratories, the Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (a.k.a., HANARO) in Korea, the SCORE project, and the McMaster University Nuclear Reactor. The top level set of criteria which form a safety philosophy and serve as a framework for more detailed developments was presented at an IAEA Conference in 1989. AECL continued this work to develop safety principles and design criteria for new small reactors. The first major application of this work has been to the design, safety analysis and licensing of the MAPLE 1 and 2 reactors for the MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor Project. This paper provides an overview of the safety principles and design criteria. Examples of an implementation of these safety principles and design criteria are drawn from the work to design the MAPLE 1 and 2 reactors. (author)

  11. Examining occupational health and safety vulnerability among Canadian workers with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, F Curtis; Lay, A Morgan; Jetha, Arif; Smith, Peter

    2017-05-26

    To compare workers with and without disabilities on their reported workplace hazard exposure and the presence of occupational health and safety vulnerability factors. Working-aged adults in Ontario or British Columbia were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional survey (n = 1988). Self-reported measures included demographic factors, work-related variables, perceived level of activity limitation at work, and presence of work safety vulnerability factors utilizing a novel framework. Reporting a disability at work was significantly associated with greater hazard exposure than those without a disability. In addition, those reporting a disability at work were more likely to be employed in conditions where hazard exposure was combined with inadequate policies and procedures, or hazard exposures were combined with inadequate empowerment. Work safety vulnerability is one way that health inequalities can be perpetuated even among those with disabilities who have found work. Our results suggest that employers and policy makers need to focus on assessing and addressing hazard exposures and targeting occupational health and safety resources in the workplace in a way that includes workers with disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation Workers with disabilities experience greater hazard exposure than those without a disability. Those with moderate and severe disabilities reported occupational health and safety vulnerability, suggesting that workplace accommodations should be available to a broader range of disability levels. It appears that, above and beyond standard safety procedures, providing workplace accommodations for people with disabilities may further reduce their hazard exposure and improve their safety.

  12. Parental concern about vaccine safety in Canadian children partially immunized at age 2: a multivariable model including system level factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Shannon E; Schopflocher, Donald P; Vaudry, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Children who begin but do not fully complete the recommended series of childhood vaccines by 2 y of age are a much larger group than those who receive no vaccines. While parents who refuse all vaccines typically express concern about vaccine safety, it is critical to determine what influences parents of 'partially' immunized children. This case-control study examined whether parental concern about vaccine safety was responsible for partial immunization, and whether other personal or system-level factors played an important role. A random sample of parents of partially and completely immunized 2 y old children were selected from a Canadian regional immunization registry and completed a postal survey assessing various personal and system-level factors. Unadjusted odds ratios (OR) and adjusted ORs (aOR) were calculated with logistic regression. While vaccine safety concern was associated with partial immunization (OR 7.338, 95% CI 4.138-13.012), other variables were more strongly associated and reduced the strength of the relationship between concern and partial immunization in multivariable analysis (aOR 2.829, 95% CI 1.151-6.957). Other important factors included perceived disease susceptibility and severity (aOR 4.629, 95% CI 2.017-10.625), residential mobility (aOR 3.908, 95% CI 2.075-7.358), daycare use (aOR 0.310, 95% CI 0.144-0.671), number of needles administered at each visit (aOR 7.734, 95% CI 2.598-23.025) and access to a regular physician (aOR 0.219, 95% CI 0.057-0.846). While concern about vaccine safety may be addressed through educational strategies, this study suggests that additional program and policy-level strategies may positively impact immunization uptake.

  13. Safety aspects of the design of a PWR gaseous radwaste treatment system using hydrogen recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glibert, R.; Nuyt, G.; Herin, S.; Fossion, P.

    1978-01-01

    PWR Gaseous radwaste treatment system is essential for the reduction of impact on environment of the nuclear power plants. Decay tank system has been used for the retention of the radioactive gaseous fission products generated in the primary coolant. The use of a system combining decay tanks and hydrogen recombiner units is described in this paper. Accent is put on the safety aspects of this gaseous radwaste treatment facilitystudied by BN for a Belgian Power Plant. (author)

  14. THE CONCEPT OF “SAFETY NET” AND ITS APPLICATION IN AMERICAN AND CANADIAN AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Soliwoda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This aim of the article was  to provide a multi-faceted presentation of the possibilities of aplication the concept of "safety net" in agriculture in the United States and Canada. Literature review, elements of heuristic methods, and the documentaty method- in comparative terms - were used.  . The theoretical basis of the concept of safety nets in agriculture refer to the achievements earned by many schools and streams  in economics and finance. An in-depth analysis is based on an "eclectic" and interdisciplinary approach. In practice, the "architecture" of safety nets in agriculture in the U.S.  and Canada is quite complex and is based on relationships between the individual components. The role of risk management systems for agriculture will be strengthened.

  15. Validation of computer codes used in the safety analysis of Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, W.E.; Lee, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    AECL has embarked on a validation program for the suite of computer codes that it uses in performing the safety analyses for its research reactors. Current focus is on codes used for the analysis of the two MAPLE reactors under construction at Chalk River but the program will be extended to include additional codes that will be used for the Irradiation Research Facility. The program structure is similar to that used for the validation of codes used in the safety analyses for CANDU power reactors. (author)

  16. Hydrogen related safety issues in the context of containments of Indian PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markendeya, S.G.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Assessment of risk due to hydrogen released during postulated hypothetical accident scenarios in the nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been an important area of R and D studies world over. The issues, such as appropriate methodologies for estimation of hydrogen source term and for hydrogen dispersion calculations, technology development for hydrogen mitigation in containment of NPPs and assessment of damage due to deflagration/detonation of hydrogen (if it occurs) are being addressed as a part of some of the multidisciplinary study programs currently underway in BARC. While a significant overall progress has been achieved in general as a result of these programs, requirements of further fine-tuning of these studies have also emerged. The present paper takes a brief look at the current state-of the-art technology available to address these issues. The progress of R and D studies underway at BARC has also been critically reviewed in the paper to bring out necessary planning of further studies so as to enhance the safety of Indian NPPs

  17. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  18. Hydrogen safety risk assessment methodology applied to a fluidized bed membrane reactor for autothermal reforming of natural gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psara, N.; Van Sint Annaland, M.; Gallucci, F.

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the development and implementation of a safety risk assessment methodology to highlight hazards potentially prevailing during autothermal reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production in a membrane reactor, as well as to reveal potential accidents related to hydrogen

  19. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology consensus guidelines on safety and quality indicators in endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David; Barkun, Alan; Bridges, Ron; Carter, Rose; de Gara, Chris; Dube, Catherine; Enns, Robert; Hollingworth, Roger; Macintosh, Donald; Borgaonkar, Mark; Forget, Sylviane; Leontiadis, Grigorios; Meddings, Jonathan; Cotton, Peter; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2012-01-01

    Increasing use of gastrointestinal endoscopy, particularly for colorectal cancer screening, and increasing emphasis on health care quality, highlight the need for clearly defined, evidence-based processes to support quality improvement in endoscopy. To identify processes and indicators of quality and safety relevant to high-quality endoscopy service delivery. A multidisciplinary group of 35 voting participants developed recommendation statements and performance indicators. Systematic literature searches generated 50 initial statements that were revised iteratively following a modified Delphi approach using a web-based evaluation and voting tool. Statement development and evidence evaluation followed the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines, REsearch and Evaluation) and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) guidelines. At the consensus conference, participants voted anonymously on all statements using a 6-point scale. Subsequent web-based voting evaluated recommendations for specific, individual quality indicators, safety indicators and mandatory endoscopy reporting fields. Consensus was defined a priori as agreement by 80% of participants. Consensus was reached on 23 recommendation statements addressing the following: ethics (statement 1: agreement 100%), facility standards and policies (statements 2 to 9: 90% to 100%), quality assurance (statements 10 to 13: 94% to 100%), training, education, competency and privileges (statements 14 to 19: 97% to 100%), endoscopy reporting standards (statements 20 and 21: 97% to 100%) and patient perceptions (statements 22 and 23: 100%). Additionally, 18 quality indicators (agreement 83% to 100%), 20 safety indicators (agreement 77% to 100%) and 23 recommended endoscopy-reporting elements (agreement 91% to 100%) were identified. The consensus process identified a clear need for high-quality clinical and outcomes research to support quality improvement in the delivery of endoscopy services. The

  20. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission 2003-2004 estimates. Part III - report on plans and priorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Commission replace the Atomic Energy Control Board in 2000 as Canada's independent agency which regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security, and the environment. This report is an individual expenditure plan that provides details on a business line basis and contains information on objectives, initiatives, and planned results, including links to related resource requirements over a three-year period. It also provides details on human resource requirements, major capital projects, grants and contributions, and net program costs. Introductory sections with a minister's message are followed by sections giving a departmental or organization overview; plans, results, activities, resources, and initiatives, as applicable; and financial information

  1. Safety critical software design approach developed for Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiyen, M.M.; Joannou, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recently two methodologies were developed that comply with a high safety critical standard: the Rational Design Process, which can be characterized as a methodology based on state machines where the required behaviour of the software is defined using mathematical functions written in a notation which has a well defined syntax and semantics, and the Integrated Approach, which uses a graphical functional notation to specify the functional software requirements. The first implementations based on the two methodologies are discussed. Results from all phases of testing show a remarkably low number of errors, demonstrating that the new methodologies have indeed led to a higher demonstrable level of software reliability. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Consensus Guidelines on Safety and Quality Indicators in Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several organizations worldwide have developed procedure-based guidelines and/or position statements regarding various aspects of quality and safety indicators, and credentialing for endoscopy. Although important, they do not specifically address patient needs or provide a framework for their adoption in the context of endoscopy services. The consensus guidelines reported in this article, however, aimed to identify processes and indicators relevant to the provision of high-quality endoscopy services that will support ongoing quality improvement across many jurisdictions, specifically in the areas of ethics, facility standards and policies, quality assurance, training and education, reporting standards and patient perceptions.

  3. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management – V: Validation for slow deflagrations in homogeneous hydrogen-air experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Holler, Tadej, E-mail: tadej.holler@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kljenak, Ivo [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komen, Ed [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Validation of the modeling approach for hydrogen deflagration is presented. • Modeling approach is based on two combustion models implemented in ANSYS Fluent. • Experiments with various initial hydrogen concentrations were used for validation. • The effects of heat transfer mechanisms selection were also investigated. • The grid sensitivity analysis was performed as well. - Abstract: The control of hydrogen in the containment is an important safety issue following rapid oxidation of the uncovered reactor core during a severe accident in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), because dynamic pressure loads from eventual hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. In the set of our previous papers, a CFD-based method to assess the consequence of fast combustion of uniform hydrogen-air mixtures was presented, followed by its validation for hydrogen-air mixtures with diluents and for non-uniform hydrogen-air mixtures. In the present paper, the extension of this model for the slow deflagration regime is presented and validated using the hydrogen deflagration experiments performed in the medium-scale experimental facility THAI. The proposed method is implemented in the CFD software ANSYS Fluent using user defined functions. The paper describes the combustion model and the main results of code validation. It addresses questions regarding turbulence model selection, effect of heat transfer mechanisms, and grid sensitivity, as well as provides insights into the importance of combustion model choice for the slow deflagration regime of hydrogen combustion in medium-scale and large-scale experimental vessels mimicking the NPP containment.

  4. Identifying performance gaps in hydrogen safety sensor technology for automotive and stationary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boon-Brett, L.; Bousek, J.; Black, G.; Moretto, P.; Castello, P.; Huebert, T.; Banach, U.

    2010-01-01

    A market survey has been performed of commercially available hydrogen safety sensors, resulting in a total sample size of 53 sensors from 21 manufacturers. The technical specifications, as provided by the manufacturer, have been collated and are displayed herein as a function of sensor working principle. These specifications comprise measuring range, response and recovery times, ambient temperature, pressure and relative humidity, power consumption and lifetime. These are then compared against known performance targets for both automotive and stationary applications in order to establish in how far current technology satisfies current requirements of sensor end users. Gaps in the performance of hydrogen sensing technologies are thus identified and areas recommended for future research and development. (author)

  5. Bavarian liquid hydrogen bus demonstration project - safety, licensing and acceptability aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurster, R.; Knorr, H.; Pruemm, W.

    1999-07-01

    A regular 12 m city bus of the MAN SL 202 type with an internal combustion engine adapted to hydrogen operation and auxiliary gasoline operation was demonstrated in the Bavarian cities of Erlangen and Munich between April 1996 and August 1998. Three bus operators, Erlanger Stadtwerke, Stadtwerke Muenchen and Autobus Oberbayern were testing the bus in three different operating schemes. In order to be able to perform this worldwide first public demonstration of a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) city bus in regular service, several requirements with respect to safety, licensing, training and acceptability had to be fulfilled. These activities were focusing mainly on the hydrogen specific issues such as (a) integration of onboard LH{sub 2} storage vessels, piping and instrumentation, (b) implementation of storage and refueling infrastructure in the operators' yards, (c) adaptation of the maintenance garages, (d) training of operating and maintenance personnel. During phase II of the demonstration activity a poll was performed on passengers traveling onboard the hydrogen-powered city bus in order to determined the level of acceptance among the users of the bus. The bus was designed and manufactured by MAN Nutzfahrzeuge Aktiengesellschaft. The cryogenic fuel storage and the refueling equipment were designed and manufactured by Linde AG. The realization of the hardware was financially supported by the European Commission (EC) within the Euro-Quebec Hydro-Hydrogen Pilot Project. The demonstration phase was financially supported by EC and the Bavarian State Government. Ludwig-Boelkow-Systemtechnik performed project monitoring for both funding organizations. The presentation will summarize the most important results of this demonstration phase and will address the measures undertaken in order to get the bus, the refueling infrastructure and the maintenance and operating procedures approved by the relevant authorities.

  6. Safety study of the coupling of a VHTR with a hydrogen production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, F.; Germain, T.; Bentivoglio, F.; Bonnet, F.; Moyart, Q.; Aujollet, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The paper deals with safety issues of the coupling of a VHTR with a H 2 production plant. → Internal incidents/accidents in the coupling system have been studied with the CATHARE2 code. → Transient studies have indicated a substantial grace delay when the VHTR faces the H 2 plant disturbances. → Hydrogen release and combustion leads to safety distances of about 100 m. → No showstopper has been put in evidence regarding the feasibility of the VHTR/H 2 plant coupling. - Abstract: The present paper deals with specific safety issues resulting from the coupling of a nuclear reactor (very high temperature reactor, VHTR) with a hydrogen production plant (HYPP). The first part is devoted to the safety approach consisting in taking into account the safety standards and rules dedicated to the nuclear facility as well as those dedicated to the process industry. This approach enabled two main families of events to be distinguished: the so-called internal events taking place in the coupling circuit (transients, breaks in pipes and in heat exchangers) and the external events able to threat the integrity of the various equipments (in particular the VHTR containment and emergency cooling system) that could result from accidents in the HYPP. By considering a hydrogen production by means of the iodine/sulfur (IS) process, the consequences of the both families of events aforementioned have been assessed in order to provide an order of magnitude of the effects of the incidents and accidents and also in order to propose safety provisions to mitigate these effects when it is necessary. The study of transients induced by a failure of a part of the HYPP has shown the possibility to keep the part of the HYPP unaffected by the transient under operation by means of an adapted regulation set. Moreover, the time to react in case of transfer of corrosive products in the VHTR containment has been assessed as well as the thermohydraulic loading that would experience the

  7. Commonly Used Preparations for Colonoscopy: Efficacy, Tolerability and Safety – A Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Barkun

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The increased demand for colonoscopy, coupled with the introduction of new bowel cleansing preparations and recent caution advisories in Canada, has prompted a review of bowel preparations by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology.

  8. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  9. Ensuring safety of fuel cell applications and hydrogen refuelling. Legislation and standards; Polttokennosovellusten ja vetytankkauksen turvallisuuden varmistaminen. Saeaedoeksiae ja standardeja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissila, M.; Sarsama, J.

    2013-09-15

    Fuel cell technology is considered a promising alternative in terms of viable energy systems. The advantages of fuel cell systems include a good efficiency rate and the lack of harmful environmental emissions. Factors which may slow down the commercialisation of fuel cell technology, e.g. fuel cell vehicles, include the high price of hydrogen and the insufficiency of the infrastructure required for the distribution of hydrogen. A large proportion of major car manufacturers are committed to introducing fuel cell cars to the market by 2014-2016. In order to ensure a successful market introduction of fuel cell vehicles, this has to be aligned with the development of the necessary hydrogen infrastructure. In the early commercialisation stages of a new technology, it is important to give the public correct, justified and understandable information on the safety of the fuel cell applications, and also on the measures taken to ensure the safety of applications. A lack of necessary information, inaccurate perceptions and prejudices can have an adverse effect on the public acceptance of fuel cell applications. Hazards and potential accidents related to fuel cell systems are mainly associated with the flammable substances (e.g. hydrogen, methane) used as fuel, the high pressure of hydrogen, electrical hazards, and dangers concerning technical systems in general. The fuel cell applications reviewed in this publication are transport applications and stationary applications and the refuelling system of gaseous hydrogen. The publication concentrates on fuel cells using hydrogen as fuel. The publication gives an overview of how EU-legislation (mainly various directives) and Finnish legislation applies to fuel cell systems and applications, and what kind of safety requirements the legislation sets. In addition, a brief overview of safety standards concerning fuel cell systems and hydrogen refuelling is presented. (orig.)

  10. On physics of the hydrogen plasticization and embrittlement of metallic materials, relevance to the safety and standards' problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yury S Nechaev; Georgy A Filippov; T Nejat Veziroglu

    2006-01-01

    In the present contribution, some related fundamental problems of revealing micro mechanisms of hydrogen plasticization, superplasticity, embrittlement, cracking, blistering and delayed fracture of some technologically important industrial metallic materials are formulated. The ways are considered of these problems' solution and optimizing the technological processes and materials, particularly in the hydrogen and gas-petroleum industries, some aircraft, aerospace and automobile systems. The results are related to the safety and standardization problems of metallic materials, and to the problem of their compatibility with hydrogen. (authors)

  11. Probabilistic analysis of safety of a production plant of hydrogen using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores F, A.; Nelson E, P.F.; Francois L, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The present work makes use of the Probabilistic Safety analysis to evaluate and to quantify the safety in a plant producer of hydrogen coupled to a nuclear reactor of high temperature, the one which is building in Japan. It is had the description of systems and devices of the HTTR, the pipe diagrams and instrumentation of the plant, as well as the rates of generic faults for the components of the plant. The first step was to carry out a HAZOP study (Hazard and Operability Study) with the purpose of obtaining the initiator events; once obtained these, it was developed a tree of events by each initiator event and for each system it was developed a fault tree; the data used for the quantification of the failure probability of the systems were obtained starting from several generic sources of information. In each tree of events different final states were obtained and it stops each one, their occurrence frequency. The construction and evaluation of the tree of events and of failures one carries out with the SAPHIRE program. The results show the safety of the shutdown system of the HTTR and they allow to suggest modifications to the auxiliary system of refrigeration and to the heat exchanger helium/water pressurized. (Author)

  12. The House of Commons of Canada, Bill C-23 : An act to establish the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and to make consequential amendments to other acts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This enactment replaces the Atomic Energy Control Act with a modern statute to provide for more explicit and effective regulation of nuclear energy. While the existing Act encompasses both the regulatory and developmental aspects of nuclear activities, this enactment disconnects the two functions and provides a distinct identity to the regulatory agency. It replaces the Atomic Energy Control Board with the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, underlining its separate role from that of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., the federal research, development and marketing organization for nuclear energy

  13. Development, use, and validation of the CFD tool FLACS for hydrogen safety studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middha, Prankul

    2010-07-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations for gas explosion safety have been widely used for doing risk assessments within the oil and gas industry for more than a decade. Based on predicted consequences of a range of potential accident scenarios a risk level is predicted. The development of applications using hydrogen as a clean energy carrier has accelerated in recent years, and hydrogen may be used widely in future. Due to the very high reactivity of hydrogen, safe handling is critical. To be able to perform proper consequence modeling as a part of a risk assessment, it is essential to be able to model the physical processes well. CFD tools have the potential to model the relevant physics and predict well, but without proper user guidelines based on extensive validation work, very mixed prediction capability can be expected. This paper deals with the development and validation of the CFD tool FLACS for hydrogen safety applications. Significant validation work against several experiments has been carried out in order to increase the confidence of predictions of scenarios relevant to hydrogen safety. The validation studies have included dispersion, explosion and combined dispersion and explosion studies. A range of different dispersion experiments is simulated, including low momentum releases in a garage, sub-sonic jets in a garage with stratification effects and subsequent slow diffusion, low momentum and subsonic horizontal jets influenced by buoyancy, and free jets from high-pressure vessels. LH2 releases are also considered. Some of the simulations are performed as blind predictions. FLACS uses a utility program in order to model releases from high-pressure reservoirs. Work has been carried out in order to extend the models in the utility program in order to include real gas effects. Validation against explosion experiments in geometries ranging from smooth and obstructed pipes, refueling station, tunnel, vented vessels, jet-ignited lane, etc. have been

  14. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  15. The laboratory and clinical safety evaluation of a dentifrice containing hydrogen peroxide and baking soda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischman, S L; Truelove, R B; Hart, R; Cancro, L P

    1992-01-01

    This study reports the laboratory, clinical, and microbiological finding of the safety testing and daily use of a dentifrice delivering 0.75% hydrogen peroxide and 5% baking soda. Laboratory studies using Ca45 labeled teeth and biologically stained teeth confirmed that the dentifrice did not decalcify enamel or bleach teeth. Over the course of a six-month period, 62 subjects using a hydrogen peroxide-baking soda dentifrice and 21 subjects using a control dentifrice were examined for oral soft tissue change and hard tissue alterations. No soft tissue changes attributable to the use of either dentifrice were noted. Experienced clinicians using Trubyte shade guide teeth observed no significant changes to the subjects' anterior teeth following 6 months use of the test dentifrice. Paired discrimination tests revealed that the examiners could distinguish color differences in the shade guide teeth at 0.7%. Microbiological monitoring of the subjects for six months use of their assigned dentifrice and for the following months on the control dentifrice, revealed neither an increased incidence of candida nor increased candida counts.

  16. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  17. Joint submission of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    The manufacturing company members of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the Organization of CANDU Industries are proud to have played their part in the development of the peaceful application of nuclear technology in Ontario, and the achievement of the very real benefits discussed in this paper, which greatly outweigh the hypothetical risks

  18. Documentation of pediatric drug safety in manufacturers' product monographs: a cross-sectional evaluation of the canadian compendium of pharmaceuticals and specialities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Navjeet K; Dupuis, Lee L; Parshuram, Christopher S

    2008-01-01

    To describe the provision of pediatric drug safety information in a national formulary of manufacturers' drug product monographs. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of comprehensive product monographs contained in the 2005 Canadian Compendium of Pharmaceuticals and Specialities (CPS). We abstracted data describing indications for prescription, statements about pediatric safety, available preparations, and provision of dosing guidelines. For each monograph we classified pediatric safety data as either present, present but limited or absent. We then described the pediatric safety data in CPS monographs for drugs listed in the published formulary of the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. A total of 2232 product monographs were screened; 684 were excluded and 1548 (66%) were further analyzed. 1462 (94%) had indications that did not exclude children. Pediatric safety information was present in 592 (38%), present but limited in 148 (10%), and absent in 808 (52%) drug monographs. Safety statements were absent in 224 (14%) drug monographs that provided both dosing guidelines and formulations suitable for administration to children, and in 214 (52%) of 411 drugs in the pediatric hospital formulary. We evaluated a widely available national source of pediatric prescribing information. Safety data for children was not mentioned in more than half of the product monographs. Moreover, the provision of safety data was discordant with indications for prescription, the availability of pediatric formulations, and dosing guidelines within the monographs, and with inclusion in a pediatric hospital formulary. Our study suggests that the presentation of pediatric safety data in drug product monographs can be improved to better inform prescribing and to optimize pharmacotherapy in children.

  19. Methodology for assessing the safety of Hydrogen Systems: HyRAM 1.1 technical reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, Katrina; Hecht, Ethan; Reynolds, John Thomas; Blaylock, Myra L.; Erin E. Carrier

    2017-03-01

    The HyRAM software toolkit provides a basis for conducting quantitative risk assessment and consequence modeling for hydrogen infrastructure and transportation systems. HyRAM is designed to facilitate the use of state-of-the-art science and engineering models to conduct robust, repeatable assessments of hydrogen safety, hazards, and risk. HyRAM is envisioned as a unifying platform combining validated, analytical models of hydrogen behavior, a stan- dardized, transparent QRA approach, and engineering models and generic data for hydrogen installations. HyRAM is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the U. S. De- partment of Energy to increase access to technical data about hydrogen safety and to enable the use of that data to support development and revision of national and international codes and standards. This document provides a description of the methodology and models contained in the HyRAM version 1.1. HyRAM 1.1 includes generic probabilities for hydrogen equipment fail- ures, probabilistic models for the impact of heat flux on humans and structures, and computa- tionally and experimentally validated analytical and first order models of hydrogen release and flame physics. HyRAM 1.1 integrates deterministic and probabilistic models for quantifying accident scenarios, predicting physical effects, and characterizing hydrogen hazards (thermal effects from jet fires, overpressure effects from deflagrations), and assessing impact on people and structures. HyRAM is a prototype software in active development and thus the models and data may change. This report will be updated at appropriate developmental intervals.

  20. The role of CFD combustion modelling in hydrogen safety management – VI: Validation for slow deflagration in homogeneous hydrogen-air-steam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutrono Rakhimov, A., E-mail: cutrono@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Visser, D.C., E-mail: visser@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Holler, T., E-mail: tadej.holler@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Komen, E.M.J., E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Deflagration of hydrogen-air-steam homogeneous mixtures is modeled in a medium-scale containment. • Adaptive mesh refinement is applied on flame front positions. • Steam effect influence on combustion modeling capabilities is investigated. • Mean pressure rise is predicted with 18% under-prediction when steam is involved. • Peak pressure is evaluated with 5% accuracy when steam is involved. - Abstract: Large quantities of hydrogen can be generated during a severe accident in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. When released in the containment, the hydrogen can create a potential deflagration risk. The dynamic pressure loads resulting from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor. Therefore, accurate prediction of these pressure loads is an important safety issue. In previous papers, we validated a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based method to determine the pressure loads from a fast deflagration. The combustion model applied in the CFD method is based on the Turbulent Flame Speed Closure (TFC). In our last paper, we presented the extension of this combustion model, Extended Turbulent Flame Speed Closure (ETFC), and its validation against hydrogen deflagration experiments in the slow deflagration regime. During a severe accident, cooling water will enter the containment as steam. Therefore, the effect of steam on hydrogen deflagration is important to capture in a CFD model. The primary objectives of the present paper are to further validate the TFC and ETFC combustion models, and investigate their capability to predict the effect of steam. The peak pressures, the trends of the flame velocity, and the pressure rise with an increase in the initial steam dilution are captured reasonably well by both combustion models. In addition, the ETFC model appeared to be more robust to mesh resolution changes. The mean pressure rise is evaluated with 18% under-prediction and the peak pressure is evaluated with 5

  1. Improving Safety, Economic, Substantiality, and Security of Nuclear Energy with Canadian Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Holly; Pencer, Jeremy; Yetisir, Metin; Leung, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor is one of the six design concepts being developed under the Generation IV International Forum. It is the only concept evolving from the water-cooled reactors and taking advantages of the balance-of-plant design and operation experience of the fossil-power plants. Canada is developing the SCR concept from the well-established pressure-tube reactor technology. The Canadian SCWR maintains modular design approach using relative small fuel channels with the separation of coolant and moderator. It is equipped with an advanced fuel channel design that is capable to transfer decay heat from the fuel to the moderator under the long-term cooling stage. Coupled with the advanced passive-moderator cooling system, cooling of fuel and fuel channel is continuous even without external power or operator intervention. The Canadian SCWR is operating at a pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 625 deg. C. This has led to a drastic increase in thermal efficiency to 48% from 34% of the current fleet of reactors (a 40% rise in relative efficiency). With the high core outlet temperature, a direct thermal cycle has been adopted and has led to simplification in plant design attributing to the cost reduction compared to the current reactor designs. The Canadian SCWR adopts the advanced Thorium fuel cycle to enhance the substantiality, economic, and security. than uranium in the world (estimated to be three times more). This provides the long-term fuel supply. Thorium's price is stable compared to uranium and is consistently lower than uranium. This would maintain the predictability and economic of fuel supply. Thorium itself is a non-fissile material and once irradiated requires special handling. This improves proliferative resistance. The objective of this paper is to highlight these improvements in generating nuclear energy with the Canadian SCWR

  2. Canadian programme overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    In a severe accident, hydrogen is released into containment. When it is well mixed, the hydrogen mixture is nonflammable because there is sufficient dilution by the large containment volume. This is the desired end point. However, the release may occur into smaller compartments of containment, stratification may occur, and local pockets of flammable mixtures may arise if hydrogen is released faster than processes that mix and disperse it. Long term hydrogen generation from water radiolysis must also be considered. Hydrogen mitigation and control strategies adopted or considered in Canada include fanforced mixing, glow plug igniters, recombiners, venting through filters, or combinations of these. The Canadian hydrogen programme is focussed on understanding hydrogen combustion behaviour and providing the data needed to demonstrate the adequacy of hydrogen mitigation and control strategies. The programme includes both experimental and modelling components of hydrogen combustion and distribution. Experiments include mixing tests, deflagration tests, diffusion flames, transition from deflagration to detonation, and testing the performance of igniters and recombiners. Modelling is focussing on the GOTHIC code as an industry standard. Detailed three dimensional modelling of gas mixing and combustion are underway, and a code validation matrix is being assembled for validation exercises. Significant progress has been made, highlights from which are being presented at this workshop. (author)

  3. Proposal of safety design methodologies for an HTGR-hydrogen production system. Mainly on countermeasures against fire and explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, Tetsuo; Hada, Kazuhiko; Shiozawa, Syusaku

    1996-03-01

    Among key issues of the safety design for an HTGR-hydrogen production system is to ensure the safety of the nuclear reactor against fire and explosion accidents in the hydrogen production plant. The fire and explosion accidents in the hydrogen production plant are categorized into the following two cases; Accidents inside the reactor building (R/B) and accidents outside the R/B. Against accidents inside the R/B, the proposed safety design concept is to prevent the occurrence of the accidents based on the defence in depth concept. The piping system and/or heat transfer tubes which have the potential possibility of combustible materials ingress into the R/B due to the failure are designed at the highest aseismic level to prevent the failure against severe earthquake. Even if the failure occurs, the piping trench and related compartments are fulfilled with nitrogen so as to prevent the occurrence of accidents. The proposed safety design concept for the accidents outside the R/B is the mitigation of effects of accidents. Proposed countermeasures is to take the safe distance between the hydrogen production plant and the items important to safety in the nuclear plant. We showed that the anticipated accidents to estimate the safe distance are large scale pool burning, fireball, pressure vessel burst and vapor cloud explosion. Especially, new estimating concept to establish the safe distance is proposed for the vapor cloud explosion. To reduce the safe distance, we proposed the underground non-pressurized storage tank and ventilation system for the storage of large amount of combustible liquid. (author). 61 refs

  4. Opinion on the management of hydrogen safety in the Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux CNPE in normal and accidental situations. Study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubech, Jerome; Leprette, Emmanuel; Proust, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    This report addresses the issue of hydrogen safety management in an electricity production nuclear plant (CNPE) either during normal operation or during an accidental situation in which risks of explosion are present. The study comprised a description of concerned installations, the identification of reasons for hydrogen leakage, an analysis of return on experience, the study of consequences of a hydrogen leakage or explosion for nuclear safety, the description of the general approach to hydrogen risk management, and the statement of an opinion on this approach and on the efficiency of existing mitigation measures

  5. Ethical and legal implications of the risks of medical tourism for patients: a qualitative study of Canadian health and safety representatives’ perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Turner, Leigh; Cohen, I Glenn; Bristeir, Janet; Snyder, Jeremy; Casey, Victoria; Whitmore, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Medical tourism involves patients’ intentional travel to privately obtain medical care in another country. Empirical evidence regarding health and safety risks facing medical tourists is limited. Consideration of this issue is dominated by speculation and lacks meaningful input from people with specific expertise in patient health and safety. We consulted with patient health and safety experts in the Canadian province of British Columbia to explore their views concerning risks that medical tourists may be exposed to. Herein, we report on the findings, linking them to existing ethical and legal issues associated with medical tourism. Design We held a focus group in September 2011 in Vancouver, British Columbia with professionals representing different domains of patient health and safety expertise. The focus group was transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Participants Seven professionals representing the domains of tissue banking, blood safety, health records, organ transplantation, dental care, clinical ethics and infection control participated. Results Five dominant health and safety risks for outbound medical tourists were identified by participants: (1) complications; (2) specific concerns regarding organ transplantation; (3) transmission of antibiotic-resistant organisms; (4) (dis)continuity of medical documentation and (5) (un)informed decision-making. Conclusions Concern was expressed that medical tourism might have unintended and undesired effects upon patients’ home healthcare systems. The individual choices of medical tourists could have significant public consequences if healthcare facilities in their home countries must expend resources treating postoperative complications. Participants also expressed concern that medical tourists returning home with infections, particularly antibiotic-resistant infections, could place others at risk of exposure to infections that are refractory to standard treatment regimens and thereby pose

  6. Safety Evaluation Report: Development of Improved Composite Pressure Vessels for Hydrogen Storage, Lincoln Composites, Lincoln, NE, May 25, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, III, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kallman, Richard A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Maes, Miguel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Skolnik, Edward G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weiner, Steven C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-12-22

    Lincoln Composites operates a facility for designing, testing, and manufacturing composite pressure vessels. Lincoln Composites also has a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to develop composite tanks for high-pressure hydrogen storage. The initial stage of this project involves testing the permeation of high-pressure hydrogen through polymer liners. The company recently moved and is constructing a dedicated research/testing laboratory at their new location. In the meantime, permeation tests are being performed in a corner of a large manufacturing facility. The safety review team visited the Lincoln Composites site on May 25, 2010. The project team presented an overview of the company and project and took the safety review team on a tour of the facility. The safety review team saw the entire process of winding a carbon fiber/resin tank on a liner, installing the boss and valves, and curing and painting the tank. The review team also saw the new laboratory that is being built for the DOE project and the temporary arrangement for the hydrogen permeation tests.

