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Sample records for canadian global village

  1. The Role of Libraries in the Global Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Donna Weiss

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and evolution of the term "global village" by author Marshall McLuhan, and presents findings from literature that associate libraries and education with society's technological advancements such as telecommunication and computerized services. Examines the role of libraries, librarians, commerce, and global…

  2. The Global Village: Migration and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavnagri, Navaz Peshotan

    2001-01-01

    Introduces this special issue on migration and education, describing the common underlying organizational framework for articles in this issue. Presents five common content strands regarding global immigration and schooling, including multiple reasons for migration, initial marginalization of immigrant groups, gaining resilience from support…

  3. Higher Education in the Global Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume is about higher education in the context of globalization. Universities are rapidly becoming internationalized, and far from being just' a question of the English language replacing local languages as the working language, this process has introduced a whole range of sociolinguistic...... hierarchical) positions....

  4. CERN’s role in the scientific global village

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    We’re proud of saying that there are over 100 nationalities at CERN, proof that people can overcome cultural boundaries in pursuit of common goals. We’re also proud of saying that our goals are noble ones: the understanding of the Universe, training of the highest quality, pushing the frontiers of technology and bringing nations together. For over 50 years, CERN has pursued these goals as part of the global scientific village. We have enjoyed healthy collaboration, and competition, with other laboratories in other regions of the world. The flow of scientists around the world has been balanced, enriching all regions. Today, however, the landscape is changing for particle physics, and as responsible citizens of our global village, we also have to evolve. The research facilities for CERN’s melting pot of nationalities are supported financially largely by the Organization’s 20 Member States. Other countries that make significant c...

  5. Improvement of GVSRM with Addressing the Interoperability Issues in Global Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mollahoseini Ardakani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In today's globally networked environment, enterprises need collaborating using Information Technology (IT and other tools to succeed in this dynamic and heterogeneous business environment. The Global Village Services Reference Model (GVSRM is a model based on SOSA (Service Oriented Strategies and Architectures ontology for global village services realization. In this model, three architectural abstraction layers have been considered for global village: ‘infrastructure for global village services’, ‘global village services provisioning’, and ‘using global village services’. Despite of relative completeness of this model, one of its obvious shortcomings is lack of attention to the crucial issue of interoperability in the global village. Based on this model, the grid of global village is comprised of VHGs (Virtual Holding Governance. The VHG is a temporary, scalable, dynamic cluster/association comprising of existing or newly service provider organizations which its aim is satisfying the requirements of global village actors through electronic processes. In this paper, we will propose a federated approach for interoperability among the VHGs of the global village and then improve the GVSRM by adding the corresponding interoperability components to it.

  6. Electronic Services, the Only Way to Realize the Global Village

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    Amid Khatibi Bardsiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available E-Services (Abbreviated for Electronic Services contained pointed different issues to each scientist and experts, since the operations from starting to tail of the E-Service value chain are significantly distinct compared to those for offline services and also because the digital world provides raised elasticity throughout the value chain. E-Service capability provides a chance, along with the require, to consider the customer first in the develop procedure. That is the time to expand the explanation of the word ‘Global Village’ according to the concept ‘E-Service’. Hence, the meaning of the word E-Service should be modifying regarding to the upcoming systems and styles similar to Grid, Cloud and Globalization. This paper discusses that Global Village could be realized only through the E-Services. However, today's E-Services are not suitable for this purpose, and in other words, they are not mature.

  7. Global Education in Canadian Elementary Schools: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Karen; Manion, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the implementation of global education in Canadian elementary schools. Curriculum analysis and 76 interviews at school, ministry, and district levels revealed limited coordination among ministry, district and NGO efforts and little support for curriculum development and teacher training. In schools, fund-raising for…

  8. Teaching and Learning in the Global Village: Connect, Create, Collaborate, and Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    The world is increasingly interconnected through technology. In order to live and work in a global village our students need to develop global literacy. Global literacy incorporates a range of overlapping concepts including an advocacy dimension, global citizenship responsibility, and cultural and linguistic awareness. Further, global literacy…

  9. Isotopes and innovation: Canadian success in a global market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, S. [Nordion Inc., Kanata, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Canadian nuclear technology for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease has a global presence. Innovation has as much to do with the way you take a product to market as with the product itself. Nordion targeted therapies are used in the treatment in a variety of cancers. TheraSphere fills a specific medical need for a targeted liver cancer treatment. Nordion is the world's leading supplier of Cobalt-60, the isotope producing gamma radiation required to destroy micro-organisms. Nordion is a world leader in medical isotope processing, packaging and delivery.

  10. Transnational Class Formation? Globalization and the Canadian Corporate Network

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    Jerome Klassen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue of transnational class formation has figured centrally in recent debates on globalization. These debates revolve around the question of whether or not new patterns of cross-border trade and investment have established global circuits of capital out of which a transnational capitalist class has emerged. This paper takes up the notion of transnational class formation at the point of corporate directorship interlocks. Using Canada as a case study, it maps the changing network of directorship interlocks between leading firms in Canada and the world economy. In particular, the paper examines the role of transnational corporations (TNCs in the Canadian corporate network; the resilience of a national corporate community; and new patterns of cross-border interlocking amongst transnational firms. Through this empirical mapping, the paper finds a definite link between investment and interlocking shaping the social space of the global corporate elite. Corporations with a transnational base of accumulation tend to participate in transnational interlocking. While national corporate communities have not been transcended, transnational firms increasingly predominate within them, articulating national with transnational elite segments. This new network of firms reconstitutes the corporate power bloc and forms a nascent transnational capitalist class.

  11. Revisioning Citizenship for the Global Village: Implications for Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Elayne

    1996-01-01

    Challenges of globalization for adult education are exposing the economic core, confronting the governance structures, assessing liberal democracy, affirming the importance of the local, and caring for the cultural environment. Their common thread is citizenship. (SK)

  12. Living in the Global Village: Strategies for Teaching Mental Flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Carol P.; Davies, MaryAnn; Maddoux, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Mental flexibility emerges as an essential skill for preparing young learners for global competency and denotes the ability to learn from and about different perspectives. Students who are regularly exposed to "alternative approaches to a wide range of scientific, social and everyday problems" appear to be more receptive to alternative solutions…

  13. Local Community Versus Globalization Tendencies: Case Study of Czech Villages in Romanian Banat Region

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    Šantrůčková Markéta

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The research question is the relationship between the local community and globalization tendencies and transformation or maintenance of local traditions. The research area is a specific locality of a Czech village in Romanian Banat. The local community has evolved in a relative isolation. Agriculture was the most important activity despite the fact that a mining factory was opened there. Agriculture was and in many features still is traditional, self-supplying, and hard-work. The life-style has always been environmentally friendly as it has been without modern technologies. Nevertheless, modernization exploded dramatically in these villages after 1989, when the communist policies collapsed along with Romania's isolation. People from the Czech Republic have rediscovered Romanian Banat and a rather busy (agro tourism has developed there. The Czech Ministry of Foreign Affairs supports development projects for making living conditions in the village better. Simultaneously, strong migration from Banat to the Czech Republic has started. People find living conditions in the Czech Republic easier and leave hard work, poverty and unemployment. It brings huge land cover changes because people who remain cannot use all arable land, which is thus abandoned and left for the natural process. One of the distinct manifestations of globalization tendencies is the build-up of wind power plants.

  14. Evolvement of uniformity and volatility in the stressed global financial village.

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    Dror Y Kenett

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the current era of strong worldwide market couplings the global financial village became highly prone to systemic collapses, events that can rapidly sweep throughout the entire village. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a new methodology to assess and quantify inter-market relations. The approach is based on the correlations between the market index, the index volatility, the market Index Cohesive Force and the meta-correlations (correlations between the intra-correlations. We investigated the relations between six important world markets--U.S., U.K., Germany, Japan, China and India--from January 2000 until December 2010. We found that while the developed "western" markets (U.S., U.K., Germany are highly correlated, the interdependencies between these markets and the developing "eastern" markets (India and China are volatile and with noticeable maxima at times of global world events. The Japanese market switches "identity"--it switches between periods of high meta-correlations with the "western" markets and periods when it behaves more similarly to the "eastern" markets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The methodological framework presented here provides a way to quantify the evolvement of interdependencies in the global market, evaluate a world financial network and quantify changes in the world inter market relations. Such changes can be used as precursors to the agitation of the global financial village. Hence, the new approach can help to develop a sensitive "financial seismograph" to detect early signs of global financial crises so they can be treated before they develop into worldwide events.

  15. The voice conveys emotion in ten globalized cultures and one remote village in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaro, Daniel T; Keltner, Dacher; Tshering, Sumjay; Wangchuk, Dorji; Flynn, Lisa M

    2016-02-01

    With data from 10 different globalized cultures and 1 remote, isolated village in Bhutan, we examined universals and cultural variations in the recognition of 16 nonverbal emotional vocalizations. College students in 10 nations (Study 1) and villagers in remote Bhutan (Study 2) were asked to match emotional vocalizations to 1-sentence stories of the same valence. Guided by previous conceptualizations of recognition accuracy, across both studies, 7 of the 16 vocal burst stimuli were found to have strong or very strong recognition in all 11 cultures, 6 vocal bursts were found to have moderate recognition, and 4 were not universally recognized. All vocal burst stimuli varied significantly in terms of the degree to which they were recognized across the 11 cultures. Our discussion focuses on the implications of these results for current debates concerning the emotion conveyed in the voice.

  16. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  17. A Global Language for the Global Village? A Response to Mary Snell-Hornby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Gunilla

    1999-01-01

    This response to an article on the effect of recent developments (particularly globalization and advances in technology) on the production and perception of language discusses the role of English as a global language and issues surrounding translation. Suggests that stereotyping resulting from non-nuanced and unsubtle transfer of information might…

  18. Preparing for Life in the Global Village: Producing Global Citizen Subjects in UK Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Alexandra; Charles, Claire

    2015-01-01

    This paper adds to a growing body of literature which views global citizenship education as part of a broader social and cultural process of subjectivity production. Rather than focus on global citizenship in relation to pedagogy or curriculum content, as much of the previous research literature has done, this paper examines it in relation to the…

  19. Citizenship Education in the Era of Globalization:Canadian Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Pashby

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Important and challenging theoretical debates and questions arising from considerations of the role of citizenship education in the current “global era” are evident in academic literature. Ultimately, our scholarly work must also engage with what happens in our elementary, secondary, and post-secondary classrooms. Much important scholarly attention is being directed to debates about the nature of globalization, and about national and, increasingly, global concepts of citizenship, multiculturalism, and social movements of global resistance. However, much of this work is done outside of a direct engagement with teachers, students, and classroom practices and is consequently left at a level of abstraction that appears disconnected from the day-to-day work of public schooling. Indeed, when working through significant theoretical interjections and conversations that engage with the complexities and possibilities to which we are drawn, we can never forget that the “what” and “how” of teaching and learning, and the values that circulate within classrooms, reflect the global movements of contemporary history and are shaped by a sense that we must take-up global issues. We must, therefore, recognize what Pashby (this issue refers to as the global imperative that exerts particular pressure on educational theory, practice, policy, and politics. To do this we must struggle with questions of theory that inform our scholarly and our practical work as educators, be that practice in faculties of education or in K to 12 classrooms. This special themed issue presents important questions, concerns, and possibilities that mark both theoretical discourses and classroom practice.

  20. Solving Real World Problems with Alternate Reality Gaming: Student Experiences in the Global Village Playground Capstone Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondlinger, Mary Jo; McLeod, Julie K.

    2015-01-01

    The Global Village Playground (GVP) was a capstone learning experience designed to address institutional assessment needs while providing an integrated and authentic learning experience for students aimed at fostering complex problem solving, as well as critical and creative thinking. In the GVP, students work on simulated and real-world problems…

  1. Canadian Orofacial Pain Team workshop report on the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain

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    Gilles J Lavigne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The year 2013–2014 has been designated the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain by the International Association for the Study of Pain. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary Canadian and international group of clinical, research and knowledge-transfer experts attended a workshop in Montreal, Quebec. The workshop had two aims: to identify new pathways for innovative diagnosis and management of chronic orofacial pain states; and to identify opportunities for further collaborative orofacial pain research and education in Canada.

  2. "With human health it's a global thing": Canadian perspectives on ethics in the global governance of an influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alison K; Smith, Maxwell J; McDougall, Christopher W; Bensimon, Cécile; Perez, Daniel Felipe

    2015-03-01

    We live in an era where our health is linked to that of others across the globe, and nothing brings this home better than the specter of a pandemic. This paper explores the findings of town hall meetings associated with the Canadian Program of Research on Ethics in a Pandemic (CanPREP), in which focus groups met to discuss issues related to the global governance of an influenza pandemic. Two competing discourses were found to be at work: the first was based upon an economic rationality and the second upon a humanitarian rationality. The implications for public support and the long-term sustainability of new global norms, networks, and regulations in global public health are discussed.

  3. A matter of prior knowledge: Canadian young children’s conceptions about the future in the global community

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    Ottilia CHAREKA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Young Canadian boys and girls aged nine to eleven were asked to consider their personal futures, the future of their community and the future of the world. Mixed methods were employed for data collection and analysis. Responses were compared with those given bychildren in eight countries and the discussion focused on the importance prior knowledge, in this case, prior knowledge of global issues, holds for effective teaching and learning about global issues. Canadian children were optimistic about the future for themselves and their community but less so for the globe. More so than other children, Canadian children were concerned with issues of social justice, issues such as discrimination and racism, and withimproving the environment, which might be attributed to the emphasis that is placed on these issues in their school curriculum. Assessing prior knowledge should be a priority for those considering development and implementation of global education curricula.

  4. Global health diplomacy: barriers to inserting health into Canadian foreign policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnels, Vivien; Labonté, Ronald; Ruckert, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Health opportunities and risks have become increasingly global in both cause and consequence. Governments have been slow to recognise the global dimensions of health, although this is beginning to change. A new concept - global health diplomacy (GHD) - has evolved to describe how health is now being positioned within national foreign policies and entering into regional or multilateral negotiations. Traditionally, health negotiations have been seen as 'low politics' in international affairs: however, attention is now being given to understanding better how health can increase its prominence in foreign policy priorities and multilateral forums. We sought to identify how these efforts were manifested in Canada, with a focus on current barriers to inserting health in foreign policy. We conducted individual interviews with Canadian informants who were well placed through their diplomatic experience and knowledge to address this issue. Barriers identified by the respondents included a lack of content expertise (scientific and technical understanding of health and its practice), insufficient diplomatic expertise (the practice and art of diplomacy, including legal and technical expertise), the limited ways in which health has become framed as a foreign policy issue, funding limitations and cuts for global health, and lack of cross-sectoral policy coordination and coherence, given the important role that non-health foreign policy interests (notably in trade and investment liberalisation) can play in shaping global health outcomes. We conclude with some reflections on how regime change and domestic government ideology can also function as a barrier to GHD, and what this implies for retaining or expanding the placement of health in foreign policy.

  5. Canadian Orofacial Pain Team workshop report on the global year against orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Gilles J; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The year 2013-2014 has been designated the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain by the International Association for the Study of Pain. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary Canadian and international group of clinical, research and knowledge-transfer experts attended a workshop in Montreal, Quebec. The workshop had two aims: to identify new pathways for innovative diagnosis and management of chronic orofacial pain states; and to identify opportunities for further collaborative orofacial pain research and education in Canada. Three topics related to chronic orofacial pain were explored: biomarkers and pain signatures for chronic orofacial pain; misuse of analgesic and opioid pain medications for managing chronic orofacial pain; and complementary alternative medicine, topical agents and the role of stress in chronic orofacial pain. It was determined that further research is needed to: identify biomarkers of chronic orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain, with a focus on psychosocial, physiological and chemical-genetic factors; validate the short- and long-term safety (i.e., no harm to health, and avoidance of misuse and addiction) of opioid use for two distinct conditions (acute and chronic orofacial pain, respectively); and promote the use of topical medications as an alternative treatment in dentistry, and further document the benefits and safety of complementary and alternative medicine, including stress management, in dentistry. It was proposed that burning mouth syndrome, a painful condition that is not uncommon and affects mainly postmenopausal women, should receive particular attention.

  6. Simulation of black carbon in snow and its climate impact in the Canadian Global Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, M.; von Salzen, K.; Cole, J. N. S.

    2015-09-01

    A new physically based parameterisation of black carbon (BC) in snow was developed and implemented in the Canadian Atmospheric Global Climate Model (CanAM4.2). Simulated BC snow mixing ratios and BC snow radiative forcings are in good agreement with measurements and results from other models. Simulations with the improved model yield considerable trends in regional BC concentrations in snow and BC snow radiative forcings during the time period from 1950-1959 to 2000-2009. Increases in radiative forcings for Asia and decreases for Europe and North America are found to be associated with changes in BC emissions. Additional sensitivity simulations were performed in order to study the impact of BC emission changes between 1950-1959 and 2000-2009 on surface albedo, snow cover fraction, and surface air temperature. Results from these simulations indicate that impacts of BC emission changes on snow albedos between these 2 decades are small and not significant. Overall, changes in BC concentrations in snow have much smaller impacts on the cryosphere than the net warming surface air temperatures during the second half of the 20th century.

  7. Simulation of black carbon in snow and its climate impact in the Canadian Global Climate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Namazi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new physically-based parameterization of black carbon (BC in snow was developed and implemented in the Canadian Atmospheric Global Climate Model (CanAM4.2. Simulated BC snow mixing ratios and BC snow radiative forcings are in good agreement with measurements and results from other models. Simulations with the improved model yield considerable trends in regional BC concentrations in snow and BC snow radiative forcings during the time period from 1950–1959 to 2000–2009. Increases in radiative forcings for Asia and decreases for Europe and North America are found to be associated with changes in BC emissions. Additional sensitivity simulations were performed in order to study the impact of BC emission changes between 1950–1959 and 2000–2009 on surface albedo, snow cover fraction, and surface air temperature. Results from these simulations indicate that impacts of BC emission changes on snow albedos between these two decades are small and not significant. Overall, changes in BC concentrations in snow have much smaller impacts on the cryosphere than the net warming surface air temperatures during the second half of the 20th century.

  8. A Fire in the Global Village: Teaching Ethical Reasoning and Stakeholder Interests Utilizing Tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooge, Lucien J.

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco has been an agricultural staple from the time of the first recorded European encounter with the plant in the fifteenth century. The pervasive nature of its cultivation and consumption has made tobacco one of the most profitable crops in world agricultural history. This case study examines the role of tobacco in the global marketplace with…

  9. Globalization and Education: What Students Will Need To Know and Be Able To Do in the Global Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, R. D.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that U.S. students are not being educated to succeed in a world dominated by the globalization of the economics, politics, and cultures of developed and developing countries. Suggests what educators can do to remedy this situation based on observations of Swedish school system. Suggestions include restructuring education, empowering…

  10. Sun-genesis 21: Empowering the global village in the digital age and the solar century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamasaki, Les [Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Sun-Genesis 21 is a global economic development plan for creating an environmentally sustainable future in the developing world. Its premise is that the solution to the survival of civil stability and democracy in developing countries in the Information Age is to slow the migration of the rural poor into the urban centers as well as dispersing some of the residents of the already impacted cities into new agro-communities. This strategy envisions empowering the 25 million coffee farmers located in the poorest countries in the world to control their own economic destiny by marketing their products directly to the international marketplace over the World Wide Web (Coffee Belt Plan 2020). The plan also envisions creating a network of new agricultural communities called World Farm Solar Telecommunities that utilizes telecommunications and environmental technologies to disperse the impacted urban population. Proven profitable commodities such as industrial hemp, aloe vera, and aquacultural farming will be the economic foundation of these agro-communities. The goal is to empower rural agro-entrepreneurs to become an economic engine for job creation and be able to afford the Coffee Solar Televillages that include distant learning centers, telemedicine clinics, food processing centers, e-commerce centers, and solar crop-drying centers. The Genesis 21 program includes creative financing strategies to deal with these massive problems of poverty and hunger through the concept of trade, not aid, including the use of barter in a proposed Green Technology for Green Coffee program. [Spanish] Sun-Genesis 21 es un plan global de desarrollo economico para crear un futuro ambiental sustentable en el mundo en desarrollo. La premisa del plan es que la solucion para la supervivencia de la estabilidad civil y la democracia en paises en desarrollo dentro de la Era de la Informacion es desacelerar la migracion de la gente pobre de las areas rurales hacia los centros urbanos, asi como

  11. Global climate change : Canadian policy and the role of terrestrial ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooten, van G.C.; Hauer, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Canadian climate change policy. It is argued that voluntary action will contribute little to climate change mitigation and that forest management strategies can, at most, contribute some 7.5 percent of Canada’s required Kyoto CO2-emissions reduction target. To do s

  12. Where theory and practice of global health intersect: the developmental history of a Canadian global health initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Daibes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper examines the scope of practice of global health, drawing on the practical experience of a global health initiative of the Government of Canada – the Teasdale-Corti Global Health Research Partnership Program. A number of challenges in the practical application of theoretical definitions and understandings of global health are addressed. These challenges are grouped under five areas that form essential characteristics of global health: equity and egalitarian North–South partnerships, interdisciplinary scope, focus on upstream determinants of health, global conceptualization, and global health as an area of both research and practice. Design: Information in this paper is based on the results of an external evaluation of the program, which involved analysis of project proposals and technical reports, surveys with grantees and interviews with grantees and program designers, as well as case studies of three projects and a review of relevant literature. Results: The philosophy and recent definitions of global health represent a significant and important departure from the international health paradigm. However, the practical applicability of this maturing area of research and practice still faces significant systemic and structural impediments that, if not acknowledged and addressed, will continue to undermine the development of global health as an effective means to addressing health inequities globally and to better understanding, and acting upon, upstream determinants of health toward health for all. Conclusions: While it strives to redress global inequities, global health continues to be a construct that is promoted, studied, and dictated mostly by Northern institutions and scholars. Until practical mechanisms are put in place for truly egalitarian partnerships between North and South for both the study and practice of global health, the emerging philosophy of global health cannot be effectively put into practice.

  13. The Arctic--A Global Hot Spot: Resources for Teaching the Geography of the Contemporary Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Betsy; Sotherden, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Canadian geography is a fascinating topic, particularly the Canadian North. The North is central to Canadian identity as can be seen by the choice of the far north "inukshuk" standing stones as the emblem for the 2010 Winter Olympics held in Vancouver, southern British Columbia. Canada's Arctic is receiving increasing attention by media,…

  14. Exposure to Global Markets, Internal Labour Markets, and Worker Compensation: Evidence from Canadian Microdata

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    Heather Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we address two bodies of sociological research: the effects of globalization and theories of pay. Most sociological writings on globalization emphasize its negative consequences. Most sociological writings on pay allow no role for productivity but, rather, assert the importance of power in the production of labour market outcomes. In this paper we examine the effects of threeforms of globalization — exporting, foreign ownership, and outsourcing — and include in our analysis institutional features of organizations typically associated with worker power. Using the rich data available in the Workplace and Employee Survey we find: i pay tends to be higher in workplaces that export and are foreign owned; ii employees in more productive workplaces are paid more; iii pay is higher where internal labour markets are present; and iv treating productivityand power as alternative explanations for pay differentials is a mistake.

  15. Cinderella Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hancunhe, which used to be a rural village 40 km to thesouthwest of downtown Beijing, rose to prominence in the pastdecade or so, owing to its booming development and rapid urban-ization.Anyone who pays a visit to Hancunhe these days will be im-pressed by its outward appearance: rows upon rows of modern,

  16. Varying high levels of faecal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae in rural villages in Shandong, China: implications for global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Tärnberg, Maria; Zhao, Lingbo; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Song, Yanyan; Grape, Malin; Nilsson, Maud; Tomson, Göran; Nilsson, Lennart E

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is considered a major threat to global health and is affected by many factors, of which antibiotic use is probably one of the more important. Other factors include hygiene, crowding and travel. The rapid resistance spread in Gram-negative bacteria, in particular extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E), is a global challenge, leading to increased mortality, morbidity and health systems costs worldwide. Knowledge about resistance in commensal flora is limited, including in China. Our aim was to establish the faecal carriage rates of ESBL-E and find its association with known and suspected risk factors in rural residents of all ages in three socio-economically different counties in the Shandong Province, China. Faecal samples and risk-factor information (questionnaire) were collected in 2012. ESBL-E carriage was screened using ChromID ESBL agar. Risk factors were analysed using standard statistical methods. Data from 1000 individuals from three counties and in total 18 villages showed a high and varying level of ESBL-E carriage. Overall, 42% were ESBL-E carriers. At county level the carriage rates were 49%, 45% and 31%, respectively, and when comparing individual villages (n = 18) the rate varied from 22% to 64%. The high level of ESBL-E carriage among rural residents in China is an indication of an exploding global challenge in the years to come as resistance spreads among bacteria and travels around the world with the movement of people and freight. A high carriage rate of ESBL-E increases the risk of infection with multi-resistant bacteria, and thus the need for usage of last resort antibiotics, such as carbapenems and colistin, in the treatment of common infections.

  17. In Praise of Canadian Contradictions: Making Our Way in a Globalized World

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    Rao, Govind

    2004-01-01

    Many of the cultural items that are associated with globalization started out as American cultural products, for example, McDonalds hamburgers, Jeans, Coca-Cola, and Rock-and-Roll. Canada, next-door neighbour to the United States, was the first country to be subjected to this onslaught early in the 20th century, as American cultural and economic…

  18. Canadian SAR remote sensing for the Terrestrial Wetland Global Change Research Network (TWGCRN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Shannon; Brisco, Brian; Cull, Andrew; Gallant, Alisa L.; Sadinski, Walter J.; Thompson, Dean

    2010-01-01

    The Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) has more than 30 years of experience investigating the use of SAR remote sensing for many applications related to terrestrial water resources. Recently, CCRS scientists began contributing to the Terrestrial Wetland Global Change Research Network (TWGCRN), a bi-national research network dedicated to assessing impacts of global change on interconnected wetland-upland landscapes across a vital portion of North America. CCRS scientists are applying SAR remote sensing to characterize wetland components of these landscapes in three ways. First, they are using a comprehensive set of RADARSAT-2 SAR data collected during April to September 2009 to extract multi-temporal surface water information for key TWGCRN study landscapes in North America. Second, they are analyzing polarimetric RADARSAT-2 data to determine areas where double-bounce represents the primary scattering mechanism and is indicative of flooded vegetation in these landscapes. Third, they are testing advanced interferometric SAR techniques to estimate water levels with RADARSAT-2 Fine Quad polarimetric image pairs. The combined information from these three SAR analysis activities will provide TWGCRN scientists with an integrated view and monitoring capability for these dynamic wetland-upland landscapes. These data are being used in conjunction with other remote sensing and field data to study interactions between landscape and animal (birds and amphibians) responses to climate/global change.

  19. Egypt emerges : with help from some Canadian companies, Alexandria is striving to grab a spot on the global LNG stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, A.

    2006-12-15

    Two new liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants recently built in Egypt are a testimony to the country's renewed natural gas industry. This article presented details of Canadian companies who are now operating in Egypt as a result of the Egyptian government's decision to include gas as a commodity from which foreign companies could earn a profit in the late 1980s. Apache negotiated a lease on a 2.2 million acre block southwest of Giza called the Qarun Block along with a partner called Phoenix Resources Companies Inc. in 1992, and has since made significant gas discoveries. In March 2006, the company posted record gross oil and gas production of 119,500 barrels per day and 501 million cubic feet per day. Egypt currently produces 3.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day. Approximately half is consumed locally and the balance is liquefied for export to Europe and Asian markets. The 2 LNG plants in Egypt currently process 700 million cubic feet and 1 billion cubic feet per day respectively. Egypt's Nile Delta is emerging as a world-class hydrocarbon basin, where companies such as BP have been exploring and producing since 1992. BP is confident that Egypt's potential reserves exceed 100 trillion cubic feet and that its aggressive exploration strategy is expected to form the foundation of a significant LNG business. Calgary-based company Centurion has established a presence in Egypt and has formed a partnership with Royal Dutch/Shell Group. The company has granted Shell 2 concessions in exchange for the construction of a gas train worth $1.5 billion capable of handling 500 million cubic feet per day of gas. It was concluded that while current global prices for natural gas are still too low to make it economical to ship Egyptian LNG to North America, higher prices may mean that LNG currently being transported to Europe may eventually end up in North American LNG terminals. 9 figs.

  20. The global village in a local context. Implementing global awareness as a managerial competency within South Africa's multicultural mainstream media newsrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Steyn

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As part of a national research survey into the importance and implementation of six managerial competencies, this article aims to investigate the importance a national sample of reporters and first-line newsroom managers in South Africa's mainstream media attach to global awareness as a managerial competency. It also aims to establish gaps between the importance attached to and current implementation thereof by the latter. Design/Methodology/Approach: Qualitative and quantitative research designs were combined to obtain the most comprehensive view on the research problem. Quantitative data was compiled through self-administered questionnaires among first-line newsroom managers and reporters employed by the country's mainstream media. Qualitative data was obtained through semi-structured interviews and observational research. These sets of data were combined triangularly to improve validity and reliability. Quantitative data was analysed through factor analysis and effect size analysis, while qualitative data was analysed through qualitative content analysis.Findings: It was found that both respondent groups perceive first-line newsroom managers unable to implement the skills associated with the global awareness competency (given the importance they attach to it. While in some cases first-line newsroom managers themselves were more aware of their shortcomings, reporters highlighted other instances where they perceive their superiors unable to perform as expected. Implications: Given the challenges associated with globalisation, media managers need skills to identify and realise the impact of national and international changes on their business activities. South African media managers must also identify and address the challenges associated with the multilingual and multicultural backgrounds of their newsroom staff. Originality/Value: The dimensions of global awareness as a managerial competency are rooted in general management theory. In

  1. Global positioning system & Google Earth in the investigation of an outbreak of cholera in a village of Bengaluru Urban district, Karnataka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masthi, N.R. Ramesh; Madhusudan, M.; Puthussery, Yannick P.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: The global positioning system (GPS) technology along with Google Earth is used to measure (spatial map) the accurate distribution of morbidity, mortality and planning of interventions in the community. We used this technology to find out its role in the investigation of a cholera outbreak, and also to identify the cause of the outbreak. Methods: This study was conducted in a village near Bengaluru, Karnataka in June 2013 during a cholera outbreak. House-to-house survey was done to identify acute watery diarrhoea cases. A hand held GPS receiver was used to record north and east coordinates of the households of cases and these values were subsequently plotted on Google Earth map. Water samples were collected from suspected sources for microbiological analysis. Results: A total of 27 cases of acute watery diarrhoea were reported. Fifty per cent of cases were in the age group of 14-44 yr and one death was reported. GPS technology and Google Earth described the accurate location of household of cases and spot map generated showed clustering of cases around the suspected water sources. The attack rate was 6.92 per cent and case fatality rate was 3.7 per cent. Water samples collected from suspected sources showed the presence of Vibrio cholera O1 Ogawa. Interpretation & conclusions: GPS technology and Google Earth were easy to use, helpful to accurately pinpoint the location of household of cases, construction of spot map and follow up of cases. Outbreak was found to be due to contamination of drinking water sources. PMID:26658586

  2. Nuclear Crisis Affects Global Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    At Beijing’s large restaurants, the table talk recently has all been about seafood. Some believe that not only are fish from Japan polluted, but that seafood from the Chinese coast is also not safe.Maybe it’s still too early to say how serious the Fukushima nuclear accident is,but it can be certain that its influence has moved beyond Japan, helped along withthe Pacific air and ocean current, as traces

  3. Infrastructure for the Global Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Al

    1991-01-01

    Technologies that enhance the ability to create and understand information have led to changes in the traditional legal concepts of property, ownership, originality, privacy, and intellectual freedom. The importance of government addressing such issues and investing in development of a high-capacity computer network is discussed. (KR)

  4. Life in our villages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotte Vermeij; Gerald Mollenhorst

    2008-01-01

    Original title: Overgebleven dorpsleven. Village communities have changed almost beyond recognition. Virtually everyone who lives in the countryside now has a car, and many leave the confines of the village for work, shopping and entertainment. Most village-dwellers were not born and raised in the

  5. Through the '80s: thinking globally, acting locally. [Combined Canadian Futures Society and Third General Assembly of World Future Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feather, F. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    This volume was prepared in conjunction with the First Global Conference on the Future, held in Toronto, Canada, July 20-24, 1980. The conference combined the Third General Assembly of the World Future Society and the fifth annual conference of the Canadian Futures Society. The 59 papers presented here were selected from the very large number submitted to the conference committee; space limitations permitted only a small number of papers to be published in this volume. Included also are: the foreword, Mystery of the Future, by Edward R. Schreyer, Governor General of Canada; preface, A Time for Action, by Maurice F. Strong; introduction, Transition to Harmonic Globalism, by Frank Feather; conclusion, What We Must Do: An Agenda for Futurists; and postscript, The Challenge of the '80s, by Aurelio Peccei. The papers were presented under the following topics: The Trauma of Change (4); A Global Perspective (7); Inventorying Our Resources (7); The International Context (8); Economics: Getting Down to Business (9); Human Values: Personal, Social, Religious (6); Communications: Connecting Ourselves Together (4); Education: Learning to Meet Tomorrow (4); Health: New Approaches to Staying Fit (3); Futurism as a Way of Life (5); and Dreams into Action: Methods and Real-Life Experience (2).

  6. VT Boundaries - village polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The BNDHASH dataset depicts Vermont villages, towns, counties, Regional Planning Commissions (RPC), and LEPC (Local Emergency Planning Committee)...

  7. The Internationalization of Canadian University Research: A Global Higher Education Matrix Analysis of Multi-Level Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Glen A.; Oleksiyenko, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    To date, much of the research on internationalization and globalization of higher education has focused on the institution or higher education system as the unit of analysis. Institution based studies have focused on the analysis of institutional practices and policies designed to further internationalization. System-level studies focus on state…

  8. Economic Migrants in a Global Labour Market: A Report on the Recruitment and Retention of Asian Computer Professionals by Canadian High Tech Firms. CPRN Discussion Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Badrinath

    The recruitment and retention of Asian computer professionals by Canadian high-tech companies was examined by interviewing 8 Canadian-born information technology (IT) workers, 47 Asian-born IT workers, and 8 human resource (HR) professionals employed by high-tech companies in Ottawa. Of the 47 Asians, 33 stated that they did not know much about…

  9. Biomass energy utilization in rural areas may contribute to alleviating energy crisis and global warming: A case study in a typical agro-village of Shandong, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y.H. [State Key Laboratory of Quantitative Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 Nanxincun, Xiangshan, Beijing 100093 (China); Li, Z.F. [State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Agronomy, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Taishan Academy of Science and Technology, Tai' an, Shandong 271000 (China); Feng, S.F.; Wu, G.L.; Li, Y.; Li, C.H. [State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Agronomy, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China); Lucas, M. [Rheinisch-Westfalisch Technische Hochschule, Aachen University, Aachen 52070 (Germany); Jiang, G.M. [State Key Laboratory of Quantitative Vegetation Ecology, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20 Nanxincun, Xiangshan, Beijing 100093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Agronomy, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A biomass energy exploration experiment was conducted in Jiangjiazhuang, a typical agro-village in Shandong, China from 2005 to 2009. The route of this study was designed as an agricultural circulation as: crops {yields} crop residues {yields} ''Bread'' forage {yields} cattle {yields} cattle dung {yields} biogas digester {yields} biogas/digester residues {yields} green fertilizers {yields} crops. About 738.8 tons of crop residues are produced in this village each year. In 2005, only two cattle were fed in this village and 1.1% of the crop residues were used as forage. About 38.5% crop residues were used for livelihood energy, 24.5% were discarded and 29.7% were directly burned in the field. Not more than three biogas digesters were built and merely 2250 m{sup 3} biogas was produced a year relative to saving 1.6 tons standard coal and equivalent to reducing 4.3 tons CO{sub 2} emission. A total of US$ 4491 profits were obtained from cattle benefit, reducing fossil energies/chemical fertilizer application and increasing crop yield. After 5 years experiment, cattle capita had raised gradually up to 146 and some 62.3% crop residues were used as forage. The percentages used as livelihood energy, discarded and burned in the field decreased to 16.3%, 9.2% and 9.8%, respectively. Biogas digesters increased to 123 and 92,250 m{sup 3} biogas was fermented equal to saving 65.9 tons standard coal and reducing 177.9 tons CO{sub 2} emission. In total US$ 60,710 profits were obtained in 2009. In addition, about 989.9 tons green fertilizers were produced from biogas digesters and applied in croplands. The results suggested that livestock and biogas projects were promising strategies to consume the redundant agricultural residues, offer livelihood energy and increase the villagers' incomes. Biogas production and utilization could effectively alleviate energy crisis and CO{sub 2} emission, which might be a great contribution to reach the affirmatory carbon

  10. Exploring Canadian Identity through Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2001-01-01

    Considers what commonplaces of culture and identity are being, could be, transmitted through the use of children's literature in classrooms. Explores what is Canadian about Canadian children's literature. Describes a study which involved Canadian elementary school children who read Canadian children's books. Concludes that literature plays a…

  11. Villages in landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    For more than 30 years the physical environment (buildings, gardens, roads and spaces, etc.) in Danish villages has undergone dramatic changes. Many villages close to the bigger towns have grown and are dominated by modern, architecturally maladapted buildings, and as one of the results other...... villages especially in the periphery are declining with physical impoverishment and decay. Mainly due to the structural rationalization processes in the agricultural sector throughout the last generation the physical rural structures are under pressure. The changes in the countryside are highly visible......, and the physical appearance of many villages and detached farms can at best be characterized as shockingly inferior. It can be argued that the Danish society has grossly omitted to take care of the largest and most important part of its cultural heritage in the Danish landscape; 6-7,000 large and small villages...

  12. I Am Canadian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joe

    2011-01-01

    "I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness......."I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness....

  13. Village Without Barriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Beijing’s efforts to transform the Olympic Village for the Paralympicsare praised by athletes as well as officials when Sinisn Vidic wandered ina wheelchair along the busi-ness and culture avenue in thenorthwestern part of the BeijingParalympic Village, the sunset and gentlebreeze made the Serbian marksman feel as free and easy as at home in Belgrade, capi-tal city of Serbia.

  14. Village Power `97. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinal, J.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.; Weingart, J. [eds.

    1997-09-01

    It is estimated that two billion people live without electricity and its services. In addition, there is a sizable number of rural villages that have limited electrical service, with either part-day operation by diesel gen-sets or partial electrification (local school or community center and several nearby houses). For many villages connected to the grid, power is often sporadically available and of poor quality. The U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has initiated a program to address these potential electricity opportunities in rural villages through the application of renewable energy (RE) technologies. The objective of this program is to develop and implement applications that demonstrate the technical performance, economic competitiveness, operational viability, and environmental benefits of renewable rural electric solutions, compared to the conventional options of line extension and isolated diesel mini-grids. These four attributes foster sustainability; therefore, the program is entitled Renewables for Sustainable Village Power (RSVP). The RSVP program is a multi-disciplinary, multi-technology, multi-application program composed of six key activities, including village application development, computer model development, systems analysis, pilot project development, technical assistance, and an Internet-based village power project database. The current program emphasizes wind, photovoltaics (PV), and their hybrids with diesel gen-sets. NREL`s RSVP team is currently involved in rural electricity projects in thirteen countries, with U.S., foreign, and internationally based agencies and institutions. This document contains reports presented at the Proceedings of Village Power, 1997. Individual projects have been processed separately for the United States Department of Energy databases.

  15. The Moon Village Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Piero; Foing, Bernard H.; Hufenbach, Bernhard; Haignere, Claudie; Schrogl, Kai-Uwe

    2016-07-01

    The "Moon Village" concept Space exploration is anchored in the International Space Station and in the current and future automatic and planetary automatic and robotic missions that pave the way for future long-term exploration objectives. The Moon represents a prime choice for scientific, operational and programmatic reasons and could be the enterprise that federates all interested Nations. On these considerations ESA is currently elaborating the concept of a Moon Village as an ensemble where multiple users can carry out multiple activities. The Moon Village has the ambition to serve a number of objectives that have proven to be of interest (including astronomy, fundamental research, resources management, moon science, etc. ) to the space community and should be the catalyst of new alliances between public and private entities including non-space industries. Additionally the Moon Village should provide a strong inspirational and education tool for the younger generations . The Moon Village will rely both on automatic, robotic and human-tendered structures to achieve sustainable moon surface operations serving multiple purposes on an open-architecture basis. This Europe-inspired initiative should rally all communities (across scientific disciplines, nations, industries) and make it to the top of the political agendas as a the scientific and technological undertaking but also political and inspirational endeavour of the XXI century. The current reflections are of course based on the current activities and plans on board the ISS and the discussion held in international fora such as the ISECG. The paper will present the status of these reflections, also in view of the ESA Council at Ministerial Level 2016, and will give an overview of the on-going activities being carried out to enable the vision of a Moon Village.

  16. A Village of Folk Tales

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    WUJIAGOU, a small and remote village in Hubei Province, is gaining fame for its Chinese folk tales. With only 878 villagers in 216 households, experts call it "a living fossil of the culture of Hubei Province." Sitting deep in the majestic Wudangshan Mountain, the shrine of Taoism and surrounded by breathtaking scenery, Wujiagou Village has a long history. Closed-off geographically, its villagers live scattered among the valleys. The village oozes local flavors, rich with traditional customs. Villagers gather spontaneously to sing folk songs

  17. Designing A New Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    HAVING arrived in Heze,Shandong Province by Beijing-Kowloon Railway, we heard of asmall village called Wulidun. It thrives asa highly proficient farm production basethrough integrating tourism, ecologicaland sustainable agriculture and its naturalbeauty: luxuriant greenery and bounteoustrees laden with fruit. The fine ecologicalenvironment has given the whole villagea mass of vitality. Wang Yinxiang,

  18. From Gutenberg to the global village. (Re) thinking about public policy in the digital age for the publishing industry in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Paola Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Los nuevos soportes de mercantilización de los bienes y obras intelectuales modifican lo que históricamente reconocemos como libro. Los libros electrónicos representan nuevos desafíos para la gestión de la industria editorial no solo por los cambios en la cadena de valor de la producción editorial y la necesidad de ajustar la jurisprudencia a un escenario digitalizado y global, sino también por las nuevas formas y hábitos de lectura, que desafían las restricciones impuestas (legislativas y la...

  19. Canadian Content in Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    THEME: Internationalism: Worlds at Play Topics: Internationalism, Identity in Gaming and Learning to Play Abstract: How does Canada fit into the global cultural context of video games? This paper investigates the culture being reflected in video games being produced in Canada as Canada is one of the world's leading producers of video games. It examines the how Canadian culture is represented in current new media artistic output against the culture, or lack of culture, being represented in vid...

  20. Village power options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilienthal, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes three different computer codes which have been written to model village power applications. The reasons which have driven the development of these codes include: the existance of limited field data; diverse applications can be modeled; models allow cost and performance comparisons; simulations generate insights into cost structures. The models which are discussed are: Hybrid2, a public code which provides detailed engineering simulations to analyze the performance of a particular configuration; HOMER - the hybrid optimization model for electric renewables - which provides economic screening for sensitivity analyses; and VIPOR the village power model - which is a network optimization model for comparing mini-grids to individual systems. Examples of the output of these codes are presented for specific applications.

  1. The "Canadian" in Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Wolodko, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Notes that a rich body of Canadian children's literature exists that reflects the country's literary and socio-cultural values, beliefs, themes and images, including those of geography, history, language and identity. Discusses how Canadians tend to identify themselves first by region or province and then by nation. (SG)

  2. Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Libraries in Canada, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes 15 articles that relate to Canadian children's literature, including the power of literature; using Canadian literature in Canada; the principal's role in promoting literacy; Canadian Children's Book Centre; the National Library of Canada's children's literature collection; book promotion; selection guide; publisher's perspective; and…

  3. Canadian suppliers of mining goods and services: Links between Canadian mining companies and selected sectors of the Canadian economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemieux, A. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Economic links between Canada's minerals and metals industry and Canadian suppliers of mining goods and services are examined to provide an insight into the interdependencies of these two key resource-related components of Canada's economy. The impact of globalization of the mining industry, estimates of its economic potential and the potential for exporting goods and services in conjunction with Canadian mining projects abroad are also assessed. The study concludes that the links between Canadian mining companies and the rest of the economy are difficult to quantify, due to the absence of statistical data that would differentiate supplier transactions with mining companies from those with other areas of the economy. At best, the approaches used in this study give but an imperfect understanding of the complex relationships between mining companies and their suppliers. It is clear, however, that as much of the demand for mining products is global, so is the supply, therefore, globalization of the mining industry, while creating unprecedented opportunities for Canadian suppliers to provide expertise, goods and services to Canadian and other customers offshore, the fact remains that mining multinationals buy a lot of their supplies locally. As a result, only some of the opportunities created by mining companies based in Canada and elsewhere will translate into sales for Canadian suppliers. Nevertheless, Canadian suppliers appear to have considerable depth in products related to underground mining, environment protection, exploration, feasibility studies, mineral processing, and mine automation. There appear to be considerable opportunities to derive further benefits from these areas of expertise. Appendices contain information about methodological aspects of the survey. 8 tabs., 32 figs., 6 appendices.

  4. Seeking Internationalization: The State of Canadian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the internationalization of Canadian universities, with a focus on the rise of foreign postsecondary students in Canada, the economic impacts, and the various benefits, challenges, and adjustments that have been influenced by the continuing demographic shifts on Canadian campuses since 2000. Rooted in recent global and…

  5. Olympic village: discover all you need to knowabout the Olympic village

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This document provides information about the Olympic village of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. The topics covered go from information on resident centre, the Olympic village policies, food and beverage, village transport, ceremonies to Village plaza and key contacts.

  6. West German Education in the Global Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    GeschichwlEdbode) with additional studies in religion (Refigiotarehre), art (K/auterfehumg), music ( Musik ), physical education (Leiberuebumgen...chemistry (OChmie) and bioklgy (Bioiogie) instead of general science. Additional studies include religion, art, music , physical education...religion, English, history, biology and chemistry, music , and physical education but adds a required choice between three different major course

  7. An electronic stroll through the global village

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, J.

    1992-09-01

    This paper is a semi-random walk through Usenet News, a bulletin board system that exists on the vast Internet computer network. Interaction in such a medium is an interesting hybrid of speech and writing, of monologue and dialogue and sometimes an open shouting match in a crowded room. Those who are intrigued by these matters will be able to see a number of research areas exposed in this frankly anecdotal paper. In addition to being anecdotal, this paper is a work of participatory observation. In fact, I occasionally let it be known that I was observing the sociology and rhetoric of the newsgroups. The natives appeared unimpressed.

  8. IN VOZDVIZHENSKOE VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetyrina Natalya Arkadevna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers civil engineering in retrospect. The paper presents the records of the two contracts that date back to 1837 and 1838. The contracts cover the two stages of construction of a famous church in Vozdvizhenskoe Village in the Moscow Province. These documents were stored in the Central Historic Archive, namely, in the collection of the town hall of Sergievskij Possad. These records of the two agreements in the collection of the brokers notes (or in other books of the same type are of particular value, as the majority of authentic contracts have been lost. One of the contracts covers the organizational procedure and pre-construction works, while the other one covers the construction of the church. The first document gives the idea of environmental protection, employment of ecological technologies, and safe disposal and recycling of human biowaste in the course of dismantling of an old structure in Vozdvizhenskoe village. The second document that dates back to 1838 covers the sequence of construction works, starting from the foundation and ending with the arches, the types of building materials used, and peculiarities of stone masonry. The information recorded in the contract includes the names of the counterparties, day-to-day mode of life of seasonal workers, remuneration of labour and procedures that assure the quality of construction. This agreement makes it possible to outline the construction process that includes workers, bricklayers, the foreman, the contractor, the architect, and the customer. On the whole, both documents help us outline and assess some of the building practices of the 19th century. This issue is relevant nowadays, as our society has entered the phase of the market economy, while the experience accumulated by the past generations is of undeniable value.

  9. A village dog is not a stray : human-dog interactions in coastal Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, E.

    2013-01-01

    Dogs (Canis familiaris) are considered one of the most numerous carnivores worldwide. Although in the Global North dogs are popular companions, that live inside homes, about 80% of the dogs in the world are village dogs. Village dogs are typically free-roaming, scavenge refuse around human dwellings

  10. Globalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范玮丽

    2008-01-01

    This paper mainly talks about the currently hot topic-globalization. Firstly, it brings out the general trend about globalization and how to better understand its implication. Secondly, it largely focuses on how to deal with it properly, especially for international marketers. Then, facing with the overwhelming trend, it is time for us to think about seriously what has globalization brought to us. Last but not least, it summarized the author's personal view about the future of globalization and how should we go.

  11. Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio Rosembuj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no singular globalization, nor is the result of an individual agent. We could start by saying that global action has different angles and subjects who perform it are different, as well as its objectives. The global is an invisible invasion of materials and immediate effects.

  12. The Village of the Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, John

    1995-01-01

    Describes the process by which Dr. Hassan Ragab recreated a village set in the days of the pharaoh Tutankhamen as a living museum of Egyptian culture. Native plants, animals, and living processes were used as faithfully as possible. (LZ)

  13. A Rhetorical Analysis of Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Pynt

    2011-01-01

    The award-winning TV spot Village is a creative example of NGO advertising using condensed visual stprytelling. The spot is analysed using rhetorical concepts and communication theory, and potential effects are discused in relation to contexts, strategy and communication ethics.......The award-winning TV spot Village is a creative example of NGO advertising using condensed visual stprytelling. The spot is analysed using rhetorical concepts and communication theory, and potential effects are discused in relation to contexts, strategy and communication ethics....

  14. Woman Village Leader and The Red Peppers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    YU Hua, 28, deputy head of Sanduan Village is very proud of her village. As she welcomes visitors, she is sure to let them know: "Our red peppers were reported in the Chinese Population News." Red peppers grown in Sanduan Village are distinctive for their good quality, bright color, and pure hot taste Traders came to the village to buy red peppers. Thus their reputation grew quickly and the village head was even invited to Beijing to take part in a

  15. Global glance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Molycorp Announces Successful Close of Neo Materials Acquisition Molycorp, Inc. announced on 11 June 2012 that its acquisition of Canadian-based Neo Material Technologies Inc. has officially closed, creating a global rare earth leader with a combination of a world-class rare earth resource, ultra-high-purity rare earth processing capabilities, and full 'mine-to-magnetics' vertical integration.

  16. Solar Cookers for Fish Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JERMAY; JAMSU; KEVIN; STUART

    2002-01-01

    Collecting wood was areal pain in the fore-head. We used to goto the forest to collectwood thirty times or so eachwinter regardless of the snowor wind. We had to get up anhour or so after midnight andafter doing our chores wewould head off to the forest.We didn’t return until dusk,"said Ms.Zhongcujia,aged 52and a resident of Niamu orFish Village,located in JiancaCounty,Malho TibetanAutonomous Prefecture,Qinghai Province,China. FishVillage is nestled on a denud-ed west-facing mountainslope.

  17. The Study of Canadian Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Eli

    1971-01-01

    Discussed are Canadian novels, short stories, poems and a film which revolve around man's confrontation with nature, the depression, the problem of isolation, realism in Canadian literature. (Author/AF)

  18. Welcome to The Green Village

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wijk, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A sustainable world can only be achieved by an open collaboration between science, business and the public. That is why we create the Green Village: an innovative, lively, interactive and challenging environment where entrepreneurs, innovators, companies, artists, teachers and visitors can meet, wor

  19. Rebirth of A Mountain Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A group of well-designed two-storey buildings stands in a mountainousarea in southeast Hubei Province. Instead of having only one apartmentas in urban residential quarters, here each family has a house to itself.Altogether, 86 houses form the first complex in the village. They were built in

  20. Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Maja

    Globalization is often referred to as external to education - a state of affair facing the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this paper it is examined as internal to curriculum; analysed as a problematization in a Foucaultian sense. That is, as a complex of attentions, worries, ways...... of reasoning, producing curricular variables. The analysis is made through an example of early childhood curriculum in Danish Pre-school, and the way the curricular variable of the pre-school child comes into being through globalization as a problematization, carried forth by the comparative practices of PISA...

  1. Teaching Canadian Literature: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, W. John

    1984-01-01

    Suggests granting greater recognition to the artistic integrity of Canadian literature by removing it from the broader context of Canadian studies. Indicates that understanding and appreciation of Canadian literature as a representation of reality filtered through the perception of an author should be focus of literature in schools. (NEC)

  2. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  3. International surgery: definition, principles and Canadian practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, Ronald

    2003-10-01

    This article is dedicated to the Canadian international surgeon, Norman Bethune (1890-1939). International surgery is defined as a humanitarian branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of bodily injuries or disorders by incision or manipulations, emphasizing cooperation and understanding among nations and involving education, research, development and advocacy. In this article I review the colonial past, the dark ages following the Declaration of Alma-Ata, the progress made and the present challenges in international surgery. I present a definition of international surgery that recognizes the current era of surgical humanitarianism, validates a global understanding of surgical issues and promotes cooperation among nations. Included are the principles of international surgery: education, research, infrastructure development and advocacy. International surgical projects are classified according to type (clinical, relief, developmental) and integration strategy (vertical or horizontal). Also reviewed are the Canadian practice of international surgery by nongovernmental, professional and academic organizations and the requirements of international and Canadian funding agencies, the development concepts basic to all projects, including results-based management and the cross-cutting themes of gender equity, environmental protection and human safety. I recommend formalizing international surgery into a discipline as a means of promoting surgical care in low-income countries. If international surgery is to be sustained in Canada, infrastructure and support from Canadian surgeons is particularly important. An understanding of the history, definition and classification of international surgery should promote surgical care in low-income countries.

  4. Heat exposure in the Canadian workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2010-08-01

    Exposure to excessive heat is a physical hazard that threatens Canadian workers. As patterns of global climate change suggest an increased frequency of heat waves, the potential impact of these extreme climate events on the health and well-being of the Canadian workforce is a new and growing challenge. Increasingly, industries rely on available technology and information to ensure the safety of their workers. Current Canadian labor codes in all provinces employ the guidelines recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) that are Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) based upon Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT). The TLVs are set so that core body temperature of the workers supposedly does not exceed 38.0 degrees C. Legislation in most Canadian provinces also requires employers to install engineering and administrative controls to reduce the heat stress risk of their working environment should it exceed the levels permissible under the WBGT system. There are however severe limitations using the WGBT system because it only directly evaluates the environmental parameters and merely incorporates personal factors such as clothing insulation and metabolic heat production through simple correction factors for broadly generalized groups. An improved awareness of the strengths and limitations of TLVs and the WGBT index can minimize preventable measurement errors and improve their utilization in workplaces. Work is on-going, particularly in the European Union to develop an improved individualized heat stress risk assessment tool. More work is required to improve the predictive capacity of these indices.

  5. Complex population structure in African village dogs and its implications for inferring dog domestication history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Adam R; Boyko, Ryan H; Boyko, Corin M; Parker, Heidi G; Castelhano, Marta; Corey, Liz; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D; Auton, Adam; Hedimbi, Marius; Kityo, Robert; Ostrander, Elaine A; Schoenebeck, Jeffrey; Todhunter, Rory J; Jones, Paul; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2009-08-18

    High genetic diversity of East Asian village dogs has recently been used to argue for an East Asian origin of the domestic dog. However, global village dog genetic diversity and the extent to which semiferal village dogs represent distinct, indigenous populations instead of admixtures of various dog breeds has not been quantified. Understanding these issues is critical to properly reconstructing the timing, number, and locations of dog domestication. To address these questions, we sampled 318 village dogs from 7 regions in Egypt, Uganda, and Namibia, measuring genetic diversity >680 bp of the mitochondrial D-loop, 300 SNPs, and 89 microsatellite markers. We also analyzed breed dogs, including putatively African breeds (Afghan hounds, Basenjis, Pharaoh hounds, Rhodesian ridgebacks, and Salukis), Puerto Rican street dogs, and mixed breed dogs from the United States. Village dogs from most African regions appear genetically distinct from non-native breed and mixed-breed dogs, although some individuals cluster genetically with Puerto Rican dogs or United States breed mixes instead of with neighboring village dogs. Thus, African village dogs are a mosaic of indigenous dogs descended from early migrants to Africa, and non-native, breed-admixed individuals. Among putatively African breeds, Pharaoh hounds, and Rhodesian ridgebacks clustered with non-native rather than indigenous African dogs, suggesting they have predominantly non-African origins. Surprisingly, we find similar mtDNA haplotype diversity in African and East Asian village dogs, potentially calling into question the hypothesis of an East Asian origin for dog domestication.

  6. Twitter and Canadian Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Max

    2012-01-01

    An emerging group of leaders in Canadian education has attracted thousands of followers. They've made Twitter an extension of their lives, delivering twenty or more tweets a day that can include, for example, links to media articles, research, new ideas from education bloggers, or to their own, or simply a personal thought. At their best,…

  7. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  8. CULTURAL CAPITAL AS TOURISM DEVELOPMENT BASIS IN TRADITIONAL VILLAGE OF KUTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketut Sumadi

    2012-11-01

    pragmatism one and the image as global village; (3 Cultural village astourism development basis in traditional village of Kuta has innovation, religious,preservation of cultural, political identity and prosperity meanings.Behind the success of cultural capital as tourism development basis, itimproves live prosperity, and also it causes negative effect such as there is krama(member of traditional village for losing their cultural capital. They aremarginalized in economic field as they have no cultural capital in term of knowledgeand skill in tourism area and it is said to be “kidang nyirig pangkung”; they cannot utilize the opportunity of tourism market well. As consequence in traditional villageof Kuta, there are still poor families and they have no suitable housing.

  9. Village microgrids: The Chile project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E.I.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a village application in Chile. The objective was to demonstrate the technical, economic and institutional viability of renewable energy for rural electrification, as well as to allow local partners to gain experience with hybrid/renewable technology, resource assessment, system siting and operation. A micro-grid system is viewed as a small village system, up to 1200 kWh/day load with a 50 kW peak load. It can consist of components of wind, photovoltaic, batteries, and conventional generators. It is usually associated with a single generator source, and uses batteries to cover light day time loads. This paper looks at the experiences learned from this project with regard to all of the facets of planning and installing this project.

  10. Zhongguan Village, China's Silicon Valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinwen

    2008-01-01

    @@ In 1999,driven by the dream of using technology to change people's lives,Li Yanhong,returned to Zhongguancun(Zhongguan Village in Chinese),Beijing from Silicon Valley in the U.S.to create Baidu.com.Over the years,Baidu has become the most frequently hitted website in China as well as the largest Chinesc search engine and Chinese language website in the world.

  11. Better Village,Better Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The model of a village in east China will showcase the new look of the country’s rural areas during the 2010 Shanghai World Expo A two-story World Expo 2010 building, still under construction on the south bank of Shanghai’s Huangpu River, is garnering a great deal of attention. The 14-meter high and 1,000-square-me

  12. Financial Village Standing in Indonesian Financial System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Purnomo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial resources of the village that are sourced from a country or a Regional Finance Financial based Law Number 6 Year 2014 of The Village is the mandate of the law that must be allocated to the village. The interconnectedness of the financial position of the village in the financial system of the country or Region concerned the Financial administrative and territorial relations, and there is no setting directly regarding the finances of the village as part of the financial system of the country or the financial area. In respect of the elements of the crime of corruption deeds against financial irregularities of the village there are still disagreements on the interpretation of the law in trapping the perpetrators of corruption on the village chief that implies not satisfy the principle of legality and legal certainty in the ruling of the matter of financial irregularities. In fact, many of the village chief or Councilor caught the criminal offence of corruption over the use of financial irregularities. This research analyzes How the financial position of the village in the financial system of the country or region, as well as whether the financial resources of the village is derived from the state budget or region budget managed in village budget belongs to the category of village finances and whether tort against the financial management of the village can be categorized as a criminal act corruption. How To Cite: Purnomo, H. (2015. Financial Village Standing in Indonesian Financial System. Rechtsidee, 2(2, 121-140. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.21070/jihr.v2i2.81

  13. Position of Village Regulations and Folk Conventions in the Villager Autonomy System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaming; ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    The Villagers’ Charter of Self-government,as a senior form of village regulations and folk conventions,is the general charter of villagers’ self-government. It is a small constitution of villagers,so it holds an important position in the villager autonomy system. Such position gives the credit to both historic and realistic objective factors. Rise of state power,vacancy of legislation,accumulation of excellent traditional resources,and democracy and contract spirit in village regulations and folk conventions will certainly accelerate development of village regulations and folk conventions and promote gradual improvement in the villager autonomy system.

  14. CANLIT (Canadian Literature) Teachers' Crash Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CANLIT, Toronto (Ontario).

    As a result of a study of the situation of Canadian literature in Canadian high schools and universities, this course was developed to provide teachers with useful information about Canadian literature. Included in this kit are sections on Canadian literature (the great debate about the importance of Canadian content), history and sources…

  15. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  16. Canadian identity: Implications for international social work by Canadians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    This paper is in response to recent calls to conceptualize and articulate Canadian perspectives and experiences in international social work, given that the Canadian standpoint has been lacking in international social work literature. This paper contends that it is imperative, first of all......, to critically examine and unpack our ‘Canadian’ identity in order to practice international work that is socially just and anti-imperialist. Drawing on the work of post-colonial authors, critical race theorists, and those who study national myth-making, this essay revisits Canadian identity because...... it is this identity that Canadian social workers often carry into their international work....

  17. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  18. Internationalization at Canadian Universities: Where are we Now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Weber

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Internationalization is powerfully impacting the missions, planning documents, and learning environments of Canadian universities. Internationalization within Canadian universities is viewed from a local as well as global context. Accounts of the composition of domestic students studying abroad and international students studying in Canada, and the implications of these statistics, are related. Emphasis is given to a discussion of the contribution that economic factors play in internationalization decisions. Economic factors have undeniably shaped the face of internationalization at Canadian universities. Complexities of the relationship between global context and educational goals are outlined and educators are challenged to responsibly interpret and implement university changes resulting from internationalization while prioritizing the learning needs of students.

  19. My Home in SOS Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYang; LuMinyi

    2004-01-01

    AZHATI Guli, 24, is a native of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Her parents have five children, and she is the fourth child. In February 2001, Guli volunteered to work for the SOS Children's Village. Talking about children, Guli is excited. “I am in charge of nine children, five boys and four girls,” she says. “The eldest, aged nine, is a third-grader, and the youngest, Yusupu Aili,is only four years old, now attending kindergarten.”

  20. Canadian Ice Service Arctic Regional Sea Ice Charts in SIGRID-3 Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Canadian Ice Service (CIS) produces digital Arctic regional sea ice charts for marine navigation, climate research, and input to the Global Digital Sea Ice Data...

  1. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, J; Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Stepanenko, V F; Kondrashov, A E; Petin, D; Skvortsov, V; Ivannikov, A; Tikounov, D; Gavrilin, Y; Snykov, V P

    2000-05-01

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m2 of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 microSv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  2. Investigation of the Factors Hindering and Promoting Tourism Evidences from Villages of Abyaneh Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Manafian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rural tourism, a dynamic industry with a promising future, can play a key role in economic improvement of talented countries such as Iran. Abyaneh village is one of the best-known villages in both Iran and the world. The number of annual visitors of this ancient village is approximately 550,000 that is a considerable number. Within a short radius of Abyaneh there are five villages (Barz, Tare, Komjan, Yarand, Hanjan with a lot of potentials to develop rural tourism. But only 20% of tourists of Abyaneh population consider the surrounding villages as a separate destination. The large number of tourists visiting Abyaneh village provides opportunity for managing rural tourism in this area is to attract tourists to the surrounding villages around Abyaneh. In the present study, the hindering and promoting factors of fostering tourism in these villages have been compared by both the surrounded villagers' and locals' of Abyaneh village. To this end, 222 questionnaires were distributed among the individuals and the means were compared using Mann-Whitney test. The most important unfavorable factor, from the surrounded villagers' point of view, is lack of enough advertising and marketing and from the locals of Abyaneh village points of view, is the shortage of attractions, compared with attractions of Abyaneh.

  3. Perceptions of Village Dogs by Villagers and Tourists in the Coastal Region of Rural Oaxaca, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, E.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to gain an understanding of the village dog-keeping system, and of perceptions of dog-related problems by villagers and tourists, in the coastal region of Oaxaca, Mexico. We conducted a survey of the inhabitants of three villages (Mazunte, Puerto Angel, and Río Seco),

  4. On Realities of Canadian Multiculturalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦辰

    2013-01-01

    Canada is a multicultural country which was mainly established by immigrants. Just because of that, Canadian govern⁃ment has carried out the policy of multiculturalism since1970s. However, it has encountered many problems such as policy con⁃flicts, national identity, democracy-inquiry and racial discrimination, etc. Hence the Canadian multiculturalism has been in a di⁃lemma.

  5. Biogas for Javanese villages - a simple unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, J.; Richmond, B.

    1980-09-01

    Java is on the verge of suffering severe ecological damage due to deforestation as villagers attempt to meet a desperate need for food and firewood. In an attempt to alleviate this situation a biogas unit has been developed suited to local conditions with the potential for distribution to Javanese village farmers. The design, construction and operation of one such unit is described.

  6. MIRACLES SHOWN BY MARRIAGE CUSTOMS IN SOPA FISHING VILLAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sopa Village in Chushur County of Lhasa Municipality is the only village in Tibet with a fishing business.The unique culture of this village includes ancient traditional customs.One in particular is a strange marriage custom.

  7. Institutional issues in Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco, R.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents a view on renewable energy resource projects from one much closer to recipient of the services. The author argues that such programs aimed at development of village power situations need to keep certain points clearly in focus. These include the fact that electricity is not the goal, technology is not the problem, site selection involves more than just resource potential, the distinction between demonstration and pilot programs, and that such programs demand local involvement for success. The author recommends coordinating such projects with programs seeking competing funds such as health, education, and transportation. The projects must demonstrate a high economic benefit to justify the high economic cost, and one must use the benefits to leverage the program funding.

  8. Canadian construction industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, M.

    2001-07-01

    The principal sectors of the Canadian construction industry - commercial, industrial, institutional and residential - are examined with regard to their technical considerations concerning the subject of sustainability. Apart from the different needs of each of the sectors of the industry there are also regional differences caused by population distribution, and differences in climate, that have to be identified and accommodated in considering attitudes to recycling and sustainable development. Some indications that there is growing awareness of recycling and reuse are: the increasing frequency of life cycle costing in the commercial and institutional sectors, the use of recycled or otherwise waste materials in concrete, examples of using steel supporting structures and roof joists salvaged from previous uncompleted projects in the industrial sector, improved building envelope and indoor air quality concerns, collective ground source heating, and new basement and framing technologies and construction materials in the residential sector. These improvements notwithstanding, there remains much to be done. The new objective-based National Building Code, for which comments are now being solicited across the country, is expected to identify new and innovative solutions and to kick-start serious efforts to come up with solutions towards increasing overall sustainability in all sectors of the Canadian construction industry.

  9. Grade 3 Students Explore the Question, "What's Canadian about Canadian Children's Literature?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2000-01-01

    Explores third graders' responses to the question "What's Canadian about Canadian Children's Literature?" Describes 6 picture books and summarizes students' responses to each. Finds students mentioned geographical aspects as characteristic of Canadian literature, and they felt Canadian children's literature should reflect Canadian "experiences."…

  10. Problems in the Study of Canadian Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Barry

    1980-01-01

    Considers reasons for studying Canadian literature. Notes the relative infancy of Canadian literature and the need for maintaining objectivity in the study of Canadian literature. Proposes that teachers of Canadian literature focus on individual, contemporary works, examining language, form, and craftsmanship. (RL)

  11. [Canadian Literature. "Featuring: CanLit."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock, Ken, Ed.; Haycock, Carol-Ann, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The feature articles in this journal issue deal with various aspects of Canadian literature. The articles include: (1) a discussion of who's who and what's what in Canadian literature; (2) reviews of worthwhile but overlooked Canadian children's literature; (3) a list of resource guides to Canadian literature and a short quiz over famous first…

  12. COMMODIFICATION OF TELAJAKAN AT UBUD VILLAGE, GIANYAR, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Brata

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was intended to understand the phenomenon of the commodification of telajakan at Ubud Village, Gianyar Regency, Bali in the era of globalization. It focused on how the commodification of telajakan took place in the era of globalization; what factors causing the commodification of telajakan to take place; and what were the impact and meaning of the commodification of telajakan at Ubud Village. The data were collected through observation, interview, library research and documentation study. The theory of Commodification, the theory of Discourse, the theory of Power and Knowledge, and the theory of Globalization were eclectically used in the present study.   The results of the study were as follows. The commodification of telajakan was defined as how it was produced as economic space, how it was distributed through printed media, announcement board, from mouth to mouth, and through the meetings held by traditional organizations, and then it was consumed by the owners and others undertaking businesses. The factors contributing to the commodification of telajakan were market ideology, business of tourism, technological flow, and mass media as the popular cultural agent, mimicry, and economic libido. For the sake of money, telajakan was not regarded as a local genius any longer; its value as traditional green open space was neglected; as a result, ecological damage could not be avoided; the aesthetics of the Balinese architecture was getting extict; and the Balinese identity was getting  destructed. 

  13. Dimensions of Community and Local Institutions’ Support: Towards an Eco-Village Kelurahan in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nany Yuliastuti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the Global Eco-village Network (GEN is to create and promote sustainable human settlements that allow people to live more comfortably. However, an eco-village cannot exist without the support of the local government and the community. A village (kelurahan is expected to recognize and implement a settlement’s environmental management by maintaining environmentally friendly behavior in daily activities. Gayamsari is a kelurahan in Semarang City that has been implementing the eco-village concept. This study aims to explain, through quantitative descriptive analysis, the extent at which the eco-village aspects are achieved by local and institutional participation in Gayamsari. The idea of an eco-village is to bring harmony to the three pillars of sustainable development—the social, economic, and ecological components—to create a sustainable living environment. However, the results show that Gayamsari needs improvement, especially in terms of ensuring a safe and comfortable environment, which can be achieved through strengthening the participation of both the community and local institutions.

  14. SUSTAINABLE URBAN-RURAL RELATION IN RAPID URBANIZATION AREAS --Case of Transformation of "Urban Village" in Guangzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Li-hua; YAN Xiao-pei

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have been made concerning the problems, characteristics, formation, transformation measures, etc. of urban village from sociology, urban planning and geography, etc., which have made insightful analysis. However, most of these studies started mainly from the standpoint of the city government, drumming for the landscape-oriented urbanization, namely pulling-down the urban village and constructing the splendid residence or business buildings. The article maintains that the most important thing the city government should do is to pay much attention to the sustainable living of urban villagers, who would lose their main income source, namely, the collective dividend and the family housing rent. The single method of compensation has been proved to be harmful to the villagers′ community,in which some young villagers relying on rent were no longer to do anything but stay at home. On the other hand, considering the floating population has become the main stream of renters in urban villages, the emergence of urban villages was inevitable and would continue to exist in a long time under the socio-economic transition in urban China and globalization. Based on the analysis above, the transformation of urban village should take more concerns on the housing demands of floating population besides compensation for local villagers. Meanwhile, it is necessary to avoid the "landscape-oriented urbanization" without the "peasant-to-citizen" transformation.

  15. Do Relocated Villages Experience More Forest Cover Change? Resettlements, Shifting Cultivation and Forests in the Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Boillat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationships between forest cover change and the village resettlement and land planning policies implemented in Laos, which have led to the relocation of remote and dispersed populations into clustered villages with easier access to state services and market facilities. We used the Global Forest Cover Change (2000–2012 and the most recent Lao Agricultural Census (2011 datasets to assess forest cover change in resettled and non-resettled villages throughout the country. We also reviewed a set of six case studies and performed an original case study in two villages of Luang Prabang province with 55 households, inquiring about relocation, land losses and intensification options. Our results show that resettled villages have greater baseline forest cover and total forest loss than most villages in Laos but not significant forest loss relative to that baseline. Resettled villages are consistently associated with forested areas, minority groups, and intermediate accessibility. The case studies highlight that resettlement coupled with land use planning does not necessarily lead to the abandonment of shifting cultivation or affect forest loss but lead to a re-spatialization of land use. This includes clustering of forest clearings, which might lead to fallow shortening and land degradation while limited intensification options exist in the resettled villages. This study provides a contribution to studying relationships between migration, forest cover change, livelihood strategies, land governance and agricultural practices in tropical forest environments.

  16. The Impact of Credit on Village Economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboski, Joseph P; Townsend, Robert M

    2012-04-01

    This paper evaluates the short-term impact of Thailand's 'Million Baht Village Fund'program, among the largest scale government microfinance iniative in the world, using pre- and post-program panel data and quasi-experimental cross-village variation in credit-per-household. We find that the village funds have increased total short-term credit, consumption, agricultural investment, income growth (from business and labor), but decreased overall asset growth. We also find a positive impact on wages, an important general equilibrium effect. The findings are broadly consistent qualitatively with models of credit-constrained household behavior and models of intermediation and growth.

  17. Canadian National Vegetation Classification (CNVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The mandate of the CNVC is to comprehensively classify and describe natural and semi-natural Canadian vegetation in an ecologically meaningful manner. The...

  18. Canadian Literature Is Comparative Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, E. D.

    1988-01-01

    Argues that the way out of worn out analogies of Canadian literature is found not only by acquiring knowledge of other cultures, but also by abandoning the deceptive parallelisms that overcome differences only by hiding them. (RAE)

  19. The village as a ‘community of practice’ Constitution of village belonging through leisure sociality

    OpenAIRE

    Fausto Barlocco

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at the formation and display of a form of identification alternative to the national one, the belonging to the village, within the leisure practices of Kadazan villagers in Sabah, East Malaysia, both constituted by the regular meetings of peer groups and by festive events. The analysis of the paper applies the concept of ‘community of practice’ to the group of villagers who regularly invest most of their resources of free time, but also money, in interacting between themselve...

  20. Village Green Project and Air Sensor Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a presentation for the OAQPS Teachers Workshop. Will provide a background overview on the Village Green Project and our air sensor kit for outreach, then have the teachers try putting it together.

  1. How Biodiversity Conservation Policy Accelerates Agrarian Differentiation: The Account of an Upland Village in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dressler, W.H.; Xuan To, P.; Mahanty, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows how the implementation of Vietnam«SQ»s recent biodiversity conservation policy in Ba Vi National Park has increased the economic value of nature, created sustained conflict, and exacerbated agrarian differentiation in an upland village in northern Vietnam. Increased global and natio

  2. Schistosomiasis in Lake Malaŵi villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Henry; Bloch, Paul; Makaula, Peter; Phiri, Happy; Furu, Peter; Stauffer, Jay R

    2011-06-01

    Historically, open shorelines of Lake Malaŵi were free from schistosome, Schistosoma haematobium, transmission, but this changed in the mid-1980s, possibly as a result of over-fishing reducing density of molluscivore fishes. Very little information is available on schistosome infections among people in lake-shore communities and therefore we decided to summarise data collected from 1998 to 2007. Detailed knowledge of the transmission patterns is essential to design a holistic approach to schistosomiasis control involving the public health, fisheries and tourism sectors. On Nankumba Peninsula, in the southern part of the lake, inhabitants of villages located along the shores of Lake Malaŵi have higher prevalence of S. haematobium infection than those living in inland villages. Overall prevalence (all age classes combined) of urinary schistosomiasis in 1998/1999 ranged from 10.2% to 26.4% in inland villages and from 21.0% to 72.7% in lakeshore villages; for school children prevalence of infection ranged from 15.3% to 57.1% in inland schools and from 56.2% to 94.0% in lakeshore schools. Inhabitants on the islands, Chizumulu and Likoma, also have lower prevalence of infection than those living in lakeshore villages on Nankumba Peninsula. This increased prevalence in lakeshore villages is not necessarily linked to transmission taking place in the lake itself, but could also be due to the presence of more numerous typical inland transmission sites (e.g., streams, ponds) being close to the lake. Temporal data witness of intense transmission in some lakeshore villages with 30-40% of children cleared from infection becoming reinfected 12 months later (also lakeshore village). The level of S. mansoni infection is low in the lakeshore communities. Findings are discussed in relation to fishing in the lake.

  3. Determinants of School Enrollment in Indian Villages

    OpenAIRE

    Dostie, Benoit; Jayaraman, Rajshri

    2006-01-01

    Attaining universal basic education remains an elusive goal in many developing countries. This article examines the determinants of school enrollment among children in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, two large north Indian states. In addition to individual- and household-level influences, we consider the role of village-level contextual effects on the school enrollment decision. Our results suggest that enrollment is increasing in parental education as well as wealth and that village caste compositi...

  4. Village fairs (panigyria, dance and social groups in the village of Faraklita, Kefalonia, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosmatou Varvara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this project is to understand the small community of Faraklata, a village on the Ionian island of Kefalonia, Greece, by studying the village fairs (community festivities in honour of individual saints of Agia Paraskevi and Profiti Ilia and their dance practice. Dance constitutes a major element of the village fairs. The observation of the dancers at each fair leads unavoidably to the question: to which social group do they belong to. The participation of inter-families in the village fair and the dances that take place, reveal a coexistence and competition between two social groups as defined by their family origins.

  5. The Canadian war on drugs: structural violence and unequal treatment of Black Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenti, Akwatu

    2014-03-01

    This paper examines the impact of Canada's war on drugs on segments of the Black community, specifically with respect to the impact of structural violence, over-policing, and high incarceration rates. It offers evidence of the systemic nature of these dynamics by examining the early context of the war, growing stigma against Blacks, globalizing influences, and the punitive focus of funding and policy. The paper also explores how Black men have been identified as the main enemy and how drug control efforts have served to diminish the health, well-being, and self-image of Black men via discriminatory and inequitable treatment before the law. The current high rates of imprisonment of Black men are an indicator of systematic deprivation of significant social capital, which will perpetuate socioeconomic harm and cycles of violence. This commentary calls for an immediate dissolution of policies regulating the war on drugs as the first step in remedying the injustices experienced by Black Canadians. Due to the lack of Canadian data in this important area, the paper also emphasizes the critical need for more research to shed more light on the Canadian-specific complexities.

  6. 25 CFR 91.11 - Domestic animals in village reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Domestic animals in village reserves. 91.11 Section 91.11... VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.11 Domestic animals in village reserves. (a) No livestock shall... owner of the animal, if known, by certified mail or by posting in the village square. The notice...

  7. Program Evaluation: Outcomes of Participation in Lac Du Bois, the French Language Village of Concordia Language Villages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe perceptions of stakeholders (leadership of Concordia Language Villages, staff members and villagers of "Lac du Bois", the French Language Village of Concordia Language Villages), related to achievement of the mission statement. The research question was: How do stakeholders in "Lac du…

  8. SUSTAINABLE CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT: THE FATE OF BALINESE ADAT VILLAGE POSTERIOR THE ENACTMENT OF LAW NUMBER 6 YEAR 2014 CONCERNING VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Nurjaya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of indigenous peoples existence is very dependent on the will of the Government. The village government as formulated in Act number 6/2014 of the village, as well as Government Regulation number 43/2014 about Implementation of the Act number 6/2014 has naturally become a bureaucratic and legal officials law, that the village is set in the system of local government under the supervision of State law. In the case of Bali and the local Government of Bali, there is legal consequences with the fate and the future existence and life of indigenous village/pakraman village as a social and cultural system of the Hindu society, it is the law on the development basis of the indigenous village/pakraman village will not remain be ”the awig-awig” as Balinese traditional society customary law; philosophy and the essence, function and role of the indigenous village/pakraman village changed physically as well as community life of Balinese people loss; traditional customs and Government system should be changed in accordance with the system of the village Government; on one side the customs affairs village should organize pakraman village administration and bureaucracy under the structure of local governments, and on the other hand the indigenous village is at the same time responsible to organize and responsible about the culture, traditions, customs and ritual as Hindu affairs, village understanding of pakraman village customs and traditions should be completely ignored in Balinese village daily community life.

  9. Assessing perceived health risks of climate change : Canadian public opinion 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-03-15

    This paper discussed a survey conducted to evaluate the awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours of Canadians in relation to climatic change. A total of 1600 telephone surveys were conducted with a broad range of age groups. The study showed that climate change is considered by many Canadians to pose a significant threat at both local and global levels. Evidence of climate change has been noted in many communities. However, relatively few Canadians understand how climate change may impact human health. While many Canadians associated climatic change with air pollution hazards and ozone depletion, most Canadians were not aware of the potential negative health impacts related to changes in disease vectors, extreme weather events, and coastal flooding. The strongest awareness and concern about health impacts were expressed by Canadians concerned about global warming. Individuals with chronic health conditions were more likely to be attuned to the potential health impacts of climatic change. Seniors viewed climate change as a longer term problem. Only 10 per cent of Canadians viewed global warming as a major health risk. Sixty-nine per cent of Canadians believed that global warming was happening, while 63 per cent attributed climate change to human activity. Nearly half of all respondents believed that an extreme weather disaster would affect their community during the course of their lifetime. The report suggested that marketing or communications campaigns should build public awareness of the health risks associated with direct or proximal environmental risks. Information about health risks should be specific, and communications should be tailored to age cohorts. Television and print media should be used to build awareness of the health risks of climate change. Provincial concerns related to climatic change were also outlined. tabs., figs.