  7. Enhanced safety margins during wet transport of irradiated fuel by catalytic recombination of radiolysis hydrogen and oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.T.; Bankhead, M.; Hodge, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL has developed and tested a new method for use in wet transport of irradiated fuel. The method uses a catalyst to recombine the hydrogen and oxygen produced from radiolysis. The catalyst is installed in the nitrogen ullage gas region. It has twin benefits as it eliminates a gas mixture that could, in principle, exceed the safe target levels set to ensure safety during Transport, and it also reduces overall gas pressure. Pure water radiolysis predictions, from experiment and theory, indicate very low levels of hydrogen and oxygen generation. BNFL's historic experience is that in some transport packages it is possible to produce higher levels of hydrogen and oxygen. This drives the need to improve on our existing ullage gas remediation technology. Our studies of the radiolysis science and our flask data suggest it is the interaction of the liquors and material surfaces that is giving rise to the enhanced levels of hydrogen and/or oxygen. This technical paper demonstrates the performance of the recombiner catalyst under normal and extreme conditions of transport. The paper will present experimental data that shows the recombiner catalyst working to manage the hydrogen and oxygen levels

  8. Effects of hydrogen burning and associated engineered safety features on containment building response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, S.S.; Deem, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    It is established that large amounts of hydrogen can be generated during degraded core events. The burning of this hydrogen can produce resulting loads which may represent a serious challenge to containment integrity. This paper presents some perspectives on hydrogen behavior during various degraded core events for a large dry containment. The analysis addresses the hydrogen transport and its subsequent diffusion once released to the containment. Since the distribution of hydrogen in the containment depends on the rate of release and various driving forces, the effects from various subsystems (i.e. fan coolers, sprays, heat structures, etc.) are examined to determine the sensitivity of each effect on the overall containment response. The sensitivity of results due to subcompartmentalization of the containment is also examined. Effects from localized hydrogen pocketing and burning will be addressed with emphasis on its relative impact on containment integrity

  9. Hydrogen Safety Analysis of the OPR1000 Nuclear Power Plant during a Severe Accident by a Small-Break Loss of Coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae; Park, Soo Yong; Ha, Kwang Soon; Hong, Seong Wan; Kim, Sang Baik

    2009-01-01

    A huge amount of hydrogen can be generated in a nuclear reactor and released into the reactor containment if a hypothetical severe accident happens. Even for the accident, the hydrogen concentrations must be safely controlled. In order to prove a nuclear power plant (NPP) safe from hydrogen, a simulation of hydrogen distributions in the containment are usually conducted by using a 1-dimensional thermo-hydraulic system code. If there exists a possibility of a hydrogen explosion in the containment, it is required to install a hydrogen mitigation system such as igniters or hydrogen recombiner. For a licensing of NPP construction and operation, the hydrogen combustion and hydrogen mitigation system in the containment is one of the important safety issues. In Korea, two OPR1000 NPPs by the name of Shin-Wolsung 1 and 2 are under construction. The hydrogen safety and its control for the new NPPs will be evaluated in detail until a licensing of the operation. Until now, simulations of the hydrogen behaviors in the OPR1000 have been conducted by a lumped method for each compartment in the containment using CONTAIN or MAAP. This 1-dimensional method is very efficient for a long-term simulation of an accident because of its fast running time, and it is very effective for establishing the averaged hydrogen concentrations in each compartment. But a 3-dimensional flow structure developed by a discharged mass from a reactor vessel and local concentrations of hydrogen are difficult to be resolved by the lumped method. In this study, hydrogen distributions and characteristics of hydrogen mixture cloud such as a possibility of flame acceleration in each compartment of OPR1000 containment were evaluated by using GASFLOW code

  10. Main outcomes from the EURATOM-ROSATOM ERCOSAM SAMARA parallel projects for hydrogen safety of LWR - 15357

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, D.; Kiselev, A.

    2015-01-01

    ERCOSAM and SAMARA are the acronyms for 2 parallel projects co-financed respectively by EURATOM and ROSATOM during the 2010-2014 period with the general aim to advance the knowledge on the phenomenology associated to the hydrogen and steam spreading and stratification in the LWR containment during a severe accident. The important peculiarity of the project was its experimental and analytical investigation of the impact of safety systems such as spray, coolers and PAR (Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners) on the distribution of gas species (hydrogen, steam and air). The main outcomes of the ERCOSAM-SAMARA projects are presented in this paper. The research needs, which could be considered in follow-up activities, are also identified. (authors)

  11. Work life and patient safety culture in Canadian healthcare: connecting the quality dots using national accreditation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan I

    2012-01-01

    Fostering quality work life is paramount to building a strong patient safety culture in healthcare organizations. Data from two patient safety culture and work-life questionnaires used for Accreditation Canada's national program were analyzed. Strong team leadership was reported in that units were doing a good job of identifying, assessing and managing risks to patients. Seventy-one percent of respondents gave their unit a positive overall grade on patient safety, and 79% of respondents felt that they could often do their best-quality work in their job. However, healthcare workers felt that they did not have enough time to do their jobs adequately and indicated that co-workers were cutting corners in patient care in order to save time. This article discusses engaging both senior leadership and the entire organization in the change process, ensuring supervisory support, and using performance measures to focus organizational efforts on key priorities all as improvement strategies relevant to these findings. These strategies can be used by organizations across sectors and jurisdictions and by healthcare leaders to positively affect work life and patient safety.

  12. Self-reported patient safety competence among Canadian medical students and postgraduate trainees: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Patricia; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Edge, Dana S; Ginsburg, Liane; Goldstein, David H

    2015-02-01

    Quality and patient safety (PS) are critical components of medical education. This study reports on the self-reported PS competence of medical students and postgraduate trainees. The Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey was administered to medical students and postgraduate trainees in January 2012. PS dimension scores were compared across learning settings (classroom and clinical) and year in programme. Sixty-three percent (255/406) of medical students and 32% (141/436) of postgraduate trainees responded. In general, both groups were most confident in their learning of clinical safety skills (eg, hand hygiene) and least confident in learning about sociocultural aspects of safety (eg, understanding human factors). Medical students' confidence in most aspects of safety improved with years of training. For some of the more intangible dimensions (teamwork and culture), medical students in their final year had lower scores than students in earlier years. Thirty-eight percent of medical students felt they could approach someone engaging in unsafe practice, and the majority of medical students (85%) and postgraduate trainees (78%) agreed it was difficult to question authority. Our results suggest the need to improve the overall content, structure and integration of PS concepts in both classroom and clinical learning environments. Decreased confidence in sociocultural aspects of PS among medical students in the final year of training may indicate that culture in clinical settings negatively affects students' perceived PS competence. Alternatively, as medical students spend more time in the clinical setting, they may develop a clearer sense of what they do not know. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.; Lockerby, W.E.; Rae, H.K.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of the Canadian R and D programme on heavy water processes. Six Canadian heavy water plants with a total design capacity of 4000Mg/a are in operation or under construction. All use the Girdler-Sulphide (GS) process, which is based on deuterium exchange between water and hydrogen sulphide. Early operating problems have been overcome and the plants have demonstrated annual capacity factors in excess of 70%, with short-term production rates equal to design rates. Areas for further improvement are: to increase production rates by optimizing the control of foaming to give both higher sieve tray efficiency and higher flow rates, to reduce the incapacity due to deposition of pyrite (FeS 2 ) and sulphur (between 5% and 10%), and to improve process control and optimization of operating conditions by the application of mathematical simulations of the detailed deuterium profile throughout each plant. Other processes being studied, which look potentially attractive are the hydrogen-water exchange and the hydrogen-amine exchange. Even if they become successful competitors to the GS process, the latter is likely to remain the dominant production method for the next 10-20 years. This programme, when related to the long-term electricity demand, indicates that heavy water supply and demand are in reasonable balance and that the Candu programme will not be inhibited because of shortages of this commodity. (author)

  14. Canadian attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.E.O.

    1977-01-01

    In the past ten years, public interest in nuclear power and its relationship to the environment has grown. Although most Canadians have accepted nuclear power as a means of generating electricity, there is significant opposition to its use. This opposition has effectively forced the Canadian nuclear industry to modify its behaviour to the public in the face of growing concern over the safety of nuclear power and related matters. The paper reviews Canadian experience concerning public acceptance of nuclear power, with special reference to the public information activities of the Canadian nuclear industry. Experience has shown the need for scientific social data that will permit the nuclear industry to involve the public in a rational examination of its concern about nuclear power. The Canadian Nuclear Association sponsored such studies in 1976 and the findings are discussed. They consisted of a national assessment of public attitudes, two regional studies and a study of Canadian policy-makers' views on nuclear energy. The social data obtained were of a base-line nature describing Canadian perceptions of and attitudes to nuclear power at that time. This research established that Canadian levels of knowledge about nuclear power are very low and that there are marked regional differences. Only 56% of the population have the minimum knowledge required to indicate that they know that nuclear power can be used to generate electricity. Nevertheless, 21% of informed Canadians oppose nuclear power primarily on the grounds that it is not safe. Radiation and waste management are seen to be major disadvantages. In perspective, Canadians are more concerned with inflation than with the energy supply. About half of all Canadians see the question of energy supplies as a future problem (within five years), not a present one. A more important aspect of energy is seen by the majority of Canadians to be some form of energy independence. The use of data from these studies is no easy

  15. Safety conditions of using structural steels under high temperature and pressures in hydrogen containing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asviyan, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    The method for establishing full-strength conditions was suggested on the base of results of creep-rupture test of tube samples under hydrogen pressure and according to permissible stresses in neutral medium. Applicability of the method was considered taking St3 and 12KhM steels as examples. It was shown that the use of suggested dependences and special efficiency factors enables to forecast endurance limit for the given steel grade and assigned partial hydrogen pressure without labour-intensive test conducting

  16. Comparison between Canadian probabilistic safety assessment methods formulated by Atomic Energy of Canada limited and probabilistic risk assessment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, H.S.; Smith, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The procedures used by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to perform probabilistic safety assessments (PRAs) differ somewhat from conventionally accepted probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) procedures used elsewhere. In Canada, PSA is used by AECL as an audit tool for an evolving design. The purpose is to assess the safety of the plant in engineering terms. Thus, the PSA procedures are geared toward providing engineering feedback so that necessary changes can be made to the design at an early stage, input can be made to operating procedures, and test and maintenance programs can be optimized in terms of costs. Most PRAs, by contrast, are performed in plants that are already built. Their main purpose is to establish the core melt frequency and the risk to the public due to core melt. Also, any design modification is very expensive. The differences in purpose and timing between PSA and PRA have resulted in differences in methodology and scope. The PSA procedures are used on all plants being designed by AECL

  17. Review of Design Data for Safety Assessment of Tokai Reprocessing Plant. Control of hydrogen gas produced by radiolysis of reprocessing solutions at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, E.; Surugaya, N.; Takaya, A.; Nakamura, H.; Maki, A.; Yamanouchi, T.

    1999-10-01

    Radioactive materials in aqueous solution at a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant causes radiolytic generation of several gases including hydrogen. Hydrogen accumulating in equipment can be an explosion hazard. In such plants, though the consideration in the design has been fundamentally made in order to remove the ignition source from the equipment, the hydrogen concentration in the equipment should not exceed the explosion threshold. It is, therefore, desired to keep the hydrogen concentration lower than the explosion threshold by dilution with the air introduced into equipment, from the viewpoint which previously prevents the explosion. This report describes the calculation of hydrogen generation, evaluation of hydrogen concentration under abnormal operation and consideration of possible improvement at Tokai Reprocessing Plant. The amount of hydrogen generation was calculated for each equipment from available data on radiolysis induced by radioactive materials. Taking into consideration for abnormal condition that is single failure of air supply and loss of power supply, the investigation was made on the method for controlling so that the hydrogen concentration may not exceed the explosion threshold. Possible means which can control the concentration of hydrogen gas under the explosion threshold have been also investigated. As the result, it was found that hydrogen concentration of most equipment was kept under the explosion threshold. It was also shown that improvement of the facility was necessary on the equipment in which the concentration of the hydrogen may exceed the explosion threshold. Proposals based on the above results are also given in this report. The above content has been described in 'Examination of the hydrogen produced by the radiolysis' which is a part of 'Reviews of Design Data for Safety Assessment of Tokai Reprocessing Plant' (JNC TN8410 99-002) published in February 1999. This report incorporates the detail evaluation so that operation

  18. Knowledge and attitudes toward food safety and use of good production practices among Canadian broiler chicken producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ian; Rajić, Andrijana; Letellier, Ann; Cox, Bill; Leslie, Mira; Sanei, Babak; McEwen, Scott A

    2010-07-01

    Provincial broiler-chicken marketing boards in Canada have recently implemented an on-farm food safety program called Safe, Safer, Safest. The purpose of this study was to measure broiler chicken producers' attitudes toward the program and food safety topics and use of highly recommended good production practices (GPP). Mailed and Web-based questionnaires were administered to all producers registered in British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec in 2008. The response percentage was 33.2% (642 of 1,932). Nearly 70% of respondents rated the program as effective in producing safe chicken, and 49.1% rated the program requirements as easy to implement. Most respondents (92.9%) reported that they do not raise other poultry or keep birds as pets, and 79.8% reported that they clean and disinfect their barns between each flock cycle. Less than 50% of respondents reported that visitors wash their hands or change their clothes before entering barns, 38.4% reported that catching crews wear clean clothes and boots, and 35.8% reported that a crew other than from the hatchery places chicks. Respondents who rated the program requirements as effective or easy to implement were more likely to report the use of five of six highly recommended GPP. Only 21.1% of respondents indicated that Campylobacter can be transmitted from contaminated chicken meat to humans, and 26.6% believed that antimicrobial use in their industry is linked to antimicrobial resistance in humans. Continuing education of producers should focus on improving their awareness of these issues, while mandatory GPP should include those that are known to be effective in controlling Campylobacter and Salmonella in broiler chicken flocks.

  19. Nuclear safety and control act, chapter 9: An Act to establish the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and to make consequential amendements to other Acts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to provide for: the limitation, to a reasonable level and in a manner that is consistent with Canada's international obligations, of the risks to national security, the health and safety of persons and the environment that are associated with the development, production and use of nuclear energy and the production, possession and use of nuclear substances, prescribed equipment and prescribed information; and the implementation in Canada of measures to which Canada has agreed respecting international control of the development, production and use of nuclear energy, including the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and nuclear explosive devices

  20. Fiscal 1975 Sunshine Project research report. Research on safety technology for hydrogen energy systems; 1975 nendo suiso energy system ni okeru hoan gijutsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-05-01

    Important notices and problems on the safety for hydrogen gas were analyzed. Analysis was made on hydrogen gas property, flammability, explosivility, bio-toxicity, equipment, storage, transport, leakage, fire, technology and education for safety management, and quality and analysis of products. Study was also made on the relation between the above items and every domestic or overseas standard. Important notices and problems on the safety for liquid hydrogen were analyzed. Analysis was made on liquid hydrogen property, liquefaction and refining equipment, transport, storage, materials concerned, bio-toxicity, leakage, fire fighting technique, and safety management. Among them, such problems are pointed out from the viewpoint of accident prevention, as O-P conversion, refining of hydrogen gas for liquefaction, selection of structural materials, hydrogen embrittlement, layout of various equipment and devices, explosion-proof electric devices, and leakage detection. Research on effective fire fighting and fire preventive measures against hydrogen leakage and diffusion from tanks or piping are also in demand. (NEDO)

  1. Safety operation of chromatography column system with discharging hydrogen radiolytically generated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, S; Sano, Y.; Nomura, K.; Koma, Y.; Okamoto, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The extraction chromatography technology is one of the promising methods for the partitioning of minor actinides (Am and Cm) from spent nuclear fuels. In the extraction chromatography system, the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the chromatography column is suspected to lead to fire or explosion. In order to prevent hazardous accidents, it is necessary to evaluate behaviors of gas radiolytically generated inside the column. In this study, behaviors of gas inside the extraction chromatography column were investigated through experiments and Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. N_2 gas once accumulated as bubbles in the packed bed was hardly discharged by the flow of mobile phase. However, the CFD simulation and X-ray imaging on γ-ray irradiated column revealed that during operation the hydrogen gas generated in the column was dissolved into the mobile phase without accumulation and then discharged. (authors)

  2. CANDU safety analysis system establishment; development of trip coverage and multi-dimensional hydrogen analysis methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jong Ho; Ohn, M. Y.; Cho, C. H. [KOPEC, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The trip coverage analysis model requires the geometry network for primary and secondary circuit as well as the plant control system to simulate all the possible plant operating conditions throughout the plant life. The model was validated for the power maneuvering and the Wolsong 4 commissioning test. The trip coverage map was produced for the large break loss of coolant accident and the complete loss of class IV power event. The reliable multi-dimensional hydrogen analysis requires the high capability for thermal hydraulic modelling. To acquire such a basic capability and verify the applicability of GOTHIC code, the assessment of heat transfer model, hydrogen mixing and combustion model was performed. Also, the assessment methodology for flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition is established. 22 refs., 120 figs., 31 tabs. (Author)

  3. Canadian perspectives in evaluating transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herwig, L.

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's mission is to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect the health, safety, and security of Canadians and the environment, as well as to respect Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. In 2001, the CNSC established a vision to be one of the best nuclear regulators in the world and established four strategic priorities of effectiveness, transparency, excellence in staff, and efficiency. While fulfilling a very comprehensive mandate, the CNSC operates with a. very clear vision of its clientele - the Canadian people. That commitment guides every employee and every action of the CNSC and ensures a firm commitment to transparency. The presentation will begin with a brief overview of the worldwide context of transparency and transparency measurement, with a look at what lessons can be learned from other organizations and initiatives. It will look broadly at the Canadian context and the government framework that establishes transparency, including the keystone legislation of the Access to Information Act. The presentation will then focus on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The CNSC is firmly committed to putting additional measures in place to ensure transparency, which is being done concurrently with an overall organisational performance measurement system. It is within this framework that the presentation will address the transparency efforts at the CNSC as well transparency measurement activities. And, finally, the presentation will look at future directions for transparency and its measurement at the CNSC. (author)

  4. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  5. Barriers and facilitators of Canadian quality and safety teams: a mixed-methods study exploring the views of health care leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White DE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Deborah E White,1 Jill M Norris,1 Karen Jackson,2 Farah Khandwala3 1Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, 2Workforce Research and Evaluation, Alberta Health Services, 3Cancer Care Services, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada Background: Health care organizations are utilizing quality and safety (QS teams as a mechanism to optimize care. However, there is a lack of evidence-informed best practices for creating and sustaining successful QS teams. This study aimed to understand what health care leaders viewed as barriers and facilitators to establishing/implementing and measuring the impact of Canadian acute care QS teams.Methods: Organizational senior leaders (SLs and QS team leaders (TLs participated. A mixed-methods sequential explanatory design included surveys (n=249 and interviews (n=89. Chi-squared and Fisher’s exact tests were used to compare categorical variables for region, organization size, and leader position. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed for constant comparison analysis.Results: Five qualitative themes overlapped with quantitative data: (1 resources, time, and capacity; (2 data availability and information technology; (3 leadership; (4 organizational plan and culture; and (5 team composition and processes. Leaders from larger organizations more often reported that clear objectives and physician champions facilitated QS teams (p<0.01. Fewer Eastern respondents viewed board/senior leadership as a facilitator (p<0.001, and fewer Ontario respondents viewed geography as a barrier to measurement (p<0.001. TLs and SLs differed on several factors, including time to meet with the team, data availability, leadership, and culture.Conclusion: QS teams need strong, committed leaders who align initiatives to strategic directions of the organization, foster a quality culture, and provide tools teams require for their work. There are excellent opportunities to create synergy across the country to address each

  6. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Study of the hydrogen safety technology (Study of the hydrogen safety technology in the distribution/consumption process); 1974 nendo suiso no hoan gijutsu no kenkyu seika hokokusho. Suiso no ryutsu shohi process ni okeru hoan gijutsu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-25

    To put it forcibly, the gas leakage problem should be solved to prevent disaster accidents caused by high pressure gas. From this point of view, the R and D of the safety technology were conducted for the process of hydrogen distribution/consumption. The literature collected was studied, and the present situation was again recognized of the hydrogen gas industrial circle in Japan. At the same time, hydrogen physical properties and the peculiar dangers derived therefrom were comprehensively arranged. Examples of accidents tell realistically how dangerous hydrogen is, and give suggestions for treating hydrogen safely. We can see a lot of examples of how to treat liquid hydrogen in the U.S. It seems that there are no effective methods to detect the leakage of hydrogen, and methods to meet each case are required. To sum up, the research results show how much safety of the distribution/consumption process is secured under the present safety technology and legal regulation. At the same time, those also indicate how much the safety can be enhanced technically in the future. (NEDO)

  7. Achievement report for fiscal 1976 on Sunshine Program. Research on safety technology in hydrogen energy system; 1976 nendo suiso energy system ni okeru hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-03-01

    Material is collected relative to the safety of hydrogen inside Japan and outside and, on the basis of the collected data, generalization is made of a draft of general standards for the safety of hydrogen and a draft of technological standards for the safety of gaseous hydrogen and liquid hydrogen. In the draft of general standards for the safety of hydrogen, the physical properties of hydrogen and basic matters about the handling of hydrogen are put together, and the possible ignition sources are classified and measures against ignition are shown, and general matters about fire prevention and fighting are explained. Hydrogen attack and embrittlement are taken into consideration, and the caution to exercise when selecting, treating, and processing materials for use with hydrogen is described. Attention is paid to the handling of hydrogen, referring to the dangers of aerohypoxia, frostbite and cold death, and burns. Furthermore, a proposition is newly suggested this fiscal year, which emphasizes the need of disaster preventing facilities such as explosion-proofed electrical equipment and explosion-proofed wiring and explains where to install them and how to maintain them. Also taken up in the research are the need of measures, such as the delivery of safety education and training to workers, to cope with dangers peculiar to hydrogen, and the methods of implementing such programs. (NEDO)

  8. Horizon Expansion of Thermal-Hydraulic Activities into HTGR Safety Analysis Including Gas-Turbine Cycle and Hydrogen Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Hee Cheon; Yoon, Ho Joon; Kim, Seung Jun; Lee, Byeng Jin; Kim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hyeun Min; Lim, Hong Sik

    2009-01-01

    We present three nuclear/hydrogen-related R and D activities being performed at KAIST: air-ingressed LOCA analysis code development, gas turbine analysis tool development, and hydrogen-production system analysis model development. The ICE numerical technique widely used for the safety analysis of water-reactors is successfully implemented into GAMMA, with which we solve the basic equations for continuity, momentum conservation, energy conservation of the gas mixture, and mass conservation of 6 species (He, N2, O2, CO, CO2, and H2O). GAMMA has been extensively validated using data from 14 test facilities. We developed a tool to predict the characteristics of HTGR helium turbines based on the through flow calculation with a Newton- Raphson method that overcomes the weakness of the conventional method based on the successive iteration scheme. It is found that the current method reaches stable and quick convergence even under the off-normal condition with the same degree of accuracy. The dynamic equations for the distillation column of HI process are described with 4 material components involved in the HI process: H2O, HI, I2, H2. For the HI process we improved the Neumann model based on the NRTL (Non-Random Two-Liquid) model. The improved Neumann model predicted a total pressure with 8.6% maximum relative deviation from the data and 2.5% mean relative deviation, and liquid-liquid-separation with 9.52% maximum relative deviation from the data

  9. Safety Assessments for the IS Process in a Hydrogen Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gun Hyo; Cho, Nam Chul; Jae, Moo Sung

    2006-01-01

    The thermochemical water decomposition cycle is one of the methods for the hydrogen production process from water. The successful continuous operation of the IS-process was demonstrated and this process is one of the thermochemical processes, which is the closest to be industrialized. Currently, Korea has also started a research about the IS process and the construction of the IS process system is planned. In this study, for risk analysis of the IS process, initiating events of the IS process are identified by using the Master Logic Diagram (MLD) which is the method for initiating the event identification. Also, 6 events were identified among 9 initiating events above and performed quantification of events using event tree analysis

  10. Status and integration of the gas generation studies performed for the Hydrogen Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

    1993-02-01

    Waste in Tank 241-SY-101 on the Hanford Site generates and periodically releases hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gases. Studies have been conducted at several laboratories to determine the chemical mechanisms for the gas generation and release. Results from these studies are presented and integrated in an attempt to describe current understanding of the physical properties of the waste and the mechanisms of gas generation and retention. Existing tank data are consistent with the interpretation that gases are uniformly generated in the tank, released continuously from the convecting layer, and stored in the nonconvecting layer. Tank temperature measurements suggest that the waste consists of ''gobs'' of material that reach neutral buoyancy at different times. The activation energy of the rate limiting step of the gas generating process was calculated to be about 7 kJ/mol but measured in the laboratory at 80 to 100 kJ/mol. Based on observed temperature changes in the tank the activation energy is probably not higher than about 20 kJ/mol. Several simulated waste compositions have been devised for use in laboratory studies in the place of actual waste from Tank 241-SY-101. Data from these studies can be used to predict how the actual waste might behave when heated or diluted. Density evaluations do not confirm that heating waste at the bottom of the tank would induce circulation within the waste; however, heating may release gas bubbles by dissolving the solids to which the bubbles adhere. Gas generation studies on simulated wastes indicated that nitrous oxide and hydrogen yields are not particularly coupled. Solubility studies of nitrous oxide, the most soluble of the principal gaseous products, indicate it is unlikely that dissolved gases contribute substantially to the quantity of gas released during periodic events

  11. Valuation of the safety concept of the combined nuclear/chemical complex for hydrogen production with HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.; Nishihara, T.

    2004-06-01

    The high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) in Oarai, Japan, will be worldwide the first plant to demonstrate the production of hydrogen by applying the steam reforming process and using nuclear process heat as primary energy. Particular safety aspects for such a combined nuclear/chemical complex have to be investigated to further detail. One of these special aspects is the fire and explosion hazard associated with the presence of flammable gases including a large LNG storage tank in close vicinity to the reactor building. A special focus is laid upon the conceivable development of a detonation pressure wave and its damaging effect on the reactor building. A literature study has shown that methane is a comparatively slow reacting gas and that a methane vapor cloud in the open atmosphere or partially obstructed areas is highly unlikely to result in a detonation if inadvertently released and ignited. Various theoretical assessments and experimental studies, which have been conducted in the past and which are of significance for the HTTR-steam reforming system, include the spreading and combustion behavior of cryogenic liquids and flammable gas mixtures providing the basis of a comprehensive safety analysis of the combined nuclear/chemical facility. (orig.)

  12. Canadian attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.E.O.; Dobson, J.K.; Baril, R.G.

    1977-05-01

    A national assessment was made of public attitudes towards nuclear power, along with regional studies of the Maritimes and mid-western Canada and a study of Canadian policy-makers' views on nuclear energy. Public levels of knowledge about nuclear power are very low and there are marked regional differences. Opposition centers on questions of safety and is hard to mollify due to irrational fear and low institutional credibility. Canadians rate inflation as a higher priority problem than energy and see energy shortages as a future problem (within 5 years) and energy independence as a high priority policy. (E.C.B.)

  13. Modelling in the experimental study of the hydrogen mixing with inner atmosphere of the safety containers of nuclear power plants in post LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fineschi, F.; Lanza, S.

    1979-01-01

    In light water nuclear power plants hydrogen releases from the pressure containment system may take place following a loss-of-coolant accident. In view of preparing technical safeguards aiming at the control of the flame propagation probability and of explosions, it is important to know the space-time distribytion of hydrogen concentrations in the safety containers. It is shown that an experimental study on a scale model is praticable only in the case when full turbulence conditions occur in the container and in the model. Then general aspects of a methodology capable to verify with a reasonable confiance degree the validity of the assumptions is illustrated

  14. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  15. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Nuclear safety; (2) Industrial and health safety; (3) Radiation safety; and Fire protection

  16. Study of hydrogen vehicle storage in enclosed parking facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzile, M A [Transport Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles; Cook, S [Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper reported on a coordinated research program between Transport Canada and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada that examines issues of hydrogen vehicle storage. The ecoTECHNOLOGY for Vehicles (eTV) program focuses on the safety issues of operating and storing hydrogen fuelled vehicles in enclosed parking facilities. The aim of the program is to review existing research, current building standards applied in Canada, standards applied to natural gas vehicles, and standards and recommended practices for the design of fuel cell vehicles. Any potential gaps in safety will be considered in the design of CFD modeling scenarios. Considerations that extend beyond previously performed studies include the effect of Canadian climate on vehicle safety and leak detection equipment, fail-safe mechanism performance, as well as analyses of the frequency of hydrogen leak occurrences and the probability of ignition. The results of the study will facilitate policy makers and authorities in making decisions regarding the storage of hydrogen fuelled vehicles as they become more popular.

  17. Development of thermal-hydraulic safety codes for HTGRs with gas-turbine and hydrogen process cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Hee Cheon; Yoon, Ho Joon; Lee, Byung Jin; Kim, Yong Soo; Jin, Hyeng Gon; Kim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hyeun Min; Lim, Hong Sik

    2008-01-01

    We present three nuclear/hydrogen-related R and D activities being performed at KAIST: air-ingressed LOCA analysis code development, gas turbine analysis tool development, and hydrogen-production system analysis model development. The ICE numerical technique widely used for the safety analysis of water-reactors is successfully implemented into GAMMA in which we solve the basic equations for continuity, momentum conservation, energy conservation of the gas mixture, and mass conservation of 6 species (He, N2, O2, CO, CO2, and H2O). GAMMA has been extensively validated using data from 14 test facilities. We developed SANA code to predict the characteristics of HTGR helium turbines based on the throughflow calculation with a Newton-Raphson method that overcomes the weakness of the conventional method based on the successive iteration scheme. It is found out that the current method reaches stable and quick convergence even under the off-normal condition with the same degree of accuracy. The GAMMA-SANA coupled code was assessed by comparing its results with the steady-state of the GTHTR300, and the load reduction transient was simulated for the 100% to 70% power operation. The calculation results confirm that two-dimensional throughflow modeling can be successfully used to describe the gas turbine behavior. The dynamic equations for the distillation column of the HI process in the I-S cycle are described with 4 material components involved in the HI process: H2O, HI, I2, and H2. For the VLE prediction in the HI process we improved the Neumann model based on the NRTL (Non-Random Two-Liquid) model. Relative to the experimental data, the improved Neumann model shows deviations of 8.6% in maximum and 2.5% in average for the total pressure, and 9.5% in maximum for the liquid-liquid separation composition. Through a parametric analysis using the published experimental data related to the Bunsen reaction and liquid-liquid separation, an optimized operating condition for the

  18. Hydrogen Gas Inhalation Treatment in Acute Cerebral Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Study on Safety and Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hirohisa; Nishijima, Yoji; Ohta, Shigeo; Sakamoto, Masaki; Kinone, Kazunori; Horikosi, Tohru; Tamaki, Mituyuki; Takeshita, Hirosi; Futatuki, Tomoko; Ohishi, Wataru; Ishiguro, Taichi; Okamoto, Saori; Ishii, Shou; Takanami, Hiroko

    2017-11-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. Inhalation of H 2 gas (1-4%) was effective for the improvement of cerebral infarction in multiple animal experiments. Thus, for actual applications, a randomized controlled clinical study is desired to evaluate the effects of inhalation of H 2 gas. Here, we evaluate the H 2 treatment on acute cerebral infarction. Through this randomized controlled clinical study, we assessed the safety and effectiveness of H 2 treatment in patients with cerebral infarction in an acute stage with mild- to moderate-severity National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores (NIHSS = 2-6). We enrolled 50 patients (25 each in the H 2 group and the control group) with a therapeutic time window of 6 to 24 hours. The H 2 group inhaled 3% H 2 gas (1 hour twice a day), and the control group received conventional intravenous medications for the initial 7 days. The evaluations included daily vital signs, NIHSS scores, physical therapy indices, weekly blood chemistry, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans over the 2-week study period. The H 2 group showed no significant adverse effects with improvements in oxygen saturation. The following significant effects were found: the relative signal intensity of MRI, which indicated the severity of the infarction site, NIHSS scores for clinically quantifying stroke severity, and physical therapy evaluation, as judged by the Barthel Index. H 2 treatment was safe and effective in patients with acute cerebral infarction. These results suggested a potential for widespread and general application of H 2 gas. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Achievement report on research and development in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1977. Studies on hydrogen energy total systems and the safety assuring technologies thereon (Studies on preparing criteria for the safety assuring technologies for hydrogen energy total systems); 1977 nendo suiso energy total system to sono hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Suiso energy total system no hoan gijutsu kijun no sakusei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-03-01

    Studies have been made on preparing criteria for the safety assuring technologies for hydrogen energy total systems. The outline of the technological guideline for hydrogen manufacturing processes in the high temperature and pressure water decomposition method is the same as that in the normal pressure water decomposition method. However, its high temperature and pressure environment can cause new safety problems. Considerations should be given on, for example, material problems in structural materials and insulation materials including electrodes and membranes, introduction of gas-liquid separation and pressure balancing devices, problems in electrolyte circulation, and safety problems that may occur because of generation of hydrogen and oxygen under high temperature and pressure conditions. This paper summarizes these matters by surveying literature data. In order to provide basic information to prepare criteria for safety assuring technologies for the gaseous hydrogen liquefaction process, surveys and studies were made based on different items of technological information and experimental study results. Safety assuring technologies were discussed on metal hydrides (promising means for storing hydrogen). Powder is used to enhance hydrogen absorbing performance, whereas the metal hydrides are pulverized as a result of repetition of absorption and discharge of hydrogen. This paper describes also metal dust explosion disaster and its risk of occurrence. (NEDO)

  20. Fiscal 1975 Sunshine Project research report. Research on refining, transport and storage systems for hydrogen, and their safety technologies (Research on measurement/control system for safety management in low-temperature storage and refining processes of hydrogen); 1975 nendo suiso no seisei, yuso, chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Suiso no teion chozo, seisei dankai no anzen no tame no keisoku seigyo system ni kansuru kenkyu chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-05-28

    The following were selected as themes necessary and important for the safety of the forthcoming hydrogen energy system, based on the fiscal 1974 document survey result, and the fiscal 1975 research results. First as for low- temperature storage of hydrogen, since safe discharge of hydrogen gas generated in a storage tank is important, gas motor discharging usually used for such transport tanks as tank lorry, and burn bond discharging suitable for discharge of a large amount of hydrogen were selected as test items. Next as for storage and transport of low-temperature hydrogen such as liquid hydrogen, a low-temperature control valve to control the amount of liquid hydrogen for transport was selected as a test item. Under the assumption of the model tests on the above 3 items in fiscal 1976, various studies and trial designs were made on concrete test equipment. The test plans were also prepared for some ones among them. (NEDO)

  1. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management – IV: Validation based on non-homogeneous hydrogen–air experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap, E-mail: pratap.sathiah78@gmail.com [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Komen, Ed, E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Roekaerts, Dirk, E-mail: d.j.e.m.roekaerts@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Department of Process and Energy, Section Fluid Mechanics, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • TFC combustion model is further extended to simulate flame propagation in non-homogeneous hydrogen–air mixtures. • TFC combustion model results are in good agreement with large-scale non-homogeneous hydrogen–air experiments. • The model is further extended to account for the non-uniform hydrogen–air–steam mixture for the presence of PARs on hydrogen deflagration. - Abstract: The control of hydrogen in the containment is an important safety issue in NPPs during a loss of coolant accident, because the dynamic pressure loads from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. In Sathiah et al. (2012b), we presented a computational fluid dynamics based method to assess the consequence of the combustion of uniform hydrogen–air mixtures. In the present article, the extension of this method to and its validation for non-uniform hydrogen–air mixture is described. The method is implemented in the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT using user defined functions. The extended code is validated against non-uniform hydrogen–air experiments in the ENACCEF facility. It is concluded that the maximum pressure and intermediate peak pressure were predicted within 12% and 18% accuracy. The eigen frequencies of the residual pressure wave phenomena were predicted within 4%. It is overall concluded that the current model predicts the considered ENACCEF experiments well.

  2. The In Vitro-In Vivo Safety Confirmation of PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil as a Surfactant for Oral Nanoemulsion Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmawati, Heni; Novel, Miranti Anggraeni; Ayu, Sri; Berlian, Guntur; Tandrasasmita, Olivia Mayasari; Tjandrawinata, Raymond Rubianto; Anggadiredja, Kusnandar

    2017-03-31

    Evaluation on the safety use of high concentration of polyoxyl 40 (PEG-40) hydrogenated castor oil as a surfactant for oral nanoemulsion was performed in Webster mice. As previously reported, nearly 20% of PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil was used to emulsify the glyceryl monooleate (GMO) as an oil to the aqueous phase. Thermodynamically stable and spontaneous nanoemulsion was formed by the presence of co-surfactant polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG-400). Standard parameters were analyzed for nanoemulsion including particle size and particle size distribution, the surface charge of nanoemulsion, and morphology. To ensure the safety of this nanoemulsion, several cell lines were used for cytotoxicity study. In addition, 5000 mg/kg body weight (BW) of the blank nanoemulsion was given orally to Webster mice once a day for 14 days. Several parameters such as gross anatomy, body weight, and main organs histopathology were observed. In particular, by considering the in vivo data, it is suggested that nanoemulsion composed with a high amount of PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil is acceptable for oral delivery of active compounds.

  3. The "Canadian" in Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Wolodko, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Notes that a rich body of Canadian children's literature exists that reflects the country's literary and socio-cultural values, beliefs, themes and images, including those of geography, history, language and identity. Discusses how Canadians tend to identify themselves first by region or province and then by nation. (SG)

  4. Protest: The Canadian pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    This popularly written article compares Canadian attitudes to protests against nuclear power to those in the United States. Canadian protesters are more peaceful, expressing their opinions within the law. The article describes the main anti-nuclear groups in Canada and presents the results of public opinion surveys of Canadians on the use of nuclear power for generating electricity. (TI)

  5. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  6. Achievement report for fiscal 1976 on Sunshine Program. Research on systems for hydrogen refining, transporting, and storing, and technology for assuring safety; 1976 nendo suiso no seisei yuso chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-03-01

    The results of studies conducted in the 3-year period beginning in fiscal 1974 are collected in this report. Dealt with in Chapter 1 are hydrogen production systems that constitute the stages before and after a hydrogen refining/transporting/storing subsystem, the future outlook of a hydrogen supply system with consideration bestowed on its connection with hydrogen-using systems, and how subsystems involving transportation and storage should be in such a hydrogen supply system. In Chapter 2, for the purpose of helping the construction in the future of a total energy system for hydrogen, the flows of energy and substances in Japan based on the records of fiscal 1974 and charts of the actualities of hydrogen utilization are shown. In Chapter 3, tentative designs of hydrogen supply systems are taken up for assessment. In Chapter 5, subsystems for a hydrogen supply system including topological patterns are tentatively designed. In Chapter 6, the transportation and storage of hydrogen are quantitatively evaluated, and assessment is conducted about investment for the embodiment of a topological model, selection of a profitable system, and environmental safety. Reference is also made in this chapter to research and development policies under which a hydrogen system to be the target is manifestly defined, where the aim of such research and development is declared and the need of its achievement is emphasized. (NEDO)

  7. Canadian national nuclear forensics capability project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Dimayuga, I.; Summerell, I.; Totland, M.; Jonkmans, G.; Whitlock, J.; El-jaby, A.; Inrig, E.

    2015-01-01

    Following the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, Canada expanded its existing capability for nuclear forensics by establishing a national nuclear forensics laboratory network, which would include a capability to perform forensic analysis on nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as on traditional evidence contaminated with radioactive material. At the same time, the need for a national nuclear forensics library of signatures of nuclear and radioactive materials under Canadian regulatory control was recognized. The Canadian Safety and Security Program, administered by Defence Research and Development Canada's Centre for Security Science (DRDC CSS), funds science and technology initiatives to enhance Canada's preparedness for prevention of and response to potential threats. DRDC CSS, with assistance from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, formerly Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is leading the Canadian National Nuclear Forensics Capability Project to develop a coordinated, comprehensive, and timely national nuclear forensics capability. (author)

  8. Canadian national nuclear forensics capability project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.; Dimayuga, I., E-mail: joanne.ball@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Summerell, I. [Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Totland, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Jonkmans, G. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Whitlock, J. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); El-jaby, A. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Inrig, E. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Following the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, Canada expanded its existing capability for nuclear forensics by establishing a national nuclear forensics laboratory network, which would include a capability to perform forensic analysis on nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as on traditional evidence contaminated with radioactive material. At the same time, the need for a national nuclear forensics library of signatures of nuclear and radioactive materials under Canadian regulatory control was recognized. The Canadian Safety and Security Program, administered by Defence Research and Development Canada's Centre for Security Science (DRDC CSS), funds science and technology initiatives to enhance Canada's preparedness for prevention of and response to potential threats. DRDC CSS, with assistance from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, formerly Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is leading the Canadian National Nuclear Forensics Capability Project to develop a coordinated, comprehensive, and timely national nuclear forensics capability. (author)

  9. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 15. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings of the 15. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society cover a wide range of nuclear topics, but the emphasis is on CANDU reactors and Canadian experience. The 89 papers are arranged in 17 sessions dealing with the following subjects: thermalhydraulics, fuel channels, operations, reactor physics, fuel, new technology, safety, training, waste management. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  10. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 15. annual conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, H M [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The proceedings of the 15. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society cover a wide range of nuclear topics, but the emphasis is on CANDU reactors and Canadian experience. The 89 papers are arranged in 17 sessions dealing with the following subjects: thermalhydraulics, fuel channels, operations, reactor physics, fuel, new technology, safety, training, waste management. The individual papers have been abstracted separately.

  11. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report of the Senior Inspector for the Nuclear Safety, analyses the nuclear safety at EDF for the year 1999 and proposes twelve subjects of consideration to progress. Five technical documents are also provided and discussed concerning the nuclear power plants maintenance and safety (thermal fatigue, vibration fatigue, assisted control and instrumentation of the N4 bearing, 1300 MW reactors containment and time of life of power plants). (A.L.B.)

  12. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  13. Final report of the cosmetic ingredient review expert panel on the safety assessment of Polyisobutene and Hydrogenated Polyisobutene as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    controls. Neither Polyisobutene nor Hydrogenated Polyisobutene were ocular irritants, nor were they dermal irritants or sensitizers. Polyisobutene was not comedogenic in a rabbit ear study. Polyisobutene did not induce transformation in the Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay, but did enhance 3-methylcholanthrene-induced transformation of C3H/10T1/2 cells. In a carcinogenicity study in mice, Polyisobutene was not carcinogenic, nor did it promote the carcinogenicity of 7,12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene. Clinical patch tests uncovered no evidence of dermal irritation and repeat-insult patch tests with a product containing 4% Hydrogenated Polyisobutene or 1.44% Hydrogenated Polyisobutene found no reactions greater than slight erythema. These products also were not phototoxic or photoallergenic. The product containing 4% Hydrogenated Polyisobutene was not an ocular irritant in a clinical test. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel recognized that there are data gaps regarding use and concentration of these ingredients. However, the overall information available on the types of products in which these ingredients are used and at what concentrations indicate a pattern of use, which was considered by the Expert Panel in assessing safety. Although there is an absence of dermal absorption data for Polyisobutene and Hydrogenated Polyisobutene, the available octanol water partition coefficient data and the low solubility in water suggest very slow absorption, so additional data are not needed. Gastrointestinal absorption is also not a major concern due to the low solubility of these chemicals. Although one in vitro study did report that Polyisobutene did promote cellular transformation, a mouse study did not find evidence of tumor promotion. Because lifetime exposure studies using rats and dogs exposed to Polybutene failed to demonstrate any carcinogenic or tumor promotion effect, and a three-generation reproductive/developmental toxicity study produced

  14. Achievement report for fiscal 1976 on Sunshine Program research and development. Research on safety technology for hydrogen (Research on safety technology applicable to distribution and consumption processes of hydrogen); 1976 nendo suiso no hoan gijutsu no kenkyu seika hokokusho. Suiso no ryutsu process ni okeru hoan gijutsu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-03-31

    Evaporation/diffusion tests are conducted in which 10 liters of liquid hydrogen is discharged instantaneously from a certain altitude toward the middle of spill surfaces. Four types of spill surfaces are used, which are soil, concrete, crushed stone, and water. Tests of continuous discharge of 50 liters of liquid hydrogen and of ignition/combustion are also carried out. The evaporation/diffusion phenomenon of liquid hydrogen is found to be greatly varied dependent on the spill surface type. The rising speed of the visible vapor mass is fairly great, and is approximately 1m/sec or more on any of the spill surfaces. Vapor diffusion is the fastest on the crushed stone spill surface where lateral expansion is the least, which is excellent from the viewpoint of safety. It is found that the rise of the vapor mass formed just after liquid hydrogen discharge is attributable to its own buoyancy. The flame of burning hydrogen is colorless and transparent, barely visible just like shimmering heat haze. When sodium bicarbonate power is lightly scattered all over the flame, it becomes obviously visible because of its turning orange due to the color flame reaction of sodium. Documentary records are also investigated. (NEDO)

  15. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Study on a system to refine/transport/store hydrogen and the safety technology; 1974 nendo suiso no seisei yuso chozo system oyobi hoan gijjutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-31

    This study aims at the following. As to an alternative plan of the hydrogen distribution system, this paper makes the comprehensive evaluation from viewpoints of possibility, adaptability to society, economical efficiency, reliability, dynamic characteristics, etc., selects the most rational system and picked up the problems for realization of the system. It also sets up standards for safety technology relating to the hydrogen energy system and acquires the basic knowledge/information on concrete disaster prevention technology which backs up the standards. Among those, in this fiscal year, as system analysis of the hydrogen distribution system, study was made on system analysis of the system alternative plan and problems on system realization. Next, as an investigational study on safety technology in hydrogen energy system, the paper conducted the survey/collection in Japan and abroad of the present law, standards for handling, and examples of disaster/accident in relation to hydrogen, and the survey research on the concrete safety problem predicted. The paper studied the technology related to the safety problem required for safety (survey of effects of impurities, measuring technology, technology to prevent leakage accidents, etc. ). (NEDO)

  16. The role of CFD combustion modeling in hydrogen safety management – III: Validation based on homogeneous hydrogen–air–diluent experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiah, Pratap, E-mail: pratap.sathiah78@gmail.com [Shell Global Solutions Ltd., Brabazon House, Concord Business Park, Threapwood Road, Manchester M220RR (United Kingdom); Komen, Ed [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group – NRG, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Roekaerts, Dirk [Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5, 2600 AA Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • A CFD based method proposed in the previous article is used for the simulation of the effect of CO{sub 2}–He dilution on hydrogen deflagration. • A theoretical study is presented to verify whether CO{sub 2}–He diluent can be used as a replacement for H{sub 2}O as diluent. • CFD model used for the validation work is described. • TFC combustion model results are in good agreement with large-scale homogeneous hydrogen–air–CO{sub 2}–He experiments. - Abstract: Large quantities of hydrogen can be generated and released into the containment during a severe accident in a PWR. The generated hydrogen, when mixed with air, can lead to hydrogen combustion. The dynamic pressure loads resulting from hydrogen combustion can be detrimental to the structural integrity of the reactor safety systems and the reactor containment. Therefore, accurate prediction of these pressure loads is an important safety issue. In our previous article, a CFD based method to determine these pressure loads was presented. This CFD method is based on the application of a turbulent flame speed closure combustion model. The method was validated against three uniform hydrogen–air deflagration experiments with different blockage ratio performed in the ENACCEF facility. It was concluded that the maximum pressures were predicted within 13% accuracy, while the rate of pressure rise dp/dt was predicted within about 30%. The eigen frequencies of the residual pressure wave phenomena were predicted within a few %. In the present article, we perform additional validation of the CFD based method against three uniform hydrogen–air–CO{sub 2}–He deflagration experiments with three different concentrations of the CO{sub 2}–He diluent. The trends of decrease in the flame velocity, the intermediate peak pressure, the rate of pressure rise dp/dt, and the maximum value of the mean pressure with an increase in the CO{sub 2}–He dilution are captured well in the simulations. From the

  17. Certification of Canadian nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newbury, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security of Canadians and the environment, and to implement Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. As part of its mandate, the CNSC requires certification of those who work in positions with direct impact on the safety of Canadian nuclear power plants (NPPs) and research reactors. Other positions, such as exposure device operators and radiation safety officers at other nuclear facilities, also require CNSC certification. In this paper, the certification process of Canadian NPP personnel will be examined. In keeping with the CNSC's regulatory philosophy and international practice, licensees bear the primary responsibility for the safe operation of their NPPs. They are therefore held entirely responsible for training and testing their workers, in accordance with applicable regulatory requirements, to ensure they are fully qualified to perform their duties. The CNSC obtains assurance that all persons it certifies are qualified to carry out their respective duties. It achieves this by overseeing a regime of licensee training programs and certification examinations, which are based on a combination of appropriate regulatory guidance and compliance activities. Reviews of the knowledge-based certification examination methodology and of lessons learned from Fukushima have generated initiatives to further strengthen the CNSC's certification programs for NPP workers. Two of those initiatives are discussed in this paper. (author)

  18. Achievement report on research and development in the Sunshine Project in fiscal 1976. Researches related to hydrogen refining, transporting and storing systems, and safety assurance technologies (Surveys and researches on low-temperature storage of hydrogen, and measurement and control systems for safety in refining stage); 1976 nendo suiso no seisei, yuso, chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Suiso no teion chozo, seisei dankai no anzen no tame no keisoku seigyo system ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-03-01

    This paper discusses low-temperature storage of hydrogen, and safety in the refining stage thereof. Discussions were given on a device to discharge safely hydrogen evaporated from a liquefied hydrogen storing tank rolly. A testing equipment of a 1/10 size of a full size equipment was fabricated on a trial basis. The equipment was used to test discharging a gaseous mixture containing hydrogen at concentration of about 2%, while air is being supplied from a blower directly connected to a gas motor (rotating on gas pressure) with treatment rate of 15 Nm{sup 3}/h. In order to keep the hydrogen concentration below the lower explosion limit of 4%, uniformity in the spatial distribution of the concentration is important. Full consideration should be given thereto in future designing works. With a cryogenic adsorption refining device for hydrogen, oxygen content is adsorbed, and hydrogen is refined. During regeneration of the adsorption device, oxygen is discharged. Experiments on regeneration methods were performed for comparing and discussing oxygen discharge behavior by using three systems: nitrogen purge, hydrogen purge, and temperature raising. Cases were found in which oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas exceeds the lower explosion limit of 4%. There is a number of important assignments to assure safety, including specific measures to prevent the above excess, reciprocal influence of multiple impurities, and removal of ignition sources. The present experiments have great significance in providing fundamental items of information. (NEDO)

  19. Research and Production Corporation Radiy activities within Canadian nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmach, I.; Siora, O.; Kharchenko, V.; Sklyar, V.; Andrashov, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents key results of RPC Radiy activities within Canadian nuclear market. RPC Radiy (located in Kirovograd, Ukraine) is a vendor which designs and produces digital safety I and C platform as well as turnkey applications, based on the platform, for NPPs (safety systems). The main feature of the Radiy Platform is the application of Field Programmable Gates Arrays (FPGA) as programmable components for logic control operations. Since 2009 RPC Radiy started to explore the possibility to conduct the expansion to Canadian nuclear market. The activities performed by RPC Radiy related to this direction are resulted in several joint projects with Canadian companies. (author)

  20. Sci-Fri AM: Quality, Safety, and Professional Issues 06: An Evaluation of Incident Reporting and Learning using the Canadian National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Logan; Kildea, John [McGill University Health Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    We report on the development and clinical deployment of an in-house incident reporting and learning system that implements the taxonomy of the Canadian National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Treatment (NSIR-RT). In producing our new system, we aimed to: Analyze actual incidents, as well as potentially dangerous latent conditions. Produce recommendations on the NSIR-RT taxonomy. Incorporate features to divide reporting responsibility among clinical staff and expedite incident categorization within the NSIR-RT framework. Share anonymized incident data with the national database. Our multistep incident reporting workflow is focused around an initial report and a detailed follow-up investigation. An investigator, chosen at the time of reporting, is tasked with performing the investigation. The investigation feature is connected to our electronic medical records database to allow automatic field population and quick reference of patient and treatment information. Additional features include a robust visualization suite, as well as the ability to flag incidents for discussion at monthly Risk Management meetings and task ameliorating actions to staff. Our system was deployed into clinical use in January 2016. Over the first three months of use, 45 valid incidents were reported; 31 of which were reported as actual incidents as opposed to near-misses or reportable circumstances. However, we suspect there is ambiguity within our centre in determining the appropriate event type, which may be arising from the taxonomy itself. Preliminary trending analysis aided in revealing workflow issues pertaining to storage of treatment accessories and treatment planning delays. Extensive analysis will be undertaken as more data are accrued.

  1. Sci-Fri AM: Quality, Safety, and Professional Issues 06: An Evaluation of Incident Reporting and Learning using the Canadian National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, Logan; Kildea, John

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development and clinical deployment of an in-house incident reporting and learning system that implements the taxonomy of the Canadian National System for Incident Reporting – Radiation Treatment (NSIR-RT). In producing our new system, we aimed to: Analyze actual incidents, as well as potentially dangerous latent conditions. Produce recommendations on the NSIR-RT taxonomy. Incorporate features to divide reporting responsibility among clinical staff and expedite incident categorization within the NSIR-RT framework. Share anonymized incident data with the national database. Our multistep incident reporting workflow is focused around an initial report and a detailed follow-up investigation. An investigator, chosen at the time of reporting, is tasked with performing the investigation. The investigation feature is connected to our electronic medical records database to allow automatic field population and quick reference of patient and treatment information. Additional features include a robust visualization suite, as well as the ability to flag incidents for discussion at monthly Risk Management meetings and task ameliorating actions to staff. Our system was deployed into clinical use in January 2016. Over the first three months of use, 45 valid incidents were reported; 31 of which were reported as actual incidents as opposed to near-misses or reportable circumstances. However, we suspect there is ambiguity within our centre in determining the appropriate event type, which may be arising from the taxonomy itself. Preliminary trending analysis aided in revealing workflow issues pertaining to storage of treatment accessories and treatment planning delays. Extensive analysis will be undertaken as more data are accrued.

  2. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1983-05-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is now well established. This report outlines the generic research and technological development underway in this program to assess the concept of immobilization and subsequent disposal of nuclear fuel waste deep in a stable plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. The program participants, funding, schedule and associated external review processes are briefly outlined. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely, immobilization studies, geoscience research and environmental and safety assessment, are described in more detail

  3. Probabilistic analysis of safety of a production plant of hydrogen using nuclear energy; Analisis probabilistico de seguridad de una planta de produccion de hidrogeno utilizando energia nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores F, A. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Nelson E, P.F.; Francois L, J.L. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: alain_fyf@yahoo.com

    2005-07-01

    The present work makes use of the Probabilistic Safety analysis to evaluate and to quantify the safety in a plant producer of hydrogen coupled to a nuclear reactor of high temperature, the one which is building in Japan. It is had the description of systems and devices of the HTTR, the pipe diagrams and instrumentation of the plant, as well as the rates of generic faults for the components of the plant. The first step was to carry out a HAZOP study (Hazard and Operability Study) with the purpose of obtaining the initiator events; once obtained these, it was developed a tree of events by each initiator event and for each system it was developed a fault tree; the data used for the quantification of the failure probability of the systems were obtained starting from several generic sources of information. In each tree of events different final states were obtained and it stops each one, their occurrence frequency. The construction and evaluation of the tree of events and of failures one carries out with the SAPHIRE program. The results show the safety of the shutdown system of the HTTR and they allow to suggest modifications to the auxiliary system of refrigeration and to the heat exchanger helium/water pressurized. (Author)

  4. Framing Canadian federalism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saywell, John; Anastakis, Dimitry; Bryden, Penny E

    2009-01-01

    ... the pervasive effects that federalism has on Canadian politics, economics, culture, and history, and provide a detailed framework in which to understand contemporary federalism. Written in honour of John T. Saywell's half-century of accomplished and influential scholarly work and teaching, Framing Canadian Federalism is a timely and fitting t...

  5. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Study on a system to refine/transport/store hydrogen and the safety technology (Investigational study of the measuring control system for safety in the stage of low temperature storage and refining of hydrogen); 1974 nendo suiso no seisei, yuso, chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Suiso no teion chozo, seisei dankai no anzen no tame no keisoku seigyo system ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-30

    Safety technology is necessary and indispensable for future materialization of a hydrogen energy system. The survey was made from a viewpoint of safety technology in refining hydrogen at low temperature and in storing it in a low temperature liquid state. Japan has so far had no experiences for the handling and consumption of liquid hydrogen except the partial use at laboratory. Accordingly, collected here was literature on the storage, transportation, handling, low temperature refining of the liquid, etc. The present state of technology in Japan and abroad was grasped and items in the safety relation were picked up. As to the existing literature on the hydrogen relation, there is much literature on the U.S. NASA project, and there is also much on practical business details such as the handling of a large quantity of liquid. Therefore, from each literature mostly on the above, the literature on the liquid storage, transportation use storage tank and refining method was reviewed and arranged, and at the same time, the items were picked up of the safe disposal method, disaster prevention relation, and measuring relation. The paper also arranged the results of surveying hydrogen physical properties and equipment materials which are closely related to safety general, in particular, and examples of disaster. (NEDO)

  6. Canadian Petroleum Products Inst. annual report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Canadian Petroleum Products Institute (CPPI) was created in 1989 as a nonprofit association of Canadian refiners and marketers of petroleum products. The objective of the CPPI is to serve and represent the refining and marketing sectors of the petroleum industry with respect to environment, health and safety, and business issues. CPPI conducts research to develop industry policy on a wide variety of environmental, health, safety and business issues. Key activities include: developing guidelines for the safe handling of petroleum products, establishing environmental policies, managing a national environmental protection network of over 100 centers across Canada; providing information on industry activities to the public; and developing working partnerships with government and public interest groups to address issues of common concern. An overview is provided of industry operations, economics and financial performance, and environmental protection and safety. Lists of CPPI publications, awards, standing committees, and officers are also included. 9 figs

  7. Tritium technology. A Canadian overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmings, R.L. [Canatom NPM (Canada)

    2002-10-01

    An overview of the various tritium research and operational activities in Canada is presented. These activities encompass tritium processing and recovery, tritium interactions with materials, and tritium health and safety. Many of these on-going activities form a sound basis for the tritium use and handling aspects of the ITER project. Tritium management within the CANDU heavy water reactor, associated detritiation facilities, research and development facilities, and commercial industry and improving the understanding of tritium behaviour in humans and the environment remain the focus of a long-standing Canadian interest in tritium. While there have been changes in the application of this knowledge and experience over time, the operating experience and the supporting research and development continue to provide for improved plant and facility operations, an improved understanding of tritium safety issues, and improved products and tools that facilitate tritium management. (author)

  8. Tritium technology. A Canadian overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmings, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the various tritium research and operational activities in Canada is presented. These activities encompass tritium processing and recovery, tritium interactions with materials, and tritium health and safety. Many of these on-going activities form a sound basis for the tritium use and handling aspects of the ITER project. Tritium management within the CANDU heavy water reactor, associated detritiation facilities, research and development facilities, and commercial industry and improving the understanding of tritium behaviour in humans and the environment remain the focus of a long-standing Canadian interest in tritium. While there have been changes in the application of this knowledge and experience over time, the operating experience and the supporting research and development continue to provide for improved plant and facility operations, an improved understanding of tritium safety issues, and improved products and tools that facilitate tritium management. (author)

  9. Canadian Petroleum Products Inst. annual report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Canadian Petroleum Products Institute (CPPI) was created in 1989 as a nonprofit association of Canadian refiners and marketers of petroleum products. In 1991, the Atlantic Petroleum Association, the Quebec Petroleum Association, the Ontario Petroleum Association, the Canada West Petroleum Association, and the Petroleum Association for Conservation of the Canadian Environment (PACE) were integrated into the CPPI. The objective of the CPPI is to serve and represent the refining and marketing sectors of the petroleum industry with respect to environment, health and safety, and business issues. An industry overview is provided, as well as highlights of environmental achievements and challenges, and economics and operations for the year. Lists of CPPI publications, standing committees, and officers are also included. 9 figs

  10. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  11. The hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigg, A.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  12. The hydrogen highway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, A. [Fuel Cells Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  13. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  14. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  15. Handheld hydrogen - a new concept for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink

    2005-01-01

    A method of hydrogen storage using metal ammine complexes in combination with an ammonia decomposition catalyst is presented. This dense hydrogen storage material has high degree of safety compared to all the other available alternatives. This technology reduces the safety hazards of using liquid...

  16. Use of probabilistic safety analysis for design of emergency mitigation systems in hydrogen producer plant with sulfur-iodine technology, Section II: sulfuric acid decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza A, A.; Nelson E, P. F.; Francois L, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    Over the last decades, the need to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases has prompted the development of technologies for the production of clean fuels through the use of primary energy resources of zero emissions, as the heat of nuclear reactors of high temperature. Within these technologies, one of the most promising is the hydrogen production by sulfur-iodine cycle coupled to a high temperature reactor initially proposed by General Atomics. By their nature and because it will be large-scale plants, the development of these technologies from its present phase to its procurement and construction, will have to incorporate emergency mitigation systems in all its parts and interconnections to prevent undesired events that could put threaten the plant integrity and the nearby area. For the particular case of sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle, most analysis have focused on hydrogen explosions and failures in the primary cooling systems. While these events are the most catastrophic, is that there are also many other events that even taking less direct consequences, could jeopardize the plant operation, the people safety of nearby communities and carry the same economic consequences. In this study we analyzed one of these events, which is the formation of a toxic cloud prompted by uncontrolled leakage of concentrated sulfuric acid in the second section of sulfur-iodine process of General Atomics. In this section, the sulfuric acid concentration is near to 90% in conditions of high temperature and positive pressure. Under these conditions the sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides from the reactor will form a toxic cloud that the have contact with the plant personnel could cause fatalities, or to reach a town would cause suffocation, respiratory problems and eye irritation. The methodology used for this study is the supported design in probabilistic safety analysis. Mitigation systems were postulated based on the isolation of a possible leak, the neutralization of a pond of

  17. Canadian nuclear risk experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    1982-05-01

    Risk assessment in the Canadian nuclear fuel cycle is a very important and complex subject. Many levels of government are involved in deciding the acceptable limits for the risks, taking into account the benefits for society [fr

  18. Fording Canadian Coal Trust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowich, J.; Millos, R. [Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This is the first of five slide/overhead presentations presented at the Fording Canadian Coal Trust and Tech Cominco Ltd. investor day and mine tour. The Fording Canadian Coal Trust is described. The Trust's assets comprise six Elk Valley metallurgical coal mines and six wollastonite operations (in the NYCO Group). Trust structure, corporate responsibility, organizational structure, reserves and resources, management philosophy, operating strategies, steel market dynamics, coal market, production expansion, sales and distribution are outlined. 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects of fission reactors are considered - control, heat removal and containment. Brief descriptions of the reactor accidents at the SL-1 reactor (1961), Windscale (1957), Browns Ferry (1975), Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986) are given. The idea of inherently safe reactor designs is discussed. Safety assessment is considered under the headings of preliminary hazard analysis, failure mode analysis, event trees, fault trees, common mode failure and probabalistic risk assessments. These latter can result in a series of risk distributions linked to specific groups of fault sequences and specific consequences. A frequency-consequence diagram is shown. Fatal accident incidence rates in different countries including the United Kingdom for various industries are quoted. The incidence of fatal cancers from occupational exposure to chemicals is tabulated. Human factors and the acceptability of risk are considered. (U.K.)

  20. An overview of the evaluations of nuclear power by Canadians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrados, Maria

    1980-01-01

    Limited data are available on Canadian evaluations of nuclear power. General observations are made, based on a 1976 national study by B. Greer-Wootten and a 1978 Canadian Gallup Poll survey. Little change in the knowledge Canadians have of nuclear power appears to have taken place. A sizeable proportion of the population is willing to offer an opinion about the use of nuclear power while knowing nothing about it. Increased knowledge is not associated with more positive or negative evaluations of nuclear power. In more specific evaluations of nuclear safety, increased knowledge is found to be associated with a lowered confidence in the safety of Canadian reactors. There appears to have been a drop in the proportions of Canadians somewhat in favour of nuclear power between 1976 and 1978. Since many Canadians do not know much about the use of nuclear power and the majority of opinions are not strongly committed, there is considerable potential for fluctuation in these figures. Increased emphasis appears to be put on waste management issues in 1978, while nuclear power plants are less likely to be perceived as unsafe. This may be the result of increased discussion of Canadian power reactors. (LL)

  1. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 12. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the seventeen Technical Sessions from the Twelfth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society held in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, June 9 to 12, 1991. As in previous years, the Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society was held in conjunction with the Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. The major topics of discussion included: reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components; safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining processing

  2. EC6 safety design improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.; Lee, A.G.; Soulard, M. [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6) builds on the proven high performance design such as the Qinshan CANDU 6 reactor, and has made improvements to safety, operational performance, and has incorporated extensive operational feedback. Completion of all three phases of the pre-licensing design review by the Canadian Regulator - the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission has provided a higher level of assurance that the EC6 reference design has taken modern regulatory requirements and expectations into account and further confirmed that there are no fundamental barriers to licensing the EC6 design in Canada. The EC6 design is based on the defence-in-depth principles in INSAG-10 and provides further safety features that address the lessons learned from Fukushima. With these safety features, the EC6 design has strengthened accident prevention as the first priority in the defence-in-depth strategy, as outlined in INSAG-10. As well, the EC6 design has incorporated further mitigation measures to provide additional protection of the public and the environment if the preventive measures fail. The EC6 design has an appropriate combination of inherent, passive safety characteristics, engineered features and administrative safety measures to effectively prevent and mitigate severe accident progressions. A strong contributor to the robustness and redundancy of CANDU design is the two-group separation philosophy. This ensures a high degree of independence between safety systems as well as physical separation and functional independence in how fundamental safety functions are provided. This paper will describe the following safety features based on the application of defence-in-depth and design approach to prevent beyond design basis events progressing to severe accidents and to mitigate the consequences if it occurs: Improved steam generator heat sink via a more reliable emergency heat removal system; Increased time before manual field actions are required via enhanced capacity of

  3. Conference summaries of the Canadian Nuclear Association 30. annual conference, and the Canadian Nuclear Society 11. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 30. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 11. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: energy needs and challenges facing the Canadian nuclear industry; the environment and nuclear power; the problems of maintaining and developing industrial capacity; the challenges of the 1990's; programmes and issues for the 1990's; thermalhydraulics; reactor physics and fuel management; nuclear safety; small reactors; fuel behaviour; energy production and the environment; computer applications; nuclear systems; fusion; materials handling; and, reactor components

  4. Transfer of Canadian nuclear regulatory technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    This paper discusses the Canadian approach to the regulation of nuclear power reactors, and its possible application to CANDU reactors in other countries. It describes the programs which are in place to transfer information on licensing matters to egulatory agencies in other countries, and to offer training on nuclear safety regulation as it is practised in Canada. Experience to date in the transfer of regulatory technology is discussed. 5 refs

  5. Fiscal 1975 Sunshine Project research report. Research on hydrogen purification storage transport systems, and their safety technologies; 1975 nendo suiso no seisei, yuso, chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-05-31

    In fiscal 1975, research was made on (1) some problems and their solutions for practical hydrogen purification storage transport (HPST) systems, and (2) analysis and optimization of HPST systems. The material-energy flow diagram and rough hydrogen system relevance tree were prepared, and the position of HPST system in hydrogen systems was considered together with use of liquid hydrogen. In (1), the current technologies and problems were arranged for every component of purification system, storage system, transport and distribution system, and metal hydride. Study was also made on some problems and solutions for their R and D. In (2), study was made on the basic model of HPST, and the compatibility with a total energy system. Overseas and Industrial Research Institute (IRI)'s trial calculation results were arranged for HPST cost data as input data for trial calculation of optimization. As for a safety and reliability, study was made on the target, system and main R and D fields for the safety management of HPST system, referring to the concept of safety managements in nuclear power generation and LNG system. (NEDO)

  6. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  7. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are described. Program funding, scheduling and associated external review processes are briefly outlined

  8. Canadian competitive advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of the Canadian petrochemical industry was outlined, emphasizing the proximity to feedstocks as the principal advantage enjoyed by the industry over its international competitors. Annual sales statistics for 1995 were provided. Key players in the Canadian petrochemical industry (Nova, Dow, DuPont, Methanex, Esso, Union Carbide, Shell and Celanese), their share of the market and key products were noted. Manufacturing facilities are located primarily in Alberta, southern Ontario and Quebec. The feedstock supply infrastructure, historical and alternative ethane pricing in Canada and the US, the North American market for petrochemicals, the competitiveness of the industry, tax competitiveness among Canadian provinces and the US, the Canada - US unit labour cost ratio, ethylene facility construction costs in Canada relative to the US Gulf Coast, and projected 1997 financial requirements were reviewed. 19 figs

  9. Outlook for Canadian refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boje, G.

    1998-01-01

    The petroleum supply and demand balance was discussed and a comparison between Canadian and U.S. refineries was provided. The impact of changing product specifications on the petroleum industry was also discussed. The major changes include sulphur reductions in gasoline, benzene and MMT additives. These changes have been made in an effort to satisfy environmental needs. Geographic margin variations in refineries between east and west were reviewed. An overview of findings from the Solomon Refining Study of Canadian and American refineries, which has been very complimentary of the Canadian refining industry, was provided. From this writer's point of view refinery utilization has improved but there is a threat from increasing efficiency of US competitors. Environmental issues will continue to impact upon the industry and while the chances for making economic returns on investment are good for the years ahead, it will be a challenge to maintain profitability

  10. International surgery: definition, principles and Canadian practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    This article is dedicated to the Canadian international surgeon, Norman Bethune (1890–1939). International surgery is defined as a humanitarian branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of bodily injuries or disorders by incision or manipulations, emphasizing cooperation and understanding among nations and involving education, research, development and advocacy. In this article I review the colonial past, the dark ages following the Declaration of Alma-Ata, the progress made and the present challenges in international surgery. I present a definition of international surgery that recognizes the current era of surgical humanitarianism, validates a global understanding of surgical issues and promotes cooperation among nations. Included are the principles of international surgery: education, research, infrastructure development and advocacy. International surgical projects are classified according to type (clinical, relief, developmental) and integration strategy (vertical or horizontal). Also reviewed are the Canadian practice of international surgery by nongovernmental, professional and academic organizations and the requirements of international and Canadian funding agencies, the development concepts basic to all projects, including results-based management and the cross-cutting themes of gender equity, environmental protection and human safety. I recommend formalizing international surgery into a discipline as a means of promoting surgical care in low-income countries. If international surgery is to be sustained in Canada, infrastructure and support from Canadian surgeons is particularly important. An understanding of the history, definition and classification of international surgery should promote surgical care in low-income countries. PMID:14577711

  11. Canadian Irradiation Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Canadian Irradiation Centre is a non-profit cooperative project between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Radiochemical Company and Universite du Quebec, Institut Armand-Frappier, Centre for Applied Research in Food Science. The Centre's objectives are to develop, demonstrate and promote Canada's radiation processing technology and its applications by conducting applied research; training technical, professional and scientific personnel; educating industry and government; demonstrating operational and scientific procedures; developing processing procedures and standards, and performing product and market acceptance trials. This pamphlet outlines the history of radoation technology and the services offered by the Canadian Irradiation Centre

  12. Hydrogen fuel cell engines and related technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The manual documents the first training course developed on the use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. The manual contains eleven modules covering hydrogen properties, use and safety; fuel cell technology and its systems, fuel cell engine desi...