  10. The village as a ‘community of practice’ Constitution of village belonging through leisure sociality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Barlocco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the formation and display of a form of identification alternative to the national one, the belonging to the village, within the leisure practices of Kadazan villagers in Sabah, East Malaysia, both constituted by the regular meetings of peer groups and by festive events. The analysis of the paper applies the concept of ‘community of practice’ to the group of villagers who regularly invest most of their resources of free time, but also money, in interacting between themselves and in organising celebrations for various life-cycle events or for other occasions, and argues that a strong sense of belonging to the village is developed through this engagement. These practices are informed by a powerful and widely spread local ideology, positing the village as the central point of reference for its inhabitants’ sense of belonging and as the locus of a traditionalist ‘way of life’, based on cooperation, sharing and egalitarian principles, and rejecting the modern, multi-ethnic urban world from which the majority of the villagers derive their livelihood. This ideology defines the village as Kadazan and Christian, determining a rootedness in everyday life of ethnic identity as well as a general rejection of government-led nationalist propaganda and of its policies. This ideology is an essential part of the affirmation by the villagers of the primacy of the local and of direct involvement and participation over their sense of belonging to collective categories.

  11. Literature on the periphery of capitalism: Brazilian theory, Canadian culture Literature on the periphery of capitalism: Brazilian theory, Canadian culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Szeman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to get past the blind spots that have developed in contemporary postcolonial theory, it is essential to seek out complementarities and solidarities in different national situations and in different modernities. This essay undertakes this task by exploring the homologous situations faced in Brazil and Canada in their respective attempts to create genuine national cultures. As in many postcolonial situations, the problem of creating an authentic culture is directly related to the sense that postcolonial culture is necessarily imitative and belated. In Misplaced Ideas, Roberto Schwarz exposes the hidden class character of the problem of cultural authenticity in Brazil, and in so doing, shows that the trauma of national-cultural identity merely reflects the contradictory structural position of Brazil’s postcolonial elite. Using Schwarz’s insights to explore the Canadian situation, the author shows that the same forces are at work in Canada. Though the crisis of a lack of an authentic Canadian culture has recently been surmounted as a result of the apparent international success of Canadian culture (especially literary fiction, that author cautions that this “success” story hides the class basis of Canadian culture in both its belated and isochronic phases (the latter being the moment when cultural belatedness is overcome. Making use of Brazilian theory to examine problems in Canadian culture allows us to see that Canadian modernity, long thought to be simply a derivative of the UK and USA, has similarities with Brazilian modernity that are essential to understanding the space and place Canada occupies in globalization. In order to get past the blind spots that have developed in contemporary postcolonial theory, it is essential to seek out complementarities and solidarities in different national situations and in different modernities. This essay undertakes this task by exploring the homologous situations faced in Brazil

  12. Greenhouse gas emissions from Canadian prairie agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellert, B.H.; Janzen, H.H. [Agriculture and Agri-food Canada Research Centre, Lethbridge, AB, (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    There is a close relationship between soil and air quality, on the one hand, and the exchange of greenhouse gases between the earth and atmosphere, on the other. International efforts by people such as soil conservationists and climatologists to control emissions of these gases and negotiations surrounding the Kyoto Protocol have increased the debate regarding the role of agricultural activities. From evaluation of both data available before global change became important and recent research efforts, much information on greenhouse gas emissions from Canadian agriculture has been gained. A summary is included of the contribution of Canadian prairie agriculture to emissions of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane gas. A stress is placed on the subject of the carbon cycle and on how land management practices could influence soil carbon storage capacity. The potential for increasing this carbon storage capacity is described in relation to land use, historical changes in agricultural land, and recent observations on the influence of agricultural parctices, and obstacles to estimating changes in soil carbon dioxide emissions and carbon storage, and extending the estimates to large land areas are examined. Emissions of nitrous oxide and methane gas are considered in relation to the influence of agricultural management practices. (Abstract only)

  13. Harvey Cushing's Canadian connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feindel, William

    2003-01-01

    During his surgical career between 1896 and 1934, Harvey Cushing made eight visits to Canada. He had a broad impact on Canadian medicine and neurosurgery. Cushing's students Wilder Penfield and Kenneth McKenzie became outstanding leaders of the two major centers in Canada for neurosurgical treatment and training. On his first trip to Canada, shortly after completing his surgical internship in August 1896, Cushing traveled with members of his family through the Maritime Provinces and visited hospitals in Quebec and Montreal. Eight years later, in February 1904, as a successful young neurosurgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, he reported to the Montreal Medico-Chirurgical Society on his surgical experience in 20 cases of removal of the trigeminal ganglion for neuralgia. In 1922, as the Charles Mickle Lecturer at the University of Toronto, Cushing assigned his honorarium of $1000 to support a neurosurgical fellowship at Harvard. This was awarded to McKenzie, then a general practitioner, for a year's training with Cushing in 1922-1923. McKenzie returned to initiate the neurosurgical services at the Toronto General Hospital, where he developed into a master surgeon and teacher. On Cushing's second visit to McGill University in October 1922, he and Sir Charles Sherrington inaugurated the new Biology Building of McGill's Medical School, marking the first stage of a Rockefeller-McGill program of modernization. In May 1929, Cushing attended the dedication of the Osler Library at McGill. In September 1934, responding to the invitation of Penfield, Cushing presented a Foundation Lecture-one of his finest addresses on the philosophy of neurosurgery-at the opening of the Montreal Neurological Institute. On that same trip, Cushing's revisit to McGill's Osler Library convinced him to turn over his own treasure of historical books to Yale University.

  14. How Should Canadian Literature Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colborne, Garnet

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for and several approaches to teaching Canadian literature, including a cultural and regional approach to Canadian literature, a comparative approach, and a language study approach. (HTH)

  15. Attitudes to Chronic Poverty in the "Global Village"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Armando; Neff, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The paper explores attitudes to chronic poverty in a cross-section of developed and developing countries contributing data to the World Values Survey Wave Three (1994-1998). The analysis finds a consistent belief among a majority of respondents that poverty is persistent. The paper also explores the factors influencing public attitudes to chronic…

  16. Village Infrastructure Kit-Alpha. Global Innovation and Strategy Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    2009 <http://www.msf.org/msfinternational/aboutmsf/>. 499 Gottlieb, Sebastian. ―Doctors Without Borders kicked out of Sudan‖ Radio Nederland ...Without Borders kicked out of Sudan‖ Radio Nederland Wereldomroep. 2 Apr. 2009 <http://www.rnw.nl/internationaljustice/icc/Sudan/090311-msf-sudan>. 506...Doctors Without Borders kicked out of Sudan‖ Radio Nederland Wereldomroep. 2 Apr. 2009 <http://www.rnw.nl/internationaljustice/icc/Sudan/090311

  17. Responsible Canadian energy progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) represents oil and gas companies throughout Canada; its members produce over 90% of Canada's natural gas and crude oil output. The aim of the Association is to improve the economics of the Canadian upstream petroleum sector in an environmentally and socially responsible way. The aim of this Responsible Canadian Energy report is to present the performance data of CAPP's members for the year 2009. Data, trends, and performance analyses are provided throughout the document. This analysis makes it possible to determine where progress has been made and where performance improvement is necessary. It also presents success stories and best practices so that other companies can learn from them how to improve their own performance. This paper provides useful information on the performance of the upstream petroleum industry in Canada and highlights where the focus should be for further improvement in its performance.

  18. Birth of the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Ivan T.

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Digestive Disease Foundation, renamed the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation -- Fondation canadienne pour la promotion de la santé digestive -- in December 2001, is the culmination of ongoing efforts by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology to establish an independent charitable organization. In February 2001, it was officially endorsed as the Foundation for the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. The initial efforts to establish this Foundation, led by Dr Richa...

  19. [Schistosoma haematobium bilharziosis and urinary infections. Study of their relationship in 2 villages of Niger].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretagne, S; Rey, J L; Sellin, B; Mouchet, F; Roussin, S

    1985-01-01

    In order to assess the relation between urinary schistosomiasis and urinary tract infections (U.T.T.), a study of two villages in the surroundings of Niamey (Rep. of Niger) was undertaken. In the first village located near a rice plantation irrigation scheme, the global prevalence of S. haematobium infection was 77%. Boys between 5 to 14 years of age were all infected and their mean egg output was 500 eggs/10 ml of urine. In the second village, where water is supplied from wells, schistosomiasis was almost absent. Urinary tract infections were diagnosed upon the cytologic count of the urinary sediment and the urine culture. Comparison between S. haematobium infected and non-infected villages showed that the prevalence of U.T.I. was 3.8 times higher among the females of the infected village. This was also noticed for old men and especially for boys aged 5 to 14 (5.2% U.T.I.) for whom urinary infection is usually uncommon. However the mean blood pressure and the creatininemia showed no difference between the two populations. If schistosomiasis increases the risk of chronic pyelonephritis, that increase could not be accounted for with the measures of these two variables.

  20. Towards A Moon Village: Vision and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The new DG of ESA, Jan Wörner, has expressed from the very beginning of his duty a clear ambition towards a Moon Village, where Europe could have a lead role. The concept of Moon Village is basically to start with a robotic lunar village and then develop a permanent station on the Moon with different countries and partners that can participate and contribute with different elements, experiments, technologies, and overall support. ESA's DG has communicated about this programme and invited inputs from all the potential stakeholders, especially member states, engineers, industry, scientists, innovators and diverse representatives from the society. In order to fulfill this task, a series of Moon Village workshops have been organized first internally at ESA and then at international community events, and are also planned for the coming months, to gather stakeholders to present their ideas, their developments and their recommendations on how to put Moon Village into the minds of Europeans, international partners and prepare relevant actions for upcoming International Lunar Decade. Moon Village Workshop: The Moon Village Workshop in ESTEC on the 14th December was organized by ILEWG & ESTEC Staff Association in conjunction with the Moon 2020-2030 Symposium. It gathered people coming from all around the world, with many young professionals involved, as well as senior experts and representatives, with a very well gender balanced and multidisciplinary group. Engineers, business experts, managers, scientists, architects, artists, students presented their views and work done in the field of Lunar Exploration. Participants included colleagues from ESA, SGAC Space Generation Advisory Council, NASA, and industries such as OHB SE, TAS, Airbus DS, CGI, etc… and researchers or students from various Universities in Europe, America, and Asia. Working groups include: Moon Habitat Design, Science and Technology potentials on the Moon Village, and Engaging Stakeholders. The Moon

  1. A Topography for Canadian Curriculum Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Cynthia

    1999-01-01

    Presents challenges to Canadian curriculum theorists: (1) to create curriculum languages and genres that represent all of Canada; (2) to use Canadian scholars and indigenous languages to find these curriculum languages and genres; (3) to seek interpretive tools to understand what it means to be Canadian; and (4) to create curriculum theory that…

  2. Canadian Children's Literature: An Alberta Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Carbonaro, Mike; Green, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an online survey administered to Alberta elementary school teachers in 2000-2001. The survey explored the teachers' knowledge and use of Canadian children's literature and their thoughts about the role of Canadian literature in elementary school classrooms. Canadian children's trade books espouse particular…

  3. The Ideological Orientations of Canadian University Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaie, M. Reza; Brym, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the ideological orientations of Canadian university professors based on a unique 2000 study of a representative sample of Canadian academics (n=3,318). After summarizing methodological problems with extant research on this subject, and tentatively comparing the political views of Canadian and American academics, the paper…

  4. Transnational archives: the Canadian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Creet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the concept of the transnational archive as a counterpoint to the idea that a national archive is necessarily a locus of a static idea of nation. The Canadian national archives is used as a case study of an archives that was transnational in its inception, and one that has continued to change in its mandate and materials as a response to patterns in migration and changing notions of multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy. It introduces the most recent formation of the transnational archive and its denizens: the genealogical archive inhabited by family historians.

  5. Photovoltaic village power systems: the minigrid concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conger, J.

    1980-01-01

    The photovoltaic power system of Schuchuli, a Papgo Indian village in Arizona, USA, is described and illustrated. 24 solar panels, each 1.22 x 2.44 m supply up to 3.5 kW at a supply voltage of 120 Vdc. Energy storage is provided by fifty-two 2380-Ah batteries connected in series. A load management system is utilized to disconnect, progressively, different loads as the battery capacity falls, and to reconnect the loads in the reverse sequence as the batteries become recharged. Such a system is considered eminently suitable for villages in the Third World. 5 references.

  6. The Sea Stacks Project: Enhancing the Use of Regional Literature in Atlantic Canadian Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Howard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Research over the past two decades has amply demonstrated the importance of literature to the formation of both regional and national cultural identity, particularly in the face of mass market globalization of children’s book publishing in the 21st century as well as the predominance of non-Canadian content from television, movies, books, magazines and internet media. However, Canadian children appear to have only very limited exposure to Canadian authors and illustrators. In Atlantic Canada, regional Atlantic Canadian authors and illustrators for children receive very limited critical attention, and resources for the study and teaching of Atlantic Canadian children’s literature are few. Print and digital information sources on regional children’s books, publishing, authors and illustrators are scattered and inconsistent in quality and currency. This research project directly addresses these key concerns by summarizing the findings of a survey of Atlantic Canadian teachers on their use of regional books. In response to survey findings, the paper concludes by describing the creation of the Sea Stacks Project an authoritative web-delivered information resource devoted to contemporary Atlantic Canadian literature for children and teens.

  7. Village Elections, Accountability and Income Distribution in Rural China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yao

    2006-01-01

    China has experimented with village elections for nearly 20 years. Using village and household survey data collected from 48 villages of 8 Chinese provinces for the period 1986-2002, this paper studies how the introduction of elections affects village governance and income distribution in Chinese villages. The econometric analysis finds the following outcomes. First, village elections have increased the share of public expenditure and reduced the share of administrative expenditure in the village budget, so the accountability of the elected village committee has been enhanced. Second, elections have not led to more income redistribution; instead, they have reduced the progressiveness of income redistribution.Third, elections have reduced income inequality measured by the Gini coefficient in villages.The reduction is equivalent to 5.7 percent of the sample average, or 32 percent of the growth of the Gini coefficient in the period of 1987-2002. Because village elections have not led to more income redistribution, this positive effect must have come from more public investment,which benefits the poor more than wealthier people. The general conclusion that we draw from our results is that, despite institutional constraints, village elections have improved village governance and the life of villagers.

  8. Canadian contributions studies for the WFIRST instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, J.-F.; Rowlands, N.; Grandmont, F. J.; Lafrenière, D.; Marois, C.; Daigle, O.; Thibault, S.; Schade, D.; Artigau, É.; Brousseau, D.; Maire, J.; Cretot-Richert, G.; Ducharme, M.-È.; Levesque, L. E.; Laurin, D.; Dupuis, J.

    2016-07-01

    WFIRST-AFTA is the NASA's highest ranked astrophysics mission for the next decade that was identified in the New World, New Horizon survey. The mission scientific drivers correspond to some of the deep questions identified in the Canadian LRP2010, and are also of great interest for the Canadian scientists. Given that there is also a great interest in having an international collaboration in this mission, the Canadian Space Agency awarded two contracts to study a Canadian participation in the mission, one related to each instrument. This paper presents a summary of the technical contributions that were considered for a Canadian contribution to the coronagraph and wide field instruments.

  9. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  10. Universal values of Canadian astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brcic, Jelena; Della-Rossa, Irina

    2012-11-01

    Values are desirable, trans-situational goals, varying in importance, that guide behavior. Research has demonstrated that universal values may alter in importance as a result of major life events. The present study examines the effect of spaceflight and the demands of astronauts' job position as life circumstances that affect value priorities. We employed thematic content analysis for references to Schwartz's well-established value markers in narratives (media interviews, journals, and pre-flight interviews) of seven Canadian astronauts and compared the results to the values of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Russian Space Agency (RKA) astronauts. Space flight did alter the level of importance of Canadian astronauts' values. We found a U-shaped pattern for the values of Achievement and Tradition before, during, and after flight, and a linear decrease in the value of Stimulation. The most frequently mentioned values were Achievement, Universalism, Security, and Self-Direction. Achievement and Self Direction are also within the top 4 values of all other astronauts; however, Universalism was significantly higher among the Canadian astronauts. Within the value hierarchy of Canadian astronauts, Security was the third most frequently mentioned value, while it is in seventh place for all other astronauts. Interestingly, the most often mentioned value marker (sub-category) in this category was Patriotism. The findings have important implications in understanding multi-national crew relations during training, flight, and reintegration into society.

  11. Canadian Government Electronic Information Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Kirsti

    1993-01-01

    Examines development and evolution of Canadian government information policy in response to issues of preservation of data, information industry involvement in government data development and marketing, role of Crown copyright, and public access to government information in electronic formats. Six key information policy instruments are also…

  12. Canadian Literature in American Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. Robert

    1973-01-01

    Acquisition of Canadian literature by American libraries was investigated in three ways: questionnaires were sent to selected large libraries, titles were checked against the National Union Catalog'' and published literature describing major collections was examined. With the exception of the Library of Congress, American libraries purchase…

  13. Barefoot in Afghanistan: solar electrification of villages in Afghanistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Bunker [Barefoot Coll., Rajasthan (India); Synnevag, Gry [Norwegian Church Aid (Norway)

    2006-05-15

    In the mountains of Afghanistan, villagers must walk long distances and pay high prices to buy fuel to survive. The authors report on an innovative solar electrification scheme that has enabled villagers to be self-reliant installers. (Author)

  14. Pico-hydro for affordable village power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-15

    This project developed and disseminated 'off-the-shelf' hydro generator units of up to 5kW that are: directly affordable by villagers in remote communities of developing counties; financially viable through fuel savings and income generation; and suitable for local manufacture and use in adverse conditions. Work was undertaken in Nepal, Colombia and Peru. (author)

  15. Transmission of News in the Turkish Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroldsen, Edwin O.; Blake, Reed H.

    In the traditional Turkish village, the coffee house acts as a modern-day parish pump in news transmission. Within the coffee house, there is evidence of a two-step flow of communication. The role of the influential person in this study is the same as that in other studies: as a mediator and interpreter of news. In social characteristics, however,…

  16. Freedman's Village, Arlington, Virginia: 1863-1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shildt, Roberta

    Designed for 7th- and 8th-grade students, the teaching unit demonstrates how blacks lived during and after the Civil War in the first government-provided housing in Freedman's Village. While concerned with local Arlington, Virginia sites and history, the unit provides an illustration of the role of architecture and design on American social…

  17. The Mysterious Wutu Dance of Nianduhu Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuBingshu

    2005-01-01

    The Wutu dance, an ancient ritual dance to exorcise evil spirits, is still practiced in Nianduhu, a village in Tongren County of Qinghai Province. An extraordinary example of a oncevigorous culture, this dance illustrates reflects their strong attachment to their own unique ways.

  18. Nangong: China's No. 1 Geothermal Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING LILI

    2007-01-01

    @@ EDITOR'S NOTE: A drive to build new socialist countryside is sweeping across China. In Beijing, the drive means a process of modernization in rural economy, culture and eco-environmental protection that will transform the rural outskirts into a modern industrial society.The Nangong Village southwest of Beijing city proper, which is experiencing earthshaking changes, is an epitome of the sweeping drive.

  19. Green Legacy of a Tibetan Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    When he finally reached the tittle Tibetan village hidden deep in the emerald mountains by the Tongtian River, on the upper reaches of the Yangtze River, Jeff Soule, policy director of the American Planning Association (APA), looked around with shining eyes.

  20. Spatial diversity of urban village development in Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.; Geertman, S.C.M.; Hooimeijer, P.; Sliuzas, R.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic urbanization in China during the reform period has led to the emergence and proliferation of so-called urban villages in many cities. The development of urban villages, based on a self-help approach of indigenous villagers, has been satisfying great demand for migrant housing and space for o

  1. Beyond "medical tourism": Canadian companies marketing medical travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Leigh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite having access to medically necessary care available through publicly funded provincial health care systems, some Canadians travel for treatment provided at international medical facilities as well as for-profit clinics found in several Canadian provinces. Canadians travel abroad for orthopaedic surgery, bariatric surgery, ophthalmologic surgery, stem cell injections, “Liberation therapy” for multiple sclerosis, and additional interventions. Both responding to public interest in medical travel and playing an important part in promoting the notion of a global marketplace for health services, many Canadian companies market medical travel. Methods Research began with the goal of locating all medical tourism companies based in Canada. Various strategies were used to find such businesses. During the search process it became apparent that many Canadian business promoting medical travel are not medical tourism companies. To the contrary, numerous types of businesses promote medical travel. Once businesses promoting medical travel were identified, content analysis was used to extract information from company websites. Company websites were analyzed to establish: 1 where in Canada these businesses are located; 2 the destination countries and health care facilities that they market; 3 the medical procedures they promote; 4 core marketing messages; and 5 whether businesses market air travel, hotel accommodations, and holiday tours in addition to medical procedures. Results Searches conducted from 2006 to 2011 resulted in identification of thirty-five Canadian businesses currently marketing various kinds of medical travel. The research project began with what seemed to be the straightforward goal of establishing how many medical tourism companies are based in Canada. Refinement of categories resulted in the identification of eighteen businesses fitting the category of what most researchers would identify as medical tourism

  2. Human–dog interactions and behavioural responses of village dogs in coastal villages in Michoacán, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Izaguirre, E.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.; Bokkers, E.A.M.; Ortolani, A.; Ortega-Pacheco, A.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In Mexican villages, most households keep dogs that roam freely. Therefore, socialisation of village dogs occurs in a different context than that of companion dogs in developed countries. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess village dogs’ behavioural responses towards familiar and unfami

  3. Reconstruction of Village Administration Mode in Building New Socialist Countryside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, definition of village administration is introduced. Then, through analysis of history, complexity and innovation characteristics of village administration, it points out that village administration plays a significant role in the reform of grass-roots government. Based on these, existing problems in village administration mode are discussed. It is believed that the administration subject (government), object (farmers), and administration measures have potential to explore. Finally, suggestions are put forward from perfecting village autonomy, role orientation of grass-roots government, and simplifying grass-roots government organs.

  4. Canadian survey on pandemic flu preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy CS

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of pandemic influenza creates public health challenges. An ethical framework, 'Stand on Guard for Thee: ethical considerations in pandemic influenza preparedness' that served as a template for the World Health Organization's global consultation on pandemic planning, was transformed into a survey administered to a random sample of 500 Canadians to obtain opinions on key ethical issues in pandemic preparedness planning. Methods All framework authors and additional investigators created items that were pilot-tested with volunteers of both sexes and all socioeconomic strata. Surveys were telephone administered with random sampling achieved via random digit dialing (RDD. Eligible participants were adults, 18 years or older, with per province stratification equaling provincial percent of national population. Descriptive results were tabulated and logistic regression analyses were used to assess whether demographic factors were significantly associated with outcomes. Results 5464 calls identified 559 eligible participants of whom 88.5% completed surveys. Over 90% of subjects agreed the most important goal of pandemic influenza preparations was saving lives, with 41% endorsing saving lives solely in Canada and 50% endorsing saving lives globally as the highest priority. Older age (OR = 8.51, p Conclusions Results suggest trust in public health officials to make difficult decisions, providing emphasis on reciprocity and respect for individual rights.

  5. The physical impoverishment and decay of Danish villages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    For the latest 30 years the physical environment (buildings, gardens, roads and spaces, etc.) in the Danish villages has undergone drastic changes. Many villages near the large towns are drowned in growth and modern buildings, and other villages in the Danish outskirts are hit by decline...... and physical impoverishment and decay. I shall concentrate on the last-mentioned villages in this abstract. The conference paper contains a short analysis of the social-structural development forces which imply great changes in the physical environment of the villages. I shall deal with both residences...... and production buildings and try to understand which are the causes that so many Danish outskirt villages are impoverished purely physically with still increasing haste these years. When the causes are illustrated I shall discuss the consequences of the physical impoverishment in the villages on a social level...

  6. Perspectives on renewable energy and Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, A.R.

    1997-12-01

    The author provides a brief overview of the role the Department of Energy has been playing in the area of renewable energy sources and their applications at a village level. Energy demand is rising sharply, and shortages are becoming more acute. Developing countries will present a large demand, and market opportunity over the next 40 years. Environmental concerns are a factor in the choice for what sources to promote and develop. The author touches on the features of renewable sources which makes them attractive to DOE for some applications, and what the goals of the department are in supporting this technology. Examples of applications at the level of village power are presented for both the US and abroad.

  7. SERVIR Town Hall - Connecting Space to Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Searby, Nancy D.; Irwin, Daniel; Albers, Cerese

    2013-01-01

    SERVIR, a joint NASA-USAID project, strives to improve environmental decision making through the use of Earth observations, models, and geospatial technology innovations. SERVIR connects these assets with the needs of end users in Mesoamerica, East Africa, and Hindu Kush-Himalaya regions. This Town Hall meeting will engage the AGU community by exploring examples of connecting Space to Village with SERVIR science applications.

  8. A Visit to Pakui Village In Gyangze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BENBA; CERING

    2002-01-01

    Low-lying houses, dirt paths, stinking ditches, a litter-strewn environment, poor school conditions, and poorly equipped clinics-these are problems still plaguing many parts of the rural areas today.Generally speaking, living conditions in rural areas in the autonomous region can only be termed as nasty. In some villages, many houses have no space for bicycles in front. Some of the farmers’ houses have their door facing the toilets of the house in front.

  9. Communicative and narrative sound in Village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Iben

    2010-01-01

    The soundtrack of the TV spot Village tells a story of its own. Some of the sounds communicate meaning very close to the visuals, for example by creating an African soundscape. But the soundtrack also supplies narrative elements of its own, which is most remarkable when it adds a happy ending...... to the sombre message of the spot. This article identifies the sonic, communicative elements of the spot and describes the main narrative functions of the soundtrack....

  10. Education Outreach in Village Schools during the SnowSTAR 2007 Alaska-Canada Barrenlands Traverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solie, D.; Sturm, M.; Huntington, H.; Anderson, D.; Derksen, C.

    2008-12-01

    In spring 2007, the IPY expedition, SnowSTAR-2007, traveled 4200 kilometers by snow machine across much of Alaska and Northern Canada. The primary objectives of the trip were education outreach, and collaborative US/Canadian field measurements of the snow across the route. Starting in Fairbanks, Alaska and ending in Baker Lake, Nunavut, Canada near Hudson Bay 42 days later, the team visited numerous settlements in route. The primary outreach efforts during the expedition were the expedition website (http://www.barrenlands.org ), and in-school presentations and interactive science demonstrations. The website, aimed at school children as well as the general public, was updated daily from the field, and had strong national and international interest. We gave presentations (classrooms and all-school assemblies), in nine of the villages we visited. In the schools we demonstrated the equipment we use in the field, as well as two proven demonstrations of physical principles (acoustic resonance in a plastic sewer pipe and eddy current forces on a magnet falling through a copper water pipe). Video recordings from the expedition travel, science and village school presentations can be adapted for classroom use to show application of scientific principles as well as excite student interest in the physical and geo-sciences.

  11. PARADOX OF POVERTY IN VILLAGE Ubud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nyoman Sudipa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The research raises poverty as a social reality in the middle of the sparkling tourism in Ubud Village . This study focused on the discussion : ( 1 why is there poverty , ( 2 what efforts the government and other agencies to reduce poverty , and ( 3 how the effects of poverty are emerging . This study used qualitative methods . Data obtained through observation , interviews , and documentation . The results showed , poverty in the village of Ubud , which is caused by external factors such as government policy reference data, which is not clear , the lack of proper diagnosis , addressing poverty is not integrated and overlapping , and the failure of tourism development policies . External factors supported internal factors , namely the economic constraints , resources , and socio-cultural pressures , lifestyle , consumer behavior , asset ownership , land , and the cost of customs and rituals . Government efforts made ??through the program financially and non- financially poverty reduction through policy or regulation , mentoring , and training . NGOs make efforts to non - financially as a companion , mediator , facilitator and prepare sosial.Dampak mapping poverty in the village of Ubud is to reduce public confidence in the government , social conflict , and economic conflicts . The impact on tourism is tourism failing to provide social welfare . The impact for the community is resulting in social inequality , conflict , rising crime , and the inheritance of poverty

  12. Contexts for Ethnic Identity of Japanese Canadians

    OpenAIRE

    浦田, 葉子; Yoko, URATA

    1997-01-01

    In this paper I reviewed the literature in order to gain a broad understanding of the contexts for ethnic identity of Japanese Canadians guided by the premise that ethnic identity is a situational as well as a primordial phenomenon. Two main areas were reviewed - the pattern of distribution of resources in Canadian society and the particular situation in which Japanese Canadians are placed. In the distribution of material resources, individual meritocracy for mass and social closure for elite...

  13. "They come in peasants and leave citizens": urban villages and the making of Shenzhen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines the ongoing process of postsocialist transformation at the intersection of cultural and economic forces in an urban environment through the example of the so-called "urban villages"(chengzhongcun) in Shenzhen, China, a booming southern Chinese city and former Special Economic Zone next to Hong Kong. This essay ethnographically examines the role of former rural collectives encircled by a city that has exploded from farmland to an export-driven city of over 14 million people in little over one generation. These villages form an internal other that is both the antithesis and the condition of possibility for Shenzhen city. By co-opting the market economy in ways that weave them into the fabric of the contemporary global city, the villages become as much an experiment as the Special Economic Zone itself. This essay analyzes the urban-rural divide as complicit in each other's continued production and effacement and explores how village and city exploit the ambiguities of their juxtaposition in the making of Shenzhen.

  14. In Canada, Business Schools Lead Push for Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewington, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    At Canadian universities, business schools are light-years ahead of the rest of the campus in raising their global profile. Intensive foreign-student-recruitment efforts, friendly Canadian immigration rules, mandatory study-abroad requirements, and, in some cases, the option to pursue programs in multiple languages have combined to pack a punch in…

  15. Towards a Moon Village : Community Workshops Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    A series of Moon Village Workshops were organised at ESTEC and at ILEWG community events in 2015 and 2016. They gathered a multi-disciplinary group of professionals from all around the world to discuss their ideas about the concept of a Moon Village, the vision of ESA's Director General (DG) Jan Woerner of a permanent lunar base within the next decades [1]. Three working groups focused on 1) Moon Habitat Design; 2) science and technology potentials of the Moon Village, and 3) engaging stake-holders [2-3]. Their results and recommendations are presented in this abstract. The Moon Habitat Design group identified that the lunar base design is strongly driven by the lunar environment, which is characterized by high radiation, meteoroids, abrasive dust particles, low gravity and vacuum. The base location is recommended to be near the poles to provide optimized illumination conditions for power generation, permanent communication to Earth, moderate temperature gradients at the surface and interesting subjects to scientific investigations. The abundance of nearby available resources, especially ice at the dark bottoms of craters, can be exploited in terms of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU). The identified infrastructural requirements include a navigation, data- & commlink network, storage facilities and sustainable use of resources. This involves a high degree of recycling, closed-loop life support and use of 3D-printing technology, which are all technologies with great potential for terrestrial spin-off applications. For the site planning of the Moon Village, proven ideas from urban planning on Earth should be taken into account. A couple of principles, which could improve the quality of a long-term living milieu on the Moon, are creating spacious environments, visibility between interior and exterior spaces, areas with flora, such as gardens and greenhouses, establishing a sustainable community and creating social places for astronauts to interact and relax. The

  16. Terrorism threats and preparedness in Canada: the perspective of the Canadian public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Stacey; Lemyre, Louise; Clément, Mélanie; Markon, Marie-Pierre L; Lee, Jennifer E C

    2007-06-01

    Although Canada has not experienced a major terrorist attack, an increased global pending threat has put preparedness at the top of the Canadian government's agenda. Given its strong multicultural community and close proximity to the recently targeted United States, the Canadian experience is unique. However, minimal research exists on the public's reactions to terrorism threats and related preparedness strategies. In order for response initiatives to be optimally effective, it is important that the public's opinions regarding terrorism and preparedness be considered. This qualitative study examined perceptions of terrorism threats among Canadians living in Central and Eastern Canada (N = 75) in the fall of 2004. Conceptualizations of terrorism threat, psychosocial impacts, and sense of preparedness were explored in a series of qualitative interviews. Findings revealed that the majority of Canadians did not feel overly threatened by terrorist attacks, due in part to a perception of terrorist threats as related to global sociopolitical events and a positive Canadian identity. In addition, while most respondents did not feel they were individually affected by the threat of terrorism, there was some concern regarding larger societal impacts, such as increased paranoia, discrimination, and threats to civil liberties. Participants' views on preparedness focused largely on the utility of emergency preparedness strategies and the factors that could mitigate or inhibit preparedness at the individual and institutional levels, with a specific focus on education. Finally, the significant relevance of these findings in shaping terrorism preparedness, both in Canada and generally, is discussed.

  17. Occupational Stress, Mental Health and Satisfaction in the Canadian Multicultural Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasca, Romana; Wagner, Shannon L.

    2012-01-01

    Workplaces are becoming increasingly multicultural and therefore, include a large variety of employees from more than one ethnicity, nationality, religious and/or cultural background. In the context of this new global economy, Canadian workplace structure and composition has also permanently changed. Consequently, the primary purpose of this…

  18. A Cross-Sectional Study to Compare Caregiver Distress Among Korean Canadian, Chinese Canadian, and Other Canadian Home Care Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Wook Chang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the health of elderly Korean Canadians in home care and investigates the risk factors for caregiver distress of families caring for their elderly relatives. Korean Canadians, Chinese Canadians, and other Canadian home care clients were compared using the Resident Assessment Instrument–Home Care (RAI-HC. The assessments were done as a part of normal clinical practice between January 2002 and December 2010 within Ontario. A sample of 58,557 home care clients was analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis at the bivariate level and multiple logistic regression models. The major finding of the present study is that Korean clients had higher physical impairments and higher prevalence of major chronic diseases, but they were less likely to receive personal support or nursing services. Moreover, the results provide clear evidence of the importance of language barriers for all linguistic minorities, including Korean Canadians.

  19. Model strategy for village development in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav ROLÍNEK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The model strategies discussed in this article represent different ways of possible village development in the Czech Republic. We used typologies of strategies from business strategic management for their definition. Twenty municipalities, where structured interviews were carried out with their mayors, were chosen randomly from among 100 villages where a questionnaire survey was conducted in 2012 (Faltová Leitmanová, et al., 2012. Based on the qualitative analysis of the structured interview summaries, eight model strategies were ascertained. These include integration strategy, service differentiation, spending cuts, usage of municipal property, stabilization of village population, business support, fundraising, and identification of the inhabitants with the village (village pride. The most commonly applied model strategy is integration, followed by village population stabilization.

  20. Medication use among Canadian seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Mark; Ji, Hong; Hunt, Jordan; Ranger, Rob; Gula, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    As they age, many seniors develop a progressively more complex mix of health conditions. Multiple prescription medications are often required to help manage these conditions and control symptoms, with the goal of maintaining seniors' health for as long as possible. This article explores trends in the number and types of medications used by seniors on public drug programs in Canada. Our findings suggest that a high proportion of Canadian seniors are taking several medications, highlighting the need for medication management systems focusing on this population.

  1. REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Modern English is an international language inthe world.Besides Great Britain,English is spokenas first language in 39 countries.These countries arelocated in different regions with different naturalfeatures,history development and cultural character-istics.Thus,English used in these different regionscarries its own regional character—forming Englishregional varieties.The main English regional varieties are:BritishEnglish,American English,Canadian English andSouth African English.Canada is a rich country inNorth America with its own characteristics,which of

  2. Rural Canadian Youth Exposed to Physical Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laye, Adele M.; Mykota, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to physical violence is an unfortunate reality for many Canadian youth as it is associated with numerous negative psychosocial effects. The study aims to assist in understanding resilience in rural Canadian youth exposed to physical violence. This is accomplished by identifying the importance of protective factors, as measured by the…

  3. DATA MINING IN CANADIAN LYNX TIME SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Karnaboopathy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper sums up the applications of Statistical model such as ARIMA family timeseries models in Canadian lynx data time series analysis and introduces the method of datamining combined with Statistical knowledge to analysis Canadian lynx data series.

  4. A Boost for Sino-Canadian Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU XUECHENG

    2010-01-01

    @@ If Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper's visit to China last December led to a thaw in the frozen Sino-Canadian relations in recent years, Chinese President Hu Jintao's latest trip to Ottawa appeared to usher in yet another warm period for these deep-rooted relations.

  5. Canadian Library Integrated Systems: Second Annual Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilees, Bobbie

    1988-01-01

    Reports the results of a survey of the Canadian integrated library systems market. The analysis includes comparisons of large versus microcomputer-based installations by type of library and across all libraries, foreign sales by Canadian vendors, and trends in the library systems market. (CLB)

  6. Lessons learned -- NREL Village Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flowers, L.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, a workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss the issues of applying renewable energy in a sustainable manner to international rural development. One of the summary recommendations was that NREL could assist in the renewable energy for rural electrification effort by developing and supplying six related activities: resource assessment, comparative analysis and modeling, performance monitoring and analysis, pilot project development, internet-based project data, communications, and training. In response to this recommendation, NREL launched its Village Power Program consisting of these activities that cut across NREL technologies and disciplines. Currently NREL is active in 20 countries, with pilot projects in 12 of those countries. At this time the technologies include photovoltaics, wind, biomass, and hybrids. The rural applications include home lighting and communications, water pumping, schools and health posts, battery charging stations, ecotourism, and village systems. These pilot projects are central to the renewable energy village power development through the demonstration of three aspects critical to replication and implementation of the projects on a significant scale. The three aspects are technical functionality, economic competitiveness, and institutional sustainability. It is important to note that the pilot projects from which NREL's experience has been gained were funded and, in many cases, developed by other organizations and agencies. NREL's role has been one of technical assistance or project management or both. The purpose of this paper is to describe the lessons NREL staff has gleaned from their participation in the various pilot projects. The author hopes that these lessons will help the Renewable Energy-Based Rural Electrification (RERE) community in implementing sustainable projects that lead to replication.

  7. Open Villages within the Exclusive City : an Empirical Study on Urban Villages in Shenzhen, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.; Sliuzas, R.; Geertman, S.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, rural-to-urban migration in China has been taking place at an unprecedented rate. Many rural villages have been encompassed into newly developed urban areas in the process of economic and industrial development. These so-called “urban villages” provide migrants with affordable h

  8. Study Review on Urban Village and Related Planning Policy Suggestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarizes the studies on urban village (chengzhongcun) in domestic and abroad from four perspectives including the concepts and definitions,the formation mechanism,the value orientations,and the renovation and reform strategies.Based on the summary,the paper states that a neutralized value orientation should be the logical starting point of analysis on urban village;the formation of urban village should be interpreted within the framework of "institution-action;" and the strategy of community management of urban village should be made from the angle of constructing city low-grade community and the restrictions of current institutions and various practical conditions.

  9. [Two Lebanese villages in the Gulf: village transfers and labour markets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy, M

    1985-01-01

    This article analyzes the experiences of 2 cohorts of Lebanese emigrants who departed from 2 dissimilar villages, a large agricultural village called Kfar Rumman with a tradition of significant migration to Kuwait beginning in 1950 and a small village called Kaakour located 30 km from Beirut in which agriculture is secondary to stonecutting and emigration to Saudi Arabia has assumed importance more recently. Among 168 current or formar migrants to Kuwait from Kfar-Rumman, 125 are still in Kuwait, almost all with their families. Members of the same village and family have shown great solidarity over 30 years in helping new migrants find jobs, and their network of friendships and alliances in Kuwait has allowed them to diversify their employment opportunities. Transport and construction were the dominant employment of the 1st 75 migrants who entered Kuwait between 1950-60; they were adroit in building up small businesses in Kuwait and in departing for Saudi Arabia or elsewhere when the construction boom slowed in Kuwait and better opportunities arose elsewhere. Among other jobs, migrants in Kuwait worked in plumbing, furniture making, interior decoration, printing, administrative and other salaried employment in the public or private sector, and iron working and transport. The history of Kfar-Rumman in Kuwait depended greatly on the solidarity and collective life of the village, which greatly reduced the external constraints of the labor market and applied internal economic capacities to the most promising situations. Villagers from Kaakour began migrating to Saudi Arabia in 1958; by 1973 the pace had accelarated greatly due to the oil boom. Until 1974 they had little difficulty establishing themselves as stonecutters and in related trades, but competition increased thereafter with the arrival of stoneworkers from other Arab countries and especially after 1978 with the entrance of Asian workers. Village migrants showed great mobility; most workers were single or left

  10. Chinese villages and their sustainable future: the European Union-China-Research Project "SUCCESS".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumreicher, Heidi

    2008-04-01

    China has 800,000 villages-one person out of seven on the globe is living in a Chinese rural settlement. Yet the global discussions about the situation in China is currently characterised by a disproportionate focus on the development of towns and until now circumstances have generally been neglected in the rural areas, where 70% of the Chinese population is still living. Within the 5 years of the SUCCESS project research, this set of actual problems has been considered and analysed under the principle of sustainability: "What to maintain?" "What to change?" were the overall research questions asked in the SUCCESS project; the researchers were looking for answers under a sustainability regime, respecting the need to raise the quality of life in the villages. Several interweaving processes were used to achieve results: the inter-disciplinary research process between many areas of expertise, the trans-disciplinary process between the researchers and the Chinese villagers, and a negotiation process that made the connection between these two processes. The introduction describes the basic sustainability definition that was orienting the whole study. The innovation lays mostly in the methodology: the inter-disciplinary research co-operation related to practice and to involving the affected communities is needed to manage the significant and growing imbalances between urban and rural areas regarding their sustainability. In the transdisciplinary work, the project developed "village future sentences" that describe the local outcome of the research as one step towards better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms that could lead to a sustainable future, and they also managed to start sustainability processes in the case study sites. The integrated approach of the project helped generating future scenarios for these villages covering all aspects of their development, including urban design issues. Out of these scenarios, the villages developed small projects that could

  11. Analysis on Sustainable Development Management Model of Village Banks - Based on Bayan Rongxing Village Bank in Heilongjiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang shuang; Wang Ji-heng; Liu Bing; Yu Xiao-wen

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarized the management models of village banks in China. We compared and analyzed different management models of four village banks in different regions on four aspects: regional agriculture feature, loan for farmers, loan for enterprises and the construction of network, then came to the conclusion that, if the village banks' health development can realize, they must pay attention to innovating in loan patterns as well as material loan and starting out the network development.

  12. It Takes an e-Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, F.; Gay, P. L.; Foster, T.; Plait, P.

    2008-06-01

    Online discussion groups, such as the popular BAUT Forum, bring together astronomy enthusiasts with amateur and professional astronomers to discuss astronomy news, views, and dreams. Within this digital community, we look to discover if an e-village can raise an astronomer. In this pilot study, we follow 3 individuals as they go from forum newbie to community elder. We examine their posting habits to determine if it is possible to quantify learning within the bulletin board-based forum environment. We specifically document how the difficulty levels of user questions and the patterns of their responses to questions can be used to document growth in knowledge base and confidence in material. In this poster, we put particular emphases on the creation, validation, and evaluation of our interpretive rubric used to track the development of our three users along the previously identified dimensions. In effect, can we create an objective tool to measure learning from participation in an e-village? The rubric will allow EPO evaluators to judge the effectiveness of forums in meeting both educational and community needs given limited finances. The rubric will also open up new avenues for educational researchers exploring the impact of internet-based learning tools. This tool is the first step in a broader study to assess learning within the BAUT Forum, the largest online astronomy forum. We strive to achieve a statistical significant sample of life-long learners.

  13. The Ohrberg solar village; Solarsiedlung am Ohrberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanoli, K.; Christoffers, D.; Rockendorf, G. [Institut fuer Solarenergieforschung GmbH Hameln/Emmerthal (ISFH), Emmerthal (Germany). Abt. Systemtechnik von Solarenergieanlagen; Kranz, R. [Elektrizitaetswerke Wesertal GmbH, Hameln (Germany). Abt. Energieberatung/Energiekonzepte

    1998-02-01

    As an officially approved regional project of the EXPO 2000, the Ohrberg Solar Village will demonstrate an integrated energy concept - combining customer information and counseling, modern energy technologies and energy services rendered by utilities - which reduces the consumption of conventional energy ressources and the CO{sub 2}-emissions. The local utility Wesertal GmbH will equip the 82 low-energy solar houses of the village with reliable, cost-effective and innovative energy technologies and will provide energy services on the basis of a user-friendly contract. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Solarsiedlung am Ohrberg demonstriert als registriertes Regionalprojekt der EXPO 2000, wie ein integriertes Energiekonzept - bestehend aus umfassender Energieberatung, Einsatz moderner Energietechnologien und einem Nutz-Energie-Dienstleistungsangebot der Energieversorger - einen substantiellen Beitrag zur Ressourcenschonung und zur Reduzierung der klimarelevanten Umweltbelastung leisten kann. Das regionale Energieversorgungsunternehmen Wesertal GmbH wird innovative, erprobte, kostenguenstige, rationelle und regenerative Energieversorgungstechniken in den 82 solaren Niedrigenergiehaeusern dieser Siedlung installieren und die Waermeversorgung im Rahmen eines Waermedienstleistungskonzeptes uebernehmen. (orig.)

  14. A visit to the village of Saye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This brief article describes the changes in the village of Saye, Burkina Faso which were recognizable after 20 years absence. Rainfall was plentiful and it was the best season for agriculture in 20 years; the sorghum swayed in the breezes ready for harvest. There are 28 women and village elders who still recognized their visitor, Ramata. The changes in family planning attitudes and sexuality were evident in the way men and women freely joke and laugh about sexual issues in a good humored but not superficial way. The respected El Hadj (meaning that he had visited Mecca) Sawadogo, president of the local Naam group, was the one who cracked jokes which brought laughter to the audience. The taboos are still there, but everyone agrees that family planning is a good idea because it reduces suffering and the people do not still have enough food to eat. Birth spacing is generally accepted, but there is resistance to stopping births. There is growing tolerance toward premarital pregnancies, and polygamy among younger women, which leads to fractious polygamous wives. 20 years ago it was a radical act to show a film on sex education, where pen and ink outlines gave shape to a naked teenaged boy and girl next to each other on the screen. The audience response was a roar of disbelief and the author feared that the local prefet would put him in jail for disturbing public order and violating a taboo.

  15. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was…

  16. The Concept of Village Autonomy in Indonesia (Indonesian Constitution Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifqi Ridlo Phahlevy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia was introduced to the term, “village autonomy” in 1970s; however, throughout the past years of establishing autonomous villages in Indonesia, the legislators have not been able to provide any clarity about this concept. Villages, as a legal entity, do not have enough independence to represent themselves as an autonomous unit of community in the state administration system of Indonesia. Article 18B and 28I of the second amendment of The 1945 Constitution of The State of Republic of Indonesia (UUD 45 state that the villages can have independent governments, by giving the alternative of village autonomy. Implementation the Law No. 6 Year 2014 is a part of the effort to realize the message of constitution and hence conception of autonomous villages is expected to be the catalyst for this concept. The presence of this law had a considerable impact on the 2014 presidential elections. Because of this people are concerned that political interests may try to drive and turning the direction and purpose of the law. This study is a part of the research on the implementation of village autonomy policies in Indonesia, and is compiled by using statute and conceptual approach. How To Cite: Phahlevy, R. (2016. The Concept of Village Autonomy in Indonesia (Indonesian Constitution Perspective. Rechtsidee, 3(1, 27-40. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.21070/jihr.v3i1.151

  17. Grand Gathering for China and ROK at Mingyue Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengdu; Municipal; Foreign; and; Overseas; Chinese; Affairs; Office

    2016-01-01

    A small village nestled beside National H ighw ay 318 in Chengdu’s Pujiang county was little known until recently,when Chengdu joined with the South Korean city of Gimcheon to launch a pottery art exchange program there.Under a government plan to build innovative industry-oriented villages and promote the Qiong kiln

  18. The land use diversity of urban villages in Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, P.; Geertman, S.C.M.; Hooimeijer, P.; Sliuzas, R.

    2012-01-01

    China’s dynamic urbanisation since 1978 has led to the proliferation of so-called ‘urban villages’ in many cities. Their development, via a self-help approach by indigenous villagers, delivers low-cost housing and various other social and economic activities. Consequently, urban villages are charact

  19. A Malay Village and Malaysia; Social Values and Rural Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Peter J.

    According to the author, the aim of the report was to concentrate attention on the conduct of Malay villagers in their relationships with their outside world and on the values and attitudes that underlie this conduct. The inhabitants of the village of Jendram Hilir, who were the subjects of the study, are typical of the segment of the Malay…

  20. A perspective on Canadian shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mike; Davidson, Jim; Mortensen, Paul

    2010-09-15

    In a relatively new development over just the past few years, shale formations are being targeted for natural gas production. Based on initial results, there may be significant potential for shale gas in various regions of Canada, not only in traditional areas of conventional production but also non-traditional areas. However, there is much uncertainty because most Canadian shale gas production is currently in experimental or early developmental stages. Thus, its full potential will not be known for some time. If exploitation proves to be successful, Canadian shale gas may partially offset projected long-term declines in Canadian conventional natural gas production.

  1. Chinese Feelings Cherished By Canadians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>On March 30, "The Chinese Feelings Across the Pacific-The Century Exhibition of the Old Photos Treasured by the Canadians" was open in the Lu Xun Museum in Beijing. The exhibition lasted for one week. At the exhibition some old photos taken in the early 20th century were on display, showing James G. Endicott, envoy of world peace, together with Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai; the family of O. L. Kilborn, one of the founders of West China Union University, together with Chinese women with bound feet: O. L. Kilborn treating the wounded soldiers during the Revolution of 1911; Leslie Earl Willmott in Chinese tunic suit and his wife reluctant to bid farewell to China, as well as photos of Ashley Woodward Lindesay, founder of China’s modern

  2. THE CANADIAN POLITICAL BUSINESS CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Libby

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss the existence of a Canadian Political Business Cycle (PBC during the period 1946-1989. Logit analysis was used to determine if changes in the unemployment rate, growth of real GNE and the rate of inflation are significantly different in the period before an election than during the rest of the electoral term. It was found that the rate of growth in the unemployment rate declines and the rate of growth of real GNP increases in the four quarters before an election. The behavior of these variables reverses in the period after an election. These findings are consistent with a political business cycle. Policy variables, under a majority government, also behave in a manner associated with a PBC, with the government stimulating the economy approximately two years into its term so that good economic news will occur before it has to call an election. Minority governments tend to simulate the economy immediately after taking office.

  3. BERCENI VILLAGE - A SOCIAL-ECONOMICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina IORGA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rural modernization aims at maintaining rural societies through occupational diversification that will improvequality of life and avoid rural exodus. It aims to acquire some features of the modern world such as those related totechnical, increased productivity, infrastructure, whereby rural community enriches its identity, acquiring newmeanings.This study is a close social-economical analysis of the countryside households of Berceni village. Berceniis in the southern county of Ilfov near Bucharest. It is based on the statistical data provided by National Institute ofStatistics. The data have been processed into the following indicators:age structure and gender, births and deaths,feminization, migration .Considering that human resources is the main factor in developing and moderinization ofrural space, this study is aimed to investigate as well, the posibility of diversifying inhabitants’ occupationsaccording to pshicologycal, social and economical resources.

  4. Lighting: The Killer App of Village Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This paper looks at lighting systems as the major market for village level power generation. To the consumer it is something which is needed, could come from a much friendlier source, and the issues of affordability, convenience, and reliability are important. To the supplier lighting has an enormous range of potential customers, it opens the opportunity for other services, and even small demand can give big returns. Because the efficiency of the light source is critical to the number of lights which a fixed power supply can drive, it is important to pick the proper type of bulb to use in this system. The paper discusses test results from an array of fluorescent and incadescent lamps, compared with a kerosene lamp. Low wattage fluorescents seem to perform the best.

  5. Moving Towards Eco Cultural Tourism Village (A Case Study of Pondok Cabe Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Kurniawati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study identifies some eco-cultural tourism attraction potentials that exist in PondokCabeUdik Village Tangerang Selatan Indonesia. In addition, it investigates local people’s opinion on tourism development. The objective is to provide a preliminary overview of eco-tourism development. This study is a descriptive study that uses three types of instrument in data collection method, including questionnaire, interview and field observation. The data is then analyzed using SWOT analysis. The result indicated that natural potential include farming, lake and fish pond, and chicken hatchery. Cultural potentials include cultural diversity that depicted in praying houses and culinary. 194 respondents involved are the locals. The result showed thatthere is positive view from the local community on the availability of tourism potentials and development in the future. It is proposed that environmental awareness, education, ecotourism development, and consensus buildingare needed to implement eco cultural tourism concept. Keywords: Tourism, Eco-Cultural, Village, Planning and Development

  6. Canadian national nuclear forensics capability project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.; Dimayuga, I., E-mail: joanne.ball@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Summerell, I. [Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Totland, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Jonkmans, G. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Whitlock, J. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); El-jaby, A. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Inrig, E. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Following the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, Canada expanded its existing capability for nuclear forensics by establishing a national nuclear forensics laboratory network, which would include a capability to perform forensic analysis on nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as on traditional evidence contaminated with radioactive material. At the same time, the need for a national nuclear forensics library of signatures of nuclear and radioactive materials under Canadian regulatory control was recognized. The Canadian Safety and Security Program, administered by Defence Research and Development Canada's Centre for Security Science (DRDC CSS), funds science and technology initiatives to enhance Canada's preparedness for prevention of and response to potential threats. DRDC CSS, with assistance from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, formerly Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is leading the Canadian National Nuclear Forensics Capability Project to develop a coordinated, comprehensive, and timely national nuclear forensics capability. (author)

  7. Canadian Law Schools: In Search of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakman, Leon E.

    1980-01-01

    Academically, Canadian education is at the crossroads between formalism and functionalism, with the latter prevailing in recent years. There now arises a demand for a more integrated approach, linking legal theory with legal practice. (MSE)

  8. Facts about Canadian musk-oxen

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses the historical and current status of the Canadian musk-oxen. The musk-oxen's distribution, social structure, food and range, and breeding...

  9. Canadian Business Schools: Going out of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobni, Dawn; Dobni, Brooke

    1996-01-01

    Using Porter's five-forces model (potential entrants, suppliers, buyers, rivalry, substitutes) to analyze competition in Canadian university business schools, the authors conclude that schools are becoming increasingly vulnerable to competitive pressures and that strategic reorientation is necessary. (SK)

  10. Canadian National Identity and Anti-Americanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭万宏

    2015-01-01

    Canadian national identity is closely related to antiAmericanism and for Canadians,comparing with America has become the main way to identify themselves.So some scholars argue that Canada lacks a real national identity and this is the main reason of its anti-American tradition.However,the author remarks Canada has its national identity.In this paper,the author will present three reasons to support her view.

  11. Canadian National Identity and Anti-Americanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭万宏

    2015-01-01

    Canadian national identity is closely related to anti-Americanism and for Canadians,comparing with America has become the main way to identify themselves.So some scholars argue that Canada lacks a real national identity and this is the main reason of its anti-American tradition.However,the author remarks Canada has its national identity.In this paper,the author will present three reasons to support her view.

  12. Governance, Globalization, and Political Economy: Perspectives from Canadian Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The concept of governance has become increasingly popular over the past 15 years signifying its growing acceptance in a number of key sectors of society. Is governance a neutral term that is merely a synonym for government, or does it signify a shift to neoliberalism? Working from a political-economy perspective, this article will explore the…

  13. Relégation au village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Renahy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Les thèses de l’individualisation des sociétés occidentales, ou de l’exclusion de ceux qui resteraient en marge d’une vaste classe moyenne aux modes de vie homogénéisés, ont sans doute permis de sortir d’une grille de lecture rigide héritée du marxisme. Mais elles résistent aujourd’hui mal aux faits et sont vivement contredites par le renouvellement des études sur les inégalités sociales pensées en termes de stratification. Enquêtant la population ouvrière d’un village industriel de Bourgogne au cours des années 1990, l’auteur a pu mesurer tout autant la force socialisatrice continue du groupe ouvrier sur sa jeunesse que le lent processus de délitement de ses cadres de références, longtemps stabilisés autour d’une mono-industrie métallurgique, provoquant une crise dans la reproduction de ce monde ouvrier. C’est cette crise de reproduction qui est évoquée ici. Dans un premier temps sont explicitées les formes passées de la présence industrielle au village, qui n’a jamais été celle d’un bastion de la grande industrie – la population locale n’est pas structurellement différenciée de celle de son environnement rural immédiat. L’exemple d’une lignée familiale d’artisans montre pour finir l’étroit maillage entre usine et structures sociales plus classiquement rurales, favorisant la constitution d’un capital d’autochtonie, déclinaison populaire du capital social.Relegation to the villageArguments demonstrating the individualisation of western societies, or the exclusion of those who stay on the margins of a vast middle class homogeneous life style, have no doubt allowed the move away from the rigid interpretations inherited from Marxism. However, these arguments resist today in spite of the facts and they are even keenly contradicted by the renewal of stratification studies on social inequalities. Analyzing the working population of an industrial village in Bourgogne during the

  14. Biomass District Heat System for Interior Rural Alaska Villages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, William A.; Parker, Charles R.

    2014-09-01

    Alaska Village Initiatives (AVI) from the outset of the project had a goal of developing an integrated village approach to biomass in Rural Alaskan villages. A successful biomass project had to be ecologically, socially/culturally and economically viable and sustainable. Although many agencies were supportive of biomass programs in villages none had the capacity to deal effectively with developing all of the tools necessary to build a complete integrated program. AVI had a sharp learning curve as well. By the end of the project with all the completed tasks, AVI developed the tools and understanding to connect all of the dots of an integrated village based program. These included initially developing a feasibility model that created the capacity to optimize a biomass system in a village. AVI intent was to develop all aspects or components of a fully integrated biomass program for a village. This meant understand the forest resource and developing a sustainable harvest system that included the “right sized” harvest equipment for the scale of the project. Developing a training program for harvesting and managing the forest for regeneration. Making sure the type, quality, and delivery system matched the needs of the type of boiler or boilers to be installed. AVI intended for each biomass program to be of the scale that would create jobs and a sustainable business.

  15. Human energy and work in a European village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberger, H

    1998-09-01

    In order to understand the problem of poverty its historical background must be elucidated. Since in the past most people in Europe were peasants living in small villages, a useful, initial way to examine the question of poverty is to investigate the villagers' condition of life. A basic contribution to this endeavor is to compile a food balance sheet that includes the food energy necessary for a healthy population, the amount of food in terms of calories that was available and the human energy required for the production of the nutriments. This essay is a case-study, incorporating these variables for the village Unterfinning (Bavaria) in 1721.

  16. Changing Traditions and Village Development in Kalotaszentkirály

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Kraft

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The continuity of village traditions depends on the stability and cohesion of village communities. Since the opening of Transylvania after the fall of Nicolae Ceauşescu, there has been a sort of revival of Hungarian village dance and music, on the one hand, but, on the longer term, the communities themselves are threatened by economic challenges and by consequent demographic changes. This essay is based on field research conducted in Kalotaszentkirály (Sincraiu from 1995 to 2010.

  17. Theorizing Gender in Contemporary Canadian Citizenship: Lessons Learned from the CBC's "Greatest Canadian" Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubas, Kaela

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I have used the 2004 Greatest Canadian contest as an example of media's educational function. Contrary to mainstream discourse of gender-neutral citizenship, this contest reiterates a notion of Canadian citizenship as masculinized, classed, and raced. Gramsci's concepts of "hegemony," "ideology", and…

  18. Cultural Landscape Evolution of Traditional Agricultural Villages in North China——Case of Qianzhai Village in Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Yangang; LIU Jisheng

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural village is an important rural type in China. The evolution process and mechanism of its cultural landscape are different from those of the industrialized village. The paper focuses this theme by a case study of Qianzhai Village of Qufu City, Shangdong Province. In the case of Qianzhai Village, the evolution of its settlement has experienced three stages: mechanical expansion, sprawling expansion and hollowing, and recentralization. The land-scape evolution of residents' houses has undergone three phases: traditional quadrangle house, one-storied house and multistoried house. The evolution of its land use has experienced three stages: circled stratification, fragment and in-tensive use, and concentration and extensive use. We can see that the main driving factors of cultural landscape evolu-tion of agricultural village are the changes of rural population, seciety, economy and culture, which are influenced by the change of urban-rural relation, the national modernization process and economic development, the reform of family planning and land system, and the changes in governmental policies. In the future, the modernization, ecological trend, and individualization for residents' houses of agricultural villages in China will develop step by step. The recentraliza-tion of settlement and the scaled, sustainable, intensive land use are likely to be the trends of agricultural villages in China.

  19. Medical cannabis - the Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gordon D; Bober, Sara L; Mindra, Sean; Moreau, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been widely used as a medicinal agent in Eastern medicine with earliest evidence in ancient Chinese practice dating back to 2700 BC. Over time, the use of medical cannabis has been increasingly adopted by Western medicine and is thus a rapidly emerging field that all pain physicians need to be aware of. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a significant and dose-dependent relationship between neuropathic pain relief and tetrahydrocannabinol - the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. Despite this, barriers exist to use from both the patient perspective (cost, addiction, social stigma, lack of understanding regarding safe administration) and the physician perspective (credibility, criminality, clinical evidence, patient addiction, and policy from the governing medical colleges). This review addresses these barriers and draws attention to key concerns in the Canadian medical system, providing updated treatment approaches to help clinicians work with their patients in achieving adequate pain control, reduced narcotic medication use, and enhanced quality of life. This review also includes case studies demonstrating the use of medical marijuana by patients with neuropathic low-back pain, neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. While significant preclinical data have demonstrated the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating pain in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, and cancer, further studies are needed with randomized controlled trials and larger study populations to identify the specific strains and concentrations that will work best with selected cohorts.

  20. TOURISM WAS BORN IN THE VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela-Liliana CIOBAN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Statistical data certifies that tourism is one of the most profitable and dynamic sectors of the economy, occupying the second position in international trade, after oil. By extrapolation results that rural tourism also has major implications for the economic, social and cultural development of the villages. This study presents an analysis of the factors contributing to the practice of rural tourism in Romania during 2000-2015. Using data provided by the National Statistics Institute was possible to analyze the number of employees and number of units specific to rural tourism. In the structure of this study, the methods of improving and developing rural tourism are defined by the concept of volunteer tourism by developing national portals presenting the vacant jobs in tourism and developing human capital by attracting European Funds 2014-2010. The importance of these methods have as a starting point the alignment with the current requirements of tourists and human resources due to the fact that workers in tourism are the main connection point between services and tourist.

  1. Solar village Indonesia. Biotechnologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurismono, H.; Budiono, C.; Noetzold, H.

    1992-12-31

    Within the framework of an bilateral cooperation between the FRG and the Republic of Indonesia the application of systems for solar energy and biomass utilization have been tested and assessed. Two similar wood gasification systems were installed and tested in the farmer`s village of Picon. The differed in the cooling and cleaning components. One of them caused problems from the very beginning so it was modified. The first test with the modified system were successful and the amount of contaminated water could largely be reduced. The system was taken over by a saw-mill factory. From the analysis of profitability it can be shown that the application of wood gasifiers in saw-mills under Indonesian condition can compete with Diesel systems. (BWI). [Deutsch] Im Rahmen einer bilateralen Zusammenarbeit zwischen der BRD und der Republik Indonesien wird die Anwendung von solaren Energiesystemen sowie die Biomassenutzung untersucht. Es wurden dafuer zwei gleich aufgebaute Holz-Vergasungsanlagen installiert und im Dorf Picon getestet. Sie unterschieden sich in Bezug auf das Kuehl- bzw. Saeuberungssystem. Eine der Analgen fuehrte von Anfang an zu Problemen, so dass Modifikationen vorgenommen wurden. Testlaeufe verliefen danach erfolgreich; die Abwassermenge konnte erheblich reduziert werden. Das System wurde daraufhin in einem Saegewerk uebernommen. Analysen zeigen, dass die Anwendung von Holz-Vergasungsanlagen zur Stromerzeugung unter indonesischen Bedingungen durchaus mit Dieselsystemen konkurrieren kann. (BWI).

  2. Diversity Management in the Canadian Workplace: Towards an Antiracism Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanmala Hiranandani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most diversity management programs in Canada maintain that enhancing workforce diversity is of tremendous significance for business organizations in today’s competitive global urban markets. Since well-meaning diversity management initiatives have been largely ineffective thus far in dealing with workplace discrimination and racism in the Canadian workplace, this paper underscores the need to decenter the focus of diversity management from a business imperative to an antidiscrimination and social justice imperative. Within this latter perspective, the paper examines the strengths and limitations of the antiracism approach that has been implemented in various developed countries in recent years. The antiracism approach is an action-oriented strategy for institutional and systemic change that has at its core the interrogation of privilege, power disparities, and other forms of inequity within the organization. Drawing from the lessons of various initiatives that have utilized this approach, the present paper emphasizes the need for a nuanced antiracism approach in the multicultural Canadian society if diversity management is to attain its goal of greater inclusion of all individuals in informal networks and formal organizational programs.

  3. Cities, Towns and Villages, Published in unknown, SWGRC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset, was produced all or in part from Road Centerline Files information as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided...

  4. Cities, Towns and Villages, Published in unknown, Monroe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in NAD_1983_HARN_WISCRS_Monroe_County_Feet coordinate system; in a...

  5. Cities, Towns and Villages, Published in 2005, WTH Technology, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2005. Data by this publisher are often provided in UTM...

  6. Implementation and Development of Village Merging in Zhucheng City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the status quo of implementation of village merging in Zhucheng City of Shandong Province.Owing to thoroughness and originality,the village merging of Zhucheng City has created " Zhucheng Model" and disseminated " Zhucheng experience".By comparing part of annual values concerning the process of rural communitization in Zhucheng City,we use SWOT analysis method to objectively obtain strength,weakness,opportunity and risk of village merging in Zhucheng City,and offer corresponding SO,WO,ST,WT countermeasures.Finally,some proposals are put forward for future work of village merging in Zhucheng City as follows:grasp opportunity to undergird merger achievement;improve the drawback to beef up merger achievement;monitor risk to maintain merger achievement;eliminate hidden trouble to safeguard merger achievement.

  7. Cities, Towns and Villages, Towns, Published in 2001, Freelance.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2001. It is described as 'Towns'. Data by this publisher...

  8. Rural Village Organizations And Their Services (Ⅲ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHALHO

    2004-01-01

    In the Tibet Autonomous Region, 80 percent of residents are still living in rural pasturage areas. In addition to accomplishing the tasks assigned by upper level governments, village organizations can also offer flexible and effective public services.

  9. Rural Village Organizations and Their Services (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHALHO

    2004-01-01

    In the Tibet Autonomous Region,80 percent of residents are still living in rural pasturage areas.In addition to accomplishing the tasks assigned by upper level governments, village organizations can also offer flexible and effective public services.

  10. Rural Village Organizations and Their Services (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHALHO

    2004-01-01

    Statistics show about 80 percent of the people in the Tibet Autonomous Region live in the rural and pastoral areas. This points up the need for further improve-ment of village organizations and their public services.

  11. Cities, Towns and Villages, County subdivisions, Published in 2006, Freelance.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'County subdivisions'....

  12. PRIMARY MILK OFFER IN CASTRANOVA VILLAGE, DOLJ COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Lucian PÂNZARU

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Castranova village is situated in the south-eastern county of Dolj on county road Leu - Visina (35 km from Craiova, limited in the north by the commune Leu, Apele Vii to the east of village, south and west by the commune Marsani and Bratovoieşti. Commune is composed of villages and wells Castranova. In the village there are 12 agricultural companies and two companies. Specific of the area is agriculture, mainly large crop: wheat and maize farming. Simultaneously develop livestock sector, and milling and bakery activities. Elucidating the communal potential, of milk production is based on use of an appropriate set of indicators: effective in exploitation (by species, total production and average yield per head. The study covers the period 2010-2012, taken as a starting point for developing a strategy of reviving the sector of production.

  13. Sustainability literacy of older people in retirement villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bo; Zuo, Jian; Skitmore, Martin; Buys, Laurie; Hu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia's central business district (CBD). Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  14. Seating, Money, and Food at an Amdo Village Funeral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rin chen rdo rje

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Seating, food, and money are discussed in the context of funerals held in the Amdo Tibetan village of Lo khog, located in Mar khu thang Town, Gcan tsha County, Rma lho Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province, PR China. An analysis of these three elements, combined with an intimate personal account of the funeral of the first author's close relative in 2005, offer insights into villagers' social status, and power and gender roles in their everyday lives.

  15. [[The duration of postpartum amenorrhea in a Sundanese village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaka, K

    1988-06-01

    "The duration of postpartum amenorrhea of women in a Sundanese agricultural village [in Indonesia] whose last pregnancy resulted in live birth in the past six years was studied. Data were collected from 197 women from September through November 1983....[The] results suggest that the duration of postpartum amenorrhea of women in a Sundanese agricultural village although relatively long, has recently become shorter." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  16. Preparing North American Preservice Teachers for Global Perspectives: An International Teaching Practicum Experience in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwebi, Bosire Monari; Brigham, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Given the economic, political, and social conditions in the world today and the increased diversity in Canadian classrooms, schools require teachers who have a strong sense of self-awareness and understanding of global issues. This article is based on empirical research involving preservice teachers from an Atlantic Canadian university. The…

  17. Remote sensing and conservation of isolated indigenous villages in Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert S; Hamilton, Marcus J; Groth, Aaron A

    2014-11-01

    The vast forests on the border between Brazil and Peru harbour a number of indigenous groups that have limited contact with the outside world. Accurate estimates of population sizes and village areas are essential to begin assessing the immediate conservation needs of such isolated groups. In contrast to overflights and encounters on the ground, remote sensing with satellite imagery offers a safe, inexpensive, non-invasive and systematic approach to provide demographic and land-use information for isolated peoples. Satellite imagery can also be used to understand the growth of isolated villages over time. There are five isolated villages in the headwaters of the Envira River confirmed by overflights that are visible with recent satellite imagery further confirming their locations and allowing measurement of their cleared gardens, village areas and thatch roofed houses. These isolated villages appear to have population densities that are an order of magnitude higher than averages for other Brazilian indigenous villages. Here, we report on initial results of a remote surveillance programme designed to monitor movements and assess the demographic health of isolated peoples as a means to better mitigate against external threats to their long-term survival.

  18. JUDGING SELECTION: APPOINTING CANADIAN JUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter McCormick

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s, the appointment of trial judges in Canada has generally involved an arms-length committee of professionals, although the structure of these committees and their role in the process has varied from province to province, as well as evolving over time. Yet these “new” structures and “new” processes did not prevent a major judicial appointment scandal in the province of Quebec in 2010, culminating in the formation of the Bastarache Committee to recommend changes. This paper summarizes the forty-year history of Canadian judicial appointment committees, identifies the major challenges that face those committees, and suggests the basic values toward which reforms to the appointment process might be directed. Depuis les années 1970, la nomination des juges de première instance au Canada a généralement mis à contribution un comité de professionnels indépendants, bien que la structure de ce comité et son rôle dans le processus de nomination aient varié d’une province à l’autre et évolué avec le temps. Ces « nouvelles » structures et « nouveaux » processus n’ont certes pas empêché l’éclatement du scandale sur la nomination des juges au Québec en 2010. Ce scandale a donné lieu à la formation de la Commission Bastarache qui avait notamment le mandat de recommander des changements. La présent document résume les quarante ans d’histoire des comités canadiens de nomination des juges, recense les principaux défis que ces comités doivent relever, et propose les valeurs fondamentales qui devraient inspirer les réformes du processus de nomination.

  19. THE IMPORTANCE OF PRACTICAL EXPORT SKILLS: SOME EVIDENCE FROM CANADIAN AGRIBUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    This paper compares the practical export skills needed by Canadian Agribusiness for sales to the U.S. with those for Overseas markets. Seventy skills in global entrepreneurship, international marketing, international finance, and international trade logistics were ranked and used to gauge the influence of export market on practical international trade skills. The findings show that practical export skill requirements vary substantially by firm and export market. Generally, basic management, m...

  20. Servant leadership: a case study of a Canadian health care innovator

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Tim H VanderpylSchool of Global Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA, USAAbstract: Both servant leadership and innovation are easier to theorize than to actually implement in practice. This article presents a case study of a Canadian health care executive who led a remarkable turnaround of St Michael's Health Centre, a floundering and almost bankrupt nursing home. In less than 7 years, Kevin Cowan turned around the finances and changed numerous broken relationships into s...

  1. Lead in Chinese villager house dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiangyang; Liu, Jinling; Han, Zhixuan

    2016-04-01

    House dust has been recognized as an important contributor to children's blood Pb. Here we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate geographical variation of Pb in Chinese villager house dust. The concentrations of Pb in 477 house dust samples collected from twenty eight areas throughout China varied from 12 to 2510 mg/kg, with geometric mean and median concentration of 54 mg/kg and 42 mg/kg, respectively. The median Pb concentrations in different geographical areas ranged from 16 (Zhangjiakou, Hebei) to 195 mg/kg (Loudi, Hunan). The influences of outdoor soil Pb concentrations, dates of construction, house decorative materials, heating types, and site specific pollution on Pb concentrations in house dust were evaluated. No correlations were found between the house dust Pb concentrations and the age of houses, as well as house decorative materials. Whereas outdoor soil, coal combustion, and site specific pollution may be potential Pb sources. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that Pb bearing particles appeared as cylindrical, flaky and irregular aggregates with the particle size ranging from about 10 to 800 μm. The energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) suggested that Pb in the dust particles may be associated with calcium compounds. But the major fraction of Pb in the household dust samples was found to be strongly bound to Fe-Mn oxide phases (37%) while Pb present in minor fractions individually making up between 14 and 18% was characterized in falling order as residual, carbonate, organic/sulphide and exchangeable fractions by the sequential extraction method applied. Bioaccessible Pb making up an average proportion of 53% in the household dusts was significantly correlated to the Fe-Mn oxide phases of Pb.

  2. A Roadmap for Canadian Submillimetre Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Tracy; Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda; Murray, Norm; Scott, Douglas; Wilson, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We survey the present landscape in submillimetre astronomy for Canada and describe a plan for continued engagement in observational facilities to ~2020. Building on Canada's decadal Long Range Plan process, we emphasize that continued involvement in a large, single-dish facility is crucial given Canada's substantial investment in ALMA and numerous PI-led submillimetre experiments. In particular, we recommend: i) an extension of Canadian participation in the JCMT until at least the unique JCMT Legacy Survey program is able to realize the full scientific potential provided by the world-leading SCUBA-2 instrument; and ii) involvement of the entire Canadian community in CCAT, with a large enough share in the partnership for Canadian astronomers to participate at all levels of the facility. We further recommend continued participation in ALMA development, involvement in many focused PI-led submillimetre experiments, and partnership in SPICA.

  3. Birth of the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ivan T

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Digestive Disease Foundation, renamed the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation--Fondation canadienne pour la promotion de la santé digestive--in December 2001, is the culmination of ongoing efforts by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology to establish an independent charitable organization. In February 2001, it was officially endorsed as the Foundation for the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. The initial efforts to establish this Foundation, led by Dr Richard McKenna in 1963, were unsuccessful. In 1991, Glaxo Canada (now GlaxoSmithKline) became a founding donor, and with the four founding physicians--Drs Ivan T Beck, Richard H Hunt, Suzanne E Lemire and Alan BR Thomson--the expenses to establish the Foundation were met. A charitable number was obtained in 1995 (0997427-11). The second founding donor was Janssen Canada (now Janssen-Ortho), and public education support came from Astra Canada (now AstraZeneca Canada). The Foundation initially relied on corporate donors, but now approaches physicians, patients and the general public. The objectives of the Foundation are to advance the science of gastroenterology and to provide knowledge of digestive diseases and nutrition to the general public, to enhance the quality of life of persons who are afflicted with these disorders. The major achievements of the Foundation are the provision of one-year operating grants to new investigators, which have allowed them to accumulate early data and subsequently obtain support from other major granting organizations. It also provides Fellowships and studentship support grants, in conjunction with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the pharmaceutical industry. The education committee found that there was little research support in this field, considering the large economic burden of digestive disease and the amount of outstanding work done by Canadian researchers. A bilingual Web site, a web-based specialist's discussion program and bilingual

  4. A Course in Canadian Film for U.S. Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenko, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Canadian Film will be a new course in the Communications Studies department at the University of Missouri at Kansas City particularly designed for non-Canadian Midwestern US students. It will not only introduce students to the richness and significance of Canadian film as both art and entertainment (which is virtually unrecognized around here),…

  5. 47 CFR 101.1423 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1423... GHz Band § 101.1423 Canadian and Mexican coordination. Pursuant to § 2.301 of this chapter, MVDDS systems in the United States within 56 km (35 miles) of the Canadian and Mexican border will be...

  6. Management of hereditary angioedema: 2010 Canadian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract C1-inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency is a rare blood disorder resulting in angioedema attacks that are debilitating and may be life-threatening. Prophylaxis and therapy of events has changed since our first Canadian Consensus Conference on the diagnosis, therapy and management of HAE. We have formed the Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'Angioédème Héréditaire (RCAH - http://www.haecanada.com to advance care of patients with this disorder in Canada. We here present a review of management of HAE in Canada.

  7. Statistics in action a Canadian outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Jerald F

    2014-01-01

    Commissioned by the Statistical Society of Canada (SSC), Statistics in Action: A Canadian Outlook helps both general readers and users of statistics better appreciate the scope and importance of statistics. It presents the ways in which statistics is used while highlighting key contributions that Canadian statisticians are making to science, technology, business, government, and other areas. The book emphasizes the role and impact of computing in statistical modeling and analysis, including the issues involved with the huge amounts of data being generated by automated processes.The first two c

  8. Opportunities for Canadian stakeholders in the North American large wind turbine supply chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Wind energy is the fastest growing source of electricity in terms of annual installed capacity. This report presented a study of the North American large wind turbine generator supply chain and technological innovation challenges, and identified opportunities for Canadian industrial and research stakeholders to increase their participation in the wind industry. The study was conducted in three phases. The report described each of these phases, which included identification of the North American turbine supply chain needs and opportunities and its technological innovation challenges; identification of Canadian industrial and research stakeholders, either currently involved in the wind sector or external to it, which had strong transferable skills or capabilities to respond to the specific opportunities; and an assessment of the overall likelihood of Canadian stakeholders being able to respond to specific opportunities within the large wind turbine manufacturing segment of the supply chain. The report provided a market overview of the global, American and Canadian markets and discussed the key North American market drivers and potential economic benefits of wind power. The report also presented an overview of drivers for success in major markets jurisdictions and discussed the large wind turbine supply chain. Several strategic recommendations were offered, such as establishing and maintaining an open line of communication with key contacts within prime contractor and component manufacturer organizations; and maintaining and strengthening wind market policies and creating long-term market signals. refs., tabs., figs.

  9. Differences in Power Structures Regarding Access to Natural Resources at the Village Level in Central Sulawesi (Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Barkmann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The mountain forests of the Indonesian province of Central Sulawesi include core areas of the global Wallacea biodiversity “hotspot”. Remote sensing data indicated that deforestation rates around Central Sulawesi’s Lore-Lindu National Park differ more strongly between villages than could be explained by differences in the individual characteristics of the village households as assessed by quantitative village censuses. This setting provided the background for a study into inter-village differences in power structures regarding access to natural resources. Our results are abstracted from 3*10 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with key informants from the leading groups of autochthonous and migrant households of three contrasting villages. In village A, nearly feudal power relationships are exerted by a group of local “first settler” families that dominate formal village leadership as well as the influential Council of Traditional Leaders (Lembaga Adat, and that restrict deforestation and land transactions. No such institutional restrictions exist in village C. Traditional power relationships are replaced by economic power based on petty capitalist type production of the international agricultural commodity cocoa. Deforestation is muchhigher in village C. In village B, traditional institutions and power structures still appear in place although land transactions are less restricted than in village A, resulting also in high deforestation rates. While contrasting problematic social effects, our study highlights the potential efficacy of traditional institutions in the regulation of access to resources. ----- Die Bergregenwälder Zentralsulawesis sind Teil des globalen Wallacea-Biodiversität-"Hotspots" und beheimaten viele endemische Tier- und Pflanzenarten. Die Entwaldung im Bereich des dortigen Lore-Lindu Nationalparks unterscheidet sich zwischen umliegenden Dörfern stärker, als dies durch quantitative Haushaltsdaten zu erkl

  10. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation: Guidelines on Colon Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Leddin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer affecting both men and women in Canada. Many of these cancers are preventable, and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation (CDHF strongly support the establishment of screening programs for colorectal cancer. These guidelines discuss a number of screening options, listing the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ultimately, the test that is used for screening should be determined by patient preference, current evidence and local resources.