  13. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Study on a system to refine/transport/store hydrogen and the safety technology (Data book); 1974 nendo suiso no seisei yuso chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Shiryohen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-30

    The paper studied separately some items which become pre-conditions or periphery conditions for study work included in the report work of a system to refine/transport/store hydrogen and the safety technology. Those were arranged as data in the form of figure/tables. The data as literature related to the hydrogen energy system were also arranged. Included in these are a concept of so-called hydrogen economy system, ideas for end users and technology development, etc. The safety problem was also arranged in the form of characteristics of hydrogen and the comparison with other systems. As to the hydrogen production, the paper outlined primary energy sources and included the outline of hydrogen production technology. It also centered on the hydrogen refining/storage/transport system and made a list of research institutes, researchers, details of study, main related study, main topics, etc. The data are those about energy related data, features and safety of hydrogen energy system, various examples of the concept of hydrogen energy system, concept and development of end user use technology, production of hydrogen, etc. (NEDO)

  14. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.; Lockerby, W.E.; Rae, H.K.

    1977-05-01

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of our research and development program on heavy water processes

  15. Canadian petroleum industry review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feick, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    A wide ranging discussion about the factors that have influenced oil and natural gas prices, the differences of the Canadian market from international markets, the differences between eastern and western Canadian markets, and shareholders' perspectives on recent commodity price developments was presented. Developments in the OPEC countries were reviewed, noting that current OPEC production of 25 mmbbls is about 60 per cent higher than it was in 1985. It is expected that OPEC countries will continue to expand capacity to meet expected demand growth and the continuing need created by the UN embargo on Iraqi oil sales. Demand for natural gas is also likely to continue to rise especially in view of the deregulation of the electricity industry where natural gas may well become the favored fuel for incremental thermal generation capacity. Prices of both crude oil and natural gas are expected to hold owing to unusually low storage levels of both fuels. The inadequacy of infrastructure, particularly pipeline capacity as a key factor in the Canadian market was noted, along with the dynamic that will emerge in the next several years that may have potential consequences for Canadian production - namely the reversal of the Sarnia to Montreal pipeline. With regard to shareholders' expectations the main issues are (1) whether international markets reach back to the wellhead, hence the producer's positioning with respect to transportation capacity and contract portfolios, and (2) whether the proceeds from increased prices are invested in projects that are yielding more than the cost of capital. 28 figs

  16. Canadian gas resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Canadian exports of gas to the United States are a critical component of EMF-9 (North American Gas Supplies). However, it has been noted that there are differences between US expectations for imports and Canadian forecasts of export supply capacity. Recent studies by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) indicate that 1.8 to 2.4 Tcf of imports may be required in the mid to late 1990's; A recent study by Canada's National Energy Board (NEB) indicates that the conventional resource base may not be able to provide continued gas exports to the US after the mid 1990's and that frontier sources would need to be developed to meet US expectations. The discrepancies between US expectations and Canadian estimates of capacity are of great concern to US policymakers because they call into question the availability of secure supplies of natural gas and suggest that the cost of imports (if available) will be high. By implication, if shortages are to be averted, massive investment may be required to bring these higher cost sources to market. Since the long-term supply picture will be determined by the underlying resource base, EMF-9 participants have been asked to provide estimates of critical components of the Canadian resource base. This paper provides a summary of ICF-Lewin's recent investigation of both the Conventional and Tight Gas resource in Canada's Western Sedimentary Basin, which includes both quantitative estimates and a brief sketch of the analysis methodology

  17. Canadian petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagher, J.H.

    1969-12-01

    This study covers the following Canadian petroleum industry categories: (1) a brief history; (2) the demand for Alberta crude; (3) U.S. oil policies; (4) overseas exploration; (5) the national oil policy; (6) the Montreal pipeline and its targets; (7) a continental oil policy; and (8) the impact of Arctic reserves. It is noted that large potential benefits will improve from the Manhattan navigating the Northwest Passage. Without prejudging the analysis now applied to the information gathered on this voyage, the Manhattan has greatly contributed to the solution of the problem of access to the Arctic islands. The picture for natural gas is less fraught with uncertainties. Unlike oil, where domestic and international considerations may weigh in U.S. policy decision, Canadian natural gas is likely to be allowed to enjoy its full economic potential in bridging the foreseeable U.S. supply gap and, inasmuch as this potential is ultimately tied with that for crude oil markets, the anticipated U.S. needs for Canadian natural gas may be expected to enhance U.S. interest in the overall well-being of the Canadian petroleum industry.

  18. Canadian Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, John

    1992-01-01

    It is the view of the Canadian Nuclear Association that continuing creation of economic wealth is vital to sustainable development. A plentiful supply of cheap energy is essential. Nuclear energy provides the cleanest source of bulk energy generation essential to any path of sustainable development

  19. CANDU safety under severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.; Howieson, J.Q.; Frescura, G.M.; King, F.; Rogers, J.T.; Tamm, H.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the CANDU reactor relevant to severe accidents are set first by the inherent properties of the design, and second by the Canadian safety/licensing approach. Probabilistic safety assessment studies have been performed on operating CANDU plants, and on the 4 x 880 MW(e) Darlington station now under construction; furthermore a scoping risk assessment has been done for a CANDU 600 plant. They indicate that the summed severe core damage frequency is of the order of 5 x 10 -6 /year. CANDU nuclear plant designers and owner/operators share information and operational experience nationally and internationally through the CANDU Owners' Group (COG). The research program generally emphasizes the unique aspects of the CANDU concept, such as heat removal through the moderator, but it has also contributed significantly to areas generic to most power reactors such as hydrogen combustion, containment failure modes, fission product chemistry, and high temperature fuel behaviour. Abnormal plant operating procedures are aimed at first using event-specific emergency operating procedures, in cases where the event can be diagnosed. If this is not possible, generic procedures are followed to control Critical Safety Parameters and manage the accident. Similarly, the on-site contingency plans include a generic plan covering overall plant response strategy, and a specific plan covering each category of contingency

  20. New efficient hydrogen process production from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunel, Jean Michel [Unite URMITE, UMR 6236 CNRS, Faculte de Medecine et de Pharmacie, Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille 05 (France)

    2010-04-15

    While the source of hydrogen constitutes a significant scientific challenge, addressing issues of hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery is equally important. None of the current hydrogen storage options, liquefied or high pressure H{sub 2} gas, metal hydrides, etc.. satisfy criteria of size, costs, kinetics, and safety for use in transportation. In this context, we have discovered a methodology for the production of hydrogen on demand, in high yield, under kinetic control, from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives and methanol as co-reagent under mild conditions catalyzed by a cheap ammonium fluoride salt. Finally, the silicon by-products can be efficiently recycle leading to an environmentally friendly source of energy. (author)

  1. Proceedings of the 32. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The conference proceedings comprise 34 papers, arranged under the following sessions: Plenary; The international CANDU program; Canadian used fuel management program; Public information advocates; Fuel and electricity supply; In which direction should reactors advance?; Canadian advanced nuclear research programs; International cooperation in operations; Safety in design, operation, regulation; Renovation of operating stations; CNS/CNA luncheon addresses. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  2. 75 FR 21666 - Canadian Standards Association; Application for Expansion of Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ...] Canadian Standards Association; Application for Expansion of Recognition AGENCY: Occupational Safety and... the Canadian Standards Association for expansion of its recognition and presents the Agency's... Office's normal business hours, 8:15 a.m.-4:45 p.m., e.t. Instructions: All submissions must include the...

  3. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  4. Canadian contribution to the European Union Home Team program for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, D.K.; Blevins, J.D.; Gierszewski, P.; Matsugu, R.

    1998-01-01

    Canadian participation in R and D and design tasks for the ITER project is predominantly in the fuel cycle, remote handling and safety fields. These tasks are carried out in Canada by Ontario Hydro, research institutes, industry and universities. In addition, Canada provides the services of a number of specialist engineers and scientists in key positions at the three ITER work sites and in the European Home Team. The Canadian contribution, which is coordinated by the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP), forms an integral part of the European Union Home Team program. The key components of the Canadian contribution are described. (author)

  5. Assessment of the safety of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin: reverse mutation assay, acute and 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity in rats, and acute no-effect level for diarrhea in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yuko; Kishimoto, Yuka; Tagami, Hiroyuki; Kanahori, Sumiko

    2013-01-01

    A series of safety assessments were performed on hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin prepared by converting the reducing terminal glucose of resistant maltodextrin into sorbitol. The reverse mutation assay did not show mutagenicity. Acute and 90-day subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats showed no death was observed in any groups, including the group receiving the highest single dose of 10 g/kg body weight or the highest dose of 5 g/kg body weight per day for 90 days. Mucous or watery stools were observed in the hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin treatment group on the acute study, which were transient and were associated with the osmotic pressure caused by intake of the high concentrations. Subchronic study showed dose-dependent increases in the weights of cecum alone, cecal contents alone, and cecum with cecal contents as well as hypertrophy of the cecal mucosal epithelium, which are considered to be common physiological responses after intake of indigestible carbohydrates. These results indicated that the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin was 10 g/kg body weight or more on the acute oral toxicity study and 5.0 g/kg body weight/day or more on the 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity study in rats. Further study performed in healthy adult humans showed that the acute no-effect level of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin for diarrhea was 0.8 g/kg body weight for men and more than 1.0 g/kg body weight for women. The results of the current safety assessment studies suggest that hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin is safe for human consumption.

  6. Canadian seismic agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Lapointe, S.P.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A.

    1990-04-01

    This is the twenty-first progress report under the agreement entitled Canadian Seismic Agreement between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Canadian Commercial Corporation. Activities undertaken by the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1988 to June 30, 1989 and supported in part by the NRC agreement are described below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong motion network developments and earthquake activity. In this time period eastern Canada experienced its largest earthquake in over 50 years. This earthquake, which has been christened the Saguenay earthquake, has provided a wealth of new data pertinent to earthquake engineering studies in eastern North America and is the subject of many continuing studies, which are presently being carried out at GD and elsewhere. 41 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs

  7. Financing Canadian international operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle, G.

    1996-01-01

    A primer on financing international operations by Canadian corporations was provided. Factors affecting the availability to project finance (location, political risk), the various forms of financing (debt, equity, and combinations), the main sources of government backed financing to corporations (the International Finance Corporation) (IFC), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Overseas Property Insurance Corporation (OPIC), government or agency guarantees, political risk coverage, the use of offshore financial centres, and the where, when and how these various organizations operate, were reviewed. Examples of all of the above, taken from the experiences of Canadian Occidental Petroleum of Calgary in the U.S., in South America, in the Middle and Far East, and in Kazakhstan, were used as illustrations. figs

  8. Canadian Medicare: prognosis guarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, C D; Fooks, C; Williams, J I

    1995-08-01

    Beset by unprecedented fiscal pressures, Canadian medicare has reached a crossroads. The authors review the impact of recent cuts in federal transfer payments on provincial health care programs and offer seven suggestions to policymakers trying to accommodate these reductions. (1) Go slowly: public health care spending is no longer rising and few provinces have the necessary systems in place to manage major reductions. (2) Target reductions, rewarding quality and efficiency instead of making across-the-board cuts. (3) Replace blame with praise:give health care professionals and institutions credit for their contributions. (4) Learn from the successful programs and policies already in place across the country. (5) Foster horizontal and vertical integration of services. (6) Promote physician leadership by rewarding efforts to promote the efficient use of resources. (7) Monitor the effects of cutbacks: physician groups should cooperate with government in maintaining a national "report card" on services, costs and the health status of Canadians.

  9. Canadian fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.S.

    1982-06-01

    The National Research Council of Canada is establishing a coordinated national program of fusion research and development that is planned to grow to a total annual operating level of about $20 million in 1985. The long-term objective of the program is to put Canadian industry in a position to manufacture sub-systems and components of fusion power reactors. In the near term the program is designed to establish a minimum base of scientific and technical expertise sufficient to make recognized contributions and thereby gain access to the international effort. The Canadian program must be narrowly focussed on a few specializations where Canada has special indigenous skills or technologies. The programs being funded are the Tokamak de Varennes, the Fusion Fuels Technology Project centered on tritium management, and high-power gas laser technology and associated diagnostic instrumentation

  10. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  11. Canadian Medicare: prognosis guarded.

    OpenAIRE

    Naylor, C D; Fooks, C; Williams, J I

    1995-01-01

    Beset by unprecedented fiscal pressures, Canadian medicare has reached a crossroads. The authors review the impact of recent cuts in federal transfer payments on provincial health care programs and offer seven suggestions to policymakers trying to accommodate these reductions. (1) Go slowly: public health care spending is no longer rising and few provinces have the necessary systems in place to manage major reductions. (2) Target reductions, rewarding quality and efficiency instead of making ...

  12. Canadian petroleum history bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2003-09-27

    The Petroleum History Bibliography includes a list of more than 2,000 publications that record the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. The list includes books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles, company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry, humour, and an author index. It was created over a period of several years to help with projects at the Petroleum History Society. It is an ongoing piece of work, and as such, invites comments and additions.

  13. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  14. Canadian small wind market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorhouse, E.

    2010-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed initiatives and strategies adopted by the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) to support the development of Canada's small wind market. The general public has shown a significant interest in small wind projects of 300 kW. Studies have demonstrated that familiarity and comfort with small wind projects can help to ensure the successful implementation of larger wind projects. Small wind markets include residential, farming and commercial, and remote community applications. The results of CanWEA market survey show that the small wind market grew by 78 percent in 2008 over 2007, and again in 2009 by 32 percent over 2008. The average turbine size is 1 kW. A total of 11,000 turbines were purchased in 2007 and 2008. Global small wind market growth increased by 110 percent in 2008, and the average turbine size was 2.4 kW. Eighty-seven percent of the turbines made by Canadian mid-size wind turbine manufacturers are exported, and there is now a significant risk that Canada will lose its competitive advantage in small wind manufacturing as financial incentives have not been implemented. American and Canadian-based small wind manufacturers were listed, and small wind policies were reviewed. The presentation concluded with a set of recommendations for future incentives, educational programs and legislation. tabs., figs.

  15. Canadian ethane market overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauft, T. [TransCanada Midstream, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    A review of the Canadian petrochemical industry, the supply and demand for ethane, and the longer-term outlook for ethane are presented. Recent projections of natural gas production by the National Energy Board are examined, along with the impact on ethane supply and demand by Alliance. It is suggested that reduced gas will flow past Cochrane and Empress, Alberta ethane and gas prices will increase relative to US Gulf Coast prices, and since expansion is based on ethane demand, the combined influence of these factors will be to delay the construction of new extraction capacity. Present capacity is considered sufficient to produce ethane for the current round of petrochemical plant expansions. Excess supplies will exist for the next few years, and Alberta ethane prices are likely to strengthen due to the tight supply/demand balance. The combination of the impact of the Alliance Pipeline project and the ultimate potential of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin are the major uncertainties. On the plus side, both the US and Canadian regulatory agencies appear to be moving away from regulating ethane, and towards allowing a competitive market to develop.

  16. Canadian ethane market overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauft, T.

    1999-01-01

    A review of the Canadian petrochemical industry, the supply and demand for ethane, and the longer-term outlook for ethane are presented. Recent projections of natural gas production by the National Energy Board are examined, along with the impact on ethane supply and demand by Alliance. It is suggested that reduced gas will flow past Cochrane and Empress, Alberta ethane and gas prices will increase relative to US Gulf Coast prices, and since expansion is based on ethane demand, the combined influence of these factors will be to delay the construction of new extraction capacity. Present capacity is considered sufficient to produce ethane for the current round of petrochemical plant expansions. Excess supplies will exist for the next few years, and Alberta ethane prices are likely to strengthen due to the tight supply/demand balance. The combination of the impact of the Alliance Pipeline project and the ultimate potential of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin are the major uncertainties. On the plus side, both the US and Canadian regulatory agencies appear to be moving away from regulating ethane, and towards allowing a competitive market to develop

  17. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  18. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society sixth annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, P.M.; Phillips, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the Sixth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society comprise 103 papers on the following subjects: fuel technology, nuclear plant safety, instrumentation, public and regulatory matters, fusion, fuel behaviour under normal and accident conditions, nuclear plant design and operations, thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, accelerators, waste management, new reactor concepts

  19. Proceedings of the seventeenth annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The seventeenth annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, presented in Fredericton, New Brunswick. The conference includes papers on general topics of interest on the nuclear community, waste management and the environment, instrumentation and design of Candu reactors, safety analysis, thermal hydraulics, fuel channels, plant operations and in-core instrumentation

  20. Proceedings of the seventeenth annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The seventeenth annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, presented in Fredericton, New Brunswick. The conference includes papers on general topics of interest on the nuclear community, waste management and the environment, instrumentation and design of Candu reactors, safety analysis, thermal hydraulics, fuel channels, plant operations and in-core instrumentation.

  1. Dictionaries of Canadian English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Considine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: The lexicographical record of English in Canada began with wordlists of the late eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries. From the beginning of the twentieth century onwards, the general vocabulary of English in Canada has been represented in bilingual and monolingual dictionaries, often adapted from American or British dictionaries. In the 1950s, several important projects were initiated, resulting in the publication of general dictionaries of English in Canada, and of dictionaries of Canadianisms and of the vocabulary of particular regions of Can-ada. This article gives an overview of these dictionaries and of their reception, contextualizing them in the larger picture of the lexicography of Canada's other official language, French, and of a number of its non-official languages. It concludes by looking at the future of English-language lexicography in Canada, and by observing that although it has, at its best, reached a high degree of sophistication, there are still major opportunities waiting to be taken.

    Keywords: DICTIONARY, LEXICOGRAPHY, CANADIAN ENGLISH, CANADIANISMS, NATIONAL DICTIONARIES, CANADIAN FRENCH, CANADIAN FIRST NATIONS LAN-GUAGES, BILINGUAL DICTIONARIES, REGIONAL DICTIONARIES, UNFINISHED DICTIONARY PROJECTS

    Opsomming: Woordeboeke van Kanadese Engels. Die leksikografiese optekening van Engels in Kanada begin met woordelyste van die laat agtiende, neëntiende en vroeë twintigste eeue. Van die begin van die twintigste eeu af en verder, is die algemene woordeskat van Engels weergegee in tweetalige en eentalige woordeboeke, dikwels met wysiginge ontleen aan Ameri-kaanse en Britse woordeboeke. In die 1950's is verskeie belangrike projekte onderneem wat gelei het tot die publikasie van algemene woordeboeke van Engels in Kanada, en van woordeboeke van Kanadeïsmes en van die woordeskat van bepaalde streke van Kanada. Hierdie artikel gee 'n oorsig van dié woordeboeke, en van hul ontvangs, deur

  2. Performance of Existing Hydrogen Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Samuel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Christopher D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-01

    In this presentation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory presented aggregated analysis results on the performance of existing hydrogen stations, including performance, operation, utilization, maintenance, safety, hydrogen quality, and cost. The U.S. Department of Energy funds technology validation work at NREL through its National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC).

  3. Fiscal 1997 survey report. Subtask 3 (hydrogen utilization worldwide clean system technology) (WE-NET) (total system conceptual design/safety measures/evaluation technology); 1997 nendo seika hokokusho. Suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) subtask 3 zentai system gainen sekkei - anzen taisaku hyoka gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Concerning the study of safety measures in WE-NET, the paper described the fiscal 1997 results. For drawing up a policy for safety design, technology of preserving hydrogen at high temperature/pressure, continuing collecting information on existing plants (liquid hydrogen, LNG). Investigating manuals of NASA and NASDA and also referring to people`s opinions at chemical plants, etc., the study entered into the setting-up of the safety policy and design standards. Examples of anomalies/accidents were extracted, and classification/arrangement were commenced of the measures for anomalies of detection/prevention/protection. Toward the diffusion of hydrogen and the enhancement and unification of explosion/fire simulation models, the extraction of problems has been almost finished. The second mini work shop on safety was held in the U.S., and exchanges of information were made among researchers of each country. All agreed on the importance of collecting data as the base of safety standards. As to safety measures in various tests using combustor evaluation experimental facilities, experimental equipment for materials under liquid hydrogen and experimental equipment of thermal insulation under liquid hydrogen, problems were extracted between researchers and people concerned with safety measures, and the measures to solve them were studied. 18 refs., 31 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Status of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.B.

    1985-10-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is in the fifth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The major objective of this phase of the program is to assess the basic safety and environmental aspects of the concept of isolating immobilized fuel waste by deep underground disposal in plutonic rock. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely immobilization studies, geoscience research, and environmental and safety assessment, are well established

  5. Government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    Several facets of government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry are examined by reviewing the general historical evolution of intervention since the Second World War and by a more detailed analysis of three case studies. The case studies are the public sector - private sector content of the initial CANDU reactor program in the 1950's, the regulation of the health and safety of uranium miners in the late 1960's and early 1970's, and the Ontario Hydro decision in 1978 to enter into longer-term (40 year) contracts for uranium for its power reactors. (auth)

  6. Government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doern, G B [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). School of Public Administration

    1980-01-01

    Several facets of government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry are examined by reviewing the general historical evolution of intervention since the Second World War and by a more detailed analysis of three case studies. The case studies are the public sector - private sector content of the initial CANDU reactor program in the 1950's, the regulation of the health and safety of uranium miners in the late 1960's and early 1970's, and the Ontario Hydro decision in 1978 to enter into longer-term (40 year) contracts for uranium for its power reactors.

  7. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.

    1984-12-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1983 are described in this report

  8. Fiscal 1999 phase 2 R and D report of WE-NET (International Clean Energy Network Using Hydrogen Conversion). Task 2. Research on safety measures; 1999 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) dainiki kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Task 2. Anzen taisaku ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1999 WE-NET phase 2, task 2 research result on safety measures. In the study on preparation of the safety design standard, based on the concept design of the hydrogen supply station under investigation in task 7, latent anomalies and accidents, safety measures against them, and precautions for the safety design were arranged. Survey was made on databases available to collect failure rates necessary for quantitative risk assessment. In the study on establishment of a safety evaluation method, an evaporation apparatus for liquid hydrogen was prepared for comparative experiment with liquid nitrogen. Various information on flow and evaporation properties of liquid hydrogen were obtained. Survey was made on previously reported documents for hydrogen explosion experiment and preparation of an experiment plan. The simulation model for spillage, evaporation and diffusion of liquid hydrogen was verified and improved on the basis of the experiment results. A commercially available computation program for hydrogen deflagration was introduced, and its implementation was studied. (NEDO)

  9. Extensive analysis of hydrogen costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinea, D M; Martin, D; Garcia-Alegre, M C; Guinea, D [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Arganda, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Automatica Industrial; Agila, W E [Acciona Infraestructuras, Alcobendas, Madrid (Spain). Dept. I+D+i

    2010-07-01

    Cost is a key issue in the spreading of any technology. In this work, the cost of hydrogen is analyzed and determined, for hydrogen obtained by electrolysis. Different contributing partial costs are taken into account to calculate the hydrogen final cost, such as energy and electrolyzers taxes. Energy cost data is taken from official URLs, while electrolyzer costs are obtained from commercial companies. The analysis is accomplished under different hypothesis, and for different countries: Germany, France, Austria, Switzerland, Spain and the Canadian region of Ontario. Finally, the obtained costs are compared to those of the most used fossil fuels, both in the automotive industry (gasoline and diesel) and in the residential sector (butane, coal, town gas and wood), and the possibilities of hydrogen competing against fuels are discussed. According to this work, in the automotive industry, even neglecting subsidies, hydrogen can compete with fossil fuels. Hydrogen can also compete with gaseous domestic fuels. Electrolyzer prices were found to have the highest influence on hydrogen prices. (orig.)

  10. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  11. Canadian advanced life support capacities and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamsey, M.; Graham, T.; Stasiak, M.; Berinstain, A.; Scott, A.; Vuk, T. Rondeau; Dixon, M.

    2009-07-01

    applications). To advance the technical readiness for the proposed lunar missions, including a lunar plant growth lander, lunar "salad machine" (i.e. small scale plant production unit) and a full scale lunar plant production system, a suite of terrestrial developments and analogue systems are proposed. As has been successfully demonstrated by past Canadian advanced life support activities, terrestrial technology transfer and the development of highly qualified personnel will serve as key outputs for Canadian advanced life support system research programs. This approach is designed to serve the Canadian greenhouse industry by developing compliance measures for mitigating environmental impact, reducing labour and energy costs as well as improving Canadian food security, safety and benefit northern/remote communities.

  12. The Canadian safeguards program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarecki, C.W.; Smith, R.M.

    1981-12-01

    In support of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Canada provides technical support to the International Atomic Energy Agency for the development of safeguards relevant to Canadian designed and built nuclear facilities. Some details of this program are discussed, including the philosophy and development of CANDU safeguards systems; the unique equipment developed for these systems; the provision of technical experts; training programs; liaison with other technical organizations; research and development; implementation of safeguards systems at various nuclear facilities; and the anticipated future direction of the safeguards program

  13. Canadian photovoltaic industry directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This directory has been prepared to help potential photovoltaic (PV) customers identify Canadian-based companies who can meet their needs, and to help product manufacturers and distributors identify potential new clients and/or partners within the PV industry for new and improved technologies. To assist the reader, an information matrix is provided that identifies the product and service types offered by each firm and its primary clients served. A list of companies by province or territory is also included. The main section lists companies in alphabetical order. Information presented for each includes address, contact person, prime activity, geographic area served, languages in which services are offered, and a brief company profile

  14. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S...

  15. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  16. On Realities of Canadian Multiculturalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦辰

    2013-01-01

    Canada is a multicultural country which was mainly established by immigrants. Just because of that, Canadian govern⁃ment has carried out the policy of multiculturalism since1970s. However, it has encountered many problems such as policy con⁃flicts, national identity, democracy-inquiry and racial discrimination, etc. Hence the Canadian multiculturalism has been in a di⁃lemma.

  17. "Canadianizing" an American Communication Textbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, Jennifer M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents a study on the process involved in the "Canadianization" of U.S. textbooks for the domestic market. Explores whether disciplinary values have been shaped by the United States in the field of communication. Focuses on the experience of developing the Canadian edition of the book "Public Speaking: Strategies for Success"…

  18. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    ... these and other issues at the intersections of gender, immigration, and health in the lives of new Canadians. Situating their work within the context of Canadian policy and society, the contributors illuminate migrants' testimonies of struggle, resistance, and solidarity as they negotiate a place for themselves in a new country. Topics range fr...

  19. Canadian perspectives on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstadt, P.

    1988-01-01

    Canada has been in the forefront of irradiation technology for some 30 years. Nearly 90 of the 140 irradiators used worldwide are Canadian-built, yet Canadian food processors have been very slow to use the technology. The food irradiation regulatory situation in Canada, the factors that influence it, and some significant non-regulatory developments are reviewed. (author)

  20. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  1. Canadian geologic isolation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyne, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    The Canadian geologic isolation program is directed at examining the potential of (1) salt deposits and (2) hard rock as repositories for radioactive wastes. It was felt essential from the inception that alternative host rocks be evaluated over a fairly large geographical area. The studies on salt deposits to date are based on existing geological information and have identified the areas that show some potential and merit further study. The factors considered include depth, thickness and purity of the deposit, overlying aquifers, and the potential for gas and oil exploration as well as potash recovery. The studies on hard rock are restricted to plutonic igneous rocks in the Ontario part of the Canadian Shield. Because geological information on their nature and extent is sparse, the study is limited to bodies that are well exposed and for which information is available.for which information is available. Field studies in the next two seasons are aimed at mapping the fault and joint patterns and defining the geologic controls on their development. In 1977 and 1978, two or three of the more favorable sites will be mapped in greater detail, and an exploratory drilling program will be established to determine the extent of fracturing at depth and the hydrology of these fractures. Conceptual designs of mined repositories in hard rock are also being made with the hope of identifying, at an early stage in this program, special problems in hard-rock repositories that may require development and study

  2. Experimental study of hydrogen isotopes storage on titanium bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasut, Felicia; Zamfirache, Marius; Bornea, Anisia; Pearsica, Claudia; Bidica, Nicolae

    2002-01-01

    As known, the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda equipped with a Canadian reactor, of CANDU type, is the most powerful tritium source from Europe. On long term, due to a 6·10 16 Bq/year, Cernavoda area will be contaminated due to the increasing tritium quantity. Also, the continuous contamination of heavy water from the reactor, induces a reduction of moderation's capacity. Therefore, one considers that it is improperly to use heavy water if its activity level is higher than 40 Ci/kg in the moderator and 2 Ci/kg in the cooling fluid. For these reasons, we have developed a detritiation technology, based on catalytic isotopic exchange and cryogenic distillation. Tritium will be removed from the tritiated heavy water, so it appears the necessity of storage of tritium in a special vessel that can provide a high level of protection and safety of environment and personal. There several metals were tested as storage beds for hydrogen isotopes. One of the reference materials used for storage of hydrogen isotopes is uranium, a material with a great storage capacity, but unfortunately it is a radioactive metal and also can react with the impurities from the stored gas. Other metals and alloys as ZrCo, Ti, FeTi are also adequate as storage beds at normal temperature. The paper presents studies about the reaction between hydrogen and titanium used as storage bed for the hydrogen isotopes resulted after the detritiation of tritiated heavy water. The experiments that were carried out used protium and mixture of deuterium and protium at different storage parameters as process gas. (authors)

  3. Canadian beef quality audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Donkersgoed, J; Jewison, G; Mann, M; Cherry, B; Altwasser, B; Lower, R; Wiggins, K; Dejonge, R; Thorlakson, B; Moss, E; Mills, C; Grogan, H

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted in 4 Canadian processing plants in 1995-96 to determine the prevalence of quality defects in Canadian cattle. One percent of the annual number of cattle processed in Canada were evaluated on the processing floor and 0.1% were graded in the cooler. Brands were observed on 37% and multiple brands on 6% of the cattle. Forty percent of the cattle had horns, 20% of which were scurs, 33% were stubs, 10% were tipped, and 37% were full length. Tag (mud and manure on the hide) was observed on 34% of the cattle. Bruises were found on 78% of the carcasses, 81% of which were minor in severity. Fifteen percent of the bruises were located on the round, 29% on the loin, 40% on the rib, 16% on the chuck, and 0.02% on the brisket. Grubs were observed in 0.02% of the steers, and injection sites were observed in 1.3% of whole hanging carcasses. Seventy percent of the livers were passed for human food and 14% for pet food; 16% were condemned. Approximately 71% of the liver condemnations were due to liver abscesses. Four percent of the heads, 6% of the tongues, and 0.2% of whole carcasses were condemned. The pregnancy rate in female cattle was approximately 6.7%. The average hot carcass weight was 357 kg (s = 40) in steers, 325 kg (s = 41) in heifers, 305 kg (s = 53) in cows, 388 kg (s = 62) in virgin bulls and 340 kg (s = 39) in mature bulls. The average ribeye area in all cattle was 84 cm2 (s = 12); range 29 cm2 to 128 cm2. Grade fat was highly variable and averaged 9 mm (s = 4) for steers and heifers, 6 mm (s = 6) for cows, 5 mm (s = 1) for virgin bulls, and 4 mm (s = 0.5) for mature bulls. The average lean meat yield was 59.7% in cattle (s = 3.4); range 39% to 67%. One percent of the carcasses were devoid of marbling, 1% were dark cutters, and 0.05% of the steer carcasses were staggy. Six percent of the carcasses had poor conformation, 3.7% were underfinished, and 0.7% were overfinished. Yellow fat was observed in 4% of the carcasses; 10% of carcasses were

  4. Radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation sources is a privilege; in order to retain the privilege, all persons who use sources of radiation must follow policies and procedures for their safe and legal use. The purpose of this poster is to describe the policies and procedures of the Radiation Protection Program. Specific conditions of radiation safety require the establishment of peer committees to evaluate proposals for the use of radionuclides, the appointment of a radiation safety officer, and the implementation of a radiation safety program. In addition, the University and Medical Centre administrations have determined that the use of radiation producing machines and non-ionizing radiation sources shall be included in the radiation safety program. These Radiation Safety policies are intended to ensure that such use is in accordance with applicable State and Federal regulations and accepted standards as directed towards the protection of health and the minimization of hazard to life or property. It is the policy that all activities involving ionizing radiation or radiation emitting devices be conducted so as to keep hazards from radiation to a minimum. Persons involved in these activities are expected to comply fully with the Canadian Nuclear Safety Act and all it. The risk of prosecution by the Department of Health and Community Services exists if compliance with all applicable legislation is not fulfilled. (author)

  5. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Investigational research on safety technology in the hydrogen energy system; 1974 nendo suiso erergy system ni okeru hoan gijutsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-01

    In this study, samples were surveyed and collected of the present regulations and standard, disaster accident, basic literature, etc. concerning the safety of hydrogen in Japan and abroad. Further, according to the necessity, these collected data were translated. The data to be examined/collected are those in and after 1950, and the data except the above-mentioned are collected if those are thought to be important. As to the condition of hydrogen to be examined/surveyed, those under all conditions from gas (normal pressure) to liquid and solidified hydrogen. The data for survey were classified into law/standard, corporate standard, samples of disaster accident, and general literature. The general literature was classified into general physical property, material relation, fire/explosion, and harmfulness/environment. The number of the disasters collected is 81, from which 3 in relation to suffocation and handicap were excluded. The rest is related to fire/explosion and burst. Most accidents occurred at plant or on corporate side, however, it is worthy of note that accidents occurred during the charge of buttery and with advertising balloon or balloon. (NEDO)

  6. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Study on a system to refine/transport/store hydrogen and the safety technology (Summary); 1974 nendo suiso no seisei yuso chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Yoyakuban

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-30

    This study aims at the following. As to an alternative plan of the hydrogen distribution system, this paper makes the comprehensive evaluation from viewpoints of possibility, adaptability to society, economical efficiency, reliability, dynamic characteristics, etc., selects the most rational system and picked up the problems for realization of the system. It also sets up standards for safety technology relating to the hydrogen energy system and acquires the basic knowledge/information on concrete disaster prevention technology which backs up the standards. Among those, in this fiscal year, as system analysis of the hydrogen distribution system, study was made on system analysis of the system alternative plan and problems on system realization. Next, as an investigational study on safety technology in hydrogen energy system, the paper conducted the survey/collection in Japan and abroad of the present law, standards for handling, and examples of disaster/accident in relation to hydrogen, and the survey research on the concrete safety problem predicted. The paper studied the technology related to the safety problem required for safety. Industrial Research Institute, Japan, and the four companies under re-consignment made each report in which the results of the research were detailedly arranged. This paper is a summary of these reports. (NEDO)

  7. Hydrogen application dynamics and networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E. [Air Liquide Large Industries, Champigny-sur-Marne (France)

    2010-12-30

    The Chemical Industry consumes large volumes of hydrogen as raw material for the manufacture of numerous products (e.g. polyamides and polyurethanes account for 60% of hydrogen demand). The hydrogen demand was in the recent past and will continue to be driven by the polyurethane family. China will host about 60% of new hydrogen needs over the period 2010-2015 becoming the first hydrogen market next year and reaching 25% of market share by 2015 (vs. only 4% in 2001). Air Liquide supplies large volumes of Hydrogen (and other Industrial Gases) to customers by on-site plants and through pipeline networks which offer significant benefits such as higher safety, reliability and flexibility of supply. Thanks to its long term strategy and heavy investment in large units and pipeline networks, Air Liquide is the Industrial Gas leader in most of the world class Petrochemical basins (Rotterdam, Antwerp, US Gulf Coast, Yosu, Caojing,..) (orig.)

  8. Canadian wind energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templin, R J; South, P

    1976-01-01

    Several aspects of recent work at the National Research Council of Canada on the development of vertical-axis turbines have been reviewed. Most of this work, during the past year or more, has been in support of the design of a 200 kW unit now being built for experimental operation on the Magdelen Islands in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Results of small and large scale aeroelastic wind tunnel model experiments have confirmed that very large scale vertical-axis wind turbines are feasible, especially if designed for normal operation at constant rotational speed. A computer model of a simple mixed power system has indicated that substantial cost savings may be possible by using wind energy in Canadian east coast regions. 4 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Women and nuclear issues: Comments in a Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne-Marsolais, Rita

    1989-01-01

    When the Canadian Nuclear industry launched its information program, it was found that women were less supportive of nuclear power. Reasons were difficult to pin-point and hovered around individual perceptions and misunderstandings. The basis of the Canadian Nuclear Association Public Information program lies with its target: men and women equally. The Program Takes Into Consideration The major characteristics and nuances of these two groups. Female Characteristics from Canadian Perspective are: Strong sense of generation continuity; Detail and task oriented; Nontechnical training; Strong sense of individuality (local). Patterns of behavoiur in relation to nuclear industry for women in Canada are: not prone to take risks; micro-economic approach to decisions (local); little confidence in technology; pragmatic and balanced in their choices (local). Major concerns of Canadian women are: Safety of power plants; disposal of waste; peace and environment versus growth and energy need; trustworthiness of the industry. Canadian nuclear association public information program communirations -approach covers: the right message, down to earth language, factual and real information for real choices, effective reach: spokespeople and media buy. Results of polls: show thtt women are less in favour of Nuclear energy in Canada today than men, consider NPPs less important in Meeting Canada's energy need in the years ahead; and think that Nuclear Energy is not a choice for Canada of all sources of energy available for large scale use

  10. Dictionaries of Canadian English | Considine | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... its best, reached a high degree of sophistication, there are still major opportunities waiting to be taken. keywords: dictionary, lexicography, canadian english, canadianisms, national dictionaries, canadian french, canadian first nations lan-guages, bilingual dictionaries, regional dictionaries, unfinished diction-ary projects ...

  11. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  12. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  13. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  14. 2016 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-09

    The 2016 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2016 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; market transformation; and Small Business Innovation Research projects.

  15. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  16. Integrated waste hydrogen utilization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, C.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The BC Hydrogen Highway's, Integrated Waste Hydrogen Utilization Project (IWHUP) is a multi-faceted, synergistic collaboration that will capture waste hydrogen and promote its use through the demonstration of 'Hydrogen Economy' enabling technologies developed by Canadian companies. IWHUP involves capturing and purifying a small portion of the 600 kg/hr of by-product hydrogen vented to the atmosphere at the ERCO's electrochemical sodium chlorate plant in North Vancouver, BC. The captured hydrogen will then be compressed so it is suitable for transportation on roadways and can be used as a fuel in transportation and stationary fuel cell demonstrations. In summary, IWHUP invests in the following; Facilities to produce up to 20kg/hr of 99.999% pure 6250psig hydrogen using QuestAir's leading edge Pressure Swing Absorption technology; Ultra high-pressure transportable hydrogen storage systems developed by Dynetek Industries, Powertech Labs and Sacre-Davey Engineering; A Mobile Hydrogen Fuelling Station to create Instant Hydrogen Infrastructure for light-duty vehicles; Natural gas and hydrogen (H-CNG) blending and compression facilities by Clean Energy for fueling heavy-duty vehicles; Ten hydrogen, internal combustion engine (H-ICE), powered light duty pick-up vehicles and a specialized vehicle training, maintenance, and emissions monitoring program with BC Hydro, GVRD and the District of North Vancouver; The demonstration of Westport's H-CNG technology for heavy-duty vehicles in conjunction with local transit properties and a specialized vehicle training, maintenance, and emissions monitoring program; The demonstration of stationary fuel cell systems that will provide clean power for reducing peak-load power demands (peak shaving), grid independence and water heating; A comprehensive communications and outreach program designed to educate stakeholders, the public, regulatory bodies and emergency response teams in the local community, Supported by industry

  17. The Canadian Dollar and the Dutch and Canadian Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Coulombe

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the spectacular rise of the dollar, along with rising natural-resource prices during the first decade of the 21st century, Canadians heard a great deal about Dutch disease. Many politicians and pundits blamed the phenomenon — in which a country’s currency, inflated by rising commodity prices, renders manufacturing exports increasingly uncompetitive — for rising unemployment in the Canadian manufacturing industry. But a close look at what happened during that period reveals that the Dutch disease mechanism was only part of the story. The other part, and quantitatively the most important, is an affliction of an altogether different providence: Canadian disease. Canadian disease is the economic trouble that can be caused by Canada’s extraordinarily heavy reliance on the United States as a trading partner. As a consequence, a sudden depreciation of the U.S, dollar will deteriorate the competitiveness of Canadian manufacturing exporters. Such a phenomenon was at work during the “Great Appreciation” of the Canadian dollar between 2002 and 2008 — the largest such appreciation on record in this country. The depreciation of the U.S. dollar is a phenomenon that is independent of the resource boom and the resulting consequences on the Canadian economy cannot be endorsed to a Dutch disease. Almost 2/3 of the employment losses that are exchange rate related in the trade-exposed manufacturers in Canada during the 2002–2008 period could be attributed to the Canadian disease. The Canadian dollar is partly driven by commodity prices, and the appreciation of the Canadian dollar exerts a negative impact on manufacturing industries that are exposed to international competition. This phenomenon can be coined as a Dutch Affair. The Dutch Affair becomes a disease in the long run when the non-renewable resource is depleted and the manufacturing base is gone. New manufacturing activities might not reappear due to a variety of obstacles. In Canada

  18. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    "Voluntary migrants to Canada are generally healthier than the average Canadian, but after ten years in the country they report poorer health and higher rates of chronic disease than those born here...

  19. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    .... What contributes to this deterioration, and how can its effects be mitigated? Engendering Migrant Health brings together researchers from across Canada to address the intersections of gender, immigration, and health in the lives of new Canadians...

  20. The Canadian heavy water situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.

    The Canadian heavy water industry is analyzed. Supply and demand are predicted through 1985. Pricing is broken down into components. Backup R and D contributes greatly to process improvements. (E.C.B.)

  1. Canadian gas supply : an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochefort, T.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the daily production from the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) from 1986 to 1997 was presented. This presentation also outlined Canadian production trends, Canadian reserves and resources, and supply challenges. Ultimate conventional marketable gas from the WCSB, the Scotian Shelf, the Beaufort Sea and Canada's Arctic region was estimated at 591 TCF. Issues regarding supply and demand of natural gas such as the impact of electricity restructuring on pricing, generation fuel mix, the capacity of the U.S. market to absorb Canadian heavy oil production, and the influence of the rate of technological advances on supply and demand were outlined. The overall conclusion confirmed the health and competitiveness of the Canadian upstream sector and expressed confidence that the WCSB can support rising levels of production to meet the expected continued market growth. tabs., figs

  2. Canadian perspectives on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstadt, P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada has been in the forefront of irradiation technology for over 30 years. Some 83 of the 147 irradiators used worldwide are Canadian-built, yet Canadian food processors have been very slow to use the technology. This paper is an update on the food irradiation regulatory situation in Canada and the factors that influence it. It also reviews some significant non-regulatory developments. (author)

  3. Canadian hydrocarbon transportation system : transportation assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This document provided an assessment of the Canadian hydrocarbon transportation system. In addition to regulating the construction and operation of Canada's 45,000 km of pipeline that cross international and provincial borders, Canada's National Energy Board (NEB) regulates the trade of natural gas, oil and natural gas liquids. The ability of pipelines to delivery this energy is critical to the country's economic prosperity. The pipeline system includes large-diameter, cross-country, high-pressure natural gas pipelines, low-pressure crude oil and oil products pipelines and small-diameter pipelines. In order to assess the hydrocarbon transportation system, staff at the NEB collected data from pipeline companies and a range of publicly available sources. The Board also held discussions with members of the investment community regarding capital markets and emerging issues. The assessment focused largely on evaluating whether Canadians benefit from an efficient energy infrastructure and markets. The safety and environmental integrity of the pipeline system was also evaluated. The current adequacy of pipeline capacity was assessed based on price differentials compared with firm service tolls for major transportation paths; capacity utilization on pipelines; and, the degree of apportionment on major oil pipelines. The NEB concluded that the Canadian hydrocarbon transportation system is working effectively, with an adequate capacity in place on existing natural gas pipelines, but with a tight capacity on oil pipelines. It was noted that shippers continue to indicate that they are reasonably satisfied with the services provided by pipeline companies and that the NEB-regulated pipeline companies are financially stable. 14 refs, 11 tabs., 28 figs., 4 appendices

  4. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  5. Development of Canadian seismic design approach and overview of seismic standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmani, A. [Amec Foster Wheeler, Toronto, ON (Canada); Aziz, T. [TSAziz Consulting Inc., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Historically the Canadian seismic design approaches have evolved for CANDU® nuclear power plants to ensure that they are designed to withstand a design basis earthquake (DBE) and have margins to meet the safety requirements of beyond DBE (BDBE). While the Canadian approach differs from others, it is comparable and in some cases more conservative. The seismic requirements are captured in five CSA nuclear standards which are kept up to date and incorporate lessons learnt from recent seismic events. This paper describes the evolution of Canadian approach, comparison with others and provides an overview and salient features of CSA seismic standards. (author)

  6. Experimental study of laminar and turbulent flame speed of a spherical flame in a fan-stirred closed vessel for hydrogen safety application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulier, J. [Institut de Combustion, Aérothermique, Réactivité et Environnement, CNRS-ICARE (France); Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) (France); Chaumeix, N., E-mail: chaumeix@cnrs-orleans.fr [Institut de Combustion, Aérothermique, Réactivité et Environnement, CNRS-ICARE (France); Halter, F. [Institut de Combustion, Aérothermique, Réactivité et Environnement, CNRS-ICARE (France); Meynet, N.; Bentaïb, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) (France)

    2017-02-15

    The aim of this paper is to report new experimental results on the effect of turbulence on the propagation speed of hydrogen/air flames. To do so, a new experimental setup, called the spherical bomb, has been designed and built at CNRS-ICARE laboratory. With this new setup, the effect of a given and well-characterized turbulence intensity on the increase of hydrogen/air flame speed can be investigated. This new facility consists of a spherical vessel equipped (563 mm internal diameter) equipped with 8 motors which are linked to fans inside the bomb. Fan actuation induces the generation of a turbulent flow inside the vessel prior to any ignition. The spherical bomb is equipped with 4 quartz windows (200 mm optical diameter) that allow the use of a Particle Image Velocimetry diagnostic in order to characterize the turbulence level inside the bomb. The flame propagation was recorded using a high speed camera at 19,002 frames per second. These experiments were performed for lean to stoichiometric hydrogen/air mixtures (16–20% of H{sub 2} in air), initially at ambient temperature and pressure, and for a rotation speed from 1000 to 5000 rpm. The PIV measurements showed that a homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is created with a fluctuation speed that can reach 4 m/s at 5000 rpm.

  7. Progress in hydrogen fueled busses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P.B.; Mazaika, D.M.; Tyler, T.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Thor/ISE fuel cell bus has been in demonstration and revenue service during 2002-2003 at sites including SunLine Transit, Chula Vista Transit, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority, and AC Transit in Oakland. By taking advantage of ISE's advanced hybrid-electric drive technology, this 30-foot bus operates with a much smaller fuel cell than those used in other buses of this class. Further, stress on the fuel cell is diminished. Based on the exceptional performance of this prototype bus, the transit agencies listed above have concluded that hybrid electric hydrogen fueled buses are attractive. Two types of hydrogen fueled hybrid electric buses will be described: - fuel cell powered, and - HICE (Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine) This progress report will include: 1. Experience with the Thor/ISE fuel cell bus, including results from revenue service at two transit locations, 2. Design and fabrication status of the advanced fuel cell buses being built for AC Transit and SunLine Transit, 3. Design and fabrication status of the prototype HHICE (Hybrid electric Hydrogen fueled Internal Combustion Engine) bus that uses a Ford hydrogen burning engine, mated to a generator, rather than a fuel cell. Other than the engine, the drive train in the HHICE bus is nearly identical to that of a fuel cell hybrid-electric bus. Canadian participation in the HHICE bus is extensive, it is a New Flyer platform and will be winter tested in Winnipeg. (author)

  8. Canadian leadership in energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    Canada's energy is complex and an important resource as it fuels and funds the economy. The unique character of Canada's energy production and consumption provides strength to the country. The purpose of this booklet was to highlight Canada's energy production and consumption and to demonstrate Canada's rank globally with other major global energy players. The document also presented information on the value of Canada's energy exports, Canada's relationship with the United States, and Canada's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Specifically, the document discussed Canada's energy in a global context; the value of Canada's energy exports; domestic value of energy; Canada's unique energy mix; Canada's electricity mix; Canada's carbon dioxide emissions; energy strategies; and the importance of energy to Canadians. It was concluded that there are 14 federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions managing their respective energy resources. All of these regions, with the exception of Saskatchewan have produced an energy strategy document or a climate change action plan focusing on 8 areas of action, notably awareness; benefit; efficiency; development; diversification; electricity; and emissions. refs., tabs., figs.

  9. Canadian fuel development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gacesa, M.; Young, E.G.

    1992-11-01

    CANDU power reactor fuel has demonstrated an enviable operational record. More than 99.9% of the bundles irradiated have provided defect-free service. Defect excursions are responsible for the majority of reported defects. In some cases research and development effort is necessary to resolve these problems. In addition, development initiatives are also directed at improvements of the current design or reduction of fueling cost. The majority of the funding for this effort has been provided by COG (CANDU Owners' Group) over the past 10 to 15 years. This paper contains an overview of some key fuel technology programs within COG. The CANDU reactor is unique among the world's power reactors in its flexibility and its ability to use a number of different fuel cycles. An active program of analysis and development, to demonstrate the viability of different fuel cycles in CANDU, has been funded by AECL in parallel with the work on the natural uranium cycle. Market forces and advances in technology have obliged us to reassess and refocus some parts of our effort in this area, and significant success has been achieved in integrating all the Canadian efforts in this area. This paper contains a brief summary of some key components of the advanced fuel cycle program. (Author) 4 figs., tab., 18 refs

  10. Canadian leadership in energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-09-01

    Canada's energy is complex and an important resource as it fuels and funds the economy. The unique character of Canada's energy production and consumption provides strength to the country. The purpose of this booklet was to highlight Canada's energy production and consumption and to demonstrate Canada's rank globally with other major global energy players. The document also presented information on the value of Canada's energy exports, Canada's relationship with the United States, and Canada's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Specifically, the document discussed Canada's energy in a global context; the value of Canada's energy exports; domestic value of energy; Canada's unique energy mix; Canada's electricity mix; Canada's carbon dioxide emissions; energy strategies; and the importance of energy to Canadians. It was concluded that there are 14 federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions managing their respective energy resources. All of these regions, with the exception of Saskatchewan have produced an energy strategy document or a climate change action plan focusing on 8 areas of action, notably awareness; benefit; efficiency; development; diversification; electricity; and emissions. refs., tabs., figs.

  11. Overview of North American Hydrogen Sensor Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, Kathleen [SRA International, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Lopez, Hugo [UL LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Cairns, Julie [CSA Group, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wichert, Richard [Professional Engineering, Inc.. Citrus Heights, CA (United States); Rivkin, Carl [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, Robert [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, William [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-11

    An overview of the main North American codes and standards associated with hydrogen safety sensors is provided. The distinction between a code and a standard is defined, and the relationship between standards and codes is clarified, especially for those circumstances where a standard or a certification requirement is explicitly referenced within a code. The report identifies three main types of standards commonly applied to hydrogen sensors (interface and controls standards, shock and hazard standards, and performance-based standards). The certification process and a list and description of the main standards and model codes associated with the use of hydrogen safety sensors in hydrogen infrastructure are presented.

  12. Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project was formally established in 1982. The project is directed toward the further development of Canadian capabilities in five major areas: tritium technology, breeder technology, materials technology, equipment development and safety and the environment. The project is funded by three partners - Government of Canada (50%), Ontario Provincial Government (25%) and Ontario Hydro (25%). The fiscal year 1984/85 represents the third year of operation of the project. In 1984/85, 108 contracts were awarded totalling $4 million. Supplementary funding by subcontractors added approximately $1.9 million to the total project value. More than 200 people participated in the technical work involved in the project. Sixteen people were on attachment to foreign facilities for terms ranging from 1 month to 2.5 years. Five patents were applied for including a tritium discrimination monitor, a new radio-chemical tritium separation method, a new variation of fuel cleanup by gas chromatography, a passive tritium permeation system using bimetallic membranes, and a new breeder process using lithium salts dissolved in heavy water

  13. Canadian Petroleum Products Institute 1996 annual review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Canadian Petroleum Products Institute (CPPI) is an association of Canadian companies involved in the downstream sector of the petroleum industry which includes refining, distributing and marketing of petroleum products. CPPI's mandate includes: (1) establishing environmental policies, (2) establishing working relationships with governments to develop public policy, (3) developing guidelines for the safe handling of petroleum products, and (4) providing information about the petroleum industry to the public. Canada's 19 refineries processed an average of 1.5 million barrels of crude oil per day in 1996. Domestic sources of crude made up 61 per cent of crude oil processed in 1996. Total exports during the year amounted to 105 million barrels. Some of the issues that the CPPI focused on during 1996 included the controversy over the future of the octane enhancing fuel additive MMT, fuel quality standards for transportation fuels and reformulated fuels, gasoline pricing, air quality and workplace safety. CPPI members' participation in the Voluntary Challenge and Registry (VCR) program towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions was also discussed. The industry was also actively involved in seeking to improve its refinery wastewater discharges

  14. Cryogenics safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reider, R.

    1977-01-01

    The safety hazards associated with handling cryogenic fluids are discussed in detail. These hazards include pressure buildup when a cryogenic fluid is heated and becomes a gas, potential damage to body tissues due to surface contact, toxic risk from breathing air altered by cryogenic fluids, dangers of air solidification, and hazards of combustible cryogens such as liquified oxygen, hydrogen, or natural gas or of combustible mixtures. Safe operating procedures and emergency planning are described

  15. World-wide cooperation in nuclear power: a canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the point of view of Canadian Authorities about the future of nuclear activities. Generally speaking, OECD countries will be focusing their efforts on plant refurbishment, maintenance and life extension while non-OECD countries will be facing capacity expansion needs. This duality will favour collaboration in the nuclear field between OECD and other countries. Key areas for enhanced cooperation will be: nuclear technology, nuclear safety, regulations, waste management, non-proliferation and financing

  16. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  17. Decision 99-16: Canadian 88 Energy Corp. application to drill a level 4 critical sour gas well, Lochend Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    Canadian 88 Energy Corp. applied, pursuant to section 2.020 of the Oil and Gas Conservation Regulations, for a licence to drill a level 4 critical sour gas well to be located at Legal Subdivision 10 of Section 35, Township 26, Range 3, West of the fifth Meridian. The level 4 designation is used to determine the minimum separation distance between the well and land-use surface developments during the suspended or producing stage. This 10-35 well would require a minimum separation distance of 100 m from any individual dwelling development up to eight dwellings per quarter section, 500 m from an unrestricted county development, and 1500 m from an urban centre or public facility. The application and interventions were considered at a hearing in Calgary, Alberta commencing on 4 May 1998. The issues respecting the application were: the need for the well, the proposed well location, the potential hydrogen sulfide release rate, the drilling and completion considerations, the public safety risk assessment, emergency preparedness, the land use impacts, and public consultation. The Board believes that the public safety risks associated with the proposed well are representative of normal industrial risks accepted by society and that the well can be safely drilled. Also, the Board believes that these risks are similar to existing facilities and are acceptable if managed through strict adherence to the risk control measures required in the existing regulations. Given this, and having considered all the evidence, the Board is prepared to issue the well licence after Canadian 88 has undertaken, committed to, and submitted a number of requirements for review

  18. Importance of international standards on hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Gingras, S.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation provided some basic information regarding standards and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). It also explained the importance of standardization activities, particularly ISO/TC 197 which applies to hydrogen technologies. Standards are established by consensus. They define the minimum requirements that will ensure that products and services are reliable and effective. Standards contribute to the elimination of technical barriers to trade (TBT). The harmonization of standards around the world is desirable in a free trade environment. The influence of the TBT on international standardization was discussed with particular reference to the objectives of ISO/TC 197 hydrogen technologies. One of the priorities for ISO/TC 197 is a hydrogen fuel infrastructure which includes refuelling stations, fuelling connectors, and storage technologies for gaseous and liquid hydrogen. Other priorities include an agreement between the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the ISO, in particular the IEC/TC 105 and ISO/TC 197 for the development of fuel cell standards. The international standards that have been published thus far include ISO 13984:1999 for liquid hydrogen, land vehicle fuelling system interface, and ISO 14687:1999 for hydrogen fuel product specification. Standards are currently under development for: liquid hydrogen; airport hydrogen fuelling facilities; gaseous hydrogen blends; basic considerations for the safety of hydrogen systems; gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and gaseous hydrogen for land vehicle filling connectors. It was concluded that the widespread use of hydrogen is dependent on international standardization

  19. Health practices of Canadian physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Erica; Segura, Carolina

    2009-08-01

    To study the health and health practices of Canadian physicians, which can often influence patient health. Mailed survey. Canada. A random sample of 8100 Canadian physicians; 7934 were found to be eligible and 3213 responded (40.5% response rate). Factors that influence health, such as consumption of fruits and vegetables, amount of exercise and alcohol consumption, smoking status, body mass idex, and participation in preventive health screening measures, as well as work-life balance and emotional stability. Canadian physicians are healthy. More than 90% reported being in good to excellent health, and only 5% reported that poor physical or mental health made it difficult to handle their workload more than half the time in the previous month (although a quarter had reduced work activity because of long-term health conditions). Eight percent were obese, 3% currently smoked cigarettes, and 1% typically consumed 5 drinks or more on days when they drank alcohol. Physicians averaged 4.7 hours of exercise per week and ate fruits and vegetables 4.8 times a day. Their personal screening practices were largely compliant with Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommendations. They averaged 38 hours per week on patient care and 11 hours on other professional activities. Fifty-seven percent agreed that they had a good work-life balance, and 11% disagreed with the statement "If I can, I work when I am ill." Compared with self-reports from the general Canadian population, Canadian physicians, like American physicians, seem to be healthy and to have generally healthy behaviour. There is, however, room for improvement in physicians' personal and professional well-being, and improving their personal health practices could be an efficient and beneficent way to improve the health of all Canadians.

  20. The hydrogen mine introduction initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betournay, M.C.; Howell, B. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories

    2009-07-01

    In an effort to address air quality concerns in underground mines, the mining industry is considering the use fuel cells instead of diesel to power mine production vehicles. The immediate issues and opportunities associated with fuel cells use include a reduction in harmful greenhouse gas emissions; reduction in ventilation operating costs; reduction in energy consumption; improved health benefits; automation; and high productivity. The objective of the hydrogen mine introduction initiative (HMII) is to develop and test the range of fundamental and needed operational technology, specifications and best practices for underground hydrogen power applications. Although proof of concept studies have shown high potential for fuel cell use, safety considerations must be addressed, including hydrogen behaviour in confined conditions. This presentation highlighted the issues to meet operational requirements, notably hydrogen production; delivery and storage; mine regulations; and hydrogen behaviour underground. tabs., figs.

  1. Magnesium mechanical alloys for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.; Konstanchuk, I.; Stepanov, A.; Boldyrev, V.

    1985-01-01

    Metal hybrides are currently being used to store and handle hydrogen and its isotopes. They are also being tested in hydrogen compressors and in heat energy, refrigerators and in hydrogen and thermal storage devices. Metal hydrides have been proposed as one of the possible media for hydrogen storage to overcome the limitations of other techniques in regard to safety hydrogen weight and volume ration. The suitability of metal hybrides as a hydrogen storage media depends on a number of factors such as storage capacity, reactivity with hydrogen at various pressures and temperatures, and the cost of base materials. Magnesium based alloys are promising materials for storing hydrogen. They are generally made by argon melting and no attention has been payed to other fabrication techniques such as mechanical alloying or powder technique

  2. Optical Fiber Grating Hydrogen Sensors: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jixiang; Zhu, Li; Wang, Gaopeng; Xiang, Feng; Qin, Yuhuan; Wang, Min; Yang, Minghong

    2017-03-12

    In terms of hydrogen sensing and detection, optical fiber hydrogen sensors have been a research issue due to their intrinsic safety and good anti-electromagnetic interference. Among these sensors, hydrogen sensors consisting of fiber grating coated with sensitive materials have attracted intensive research interests due to their good reliability and distributed measurements. This review paper mainly focuses on optical fiber hydrogen sensors associated with fiber gratings and various materials. Their configurations and sensing performances proposed by different groups worldwide are reviewed, compared and discussed in this paper. Meanwhile, the challenges for fiber grating hydrogen sensors are also addressed.

  3. Achievement report for fiscal 2000 on the phase II research and development for hydrogen utilizing international clean energy system technology (WE-NET). Task 2. Investigations and researched on safety measures; 2000 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) dai 2 ki kenkyu kaihatsu. Task 2. Anzen taisaku ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This paper describes the achievements in fiscal 2000 from the WE-NET Phase II for Task-2, the safety measures. In order to structure safety design criteria, potential anomalies, accident phenomena, and safety measures that can be applied were put into order based on the conceptual designs on hydrogen supply stations. Items of information were collected and put into order on failure rates and other factors to estimate accident occurrence frequency required for quantitative risk assessment. Representative event scenarios were selected by estimating the event evolving processes. In order to obtain knowledge about the steady state of run-off and evaporation of liquefied hydrogen, experiments were performed by using a small-size experimenting device, whereas new findings were discovered. To identify the fundamental knowledge related to explosion of hydrogen, and to verify a program simulating the explosion, explosion experiments were inaugurated to have established the stable experiment performing method. A calculation program simulating leakage and evaporation of liquefied hydrogen was verified and analyzed from the experimental results, and the program improvements were discussed. Pre-estimation and verification were carried out on the explosion experiments by using the hydrogen explosion and combustion simulating calculation program, and discussions were given on program improvement. (NEDO)

  4. Perspectives on dam safety in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, R.

    2004-01-01

    Canadian dam safety issues were reviewed from the perspective of a water resources engineer who is not a dam safety practitioner. Several external factors affecting dam safety were identified along with perceived problems in dam safety administration. The author claims that the main weakness in safety practices can be attributed to provincial oversights and lack of federal engagement. Some additions to the Canadian Dam Safety Guidelines were proposed to address these weaknesses. Canada has hundreds of large dams and high hazard dams whose failure would result in severe downstream consequences. The safety of dams built on boundary waters shared with the United States have gained particular attention from the International Joint Commission. This paper also examined safety criteria for concerns such as aging dams, sabotage and global climate change that may compromise the safety of a dam. 26 refs

  5. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin

  6. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby

    2010-01-01

    previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a

  7. Chernobyl - a Canadian technical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howieson, J.Q.; Snell, V.G.

    1987-01-01

    In this report we present the design review done to date in Canada by AECL. From the Canadian point of view it covers: 1) relevant information on the Chernobyl design and the accident, both as presented by the Soviets at the Post-Accident Review Meeting (PARM) held in Vienna from August 25-29, 1986, and as deduced from publicly available Soviet documentation; and 2) details of AECL's technical review of the CANDU PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) against the background of the Chernobyl accident, and implications of the Chernobyl accident. Reviews of operational aspects are underway by the Canadian electrical utilities and a review by the Canadian regulatory agency (the Atomic Energy Control Board) is near completion

  8. Responsible Canadian energy progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) represents oil and gas companies throughout Canada; its members produce over 90% of Canada's natural gas and crude oil output. The aim of the Association is to improve the economics of the Canadian upstream petroleum sector in an environmentally and socially responsible way. The aim of this Responsible Canadian Energy report is to present the performance data of CAPP's members for the year 2009. Data, trends, and performance analyses are provided throughout the document. This analysis makes it possible to determine where progress has been made and where performance improvement is necessary. It also presents success stories and best practices so that other companies can learn from them how to improve their own performance. This paper provides useful information on the performance of the upstream petroleum industry in Canada and highlights where the focus should be for further improvement in its performance.

  9. Political Socialization Research and Canadian Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins, George S.

    1977-01-01

    Presents a review of the burgeoning field of Canadian political socialization research as it applies to children and youth, and considers some implications of recent findings for the Canadian studies curriculum. (Editor)

  10. Research Awards: Canadian Partnerships Program Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... IDRC's Canadian Partnerships (CP) Program offers a Research ... For this, they may consider quantitative and qualitative methods, case studies, ... What types of processes do Canadian organizations use to learn about their ...

  11. Ethno-linguistic peculiarities of French Canadian and English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When English Canadian and French Canadian phraseology is compared, the greater role of religion in the French Canadian community is evident, rather than in English Canadian; the influence of the Canadian variant of the English language on the Canadian variant of French is clearly expressed. With all the differences, ...

  12. Transnational archives: the Canadian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Creet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the concept of the transnational archive as a counterpoint to the idea that a national archive is necessarily a locus of a static idea of nation. The Canadian national archives is used as a case study of an archives that was transnational in its inception, and one that has continued to change in its mandate and materials as a response to patterns in migration and changing notions of multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy. It introduces the most recent formation of the transnational archive and its denizens: the genealogical archive inhabited by family historians.

  13. Issues in Canadian LLRW management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesworth, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the issues which are of concern in Canada are similar to those being discussed in the US because Canadian low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) production is similar in quantity and characteristics to that which will be handled by some state compacts. This paper gives a Canadian viewpoint of: the choice between interim storage and permanent disposal; the importance of considering inadvertent intrusion; the role of waste categorization and stability; and the concerns in assessing disposal performance. The discussion is related to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's LLRW disposal program, and its approach to resolving these issues

  14. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  15. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  16. Financial outlook for the Canadian gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedenberg, B.

    1995-01-01

    The financial outlook for the Canadian gas industry depends on the outlook for gas prices at Canadian producing basins, the cost of producing in Canada and the volume of production of Canadian natural gas. Price, cost and volume determine the health of the Canadian industry. Industry's costs are the basis of the supply (volume) offered on the market and price is determined by the interaction of supply and demand. (author)

  17. Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF). The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFS-RF) is a collaborative program of the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and IDRC valued at CA $61 654 707 (CIDA: CA $50 000 000; IDRC: CA $11 654 707). The program ...

  18. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, César A. C.; Figueiredo, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article...

  19. Safety first

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvie, W.

    1997-06-01

    Expansion of international business opportunities for Canadian producers and service companies brings with it a dimension almost never considered on home base - security. It was pointed out that once abroad, safety and defence of people and equipment can become significant problems in many parts of the world. The nature of the security risks involved, and how best to deal with them, were discussed. The use of consultants, mostly foreign ones to date, and the kind of assistance they can provide, everything from written reports on the local situation to counter surveillance training, and bodyguard services, have been described. Examples of recent involvements with guerilla groups demanding `revolutionary war taxes`, kidnapping executives for ransom, due diligence investigations of potential partners, and the like, have been provided to illustrate the unique character of the problem, and the constant need for being alert, educated to risks, and being prepared to react to risk situations.

  20. Hydrogen fuel - Universal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, A. G.; Burg, J. A.

    The technology for the production, storage, transmission, and consumption of hydrogen as a fuel is surveyed, with the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen examined as they affect its use as a fuel. Sources of hydrogen production are described including synthesis from coal or natural gas, biomass conversion, thermochemical decomposition of water, and electrolysis of water, of these only electrolysis is considered economicially and technologically feasible in the near future. Methods of production of the large quantities of electricity required for the electrolysis of sea water are explored: fossil fuels, hydroelectric plants, nuclear fission, solar energy, wind power, geothermal energy, tidal power, wave motion, electrochemical concentration cells, and finally ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). The wind power and OTEC are considered in detail as the most feasible approaches. Techniques for transmission (by railcar or pipeline), storage (as liquid in underwater or underground tanks, as granular metal hydride, or as cryogenic liquid), and consumption (in fuel cells in conventional power plants, for home usage, for industrial furnaces, and for cars and aircraft) are analyzed. The safety problems of hydrogen as a universal fuel are discussed, noting that they are no greater than those for conventional fuels.

  1. Hydrogen Production Using Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, K. [Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Nuclear generated hydrogen has important potential advantages over other sources that will be considered for a growing hydrogen share in a future world energy economy. Still, there are technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes that need to be addressed through a vigorous research and development effort. Safety issues as well as hydrogen storage and distribution are important areas of research to be undertaken to support a successful hydrogen economy in the future. The hydrogen economy is gaining higher visibility and stronger political support in several parts of the

  2. The hydrogen production; La production d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aujollet, P.; Goldstein, St. [CEA Cadarach, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Lucchese, P. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, Dir. des Nouvelles Technologies de l' Energie, 92 (France)

    2002-07-01

    This paper gives an overview on the implementing of the hydrogen as substitution fuel in the transportation sector. It presents also the problems of this fuel storage and exploitation and describes the production modes and their safety. It also presents the main lines of the japan HTGR program. (A.L.B.)