  11. The Canadian Hypertension Education Program – a unique Canadian knowledge translation program

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Touyz, Rhian M.; Campbell, Norm RC

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian Hypertension Education Program annually appraises data from hypertension research and updates clinical practice recommendation for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Enormous effort is devoted to disseminating these recommendations to target groups throughout the country and, through the use of institutional databases, to evaluating their effectiveness in improving the health of Canadians by lowering blood pressure in people with hypertension. The mission of the Canadi...

  12. Hemoglobin E prevalence in malaria-endemic villages in Myanmar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win,Ne

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The population of Myanmar comprises 8 major indigenous races (Bamar, Kayin, Kachin, Shan, Rakhine, Mon, Chin, and Kayah. The Bamar reside in the 7 central divisions of the country, and the others reside in the 7 peripheral states that border neighboring countries, including China, Laos, and Thailand in the east and India and Bangladesh in the west. Both malaria and HbE are endemic in Myanmar, although the actual prevalence of the latter in the different indigenous races is not yet known. Hemoglobin electrophoresis was performed in 4 malaria-endemic villages, each having a different predominating indigenous race. The overall prevalence of HbE was 11.4% (52/456 villagers, ranging from 2-6% in the Kayin-predominant villages to 13.1-24.4% in the Bamar-predominant villages. Although the overall HbE prevalence in the villages studied was not significantly different from that of the general Myanmar population, this study strongly documented the influence of racial differences on the prevalence of HbE in Myanmar. To prevent and control severe thalassemia syndromes in Myanmar, extensive prevalence studies of the country?s indigenous races are suggested.

  13. Wellbeing in retirement villages: eudaimonic challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Rebecca C; Robinson, Oliver C

    2014-12-01

    A retirement village consists of a collection of privately owned or leased flats or maisonettes for elderly adults that are supported by a central hub that provides catering, medical care and social activities. There have been studies of the psychological experience and impacts of such environments, however, there is lack of research that links the retirement village experience to overarching theories of eudaimonic wellbeing, and that uses qualitative methods to find out about how wellbeing manifests for the individual. This study used Ryff's (1989) model of wellbeing as a framework for analysis, while aiming to gain an in-depth understanding of the experiences and sources of wellbeing in residents of two retirement villages in the South East of England. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 18 residents. Thematic analysis revealed a dialectical tension to retirement village living: while facilitating all six core components of eudaimonic wellbeing as conceptualized by Ryff's model, individuals living within the retirement villages also experience challenges to wellbeing on the same dimensions. An integrative model of these tensions between positive and negative experiences is presented and discussed.

  14. Socio-Cultural Impacts in the Formation of Urban Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marpaung, B. O. Y.

    2017-03-01

    In Indonesia, a group of village people tends to move from one place to another and develops a living space to create a settlement. This research is conducted by taking an example of a particular ethnic group that leaves the forestry area to a new place in the city. After some time, this group of people creates a similar or adapted socio-cultural system adapted from their origin place. The purpose of this research is to examine the socio-cultural aspects that significantly influence the emergence of urban village. This influence is interpreted as social and cultural relations with the establishment of space and significance of urban village. By focusing on this issue, this research will trace the process of how a new and unplanned settlement could emerge. The process and elements are indispensable from social and cultural factors. Essentially, the shape of bulit space is a non-physical manifestation of local people, which is established from time to time. In this case, the research’s challenge lies on the circumstance in Indonesia where society and culture influence the emergence of urban village. Physical appearance can be identified as a tipology of settlement and morphology of urban village.

  15. UNPLANNED SETTLEMENT FORM IN POLONIA VILLAGE MEDAN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARPAUNG Beny O.Y.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization results in the increase of urban facilities and infrastructure needs in urban areas, especially the need for a place to stay. As a result, unplanned settlement is formed. The people living in Polonia Village for example look shabby and some are still living there illegally. The purpose of this research is to discover the form of settlement, the form of the distribution of community residences, the underlying terms and the process of the settlement formation in PoloniaVillage located on the banks of the Babura River. The research methods are qualitative approach in the form of interviews and quantitative approach in the form of a questionnaire. The results of this study are (1 Basically, the process of formation or the history of a settlement affects the settlement itself that it can develop sustainably, (2 The spreading pattern of the residential areas in every neighborhood in Polonia Village is an organic pattern and the road pattern is generally an irregular grid pattern, (3 The local communities’ thoughts play an important role in shaping the physical environment of Polonia Village, and (4 Polonia Village Medan has six patterns of unplanned settlement such as organic pattern, linear pattern, cluster pattern, central corridor pattern, grid pattern, and leapfrogging development pattern. The results of this study can be useful for North Sumatera Department of Settlements and Spatial Planning and for the science development in the field of socio-cultural and morphology

  16. Indigenous populations health protection: A Canadian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Katya L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disproportionate effects of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on many Canadian Aboriginal communities have drawn attention to the vulnerability of these communities in terms of health outcomes in the face of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Exploring the particular challenges facing these communities is essential to improving public health planning. In alignment with the objectives of the Pandemic Influenza Outbreak Research Modelling (Pan-InfORM team, a Canadian public health workshop was held at the Centre for Disease Modelling (CDM to: (i evaluate post-pandemic research findings; (ii identify existing gaps in knowledge that have yet to be addressed through ongoing research and collaborative activities; and (iii build upon existing partnerships within the research community to forge new collaborative links with Aboriginal health organizations. The workshop achieved its objectives in identifying main research findings and emerging information post pandemic, and highlighting key challenges that pose significant impediments to the health protection and promotion of Canadian Aboriginal populations. The health challenges faced by Canadian indigenous populations are unique and complex, and can only be addressed through active engagement with affected communities. The academic research community will need to develop a new interdisciplinary framework, building upon concepts from ‘Communities of Practice’, to ensure that the research priorities are identified and targeted, and the outcomes are translated into the context of community health to improve policy and practice.

  17. Canadian Ethnohistory: A Source for Social Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwire, Wendy

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of ethnohistory, a relatively new area of historical investigation that draws on anthropology, geography, and linguistics, as well as history, to document the pasts of predominantly indigenous peoples. Encourages social studies teachers to take notice of a major body of work being produced by Canadian ethnohistorians. (DSK)

  18. Who Are the Players in Canadian Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Geoffrey

    1987-01-01

    Labels range of persons advocating different theoretical positions of Canadian curriculum as "players." Describes players as "managers,""predictors,""transformers,""sleuths,""analysts." Values varied viewpoints for attention to language regarding curriculum, critical review of ideas/concepts, examination of current policies, awareness of history…

  19. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketovuori, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    This article is about a multidisciplinary R&D project in which a Canadian Learning Through The Arts (LTTA) program was imported to Finland in 2003-2004. Cultural differences in arts education in Finland and Canada are discussed. While Finland has a national school curriculum with all the arts included. Canada relies more on partnerships to…

  20. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five…

  1. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this journal's Fall 2009 issue, the Forum section included an article by Gordon Selman and Mark Selman arguing that although Canadian adult education had existed as a social movement in the middle part of the 20th century, it is no longer a social movement. They also speculated about the causes of this change. In the Spring 2011 issue, Tom…

  2. Canadian Children's Perceptions of Spirituality: Diverse Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelsey; Talwar, Victoria; Bosacki, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Few researchers have explored children's understandings of spirituality. Thus, Canadian children from different religious, spiritual and cultural backgrounds were asked open-ended questions concerning their spiritual thoughts, beliefs and experiences. Parents of participants completed a demographic questionnaire and reported children's religious…

  3. Canadian Perspectives on Equity in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlby, Brenda; Komlen, Mile

    2000-01-01

    Canadian school board administrators are increasingly expected to meet the needs of disabled or other students requiring specific types of accommodation. The duty to accommodate arises when otherwise legitimate school rules or policies affect the customs and observances of nonmajoritarian religions. (Contains 12 references.) (MLH)

  4. Asian and Pacific Migration: The Canadian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, T. John

    1994-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of landed immigrants (permanent settlers) from Asia, and explores their settlement, adaptation, and integration experience in Canada. It suggests that access to Canadian land does not always translate into equal opportunity in the economy and society, but notes that Canada may be more successful at assimilating Asian…

  5. Family Business Training: A Canadian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A. B.; Soufani, K.; Lam, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Family firms play an important role in the working of the Canadian economy; despite their importance to the economic activities and job creation it is observed that family businesses have lower survival rates than non-family firms, some argue that this can possibly be attributed (amongst other factors) to the lack of training. Most of the training…

  6. The impact of climate change and climate policy on the Canadian economy

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Jim; MacGee, Jim; Wibe, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We examine the relative benefits of policy aimed at mitigating GHG emissions in Canada and globally. We find that while a carbon tax that holds the stock of global emissions below the 550 ppm level would yield positive net benefits for the world economy, the impact of such a tax on the Canadian economy would be negative. This result is largely driven by our finding that the damages from small increases in temperature are much smaller in Canada than in the rest of the world.

  7. Canadian suicide mortality rates: first-generation immigrants versus Canadian-born.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, J; Johansen, H; Nair, C; Nargundkar, M

    1990-01-01

    This article examines suicide mortality rates and trends in Canada for first-generation immigrants and the Canadian-born population. Data are analyzed by age, sex and country of birth. Since 1950, suicide rates worldwide for both men and women have been increasing. In North America and most of Europe, suicide has been one of the major causes of death for many years. In Canada, suicide rates are also rising. However, this increase is due entirely to a rise in the rate for men; the rate for women has remained relatively stable. Several differences are apparent between the rates for the Canadian-born population and those for first-generation immigrants. For example, three times as many Canadian-born men as women commit suicide. For first-generation immigrants, the ratio is two to one. Suicide mortality rates for the Canadian-born are higher than those for first-generation immigrants in every age group except for the 65 and over groups. Canadian born males have higher ASMR than first generation immigrant males. The rates for women show that first-generation immigrant women have higher suicide mortality rates than their Canadian-born counterparts, and that the highest rate for all women is for immigrants born in Asia.

  8. Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis: management of glomerulonephritis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulsky, Andrey V; Walsh, Michael; Knoll, Greg; Hladunewich, Michelle; Bargman, Joanne; Reich, Heather; Humar, Atul; Samuel, Susan; Bitzan, Martin; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Mammen, Cherry; Pinsk, Maury; Muirhead, Norman

    2014-03-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) clinical practice guideline for management of glomerulonephritis was recently released. The Canadian Society of Nephrology convened a working group to review the recommendations and comment on their relevancy and applicability to the Canadian context. A subgroup of adult nephrologists reviewed the guideline statements for management of glomerular disease in adults and agreed with most of the guideline statements developed by KDIGO. This commentary highlights areas for which there is lack of evidence and areas in need of translation of evidence into clinical practice. Areas of controversy or uncertainty, including the choice of second-line agents, are discussed in more detail. Existing practice variation also is addressed. The relevance of treatment recommendations to the Canadian practitioner is discussed.

  9. Environmental Assessment of Integrated Food and Cooking Fuel Production for a Village in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kamp

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale farming in Ghana is typically associated with synthetic fertilizer dependence and soil degradation. The farmers often rely on wood fuel for cooking imported from outside the farmland, a practice that is associated with deforestation. Integration of food and energy production may be a holistic approach to solving these issues. We study four approaches to providing food and fuel for cooking in a small-scale farming community. Present practice (PP of synthetic fertilizer based food production and provision of wood fuel from outside the farming area is compared to three modeled, integrated technology options: integrated food and household-scale biogas production (HH Biogas, integrated food and village-scale biogas production (Village Biogas, and integrated food and wood fuel production (Agroforestry. Integrated approaches are able to eliminate the import of wood fuel, reduce synthetic fertilizer use by 24%, 35% and 44% and soil loss by 15%, 20% and 87%, respectively, compared to present practice. An Emergy Assessment (EmA shows that integrated approaches are relevant substitutes to present practice considering biophysical efficiency indicated by Unit Emergy Value (in solar emjoules (sej per J of output and dependence on renewable inputs indicated by the Global Renewability Fraction (in %: 2.6–3.0 × 105 sej/J and 38%–48% (PP, 2.5–2.8 × 105 sej/J and 41%–46% (HH Biogas, 2.4–2.6 × 105 sej/J and 45%–47% (Village Biogas, 1.7–2.4 × 105 sej/J and 49%–66% (Agroforestry. Systematic recycling and use of local resources may play a pivotal role in reducing the dependence on non-renewable resources in Ghanaian farming, ensuring long-term soil fertility and stemming the current deforestation of wood reserves.

  10. The Dynamics of Clopotiva Village. A Cartographical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THEODOR CEPRAGA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to analyse the dynamics of Clopotiva, a village in Hațeg Country, from the date of its first documentary mention until present. The analysis points out the role of the natural, historical and cultural conditions together with the processes influencing the dynamics of this settlement. Information extracted from monographies, historical documents and other specialised studies were used for the medieval period, and starting with the 18th century, GIS analysis was applied to the available cartographical documents in order to highlight the morphological transformations of the village. The results showed that the village appeared initially south-west of the actual location, developing towards Râul Mare and the agricultural fields. The study also aims to create an analysis model for the dynamics of the settlements in the Hațeg Country.

  11. Health-related quality of life of Canadian children and youth prenatally exposed to alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungar Wendy J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, the incidence of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD has been estimated to be 1 in 100 live births. Caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol, FASD is the leading cause of neuro-developmental disabilities among Canadian children, and youth. Objective: To measure the health-related quality of life (HRQL of Canadian children and youth diagnosed with FASD. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study design was used. One-hundred and twenty-six (126 children and youth diagnosed with FASD, aged 8 to 21 years, living in urban and rural communities throughout Canada participated in the study. Participants completed the Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3. HUI3 measures eight health attributes: vision, hearing, speech, ambulation, dexterity, emotion, cognition, and pain. Utilities were used to measure a single cardinal value between 0 and 1.0 (0 = all-worst health state; 1 = perfect health to reflect the global HRQL for that child. Mean HRQL scores and range of scores of children and youth with FASD were calculated. A one-sample t-test was used to compare mean HRQL scores of children and youth with FASD to those from the Canadian population. Results Mean HRQL score of children and youth with FASD was 0.47 (95% CI: 0.42 to 0.52 as compared to a mean score of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.92 to 0.94 in those from the general Canadian population (p Conclusion Children and youth with FASD have significantly lower HRQL than children and youth from the general Canadian population. This finding has significant implications for practice, policy development, and research.

  12. World Heritage Site Designation Impacts on a Historic Village: A Case Study on Residents’ Perceptions of Hahoe Village (Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonki Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between World Heritage Site (WHS designation and the community sustainability of a historic village, focusing on Hahoe Village, Korea, which was inscribed in 2010. It examines residents’ perceptions of increasing tourism at Hahoe Village by adopting a questionnaire and using an interview as research methods. This study examined both the positive and negative impacts that Hahoe Village’s WHS designation has had on its sustainability. Of all of the impacts examined in this research, the three most noteworthy issues are identified: (1 the acceleration of the change of the village’s industrial base and the influx of strangers; (2 the degradation of quality of life (in the physical aspects caused by increasing tourism; and (3 the collision predicated by the tension between conserving the village’s historic environments and developing tourism. In conclusion, the WHS designation impacts on Hahoe Village, which local residents perceived, have both positive and negative aspects. WHS designation needs to be accompanied by a management plan that is more concerned about the impact from tourism after the designation. In this context, Hahoe Village must not only have a comprehensive preservation plan that balances with the demand for tourism development, but also secure the village’s community sustainability as a living place other than a tourist destination.

  13. Diversity and utilization of bamboo species in Tigawasa Village, Bali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IDA BAGUS KETUT ARINASA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Tigawasa is one of the famous traditional villages as a center of bamboo handicraft in Buleleng regency-Bali. As a center of bamboo handicraft its have been wrestled since centuries. Their peoples have done traditionally bamboo conservation surrounding their house and garden too. The marginal area, river flow area and stiff slope that are outskirts of village become to focus of bamboo conservation by their peoples, too. This research conducted at Tigawasa village in June 2003 by stripe and interview methods. Two kilometers stripe length by 50 meters width; follow the direction north south of the river was investigated. To know the utilization of kind of bamboo and their product conducted by interview to craftsman and community figure. The result of inventory knew about four genus consist of 19 species planted in this village. To know those bamboo species will be presented their key of determination. The genus of Gigantochloa and Schizostachyum to dominate of their species, and have many uses of it’s, also. Not less than 54 kind of bamboos handicraft product was produced in this village. The diversity of bamboos handicraft product, develop according progress of the technology and demand of period. Many of new products composed and use of color or paint develop to produce varieties of fixed product. Two-kind of product that is traditional boxes (“sokasi” handicraft and woven bamboo (“bedeg” to become this village famous at Bali, even though in foreign countries Energetic development of bamboos home industry to come to decrease stock of raw materials. About two trucks supply from east Java regularly to anticipation of decrease local stock of raw materials every week.

  14. The Protection of Chinese Traditional Villages and Construction of Beautiful Countryside in the Wuling Mountain Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyang; LIU; Zhiguo; SUN

    2014-01-01

    Chinese traditional villages have the characteristics of both intangible and tangible cultural heritage,and are the largest cultural heritage left by farming civilization in China. Under the synchronous propulsion of new four modernizations and the coordinated development of urban and rural areas,the important issues we face are to protect the Chinese traditional villages,inherit the agricultural heritage,and develop the farming culture resources. There are 60 Chinese traditional villages in the Wuling Mountain area. This article introduces the Chinese traditional villages in the area,analyzes its Chinese traditional village protection and beautiful village construction,and puts forward corresponding recommendations.

  15. Integrating peatlands into the coupled Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) v3.6 and the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM) v2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanqiao; Verseghy, Diana L.; Melton, Joe R.

    2016-08-01

    Peatlands, which contain large carbon stocks that must be accounted for in the global carbon budget, are poorly represented in many earth system models. We integrated peatlands into the coupled Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) and the Canadian Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (CTEM), which together simulate the fluxes of water, energy, and CO2 at the land surface-atmosphere boundary in the family of Canadian Earth system models (CanESMs). New components and algorithms were added to represent the unique features of peatlands, such as their characteristic ground floor vegetation (mosses), the slow decomposition of carbon in the water-logged soils and the interaction between the water, energy, and carbon cycles. This paper presents the modifications introduced into the CLASS-CTEM modelling framework together with site-level evaluations of the model performance for simulated water, energy and carbon fluxes at eight different peatland sites. The simulated daily gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration are well correlated with observations, with values of the Pearson correlation coefficient higher than 0.8 and 0.75 respectively. The simulated mean annual net ecosystem production at the eight test sites is 87 g C m-2 yr-1, which is 22 g C m-2 yr-1 higher than the observed annual mean. The general peatland model compares well with other site-level and regional-level models for peatlands, and is able to represent bogs and fens under a range of climatic and geographical conditions.

  16. Lessons learned from the NREL village power program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NREL`s recent experiences and lessons learned.

  17. EcoVillage: A Net Zero Energy Ready Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Faakye, O. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2015-02-01

    CARB is working with the EcoVillage co-housing community in Ithaca, New York, on their third neighborhood called the Third Residential EcoVillage Experience (TREE). This community scale project consists of 40 housing units --15 apartments and 25 single family residences. The community is pursuing certifications for DOE Zero Energy Ready Home, U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Gold, and ENERGY STAR for the entire project. Additionally, seven of the 25 homes, along with the four-story apartment building and community center, are being constructed to the Passive House (PH) design standard.

  18. Tempe as Language: An Indonesian Village Revitalisation Mini-project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Bradley

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In Kandangan, a village in the Temmanggung Regency (Kabupaten Temanggung in the Province of Central Java, tempe bunguk used to be a daily food—using locally grown bunguk beans—and made in many households. But imported blocks of tempe from China made with industrially grown soy beans have slowly crept in and replaced it. As part of her food skills mapping (a part of the Spedagi Project, Francisca Callista (Siska went searching for what used to be eaten in her village, and for those who could remember how to make it.

  19. PERFORMANCE STUDIES ON DOWNDRAFT GASIFIER WITH BIOMASS ENERGY SOURCES AVAILABLE IN REMOTE VILLAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. ChristusJeya Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global concern over the environmental issues and depletion of fossil fuels, significant interest has been shown by the researchers to develop alternate energy technologies like biomass, biogas, solar to meet the future energy demand. The prediction of the performance of different biomass energy sources in gasifiers is needed for the implementation of this technology to fulfil the need of decentralized heat and power applications, relevant to remote villages. This study presents the theoretical and experimental studies conducted on a 50 kW downdraft biomass gasifier with various biomass materials such as wood, coconut shell, rubber seed kernel and coir pith which are generally available in villages. Two-zone kinetic equilibrium model approach is used to predict the composition and temperature of the producer gas. The influence of equivalence ratio on the reaction temperature, quality of producer gas and gasifier conversion efficiency are discussed. The experimental and theoretical studies show that the rubber seed kernel can be effectively used as a feedstock of the biomass gasifier to meet the rural energy demand.

  20. Globalization/s: Reproduction and Resistance in the Internationalization of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kumari

    2012-01-01

    Internationalization of higher education has become a significant feature of the Canadian educational landscape. Considered to be a product of and response to globalization, internationalization is being critiqued for having an economic orientation. This paper will begin with a brief overview of internationalization research in Canada, and the…

  1. Seeing Oneself in a Book: The Changing Face of Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Fayjean, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Takes a look at children's literature over time, and its recent emergence as a respected body of literary work. Discusses what is Canadian about Canadian children's literature. Annotates six picture books. Notes that Canadian literature reflects the diversity of the Canadian population, the vast differences in the Canadian landscape, and the…

  2. Canadian cities in transition: new sources of urban difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry S. Bourne

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cities, increasingly, are the principal arenas in which global, national and local forces intersect.Canadian cities are no exception. Those cities are currently undergoing a series ofprofound and irreversible transitions as a result of external forces originating from differentsources and operating at different spatial scales. Specifically, this paper argues that Canadiancities are being transformed in a markedly uneven fashion through the intersection ofchanges in national and regional economies, the continued demographic transition, andshifts in government policy on the one hand, and through increased levels and new sourcesof immigration, and the globalization of capital and trade flows, on the other hand. Theseshifts, in turn, are producing new patterns of external dependence, a more fragmented urbansystem, and continued metropolitan concentration. They are also leading to increased socioculturaldifferences, with intense cultural diversity in some cities juxtaposed with homogeneityin other cities, and to new sets of urban winners and losers. In effect, these transitionsare creating new sources of difference - new divides - among and within the country=surban centres, augmenting or replacing the traditional divides based on city-size, location inthe heartland or periphery, and local economic base.

  3. Canadian petroleum history bibliography. Release update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2010-01-07

    The petroleum history bibliography was created over several years as a record dedicated to preserving the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. It comprises a list of more than 5000 publications, including books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles and stories of the many companies that have come and gone. It aims to include all publications and audio visual products from the Social Sciences and Humanities on company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry and humour. An author index is included. Most government documents are excluded as they are accessible through Library and Archives Canada. This bibliography is an ongoing piece of work, and welcomes any additions relating to the study and preservation of Canadian petroleum industry history.

  4. Webpages on copyright in Canadian academic libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony G Horava

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic libraries value the web as being a vital channel for communicating information and policies to their user community. Designing a webpage on copyright is a challenging task that requires a consideration of the medium and the message. This article proposes a conceptual model and proactive approach for integrating policy objective and goals into the development of a copyright webpage, based on key elements of the library’s involvement in academia. To complement this theoretical approach, an analysis of Canadian academic library websites was conducted in order to gage the effectiveness of copyright webpages, in the Canadian legal context, according to the model as well as related design issues of visibility and access.

  5. Kofi Annan Visited Beijing Liuminying Eco-village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BianYousheng

    2005-01-01

    United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan and his party visited China's first large agricultural ecology project,Beijing Liuminying Eco-village, on October 12, 2004. During his visit, Kofi Annan was accompanied by Xie Zhenhua,Minister of the State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), Wang Guangya, Permanent Representative to the United Nations,

  6. Forest product use at an upper elevation village in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, John J.

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes forest product use at Chimkhola, an upper elevation village of west central Nepal. Villagers have large herds of livestock that they use to fertilize agricultural fields by holding the animals on cropland for one to several weeks prior to planting. Herds are moved sequentially from one group of fields to another until all are planted, and then families take animals into the forests. Herders, therefore, live in temporary shelters away from the homestead throughout the year, and for much of the year feed their livestock fodder cut from forest trees. By combining repeated interviews of sample households, one-time interviews with a large sample of village families, and direct measurements of forest products being used, I found that livestock maintenance consumes 74% of the hand-harvested wild biomass: 26.4% for green fodder, 32.3% for fuelwood at the herder's hut, and 13.8% for construction of the herder's hut. Fuelwood burned at the homestead is the next largest consumer, 17.6%. Villagers also use small amounts of forest materials for house construction, charcoal, agricultural implements, and bamboo for baskets and mats. The large amounts used by herders and livestock at Chimkhola mean that wild vegetation use there far exceeds the measurements made by previous reliable studies at other communities. This system of forest use is, however, degrading Chimkhola's forests and gradually converting them to shrublands.

  7. State-owned versus township and village enterprises in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Perotti; L. Sun; L. Zou

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an up-to-date survey of the comparison issue between state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and township-village enterprises (TVEs) in China. Although TVEs are at a disadvantage in areas such as technology, labor skills, education levels of staff access to bank loans and government suppo

  8. A Wiki-based Key to Garden and Village Birds

    OpenAIRE

    Trilar, Tomi

    2010-01-01

    A Wiki-based Key to Garden and Village Birds is available in two versions: a dichotomous, hyperlinked and printable version, and as step-bystep identification version. It is supported by jKey Player in English, Slovenian, Spanish, Romanian and German.

  9. Sustainability Literacy of Older People in Retirement Villages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With many developed countries experiencing the aging of the population, older people play a large role in contributing to environmental problems but also to environmental solutions. The purpose of this research is to understand the awareness and behavior of current older people living in retirement villages towards sustainability development. To achieve this, a sustainability literacy survey was conducted with 65 older residents of a private retirement village located 10 Km outside the Brisbane, Australia’s central business district (CBD. Most of residents recognized the importance of environment protection and would like to lead a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. In addition, the majority were willing to pay higher prices for a living environment with sustainable features. The importance of positive social communications was emphasized with most residents having established good relationships with others in the village. The findings provide an important insight into consumer perspectives regarding the sustainable features that should and can be incorporated into the village planning and development.

  10. Biogas for Javanese villages: the products of digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, J.; Richmond, B.

    1980-01-01

    The techniques and experiences with various biogas-generation and utilization devices in a Javanese village are given. Information on generation includes mostly data on mixing, temperature and time factors. Various simple and inexpensive cooking burners and lamps are also discussed. The article concludes with suggestions for the use of the biogas digester effluent as fertilizer, soil conditioner, and water hyacinth and algae substrates.

  11. Morphological diversity in fourteen cultivars Tiron village, Kediri, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Azis Fuad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tiron village, Kediri is one of central mangoes in Indonesia. Many cultivar of mangoes encountered at this location. This study aims to look at the diversity of mango cultivars in the Tiron Village, Kediri, Indonesia. Mangoes diversity is based on qualitative and quantitative character of each cultivar. The diversity among cultivar indicated by the standard deviation and variance in the eleven quantitative characters of mango. Mango cultivars categorized by phylogeny morphological characters. The method used for phylogeny analysis is an UPGMA method (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. Phylogenic analysis is based by the qualitative character of the plant. The results showed there were fourteen cultivars of mango in the village of Tiron Kediri have high diversity. Fourteen mango cultivars were categorized four groups. Based on a qualitative character, there are four classes of mango. The first group is the Katul, Podang Urang, and Podang Lumut. The second group is the Gadung, Jaran, Madu, Endog, Pakel, Dodonilo, Ireng, Lanang and Cantek. Santok Kapur into groups to form groups of three and Kopyor fourth. The high diversity in the village mango Tiron Kediri potential for resource in situ germplasm.

  12. Marin Solar Village: feasibility study and technical analysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-31

    The energy needs of Hamilton Air Force Base's Solar Village for electricity and heating and cooling of buildings are considered and alternative ways of meeting the Village's requirements for these forms of energy are evaluated. First, Solar Village's energy demand is calculated and compared to a base case representing calculations for typical energy usage for a development of similar size and density that is in conformance with current state and local ordinances. The potential of selected alternative technologies to meet the Solar Village projected demand for electrical power and natural gas is evaluated. Scenarios were developed to reduce demand, particularly in the building sector. Four alternative on-site energy technologies have been evaluated: wind, solar thermal electric, biomass conversion, photovoltaics. Each alternative is analyzed in detail. Of the four alternatives considered, the one with the greatest present potential is biomass conversion. Two technologies have been incorporated into the design. A 3-acre land fill is covered with a mantle of soil. A network of pipes carries off the methane gas which is a natural product of anaerobic decomposition of the materials in the land fill. The second technology involves the planting of rapidly-growing trees on denuded and unused portions of the site; 50 acres devoted to tree production could yield 12% of the back-up energy required for home heating on a sustainable basis.

  13. Multicultourism in Mexico’s Magical Village Cuetzalan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Casper

    multiplied.To take the temperature of this political space, this thesis examines one expression of the surge of political multiculturalism; the tourism program Magical Villages (Pueblos Mágicos) launched in 2001 by Mexico's federal government. Through a focus on the participant town and mestizo municipal...

  14. Overview of village scale, renewable energy powered desalination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.E.

    1997-04-01

    An overview of desalination technologies is presented, focusing on those technologies appropriate for use in remote villages, and how they can be powered using renewable energy. Technologies are compared on the basis of capital cost, lifecycle cost, operations and maintenance complexity, and energy requirements. Conclusions on the appropriateness of different technologies are drawn, and recommendations for future research are given.

  15. K'qizaghetnu Ht'ana (Stories from Lime Village).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobby, Pete; And Others

    A cross section of Athabascan life as related by eight inhabitants of Lime Village, Alaska, is given in this document. The short narratives are printed in English and in Dena'ina. Illustrations accompany the text. The stories tell of making eagle feather robes, birchbark or mooseskin boats, a raincoat from black bear intestines, and boots from…

  16. State-owned versus township and village enterprises in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; Sun, L.; Zou, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an up-to-date survey of the comparison issue between state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and township-village enterprises (TVEs) in China. Although TVEs are disadvantaged in areas such as technology, labour skills, education levels of staff, access to bank loans and government support

  17. [A village fair. Beware of the travelling quack doctor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeman, J N Hans

    2012-01-01

    What appears to be an image of a merry village fair is actually a warning against the practices of the travelling quack doctor. An iconological description reveals the hidden meaning of the imagery portrayed in a 17th-century genre painting.

  18. 2003 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Allan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the last 15 years; however, there has been little focus on issues relating to asthma in childhood. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies, particularly in children, have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines. The objectives of this article are to review the literature on asthma published between January 2000 and June 2003 and to evaluate the influence of new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and its 2001 update, with a major focus on pediatric issues. Methods The diagnosis of asthma in young children and prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy, inhalation devices, immunotherapy, and asthma education were selected for review by small expert resource groups. The reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Network For Asthma Care and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Data published through December 2004 were subsequently reviewed by the individual expert resource groups. Results This report evaluates early-life prevention strategies and focuses on treatment of asthma in children, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and preventive therapy, the benefits of additional therapy, and the essential role of asthma education. Conclusion We generally support previous recommendations and focus on new issues, particularly those relevant to children and their families. This document is a guide for asthma management based on the best available published data and the opinion of health care professionals, including asthma experts and educators.

  19. Morbidity Experiences and Disability Among Canadian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMeules, Marie; Turner, Linda; Cho, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Women are more frequently affected by chronic conditions and disability than men. Although some of these sex differences have been in part attributed to biological susceptibility, social determinants of health and other factors, these gaps have not been fully explained in the current literature. This chapter presents comparisons of hospitalization rates, and the prevalence of chronic conditions and physical disability between Canadian women and men and between various subgroups of women, adjusting for selected risk factors. The Canadian Hospital Morbidity Database (2000–2001) and Canadian Community Health Survey (2000–2001) were used to examine inpatient hospital morbidity, prevalence of chronic conditions and disability. Key Findings Hospitalization rates were 20% higher among women than men. This was due to the large number of hospitalizations for pregnancies and childbirth. When "normal" deliveries were excluded, hospitalization rates remained higher among women. Women had slightly lower rates of hospitalizations for ambulatory-care sensitive conditions than men. Prevalence of activity limitation (mild and severe) was higher among women than men, and differences remained after adjusting for age, chronic conditions, socio-economic status, and smoking. Women who reported a disability were less likely than men to be in a partnered relationship, have less tangible social support, and have lower income and employment rates. Data Gaps and Recommendations The impact of morbidity and disability on Canadian women is substantial. These results identify areas for interventions among more vulnerable subgroups, and point to the need for further research in the area of risk factors for the prevention of morbidity and disability in the population. PMID:15345073

  20. Canadian mercury inventories: the missing pieces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagreen, L.A.; Lourie, B.A. [Summerhill Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Research was conducted to determine the significance of the deliberate use of mercury in products in Canada and the associated releases from these sources. Through a combination of literature review and new calculations, the reservoir, flux, and releases of mercury from eight product sources were calculated, and these results compared to historical Canadian inventories. Mercury contributions from the waste sector were also assessed and compared to total Canadian mercury releases and to mercury releases from coal-fired generating stations. Results suggest the use and release of mercury associated with its use in products is 4.5 times what previous inventories indicate. Including dental amalgam and sewage sludge, the total releases of mercury to all environmental compartments in Canada totals 20 tonnes per year. This accounts for less than one-half of the 44 tonnes per year of mercury released from mercury waste disposal each year in Canada. Waste mercury contributions from hazardous waste imports, unknown product sources, and incomplete information on the use of mercury in known products may account for this discrepancy. Waste-related mercury releases and transfers for disposal and recycling are 11 times greater than that of electricity generation in Canada. Results indicate that Canadian inventories have underestimated the significance of mercury use and release associated with products, calling into question the current priorities for mercury management. This paper was developed as part of a panel session at the International Joint Commission 'Mercury in the Ecosystem' workshop, February 26-27, 2003, Windsor, ON, Canada, as a complement to the information on Canadian Inventories presented by Luke Trip (Senes Consulting, Ottawa, ON, Canada).

  1. Canadian Multiculturalism, Same as it ever Was?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hoyos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available After the Second World War ended, Canada was no longer mainly composed of its two dominant ethnocultural groups, French and English, but rather constituted by polyethnicity; meaning, Canadian culture was made up of many different ethnic groups. Since then, Canada has actively embraced multiculturalism and on 12 July 1988, the House of Commons passed Bill C-93, ‘An Act for the preservation and enhancement of multiculturalism in Canada’. The Canadian multicultural experience has been much portrayed as a celebration of ethnicity where different cultural groups share their customs and learn from each other. However, it is recently being rumoured that the multiculturalism hype is not all it is cut out to be and segregates communities rather than integrate. According to Canadian authors Keith Banting and Will Kymlicka, “in much of the world and particularly in Europe, there is a widespread perception that multiculturalism has failed” (44. In this paper, I examine some recent common issues of concern, especially, racism and discrimination, through the literary expression of Canadian playwrights and writers such as George F. Walker, Cecil Foster, and Mordecai Richler. These writers are not meant to represent any ethnic group as a whole, but rather try to project a general feeling about the nation in individual ways. I will finally explore the idea of how perhaps multiculturalism in Canada is evolving into another state since migratory patterns and the social circumstances that Canada is facing in the 21st century have changed. Today, the idea of celebrating different ethnicities and customs is no longer as important as celebrating the transcultural or “transnational” aspects of relations between individuals and groups of immigrants.

  2. The Canadian Assessment of Physical literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Claire E; Longmuir, Patricia E; Boyer, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy (CAPL) was conceptualized as a tool to monitor children's physical literacy. The original model (fitness, activity behavior, knowledge, motor skill) required revision and relative weights for calculating/interpreting scores were required....... Methods: Nineteen childhood physical activity/fitness experts completed a 3-round Delphi process. Round 1 was open-ended questions. Subsequent rounds rated statements using a 5-point Likert scale. Recommendations were sought regarding protocol inclusion, relative importance within composite scores...

  3. Canadian Light Infantry in Adaptive Dispersed Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    Sources Bercuson, David . Significant Incident: Canada’s Army, the Airborne and the murder in Somalia. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1996. Bernier...36 David Bercuson, Significant Incident: Canada’s Army, the Airborne and the Murder in Somalia...Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1996), 54-58. 37 Bernd Horn and M. Wyczynski, Hook-up! The Canadian Airborne Compendium (St.Catharines: Vanwell

  4. Gornja Studena village in the context of sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turnšek Branko A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the present condition of the sustainability elements at the level of a village, and then on the relevant representative sample of the households, according to the parameters defined in advance. By definition, such analysis of natural, economic, human and spatial resources provides the picture of the present status, but also defines the sustainability degree, and the capacities and potential directions of development. The obtained results and drawn conclusions served as a platform for the analysis of the future development and transformation of the village, the households, that is, the courtyards as they are spatial frame of a household and a central stage where these processes take place. Gornja Studena belongs to the group of spontaneously formed, sparse/dense hill villages. It was formed in the upper part of the Jelašnica valley, on the slopes of Suva planina mountain, under the Mosor peak, along the way leading from Niša to Bojanine Vode, on the east and west side of Studenica stream, flowing through the middle of the village, parallel to the road. The nature has been, as always, both generous and miserly taking on one side and giving on the other. There are rich complexes of forests and pastures, and favorable conditions for livestock keeping, mild climate, as well as many other natural and environmental values in the village locality, the ski resort and other tourist destinations of Bojanine Vode, which are nearby, did not help the village development. It is situated on the periphery of the region, and it is one of the most distant villages from the city, far away from the main traffic routes (though it has not always been like this with poor public utilities and infrastructure systems and structures, with an elderly population which is economically weak., of small land resources and unfavorable terrain configuration f or an intensive development of agriculture. It is impoverished in demographic terms and the remaining

  5. Science Traverses in the Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    The presentation is divided into three parts. Part I is an overview of early expeditions to the High Arctic, and their political consequences at the time. The focus then shifts to the Geological Survey of Canada s mapping program in the North (Operation Franklin), and to the Polar Continental Shelf Project (PCSP), a unique organization that resides within the Government of Canada s Department of Natural Resources, and supports mapping projects and science investigations. PCSP is highlighted throughout the presentation so a description of mandate, budgets, and support infrastructure is warranted. In Part II, the presenter describes the planning required in advance of scientific deployments carried out in the Canadian High Arctic from the perspective of government and university investigators. Field operations and challenges encountered while leading arctic field teams in fly camps are also described in this part of the presentation, with particular emphasis on the 2008 field season. Part III is a summary of preliminary results obtained from a Polar Survey questionnaire sent out to members of the Arctic research community in anticipation of the workshop. The last part of the talk is an update on the analog program at the Canadian Space Agency, specifically, the Canadian Analog Research Network (CARN) and current activities related to Analog missions, 2009-2010.

  6. Canadian oil and gas survey 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberge, R.B. [ed.

    1998-11-01

    The year 1997 brought record levels of financing for the Canadian oil and gas industry which led to record levels of capital spending and unprecedented merger and acquisition activity. Production records were achieved, but soft commodity prices in the fourth quarter resulted in a significant downturn in the equity markets. El Nino reduced demand for natural gas and heating oil, resulting in increased storage levels for both commodities. Record drilling and capital spending fueled the Canadian oilfield service industry as total market capitalization rose to $10 billion. As for the 1998 outlook, the industry has turned to natural gas as the favoured commodity, as indicated by the conclusion of the Alliance pipeline hearings and the Nova/TCPL merger. This survey presents a review of crude oil and natural gas production, prices, and capital spending for development and exploratory wells, and the financial and operating results for fiscal year 1997 of selected oil and gas companies and income trusts. All listed companies are Canadian public companies, or publicly traded income trusts, traded on one of the country`s four major stock exchanges. They are ranked according to gross oil and gas production revenue only (before royalties). Syncrude and oil sands production is also included. The remaining data in the financial statistics tables includes all business segments of each company included. The survey excluded companies that were wholly-owned subsidiaries, divisions or U.S. subsidiaries and private companies. tabs., figs.