  3. Status of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Stephens, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    The Canadian Concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste has been developed extensively over the past several years, and is now well-advanced. The Concept, which involves the construction of a waste vault 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock located in the Canadian Precambrian Shield, is supported by an R ampersand D program with the following objectives: (1) to develop and demonstrate technology to site, design, build and operate a disposal facility; (2) to develop and demonstrate a methodology to evaluate the performance of the disposal system; and (3) to demonstrate that sites are likely to exist in the Canadian Precambrian Shield that would meet the regulatory requirements. A combination of engineered and natural barriers will be used to ensure that the vault design will meet rigorous safety standards. Experimental work is being carried out to elucidate all the important phenomena associated with the safety of the vault, including the performance of engineered barriers, natural geological barriers, and the biosphere

  4. Nuclear regulation - the Canadian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, J.

    1981-09-01

    Although the Atomic Energy Control Board was established 35 years ago the basic philosophy of nuclear regulation in Canada and the underlying principles of the regulatory process remain essentially unchanged. This paper outlines the Canadian approach to nuclear regulation and explains in practical terms how the principles of regulation are applied. (author)

  5. Canadian Government Electronic Information Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Kirsti

    1993-01-01

    Examines development and evolution of Canadian government information policy in response to issues of preservation of data, information industry involvement in government data development and marketing, role of Crown copyright, and public access to government information in electronic formats. Six key information policy instruments are also…

  6. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    .... Focusing on the context of Canadian policy and society, the contributors illuminate migrants' testimonies of struggle, resistance, and solidarity as they negotiate a place for themselves in a new country. Topics range from the difficulties of Francophone refugees and the changing roles of fathers, to the experiences of queer newcomers and the importance of social unity to communal and individual health."--pub. desc.

  7. Canadian Postcolonialism: Recovering British Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2005-01-01

    The field of Postcolonial Studies is one of the academic fashions that has arisen in an attempt to amend or replace radical theories of social power since the alleged discrediting of Marxism. The Canadian case is more ambiguous. Postcolonialism, already an essentially contested concept, is especially conflicted where Canada is concerned. Canada…

  8. Fiscal 1975 Sunshine Project research report. Research on safety technology for hydrogen (Research on safety technology for hydrogen in distribution and consumption processes); 1975 nendo suiso no hoan gijutsu no kenkyu seika hokokusho. Suiso no ryutsu, shohi process ni okeru hoan gijutsu no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-05-25

    The experiment result on discharge and diffusion of hydrogen gas from underground buried conduits and compressed hydrogen gas vessels, and the hydrodynamic study result on gas discharge are as follows. The discharge experiment from underground buried conduits showed that the amount of gas leakage increased with a discharge duration linearly, and increased with a pinhole diameter at a rate more than a cross section ratio. Its underground diffusivity is large, and hydrogen gas advances as spherical wave uniformly within a certain discharge velocity. Gas leakage on the ground surface is affected by not buoyancy but wind (air flow) strongly. The discharge experiment from compressed hydrogen gas vessels showed that the diffusion concentration profile of discharged gas can be explained by conventional diffusion equation. Variation in gas pressure in vessels due to gas discharge, and durations until the end of discharge agree with hydrodynamic data on the whole. Thrust and change in gas temperature due to gas discharge can be estimated theoretically by the same manner. (NEDO)

  9. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  10. Hydrogenating oils. [British patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-08-31

    A safety fuel boiling within the limits 130/sup 0/ to 260/sup 0/C, is obtained by treating hydrocarbon mixtures boiling below 260/sup 0/C, and for the most part above 130/sup 0/C according to the process described in the parent Specification. A fraction boiling from 140/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/ C, which has been distilled off from the liquefaction product obtained by the destructive hydrogenation of coal soaked with ferrous sulphate, is passed at 485/sup 0/C under a partial pressure of 1.5 atmos. and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atmos. over a catalyst consisting of nickel and tungsten sulphides. The gasification is only 2 to 5 percent and from the reaction product a fraction of the same boiling range as the initial material is distilled off with a yield of 85 percent and an octane number of 97.

  11. Liquid fuels from Canadian coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G. W.

    1979-06-15

    In Canadian energy planning, the central issue of security of supply must be addressed by developing flexible energy systems that make the best possible use of available resources. For liquid fuel production, oil sands and heavy oil currently appear more attractive than coal or biomass as alternatives to conventional crude oil, but the magnitude of their economic advantage is uncertain. The existence of large resources of oil sands, heavy oils, natural gas and low-sulfur coals in Western Canada creates a unique opportunity for Canadians to optimize the yield from these resources and develop new technology. Many variations on the three basic liquefaction routes - hydroliquefaction, pyrolysis and synthesis - are under investigation around the world, and the technology is advancing rapidly. Each process has merit under certain circumstances. Surface-mineable subbituminous and lignite coals of Alberta and Saskatchewan appear to offer the best combination of favorable properties, deposit size and mining cost, but other deposits in Alberta, Nova Scotia and British Columbia should not be ruled out. The research effort in Canada is small by world standards, but it is unlikely that technology could be imported that is ideally suited to Canadian conditions. Importing technology is undesirable: innovation or process modification to suit Canadian coals and markets is preferred; coprocessing of coal liquids with bitumen or heavy oils would be a uniquely Canadian, exportable technology. The cost of synthetic crude from coal in Canada is uncertain, estimates ranging from $113 to $220/m/sup 3/ ($18 to $35/bbl). Existing economic evaluations vary widely depending on assumptions, and can be misleading. Product quality is an important consideration.

  12. Hydrogen risk and associated calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestier, A.; Lecomte, M.; Studer, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen risk is one aspect that can't be neglected by nuclear safety. On the other side, experimental data are very difficult to simulate the real conditions of an accident. So the numerical way can be an aid to the comprehension and the modelling of the risk. PLEXUS code, with its previous developments seems a good candidate to simulate this problem

  13. The Canadian Safeguards Support Program - A future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeffe, R.; Truong, Q.S. Bob

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Canadian Safeguards Support Program (CSSP) is one of the first safeguards support programs with an overall objective to assist the IAEA by providing technical assistance and other resources and by developing equipment to improve the effectiveness of international safeguards. This paper provides a brief discussion of the evolution of the CSSP, from the beginning when the program was under joint management between the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), a Canadian crown corporation, until recent years when the AECB became responsible for all projects and financial management. Recently, new legislation came into force and the AECB became the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC). However, the mandate and management of the CSSP under the CNSC remain fundamentally unchanged. Major CSSP activities are devoted to the following areas: (a) Human resource assistance through the provision of cost-free experts (CFEs) to the IAEA; (b) Training of IAEA inspectors and facility operators, development of training resources and integrated approaches for training; (c) System studies, e.g. the development of integrated safeguards approach for CANDU reactors, geological repository, and physical model; (d) Equipment development, e.g. the VXI Integrated Fuel Monitor, Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device, seals, remote monitoring, encryption and authentication; (e) Information technology which includes satellite imagery, Geographical Information System (GIS), and position tracking of spent fuel containers. The CSSP has continued to evolve during the past 25 years. Although formerly larger the CSSP budget has settled to a stable level of just slightly above (Canadian) $2M. Leveraging of the CSSP budget through collaborations with several Member State Support Programs and Canadian government departments has provided mutual benefits for all parties involved and useful results that have been put into practical use by the IAEA. (author)

  14. The Pharmaceutical Industry and the Canadian Government: Folie à Deux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel

    2017-08-01

    The interest of the pharmaceutical industry is in achieving a profit for its shareholders while the interest of the Canadian government should be in protecting public health. However, over the course of the past few decades the actions of the Canadian government have been tilted in favour of industry in two areas. The first is in the relationship between industry and Health Canada and is manifested in the regulation of clinical trials, the drug approval system, drug safety and promotion. The second is in economic policy as it applies to policies about patent protection, the price of medications and measures taken to incentivize research and development. The problems in the relationship are structural and will only be solved through systemic changes. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  15. Canadian CANDU plant data systems for technical surveillance and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deverno, M.; Pothier, H.; Xian, C.; Grosbois, J. De; Bosnich, M.

    1996-01-01

    Plant data systems are emerging as a critical plant support system technology. In particular, plant-wide Historical Data Systems (HDS) are pivotal to the successful implementation of technical surveillance and analysis programs supporting plant operations, maintenance, safety, and licensing activities. In partnership with Canadian CANDU utility and design organizations, AECL has conducted a review of current Canadian CANDU HDS approaches with emphasis on understanding the existing functionality and uses of plant historical data systems, their future needs and benefits. The results is a vision of a plant-wide HDS providing seamless access to both near real-time and historical data, user tool-kits for data visualization and analysis, and data management of the large volume of data acquired during the life of a plant. The successful implementation of the HDS vision will lead to higher capability and capacity factors while minimizing Operations, Maintenance, and Administration (OM and A) costs. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs

  16. Canadian CANDU plant data systems for technical surveillance and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deverno, M; Pothier, H; Xian, C [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Control Centre Technology Branch, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Grosbois, J De; Bosnich, M [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Control Centre Technology Branch, Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Labs.

    1997-12-31

    Plant data systems are emerging as a critical plant support system technology. In particular, plant-wide Historical Data Systems (HDS) are pivotal to the successful implementation of technical surveillance and analysis programs supporting plant operations, maintenance, safety, and licensing activities. In partnership with Canadian CANDU utility and design organizations, AECL has conducted a review of current Canadian CANDU HDS approaches with emphasis on understanding the existing functionality and uses of plant historical data systems, their future needs and benefits. The results is a vision of a plant-wide HDS providing seamless access to both near real-time and historical data, user tool-kits for data visualization and analysis, and data management of the large volume of data acquired during the life of a plant. The successful implementation of the HDS vision will lead to higher capability and capacity factors while minimizing Operations, Maintenance, and Administration (OM and A) costs. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs.

  17. Worker and public safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    1984-09-01

    Nuclear regulatory controls have been in place for many years in Canada to ensure that the risk for the safety of workers and members of the public is as low as reasonably possible. The Atomic Energy Control Board implements these controls by virtue of a broadly based Act of Parliament, rigorous regulations and compliance procedures. The Canadian experience with nuclear practices involves about 1 million person-years at risk without a fatality due to acute exposure to radiation

  18. Canadian heavy water production - 1970 to 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galley, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    In the last decade, heavy water production in Canada has progressed from the commissioning of a single unit plant in Nova Scotia to a major production industry employing 2200 persons and operating three plants with an aggregate annual production capability in excess of 1800 Mg. The decade opened with an impending crisis in the supply of heavy water due to failure of the first Glace Bay Heavy Water Plant and difficulty in commissioning the second Canadian plant at Port Hawkesbury. Lessons learned at this latter plant were applied to the Bruce plant where the first two units were under construction. When the Bruce units were commissioned in 1973 the rate of approach to design production rates was much improved, renewing confidence in Canada's ability to succeed in large scale heavy water production. In the early 1970's a decision was made to rehabilitate the Glace Bay plant using a novel flowsheet and this rebuilt plant commenced production in 1976. The middle of the decade was marked by two main events: changes in ownership of the operating plants and initiation of a massive construction program to support the forecast of a rapidly expanding CANDU power station construction program. New production units embodying the best features of their predecessors were committed at Bruce by Ontario Hydro and at La Prade, Quebec, by AECL. The high growth rate in electrical demand did not continue and some new plant construction was curtailed. The present installed production capacity will now probably be adequate to meet anticipated demand for the next decade. Canadian plants have now produced more than 7800 Mg of heavy water at a commercially acceptable cost and with a high degree of safety and compliance with appropriate environmental regulations

  19. Refining estimates of public health spending as measured in national health expenditure accounts: the Canadian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    The recent focus on public health stemming from, among other things, severe acute respiratory syndrome and avian flu has created an imperative to refine health-spending estimates in the Canadian Health Accounts. This article presents the Canadian experience in attempting to address the challenges associated with developing the needed taxonomies for systematically capturing, measuring, and analyzing the national investment in the Canadian public health system. The first phase of this process was completed in 2005, which was a 2-year project to estimate public health spending based on a more classic definition by removing the administration component of the previously combined public health and administration category. Comparing the refined public health estimate with recent data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development still positions Canada with the highest share of total health expenditure devoted to public health than any other country reporting. The article also provides an analysis of the comparability of public health estimates across jurisdictions within Canada as well as a discussion of the recommendations for ongoing improvement of public health spending estimates. The Canadian Institute for Health Information is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides Canadians with essential statistics and analysis on the performance of the Canadian health system, the delivery of healthcare, and the health status of Canadians. The Canadian Institute for Health Information administers more than 20 databases and registries, including Canada's Health Accounts, which tracks historically 40 categories of health spending by 5 sources of finance for 13 provincial and territorial jurisdictions. Until 2005, expenditure on public health services in the Canadian Health Accounts included measures to prevent the spread of communicable disease, food and drug safety, health inspections, health promotion, community mental health programs, public

  20. Safe Detection System for Hydrogen Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, Robert A. [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beshay, Manal [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States)

    2012-02-29

    Hydrogen is an "environmentally friendly" fuel for future transportation and other applications, since it produces only pure ("distilled") water when it is consumed. Thus, hydrogen-powered vehicles are beginning to proliferate, with the total number of such vehicles expected to rise to nearly 100,000 within the next few years. However, hydrogen is also an odorless, colorless, highly flammable gas. Because of this, there is an important need for hydrogen safety monitors that can warn of hazardous conditions in vehicles, storage facilities, and hydrogen production plants. To address this need, IOS has developed a unique intrinsically safe optical hydrogen sensing technology, and has embodied it in detector systems specifically developed for safety applications. The challenge of using light to detect a colorless substance was met by creating chemically-sensitized optical materials whose color changes in the presence of hydrogen. This reversible reaction provides a sensitive, reliable, way of detecting hydrogen and measuring its concentration using light from low-cost LEDs. Hydrogen sensors based on this material were developed in three completely different optical formats: point sensors ("optrodes"), integrated optic sensors ("optical chips"), and optical fibers ("distributed sensors") whose entire length responds to hydrogen. After comparing performance, cost, time-to-market, and relative market need for these sensor types, the project focused on designing a compact optrode-based single-point hydrogen safety monitor. The project ended with the fabrication of fifteen prototype units, and the selection of two specific markets: fuel cell enclosure monitoring, and refueling/storage safety. Final testing and development of control software for these markets await future support.

  1. Foreign awakenings: rig work in war-torn Sudan convinces Canadians their civilized version of industry is needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    2000-01-01

    Experiences of some Canadian geologists working in Sudan are described. Glad to be back in Canada after several years of exploration work for various international exploration companies, they have fond memories of the people, who for the most part live under very primitive conditions, and constant exposure to the ravages of tribal wars. They characterize the attitude of Canadians working in Sudan towards the native population as one that puts high values on human rights, safety, work ethics, and individual responsibility. They defend Canadian presence in these far-off regions as beneficial to the native population, by bringing Canadian standards and a civilized version of industry to an area that has seen very little of that in the past. In contrast to the situation on Canadian rigs, on Chinese oil rigs favoritism and racism are the rule; the Chinese do not see that humanitarian issues are any of their concerns

  2. Foreign awakenings: rig work in war-torn Sudan convinces Canadians their civilized version of industry is needed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, A.

    2000-05-01

    Experiences of some Canadian geologists working in Sudan are described. Glad to be back in Canada after several years of exploration work for various international exploration companies, they have fond memories of the people, who for the most part live under very primitive conditions, and constant exposure to the ravages of tribal wars. They characterize the attitude of Canadians working in Sudan towards the native population as one that puts high values on human rights, safety, work ethics, and individual responsibility. They defend Canadian presence in these far-off regions as beneficial to the native population, by bringing Canadian standards and a civilized version of industry to an area that has seen very little of that in the past. In contrast to the situation on Canadian rigs, on Chinese oil rigs favoritism and racism are the rule; the Chinese do not see that humanitarian issues are any of their concerns.

  3. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  4. 2009 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen Program, November 2009 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments of the DOE Hydrogen Program for FY2009. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  5. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  6. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  7. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyapal, Sunita [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  8. Towards a greener world : hydrogen and fuel cells 2004 conference and trade show. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Fuel Cells Canada and the Canadian Hydrogen Association hosted the Hydrogen and Fuel Cells 2004 Conference and Tradeshow in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on September 25-28, 2004. Industry leaders from around the world showcased the latest developments in fuel cell and hydrogen technology, and shared research breakthroughs. The conference focussed on many aspects of hydrogen and fuel cell technology, specifically: hydrogen technology progress, including storage, infrastructure and production; fuel cells, including quality, cost and applications; economics and policy, including government and industry strategies; fuel cell demonstrations, including transportation, micro-fuel cells, and portable power; and, impact on climate change, including health and the Kyoto Accord

  9. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  10. Hydrogen and Fuel Cells for IT Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer

    2016-03-09

    With the increased push for carbon-free and sustainable data centers, data center operators are increasingly looking to renewable energy as a means to approach carbon-free status and be more sustainable. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a world leader in hydrogen research and already has an elaborate hydrogen infrastructure in place at the Golden, Colorado, state-of-the-art data center and facility. This presentation will discuss hydrogen generation, storage considerations, and safety issues as they relate to hydrogen delivery to fuel cells powering IT equipment.

  11. International Clean Energy System Using Hydrogen Conversion (WE-NET). subtask 3. Conceptual design of the total system (safety measures and evaluation technology); Suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET). subtask 3. Zentai system gainen sekkei (anzen taisaku hyoka gijutsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Safety measures and assessment technology were studied for the WE-NET project. As the study result in fiscal 1996, the information on safety design, anomaly and accident was collected and arranged. The information on safety measures, ideology and criterion was also collected by visiting some domestic and overseas organizations experienced about handling of liquid hydrogen (LH). The initial survey was made for the safety design ideology, analytical technique and disaster preventive measures of LNG systems as the similar cold liquid system. Accidents and explosion accident of a hydrogen production plant (water electrolysis) in Germany were analyzed. Events on storage tanks and leakage around the tanks were studied as typical risk of LH considering temporary and LNG system design information. The model based on the LH spillage test result and 3-D dispersion of vapor cloud were prepared by modifying a simulation code. The model allowed evaluation of the effect of explosion and fire accidents of compressed hydrogen gas and flying fragments on structures and people, and visual display of distances from a tank and damage conditions. 19 refs., 29 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Fiscal 1976 Sunshine Project research report. Interim report (hydrogen energy); 1976 nendo chukan hokokushoshu. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-11-01

    This report summarizes the Sunshine Project research interim reports on hydrogen energy of every organizations. The report includes research items, laboratories, institutes and enterprises concerned, research targets, research plans, and progress conditions. The research items are as follows. (1) Hydrogen production technology (electrolysis, high- temperature high-pressure water electrolysis, 4 kinds of thermochemical techniques, direct thermolysis). (2) Hydrogen transport and storage technology (2 kinds of solidification techniques). (3) Hydrogen use technology (combustion technology, fuel cell, solid electrolyte fuel cell, fuel cell power system, hydrogen fuel engine). (4) Hydrogen safety measures technology (disaster preventive technology for gaseous and liquid hydrogen, preventing materials from embrittlement due to hydrogen, hydrogen refining, transport and storage systems, their safety technology). (5) Hydrogen energy system (hydrogen energy system, hydrogen use subsystems, peripheral technologies). (NEDO)

  13. Controlling hydrogen behavior in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullingford, H.S.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the aftermath of the incident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a new and different treatment of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) risks is needed for public safety because of the specific events involving hydrogen generation, transport, and behavior following the core damage. Hydrogen behavior in closed environments such as the TMI-2 containment building is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Hence, an engineering approach is presented for prevention of loss of life, equipment, and environment in case of a large hydrogen generation in an LWR. A six-level defense strategy is described that minimizes the possibility of ignition of released hydrogen gas and otherwise mitigates the consequences of hydrogen release. Guidance is given to reactor manufacturers, utility companies, regulatory agencies, and research organizations committed to reducing risk factors and insuring safety of life, equipment, and environment

  14. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  15. The prospects for Canadian uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaff, S.

    1983-07-01

    The 1980s have seen a decline in markets for uranium concentrate, largely as a result of falling estimates for reactor fuel requirements and rising inventories. Spot market prices fell to $44 in September 1982, but have since risen back to $60. World production also fell in 1982 and is not expected to increase significantly before 1990. Some opportunities exist for Canadian producers with new low-cost deposits to replace high-cost producers in Canada and other countries, particularly the United States. There will be strong competition between Canadian producers as well as from Australia. Australia's reserves are somewhat larger than Canada's, although the reported ore grades tend to be lower than those of Saskatchewan

  16. Novel Methods of Hydrogen Leak Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpinder S Puri

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of the fuel cell technology and a drive for clean fuel, hydrogen gas is emerging as a leading candidate for the fuel of choice. For hydrogen to become a consumer fuel for automotive and domestic power generation, safety is paramount. It is, therefore, desired to have a method and system for hydrogen leak detection using odorant which can incorporate a uniform concentration of odorant in the hydrogen gas, when odorants are mixed in the hydrogen storage or delivery means. It is also desired to develop methods where the odorant is not added to the bulk hydrogen, keeping it free of the odorization additives. When odorants are not added to the hydrogen gas in the storage or delivery means, methods must be developed to incorporate odorant in the leaking gas so that leaks can be detected by small. Further, when odorants are not added to the stored hydrogen, it may also be desirable to observe leaks by sight by discoloration of the surface of the storage or transportation vessels. A series of novel solutions are proposed which address the issues raised above. These solutions are divided into three categories as follows: 1. Methods incorporating an odorant in the path of hydrogen leak as opposed to adding it to the hydrogen gas. 2. Methods where odorants are generated in-situ by chemical reaction with the leaking hydrogen 3. Methods of dispensing and storing odorants in high pressure hydrogen gas which release odorants to the gas at a uniform and predetermined rates. Use of one or more of the methods described here in conjunction with appropriate engineering solutions will assure the ultimate safety of hydrogen use as a commercial fuel. (authors)

  17. The hydrogen 700 project - 700 Bar Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambone, L.; Webster, C.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Major automotive companies, including DaimlerChrysler, Ford, Hyundai, Nissan, PSA Peugeot-Citroen, and Toyota, are co-operating in the Hydrogen 700 project at Powertech to establish a global basis for high pressure hydrogen fuel systems for vehicles. The fuel systems will store compressed hydrogen on-board at pressures up to 700 bar (10,000psi). It is anticipated that the 700 bar storage pressure will provide hydrogen powered vehicles with a range comparable to the range of petroleum-fueled vehicles. The Hydrogen 700 project has contracted world leaders in high pressure technologies to provide 700 bar fuel system components for evaluation. The data from these tests will be used as the basis for the development of relevant standards and regulations. In a development that complements the Hydrogen 700 project, Powertech Labs has established the world's first 700 bar hydrogen station for fast filling operations. This prototype station will be used to evaluate the performance of the 700 bar vehicle fuel system components. The presentation will provide an overview of the Hydrogen 700 project. Safety issues surrounding the use of compressed hydrogen gas as a vehicle fuel, as well as the use of higher storage pressures, will be reviewed. Test data involving the fire testing of vehicles containing hydrogen fuel systems will be presented. The project is intended to result in the introduction of 700 bar fuel systems in the next generation of hydrogen powered vehicles. (author)

  18. Proceedings of the 19. Canadian Nuclear Society simulation symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marleau, G.

    1995-01-01

    A majority of the 31 papers in this symposium on nuclear simulation deal with CANDU reactors. The sessions were organized according to the following subjects: reactor physics, hydrogen behaviour, thermalhydraulics, reactor safety and operation. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  19. Canadian wind energy industry directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The companies and organizations involved, either directly or indirectly, in the wind energy industry in Canada, are listed in this directory. Some U.S. and international companies which are active or interested in Canadian industry activities are also listed. The first section of the directory is an alphabetical listing which includes corporate descriptions, company logos, addresses, phone and fax numbers, e-mail addresses and contact names. The second section contains 54 categories of products and services associated with the industry

  20. Canadian Petroleum Association statistical handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Statistical data are presented for the Canadian oil and gas industry for 1991, with some historical and background data included. Tables are provided on land sales and holdings, drilling completions, reserves, production, inventories, production capacity, cash expenditures, value of sales, prices, consumption, sales, refinery capacity and utilization, refinery yields, pipelines, imports and exports, National Energy Board licenses and orders, electricity generation capacity, and supply and disposal of electric energy. 112 tabs

  1. Exporting the Canadian licensing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, D.J.

    1981-06-01

    This paper deals with the problems of an overseas regulatory agency in licensing a Canadian-supplied nuclear plant which is referenced to a plant in Canada. Firstly, the general problems associated with the use of a reference plant are discussed. This is followed by a discussion of specific problems which arise from the licensing practices in Canada. The paper concludes with recommendations to simplify the task of demonstrating the licensability of an overseas CANDU plant

  2. Canadian accelerator breeder system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.

    1982-11-01

    A shortage of fissile material at a reasonable price is expected to occur in the early part of the twenty-first century. Converting fertile material to fissile material by electronuclar methods is an option that can extend th world's resources of fissionable material, supplying fuel for nuclear power stations. This paper presents the rationale for electronuclear breeders and describes the Canadian development program for an accelerator breeder facility that could produce 1 Mg of fissile material per year

  3. Providing cleaner air to Canadians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    This booklet is designed to explain salient aspects of the Ozone Annex, negotiated and signed recently by Canada and the United States, in a joint effort to improve air quality in North America. By significantly reducing the transboundary flows of air pollutants that cause smog, the Ozone Annex will benefit some 16 million people in central and eastern Canada and provide an example for a future round of negotiations to address concerns of the millions of Canadians and Americans who live in the border area between British Columbia and Washington State. The brochure provide summaries of the Canadian and American commitments, focusing on transportation, monitoring and reporting. The Ozone Annex complements other air quality initiatives by the Government of Canada enacted under the Environmental Protection Act, 1999. These measures include regulations to reduce sulphur content to 30 parts per million by Jan 1, 2005; proposing to restrict toxic particulate matter (PM) to less than 10 microns; establishing daily smog forecasts in the Maritimes and committing to a national program built upon existing smog advisories and forecasts in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia; and investing in more clean air research through the newly created Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences

  4. Canadian fusion fuels technology project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project was launched in 1982 to coordinate Canada's provision of fusion fuels technology to international fusion power development programs. The project has a mandate to extend and adapt existing Canadian tritium technologies for use in international fusion power development programs. 1985-86 represents the fourth year of the first five-year term of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP). This reporting period coincides with an increasing trend in global fusion R and D to direct more effort towards the management of tritium. This has resulted in an increased linking of CFFTP activities and objectives with those of facilities abroad. In this way there has been a continuing achievement resulting from CFFTP efforts to have cooperative R and D and service activities with organizations abroad. All of this is aided by the cooperative international atmosphere within the fusion community. This report summarizes our past year and provides some highlights of the upcoming year 1986/87, which is the final year of the first five-year phase of the program. AECL (representing the Federal Government), the Ministry of Energy (representing Ontario) and Ontario Hydro, have given formal indication of their intent to continue with a second five-year program. Plans for the second phase will continue to emphasize tritium technology and remote handling

  5. Mercury in Canadian crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebone, B.P.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates for average mercury concentrations in crude oil range widely from 10 ng/g of oil to 3,500 ng/g of oil. With such a broad range of estimates, it is difficult to determine the contributions of the petroleum sector to the total budget of mercury emissions. In response to concerns that the combustion of petroleum products may be a major source of air-borne mercury pollution, Environment Canada and the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute has undertaken a survey of the average total mercury concentration in crude oil processed in Canadian refineries. In order to calculate the potential upper limit of total mercury in all refined products, samples of more than 30 different types of crude oil collected from refineries were measured for their concentration of mercury as it enters into a refinery before processing. High temperature combustion, cold vapour atomic absorption and cold vapour atomic fluorescence were the techniques used to quantify mercury in the samples. The results of the study provide information on the total mass of mercury present in crude oil processed in Canada each year. Results can be used to determine the impact of vehicle exhaust emissions to the overall Canadian mercury emission budget. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  6. Reliability issues : a Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konow, H.

    2004-01-01

    A Canadian perspective of power reliability issues was presented. Reliability depends on adequacy of supply and a framework for standards. The challenges facing the electric power industry include new demand, plant replacement and exports. It is expected that demand will by 670 TWh by 2020, with 205 TWh coming from new plants. Canada will require an investment of $150 billion to meet this demand and the need is comparable in the United States. As trade grows, the challenge becomes a continental issue and investment in the bi-national transmission grid will be essential. The 5 point plan of the Canadian Electricity Association is to: (1) establish an investment climate to ensure future electricity supply, (2) move government and industry towards smart and effective regulation, (3) work to ensure a sustainable future for the next generation, (4) foster innovation and accelerate skills development, and (5) build on the strengths of an integrated North American system to maximize opportunity for Canadians. The CEA's 7 measures that enhance North American reliability were listed with emphasis on its support for a self-governing international organization for developing and enforcing mandatory reliability standards. CEA also supports the creation of a binational Electric Reliability Organization (ERO) to identify and solve reliability issues in the context of a bi-national grid. tabs., figs

  7. Safety systems and safety analysis of the Qinshan phase III CANDU nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jianping; Shen Sen; Barkman, N.

    1999-01-01

    The author introduces the Canadian nuclear reactor safety philosophy and the Qinshan Phase III CANDU NPP safety systems and safety analysis, which are designed and performed according to this philosophy. The concept of 'defence-in-depth' is a key element of the Canadian nuclear reactor safety philosophy. The design concepts of redundancy, diversity, separation, equipment qualification, quality assurance, and use of appropriate design codes and standards are adopted in the design. Four special safety systems as well as a set of reliable safety support systems are incorporated in the design of Qinshan phase III CANDU for accident mitigation. The assessment results for safety systems performance show that the fundamental safety criteria for public dose, and integrity of fuel, channels and the reactor building, are satisfied

  8. Proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. V. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Volume 1 of the proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society includes sessions on the following topics: reactor physics, new concepts and technology, fuel behaviour, reactor design, safety analysis, fuel channel behaviour, equipment and design qualification. The individual papers have been abstracted separately.

  9. Hydrogen and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Miller, A.I.; Hancox, W.T.; Pendergast, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The current world-wide emphasis on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions provides an opportunity to revisit how energy is produced and used, consistent with the need for human and economic growth. Both the scale of the problem and the efforts needed for its resolution are extremely large. We argue that GHG reduction strategies must include a greater penetration of electricity into areas, such as transportation, that have been the almost exclusive domain of fossil fuels. An opportunity for electricity to displace fossil fuel use is through electrolytic production of hydrogen. Nuclear power is the only large-scale commercially proven non-carbon electricity generation source, and it must play a key role. As a non-carbon power source, it can also provide the high-capacity base needed to stabilize electricity grids so that they can accommodate other non-carbon sources, namely low-capacity factor renewables such as wind and solar. Electricity can be used directly to power standalone hydrogen production facilities. In the special case of CANDU reactors, the hydrogen streams can be preprocessed to recover the trace concentrations of deuterium that can be re-oxidized to heavy water. World-wide experience shows that nuclear power can achieve high standards of public safety, environmental protection and commercially competitive economics, and must . be an integral part of future energy systems. (author)

  10. Post-accident hydrogen control in GKT-containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komurka, M.

    1983-06-01

    The maximum possible temperature and pressure rise is analysed by assuming hydrogen deflagration with no heat loss to the vessel walls for hydrogen concentrations up to 10 Vol%. Alternative hydrogen control system to inerting, air dilution and recombiners based on controlled venting by passing the vented gas through the delay line of the gas treatment system is recommended. The combination of hydrogen control with control of noble gas radioactivity is though to have a positive effect on safety. (Author) [de

  11. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

  12. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society.

  13. The fusion-hydrogen energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.O.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will describe the structure of the system, from energy generation and hydrogen production through distribution to the end users. It will show how stationary energy users will convert to hydrogen and will outline ancillary uses of hydrogen to aid in reducing other forms of pollution. It will show that the adoption of the fusion hydrogen energy system will facilitate the use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. The development of highly efficient fuel cells for production of electricity near the user and for transportation will be outlined. The safety of the hydrogen fusion energy system is addressed. This paper will show that the combination of fusion generation combined with hydrogen distribution will provide a system capable of virtually eliminating the negative impact on the environment from the use of energy by humanity. In addition, implementation of the energy system will provide techniques and tools that can ameliorate environmental problems unrelated to energy use. (Author)

  14. Indigenous housing and health in the Canadian North

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I explore the relationship between housing, home and health amongst Indigenous homeless people living in the Canadian North. In particular, I examine the ways in which Indigenous homemaking practices conflict with housing policy, and exacerbate individual pathways to homelessness....... I argue that integral components in northern Indigenous conceptualizations of home and, in turn, health are not only unrecognized in housing policy, but actively discouraged. The potential for homemaking to inform health and housing policy speaks to the relevance of cultural safety not only...... to Indigenous health services, but also to a comprehensive framing of Indigenous health....

  15. Canadian database for radionuclide transfer in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Corbett, B.J.

    1995-04-01

    The transfer of radionuclides throughout the biosphere is described in models that rely on a series of transfer parameters. These parameters are typically based on experimental or monitoring observations, and describe processes such as soil-to-plant transfer, soil-to-atmosphere transfer, and water-to-fish transfer. The parameters values used in many applications to date have come from around the world. However, data from Canadian settings are generally preferable for Canadian safety assessment applications. This is particularly true for geographically unique parameters relating to specific soils and environments. This database was constructed to record future radionuclide transfer parameter data systematically and completely, and to record particularly valuable existing data. The database supports element-specific parameters. Because the emphasis is on Canadian data, the data are indexed by geographic and physiographic region. In addition to the specific transfer parameter values, there is provision for a substantial amount of ancillary data. The database now operates with dBase software. (author). 1 tab

  16. Canadian database for radionuclide transfer in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S C; Corbett, B J [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1995-04-01

    The transfer of radionuclides throughout the biosphere is described in models that rely on a series of transfer parameters. These parameters are typically based on experimental or monitoring observations, and describe processes such as soil-to-plant transfer, soil-to-atmosphere transfer, and water-to-fish transfer. The parameters values used in many applications to date have come from around the world. However, data from Canadian settings are generally preferable for Canadian safety assessment applications. This is particularly true for geographically unique parameters relating to specific soils and environments. This database was constructed to record future radionuclide transfer parameter data systematically and completely, and to record particularly valuable existing data. The database supports element-specific parameters. Because the emphasis is on Canadian data, the data are indexed by geographic and physiographic region. In addition to the specific transfer parameter values, there is provision for a substantial amount of ancillary data. The database now operates with dBase software. (author). 1 tab.