  7. Self-reliance in health among village women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M L; Chen, P C

    1991-01-01

    A project in a remote region in Sarawak, Malaysia, in which village women were mobilized to plan and implement a kindergarten and child feeding program, illustrates the potential of carefully conceptualized community participation. Permission was obtained from village elders to train 18 mothers (all of whom has at least 4 years of education) to conduct a community needs survey. III health among children emerged as the problem of greatest concern to villagers and a health committee was formed to plan an intervention. Although a team of outside professionals was available for technical support, the emphasis from he onset was on developing self-reliance and community involvement in all decisions. To build confidence and develop leadership, a month-long participatory training course in promotive health care was organized by village health volunteers. Preparation for the project included conversion of an unused hut into a kindergarten and construction of furniture by village men, registration of preschool children, preparation of educational materials, and organization of a kitchen and duty roster for the feeding program. Project funding came from local bake sales and kindergarten subscriptions. Monitoring during the initial phase identified several problems, such as food shortages brought about by drought, some parents' inability to pay for kindergarten services, and a lack of trust in the teacher's abilities. These problems were corrected by the field team, but subsequent supervisory visits focused on teaching problem-solving skills to the local women. An evaluation conducted 1 year after program implementation revealed dramatic increases in the proportion of households producing fruits and vegetables, a higher percentage of breastfeeding mothers, and improvements in weight-for-age among kindergartners.

  8. The NGO-ization of Community Colleges: One (More) Manifestation of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint-Rapoport, Mia

    2006-01-01

    In this essay the author discusses the effects of globalization on Canadian community colleges. She applies contemporary social theories culled from the fields of feminism, geography and political science to understand one hidden manifestation of globalization in community colleges: involvement in global civil society via participation in…

  9. Negotiating development narratives within large-scale oil palm projects on village lands in Sarawak, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck; Bruun, Thilde Bech; Egay, Kelvin

    2016-01-01

    The Malaysian state of Sarawak on the island of Borneo is one of the global hotspots of deforestation and forest degradation. The planting of oil palm has played a key role in the transformation of land use in the state. While much of the expansion in Sarawak so far has taken place in state forests...... resource development projects intersect with and accentuate internal community differences in sites of new plantations. We do so by examining the case of an Iban village where the introduction of a large-scale oil palm scheme has resulted in conflict and division within the community. By analysing...... the narratives that suggest that large-scale land development projects ‘bring development to the people’, utilising ‘idle lands’ and ‘creating employment’ to lift them out of poverty, we argue that political and economic processes related to cultivation of oil palm intersect with local community differences...

  10. PREVALENCE OF CHILDHOOD ILLNESS IN DRAUGHT PRONE VILLAGES OF SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. JAGADEESH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition contributes to 60% of the 10 million deaths globally that occur every year among children less than five years of age. The Anganwadi (AW is literally a courtyard play centre. It is a childcare centre, located within the village areas. It is the focal point for the delivery of services at the community level. The Anganwadi Centre (AWC is the District Head office. The data was collected from the AWC and processed for the prevalence of childhood illnesses up to 5 years of age in 2013. Objectives: The retrospective cross-sectional survey study; was conducted to estimate the prevalence of childhood illnesses in study site, to assess the distribution of nutritional deficiency disorders and to assess the breast feeding status as the prime objectives.

  11. Installation of the Canadian Muon Cargo Inspection System at CRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Installation of the Canadian Muon Cargo Inspection System at CRL Prepared by: Guy Jonkmans Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Chalk River ON...INSTALLATION OF THE CANADIAN MUON CARGO INSPECTION SYSTEM AT CRL 153-30100-REPT-001 Revision 0 2013/02/19 UNRESTRICTED 2013/02/19 ILLIMITÉ 153...30100-REPT-001 2013/02/19 Report, General Installation of the Canadian Muon Cargo Inspection System at CRL Research and Development 153-30100

  12. Should investors prefer Canadian hedge funds or stocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiao Yan; Zhou, Weihui

    2007-01-01

    This paper updates Brulhart and Klein (2006) by comparing the magnitude of extreme returns from Tremont, HFRI hedge fund indices with stock indices. It also compares the magnitude of extreme returns from Canadian hedge fund indices with stock indices. We found that the results from Brulhart and Klein hold for the updated US data. However, the results do not hold for the Canadian hedge fund indices. The magnitude of extreme returns from Canadian hedge fund indices is lower than the magnitude o...

  13. Past Fame, Present Frames and Future Flagship? An Exploration of How Health is Positioned in Canadian Foreign Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Runnels

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Canada has been regarded as a model global citizen with firm commitments to multilateralism. It has also played important roles in several international health treaties and conventions in recent years. There are now concerns that its interests in health as a foreign policy goal may be diminishing. This article reports on a thematic analysis of key Canadian foreign policy statements issued over the past decade, and interviews with key informants knowledgeable of, or experienced in the interstices of Canadian health and foreign policy. It finds that health is primarily and increasingly framed in relation to national security and economic interests. Little attention has been given to human rights obligations relevant to health as a foreign policy issue, and global health is not seen as a priority of the present government. Global health is nonetheless regarded as something with which Canadian foreign policy must engage, if only because of Canada’s membership in many United Nations and other multilateral fora. Development of a single global health strategy or framework is seen as important to improve intersectoral cooperation on health issues, and foreign policy coherence. There remains a cautious optimism that health could become the base from which Canada reasserts its internationalist status.

  14. Gezin tussen verleden en toekomst, 1960-1972 [Family in the changing village, 1960-1972

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, W.H.

    1972-01-01

    Contacts with inhabitants of second houses / opinion on different aspects of village / necessary facilities in village / preference of living near the town / use of car / opinion on future of village / attitude towards renovated old houses and their owners. Background variables: basic characteristic

  15. ??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????The Educating Neighborhood: How Villages Raise Their Children. Kettering Foundation Working Paper [2015:01]??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, John

    2015-01-01

    Almost everyone is familiar with the African saying, "It takes a village to raise a child." However, there are very few "villages" that actually engage in this practice. The educational assets of the village include the knowledge of neighborhood residents, the clubs, groups, and associations that are citizen-based learning…

  16. Poverty and Basic Education in Rural China: Villages, Households, and Girls' and Boys' Enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Emily

    2003-01-01

    Against a backdrop of educational decentralization and market transition, China demonstrates how local community resources condition educational inequality. Analysis of 1992 national survey data on 7,550 villages and nearly 78,000 rural children aged 12-14 revealed that household income, village income, and village provision of junior high schools…

  17. Building an image of Villages-in-the-City: a clarification of China's distinct urban spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Him

    2010-01-01

    Villages-in-the-city (chengzhongcun) as distinct urban spaces in Chinese cities have attracted a lot of scholarly attention, and the term has been variously interpreted. The term "urban village" was initially borrowed and applied to describe this urban phenomenon. While the term in a Western context refers to a planned neighbourhood that features good urban planning and design, the question posed in this essay is: are villages-in-the-city the Chinese equivalent of urban villages? Furthermore, within China, villages-in-the-city are always regarded as migrant enclaves, no different from Zhejiang village or Xinjiang village in Beijing. Are they the same kind of settlement? A primary aim of this essay is to reassert the differences between villages-in-the-city and urban villages that have developed in the United Kingdom. A secondary objective is to explore the variations between villages-in-the-city and Zhejiang village. Through investigating the variations between these urban morphologies, this study attempts to fill gaps in the current literature and hence clarify the misconceptions and confusion about Chinese villages-in-the-city.

  18. Interview with Village Leaders(III):Political,Legal and Public Services in Rural Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHALHO

    2006-01-01

    Village Head Nyima Cering Ready to Leave His Office Omda is a village within the jurisdiction of Chewei Township of Qamdo County, lying some 80 km from Qamdo Town, the county headquarters. About 40 km to the north of Omda Village is Garma Monastery of the Garma Gagyu Sect, famous for its Buddhist images and

  19. Stamps of New China: Ancient Villages in Southern Anhui-Special Stamps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    On June 25, 2004 the State Postal Bureau issued a set of four special stamps entitled “Ancient Villages in Southern Anhui - Xidi and Hongcun Villages.” The stamps depict two ancient villages in Yixian County, southern Anhui Province, which UNESCO added to the World Heritage List on November 30, 2000.

  20. Citizenization of Native Villagers after Redeveloped Urban Village:A Case Study of Liede Community in Guangzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuqi; LIU Ye; LI Zhigang; SHI Ke

    2012-01-01

    Based on qualitative data from in-depth interviews,participative observation,and literature study,this paper aims to get insights into the patterns and process of the citizenization of native villagers living in Liede Community,which is the first redeveloped urban village in Guangzhou.Investigation on villagers’ citizenization level is carried out to examine how the redevelopment project affects villagers’ citizenization.Our finding reveals that the redevelopment project has improved villagers’ living conditions and income levels remarkably,has facilitated the mixed housing patterns of diversified social groups,and has increased their chances to be integrated into urban social life.Nevertheless,as villagers kept their traditional mode of thinking,behavioral habits,and lifestyles,the citizenization process made little progress in terms of land ownership,management mode,mode of livelihood,and citizen identity.Therefore,the Liede redevelopment project has turned out to be a "passive citizenization" process,i.e.,villagers merely received socio-economic benefits from the redevelopment passively but remained isolated from the socio-economic and cultural system of the city.Finally,this paper proposes some policy suggestions to promote the citizenization from both conceptual and practical perspectives.

  1. Cross-language acoustic similarity predicts perceptual assimilation of Canadian English and Canadian French vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Paola; Vasiliev, Polina

    2011-11-01

    Monolingual Peruvian Spanish listeners identified natural tokens of the Canadian French (CF) and Canadian English (CE) /ɛ/ and /æ/, produced in five consonantal contexts. The results demonstrate that while the CF vowels were mapped to two different native vowels, /e/ and /a/, in all consonantal contexts, the CE contrast was mapped to the single native vowel /a/ in four out of five contexts. Linear discriminant analysis revealed that acoustic similarity between native and target language vowels was a very good predictor of context-specific perceptual mappings. Predictions are made for Spanish learners of the /ɛ/-/æ/ contrast in CF and CE.

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Driving: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Sleep Society Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najib Ayas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA experience sleep fragmentation and poor sleep quality that results in daytime sleepiness, which impairs performance during driving and leads to an increased risk for collisions. Not surprisingly, observational studies have shown that patients with OSA experience a two- to 10-fold higher risk for collision compared with healthy controls. Although treatment would clearly mitigate these risks, there is no current Canadian position on driving and OSA. This article, the first Canadian position statement addressing the issue, provides an overview of provincial regulations and proposes recommendations with regard to driving in patients with OSA.

  3. Financing renewable energy for Village Power application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santibanez-Yeneza, G.

    1997-12-01

    When one talks of rural development, no doubt, the issue of rural energy is not far behind. As a significant component of any development strategy, rural energy is seen as the engine for growth that can bring about economic upliftment in the countryside. Many approaches to rural energy development have been tried. These approaches differ from country to country. But regardless of structure and approach, the goal remain essentially the same: to provide rural communities access to reliable energy services at affordable prices. In recent years, as global concern for the environment has increased, many governments have turned to renewable energy as a more environment friendly alternative to rural electrification. Technological advances in renewable energy application has helped to encourage this use. System reliability has improved, development costs have, to some extent been brought down and varied application approaches have been tried and tested in many areas. Indeed, there is huge potential for the development of renewable energy in the rural areas of most developing countries. At the rural level, renewable energy resources are almost always abundantly available: woodwaste, agricultural residues, animal waste, small-scale hydro, wind, solar and even sometimes geothermal resources. Since smaller scale systems are usually expected in these areas, renewable energy technologies can very well serve as decentralized energy systems for rural application. And not only for rural applications, new expansion planning paradigms have likewise led to the emergence of decentralized energy systems not only as supply options but also as corrective measures for maintaining end of line voltage levels. On the other hand, where renewable energy resource can provide significant blocks of power, they can be relied upon to provide indigenous power to the grids.

  4. Enhancing Canadian Teacher Education Using a Story Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Drake

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Accord on Initial Teacher Education was created by the Canadian Deans of Education in 2006 to guide teacher educators across Canada. The Story Model (Drake et al., 1992 is aligned with the principles in the Accord and has proven useful in teacher education. Here it is explored as a framework for curriculum development and as an instructional strategy for students to analyze complex educational issues. This framework uses an inside-outside/past- future approach to analyze current issues and includes personal, cultural and global perspectives. Literacy and emerging new literacies are explored within the framework, as well as traditional assessment and assessment for and as learning. The Story Model looks toward creating a dynamic pan-Canadian “new story” in teacher education.En 2006, l’Association canadienne des doyens et doyennes des facultés d’éducation a créé l’Accord sur la formation initiale à l’enseignement afin de guider les formateurs des enseignants au Canada. Le modèle du récit (Story Model – Drake et al., 1992 correspond aux principes de l’Accord et a démontré son utilité en matière de formation des enseignants. Dans cet article, les auteurs le présentent à titre de cadre de référence pour l’élaboration de programmes d’enseignement, de même qu’à titre de stratégie d’enseignement permettant aux étudiants d’analyser des enjeux pédagogiques complexes. Ce cadre utilise une méthode intérieur-extérieur/ passé-présent pour analyser les enjeux actuels et considère les perspectives personnelles, culturelles et globales. Les auteurs étudient la littéracie et les nouvelles littéracies, tout comme l’évaluation traditionnelle et celle qui est au service de l’apprentissage. Le modèle du récit (Story Model vise à créer un « nouveau récit » pancanadien dynamique en matière d’éducation des enseignants.

  5. Counting animal species with DNA barcodes: Canadian insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Paul D N; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Zakharov, Evgeny V; Telfer, Angela C; Levesque-Beaudin, Valerie; Milton, Megan A; Pedersen, Stephanie; Jannetta, Paul; deWaard, Jeremy R

    2016-09-05

    Recent estimates suggest that the global insect fauna includes fewer than six million species, but this projection is very uncertain because taxonomic work has been limited on some highly diverse groups. Validation of current estimates minimally requires the investigation of all lineages that are diverse enough to have a substantial impact on the final species count. This study represents a first step in this direction; it employs DNA barcoding to evaluate patterns of species richness in 27 orders of Canadian insects. The analysis of over one million specimens revealed species counts congruent with earlier results for most orders. However, Diptera and Hymenoptera were unexpectedly diverse, representing two-thirds of the 46 937 barcode index numbers (=species) detected. Correspondence checks between known species and barcoded taxa showed that sampling was incomplete, a result confirmed by extrapolations from the barcode results which suggest the occurrence of at least 94 000 species of insects in Canada, a near doubling from the prior estimate of 54 000 species. One dipteran family, the Cecidomyiidae, was extraordinarily diverse with an estimated 16 000 species, a 10-fold increase from its predicted diversity. If Canada possesses about 1% of the global fauna, as it does for known taxa, the results of this study suggest the presence of 10 million insect species with about 1.8 million of these taxa in the Cecidomyiidae. If so, the global species count for this fly family may exceed the combined total for all 142 beetle families. If extended to more geographical regions and to all hyperdiverse groups, DNA barcoding can rapidly resolve the current uncertainty surrounding a species count for the animal kingdom. A newly detailed understanding of species diversity may illuminate processes important in speciation, as suggested by the discovery that the most diverse insect lineages in Canada employ an unusual mode of reproduction, haplodiploidy.This article is part of the

  6. Counting animal species with DNA barcodes: Canadian insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Zakharov, Evgeny V.; Telfer, Angela C.; Levesque-Beaudin, Valerie; Milton, Megan A.; Pedersen, Stephanie; Jannetta, Paul; deWaard, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest that the global insect fauna includes fewer than six million species, but this projection is very uncertain because taxonomic work has been limited on some highly diverse groups. Validation of current estimates minimally requires the investigation of all lineages that are diverse enough to have a substantial impact on the final species count. This study represents a first step in this direction; it employs DNA barcoding to evaluate patterns of species richness in 27 orders of Canadian insects. The analysis of over one million specimens revealed species counts congruent with earlier results for most orders. However, Diptera and Hymenoptera were unexpectedly diverse, representing two-thirds of the 46 937 barcode index numbers (=species) detected. Correspondence checks between known species and barcoded taxa showed that sampling was incomplete, a result confirmed by extrapolations from the barcode results which suggest the occurrence of at least 94 000 species of insects in Canada, a near doubling from the prior estimate of 54 000 species. One dipteran family, the Cecidomyiidae, was extraordinarily diverse with an estimated 16 000 species, a 10-fold increase from its predicted diversity. If Canada possesses about 1% of the global fauna, as it does for known taxa, the results of this study suggest the presence of 10 million insect species with about 1.8 million of these taxa in the Cecidomyiidae. If so, the global species count for this fly family may exceed the combined total for all 142 beetle families. If extended to more geographical regions and to all hyperdiverse groups, DNA barcoding can rapidly resolve the current uncertainty surrounding a species count for the animal kingdom. A newly detailed understanding of species diversity may illuminate processes important in speciation, as suggested by the discovery that the most diverse insect lineages in Canada employ an unusual mode of reproduction, haplodiploidy. This article is part of the

  7. Reduction of livelihood risk for river bank erosion affected villagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, S. Sen; Fox, D. M.; Chakrabari, S.; Bhandari, G.

    2014-12-01

    Bank erosion process of the Ganga River created a serious livelihood risk for the villagers situated on left bank of the river in Malda district of the State of West Bengal, India since last four decades. Due to the erosion of agriculture land by the river, most of the villagers having agriculture as their only means of livelihood became jobless suddenly. Presently they are living in a miserable condition. One of the main objectives of this paper is to find out an alternative means of livelihood for the victims to improve their miserable socio-economic condition. It has been found from field survey that some erosion affected villagers have started to live and practice agriculture temporarily on the riverine islands (large and stable since thirteen years) as these islands have very fertile soil. If the re-emerged land plots can again be demarcated on the newly formed islands and distributed among the landless people to practice agriculture over there, then it will be a useful alternative livelihood strategy for the victims. The demarcation of re-emerged plots can be achieved by georeferencing the cadastral maps and then overlaying the plots on the present river course. In the present study area geo-referencing process of the cadastral maps became a serious issue as the study area has been very dynamic in terms of land cover and land use. Most of the villages were lost into the river course. Thus the common permanent features, required for geo-referencing, shown in the cadastral maps (surveyed during 1954-1962) were not found in the present satellite images. The second important objective of the present study is to develop a proper methodology for geo-referencing the cadastral maps of this area. The Spatial Adjustment Transformation and Automatic Digitization tools of Arc GIS were used to prepare geo-referenced plot maps. In Projective Transformation method the geometrically corrected block maps having village boundaries were used as source file. Then the

  8. Carbon Cycling, Climate Regulation, and Disturbances in Canadian Forests: Scientific Principles for Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Landry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Canadian forests are often perceived as pristine and among the last remaining wilderness, but the majority of them are officially managed and undergo direct land use, mostly for wood harvest. This land use has modified their functions and properties, often inadvertently (e.g., age structure but sometimes purposefully (e.g., fire suppression. Based on a review of the literature pertaining to carbon cycling, climate regulation, and disturbances from logging, fire, and insect outbreaks, we propose five scientific principles relevant for Canadian managed forests. Among these, a principle we wish to highlight is the need to properly account for the management-related fossil fuel emissions, because they will affect the global carbon cycle and climate for millennia unless massive atmospheric carbon dioxide removal becomes a reality. We also use these five principles to address questions of current interest to research scientists, forest managers, and policy makers. Our review focusses on total ecosystem carbon storage and various mechanisms through which forests affect climate, in particular albedo and aerosols forcings—including how disturbances influence all these elements—but also touches on other ecosystem goods and services. Our review underscores the importance of conducting >100-year time horizon studies of carbon cycling, climate regulation, and disturbances in Canadian managed forests.

  9. Arctic sea-ice cover and sea-ice cover anomalies over eastern Canadian waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnew, T.

    1990-01-01

    Concerns about global climate warming have increased interest in climate monitoring and analysis of climate trends in Canada. Sea-ice cover is of interest for climate monitoring since it is very sensitive to changes in the climate controls over a region and is an integrator of temperature anomalies over periods of a week and longer. In addition, climate models suggest that polar regions will have the largest climate warming signal. The existence of long-term digital sea-ice databases makes analysis of sea ice as a climate change indicator possible. The northern hemisphere sea-ice concentration database for 1953 to 1988 was qualitatively evaluated for its representativeness over eastern Canadian Arctic waters. Despite inhomogeneity problems, the database identifies the average freezeup and breakup patterns in the Canadian Arctic islands, Baffin Bay/Davis Strait, and the Hudson Bay area, and can be used for sea-ice variability and anomaly studies. However, inhomogeneity problems put into question the use of the database for sea-ice trend analysis. Sea-ice anomalies for the 1982/83 El Nino winter are compared to atmospheric temperature and circulation anomalies over the Baffin Bay/Davis Strait area. Sea-ice anomaly charts for 1953-1988 are calculated and have been made available as an unpublished catalogue within the Canadian Climate Centre. 15 refs., 27 figs.

  10. Glocalized Production: The Evolution of Global Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavez, Marianna; Bilberg, Arne

    production” by key managers of these companies, and test three hypotheses: that a definition could be established from “glocalization” aspects, that it will reduce supply chain complexity, and that it can affect organizational trust levels. The results are presented along with suggestions to pave the way......In light of the challenges of the current globalized production model, four global Danish companies were interviewed with the purpose of exploring “glocalized production” as the new step and solution to the challenges of the “global village.” The research sought to gauge the interest on “glocalized...

  11. The Canadian Teaching Commons: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Canadian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuetherick, Brad; Yu, Stan

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reports on a national study exploring the current state of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and assessing the perceptions of Canadian SoTL scholars at the micro (individual), meso (departmental), macro (institutional), and mega (disciplinary) contexts.

  12. Influence of Migrant Workers Returning to Hometown on the Changes of Village Social Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Wei; ZHANG Hong

    2012-01-01

    Based on field survey data of Village Z in Henan Province and from the perspective of the end of villages,we studied the influence of migrant workers returning to hometown on the changes of village social structure from village social interaction and village right reconstruction.Survey results show that social interaction centers of migrant workers returning to hometown for starting an undertaking move outside,which has exceeded the range of rural society of acquaintances and promoted the breaking of the traditional social relationship network " Differential Model of Association".In addition,migrant workers returning to hometown actively participate in building village rights and show more passionate political enthusiasm and practice of modern democratic concept.Furthermore,it not only speeds up disintegration of China’s small peasant economy and division of traditional farmers,but also is an important opportunity for realizing farmers’ self-ending and village ending,as well as urban and rural integration.

  13. The concept of cluster- villages as planning tool in the rural districts of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lea Louise Holst; Møller, Jørgen

    villages in order to secure their future. This paper will address the concept of cluster-villages as a possible approach to strengthen the conditions of contemporary Danish villages. Cluster-villages is a concept that gather a number of villages in a network-structure where the villages both work together...... of municipalities in 2007 has resulted in geographical larger municipalities in which the distance between the lived lives in the rural villages seem increasingly alienated from the municipal government and civil service. These challenges require new methods and approaches that address the reality of the rural...... on economies of scale, or the decentralised model based on proximity. In the developments and debate relating to these matters, strategic and visionary planning is back in the municipal arena as the only tool capable of handling the many different challenges facing the municipalities. Mellem disse...

  14. Exome sequencing revealed PMM2 gene mutations in a French-Canadian family with congenital atrophy of the cerebellum

    OpenAIRE

    Noreau, Anne; Beauchemin, Philippe; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; ,; Dion, Patrick A.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Dupré, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Two affected and one unaffected siblings from a French-Canadian family were evaluated in our neurogenetic clinic. The oldest brother had intentional and postural hand tremor while his youngest sister presented mild ataxia, a similar hand tremor and global developmental delay. Brain MRIs of the two affected family members further revealed a significant cerebellar atrophy. For this study we conducted a whole exome sequencing (WES) investigation using genomic DNA prepared from the affected broth...

  15. Canadian Unilateralism in the Arctic: Using Scenario Planning to Help Canada Achieve Its Strategic Goals in the North

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Studies (SAMS). I owe a debt of gratitude to the many instructors and mentors at SAMS who took great care in my education , specifically: Dr. Stanley...Ibid., 50. 16 Ibid., 48. 5 minded allies.17 In true neoliberal Canadian spirit, this leaves...and David A. Welch, Understanding Global Conflict and Cooperation, 8th ed. (Boston: Longman, 2011), 59-60. Neoliberal institutionalism is a political

  16. Factors of Travel to the Village of Masooleh in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysam Musai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Masoole, a rural protected national heritage of Iran is characterized by the unique architecture of its inhabitants. This paper tries to survey the reasons of traveling to Masooleh as an important center of rural tourism in Iran .Two factors were studied during this objective: 1 rural properties 2 socio-economic factors. Statistical societies were selected from tourist whom two times or more travel to Masooleh. This survey done during two weeks, May, 2010. Results acquired from surveying method and completed 100 questioners with interview.56% of respondent were male and the others were female. Results show that in the properties of village attractive, behavior of people village and their informhad the most effective factors in demand of traveling to Masooleh .From the socio-economicfactors age, gender, education, season of travel and duration of traveling had an impact on demand.

  17. "The Moon Village and Journey to Mars enable each other"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldavs, Vidvuds

    2016-07-01

    NASA has proposed the Journey to Mars, a multi-decade collaborative international effort to establish permanent manned operations on the Martian surface as well as in orbit, most likely on the Martian moons. NASA's proposed the Journey to Mars has come under politically motivated attack as illusory, as beyond NASA's capabilities and anticipated NASA budgets in the foreseeable future. [1]. Other concerns come from various communities of researchers concerned about securing sustaining funding for their largely robotic research missions. ESA's Director General Dietrich Woerner's proposed Moon Village faces challenges ESA member states concerned about sustaining funding for projects already underway or in planning. Both the Journey to Mars and Moon Village raise the question - who will or who can pay for it? The 2013 US Research Council study suggested potential benefits to a mission to Mars from activities on the Moon [2]. The NASA funded Flexible Lunar Architecture study came to similar conclusions using a different methodology [3]. A logistics analysis by an MIT team suggested the possibility of cost savings through use of lunar water for propellant to reach Mars [4]. The highly promising private-public financing approach has been examined for potential application to funding the costs of reaching Mars [5]. Insofar as the feasibility of utilization of lunar water has not been determined these conclusions are speculative. This study will examine the following alternative scenarios for establishing sustainable, manned operations on Mars and permanent manned operations on the Moon: A. NASA-led Journey to Mars without an ESA-led Moon Village B. ESA-led Moon Village without NASA-led Journey to Mars C. NASA-led Journey to Mars with an ESA-led Moon Village D. Shared Infrastructure scenario - NASA-led Journey to Mars with ESA-led Moon Village and with a potential JAXA-led space-based-solar power initiative E. Space Industrialization scenario - Shared Infrastructure scenario

  18. The impact of circular migration on a village economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetler, C B

    1989-04-01

    The author examines the economy of a rural village in Indonesia in which a high proportion of households rely on remittances from urban informal sector earnings. Household income and per capita income are analyzed according to whether or not households have at least one temporary migrant, and by the sex and age of the household head. Findings indicate that "remittances from short-term circular migration push many households into the middle and upper income ranges. However, the wealthiest households continue to rely on traditional high earning activities and do not depend on remittances. The poorest households are scattered among those who rely on remittances and those still totally dependent upon traditional low earning village activities, regardless of the sex and age of the household head."

  19. Views from the Village: Photonovella with Women in Rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuula Heinonen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors provide an overview of the situation of women in rural China as a backdrop for the photonovella process and inquiry activities conducted by the first author in three rural sites in China. They describe the key themes identified through analysis of the narrative accounts and photographs presented by groups of rural women. The photonovella enabled rural women to select from their pictures several photos of significance to them to show and describe these to women from other villages and to the researcher. Concerns, interests, hardships, and achievements of the women related to their work, families, and communities were voiced as they showed their photos. This method, used in conjunction with other qualitative methods—including focus group interviews, village visits, and survey data—provided information that complemented and enriched our understanding of rural women's lives in China.

  20. Ability Fostering of Constructing New Socialist Village in Western Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The thesis expounds that constructing new socialist village in western regions needs to foster internal developmental ability,external support ability,environmental gestation ability and incentive ability.In terms of internal developmental ability,we should foster new type of farmers and realize the transformation of rural industry and management model;in terms of external support ability,we should strengthen infrastructure construction and reinforce the role of industrialization and urbanization in supporting and promoting village;in terms of environmental gestation ability,we should deepen the transformation of rural economic system,social security system,register census and employment system;in terms of incentive ability,we should take the sustainable development as objective to foster new advantage,use the income of resources industry to support agriculture and connect industry,and foster advantageous agricultural products.

  1. Sharply increased mass loss from glaciers and ice caps in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Alex S; Moholdt, Geir; Wouters, Bert; Wolken, Gabriel J; Burgess, David O; Sharp, Martin J; Cogley, J Graham; Braun, Carsten; Labine, Claude

    2011-05-19

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps are contributing significantly to present rates of sea level rise and will continue to do so over the next century and beyond. The Canadian Arctic Archipelago, located off the northwestern shore of Greenland, contains one-third of the global volume of land ice outside the ice sheets, but its contribution to sea-level change remains largely unknown. Here we show that the Canadian Arctic Archipelago has recently lost 61 ± 7 gigatonnes per year (Gt yr(-1)) of ice, contributing 0.17 ± 0.02 mm yr(-1) to sea-level rise. Our estimates are of regional mass changes for the ice caps and glaciers of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago referring to the years 2004 to 2009 and are based on three independent approaches: surface mass-budget modelling plus an estimate of ice discharge (SMB+D), repeat satellite laser altimetry (ICESat) and repeat satellite gravimetry (GRACE). All three approaches show consistent and large mass-loss estimates. Between the periods 2004-2006 and 2007-2009, the rate of mass loss sharply increased from 31 ± 8 Gt yr(-1) to 92 ± 12 Gt yr(-1) in direct response to warmer summer temperatures, to which rates of ice loss are highly sensitive (64 ± 14 Gt yr(-1) per 1 K increase). The duration of the study is too short to establish a long-term trend, but for 2007-2009, the increase in the rate of mass loss makes the Canadian Arctic Archipelago the single largest contributor to eustatic sea-level rise outside Greenland and Antarctica.

  2. An update to the analysis of the Canadian Spatial Reference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, R.; Piraszewski, M.; Craymer, M.

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective of the Canadian Spatial Reference System (CSRS) is to provide users access to a consistent geo-referencing infrastructure over the Canadian landmass. Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning accuracy requirements ranges from meter level to mm level (e.g.: crustal deformation). The highest level of the Canadian infrastructure consist of a network of continually operating GPS and GNSS receivers, referred to as active control stations. The network includes all Canadian public active control stations, some bordering US CORS and Alaska stations, Greenland active control stations, as well as a selection of IGS reference frame stations. The Bernese analysis software is used for the daily processing and the combination into weekly solutions which form the basis for this analysis. IGS weekly final orbit, Earth Rotation parameters (ERP's) and coordinates products are used in the processing. For the more demanding users, the time dependant changes of station coordinates is often more important.All station coordinate estimates and related covariance information is used in this analysis. For each input solution, variance factor, translation, rotation and scale (and if needed their rates) or subsets of these are estimated. In the combination of these weekly solutions, station positions and velocities are estimated. Since the time series from the stations in these networks often experience changes in behavior, new (or reuse of) parameters are generally used in these situations. As is often the case with real data, unrealistic coordinates may occur. Automatic detection and removal of outliers is used in these cases. For the transformation, position and velocity parameters loose apriori estimates and uncertainties are provided. Alignment using the usual Helmert transformation to the latest IGb08 realization of ITRF is also performed during the adjustment.

  3. The Canadian Niagara Power Company story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, N.R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2005-07-01

    This book chronicles the history and contributions of the Canadian Niagara Power Company and its employees toward the establishment of electricity generation and distribution in Niagara Falls and Fort Erie, Ontario, dating back to its founding in 1892. Through historical photographs, maps and drawings, the book demonstrates the impact of electricity on the Niagara region. It emphasizes the many skills and jobs required to run the company that generated electricity and maintained a complete system to deliver power, metering, and billing services through the depression, wars, and postwar booms, even during lightning, snow and ice storms. The company began producing power in 1905 with what had been the world's largest-capacity turbines and generators that supplied power to both sides of the Niagara River. Initially, most of the electricity was exported to New York State. The company eventually expanded its Canadian customer service area from Niagara Falls, Ontario, to Fort Erie, Bridgeburg, Amigari, Ridgeway, Stevensville, Crystal Beach and Point Abino. Throughout its history, the Canadian Niagara Power Company provided power at a lower cost than its neighbouring competitors. The William Birch Rankine Generating Station became an important tourist attraction, showcasing the latest electrical appliances of the time in an effort to promote the use of electricity in homes and offices. Today, the station remains a tribute to the fact that natural beauty can coincide with industry. The book also chronicles the difficult business challenges caused by restructuring in the electric power industry in the 1990s, repairing aging equipment and applying the latest in automation and remote sensing technology. Today, the company as FortisOntario is expanding to other communities around Ontario. refs., tabs., figs.

  4. PASEDHULURAN AS A SOCIAL CAPITAL FOR LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: EVIDENCE FROM POTTERY VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Karmilah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase in both industrialization and tourism in Kasongan village famous with its pottery being the tourism Village since 1988, radically altered the local economy and domestic life. Based on oral history, survey, and documentary sources, this paper examine the impact of economics globalization to the diversity of culture in Kasongan. Globalization has two faces. If it can be managed properly, globalization can certainly give sufficient benefit to the country. The result of study indicated that pasedhuluran kinship systems in pottery production chain as one of social capital in socio-economic development in Kasongan, play an important role. This can be seen in terms of hiring local labor, then the pottery associated with the ordering system, and the use of the showroom to promote their pottery. Based on this note that the negative impact of globalization, especially the pottery in Kasongan indsutry can be minimized by pasedhuluran system. Peningkatan industrialisasi dan pariwisata di Desa Kasongan yang terkenal dengan kerajinan gerabah yang telah berkembang sejak tahun 1972 dan menjadi desa wisata pada tahun 1988, secara radikal telah mengubah ekonomi lokal dan kehidupan masyarakat di desa tersebut. Berdasarkan wawancara terkait sejarah, survei, dan sumber-sumber dokumenter lainnya, maka tulisan ini akan mengkaji dampak globalisasi ekonomi terhadap keragaman budaya masyarakat setempat. Globalisasi memiliki dua sisi. Jika globalisasi dapat dikelola dengan baik, maka globalisasi dapat memberikan manfaat yang cukup baik bagi negara. Namun, jika suatu negara tidak dapat beradaptasi dan menentukan strategi yang perlu diterapkan dalam rangka menghadapi globalisasi, negara akan menjadi korban dari globalisasi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pasedhuluran adalah sistem kekerabatan di rantai produksi kegiatan produksi gerabah. Pasedhuluran sebagai salah satu modal sosial dalam pembangunan sosial-ekonomi di Kasongan, memainkan peranan yang

  5. Design considerations for infiltration trenches applied to small villages.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Madalena; Marreiros, Rui

    2004-01-01

    Population growth, changes in people's habits and urbanization are some of the causes of the overloading of sewerage drainage systems, both combined or separate. At the same time, the transportation of water by drainage systems causes important changes in natural hydrological cycle. drainage systems of small villages, usually combined systems, do not have the capacity to receive the volume of water coming from new urban areas. Source control is a very interesting solution for a sustainable ur...

  6. TINY HOUSE VILLAGE PROJECT : Creating a community development project

    OpenAIRE

    Toivainen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toivainen, Jukka. Tiny house village project. Creating a community development project. 40 p., 1 appendix. Language: English. Helsinki, Autumn 2015. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences. Degree Programme in Social Services, Option in Diaconal Social Work. Degree: Bachelor of Social Services (UAS) + Qualification for the office of diaconia worker in the Church of Finland. This thesis is telling about creating a project idea and a project proposal of producing wooden wall...

  7. TURKISH MONUMENTS IN ERDEMLİ-GÜZELOLUK VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokman TAY

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, Turkish monuments in Güzeloluk Village of Erdemli County are studied. As a result of the field work one mosque, one school, one fountain, one primary school and school house are found. Mosque, school and fountain belong to Ottoman era, while primary school and school ouse belong to Republic era. Buildings maintain their original forms mostly and reflect their respective times in terms of architecture and decoration.

  8. Second-generation youth's belief in the myth of Canadian multiculturalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mehrunnisa Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Second-generation youth in Toronto, growing up in low-income neighbourhoods, interact primarily with other racialized and ethnicized people. Within this environment they do not experience racial prejudice or discrimination, appreciate the cultural diversity around them, and attribute it to Canada's ideology of multiculturalism. However, they are beginning to realize their own subjectivity in relation to the power of White people and institutions. These confident, ambitious, and globally connected young people are likely to get deeply disappointed as they uncover the myths of Canada's multiculturalism in the world beyond their ethnically concentrated schools and neighbourhoods. Acknowledging and addressing their marginality is critical to their inclusion in Canadian society.

  9. Chinese Oil Giants Eye Canadian Oil Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Bin

    2005-01-01

    @@ SinoCanada, a subsidiary of Sinopec International Petroleum Exploration and Development Corporation, and Canada-based Synenco Energy Inc announced on May 31 that they have inked a series of agreements to launch a joint venture for common development of the oil sand project located in Athabasca region of Northeast Canada's Alberta Province. Based on the agreements, Sinopec will pay 105 million Canadian dollars (US$84 million) for a stake in Canada's Northern Lights oil sands project while Synenco owns the remaining 60 percent share,and will operate the project as the managing partner.

  10. 2007: A Canadian Corporate Ownership Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsan, Calin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study documents a decline in the levels of corporate ownership concentration between 1996 and 2007. When compared to previous studies, the incidence of ownership stakes of 20% or larger has decreased form 60% to 41% of the total population of publicly listed Canadian firms. Regional disparities among provinces remain important. Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia have the most widely-held firms, while Quebec and Atlantic Canada show the most concentrated corporate ownership patterns. The interpretation of these results requires a complex understanding of historical, demographic, cultural, political and institutional factors.

  11. Reinventing an industry at Western Canadian Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.

    2006-09-15

    Western Canadian Coal is applying lessons learned from past disruptions to coal production operations in British Columbia in order to build a low cost, long term production operation. Northeast British Columbia has huge coal deposits and an established infrastructure that includes the town of Tumbler Ridge, rail facilities, and access to Port Rupert. The company is developing 50,000 hectares of coal-bearing property. Production commenced in 2004, and it is planned to produce four million tonnes of coal per year by the end of 2007, increasing to 10 million tonnes by 2012. Equipment, staffing, and activities at the Dillon, Wolverine, and Brule mines are described. 2 photos.

  12. Refugees and education in Canadian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprielian-Churchill, Isabel

    1996-07-01

    This article summarizes some of the findings and recommendations of a research project focusing on the nature and needs of refugee students in Canadian schools. The school performance of refugee students is examined under the following headings: immigration regulations; initial identification, assessment, placement and monitoring; unaccompanied youngsters; "at risk" students; academic needs; the conflict of cultures. In particular, the article discusses the changing role of the school in the light of recent immigration trends. Many of the findings are applicable to other national settings.

  13. West Village Student Housing Phase I: Apartment Monitoring and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A.; Bell, C.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-06-01

    Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) worked with the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) and the developer partner West Village Community Partnership (WVCP) to evaluate performance on 192 student apartments completed in September, 2011 as part of Phase I of the multi-purpose West Village project. West Village, the largest planned zero net energy community in the United States. The campus neighborhood is designed to enable faculty, staff and students to affordably live near campus, take advantage of environmentally friendly transportation options, and participate fully in campus life. The aggressive energy efficiency measures that are incorporated in the design contribute to source energy reductions of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. The energy efficiency measures that are incorporated into these apartments include increased wall & attic insulation, high performance windows, high efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling, central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs), 100% high efficacy lighting, and ENERGY STAR major appliances. Results discuss how measured energy use compares to modeling estimates over a 10 month monitoring period and includes a cost effective evaluation.

  14. West Village Student Housing Phase I: Apartment Monitoring and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Bell, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) worked with the University of California, Davis and the developer partner West Village Community Partnership (WVCP) to evaluate performance on 192 student apartments completed in September, 2011 as part of Phase I of the multi-purpose West Village project. West Village is the largest planned zero net energy community in the United States. The campus neighborhood is designed to enable faculty, staff, and students to affordably live near campus, take advantage of environmentally friendly transportation options, and participate fully in campus life. The aggressive energy efficiency measures that are incorporated in the design contribute to source energy reductions of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. These measures include increased wall and attic insulation, high performance windows, high efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling, central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs), 100% high efficacy lighting, and ENERGY STAR major appliances. The report discusses how measured energy use compares to modeling estimates over a 10-month monitoring period and includes a cost effective evaluation.

  15. PRIMARY OFFER OF MEAT IN GOIESTI VILLAGE, DOLJ COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş Mihai MEDELETE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Goieşti common is part of the 104 common that make up Dolj County, is situated in the north of the county, approx. 15 km from the city of Craiova. The commune is mentioned in documents from 1577 on 28 July in a document issued by a big ban of Craiova and includes 13 villages. Name of the village comes from the name given its first inhabitant, namely "Goieşteanu" name which today can not be found from any inhabitant of the village, however is the most common inhabitants of the neighboring Simnicu de Sus. Access to the area is by land locality is crossed from south to north by a asphalted national road DN 6B, which connects Gorj county and Craiova (Tg Cărbuneşti - Târgu Jiu. Elucidating the communal potential, of meat production is based on use of an appropriate set of indicators: effective in exploitation (by species, total production and average yield per head. The study covers the period 2010-2012, taken as a starting point for developing a strategy of reviving the sector of production.

  16. Lead poisoning in a West Bank Arab Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershko, C; Abrahamov, A; Moreb, J; Hersh, M; Shiffman, R; Shahin, A; Richter, E D; Konijn, A M; Weissenberg, E; Graver, F

    1984-10-01

    Eleven patients from the West Bank village of Es-Sawiyeh were admitted with lead poisoning to two Jerusalem hospitals between November 1982 and January 1983. They all belonged to several households of a single large family. Colicky abdominal pains were present in five patients, weakness in four, behavioral changes ranging from irritability to frank psychosis in four, and paralysis in one. Anemia of various degrees was seen in all patients. Basophilic stippling and reticulocytosis were encountered in all patients with moderate to severe anemia. Therapy with edetate disodium calcium and penicillamine resulted in clinical improvement in all patients. A preliminary survey of 270 subjects in the same village disclosed 84 subjects with abnormally elevated blood lead levels, 17 of whom had grade IV lead burden according to the Centers for Disease Control risk classification. Contamination of homemade flour by lead used for stabilizing the metal parts of stone mills was the source of poisoning. As the method of milling in many West Bank villages is similar, these findings may have important implications to the well being of a large section of the rural West Bank population.

  17. Targeting cyclone relief within the village: kinship, sharing, and capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Yoshito

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the targeting of cyclone relief within villages in Fiji. It focuses on how relief allocation is linked with informal risk sharing and elite capture, both of which are directly related to kinship. The results are as follows. First, food aid is initially targeted toward kin groups according to their aggregate shocks and then shared among group members. Right after the cyclone, when aid is scarce, households with damage to their housing and with greater crop damage are allocated less aid within the group. Instead, they receive greater net private transfers in other forms, especially in labor sharing. Consistent patterns are found in village, cropping, and housing rehabilitations. Second, there is no elite capture of food aid in the kin group, and instead, traditional kin leaders share food with others; however, non-kin-based community leaders capture aid when it is allocated across kin groups. Third, distinct from food aid demanded by all, tarpaulins demanded by victims only strongly target individual housing damage at the village level—not the kin group—independent of social status. As with food aid, victims with greater crop damage are given a lower priority. Implications for relief policies are discussed.

  18. 47 CFR 101.1527 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1527 Section 101.1527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Canadian and Mexican coordination. (a) A licensee of bands 71.0-76.0, 81.0-86.0, 92-94 GHz and 94.1-95...

  19. International Disputes and Cultural Ideas in the Canadian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Danita Catherine

    of the Canadian-Arctic relationship. Using Canada as the focus for the analysis, the purpose of this project is to contribute to the existing Arctic studies and international relations literature by examining how interests and disputes in the Canadian Arctic region have been affected by domestic cultural...

  20. The Canadian Context: Monolingual Education in an "Officially" Multilingual Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    This article will examine the sociopolitical language contexts that exist in institutions of Canadian post-secondary education, through investigating how government policies affect the consumption and teaching of language in writing classrooms. A survey of Canadian multiculturalist policy, multilingualism, and post-secondary education in terms of…

  1. Attitudes Toward Oral Contraception Among Canadian University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardis, Panos D.

    The author conducted a cross-cultural survey of attitudes toward the pill among university students, part of this international sample being a group of young Canadians. The subjects were students from a southwestern Canadian university and were stratified as to sex and amount of education. The author employed his Pill Scale, a 25-item Likert type…

  2. Characters with Exceptionalities Portrayed in Contemporary Canadian Children's Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerson, Jean; Brenna, Beverley

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which exceptionality is addressed in Canadian children's literature, offering critical literacy as an avenue toward social justice. A content analysis (Berg, 2009) of 134 Canadian children's books offers a wide scope of contemporary titles to include in classrooms. We developed conceptual categories to explore…

  3. Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology and Child Health:A Canadian Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stuart Macleod

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction Canadian academic centres and children's hospitals have had a longstanding interest in the improvement of drug therapy for children through research conducted across the four pillars of activity identified as being of critical importance by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research(viz,basic research,clinical research,population health research,applied health and policy research)[1].

  4. Indigenous knowledge in Canadian science curricula: cases from Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-09-01

    To enhance Aboriginal students' educational opportunities in sciences, culturally relevant science curriculum has been examined and practiced in Western Canadian science classrooms. This article shares some examples of inclusion of indigenous knowledge in science curricula and discusses the improvement and challenges of culturally relevant science curricula in Canadian contexts.

  5. How Canadian Universities Use Social Media to Brand Themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Charles H.; Bali, Suchita; Longden, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores social media marketing strategies applied by Canadian universities as a tool for institutional branding, recruitment and engagement of home and international students. The target sample involves the total population of Canadian university-status institutions ("N" = 106). Qualitative data were collected from two major…

  6. School Autonomy and 21st Century Learning: The Canadian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul; da Costa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the policy and practice contexts for school autonomy and twenty-first century learning in Canadian provinces. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reports on an analysis of policies in Canadian provinces (particularly the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan). The authors review policies…

  7. Towards a Moon Village: Young Lunar Explorers Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Oscar; Foing, Bernard; Batenburg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: The Moon Village Workshop at ESTEC on the 14th December 2015 was organized by ILEWG/ESTEC in conjunction with the Moon 2020-2030 Symposium. It gathered a multi-disciplinary group of professionals from all around the world to discuss their ideas about the concept of a Moon Village, the vision of ESA's Director General (DG) Jan Woerner of a permanent lunar base within the next decades [1]. The workshop participants split in three working groups focusing on Moon Habitat Design, science and technology potentials of the Moon Village, and engaging stakeholders [2-3]. Their results and recommendations are presented in this abstract. The Moon Habitat Design group identified that the lunar base design is strongly driven by the lunar environment, which is characterized by high radiation, meteoroids, abrasive dust particles, low gravity and vacu-um. The base location is recommended to be near the poles to provide optimized illumination conditions for power generation, permanent communication to Earth, moderate temperature gradients at the surface and interesting subjects to scientific investigations. The abundance of nearby available resources, especially ice at the dark bottoms of craters, can be exploited in terms of In-Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU). The identified infrastructural requirements include a navigation, data- & commlink network, storage facilities and sustainable use of resources. This involves a high degree of recycling, closed-loop life support and use of 3D-printing technology, which are all technologies with great potential for terrestrial spin-off applications. For the site planning of the Moon Village, proven ideas from urban planning on Earth should be taken into account. A couple of principles, which could improve the quality of a long-term living milieu on the Moon, are creating spacious environments, visibility between interior and exterior spaces, areas with flora, such as gardens and greenhouses, establishing a sustainable community

  8. Position on The Village Head in Indonesia Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Suparman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exact definition of “administration” term is not clear yet, and still in discussion among the scholars. Administration is a term which is derived and translated from administratie (Duch, or administration (English. Those are actually derived from the Latin "Administrate" which means "to serve", in the Indonesian language it means “melayani” or “mengabdi.” In the implementation of the government is the activities undertaken to achieve the set up goals by State’s authorized officer in advance. This position administratively conducts government activities, therefore this position in the Law of the State Administration can be classified into administrative positions or can be referred to as the State Administration. It is of the government apparatus (at central or local levels that govern the administration. In the contrary of the terms used in the positive law was on Act No. 5 year of 1986 regarding the State Administrative Court does not use the term Administration of the State, but the term Tata Usaha of the State, although the terms contained State Administration terminology. This is as defined in Article 1, sub 1 of Act No. 5 of 1986, which said the authorized officer of State’s Tata Usaha who performs the function to conduct the affairs of government both at central and regional levels is the Government’s official of administration, as it is confirmed by Article 1, sub 2, which said Board or Administrative Officer is the agency or officials who carry out the affairs of government based on applicable laws and regulations, then how when connected to the government Administration of village, especially from the position of village head. Village head as the village authorized official has an authority in running the affairs of government, either under the authority of the village administration and affairs of the district/city. And besides that it also performs the task of assistance from the Government, the provincial and

  9. Impact of tropical forage seed development in villages in Thailand and Laos: Research to village farmer production to seed export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Hare

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Seed of 6 forage varieties, Mulato II hybrid brachiaria, Cayman hybrid brachiaria, Mombasa guinea, Tanzania guinea, Ubon stylo and Ubon paspalum, are currently being produced by more than 1000 smallholder farmers in villages in northeast Thailand and northern Laos, under contract to Ubon Forage Seeds, Faculty of Agriculture, Ubon Ratchathani University, Thailand. The seed is mainly exported overseas (95% and the remainder is sold within Thailand. Tropical Seeds LLC, a subsidiary of the Mexican seed company, Grupo Papalotla, employs the seed producing and seed research group, Ubon Forage Seeds, to manage seed production, seed sales and export, and to conduct research on new forage species. This paper discusses in detail how the development in villages of a smallholder farmer seed production program has had positive social and economic outcomes for the village seed growers and enabled farmers in other countries to receive high quality forage seeds. The strong emphasis on seed quality, high purity, high vigor and high germination, has had a large impact on tropical pastures in more than 20 tropical countries in Asia, Africa, the Pacific and Central and South America.

  10. Canadian Asthma Consensus Conference Summary of Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ernst

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The Asthma Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society invited a group of Canadian physicians with a particular interest in asthma to meet in Montebello, Quebec, March 9-12, 1995 to arrive at a consensus statement on the optimal approach to the management of asthma in the pediatric and adult ambulatory care settings. The societies and associations represented are listed in the appendix with the names of the contributors to this document. The objectives of the Montebello conference were: 1. To review the current ambulatory care management of asthma in Canada; 2. To develop guidelines with the participation of family physicians and specialists; 3. To develop guidelines which are evidence-based; 4. In creating evidence-based guidelines to focus attention on aspects of asthma management that are currently not supported by randomized controlled trials; 5. To develop strategies that allow for the implementation of rational guidelines at a local level. Recommendations were based on a critical review of the scientific literature by small groups prior to the meeting and are categorized according to the strength of the scientific evidence supporting each recommendation (Table 1.

  11. Exploring Canadian Echinoderm Diversity through DNA Barcodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding has proven an effective tool for species identification in varied groups of marine invertebrates including crustaceans, molluscs, polychaetes and echinoderms. In this study, we further validate its utility by analyzing almost half of the 300 species of Echinodermata known from Canadian waters. COI sequences from 999 specimens were assigned to 145 BINs. In most cases, species discrimination was straightforward due to the large difference (25-fold) between mean intra- (0.48%) and inter- (12.0%) specific divergence. Six species were flagged for further taxonomic investigation because specimens assigned to them fell into two or three discrete sequence clusters. The potential influence of larval dispersal capacity and glacial events on patterns of genetic diversity is discussed for 19 trans-oceanic species. Although additional research is needed to clarify biogeographic patterns and resolve taxonomic questions, this study represents an important step in the assembly of a DNA barcode library for all Canadian echinoderms, a valuable resource for future biosurveillance programs. PMID:27870868

  12. Strengthening the Canadian alcohol advertising regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Carly M; Rempel, Benjamin; Krank, Marvin

    2012-05-24

    Research evidence points to harmful effects from alcohol advertising among children and youth. In particular, exposure to alcohol advertising has been associated with adolescents drinking both earlier and heavier. Although current federal and provincial guidelines have addressed advertising practices to prevent underage drinking, practice has not been supported by existing policy. While protective measures such as social marketing campaigns have the potential for counteracting the effects from alcohol advertising, the effectiveness of such measures can be easily drowned out with increasing advertising activities from the alcohol industry, especially without effective regulation. Research reviewed by the European Focus on Alcohol Safe Environment (FASE) Project has identified a set of key elements that are necessary to make alcohol advertising policy measures effective at protecting children and youth from the harmful effects of alcohol marketing. Using these key elements as an evaluation framework, there are critical components in the Canadian alcohol advertising regulatory system that clearly require strengthening. To protect impressionable children and youth against the harmful effects of alcohol advertising, 13 recommendations to strengthen current alcohol advertising regulations in Canada are provided for Canadian policy-makers, advertising standard agencies, and public health groups.

  13. The Transfer of Land Contractual Management Rights in Ethnic Village--A Case Study of Ya’ergou Village in the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on field survey in Ya’ergou Village,Yuanzhou District,Guyuan City,the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region,we analyze the status quo of the transfer of land contractual management rights in this village,and study the basic information,form,characteristics,and problems concerning the transfer of land contractual management rights in this nationality village.Then corresponding countermeasures are put forward for promoting the transfer of land contractual management rights in ethnic village as follows:strengthening the publicity of the policy in order to improve farmers’ ideological understanding;raising the rent in order to promote the transfer of the land contractual management rights;diverting the governmental investment to the talented people within village;consolidating management and resolving disputes in the transfer timely and effectively.

  14. Resource Flows of Villages with Contrasting Lifestyles in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, Central Himalaya, India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. S. Rao; S. Nautiyal; R. K. Maikhuri; K. G. Saxena

    2005-01-01

    Resource use efficiency analyses of village ecosystem are necessary for effective and efficient planning of resource utilization. This paper deals with economic and energy input-output analyses of different components of village ecosystem in representative buffer zone villages, which are practicing transhumance and settled way of lifestyles in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) of Garhwal Himalaya. While the villages practicing transhumance used various natural resources spatially segregated,the villages practicing settled way of lifestyle have to manage resources from a limited spatial area through rotation and varied extraction intensities. Forests subsidized the production activity in both type of villages and the per capita resource extractions were found to be greater in transhumance village than settled village. Though crops provided maximum energy, in terms of economic criteria, animal husbandry played important role in both settled and transhumance villages. As villages representing both the situations showed different ways of adjustments to the conservation oriented land use changes,management authority needs to address the eco-development plans fulfilling the aspirations of all people traditionally using the resources of the Reserve to reduce the conflicts and encourage their participation in the conservation of the area.

  15. On improving cold region hydrological processes in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Arman; Sushama, Laxmi; Verseghy, Diana; Harvey, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Regional and global climate model simulated streamflows for high-latitude regions show systematic biases, particularly in the timing and magnitude of spring peak flows. Though these biases could be related to the snow water equivalent and spring temperature biases in models, a good part of these biases is due to the unaccounted effects of non-uniform infiltration capacity of the frozen ground and other related processes. In this paper, the treatment of frozen water in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS), which is used in the Canadian regional and global climate models, is modified to include fractional permeable area, supercooled liquid water and a new formulation for hydraulic conductivity. The impact of these modifications on the regional hydrology, particularly streamflow, is assessed by comparing three simulations performed with the original and two modified versions of CLASS, driven by atmospheric forcing data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis (ERA-Interim) for the 1990-2001 period over a northeast Canadian domain. The two modified versions of CLASS differ in the soil hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations, with one version being based on formulations from a previous study and the other one is newly proposed. Results suggest statistically significant decreases in infiltration and therefore soil moisture during the snowmelt season for the simulation with the new hydraulic conductivity and matric potential formulations and fractional permeable area concept compared to the original version of CLASS, which is also reflected in the increased spring surface runoff and streamflows in this simulation with modified CLASS over most of the study domain. The simulated spring peaks and their timing in this simulation are also in better agreement to those observed. This study thus demonstrates the importance of treatment of frozen water for realistic simulation of streamflows.

  16. 22 CFR 41.33 - Nonresident alien Canadian border crossing identification card (BCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... identification card (BCC). 41.33 Section 41.33 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION... Nonresident alien Canadian border crossing identification card (BCC). (a) Validity of Canadian BCC. A Canadian BCC or the BCC portion of a Canadian B-1/B-2 Visa/BCC issued to a permanent resident of...

  17. Generic Regional Development Strategies from Local Stakeholders' Scenarios - an Alpine Village Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Walz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the participatory elaboration of strategies for sustainable regional development in an Alpine tourist region in Austria to cope with global change effects evolving locally, considering climate change, economic change as well as (local societal change. Local stakeholders in an Alpine village in the Montafon region contributed in workshops to achieve the final results: participant teams conducted system analyses of the regional system to explore key elements of the region. Narrative scenarios described possible positive and negative development trends and indicated the critical issues controlling future development; 3D-images of landscape transition simulations show the consequences of certain development directions. Alternative development directions supported the local stakeholders to elaborate regional development strategies. In the end, the scientist team derived generic strategies for Alpine regions based on the locally developed strategy bundle. The article presents the intention, progress and outcome of the participatory approach and elaborates the potential to derive generic strategies from local ones and discusses the possibly occurring conflicts regarding cross-scale transfers of these local strategies. Overall, tourism was seen as a key element for future regional development, which can on the one hand derogate Alpine regions and is on the other hand threatened by climate change and diminution of landscape attractiveness. The suggested development strategies will help to cope with global change issues mitigating the negative consequences on the local society and environment.

  18. The Canadian National Dairy Study 2015-Adoption of milking practices in Canadian dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belage, E; Dufour, S; Bauman, C; Jones-Bitton, A; Kelton, D F

    2017-03-16

    Several studies have investigated which management practices have the greatest effect on udder health, but little information is available on how broadly the recommended milking practices are adopted across Canada. The National Dairy Study 2015 was designed to gather dairy cattle health and management data on dairy farms across Canada. The objectives of the present study were to describe the current proportions of adoption of milking practices on Canadian dairy farms, and identify factors associated with their use on farms. A bilingual questionnaire measuring use of various practices, including an udder health-specific section, was developed and sent to all Canadian dairy farms. The questions in the udder health section of the questionnaire were adapted from a bilingual questionnaire previously validated and containing questions regarding general milking hygiene and routine, and on-farm mastitis management. Chi-squared tests were used to investigate simple associations between adoption of practices and various explanatory variables including region, milking system, herd size, and bulk tank somatic cell count. In total, 1,373 dairy producers completed the survey. The regional distribution of the participants was representative of the Canadian dairy farm population, and milk quality was, on average, similar to nonparticipants. Overall, Canadian dairy producers followed the recommendations for milking procedures, but some were more extensively used than others. Fore-stripping, cleaning teats, wiping teats dry, using single-cow towels, and use of postmilking teat disinfectant were widely adopted. Use of gloves and glove hygiene, use of a premilking teat disinfectant, and use of automatic takeoffs were not as extensively implemented. Adoption percentages for several practices, including use of gloves, use of a premilking teat disinfectant, teat drying methods, and use of automatic takeoffs were significantly associated with milking system, herd size, and region. It

  19. Productivity of local chickens under village management conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwalusanya, N A; Katule, A M; Mutayoba, S K; Mtambo, M M A; Olsen, J E; Minga, U M

    2002-09-01

    The productivity of local chickens under village management conditions was studied in six villages situated in three climatic zones within Morogoro District in Tanzania. Two villages were picked in each climatic zone (warm and wet, warm and dry, cool and wet) for the study. The data were obtained by actual measurement, qualitative observations and interview of members of the households directly responsible for the care of chickens. In addition, data sheets were given to selected farmers to record the performance of their chickens. The mean flock size for the three zones was 16.2, with a range of 2 to 58. The overall mean clutch size, egg weight and hatchability were 11.8, 44.1 g and 83.6%, respectively. The overall mean chick survival rate to 10 weeks of age was 59.7%. The mean live weights for cocks and hens were 1948 g and 1348 g, respectively. The mean growth rates to the age of 10 weeks were 4.6 g/day and 5.4 g/day, while those from 10 to 14 weeks of age were 8.4 g/day and 10.2 g/day for female and male birds, respectively. The age at first lay ranged between 6 and 8 months, and the average hen had three laying cycles per year. Most of the chickens were left to scavenge during the day and were provided with simple housing at night (95.2% of the owners). Only small amounts of supplementary feeds were occasionally given and minimal health care was provided. It was concluded that the low productivity of chickens was partly due to the prevailing poor management practices, in particular the lack of proper health care, poor nutrition and housing.

  20. Assessing nutritional diversity of cropping systems in African villages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseline Remans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Sub-Saharan Africa, 40% of children under five years in age are chronically undernourished. As new investments and attention galvanize action on African agriculture to reduce hunger, there is an urgent need for metrics that monitor agricultural progress beyond calories produced per capita and address nutritional diversity essential for human health. In this study we demonstrate how an ecological tool, functional diversity (FD, has potential to address this need and provide new insights on nutritional diversity of cropping systems in rural Africa. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data on edible plant species diversity, food security and diet diversity were collected for 170 farms in three rural settings in Sub-Saharan Africa. Nutritional FD metrics were calculated based on farm species composition and species nutritional composition. Iron and vitamin A deficiency were determined from blood samples of 90 adult women. Nutritional FD metrics summarized the diversity of nutrients provided by the farm and showed variability between farms and villages. Regression of nutritional FD against species richness and expected FD enabled identification of key species that add nutrient diversity to the system and assessed the degree of redundancy for nutrient traits. Nutritional FD analysis demonstrated that depending on the original composition of species on farm or village, adding or removing individual species can have radically different outcomes for nutritional diversity. While correlations between nutritional FD, food and nutrition indicators were not significant at household level, associations between these variables were observed at village level. CONCLUSION: This study provides novel metrics to address nutritional diversity in farming systems and examples of how these metrics can help guide agricultural interventions towards adequate nutrient diversity. New hypotheses on the link between agro-diversity, food security and human nutrition are

  1. Knowledge synthesis and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ian D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR is Canada's premier health-research funding agency. We fund nearly 14,000 researchers and trainees in four theme areas: biomedical, clinical, health services, and population and public-health research. Our mandate is 'to excel according to international standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system'. Knowledge synthesis is a key element of the knowledge-translation objectives of CIHR, as outlined in our definition of knowledge-translation.

  2. CanWEA Pan-Canadian wind integration study paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremblay, Martin [GL Garrad Hassan Canada Inc, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Gardner, Paul [GL Garrad Hassan and Partners, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Price, Doug; Le, Don [GL Garrad Hassan America, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-07-01

    GL Garrad Hassan has been contracted by CanWEA to undertake a scoping study for a future Pan-Canadian Wide-Scale Wind Integration Study. The scoping study provides the methodology and the rationale on which the actual wind integration study and request for proposals will be based on. Major system operators and owners of each Canadian Province along with experts involved in major US wind integration studies have been consulted and contributed to the decisional process. This paper provides a summary of the factors considered in the study and outline the actual methodology that was adopted for the future Pan-Canadian wind integration study. (orig.)

  3. Knowledge synthesis and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ian D

    2012-02-09

    The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is Canada's premier health-research funding agency. We fund nearly 14,000 researchers and trainees in four theme areas: biomedical, clinical, health services, and population and public-health research. Our mandate is 'to excel according to international standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system'. Knowledge synthesis is a key element of the knowledge-translation objectives of CIHR, as outlined in our definition of knowledge-translation.

  4. Pulsus Group, the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and CDDW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available At the recent Canadian Digestive Diseases Week in Banff, Alberta, the third annual Dr ABR Thomson - Dr CN Williams Award was presented to Dr Krikor Kichian. This Award was initiated in 2002 by Pulsus Group in honour of Drs Alan Thomson and Noel Williams, the founding Co- Editors-in-Chief of The Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology, who served from 1987 to 2000. Robert Kalina, publisher of The Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology, invited Dr Williams to present the award to Dr Kichian.

  5. The Canadian Armed Forces “YouTube War”: A Cross-Border Military-Social Media Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Mirrlees

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to conceptualize, contextualize, and critically analyze the Canadian Armed Forces’ (CAF use of YouTube to promote itself, recruit soldiers, and frame its role in the post-9/11 U.S.-led NATO war in Afghanistan. The first section of this paper engages with scholarship on war and the media, the military-industrial-communications complex (MICC, and YouTube War to conceptualize YouTube as a tool and contested battle-space of 21st century new media wars. The second section contextualizes the rise of the CAF’s YouTube channels—Canadian Forces and Canadian Army—with regard to post-9/11 Canadian foreign policy, the growth of the Canadian military publicity state, the creeping militarization of culture, and the CAF’s “social media policy”. The third section conceptualizes the CAF’s two YouTube channels as tools and spaces of its publicity front; then, through a synoptic critical overview of numerous CAF-generated YouTube videos, it shows how the CAF uses YouTube to recruit personnel and frame its role in the war in Afghanistan. The conclusion discusses the characteristics of this cross-border military-social media complex and its contradictions, namely, the spread of pacifist and veteran-generated videos that contest the war in Afghanistan. Overall, the paper offers an initial political-economy of communication of the CAF’s foray into the global battle-space of the Internet and its use of YouTube for publicity.

  6. Results of Integrated Investigation of Collapse Sinkhole in Sarkayevo Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Kovin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The integrated investigations of karstic collapse sinkhole were conducted at the area of Sarkayevo village. The obtained hydrogeologic data show the local concentration of underground water flow at the investigated site, and high sulfate ion content in the water samples that suggests that a sinkhole is karstic in nature. Geophysical investigations allowed determining basic parameters of the site geological structure, to reveal the depth distribution of the disturbed ground in vicinity of the sinkhole, and delineate zones of different soil compaction. The recommendations for detail site study, aimed to the mitigation of further karst development hazards, are presented.

  7. Private sector village enterprise a new approach to sustainable financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, C.F.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents an enterprise plan for introducing solar power in a rural market, while providing economic development, and hence the ability of the user to pay for the power source. This plan is based on a product called GEEP - a solar sewing machine conversion kit. This kit can be retrofit onto pedal sewing machines and marketed to village tailors in India, as part of a marketing program which includes increased demand for tailored products which will allow the tailors to be able to finance the conversion kits.

  8. Stag rig Tibetan Village: Hair Changing and Marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    'Brug mo skyid

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Marriage in Stag rig Village, Shar lung Township, Khri ka County, Mtsho lho Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Mtsho sngon Province, China is described in the context of the hair dressing ritual, rules of exclusion and inclusion, the process of marriage (spouse selection, free choice marriage, arranged marriage, engagement, drinking contract liquor, bride wealth discussion, choosing a date for the wedding ritual, wedding preparations at the bride and groom's homes, the wedding ritual and banquet, marrying a groom into the bride's home, divorce, and the atmosphere surrounding the bride's arrival.

  9. Building s New Socialist Countryside, Improving Commission and Agent System of "Village-level Accounting"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hong

    2006-01-01

    Rural finance is an issue concerned with rural people, improving rural financial management is important to close the relations of cadres and masses, maintain rural stability, and promote rural economic development. This article explained the main problems of village financial, the needs of introducing commission and agent system of"village-level accounting" for building a new socialist countryside, and the measures of improving commission and agent system of "village-level accounting".

  10. Research on Internal Relevance between New Farmers and New Village Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of Marxist theories,from the perspective that the new farmers are the qualified main body,basic factors and internal motive force of constructing new village,this paper expounds the internal relevance between new farmers and new village construction.Firstly,the new farmers have insight into villages,with strong motive of constructing new village,which makes them become the qualified main body in new village construction.Secondly,the new farmers are the most basic factor of constructing new village;new farmers have close relationship with other factors,with prominent inseparability;the new farmers have strong ability to replace other factors,and the farmers can shatter capital bottleneck and policy restriction in order to promote rural development to some extent;the new farmers with strong mobility,can migrate between city and village or change vocation among different jobs,which breaks through the regional limitation of factors;there are myriad farmers in China,and we can transform traditional farmers into new farmers by fostering,which breaks through the limitation of quantity of factors,so it can guarantee the incessant factor supply for new village construction.Thirdly,the new farmers are the internal motive force for new village construction,because the literate farmers are equipped with technique skills and good at management,and they are the excellent talents among rural groups;the new farmers fathom the characteristics of rural areas,with active consciousness,intense motive and strong ability to construct new village;they pay close attention to new village construction with passion and participate in new village construction actively.

  11. Circular Economy in New Village Construction—A Case of Qinhuangdao City, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tao; Lin, Peng; Zhao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    On the strength of the theory of agricultural circular economy, the mutual relation between the development of agricultural circular economy and new village construction is analyzed. The results show that developing agricultural circular economy and constructing new village is the mutual promotion; realizing agricultural circular economy is the main aim of new agricultural construction and developing agricultural circular economy is the way of realizing new village construction. The major pro...

  12. Opportunities for renewable energy technologies in water supply in developing country villages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niewoehner, J.; Larson, R.; Azrag, E.; Hailu, T.; Horner, J.; VanArsdale, P. [Water for People, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-03-01

    This report provides the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with information on village water supply programs in developing countries. The information is intended to help NREL develop renewable energy technologies for water supply and treatment that can be implemented, operated, and maintained by villagers. The report is also useful to manufacturers and suppliers in the renewable energy community in that it describes a methodology for introducing technologies to rural villages in developing countries.

  13. Malaysia's ageing population : Viability of employment trust fund for retirement village

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Chwee Tin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to analyse the Feasibility of Retirement Village for Malaysia.s Ageing Population. The analysis process involves assessing the level of awareness and opinion in the respondents of the demand for Retirement Village in Malaysia using survey method. At the macro level perspective, an overview analysis of the social, economic, political and technical knowhow of implementing and operating a Retirement Village has been taken into consideration to verify the advantages and disadvanta...

  14. Factors Affecting Work Satisfaction of the Village Midwives At Sidenreng Rappang Regency, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Mubarak, Syahrul; Palutturi, Sukri; ZULKIFLI, ANDI; Nuru, Hasanuddin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Work satisfaction is something that could improve the capability and competence of an employee especially the village midwives. The village midwives admitted had an important position in maternal and child community health services, in order to avoid dissatisfaction; they should have high motivation, more diligent and perseverance to do their job. The study aimed to examine relationship between factors affecting work satisfaction of the village midwives in Sidenreng Rappang Rege...

  15. Quality of Water and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli from Water Sources of Hilly Tribal Villages with and without Integrated Watershed Management—A One Year Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep S. Nerkar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In many hilly tribal areas of the world, water scarcity is a major problem and diarrhoea is common. Poor quality of water also affects the environment. An integrated watershed management programme (IWMP aims to increase availability of water and to improve life conditions. Globally, there is a lack of information on water contamination, occurrence of diarrhoea and antibiotic resistance, a serious global concern, in relation to IWMP in hilly tribal areas. Therefore, a prospective observational study was conducted during 2011–2012 in six villages in a hilly tribal belt of India, three with and three without implementation of an IWMP, to explore quality of water, diarrhoeal cases in the community and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from water sources. The results showed that physico-chemical quality of water was within limits of safe consumption in all samples. The odds of coliform contamination in water samples was 2.3 times higher in non-watershed management villages (NWMV compared to integrated watershed management villages (IWMV (95% CI 0.8–6.45, p = 0.081. The number of diarrhoeal cases (18/663 vs. 42/639, p < 0.05 was lower in IWMV as compared to NWMV. Overall E. coli isolates showed high susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to a wider range of antibiotics was observed in NWMV.

  16. Quality of water and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from water sources of hilly tribal villages with and without integrated watershed management-a one year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerkar, Sandeep S; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Khedkar, Smita U; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2014-06-01

    In many hilly tribal areas of the world, water scarcity is a major problem and diarrhoea is common. Poor quality of water also affects the environment. An integrated watershed management programme (IWMP) aims to increase availability of water and to improve life conditions. Globally, there is a lack of information on water contamination, occurrence of diarrhoea and antibiotic resistance, a serious global concern, in relation to IWMP in hilly tribal areas. Therefore, a prospective observational study was conducted during 2011–2012 in six villages in a hilly tribal belt of India, three with and three without implementation of an IWMP, to explore quality of water, diarrhoeal cases in the community and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from water sources. The results showed that physico-chemical quality of water was within limits of safe consumption in all samples. The odds of coliform contamination in water samples was 2.3 times higher in non-watershed management villages (NWMV) compared to integrated watershed management villages (IWMV) (95% CI 0.8–6.45, p = 0.081). The number of diarrhoeal cases (18/663 vs. 42/639, p < 0.05) was lower in IWMV as compared to NWMV. Overall E. coli isolates showed high susceptibility to antibiotics. Resistance to a wider range of antibiotics was observed in NWMV.

  17. A Canadian paradox: Tommy Douglas and eugenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Tommy Douglas is an icon of Canadian 20th Century political history and is considered by many as the "Father" of Medicare, a key component of our national identity. Throughout his career, he was associated at both the provincial and federal levels with progressive causes concerning disadvantaged populations. In his sociology Master's thesis written in the early 1930's, Douglas endorsed eugenic oriented solutions such as segregation and sterilization to address what was perceived to be an endemic and biologically determined problem. At first glance, this endorsement of eugenics appears to be paradoxical, but careful analysis revealed that this paradox has multiple roots in religion, political belief, historical exposure and our own desire to view our collective history in a favourable light.

  18. Feminist Approaches to Journalism Studies: Canadian Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrude J. Robinson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the orthodoxies of communication scholarship is that much of the gender-based differences between males and females with regard to experiences in newsrooms can be attributed to demographics. The discussion presented in this paper challenges this claim by comparing the findings of two national surveys that measured the professional progress of Canadian press and television journalists. The first survey was undertaken in 1975, and the second in 1995. While the historical evidence points to reductions in gender-based structural inequalities over time, it also identifies the continued presence of gender-based assumptions about how work and family obligations should be combined. Such assumptions, it is argued, help to foster and reproduce systemic biases in the newsroom culture that still resonate today in the journalism profession and which can be best understood as a manifestation of the meaning of gender at three levels: as a classifying system, as a structuring structure, and as an ideology.

  19. Economic security in an aging Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert L

    2011-09-01

    Recent research indicates that today's retirees are doing very well in terms of their replacement ratios and that Canadian poverty rates among the elderly are low relative to other Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. Government-sponsored plans have been strengthened either through explicit expansion - for example, the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) - or through the reform of the Canada/Quebec Pension Plans (C/QPP). Also important is the maturation of employer-sponsored pension plans, although coverage rates are down. Future generations of retirees may not achieve the standard of living that exists today, however, which is a concern. The author argues that today's economic security programs are affordable and that their costs could be stabilized if the retirement age were raised.

  20. Review of Canadian literature to estimate risks associated with Salmonella in broilers from retail to consumption in Canadian homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Hanan; Sargeant, Jan M

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to review the literature related to the risk of salmonellosis from chicken consumed in private homes in Canada. The pathway of concern was retail-to-consumption at private homes due to the direct link between this pathway and public health. A qualitative review was conducted by searching Canadian governmental agencies' webpages, published peer-reviewed journals, and by contacting experts in the field. Overall, with the data available, estimating risk from Salmonella in chicken breasts using only Canadian information was limited. Enumeration data for Salmonella in retail raw chicken at different regions across Canada are needed to be able to generalize the risk of salmonellosis in the Canadian population. Few Canadian surveys were found to describe consumers' food safety behaviors at Canadians' private homes. Observational designs to study food safety practices and Canadian consumers' behavior in private kitchens are needed to ensure that consumer behavior is consistent with consumer perceptions of their behavior. The results of such studies will give valuable input for designing educational programs needed to increase awareness of safe food handling practices by Canadian consumers when preparing food at their homes.

  1. Survive Bravely——Main Features of Contemporary Canadian Literature Themes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Fang

    2015-01-01

    The classic works in Canadian Literatures that advantageously elaborated the characteristics of sublimation under the background for Canada’s particular history,geograph y,climate,religion,demographic factors,generation,development and continuous construction of Canadian literatures.The greatest masterpieces can highlight powerfully the certain mindset of Canadian and the permanent theme for Canadian Literature:keep working hard for survival and love bravely.Meanwhile,modern people will learn a lot from reading Canadian classic literary works.

  2. Survive Bravely——Main Features of Contemporary Canadian Literature Themes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳

    2015-01-01

    The classic works in Canadian Literatures that advantageously elaborated the characteristics of sublimation under the background for Canada's particular history,geograph y,climate,religion,demographic factors,generation,development and continuous construction of Canadian literatures.The greatest masterpieces can highlight powerfully the certain mindset of Canadian and the permanent theme for Canadian Literature:keep working hard for survival and love bravely.Meanwhile,modern people will learn a lot from reading Canadian classic literary works.

  3. The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rachel E.; Boulos, David; Garber, Bryan G.; Jetly, Rakesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS) collected detailed information on mental health problems, their impacts, occupational and nonoccupational determinants of mental health, and the use of mental health services from a random sample of 8200 serving personnel. The objective of this article is to provide a firm scientific foundation for understanding and interpreting the CFMHS findings. Methods: This narrative review first provides a snapshot of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), focusing on 2 key determinants of mental health: the deployment of more than 40,000 personnel in support of the mission in Afghanistan and the extensive renewal of the CAF mental health system. The findings of recent population-based CAF mental health research are reviewed, with a focus on findings from the very similar mental health survey done in 2002. Finally, key aspects of the methods of the 2013 CFMHS are presented. Results: The findings of 20 peer-reviewed publications using the 2002 mental health survey data are reviewed, along with those of 25 publications from other major CAF mental health research projects executed over the past decade. Conclusions: More than a decade of population-based mental health research in the CAF has provided a detailed picture of its mental health and use of mental health services. This knowledge base and the homology of the 2013 survey with the 2002 CAF survey and general population surveys in 2002 and 2012 will provide an unusual opportunity to use the CFMHS to situate mental health in the CAF in a historical and societal perspective. PMID:27270738

  4. The isotope crisis - a Canadian viewpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    From the fall of 2007 the summer of 2010 there were repeated cries in the media of North America and Europe of an -isotope crisis-. This concerned the on-going shortage of the isotope Molybdenum 99 and more specifically of its daughter product Technetium Mo 99. The latter is used in about 80 percent of medical imagining procedures in North America, Europe, Japan and a number of other countries. Both isotopes are short-lived and can not be stock-piled. Mo 99 is produced in only a handful of reactors around the world. The fifty-year old Nru reactor in Canada and the equally old Hfr reactor in the Netherlands have each traditionally supplied about a third of the world's supply. In late 2007 the Canadian nuclear regulator ordered the owner and operator of Nru, to shut down the reactor over a matter that was not a clear licence condition. Sensing the impending shortage of Mo 99, the nuclear medicine community raised a major concern sufficient to convince the Canadian government to overrule the regulator. Then in early 2009 a major leak was observed in the Nru reactor vessel. Although it did not present a safety concern it was decided to shut down the reactor to conduct an inspection. This proved to be extremely difficult since the leaks were near the bottom of the 10 metre tall vessel and the only access was through a 20 cm diameter hole at the top of the vessel. The reactor was finally restarted in August 2010, just as the Hfr reactor was shut down for a lengthy overhaul. The paper provides a background on Canada's pioneering involvement in the production and use of radioactive isotopes for medical purposes, a brief account of the Nru repair and an overview of Mo 99 production. (Author)

  5. Poverty Occurrence Characteristics of Ancient Towns and Villages in Shanxi Province and Poverty Reduction Countermeasures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on the questionnaire of 10 sample ancient towns and villages in Shanxi Province,we analyze the poverty occurrence characteristics of ancient towns and villages in Shanxi Province: the poverty incidence in ancient towns and villages is high,with the slow pace of poverty re- duction; the regional characteristics of poverty is prominent; there are conspicuous differences in income between residents living in old houses and residents not living in old houses; poverty reduction shows vulnerability and instability. Then we put forward countermeasures for poverty reduction of ancient towns and villages in Shanxi Province as follows: first,improving the targeting mechanism of poverty in ancient towns and villages; second,speeding up the development of agricultural industrialization in ancient towns and villages; third,advancing internal " urbanization" of ancient towns and villages and new countryside construction; fourth,strengthening infrastructure building in ancient towns and villages; fifth,providing fair and efficient allocation of resources,and reducing regional differences; sixth,promoting the ability of residents in ancient towns and villages to cope with poverty reduction vulnerability.

  6. On the Development of Tourism in the rural and village region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄捷

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of the tourism market in mainland China and the quick expansion of tourism in the rural and village region (alternatively called rural area or RA or village area of China or VAC for short), more and more attention has been jetted into this field at the same time, and it also attracts the attention from the government and raises the interests of experts and scholars. In this paper, the recent definition of tourism in the rural and village region(alternatively called rural area or RA or village area of China or VAC for short) is given out, and tourism in the rural and village region(alternatively called rural area or RA or village area of China or VAC for short) development is also the main concern, the analysis of the development of tourism in the rural and village region(alternatively called rural area or RA or village area of China or VAC for short), tourism in the rural and village region (alternatively named as rural area in China or called RAC for short) development programs and measures for analysis.