  17. The INERIS at the heart of energy transition - INERISmag Nr 35. Clean energy - hydrogen, an energy vector for the future. Storage of electrochemical energy - To assess and to improve the safety of batteries. Methanization - Biogas: an energy which valorises organic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The first article of this magazine proposes a brief comment on the content of the bill project related to energy transition and green growth, and briefly outlines the role the INERIS is to play in this perspective. The second article addresses the perspectives of development of the use of hydrogen as an energy vector, and evokes the GHRYD project in which the INERIS is involved with GDF Suez, the Dunkirk urban community and other partners, and which is based on the use of a mix of hydrogen, methane and natural gas for mobility and household applications. The third article evokes works and researches undertaken to improve the safety of batteries. The last article briefly evokes INERIS activities on the safety of the methanization process, and in investigating characteristics of bio-wastes and domestic wastes with respect to French and European standards

  18. Technical files. Hydrogen memento; Fiches techniques. Memento de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a compilation of 30 technical files about hydrogen and its related technologies. These files cover the following aspects: general considerations (world energy consumption growth, contribution of developing countries, atmospheric pollution and greenhouse effect, health impacts, actions implemented at the world scale, role of hydrogen); glossary and acronyms; units used and conversions; world energy situation (primary production, sectoral consumption, demand trends, environmental impact, situation of fossil fuel reserves); French energy situation (primary sources, energy independence ratio, electric power status, evolutions and trends of the French energy demand); fuel cells; basic data on hydrogen (thermodynamic properties and data); hydrogen production by water electrolysis, application to small capacity systems; thermochemical water dissociation; water photo-electrolysis; hydrogen pipeline networks in the world; mechanical energy production; hydrogen thermal engines; aeronautic applications; research laboratories; industrial actors of the hydrogen sector (companies, activities, geographical situation, financial structure, strategy, R and D, cooperations, projects etc..); hydrogen flammability and explosiveness; transport and storage safety; standards and regulations about hydrogen safety in France, in Europe and in the rest of the world; hydrogen programs in the world; the programs financed by the European Union; the German programs; the programs in Island, France and UK; the programs in North America; the Japanese programs; table of the main recent R and D projects per type of program; light vehicles with fuel cells; the Daimler-Chrysler program. (J.S.)

  19. Technical files. Hydrogen memento; Fiches techniques. Memento de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a compilation of 30 technical files about hydrogen and its related technologies. These files cover the following aspects: general considerations (world energy consumption growth, contribution of developing countries, atmospheric pollution and greenhouse effect, health impacts, actions implemented at the world scale, role of hydrogen); glossary and acronyms; units used and conversions; world energy situation (primary production, sectoral consumption, demand trends, environmental impact, situation of fossil fuel reserves); French energy situation (primary sources, energy independence ratio, electric power status, evolutions and trends of the French energy demand); fuel cells; basic data on hydrogen (thermodynamic properties and data); hydrogen production by water electrolysis, application to small capacity systems; thermochemical water dissociation; water photo-electrolysis; hydrogen pipeline networks in the world; mechanical energy production; hydrogen thermal engines; aeronautic applications; research laboratories; industrial actors of the hydrogen sector (companies, activities, geographical situation, financial structure, strategy, R and D, cooperations, projects etc..); hydrogen flammability and explosiveness; transport and storage safety; standards and regulations about hydrogen safety in France, in Europe and in the rest of the world; hydrogen programs in the world; the programs financed by the European Union; the German programs; the programs in Island, France and UK; the programs in North America; the Japanese programs; table of the main recent R and D projects per type of program; light vehicles with fuel cells; the Daimler-Chrysler program. (J.S.)

  20. Hydrogen behavior in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.; Cummings, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident resulted in the generation of an estimated 150 to 600 kg of hydrogen, some of which burned inside the containment building, causing a transient pressure rise of roughly 200 kPa (2 atm). With this accident as the immediate impetus and the improved safety of reactors as the long-term goal, the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research programs to study hydrogen behavior and control during accidents at nuclear plants. Several fundamental questions and issues arise when the hydrogen problem for light-water-reactor plants is examined. These relate to four aspects of the problem: hydrogen production; hydrogen transport, release, and mixing; hydrogen combustion; and prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion. Although much has been accomplished, some unknowns and uncertainties still remain, for example, the rate of hydrogen production during a degraded-core or molten-core accident, the rate of hydrogen mixing, the effect of geometrical structures and scale on combustion, flame speeds, combustion completeness, and mitigation-scheme effectiveness. This article discusses the nature and extent of the hydrogen problem, the progress that has been made, and the important unresolved questions

  1. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  2. Embracing autism in Canadian rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogsteen, Lindsey; Woodgate, Roberta L

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of Canadian parents living in rural areas who were parenting a child with autism. A phenomenological design described by van Manen was applied to guide this study. This study took place in rural communities of Western Canada. Purposive sampling was used to recruit 26 families parenting a child with autism in rural communities. Participants ranged in age from 26 to 50 years old and lived an average of 197 kilometres away from an urban city. Parents of children with autism took part in audio-taped, in-depth interviews. A total of 26 open-ended interviews were completed over four months with an average of 83 minutes per interview. All interviews and field notes were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using van Manen's selective highlighting approach. When describing the characteristics of living rurally while parenting a child with autism, parents reported that the rural community had (i) less of everything, (ii) safety and familiarity, and (iii) a family of support. Parents believed that although there were disadvantages to living in a rural community, parents felt isolated in terms of services but not in terms of the support received by the community. The results of this study add to our knowledge of parenting experiences with attention to the rural experience and furthermore, recommendations for nurses and health care professionals were provided. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  3. H2T liquid hydrogen delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.

    2002-01-01

    This Power Point presentation provides a preliminary evaluation of the cost of delivering liquid hydrogen produced in Quebec to hydrogen fuelled cars in Germany. The presentation describes the chain of events regarding liquid hydrogen delivery, beginning with the production of hydrogen from an initial source of hydro power. Water passes through an electrolyzer where hydrogen is liquefied and then placed into a container which is transported to market via truck, rail or tanker. Once transported, the hydrogen fuel is made available for consumers at refueling stations. The paper lists the costs related to transportation with reference to safety rules, pure transportation costs, leasing fees for the containers, and permission of customs duties for the import of hydrogen and export of empty containers between Quebec and Germany. A graph depicting a typical refueling station in Germany and the refueling events per hour was presented. For safety reasons, refueling is performed by a refueling robot. A blueprint of safety and protection distances at a refueling station was also presented. tabs., figs

  4. Nuclear criticality safety in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shultz, K.R.

    1980-04-01

    The approach taken to nuclear criticality safety in Canada has been influenced by the historical development of participants. The roles played by governmental agencies and private industry since the Atomic Energy Control Act was passed into Canadian Law in 1946 are outlined to set the scene for the current situation and directions that may be taken in the future. Nuclear criticality safety puts emphasis on the control of materials called special fissionable material in Canada. A brief account is given of the historical development and philosophy underlying the existing regulations governing special fissionable material. Subsequent events have led to a change in emphasis in the regulatory process that has not yet been fully integrated into Canadian legislation and regulations. Current efforts towards further development of regulations governing the practice of nuclear criticality safety are described. (auth)

  5. Canadian environmental sustainability indicators 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, the Canadian government committed to reporting annual national indicators of air quality, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and freshwater quality in order to provide Canadians with more regular and consistent information on the state of the environment and how it is linked with human activities. The national air quality indicators in this report focused on human exposure to ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ). The report showed that from 1990 to 2004, the ozone indicator showed year-to-year variability, with an averaged increase of 0.9 per cent per year. Stations in southern Ontario reported the highest levels of ozone and PM 2.5 in the country in 2004. There was no discernible upward or downward trend in PM 2.5 levels at the national level for the 2000 to 2004 period, and GHG emissions rose 27 per cent from 1990 to 2004. In 2004, emissions were 35 per cent above the target to which Canada committed under the Kyoto Protocol. However, while total emissions rose, emissions per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) fell by 14 per cent from 1990 to 2004. GHG emissions also grew faster than the Canadian population, resulting in a 10 per cent rise in emissions per person. The freshwater quality indicator presented in this report covered the period from 2002 to 2004, and focused on the ability of Canada's surface waters to support aquatic life. For the 340 sites selected across southern Canada, water quality was rated as good or excellent at 44 per cent of sites, fair at 34 per cent of sites, and marginal or poor at 22 per cent of sites. The report included a chapter which attempted to integrate the indicators with other environmental impacts, measures of economic performance, and indices of social progress to improve the ability of the report to influence decision-making that fully accounts for environmental sustainability. 63 refs., 18 figs

  6. The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Schade, D.; Astronomy Data Centre, Canadian

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) is the world's largest astronomical data center, holding over 0.5 Petabytes of information, and serving nearly 3000 astronomers worldwide. Its current data collections include BLAST, CFHT, CGPS, FUSE, Gemini, HST, JCMT, MACHO, MOST, and numerous other archives and services. It provides extensive data archiving, curation, and processing expertise, via projects such as MegaPipe, and enables substantial day-to-day collaboration between resident astronomers and computer specialists. It is a stable, powerful, persistent, and properly supported environment for the storage and processing of large volumes of data, a condition that is now absolutely vital for their science potential to be exploited by the community. Through initiatives such as the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM), the Canadian Virtual Observatory (CVO), and the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), the CADC is at the global forefront of advancing astronomical research through improved data services. The CAOM aims to provide homogeneous data access, and hence viable interoperability between a potentially unlimited number of different data collections, at many wavelengths. It is active in the definition of numerous emerging standards within the International Virtual Observatory, and several datasets are already available. The CANFAR project is an initiative to make cloud computing for storage and data-intensive processing available to the community. It does this via a Virtual Machine environment that is equivalent to managing a local desktop. Several groups are already processing science data. CADC is also at the forefront of advanced astronomical data analysis, driven by the science requirements of astronomers both locally and further afield. The emergence of 'Astroinformatics' promises to provide not only utility items like object classifications, but to directly enable new science by accessing previously undiscovered or intractable

  7. Canadian gas - where's it headed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominy, D.

    1998-01-01

    The evolution of gas transportation in Canada was described. The issue of what is needed and what can change in the current North American market for gas transportation was also discussed. The transportation values of natural gas from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin (WCSB) to New York, Chicago and California for 1993 to 1997 were reviewed. Export and domestic capacity additions and WCSB gas completions were also outlined. The question of how much new capacity is needed, where the gas will come from, and where will it go, was also discussed

  8. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  9. Energy: the solar hydrogen alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocheris, J O.M.

    1977-01-01

    The author argues that nuclear and solar energy should begin replacing conventional fossil sources as soon as possible because oil, gas and even coal supplies will be depleted within decades. A hydrogen economy would introduce major technical problems but its chief benefits are that it permits energy storage in a post fossil fuel era when electricity is expected to play a major role. It can be converted to electricity, cleanly and efficiently with fuel cells and in liquid form can be burnt as jet fuel. Hydrogen can also be burnt in internal combustion engines although less efficiently in fuel cells. However, although hydrogen is clean and efficient, technical development is still needed to reduce its cost and to cope with safety problems. The book contains a wealth of technical information and is a valuable reference on a topic of growing importance.

  10. Electric hydrogen recombiner special tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.

    1975-12-01

    Westinghouse has produced an electric hydrogen recombiner to control hydrogen levels in reactor containments following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. The recombiner underwent extensive testing for NRC qualification (see WCAP 7709-L and Supplements 1, 2, 3, 4). As a result, WCAP 7709-L and Supplements 1, 2, 3, and 4 have been accepted by the NRC for reference in applications not committed to IEEE-323-1974. Supplement 5 and the next supplement will demonstrate conformance to IEEE-323-1974. This supplement describes additional tests, beyond those necessary to qualify the system, which will be referenced in supplement 6. Each test has demonstrated a considerable margin of safety over required performance. Concurrently, the test results increased the fund of technical information on the electric hydrogen recombiner

  11. Recent Books on Canadian Business History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christopher

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Canadian business history books published since 1972 as well as reprints of useful older works. Topics dealt with are the fish, timber, and wheat industry, transportation, entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship, Canadian economy during World War I, the development of natural resources, and the lives of the rich and the powerful. (KC)

  12. Canadian nurse practitioner job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMarche, Kimberley; Tullai-McGuinness, Susan

    2009-01-01

    To examine the level of job satisfaction and its association with extrinsic and intrinsic job satisfaction characteristics among Canadian primary healthcare nurse practitioners (NPs). A descriptive correlational design was used to collect data on NPs' job satisfaction and on the factors that influence their job satisfaction. A convenience sample of licensed Canadian NPs was recruited from established provincial associations and special-interest groups. Data about job satisfaction were collected using two valid and reliable instruments, the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Survey and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to describe the results. The overall job satisfaction for this sample ranged from satisfied to highly satisfied. The elements that had the most influence on overall job satisfaction were the extrinsic category of partnership/collegiality and the intrinsic category of challenge/autonomy. These findings were consistent with Herzberg's Dual Factor Theory of Job Satisfaction. The outcomes of this study will serve as a foundation for designing effective human health resource retention and recruitment strategies that will assist in enhancing the implementation and the successful preservation of the NP's role.

  13. Canadian photovoltaic commercial activity review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkinson, D.J.; Royer, J.

    1992-01-01

    A survey was performed on the activities of the Canadian photovoltaic (PV) industry during 1988 for the three years of 1985-1987, and a similar survey was carried out in 1989. The findings of the latest survey are reported and compared with the previous survey. Market growth rates in the order of 15%/y and greater in the international market are reflected in the Canadian scene with an estimated 1989 activity in the range of $15 million. Details are presented of the distribution of firms across Canada, the distribution of annual sales activities by application, annual PV module sales in Europe and globally, breakdown of PV module powers produced by the United States, Japan, Europe, and others, breakdown of reported sales in Canada by source/destination, regional distribution of sales for installation in Canada, distribution by purchaser type for sales of PV equipment in Canada, and a summary of sales classified by application. In 1989 for the first time global demand for PV modules exceeded supply. 8 refs., 9 tabs

  14. Market potential for Canadian crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, M.; Fisher, L.; Golosinski, D.; Luthin, A.; Gill, L.; Raggett, C.

    1997-01-01

    Future key markets for Canadian crude were evaluated, and probable flow volumes and prices were identified. Key concerns of market participants such as pricing, alternative crude sources, pipeline tariffs and crude quality, were examined. An overview of the competition faced by Canadian crude supply in global markets was presented. World crude oil supply and demand was discussed. US and Canadian crude oil supply (2000 to 2010), refinery demand for light and heavy crudes, existing future crude oil and refined product pipeline infrastructure, and pricing implications of changing crude oil flows were analyzed. The general conclusion was that the US market will continue to provide growing markets for Canadian crude oil, and that the Canadian supply to fulfill increased export requirements will be available due to the combined effects of increasing heavy crude supply, growing production from the east coast offshore, and recent and ongoing pipeline expansions and additions. 20 refs., 64 tabs., 42 figs

  15. The US Department of Energy hydrogen baseline survey: assessing knowledge and opinions about hydrogen technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy Cooper; Tykey Truett; R L Schmoyer

    2006-01-01

    To design and maintain its education program, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program conducted a statistically-valid national survey to measure knowledge and opinions of hydrogen among key target audiences. The Hydrogen Baseline Knowledge Survey provides a reference for designing the DOE hydrogen education strategy and will be used in comparisons with future surveys to measure changes in knowledge and opinions over time. The survey sampled four U.S. populations: (1) public; (2) students; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen end-users in three business categories. Questions measured technical understanding of hydrogen and opinions about hydrogen safety. Other questions assessed visions of the likelihood of future hydrogen applications and sources of energy information. Several important findings were discovered, including a striking lack of technical understanding across all survey groups, as well as a strong correlation between technical knowledge and opinions about safety: those who demonstrated an understanding of hydrogen technologies expressed the least fear of its safe use. (authors)

  16. Novel Methods of Hydrogen Leak Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpinder S Puri

    2006-01-01

    For hydrogen to become a consumer fuel for automotive and domestic power generation, safety is paramount. Today's hydrogen systems are built with inherent safety measures and multiple levels of protection. However, human senses, in particular, the sense of smell, is considered the ultimate safeguards against leaks. Since hydrogen is an odorless gas, use of odorants to detect leaks, as is done in case of natural gas, is obvious solution. The odorants required for hydrogen used in fuel cells have a unique requirement which must be met. This is because almost all of the commercial odorants used in gas leak detection contain sulfur which acts as poison for the catalysts used in hydrogen based fuel cells, most specifically for the PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane or proton exchange membrane) fuel cells. A possible solution to this problem is to use non-sulfur containing odorants. Chemical compounds based on mixtures of acrylic acid and nitrogen compounds have been adopted to achieve a sulfur-free odorization of a gas. It is, therefore, desired to have a method and system for hydrogen leak detection using odorant which can incorporate a uniform concentration of odorant in the hydrogen gas, when odorants are mixed in the hydrogen storage or delivery means. It is also desired to develop methods where the odorant is not added to the bulk hydrogen, keeping it free of the odorization additives. A series of novel solutions are proposed which address the issues raised above. These solutions are divided into three categories as follows: 1. Methods incorporating an odorant in the path of hydrogen leak as opposed to adding it to the hydrogen gas. 2. Methods where odorants are generated in-situ by chemical reaction with the leaking hydrogen 3. Methods of dispensing and storing odorants in high pressure hydrogen gas which release odorants to the gas at a uniform and predetermined rates. Use of one or more of the methods described here in conjunction with appropriate engineering

  17. Hydrogen generation, distribution and combustion under severe LWR accident conditions: a state-of-technology report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, A.K.; Hilliard, R.K.

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report include hydrogen generation, distribution in containment, and combustion characteristics. A companion report addresses hydrogen control. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues

  18. Destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrisse, H; Dufour, L

    1929-01-21

    Oils of high boiling point, e.g. gas oil, lamp oil, schist oil, brown coal tar etc., are converted into motor benzine by heating them at 200 to 500/sup 0/C under pressure of 5 to 40 kilograms/cm/sup 2/ in the presence of ferrous chloride and gases such as hydrogen, or water gas, the desulfurization of the oils proceeding simultaneously. One kilogram of lamp oil and 100 g. ferrous chloride are heated in an autoclave in the presence of water gas under a pressure of 18 kg/cm/sup 2/ to 380 to 400/sup 0/C. The gaseous products are allowed to escape intermittently and are replaced by fresh water gas. A product distilling between 35 and 270/sup 0/C is obtained.

  19. Reactor safety method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachon, L.J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature

  20. Preliminary analyses on hydrogen diffusion through small break of thermo-chemical IS process hydrogen plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somolova, Marketa; Terada, Atsuhiko; Takegami, Hiroaki; Iwatsuki, Jin

    2008-12-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting a conceptual design study of nuclear hydrogen demonstration plant, that is, a thermal-chemical IS process hydrogen plant coupled with the High temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR-IS), which will be planed to produce a large amount of hydrogen up to 1000m 3 /h. As part of the conceptual design work of the HTTR-IS system, preliminary analyses on small break of a hydrogen pipeline in the IS process hydrogen plant was carried out as a first step of the safety analyses. This report presents analytical results of hydrogen diffusion behaviors predicted with a CFD code, in which a diffusion model focused on the turbulent Schmidt number was incorporated. By modifying diffusion model, especially a constant accompanying the turbulent Schmidt number in the diffusion term, analytical results was made agreed well with the experimental results. (author)

  1. Safety and health in the Canadian mine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, M.G.; Hardcastle, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    CANMET's Mining Research Laboratories (MRL) in Elliot Lake and Bell's Corners, Ontario, with the cooperation of the mining industry, have contributed to improving environmental conditions in underground and surface mining and milling operations. The extent of collaboration and efforts vary widely from long-term, multi-million dollar projects between several interested parties to smaller projects involving one laboratory and a single mining operation. This paper gives examples of such collaborative efforts and potential future directions as they apply to mine ventilation analysis using tracer gas techniques, optimization of mine ventilation network efficiency using real-time monitoring and controlled recirculation (heat saving), respirable dust and radiation sampling and control techniques, diesel emission control using regenerative ceramic filters and, the control of sulphide dust explosions and resulting sulphur dioxide production. (27 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.)

  2. Hydrogen Safety Project: Chemical analysis support task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.E.; Campbell, J.A.; Hoppe, E.W.; Greenwood, L.R.; Gillespie, B.M.

    1992-09-01

    Core samples taken from tank 101-SY at Hanford during ''window E'' were analyzed for organic and radiochemical constituents by staff of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Westinghouse Hanford company submitted these samples to the laboratory

  3. A Quantitative Analysis of Nursing Students' Perceptions of Patient Safety Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steighner, Tammy Rose

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine nursing students' perceptions of patient safety competencies as it related to Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies and the Safety Competencies Framework developed by The Canadian Patient Safety Institute. The study determined if nursing students knew how to provide safe patient care…

  4. Playground Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Fall Prevention Playground Safety Poisoning Prevention Road Traffic Safety Sports Safety Get Email Updates To receive ... at the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Playground Safety website . References U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Injuries and ...

  5. Canadian natural gas price debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wight, G.

    1998-01-01

    Sunoco Inc. is a subsidiary of Suncor Energy, one of Canada's largest integrated energy companies having total assets of $2.8 billion. As one of the major energy suppliers in the country, Sunoco Inc has a substantial stake in the emerging trends in the natural gas industry, including the Canadian natural gas price debate. Traditionally, natural gas prices have been determined by the number of pipeline expansions, weather, energy supply and demand, and storage levels. In addition to all these traditional factors which still apply today, the present day natural gas industry also has to deal with deregulation, open competition and the global energy situation, all of which also have an impact on prices. How to face up to these challenges is the subject of this discourse. tabs., figs

  6. Issues in Canadian board transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bart

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparency is considered one of the principles of good corporate governance. But what does it mean – in practice – especially when it comes to Board transparency – i.e. the ability of shareholders to gain knowledge about an organization’s corporate governance practices in order to make an informed assessment of Directors’ individual and collective roles and performance. In a preliminary investigation of Board transparency practices in Canadian listed firms (using data from 2003-2004, it was found that there were wide variations in the nature and quantity of corporate governance practices disclosed. The reasons for these variations are discussed and a number of recommendations for improved disclosure are presented.

  7. Nuclear communications : A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macpherson, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Times have changed since the early days of nuclear energy when it was a symbol of a brave new world, Public information strategies have evolved to meet increasing public concerns, and have shifted from being a largely unfocused attempt at publicity to being more concerned with managing issues and solving problems. This paper describes some of the salient features of the Canadian experience in nuclear communications and examines four key aspects: opinion and attitude research; media relations; coeducation; and advertising. It also addresses the challenge of responding to the allegations and tactics of those who are actively hostile to nuclear energy, and recommends that the principles of Total Quality Management and of organizational effectiveness be applied more thorough and more consistently to the public affairs function

  8. Safe production and application of hydrogen at Munich airport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szamer, R.

    2005-07-01

    At Munich International Airport the world's first public filling station for liquid and gaseous hydrogen with on-site hydrogen gas production has been installed. In order to prove the safety, liability and economic feasibility of hydrogen this pilot project examined the complete sequence of hydrogen production and application: on-site production with pressurized electrolyser and steam reformer, storage and filling of gaseous and liquid hydrogen, application of hydrogen for propelling several vehicles, e.g. airport busses in day to day operation, cars, fork lifter. TUV SUD Group, one of the largest service provider for technical safety and quality, was involved in the safety evaluation of the hydrogen project from the very beginning with the following services: safety consultancy throughout all project phases, e.g. for licensing procedures, plant design and operation safety analysis of the overall plant and of subsystems (electrolyser, filling stations, storage tanks, control systems etc.) safety assessment and acceptance testing of CH2 busses, CH2 fork lifter and LH2 passenger cars inspections and tests The challenges of this complex project relating to safety will be presented in the lecture, e.g. identification of potential hazards, safety requirements for the design and operation of the hydrogen plant as wells as for the various applications. Project description The hydrogen plant (cf. Figure 1) comprises two supply paths, one for compressed gaseous hydrogen (CH2) and one for cryogenic liquid hydrogen. Gaseous hydrogen is produced via high-pressure electrolysis at an operating pressure of 3 MPa (30 bar) and/or steam reforming process. The hydrogen will be led into a compressor, compressed to 35 MPa (350 bar) and stored in high pressure cylinders with a total geometrical storage volume of 10 m. The cylinders supply the high-pressure filling stations which refuels the 3 hydrogen buses and the fork lifter. Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is delivered in tank trucks and

  9. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was…

  10. Novel catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.P.; Rolston, J.H.; Stevens, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Catalytic isotopic exchange between hydrogen and liquid water offers many inherent potential advantages for the separation of hydrogen isotopes which is of great importance in the Canadian nuclear program. Active catalysts for isotopic exchange between hydrogen and water vapor have long been available, but these catalysts are essentially inactive in the presence of liquid water. New, water-repellent platinum catalysts have been prepared by: (1) treating supported catalysts with silicone, (2) depositing platinum on inherently hydrophobic polymeric supports, and (3) treating platinized carbon with Teflon and bonding to a carrier. The activity of these catalysts for isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of liquid water and hydrogen saturated with water vapor has been measured in a packed trickle bed integral reactor. The performance of these hydrophobic catalysts is compared with nonwetproofed catalysts. The mechanism of the overall exchange reaction is briefly discussed. 6 figures

  11. Leading Lean: a Canadian healthcare leader's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Benjamin A; Golden, Brian; Hannam, Rosemary; Morra, Dante

    2009-01-01

    Canadian healthcare organizations are increasingly asked to do more with less, and too often this has resulted in demands on staff to simply work harder and longer. Lean methodologies, originating from Japanese industrial organizations and most notably Toyota, offer an alternative - tried and tested approaches to working smarter. Lean, with its systematic approaches to reducing waste, has found its way to Canadian healthcare organizations with promising results. This article reports on a study of five Canadian healthcare providers that have recently implemented Lean. We offer stories of success but also identify potential obstacles and ways by which they may be surmounted to provide better value for our healthcare investments.

  12. A perspective on Canadian shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mike; Davidson, Jim; Mortensen, Paul

    2010-09-15

    In a relatively new development over just the past few years, shale formations are being targeted for natural gas production. Based on initial results, there may be significant potential for shale gas in various regions of Canada, not only in traditional areas of conventional production but also non-traditional areas. However, there is much uncertainty because most Canadian shale gas production is currently in experimental or early developmental stages. Thus, its full potential will not be known for some time. If exploitation proves to be successful, Canadian shale gas may partially offset projected long-term declines in Canadian conventional natural gas production.

  13. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  14. Scientific evidence contradicts findings and assumptions of Canadian Safety Panel 6: microwaves act through voltage-gated calcium channel activation to induce biological impacts at non-thermal levels, supporting a paradigm shift for microwave/lower frequency electromagnetic field action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    This review considers a paradigm shift on microwave electromagnetic field (EMF) action from only thermal effects to action via voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) activation. Microwave/lower frequency EMFs were shown in two dozen studies to act via VGCC activation because all effects studied were blocked by calcium channel blockers. This mode of action was further supported by hundreds of studies showing microwave changes in calcium fluxes and intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i signaling. The biophysical properties of VGCCs/similar channels make them particularly sensitive to low intensity, non-thermal EMF exposures. Non-thermal studies have shown that in most cases pulsed fields are more active than are non-pulsed fields and that exposures within certain intensity windows have much large biological effects than do either lower or higher intensity exposures; these are both consistent with a VGCC role but inconsistent with only a heating/thermal role. Downstream effects of VGCC activation include calcium signaling, elevated nitric oxide (NO), NO signaling, peroxynitrite, free radical formation, and oxidative stress. Downstream effects explain repeatedly reported biological responses to non-thermal exposures: oxidative stress; single and double strand breaks in cellular DNA; cancer; male and female infertility; lowered melatonin/sleep disruption; cardiac changes including tachycardia, arrhythmia, and sudden cardiac death; diverse neuropsychiatric effects including depression; and therapeutic effects. Non-VGCC non-thermal mechanisms may occur, but none have been shown to have effects in mammals. Biologically relevant safety standards can be developed through studies of cell lines/cell cultures with high levels of different VGCCs, measuring their responses to different EMF exposures. The 2014 Canadian Report by a panel of experts only recognizes thermal effects regarding safety standards for non-ionizing radiation exposures. Its position is therefore contradicted by each

  15. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99 Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  16. Hydrogen fuel injection - the bridge to fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilchrist, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' For over a century, industry has embraced a wide variety of applications for hydrogen. Since the mid-1970's, the focus of the bulk of hydrogen research has been in the area of fuel cells. Unfortunately, there is limited awareness of more immediate applications for hydrogen as a catalyst designed to improve the performance of existing hydro-carbon fuelled internal combustion engines. Canadian Hydrogen Energy Company manufactures a patented Hydrogen Fuel Injection System (HFI) that produces hydrogen and oxygen from distilled water and injects them, in measured amounts, into the air intake system on any heavy-duty diesel or gasoline application including trucks, buses, stationary generators, etc. In use on over 30 fleets, research is supported by over 40 million miles of field data. The hydrogen acts as a catalyst to promote more complete combustion, with remarkable results. Dramatically reduce emissions, particularly Carbon Monoxide and Particulate Matter. Increase horsepower and torque. Improved fuel efficiency (a minimum 10% improvement is guaranteed). Reduced oil degradation The HFI system offers the first large-scale application of the use of hydrogen and an excellent bridge to the fuel-cell technologies of the future. (author)

  17. Canadian Business Schools: Going out of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobni, Dawn; Dobni, Brooke

    1996-01-01

    Using Porter's five-forces model (potential entrants, suppliers, buyers, rivalry, substitutes) to analyze competition in Canadian university business schools, the authors conclude that schools are becoming increasingly vulnerable to competitive pressures and that strategic reorientation is necessary. (SK)

  18. Manufacture of components for Canadian reactor programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, L.P.

    Design features, especially those relating to calandrias, are pointed out for many CANDU-type reactors and the Taiwan research reactor. The special requirements shouldered by the Canadian suppliers of heavy reactor components are analyzed. (E.C.B.)

  19. Regionalisms, Nationalisms, and the Canadian State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David B.

    1984-01-01

    Concentrating on events in Canada during the last ten years, this article discusses the Quebec separatist movement and other strong regionalisms in Canada. Important processes involved with conflict and compromise within the Canadian state are examined. (RM)

  20. Canadian International Food Security Research Fund | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) invests in scaling up ... for farming families, and improve nutrition throughout the Global South. ... universities, civil society organizations, governments, and the private sector, ...

  1. The Status of Interpreters for Deaf Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Jerome D.; Yarwood, Sara

    1990-01-01

    A national survey of 170 interpreters for deaf Canadians examined demographic characteristics; knowledge of sign; education; experience; employment; voluntary service; clients served; settings; earnings and fees; and opinions regarding their work, compensation, working conditions, ethics, and education. (JDD)

  2. CASID and Canadian Journal of Development Studies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CASID and Canadian Journal of Development Studies : Organizational Strengthening 2007- ... with its Executive Council, as well as an external organizational assessment. ... Sharing opportunities for innovation in climate change adaptation.

  3. The Canadian Forces Recruitment/Attrition Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wait, Tracey

    1998-01-01

    ...), as part of its mandate to provide analysis of potential impacts of trends and change on defense and defense related issues, has designed a prototype model of recruitment and attrition of the Canadian Forces (C F...

  4. The Canadian Forces Recruitment/Attrition Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wait, Tracey

    1998-01-01

    ...). This model is designed to look at both demand, that is what recruitment is required to meet a Canadian Forces human resource scenario, and supply, that is what is the potential recruitable population...

  5. Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    . The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund(CIFSRF) is a program of Canada's International Development Research. Centre (IDRC) undertaken with the financial support of the. Government of Canada provided through Foreign ...

  6. Canadians' access to insurance for prescription medicines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ...-economic circumstances and drug needs. Volume two presents an analysis of the un-insured and under-insured by measuring the extent to which Canadians have access to insurance for prescription drug expenses and the quality of that coverage...

  7. Approaching French Language Literature in Canadian Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Mansfield, Charlie

    2005-01-01

    This book forms a self-study pack and teaching guide to help English speakers start using computers and the web to support their studies of French Canadian Literature, song, film and multimedia. Readers will need access to the Internet so that they can experience ‘Electronic Encounters’ with Canadian media in French and English. The approach is underpinned with ideas drawn from the analysis of travel writing.

  8. How Canadians feel about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    A survey conducted by Decima Research in April 1989 showed that 50% of Canadians were somewhat or strongly in favour of nuclear energy, the percentage varying from 37% in British Columbia to 65% in Ontario. A majority (56%) questioned the nuclear industry's ability to handle its waste safely, but 45% believed that it was working hard to solve the problem. It was evident that an advertising campaign by the Canadian Nuclear Association had an effect

  9. Nuclear power and the Canadian public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greer-Wootten, B; Mitson, L

    1976-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the opinions and attitudes of Canadians to the use of nuclear power for generating electricity, as an initial step in developing information programs attuned to the demonstrated needs of the public. This report presents the findings from the survey of the Canadian public aged 18 years and over. Over 2100 persons responded to our interviewers, generating about 200,000 answers to the questions.

  10. Guide to Canadian Aerospace Related Industries,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Research and Development (US). Digital Radar - Contract with Fundacao Educacional Data Processing de Bauru, Brazil. Satellite/Radar - Contract with Canadian... especially suitable for cartography and thematic mapping. The principal applications to date have been to Vehicle Mobility mapping for the Canadian Forces...This latter capability is especially applied to the repair and rebuilding of sawmill and pulpmill machinery, and mining equipment. Ebco is

  11. The Canadian nuclear industry - a national asset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    The economic importance of the Canadian nuclear industry in saving costs and creating jobs is expounded. The medical work of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is also extolled. The Canadian Nuclear Association urges the federal government to continue to support the industry at home, and to continue to promote nuclear exports. This report was prepared in response to the Federal Finance Minister's 'A New Direction for Canada'

  12. Waste management in Canadian nuclear programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyne, P.J.

    The objectives of the Canadian radioactive waste management program are described. Recycling actinides through reactors is being studied. Low and medium level waste treatments such as reverse osmosis concentration, immobilization in bitumen and plastics, and incineration are under study. Spent fuel can be stored dry in concrete canisters above ground and ultimate storage of wastes in salt deposits or hard rock is appropriate to Canadian conditions. (E.C.B.)

  13. Canadians assess the future of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, C.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the views expressed at a seminar held at Calgary on uranium marketing indicate the issues presently concerning Canadian uranium producers. There was apprehension that price rises might result from selling of the strategic stockpile by the Government. Long term growth prospects and the need for continuous exploration were discussed. Criticisms were also expressed of the Canadian safequard system and its tight export regulations. (U.K.)

  14. Meeting Canadian Forces Expansion Goals through Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    poverty, etc. The recruiting slogan has resonated well with the Canadian Public thanks to an effective advertising campaign. 2 Canadian Department of...for Joint Task Force Two selection is most probably trying to realize his full potential; an armour officer who enrolls in a voluntary continuing...meet with a recruiting staff member to start the process. This has opened the CF entry door much wider to those living in remote locations ; they

  15. South Asian Canadian experiences of depression

    OpenAIRE

    Grewal, Amarjit

    2010-01-01

    This narrative research study explored the socio-cultural context surrounding depression through semi-structured interviews with six South Asian Canadian participants, who self identified as having experienced depression. The study sought to expand on the knowledge of depression and South Asian Canadians by considering the roles of the family, the community, and the culture in the experiences of depression. Thematic analysis of the participant interviews resulted in five major themes: the exp...

  16. Canadian Manufacturing Malaise: Three Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Krzepkowski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The danger in politicians promoting the idea that “Dutch Disease” is responsible for the decline of the Ontario manufacturing sector is that the suggestion implies that Canada’s manufacturing sector will bounce back if only we could slow down oil sands development, or if the Canadian dollar were to devalue. In reality, evidence suggests that the decline in Ontario manufacturing is the result of long-term structural changes in the economy, independent of the rise of the country’s natural-resource sector and the rising dollar. And the sooner policymakers realize that, and stop blaming the decline in manufacturing on Dutch Disease (which holds that a booming natural-resource sector that drives up our dollar makes our manufacturing exports less competitive the sooner they can get to work on helping manufacturing-dependent regions transition to the evolving economy. A closer analysis of Canada’s manufacturing sector shows that jobs in that sector have been disappearing across the country since the end of the Second World War, with the sector’s share of employment falling dramatically well before rapid development began to take hold in the oil sands, and back when Canada’s dollar was still worth far less than the American dollar. It is a trend that has been occurring among most of our OECD peers, including the United States, which may be due to the widespread reallocation of production to lower cost countries. But it is also true that Canada’s manufacturing productivity performance in particular has been declining for a generation, with especially poor performance in the last decade, when labour productivity in Canada grew at just a quarter of the U.S. rate. Meanwhile, capital investment that may have improved the competitiveness of Canadian manufacturing has been anemic. Yet there is no particular reason to lament the scaling-down of manufacturing jobs in Ontario. The province remains just as economically important, as a share of

  17. Nuclear energy: a world of service to humanity. 27th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 30th Canadian Nuclear Society/Canadian Nuclear Association student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 27th Annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society was held on June 11-14, 2006 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The conference gathered close to 400 scientists, engineers, technologists and students interested in all aspects and applications of energy from the atom. The central objective of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of views on how this technical enterprise can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. The plenary sessions addressed broad industrial and commercial developments in the field. Over eighty papers were presented in 15 technical sessions on the following topics: safety analysis; plant refurbishment; control room operation; nuclear chemistry and materials; advanced reactor design; plant operation; reactor physics; safety analysis; nuclear instrumentation; and, nuclear general topics. Embedded in the conference was the 30th student conference, sponsored by the Canadian Nuclear Society and the Canadian Nuclear Association. Over thirty-five papers were presented in five sessions on the following topics: corrosion processes; control systems / physics / modelling; and, chemistry / chemical engineering

  18. Mitigation of Hydrogen Hazards in Severe Accidents in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-07-01

    Consideration of severe accidents in nuclear power plants is an essential component of the defence in depth approach in nuclear safety. Severe accidents have very low probabilities of occurring, but may have significant consequences resulting from the degradation of nuclear fuel. The generation of hydrogen and the risk of hydrogen combustion, as well as other phenomena leading to overpressurization of the reactor containment in case of severe accidents, represent complex safety issues in relation to accident management. The combustion of hydrogen, produced primarily as a result of heated zirconium metal reacting with steam, can create short term overpressure or detonation forces that may exceed the strength of the containment structure. An understanding of these phenomena is crucial for planning and implementing effective accident management measures. Analysis of all the issues relating to hydrogen risk is an important step for any measure that is aimed at the prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion in reactor containments. The main objective of this publication is to contribute to the implementation of IAEA Safety Standards, in particular, two IAEA Safety Requirements: Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design and Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. These Requirements publications discuss computational analysis of severe accidents and accident management programmes in nuclear power plants. Specifically with regard to the risk posed by hydrogen in nuclear power reactors, computational analysis of severe accidents considers hydrogen sources, hydrogen distribution, hydrogen combustion and control and mitigation measures for hydrogen, while accident management programmes are aimed at mitigating hydrogen hazards in reactor containments.

  19. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  20. Hydrogen applications for Lambert-St. Louis International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Today, major airports are facing challenges related to pollution, energy efficiency, and safety and security. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, regarded as one of the key energy solutions of the 21st century are more energy efficient and reliable ...

  1. K Basin safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall

  2. Rolling towards a cleaner future: the development of Canadian locomotive emissions regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    In 2006, the Government of Canada published a notice of intent that it would develop regulations aimed at reducing anthropogenic criteria air contaminants and greenhouse gas emissions. The Government now intends to develop railway emissions regulations for criteria air contaminants under the Railway Safety Act. The Railway Safety Act not only provides the legislative basis for developing regulations governing railways, it also gives the authority for developing the rules governing federally regulated railroads to the Minister of Transport. For the future, Transport Canada will be responsible for developing regulations governing the rail sector. The transportation sector is a substantial emitter of criteria air contaminants, so rail transportation is a key element of the current work. This paper seeks to give a framework for consultations with stakeholders and facilitate dialogue. It collects feedback from stakeholders on the design of a Canadian regulatory regime for locomotive-generated criteria air contaminant emissions. Canadian railways have managed locomotive air contaminant emissions since 1995.

  3. Overview of U.S. programs for hydrogen from renewables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses US program for hydrogen from renewable energy sources. Renewable energy sources include biomass, wind, solar, hydropower, geothermal and ocean waves. Although nuclear power is not considered renewable, a case can be made that it is, but requires recycling of spent fuel. The paper also discusses hydrogen production, storage and delivery. It discusses fuel cells, safety codes and standards and system analysis

  4. Medical cannabis - the Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gordon D; Bober, Sara L; Mindra, Sean; Moreau, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been widely used as a medicinal agent in Eastern medicine with earliest evidence in ancient Chinese practice dating back to 2700 BC. Over time, the use of medical cannabis has been increasingly adopted by Western medicine and is thus a rapidly emerging field that all pain physicians need to be aware of. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a significant and dose-dependent relationship between neuropathic pain relief and tetrahydrocannabinol - the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. Despite this, barriers exist to use from both the patient perspective (cost, addiction, social stigma, lack of understanding regarding safe administration) and the physician perspective (credibility, criminality, clinical evidence, patient addiction, and policy from the governing medical colleges). This review addresses these barriers and draws attention to key concerns in the Canadian medical system, providing updated treatment approaches to help clinicians work with their patients in achieving adequate pain control, reduced narcotic medication use, and enhanced quality of life. This review also includes case studies demonstrating the use of medical marijuana by patients with neuropathic low-back pain, neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. While significant preclinical data have demonstrated the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating pain in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, and cancer, further studies are needed with randomized controlled trials and larger study populations to identify the specific strains and concentrations that will work best with selected cohorts.

  5. Canadian photovoltaic industry directory --1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The directory is intended to help potential PV customers identify Canadian-based companies who can meet their needs, and to help product manufacturers and distributors identify potential new clients and/or partners within the PV industry for new and improved technologies leading to greater end-use customer satisfaction. The principal feature of the directory is an information matrix that identifies the product and service types offered by each firm and the primary clients served. There is also a list of companies by province and territory, followed by an alphabetical listing of all companies, with detailed information including, mailing address, contact person, prime activity, geographic area served, languages in which services are provided, and a brief company profile. Additional information provided by the companies themselves, dealing with items such as number of systems sold, the total installed capacity, etc., is included in an 'experience matrix' for each firm. Sources of additional information on photovoltaic systems are included in a list at the end of the directory

  6. Canadian natural gas price forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.

    1998-01-01

    The basic factors that influenced NYMEX gas prices during the winter of 1997/1998 - warm temperatures, low fuel prices, new production in the Gulf of Mexico, and the fact that forecasters had predicted a mild spring due to El Nino - were reviewed. However, it was noted that for the last 18 months the basic factors had less of an impact on market direction because of an increase in Fund and technical trader participation. Overall, gas prices were strong through most of the year. For the winter of 1998-1999 the prediction was that NYMEX gas prices will remain below $2.00 through to the end of October 1998 because of high U.S. storage levels and moderate temperatures. NYMEX gas prices are expected to peak in January 1999 at $3.25. AECO natural gas prices were predicted to decrease in the short term because of increasing levels of Canadian storage, and because of delays in Northern Border pipeline expansions. It was also predicted that AECO prices will peak in January 1999 and will remain relatively strong through the summer of 1999. tabs., figs

  7. Biliary atresia: the Canadian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Richard A; Barker, Collin C; Roberts, Eve A; Martin, Steven R; Alvarez, Fernando; Smith, Lesley; Butzner, J Decker; Wrobel, Iwona; Mack, David; Moroz, Stanley; Rashid, Mohsin; Persad, Rabin; Levesque, Dominique; Brill, Herbert; Bruce, Garth; Critch, Jeff

    2007-12-01

    To determine the outcomes of Canadian children with biliary atresia. Health records of infants born in Canada between January 1, 1985 and December 31, 1995 (ERA I) and between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2002 (ERA II) who were diagnosed with biliary atresia at a university center were reviewed. 349 patients were identified. Median patient age at time of the Kasai operation was 55 days. Median age at last follow-up was 70 months. The 4-year patient survival rate was 81% (ERA I = 74%; ERA II = 82%; P = not significant [NS]). Kaplan-Meier survival curves for patients undergoing the Kasai operation at age 90 days showed 49%, 36%, and 23%, respectively, were alive with their native liver at 4 years (P < .0001). This difference continued through 10 years. The 2- and 4-year post-Kasai operation native liver survival rates were 47% and 35% for ERA I and 46% and 39% for ERA II (P = NS). A total of 210 patients (60%) underwent liver transplantation; the 4-year transplantation survival rate was 82% (ERA I = 83%, ERA II = 82%; P = NS). This is the largest outcome series of North American children with biliary atresia at a time when liver transplantation was available. Results in each era were similar. Late referral remains problematic; policies to ensure timely diagnosis are required. Nevertheless, outcomes in Canada are comparable to those reported elsewhere.

  8. Violence on canadian television networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Guy

    2004-02-01

    Over the past twenty years, the question of the effects of violence on television has figured prominently in public opinion and hundreds of studies have been devoted to this subject. Many researchers have determined that violence has a negative impact on behavior. The public, broadcasters and political figures all support the idea of reducing the total amount of violence on television - in particular in shows for children. A thousand programs aired between 1993 and 2001 on major non-specialty television networks in Canada were analyzed: TVA, TQS, as well as CTV and Global, private French and English networks, as well as the English CBC Radio and French Radio-Canada for the public networks. The methodology consists of a classic analysis of content where an act of violence constitutes a unit of analysis. The data collected revealed that the amount of violence has increased regularly since 1993 despite the stated willingness on the part of broadcasters to produce programs with less violence. The total number of violent acts, as well as the number of violent acts per hour, is increasing. Private networks deliver three times more violence than public networks. Researchers have also noted that a high proportion of violence occurs in programs airing before 21:00 hours, thereby exposing a large number of children to this violence. Psychological violence is taking on a more significant role in Canadian Television.

  9. Continental energy plan. Canadian perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The 'continental energy plan' was first mentioned by US President George Bush during his election campaign, and relates to the adjustment of energy resources development in Canada and Mexico. The US energy policy aims to reduce US dependence on middle east oil supplies, increase US energy production, increase regional integration of energy supplies throughout North America, increase US refining capacity, reduce regulatory barriers, increase use of alternative energies, and to increase support for research and development. Under the Canada/US FTA (Free Trade Agreement) and NAFTA (North American Free Trade Agreement), not less than 50% of Canadian crude oil and natural gas are imported to the US market. As for Mexico, it exempted most portions of its energy sector from the agreement during the NAFTA negotiations. Now that Mexico itself is facing energy shortage, however, it is anticipated that under President Vincente Fox it will adopt a policy like that of Canada and start development by introducing foreign money into the fields of oil, gas, and electricity. (NEDO)

  10. Constructed wetlands : the Canadian context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speer, S.; Champagne, P. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Large volumes of wastewater from livestock and production facilities must be treated to minimize the contamination of waterways in agricultural areas. This paper investigated the use of constructed wetlands as a lower-cost and efficient method of treating agricultural wastewaters. The study found that while constructed wetlands required limited maintenance, temperature dependency of the constructed wetlands systems is a limiting factor in their widespread implementation. Lower operating temperatures are only overcome by constructing larger wetlands systems, which require a substantial amount of land. The Canadian climate poses significant challenges to the implementation of constructed wetlands, which become inoperative during winter months. Plants and bacteria normally become dormant or die during winter months, which can create a lag in wetland treatment during the initial months of operation in the Spring. Snowmelt and added rainfall in the Spring can also create a high flow within the wetland cells, as many constructed wetlands rely on runoff as a feed source. Washout of bacteria can occur. Wastewater storage systems or further engineering of the wetlands may be required. It was concluded that insulating wetland cells will maintain a warmer operating temperature, while the addition of an aeration system will increase the treatment efficiency of the wetland during winter months. 17 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs.

  11. Hydrogen problems related to reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujor, A.

    1993-09-01

    At reactor accidents, the combustion of hydrogen causes pressure and temperature transients which pose supplementary loads in containment. In certain conditions, they could reach hazardous levels and impair the integrity of the containment and the operability of the safety systems. The mechanisms of chemical reactions specific for the hydrogen-oxygen system are presented. Conditions in which combustion can occur and the various combustion modes, including the transition to detonation are also described. The related safety aspects and mitigation methods are discussed. Examples for particular applications and safety approaches for various types of reactors, included those promoted for the advanced reactors are also given. Presentation of the experimental research completed at AECL-Research, Whiteshell Laboratory is given, where the multi-point ignition effects for constant volume and for vented combustion of dry hydrogen-air mixtures in various geometries have been investigated. Various aspects of modelling and simulation of hydrogen combustion are discussed. The adaptations and the new models implemented in the codes VENT and CONTAIN, aimed to widen the simulation capabilities of hydrogen combustion models are described. The capabilities and limitations of the modelling assumptions of these two codes are also evaluated. (EG) (11 tabs., 39 ills., 82 refs.)

  12. Advances in Canadian regulatory practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddington, J.G.

    1993-03-01

    The new General Amendments to the Regulations, new recommendations on dose limits, developments in techniques and safety thinking, and aging of plant are all contributing to the need for a significant number of new regulatory document on a wide range of topics. this paper highlights a number of initiatives taken in response to these pressures, giving a brief background to the initiative and, where possible, outlining some of the ideas in the document licensing guides on new dose limits, dosimetry, safety analysis, reliability, fault tree analysis, reporting requirements, human factors, software, the ALARA principle, backfitting and the licensing process. (Author) 29 refs., fig., 4 tabs

  13. CSA guide to Canadian wind turbine codes and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian wind energy sector has become one of the fastest-growing wind energy markets in the world. Growth of the industry has been supported by various government agencies. However, many projects have experienced cost over-runs or cancellations as a result of unclear regulatory requirements, and wind energy developers are currently subject to a variety of approval processes involving several different authorities. This Canadian Standards Association (CSA) guide provided general information on codes and standards related to the design, approval, installation, operation, and maintenance of wind turbines in Canada. CSA codes and standards were developed by considering 5 new standards adopted by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee on Wind Turbines. The standards described in this document related to acoustic noise measurement techniques; power performance measurements of electricity-producing wind turbines; lightning protection for wind turbine generator systems; design requirements for turbines; and design requirements for small wind turbines. The guide addressed specific subject areas related to the development of wind energy projects that involve formal or regulatory approval processes. Subject areas included issues related to safety, environmental design considerations, site selection, and mechanical systems. Information on associated standards and codes was also included

  14. Occupational exposure to hydrogen sulfide: management of hydrogen sulfide exposure victims (Preprint No. SA-5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.P.

    1989-04-01

    National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, U.S.A. has listed 73 industries with potential exposure to hydrogen sulphide. Though the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide is known to mankind since the beginning of seventeenth century the exact mode of its toxicity and effective therapeutic regimen remains unclear as yet. This paper presents current thoughts on the toxicity of this substance and a discussion on the role of various antidotes used in H 2 S poisoning. (autho r)

  15. Optimization of the fuel assembly for the Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, C.; Bonin, H.; Chan, P., E-mail: Corey.French@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A parametric optimization of the Canadian Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) lattice geometry and fresh fuel content is performed in this work. With the potential to improve core physics and performance, significant gains to operating and safety margins could be achieved through slight progressions. The fuel performance codes WIMS-AECL and SERPENT are used to calculate performance factors, and use them as inputs to an optimization algorithm. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the 11th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouben, B.

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the thirteen technical sessions at the 11. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. The 68 papers presented at this conference cover the areas of programmes and issues for the 90's; thermalhydraulics; reactor physics and fuel management; nuclear safety; small reactors; fuel behaviour; energy production and the environment; computer applications; nuclear systems; fusion; reactor decommissioning, irradiated fuel and materials handling; and reactor components, (L.L.)

  17. Hydrogen-powered lawn mower: 14 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvon, K.; Lorenzoni, J.-L.

    2006-01-01

    Our hydrogen-powered lawn mower [Yvon K, Lorenzoni J-L. Hydrogen powered lawn mower. Int J Hydrogen Energy 1993; 18, 345-48] has been operated without major interruption during the past 14 years. The commercial model was originally running on gasoline and was adapted to hydrogen by making small adjustments to the carburettor and by installing a hydrogen reservoir containing solid-state metal hydrides. During the evaluation period the only maintenance work was changing the lubricating oil of the engine once a year, and reactivating the metal hydride powder by external heating after an accidental inlet of air into the reservoir. There occurred no technical failure, and there was no safety incident, neither during operation nor during recharging of hydrogen. This demonstrates that a hydrogen-operated device of this type is mature for use by greater public. Cost and marketing issues are discussed. (author)

  18. Submission to Energy and Mines Ministers Conference by the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Almost all of the oil and natural gas in Canada is transported from supply basins to customers across the country through the critical network operated by the members of the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association (CEPA). More than 50 per cent of the liquid hydrocarbons transported last year were exported to the United States. The issues discussed in this paper are pipeline safety and integrity, landowner relations, climate change, Aboriginal consultation, and economic regulation and taxation. Each of these topics is discussed in detail. CEPA members are working closely with industry partners and their associations in both the United States and Canada, especially so since the events of September 11, as well as with federal and provincial governments in the field of critical infrastructure protection. Landowners agree to the tune of 87 per cent with the statement to the effect that Canadians can trust pipelines to safely transport oil and natural gas products across the country. CEPA members continue to strive to meet the communication and information needs of stakeholders. Climate change poses significant challenges to the industry, which is committed to doing its part to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases. Consultation with Aboriginals is taking place in the eight provinces and two territories where CEPA members operate. The issues discussed are environmental protection, preservation of cultural and heritage resources, education and training, employment, contracting, and business opportunities. A vital component of the Canadian economy, the pipeline industry improves the quality of life for all Canadians, but the regulators are awarding low rates of return, creating a disadvantage for Canadians in the marketplace. Adjustments in this field are required, in the opinion of CEPA members. The current Capital Cost Allowance (CCA) rate for pipeline compressor assets is an issue that is being defended by CEPA members along with the Canadian Gas Association and

  19. A Study on Methodology of Assessment for Hydrogen Explosion in Hydrogen Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gun Hyo

    2007-02-01

    Due to the exhaustion of fossil fuel as energy sources and international situation insecurity for political factor, unstability of world energy market is rising, consequently, a substitute energy development have been required. Among substitute energy to be discussed, producing hydrogen from water by nuclear energy which does not release carbon is a very promising technology. Very high temperature gas cooled reactor is expected to be utilized since the procedure of producing hydrogen requires high temperature over 1000 .deg. C. Hydrogen production facility using very high temperature gas cooled reactor lies in situation of high temperature and corrosion which makes hydrogen release easily. In case of hydrogen release, there lies a danger of explosion. Moreover explosion not only has a bad influence upon facility itself but very high temperature gas cooled reactor which also result in unsafe situation that might cause serious damage. However, from point of thermal-hydraulics view, long distance makes low efficiency result. In this study, therefore, outlines of hydrogen production using nuclear energy is researched. Several methods for analyzing the effects of hydrogen explosion upon high temperature gas cooled reactor are reviewed. Reliability physics model which is appropriate for assessment is used. Using this model, leakage probability, rupture probability and structure failure probability of very high temperature gas cooled reactor is evaluated classified by detonation volume and distance. Also based on standard safety criteria which is a value of 1x10 -6 , the safety distance between very high temperature and hydrogen production facility is calculated. In the future, assessment for characteristic of very high temperature gas cooled reactor, capacity to resist pressure from outside hydrogen explosion and overpressure for large amount of detonation volume in detail is expected to identify more precise distance using reliability physics model in this paper. This

  20. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  1. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  2. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available .J. Cartera,*, L.A. Cornishb aAdvanced Engineering & Testing Services, MATTEK, CSIR, Private Bag X28, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa bSchool of Process and Materials Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, P.O. WITS 2050, South Africa... are contrasted, and an unusual case study of hydrogen embrittlement of an alloy steel is presented. 7 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Hydrogen; Hydrogen-assisted cracking; Hydrogen damage; Hydrogen embrittlement 1. Introduction Hydrogen suC128...

  3. Uranium mining in the Canadian social environment in the eighties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board considers the health and safety of workers and members of the public to be of primary concern in the assessment of any proposed uranium mine or mill. Of great importance also is the influence mining practices may have on waste streams, subsequent waste management, and consequently the environment. Past mistakes and the reluctance of mining companies to talk openly to the public have resulted in the loss of credibility of the uranium mining industry. The public is subjected to the biased views of nuclear critics and does not have a balanced picture of the industry. The health hazards of radiation are generally overstated, and society is not willing to accept the small risks associated with nuclear power. Complete openness on the part of the industry and regulatory agencies will be required in order to regain public confidence

  4. Uranium mining in the Canadian social environment of the eighties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-11-01

    The attitude of the Canadian public to the mining industry as a whole has changed in recent years to one of mistrust because of the public perception of mining as environmentally harmful and humanly degrading. In addition, uranium mining has had to cope with the public fear of radiation. The uranium mining industry is closely regulated by the Atomic Energy Control Board, not only in the area of radiation protection but also in other fields affecting worker health and safety. Uranium mining has been the subject of many hearings in Canada, and all but one have concluded that it is environmentally and socially acceptable. It is up to the mining industry to convey this message to the public

  5. Canadian public and leadership attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Surveys of the Canadian public and leadership were carried out to determine levels of knowledge, perceptions and attitudes toward the use of nuclear power in Canada. The public sample included population over 18 years broken down by region, age, sex and education. The leadership study sampled businessmen, politicians, civil servants, academics and environmentalists. Only 56 % of the public indicated a knowledge of the use of nuclear power: 68 % were in favour, and of these, 39 % were unsure of its safety. Environmentalits were the most knowledgealbe of all the leadership groups, with academics second, and the remaining groups having low levels of information. Fear-producing aspects defined by the survey should be used as the basis for providing information. All leadership groups except environmentalists favoured nuclear power development. Leadership groups identified the same disadvantages as the public (radiation, waste management, pollution and explosions) but added cost. (J.T.A.)

  6. Canadian fuel development program in 1997/98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, J.H.; Kohn, E.; Sejnoha, R.; Cox, D.S.; Macici, N.N.; Steed, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the CANDU fuel development activities in Canada during 1997 through 1998. The activities include those of the Fuel Technology Program sponsored by the CANDU Owners Group. The goal of the Fuel Technology Program is to maintain and improve the reliability, economics and safety of CANDU fuel in operating reactors. These activities, therefore, concentrate on the present designs of 28-element and 37-element fuel bundles. The Canadian fuel development activities also include those of the Advanced Fuel and Fuel Cycle Technology Program at AECL. These activities concentrate on the development of advanced fuel designs and advanced fuel cycles, which among other advantages, can reduce the capital and fuelling costs, maintain operating margins in aging reactors, improve natural-uranium utilization, and reduce the amount of spent fuel. (author)

  7. Geoscience research for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of deep disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock. As part of that assessment, a broad program of geoscience and geotechnical work has been undertaken to develop methods for characterizing sites, incorporating geotechnical data into disposal facility design, and incorporating geotechnical data into environmental and safety assessment of the disposal system. General field investigations are conducted throughout the Precambrian Shield, subsurface investigations are conducted at designated field research areas, and in situ rock mass experiments are being conducted in an Underground Research Laboratory. Samples from the field research areas and elsewhere are subjected to a wide range of tests and experiments in the laboratory to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes involved in ground-water-rock-waste interactions. Mathematical models to simulate these processes are developed, verified and validated. 114 refs.; 13 figs

  8. Perspectives for generation companies and the emerging hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, N.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Canadian and global power generation supply is evolving towards inclusion of emerging types of technologies for electricity production. Although much of Canadian electricity supply will continue to be derived from traditional sources in the foreseeable future the band for capital cost competitiveness is narrowing between the once clear-cut technological winners and emerging generation technologies creating opportunity for new technologies to commercialize in the market. OPG has been active in the development and commercialization of stationary high temperature fuel cells for several years. The major activity has been a partnering initiative to engineer and implement Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) demonstration installations. The relationship with SOFC developer Siemens-Westinghouse out of Pittsburgh has allowed OPG to maintain an ongoing involvement in the emerging fuel cell industry, while exploring the broader implications of this technology for the power industry business model. OPG is part of the 'Hydrogen Village Partnership'. The Hydrogen Village will demonstrate and deploy various hydrogen production, storage and delivery techniques as well as applications of hydrogen such as fuel cells for stationary, transportation (mobile) and portable applications. OPG maintains an active role in the demonstration of emerging technologies for a number of reasons: 1) advancing commercialization of emerging generation technologies, 2) 'hands-on' participation in the deployment of such technology in order to gather and apply market knowledge 3) Involvement in developing technology as a part of commitment to sustainable development. (author)

  9. Public safety around dams guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, T [Canadian Dam Association, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed Canadian and international initiatives for improving dam safety and described some of the drivers for the development of new Canadian Dam Association (CDA) public safety guidelines for dams. The CDA guidelines were divided into the following 3 principal sections: (1) managed system elements, (2) risk assessment and management, and (3) technical bulletins. Public and media responses to the drownings have called for improved safety guidelines. While the public remains unaware of the hazards of dams, public interaction with dams is increasing as a result of interest in extreme sports and perceived rights of access. Guidelines are needed for dam owners in order to provide due diligence. Various organizations in Canada are preparing technical and public safety dam guidelines. CDA guidelines have also been prepared for signage, booms and buoys, and audible and visual alerts bulletins. Working groups are also discussing recommended practices for spill procedures, spillways and the role of professional engineers in ensuring public safety. Methods of assessing risk were also reviewed. Managed system elements for risk assessment and public interactions were also discussed, and stepped control measures were presented. tabs., figs.

  10. Solar and Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadirgan, F.; Beyhan, S.; Oezenler, S.

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that the only sustainable and environmentally friendly energy is the solar energy and hydrogen energy, which can meet the increasing energy demand in the future. Solar Energy may be used either for solar thermal or for solar electricity conversion. Solar thermal collectors represent a wide-spread type of system for the conversion of solar energy. Radiation, convection and conduction are strongly coupled energy transport mechanisms in solar collector systems. The economic viability of lower temperature applications of solar energy may be improved by increasing the quantity of usable energy delivered per unit area of collector. This can be achieved by the use of selective black coatings which have a high degree of solar absorption, maintaining high energy input to the solar system while simultaneously suppressing the emission of thermal infrared radiation. Photovoltaic solar cells and modules are produced for: (1) large scale power generation, most commonly when modules are incorporated as part of a building (building integrated photovoltaic s) but also in centralised power stations, (2) supplying power to villages and towns in developing countries that are not connected to the supply grid, e.g. for lighting and water pumping systems, (3) supplying power in remote locations, e.g. for communications or weather monitoring equipment, (4) supplying power for satellites and space vehicles, (5) supplying power for consumer products, e.g. calculators, clocks, toys and night lights. In hydrogen energy systems, Proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cells are promising candidates for applications ranging from portable power sources (battery replacement applications) to power sources for future electric vehicles because of their safety, elimination of fuel processor system, thus, simple device fabrication and low cost. Although major steps forward have been achieved in terms of PEMFC design since the onset of research in this area, further

  11. IEA Hydrogen Implementing Agreement's Second Generation R and D and the Hydrogen Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, N.; Garcia-Conde, A. G.; Riis, T. U.; Luzzi, A.; Valladares, M. R. de

    2005-07-01

    Since its creation by the International Energy Agency in the late 1970's, the IEA Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) has been at the forefront of collaborative international hydrogen research and development (R and D) (http://www.ieahia.org. ) The collective body of HIA hydrogen R and D will contribute to definition of the hydrogen economy. The five-year [2004-2009) mission of the IEA HIA is to advance the adoption of a Hydrogen Economy through strategic implementation of collaborative R and D and outreach programs that address key issues and barriers. The three goals for the Second Generation HIA are: Advancement of science and technology via pre-commercial collaborative RD and D programs; Assessment of market environment, including the non-energy sector; and Implementation of outreach program, aimed at community acceptance and support. The HIA launched its Second Generation of hydrogen R and D in the latter part of 2004. The HIA's anniversary report: In Pursuit of the Future: 25 Years of IEA Research towards the realization of Hydrogen Energy Systems (http://ieahia.org/pdfs/IEA_AnniversaryReport_HIA.pdf) chronicles its contributions to hydrogen R and D. As the hydrogen economy takes shape, the HIA is pleased to share highlights of its R and D history together with progress on planned activities and its six current annexes, listed below: Task 15 Photobiological Production of Hydrogen Task 16 Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials Task 17 Solid and Liquid Storage Task 18 Integrated Systems Evaluation Task 19 Safety Task 20 Hydrogen from Waterphotolysis Planned successor annexes in storage and photobiological hydrogen production will also be discussed, along with a task on high temperature hydrogen production that is now in the definition phase. Over 250 experts from the sixteen member HIA countries and the European Union contribute to this portfolio of cutting edge hydrogen R and D and analysis activities. Several other countries are expected to

  12. Canadian environmental sustainability indicators: highlights 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    Canadians' health and their social and economic well-being are fundamentally linked to the quality of their environment. Recognizing this, in 2004 the Government of Canada committed to establishing national indicators of freshwater quality, air quality and greenhouse gas emissions. The goal of these new indicators is to provide Canadians with more regular and reliable information on the state of their environment and how it is linked with human activity. Canadians need clearly defined environmental indicators - measuring sticks that can track the results that have been achieved through the efforts of governments, industries and individuals to protect and improve the environment. Environment Canada, Statistics Canada and Health Canada are working together to further develop and communicate these indicators. Reflecting the joint responsibility for environmental management in Canada, this effort has benefited from the cooperation and input of the provinces and territories. The indicators are: air quality; greenhouse gas emissions; and, freshwater quality. Air quality tracks Canadians' exposure to ground-level ozone - a key component of smog. The indicator measures one of the most common, harmful air pollutants to which people are exposed. The use of the seasonal average of ozone concentrations reflects the potential for long-term health effects. Greenhouse gas emissions tracks the annual releases of the six greenhouse gases that are the major contributors to climate change. The indicator comes directly from the greenhouse gas inventory report prepared by Environment Canada for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Kyoto Protocol. The data are widely used to report on progress toward Canada's Kyoto target for reduced emissions. Freshwater quality reports the status of surface water quality at selected monitoring sites across the country. For this first report, the focus of the indicator is on the protection of aquatic life, such as

  13. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  14. 2007 Canadian vehicle survey : summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcha, A.; Norup, S.; Kormylo, A.

    2009-09-15

    The Canadian vehicle survey is a quarterly survey of vehicle transportation activities in Canada that began in 1999. This report presented the results of the Canadian vehicle survey for 2007. The purpose of the survey is to encourage Canadians to make energy-efficient choices regarding their driving habits. The study shed light on Canadian fuel consumption behaviour, modes of transportation and consumer trends. This report examined the composition of Canada's vehicle fleet, the main characteristics of this fleet, and the patterns of vehicle use. Some behavioural characteristics of Canadian drivers were also discussed. Specific topics that were presented included Canada's on-road vehicle fleet; geographic analysis; light vehicles; heavy vehicles such as medium and heavy trucks; and trip analysis such as road types used by vehicles, rush hour and fuel consumption, and driver's age and gender. It was concluded that vehicles in Canada consumed 31 billion litres of gasoline and 11 billion litres of diesel. In addition, fuel efficiency for heavy trucks increased 21 percent between 2000 and 2007. 15 tabs., 39 figs., 4 appendices.

  15. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debenham, Brock; Banerjee, Robyn; Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George; Trotter, Theresa; Yee, Don

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  16. Operative Landscape at Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Michael K; Dakson, Ayoub; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Sankar, Tejas; Christie, Sean D

    2017-07-01

    Background Currently, the literature lacks reliable data regarding operative case volumes at Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. Our objective was to provide a snapshot of the operative landscape in Canadian neurosurgical training using the trainee-led Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative. Anonymized administrative operative data were gathered from each neurosurgery residency program from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Procedures were broadly classified into cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures. A number of prespecified subspecialty procedures were recorded. We defined the resident case index as the ratio of the total number of operations to the total number of neurosurgery residents in that program. Resident number included both Canadian medical and international medical graduates, and included residents on the neurosurgery service, off-service, or on leave for research or other personal reasons. Overall, there was an average of 1845 operative cases per neurosurgery residency program. The mean numbers of cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures were 725, 466, 48, and 193, respectively. The nationwide mean resident case indices for cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and total procedures were 90, 58, 5, and 196, respectively. There was some variation in the resident case indices for specific subspecialty procedures, with some training programs not performing carotid endarterectomy or endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures. This study presents the breadth of neurosurgical training within Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. These results may help inform the implementation of neurosurgery training as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons residency training transitions to a competence-by-design curriculum.

  17. Sustainable development through nuclear technology : 29th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 32nd CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The 29th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 32nd CNS/CNA Student Conference on Sustainable Development through Nuclear Technology was held on June 1-4, 2008 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The theme of the conference was 'Nuclear Sustainability'. The central objective of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of views on how this technical enterprise can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. The renewed global interest in nuclear technology is based on a recognition of its potential to meet economic and environmental targets more favourably than competing technologies. Although many of these attractions are short-term in nature, they stem from a broader potential of nuclear technology to drive all aspects of development (social, environmental, economic) in a sustainable in this area. (author) a terial in support of fuel resources themselves. The conference drew a record attendance of over 450 delegates. Over 100 technical papers were presented within 15 technical sessions, as well as over 30 student papers in 5 sessions. The following list of session titles indicates the diversity of the technical papers: advanced reactors; plant and components; process systems; thermalhydraulics; safety and licensing; hydrogen; human factors; physics; instrumentation and control; environment and waste management; and plant operation. (author)

  18. Hydrogen and fuel cell research: Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, L.

    2006-01-01

    Vision: IESVic's mission is to chart feasible paths to sustainable energy. Current research areas of investigation: 1. Energy system analysis 2. Computational fuel cell engineering; Fuel cell parameter measurement; Microscale fuel cells 3. Hydrogen dispersion studies for safety codes 4. Active magnetic refrigeration for hydrogen liquifaction and heat transfer in metal hydrides 5. Hydrogen and fuel cell system integration (author)

  19. 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  20. 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 9-13, 2011, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.