  7. Theory and Countermeasures on Stakeholder Governance in Redevelopment of Urban Villages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    While urban villages are combinations of interests of different stakeholders,the redevelopment of urban villages is the benefit rearrangement among these stakeholders,whose target is to create values for all stakeholders and the society effectively.The principle of urban village redevelopment is to meet the multiple requirements of all stakeholders and balance the benefits of the dynamic environment.This paper discusses the utilization of theory of stakeholder governance amid urban village redevelopment.It proposes a "four in one" benefit coordination mechanism from the view of city planning.Some valuable policy suggestions on that are also put forward at last.

  8. "Ayni" in the Global Village: Building Relationships of Reciprocity through International Service-Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Maureen; Monard, Kathia

    2001-01-01

    Uses the indigenous Andean concept of "ayni" to extend the idea of reciprocity as an aim of service learning. Draws on student reflections from a semester-long seminar with spring break building project in Bolivia to offer eight applications of the concept. These applications offer doorways to discuss the challenges of fostering mutual, meaningful…

  9. Doing Business in the Global Village: Japanese Professionals on EL Needs in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Mitaka

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of English language (EL) education from the perspectives of Japanese and non-Japanese professionals in Singapore, based on their experiences of "doing business" in Singapore. As established career business people, the perspectives of Japanese participants offer a retrospective evaluation of their…

  10. SIAL-Build Global Village%2004:SIAL搭建国际村

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文心

    2004-01-01

      法国SIAL国际食品展于1964年创立于巴黎,2000年胜利移师中国,至今已成功举办四届,已成为中国国际食品第一大展.第四届SIAL CHINA将于2004年3月30日至4月1日在上海新国际博览中心举行.……

  11. Canadian Society of Nephrology Commentary on the 2012 KDIGO clinical practice guideline for glomerulonephritis: management of nephrotic syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Susan; Bitzan, Martin; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Mammen, Cherry; Pinsk, Maury; Cybulsky, Andrey V; Walsh, Michael; Knoll, Greg; Hladunewich, Michelle; Bargman, Joanne; Reich, Heather; Humar, Atul; Muirhead, Norman

    2014-03-01

    The KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) clinical practice guideline for management of glomerulonephritis was recently released. The Canadian Society of Nephrology convened a working group to review the recommendations and comment on their relevancy and applicability to the Canadian context. A subgroup of pediatric nephrologists reviewed the guideline statements for management of childhood nephrotic syndrome and agreed with most of the guideline statements developed by KDIGO. This commentary highlights areas in which there is lack of evidence and areas in need of translation of evidence into clinical practice. Areas of controversy or uncertainty, including the length of corticosteroid therapy for the initial presentation and relapses, definitions of steroid resistance, and choice of second-line agents, are discussed in more detail. Existing practice variation is also addressed.

  12. Pedal power : the Indian villages of Kinchlingi and Tumba and proving that small-scale biodiesel generation can create self-sufficient, sustainable communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, G.; Sankaranarayanan, R. [CTx GreEn, Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The Canadian non-profit organization CTx GreEn was involved with the installation of a pedal-driven biodiesel reactor in the Indian village of Kinchlingi four years ago. The reactor produces biodiesel to fuel a pump that supplies drinking water and running water to the village's washrooms. The reactor produces biodiesel in 5-litre batches from a combination of vegetable oil, lye and alcohol. By-products of the process include glycerine which can be used for soap, and oil cake which makes an organic fertilizer or a feed for livestock. The total production process takes 4 hours, which includes one hour of pedalling. Three hours of pedalling is sufficient to supply biodiesel for an entire month for the 75 inhabitants of Kinchlingi. CTx GreEn ensures that the machinery can be operated with ease and is manufactured and maintained locally. When fuel demand rises, an optional step-down motor-drive can replace the typical five-speed bicycle. The authors emphasized that only these higher production volumes would justify the additional effort and expense of installing, operating and maintaining a motor driven generator. Kinchlingi grows 2 hectares of an edible oilseed crop to produce the oil required to make biodiesel. The village of Tumba plans to use a non-edible tree-borne oilseed crop to fuel irrigation pumps, a power tiller and an oil expeller. With a local, renewable source of energy, it is possible to envision the transformation of both villages into self-sufficient local economies. Federal and state governments in India are promoting the large-scale cultivation of a non-indigenous oilseed species to reduce the country's dependence on foreign oil. However, the authors cautioned that such large scale schemes increase the dependence of rural communities on external inputs and puts money into the pockets of fuel refiners and retailers rather than support farmers. The feasibility of using biodiesel to generate electricity for lighting and to fuel small farm

  13. Taenia solium taeniasis and cysticercosis in a Mexican village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti-Gutierrez, E J; Schantz, P M; Lara-Aguilera, R; Gomez Dandoy, H; Flisser, A

    1988-09-01

    One hundred and twenty-four persons, nearly the entire population of a rural village in Hidalgo State, were screened for intestinal parasites and clinical or serologic (ELISA) evidence of Taenia solium cysticercosis. Heads of households were questioned about dietary and other practices that might lead to pork tapeworm transmission, and soil samples were examined for helminth eggs. Twenty-five percent of local pigs had cysticerci visible by examination of the undersurface of their tongues. Four persons passed taeniid eggs, 7 were seropositive, and 10 gave medical histories suggestive of neurodysticercosis. Most seropositive persons were not symptomatic and the reverse was also true. The clustered distribution of infected pigs, tapeworm carriers, and persons with serologic or clinical evidence of cysticercosis suggested intrahousehold transmission. Dietary and sanitary practices were generally optimal for transmission of pork tapeworm. No cattle were kept in the village and beef was rarely eaten. This preliminary report attempts to characterize T. solium transmission in communities with endemic disease in rural Mexico and illustrates some of the methodological problems faced by epidemiologists who study this disease.

  14. Design description of the Tangaye Village photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, J. E.; Ratajczak, A. F.

    1982-01-01

    The engineering design of a stand alone photovoltaic (PV) powered grain mill and water pump for the village of Tangaye, Upper Volta is described. The socioeconomic effects of reducing the time required by women in rural areas for drawing water and grinding grain were studied. The suitability of photovoltaic technology for use in rural areas by people of limited technical training was demonstrated. The PV system consists of a 1.8-kW (peak) solar cell array, 540 ampere hours of battery storage, instrumentation, automatic controls, and a data collection and storage system. The PV system is situated near an improved village well and supplies d.c. power to a grain mill and a water pump. The array is located in a fenced area and the mill, battery, instruments, controls, and data system are in a mill building. A water storage tank is located near the well. The system employs automatic controls which provide battery charge regulation and system over and under voltage protection. This report includes descriptions of the engineering design of the system and of the load that it serves; a discussion of PV array and battery sizing methodology; descriptions of the mechanical and electrical designs including the array, battery, controls, and instrumentation; and a discussion of the safety features. The system became operational on March 1, 1979.

  15. THE LESUNG MUSIC IN THE VILLAGE OF LEDOK BLORA REGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify in order to preserve traditional art lesung music in Blora Regency. This research use ethnomusicology approach. The subject of research is Blora people who still play lesung music as an expression of social and cultural activities in the community. The setting of the research took place in Ledok village. The technique of collecting data is observation and interview. The validity of data uses triangulation techniques. The data collected was analyzed with interactive type of Miles and Huberman. The result of research shows that the form of lesung music uses simple rhythms with elements of rhythm, melody, and harmony. Harmony in music is from the rhythmic beats of polyphonic arranged. This kind of music at first had any functions for the purposes of ritual, entertainment, welcoming guests, harvesting/offerings, a sign of the eclipse. Today, it serves as a means of musical entertainment at the village greeting, social interaction, and tourism. There is a shift of function due to the mindset of the people and the swift technology advances. Lesung music needs a modification in its presentation by adding songs and games. Another art element like dance can be added to make the show more interesting to be enjoyed.

  16. Design description of the Tangaye Village photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martz, J. E.; Ratajczak, A. F.

    1982-06-01

    The engineering design of a stand alone photovoltaic (PV) powered grain mill and water pump for the village of Tangaye, Upper Volta is described. The socioeconomic effects of reducing the time required by women in rural areas for drawing water and grinding grain were studied. The suitability of photovoltaic technology for use in rural areas by people of limited technical training was demonstrated. The PV system consists of a 1.8-kW (peak) solar cell array, 540 ampere hours of battery storage, instrumentation, automatic controls, and a data collection and storage system. The PV system is situated near an improved village well and supplies d.c. power to a grain mill and a water pump. The array is located in a fenced area and the mill, battery, instruments, controls, and data system are in a mill building. A water storage tank is located near the well. The system employs automatic controls which provide battery charge regulation and system over and under voltage protection. This report includes descriptions of the engineering design of the system and of the load that it serves; a discussion of PV array and battery sizing methodology; descriptions of the mechanical and electrical designs including the array, battery, controls, and instrumentation; and a discussion of the safety features. The system became operational on March 1, 1979.

  17. English for Academic Purposes through Canadian Literature and History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynne; O'Brien, Trudy

    1979-01-01

    Describes a program designed to improve English skills in university students learning English as a second language through a Canadian literature and history component. Reading lists are appended. (AM)

  18. Interpreting Critical Resource Issues in US and Canadian National Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Michael E.

    1995-01-01

    A wide range of examples gathered in U.S. and Canadian national park service areas during several years of field study reinforce the value of matching issues and messages with interpretive techniques and audiences. (LZ)

  19. Canadian advanced life support capacities and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamsey, M.; Graham, T.; Stasiak, M.; Berinstain, A.; Scott, A.; Vuk, T. Rondeau; Dixon, M.

    2009-07-01

    Canada began research on space-relevant biological life support systems in the early 1990s. Since that time Canadian capabilities have grown tremendously, placing Canada among the emerging leaders in biological life support systems. The rapid growth of Canadian expertise has been the result of several factors including a large and technically sophisticated greenhouse sector which successfully operates under challenging climatic conditions, well planned technology transfer strategies between the academic and industrial sectors, and a strong emphasis on international research collaborations. Recent activities such as Canada's contribution of the Higher Plant Compartment of the European Space Agency's MELiSSA Pilot Plant and the remote operation of the Arthur Clarke Mars Greenhouse in the Canadian High Arctic continue to demonstrate Canadian capabilities with direct applicability to advanced life support systems. There is also a significant latent potential within Canadian institutions and organizations with respect to directly applicable advanced life support technologies. These directly applicable research interests include such areas as horticultural management strategies (for candidate crops), growth media, food processing, water management, atmosphere management, energy management, waste management, imaging, environment sensors, thermal control, lighting systems, robotics, command and data handling, communications systems, structures, in-situ resource utilization, space analogues and mission operations. With this background and in collaboration with the Canadian aerospace industry sector, a roadmap for future life support contributions is presented here. This roadmap targets an objective of at least 50% food closure by 2050 (providing greater closure in oxygen, water recycling and carbon dioxide uptake). The Canadian advanced life support community has chosen to focus on lunar surface infrastructure and not low Earth orbit or transit systems (i.e. microgravity

  20. Antioxidant activity of selected wild Canadian prairie fruits

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background. Canadian prairies are a habitat for unique wild plants. The main object of the present study was to investigate phytochemicals content and antioxidant activity in seven wild Canadian prairie fruits. Material and methods. The presence of total phenolics, flavonoids, anthocyanins and antioxidant activity were identified in the extracts according to standard procedure. Results. Wild rose had the highest amounts of total phenolics and total flavonoids, whereas ...

  1. The evolution of PAs in the Canadian Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Jonathan; Descoteaux, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This study documents the growing role of the physician assistant (PA) in the Canadian Armed Forces. PAs have served as the backbone of the Royal Canadian Medical Services' frontline medical operations since 1984, on land, aboard ships and submarines, and domestically in garrison. Candidates begin as medical technicians and receive advanced training to become PAs at midcareer. The current rank of PAs as warrant officers is evolving and a commissioned status is under consideration.

  2. "Complicated Bearers of Cultural Difference" : Canadian Magazines and Trade Policy

    OpenAIRE

    McKend, Heather

    2006-01-01

    Describes the history of Canadian policy on magazines, policy designed primarily to protect Canadian culture in a market heavily dominated by U.S. magazines. Canada's traditional strategy has been to consider magazines as a "cultural exception" to trade regulations. In 2005, Canada was the country first to ratify the UNESCO Convention supporting the protection of cultural diversity as a “sovereign responsibility.”

  3. Canadian Impressions Title: Impresiones canadienses Title: Impressions canadiennes

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

    2011-01-01

    Canadian Impressions pays tribute to Canada and Calgary, Alberta, home of the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Board of Governors of the Inter-American Development Bank. Twelve Canadian artists who were selected in an open call, present a total of 34 prints in various techniques from etching to monotype. Among the participating artists are: Briar Craig, Delio Delgado, René Derouin, Katie Fife, Joscelyn Gardner, Michel Gautier, Vanessa Hall-Patch, Miriam Rudolph, Tracy Lynn Templeton, Todd Treme, Os...

  4. Word Segmentation in Monolingual Infants Acquiring Canadian English and Canadian French: Native Language, Cross-Dialect, and Cross-Language Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polka, Linda; Sundara, Megha

    2012-01-01

    In five experiments, we tested segmentation of word forms from natural speech materials by 8-month-old monolingual infants who are acquiring Canadian French or Canadian English. These two languages belong to different rhythm classes; Canadian French is syllable-timed and Canada English is stress-timed. Findings of Experiments 1, 2, and 3 show that…

  5. Cities, Towns and Villages, City and Village boundaries., Published in 2007, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Trempealeau County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2007. It...

  6. Analysis on the Employment of Landless Farmers during the Reconstruction of Urban Village: A Case Study of S Village in Shaanxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua; WANG; Yanjie; XIE

    2015-01-01

    The re-employment of landless farmers in reconstruction of urban village is an important way to solve the problems concerning farmers. In S Village of Shaanxi Province,the landless farmers are facing the employment problems such as low re-employment rate and quality,lack of employment competitiveness,and weak employment willingness. This paper analyzes the main factors influencing the employment of landless farmers in this urban village such as local government’s lack of overall design on the employment of landless farmers,landless farmers’ lack of long-term employment concept,poor employment conditions,and lack of vocational education in rural areas. Finally some recommendations are set forth to enhance the employment of landless farmers in S Village: strengthening the institutional support for the employment of landless farmers; perfecting the fund guarantee for the employment of landless farmers; actively expanding the employment channels; enhancing the employability of landless farmers.

  7. Baldíos Y Cercamientos En La Aldea Global De La Ciencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Forero-Pineda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade scientific public spaces have gradually narrowed, particularly those regarding scientific information. Scientific knowledge has been slowly retained in a corporative way. This article examines the historical analogy between the tragedies of the pre-modern village wastelands and the contemporary scientific global village wastelands of knowledge. Here criticism towards global village utopias has particular validity and erudition. Intellectual property protection embraces multiple scientific discoveries. Access to scientific communication is uneven between industrialized countries and those still developing. In Latin American countries one can perceive some global scientific communities that coexist with others centered on local life, as well as a generalized problem of population's access to scientific knowledge.

  8. Research note on the social and economic life of village people in central Java: A Case Study of Two Villages in Yogyakarta Special Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Kuroyanagi.

    2013-07-01

    But, in this note, objectives and methods of the research, general condition of two hamlets, composition of the households, occupations of the households'heads and farm households by owner ship status are covered. These results of the household survey in the two research sites indicate some emerging trends that the effects of economic development is stronger in the village within easy commuting distance to Yogyakarta City and that the attributes of the village people directed to money economy are also stronger there.

  9. Fuel condition in Canadian CANDU 6 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, R.H.; Macici, N [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Gibb, R. [New Brunswick Power, Lepreau, NB (Canada); Purdy, P.L.; Manzer, A.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Kohn, E. [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    The cornerstone of the CANDU concept is its natural uranium fuel, and the success of its reactor operation hinges on the fuel condition in the reactor. Neutron economy, on power refuelling, and simple fuel design are among the unique characteristics of CANDU fuel. In Canadian CANDU 6 reactors (Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau), the 37-element fuel has provided an enviable record of safe, economic and reliable plant operation for 29 reactor years to date. The fuelling cost is among the lowest in the world - a corollary of high neutron economy, simple fuel design, and judicial fuelling scheme. The reliability of fuel is high: only 21 of the 60000 bundles discharged from Gentilly 2 were confirmed defective and the five-year period from March 1992 to February 1997 saw no defect at all at Gentilly-2. Also, thanks to the inherent on-power refuelling capability and an effective defect detection and removal system, the primary coolant loops are kept extremely clean (very low activity level) - benefiting both maintenance and safety. Moreover, the inventories of fission products in the core and in the channel are maintained within the safety analysis envelope, due to on-power fuelling and sophisticated fuel management. In this paper, CANDU 6 fuel performance is reviewed against the feedback from post-irradiation examinations, and the findings from our ongoing R and D program. The results suggest that the fuel behavior m reactor are basically as originally anticipated, despite an evolutionary 3% increase in bundle uranium mass in the 1980's. For operating conditions within the CANDU 6 37-element experience, the average strains are typically 0.09%; and fission gas release, 2.7%. The UO{sub 2} fuel remains stoichiometric after irradiation. In-core measurements of pressure tube fitting are generally low. All these observations are consistent with the excellent fuel performance statistics coming out of the two Canadian CANDU 6 reactors. Additionally, this paper will briefly

  10. Identifying Canadian freshwater fishes through DNA barcodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Hubert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA barcoding aims to provide an efficient method for species-level identifications using an array of species specific molecular tags derived from the 5' region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene. The efficiency of the method hinges on the degree of sequence divergence among species and species-level identifications are relatively straightforward when the average genetic distance among individuals within a species does not exceed the average genetic distance between sister species. Fishes constitute a highly diverse group of vertebrates that exhibit deep phenotypic changes during development. In this context, the identification of fish species is challenging and DNA barcoding provide new perspectives in ecology and systematics of fishes. Here we examined the degree to which DNA barcoding discriminate freshwater fish species from the well-known Canadian fauna, which currently encompasses nearly 200 species, some which are of high economic value like salmons and sturgeons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We bi-directionally sequenced the standard 652 bp "barcode" region of COI for 1360 individuals belonging to 190 of the 203 Canadian freshwater fish species (95%. Most species were represented by multiple individuals (7.6 on average, the majority of which were retained as voucher specimens. The average genetic distance was 27 fold higher between species than within species, as K2P distance estimates averaged 8.3% among congeners and only 0.3% among concpecifics. However, shared polymorphism between sister-species was detected in 15 species (8% of the cases. The distribution of K2P distance between individuals and species overlapped and identifications were only possible to species group using DNA barcodes in these cases. Conversely, deep hidden genetic divergence was revealed within two species, suggesting the presence of cryptic species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study evidenced that freshwater fish

  11. Canadian plans for participation in GSETT 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. North

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC is making preparations for Canadian participation in GSETT 3 but will be unable to make a formal commitment until the necessary resources have been secured. As Canada is expected to provide at least four alpha stations, and a significant number of beta stations, the financial resources that will be needed are substantial, even though in many respccts the GSC is, with the recent modernization of the Yellowknife array and the ongoing installation of the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN, well positioned to make a significant contribution to GSETT 3. The CNSN currently (October 1993 consists of 17 broad band stations and will grow to 23 and 33 such stations by December 1993 and December 1994 respectively. Some 40 50 short period stations will complete the network. Data from all sites are continuously telemetered in real time to network acquisition centres in Ottawa and Sidney, British Columbia, archived to optical disk, and kept on line in a 72 h ring buffer. Most of the broadband sites could serve as either alpha or beta stations once the necessary software for continuous data transfer, or on request provision, of data from the selected sites has been completed. This software wili be configured so that changes in station selection are easy to implement, and this will provide considerable flexibility to the GSETT 3 planning and operations working groups in selecting the optimum network. Backup stations can be designated in the case of station failures, and the network centre in British Columbia will serve, at least for beta stations, as a backup NDC to that in Ottawa. Data from. the Yellowknife array are collected in Yellowknife and forwarded in ten minute files to Ottawa, where processing is completed and the results archived. This arrangement would not meet the deadlines for receipt of alpha station data at the IDC and new hardware and software will be needed to forward the data more immediately from

  12. Bancroftian filariasis in a Philippine village: entomological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeza, F S; Grove, D I

    1979-03-01

    Bancroftian filariasis in an isolated Philippine village has been intensively investigated; this paper reports the entomological findings. Surveys were carried out six months apart in the driest and wettest months. Significant transmission was demonstrated only during the wet season. Aedes poicillius was the major vector of Wuchereria bancrofti. Ae. poicilius accounted for 58% of larvae found in the axils of banana plants and 31% of those in abaca axils; negligible numbers of larvae of this species were found in pandanus and gabi axils. Mosquitoes were collected from indoor harbourages twice weekly for five weeks during the wet season; 615 mosquitoes were caught of which 80% were Ae. poicilius and 9% were Culex quinquefasciatus. 11% of the former and 13% of the latter contained filariae; whereas all stages of development were seen in Ae. poicilius, no development beyond the first stage was seen in Cx. quinquefasciatus. Human bait trapping was used for 110 manhours; 371 mosquitoes were caught of which 58% were Ae. poicilius and 24% were Culex summorosus. Filarial larvae were seen only in Ae. poicilius; 3.7% of mosquitoes were positive and all stages of filarial development were seen. The mean landing/biting rate between 1900 and 0500 hours was 3.37 mosquitoes per man-hour with a maximum of almost seven mosquitoes per man-hour at midnight. Overall, 2.26% of vectors collected in the human studies were infective. There was an average of 3.38 third-stage larvae per infective mosquito. The efficiency of transmision was estimated as 6.1 x 10-5, or one new case of microfilaraemia for every 16, 400 bites by infective mosquitoes in the village population. In contrast to the human studies, large numbers of mosquitoes were caught by animal bait trapping in both the wet and dry seasons. The distribution of mosquito species was similar in the two seasons. Ae. poicillius represented only 1.0-1.5% of all mosquitoes seen. No filarial larvae were seen. It was concluded that

  13. Red-Shirt Heartland: Village-level socioeconomic change in Northeast Thailand between 1999 and 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, E.B.P. de; Knippenberg, L.W.J.; Ayuwat, D.; Promphakping, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the socioeconomic changes that took place on a village level in northeast Thailand during Thaksin Shinawatra's rule as prime minister of Thailand (2001–2006). By comparing data from 1999 and 2008, we show that most households in the research villages have become wealt

  14. Red-Shirt Heartland: Village-level socioeconomic change in Northeast Thailand between 1999 and 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, E.B.P. de; Knippenberg, L.W.J.; Ayuwat, D.; Promphakping, B.

    2012-01-01

    n this article, we investigate the socioeconomic changes that took place on a village level in northeast Thailand during Thaksin Shinawatra's rule as prime minister of Thailand (2001–2006). By comparing data from 1999 and 2008, we show that most households in the research villages have become wealth

  15. The "Village" Model: A Consumer-Driven Approach for Aging in Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, Andrew; Graham, Carrie; Lehning, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study examines the characteristics of the "Village" model, an innovative consumer-driven approach that aims to promote aging in place through a combination of member supports, service referrals, and consumer engagement. Design and Methods: Thirty of 42 fully operational Villages completed 2 surveys. One survey examined…

  16. Daily health concerns in Kakabo: anthropological explorations in a Bangladeshi village

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geest; N. Selin; S. Zaman

    2008-01-01

    Daily health concerns in Kakabo: Anthropological explorations in a Bangladeshi village is a collection of essays written by students of BRAC James P Grant School of Public Health in 2005, 2006 and 2007. These essays are the results of exploratory studies conducted in a village named Kakabo, about tw

  17. Becoming Adults: One-Year Impact Findings from the Youth Villages Transitional Living Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Erin Jacobs; Skemer, Melanie; Courtney, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    The "Youth Villages Transitional Living Evaluation" is testing whether the "Transitional Living" program, operated by the social service organization Youth Villages, makes a difference in the lives of young people with histories of foster care or juvenile justice custody. The program, which was renamed "YVLifeSet" in…

  18. Moving into Adulthood: Implementation Findings from the Youth Villages Transitional Living Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Michelle; Jacobs, Erin; Alson, Julianna; Skemer, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    The Youth Villages Transitional Living program is intended to help youth who were formerly in foster care or juvenile justice custody, or who are otherwise unprepared for adult life, to make the transition to independent living. Youth Villages, which serves emotionally and behaviorally troubled young people, operates a number of programs in…

  19. Economic Stratification Differentiates Home Gardens in the Maya Village of Pomuch, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot-Pool, W.S.; Wal, van der J.C.; Flores-Guido, S.; Pat-Fernández, J.M.; Esparza-Olguín, L.

    2012-01-01

    Economic Stratification Differentiates Home Gardens in the Maya Village of Pomuch, Mexico. In this paper, we analyze if economic stratification of peasant families in a Maya village in the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico influences species composition and structure of home gardens. Our general hypothesi

  20. Durkheim’s Concept of Collective Consciousness and Chinese Villages Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YUNYAN

    2016-01-01

    In a rapid social transformation times, more and more social problems come to existence in Chinese villages, which results in instability in the society. By using the collective consciousness theory from Durkheim, the paper analyze the anomie phenomena in Chinese village community.

  1. Industrial land development in urban villages in China: A property rights perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Y.; Peng, Y.; Li, B.; Lin, Y.L.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid urbanization of China during the past decades has led to the emergence and development of urban villages. Existing literature has largely focused on the lack of state regulations in the development of urban villages. This paper comprehensively identifies and investigates the institutional

  2. Perceived Control and Liveability: Environment and behaviour interaction in two urban villages of Shenzhen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, L.; Van Dorst, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Urban village is a very special type of neighbourhood, created in the fast urbanisation process in Chinese cities like Shenzhen in the past three decades, playing an essential role in accommodating migrant groups, including rural-urban migrant workers and the young professionals. Built by the villag

  3. Globalization, Globalisation

    OpenAIRE

    Ethier, Wilfred J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses a complex of globalization issues: the effect of globalization on the skill premium; the effect of globalization on unemployment; the relative importance of globalization and exogenous technical change; the effect of globalization on the ability of national governments to conduct independent social policies. Thinking about these topics has been dominated by a large empirical literature concluding that trade has played a relatively minor role in the rise of the skill premi...

  4. Against Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Lotte; Baggesgaard, Mads Anders

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand globalization, we need to consider what globalization is not. That is, in order to understand the mechanisms and elements that work toward globalization, we must, in a sense, read against globalization, highlighting the limitations of the concept and its inherent conflicts....... Only by employing this as a critical practice will we be analytically able to gain a dynamic understanding of the forces of globalization as they unfold today and as they have developed historically....

  5. Interactions between reactive nitrogen and the Canadian landscape: A budget approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair, Thomas A.; Pelletier, Nathan; Bittman, Shabtai; Leip, Adrian; Arp, Paul; Moran, Michael D.; Dennis, Ian; Niemi, David; Sterling, Shannon; Drury, Craig F.; Yang, Jingyi

    2014-11-01

    The movement of excess reactive nitrogen (Nr) from anthropogenic activities to natural ecosystems has been described as one of the most serious environmental threats facing modern society. One of the approaches for tracking this movement is the use of budgets that quantify fluxes. We constructed an Nr budget for Canada using measured and modeled values from the scientific literature, government databases, and data from new agri-environmental indicators, in order to produce information for policy makers and scientists to understand the major flows of nitrogen to allow a better assessment of risks to the Canadian environment. We divided the Canadian territory south of 60°N into areas dominated by natural ecosystems, as well as by agricultural and urban/industrial activities to evaluate Nr flows within, between, and out of these units. We show that Canada is a major exporter of Nr due to the availability of inexpensive commercial fertilizers. The large land area suitable for agriculture makes Canada a significant agricultural Nr exporter of both grain crops and livestock. Finally, Canada exports petroleum N mainly to the United States. Because of its location and prevailing atmospheric transport patterns, Canada is a net receptor of Nr air pollution from the United States, receiving approximately 20% of the Nr leaving the U.S. airshed. We found that overall, terrestrial natural ecosystems as well as the atmosphere are in balance between Nr inputs and outputs when all N reactive and nonreactive fluxes are included. However, when only reactive forms are considered, almost 50% of N entering the Canadian atmosphere cannot be accounted for and is assumed to be lost to the Atlantic and Arctic oceans or to unmeasured dry deposition. However, agricultural and freshwater landscapes are showing large differences between measured inputs and outputs of N as our data suggest that denitrification in soils and aquatic systems is larger than what models predict. Our work also shows

  6. Radon levels and doses in dwellings in two villages in Kosovo, affected by depleted uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafezi, G; Gregoric, A; Vaupotic, J; Bahtijari, M; Kuqali, M

    2014-01-01

    The radon ((222)Rn) activity concentration in 15 dwellings in the Planej village and 10 dwellings in the Gorozhup village has been measured with the aim to complement the national radon survey and to compare the results of two different measurement techniques. The radon concentration has been measured in winter and spring using alpha scintillation cells and in winter, spring and summer by exposing solid-state nuclear track detectors. Both methods gave similar results. Radon concentrations in both villages were similar, ranging from 82 to 432 Bq m(-3); the value of 400 Bq m(-3) was exceeded only in two dwellings. The resulting annual effective doses ranged from 1.78 to 6.40 mSv, with the average values of 3.28 mSv in the Planej village and 3.87 mSv in the Gorozhup village.

  7. Emergy Evaluation of a Village Ecosystem in Wolong Nature Reserve in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yong; Kontoleon Andreas; Chen Guojie

    2009-01-01

    Due to historic reasons, there are several human settle-merits in nature reserves and national parks, which may constitute a threat to biodiversity.Establishment ofnature reserves may how-ever generate constraints for development of local communities residing in these reserves.The village ecosystem of Zhuanjinglou Village in Wolong Nature Reserve includes population, farming and livestock (domestic and alpine) and forest ecosystem.An emergy analysis of agro-ecosystem (including the farming and livestock ecosystem) and energy consumption in Zhuanjinglou Village indicates that livestock ecosystem plays an important role in village ecosystem, which may be the source of great pressure on the state of the local environment.The increasing ratio of electrici-ty in energy consumption may play a positive role for environmen-tal conservation.Despite some successful experiences, there are some remaining issues that need to be addressed in the ecological rehabilitation of the village ecosystem.

  8. Design description of the Schuchuli Village photovoltaic power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajczak, A. F.; Vasicek, R. W.; Delombard, R.

    1981-01-01

    A stand alone photovoltaic (PV) power system for the village of Schuchuli (Gunsight), Arizona, on the Papago Indian Reservation is a limited energy, all 120 V (d.c.) system to which loads cannot be arbitrarily added and consists of a 3.5 kW (peak) PV array, 2380 ampere-hours of battery storage, an electrical equipment building, a 120 V (d.c.) electrical distribution network, and equipment and automatic controls to provide control power for pumping water into an existing water system; operating 15 refrigerators, a clothes washing machine, a sewing machine, and lights for each of the homes and communal buildings. A solar hot water heater supplies hot water for the washing machine and communal laundry. Automatic control systems provide voltage control by limiting the number of PV strings supplying power during system operation and battery charging, and load management for operating high priority at the expense of low priority loads as the main battery becomes depleted.

  9. Economic Analysis of Edirne Village Development Cooperatives Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. H. Inan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the management activities of Edirne Village Development Cooperatives’ Union were evaluated and revenues and costs required for economic analysis were calculated and profit and loss income statement was estimated for the years 2002, 2003 and 2004. Data for Gross Margin Analysis were supplied from income and loss statement and thus Table comprising gross margins was formed covering all the activities of The Union.Gross Margin Analysis was made in order to determine economic performance of The Union by means of the data obtained from economic results of the operational activities in the years 2002, 2003 and 2004. The Union should develop its present activities so as to survive in the future. Therefore, suggestions were made for the expansion of the profitable activities and to improve nonprofitable activities in order to make them profitable.

  10. Transport of one SC coil through the village of Meyrin

    CERN Multimedia

    1956-01-01

    In 1952, before CERN was officially founded, two accelerator projects were launched: one for an innovative accelerator to operate at an energy level unequalled at the time, the other for a more standard machine, a Synchro-Cyclotron (SC) to operate at 600 MeV. Design work on the SC was started in 1952 and carried out by teams scattered throughout Europe. Once construction began in 1954, CERN had to arrange road transport for the first of what has since been a long series of spectacular component deliveries, such as those of the machine's two magnetic coils each weighing 60 tonnes and measuring 7.2 metres in diameter. Above, one of them is seen passing through the village of Meyrin. The SC was commissioned in 1957 and was operational for 34 years!

  11. Men's views on gender and sexuality in a Bangladesh village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Muradul; Karim, K M Rabiul

    The violation of women's sexual rights is a crucial public health problem, which is often related to the way people view gender and sexuality in a society. This study explores married men's typical views on gender, family, and sexuality in a rural Bangladesh context. Using a qualitative methodological approach, 10 married men were purposively included from a northwest village. The study revealed that married men's views about gender and sexuality are heavily influenced by patriarchal norms. Men think that a wife is the property of her husband and that the wife should obey her husband by giving sex to her husband whenever he wants. Men also think that if women fail to obey their husbands or please them sexually, men are allowed to beat their wives. Interviews explored that the violation of women's sexual rights might be closely related to men's gendered views about women's rights.

  12. Does Property Right Transformation Improve Township and Village Enterprises Performance?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixiong Du; Yoichi Izumida

    2006-01-01

    To date, few observations have been made about the performance improvement that resulted from the property right transformation of the collective-owned township and village enterprises (TVE) in the middle of 1990s. Using data collected from a questionnaire survey on the privatized TVE and their employees, the present paper provides some empirical evidence about this topic, and the analysis suggests that property right transformation has had a positive impact on sample enterprises'performance, including business improvement,employment expansion, incremental investment and contributions to government revenues.The present study concludes that, from a transient viewpoint, the property right transformation has not distorted local governments' intentions to establish TVE in earlier years.

  13. The Manipulation of Translator's Ideology in Translating In Liu Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何霞; 李莎莎

    2014-01-01

    Traditional studies on translation have generally been source-oriented. Since 1980s, translation theorists shifted their eyes on new areas, such as culture, history, and ideology. Andre Lefevere puts forward the theory of rewriting, including such three important factors as ideology, poetics and patronage. This paper focuses on the study of manipulation of ideology over trans-lation of In Liu Village by a famous writer-cum-translator Yu Lihua. Based on the data collected, the present paper argues that during the process of translation, ideology exerts constraints on the translator and influences her in such aspects as the choice of texts, the process of decoding and the choice of translation strategy.

  14. An Amdo Tibetan Village New Year Trance Medium Ritual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dpal ldan bkra shis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gling rgyal Village's (Tongren County, Rma lho [Huangnan] Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Mtsho sngon [Qinghai] Province, China Mag pa Mountain God lha ba Lo sar (Tibetan New Year Ritual is described. Despite recent scholarly attention to Reb gong klu rol, ritualized lha ba activity and dances in the context of Lo sar in Reb gong have been ignored. Ru zhol ma and Ru gong ma are Gling rgyal groups that held the ritual on the first day of the first month of the Chinese Lunar calendar. This presentation describes preparatory activities, rituals at Mag pa Shrine,and the Ru zhol ma threshing ground in the late twentieth century, illustrating that klu rol embraces certain dances and other activities that that are also performed during Lo sar.

  15. The practice of humanitarianism: a village birthing clinic in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Livia

    2011-01-01

    Discourses and practices surrounding humanitarian organisations have changed over time. This is certainly the case for Palestinian non-governmental organisations, which have followed the structural and ideological transformations observed in local, regional and international contexts. There have been three successive but interlocking generations of groups active in health in Palestine: charitable societies, popular committees, and donor-based entities. Against this background, a village clinic in the West Bank is seen to have gone through various incarnations in the context of an emerging neo-liberal economic, administrative and political environment. Despite the critiques justifiably addressed towards them, non-governmental organisations may in some cases be functionally fluid. Communities and people continue to use them strategically in their relations with states, political groups, individuals and receivers of aid, making them potential networking sites in the context of an ongoing occupation.

  16. A Blueprint of an International Lunar Robotic Village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalai, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Human civilization is destined to look, find and develop a second habitable destination in our Solar System, besides Earth: Moon and Mars are the two most likely and credible places based on proximity, available local resources and economics Recent international missions have brought back valuable information on both Moon and Mars. The vision is: A permanent presence on the Moon using advanced robotic systems as precursors to the future human settlement of the Moon is possible in the near-term. An international effort should be initiated to create a permanent robotic village to demonstrate and validate advanced technologies and systems across international boundaries, conduct broad science, explore new regions of the Moon and Mars, develop infrastructure, human habitats and shelters, facilitate development of commerce and stimulate public involvement and education.

  17. Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Bandura, Kevin; Amiri, Mandana; Bond, J Richard; Campbell-Wilson, Duncan; Connor, Liam; Cliche, Jean-Francois; Davis, Greg; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gibbs, Kenneth; Gilbert, Adam; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D; Hinshaw, Gary; Hofer, Carolin; Klages, Peter; Landecker, Tom L; Masui, Kiyoshi; Mena, Juan; Newburgh, Laura B; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B; Recnik, Andre; Shaw, J Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Michael; Smecher, Graeme; Smegal, Rick; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Don

    2014-01-01

    A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beamforming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37\\,m long by 20\\,m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument ...

  18. The bituminous sands : a Canadian mirage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousse, D.R. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Appliquees; Nasr, G.J. [Lebanese Univ., Roumieh (Lebanon). Faculty of Engineering; Turcotte, S.F. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Centre d' Etudes Internationales et Mondialisation; Salah, N.B. [Ecole Superieure des Sciences et Techniques De Tunis, Tunis (Tunisia). LMMP

    2009-07-01

    This paper examined the controversy about the potential role of a significant increase in Canadian oil sands production in order to bridge the upcoming gap between the world's increasing energy demand and the total recoverable oil supply. The paper presented the actual potential of different scenarios and considered the prediction cost forecasts. A brief overview of environmental impacts and the real return on investments were also provided. Environmental impacts that were considered included land degradation; water contamination; ecosystem damage; and air pollution. Nuclear energy was also presented as a possible solution. The paper demonstrated that even in a very optimistic scenario, Canada's oil sands accelerated production has a negligible effect on the aforementioned gap, has a considerable impact on environment that has yet to be accounted for. Energy ratios that were presented included energy return on energy investment; energy available on energy used; and energy payback. It was concluded that enhanced recovery techniques are clearly needed for future sustainable exploitation of these bituminous sands. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Managing occupational HIV exposures: a Canadian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutter, L I; Northcott, H C

    1995-10-01

    The findings reported in this paper are part of a larger study that explored how nurses cope with the risk of acquiring HIV infection while caring for persons with AIDS (PWAs). The data were collected through in-depth interviews with 13 nurses who cared for PWAs in a large Western Canadian hospital. Seven of these nurses perceived that they had been exposed to HIV-infected blood or body fluids. This paper describes how these seven nurses coped with actual exposures to HIV-infected blood or body fluids. Data were analyzed using the methodology of grounded theory. Nurses' coping efforts after exposure were grouped into four categories: minimizing the effect of exposures, reducing a sense of vulnerability, selective disclosure to others, and assigning meaning. Nurses minimized the physical effects of exposure through measures such as 'bleeding' the needlestick injury and immersing the affected area in bleach solution. Nurses reduced their sense of vulnerability by assessing the possibility of harm, avoiding situations that aroused fear, and confronting the decision for HIV testing. Nurses limited their disclosures to co-workers to avoid rejection and to preserve professional self-esteem. Disclousre to significant others was influenced primarily by the support nurses perceived they would receive. Finally, nurses attempted to assign meaning to the exposure by determining why the event occurred and by evaluating the implications it has had on their lives. The article concludes with implications for nursing practice.

  20. Medical cannabis – the Canadian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gordon D; Bober, Sara L; Mindra, Sean; Moreau, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been widely used as a medicinal agent in Eastern medicine with earliest evidence in ancient Chinese practice dating back to 2700 BC. Over time, the use of medical cannabis has been increasingly adopted by Western medicine and is thus a rapidly emerging field that all pain physicians need to be aware of. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a significant and dose-dependent relationship between neuropathic pain relief and tetrahydrocannabinol – the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. Despite this, barriers exist to use from both the patient perspective (cost, addiction, social stigma, lack of understanding regarding safe administration) and the physician perspective (credibility, criminality, clinical evidence, patient addiction, and policy from the governing medical colleges). This review addresses these barriers and draws attention to key concerns in the Canadian medical system, providing updated treatment approaches to help clinicians work with their patients in achieving adequate pain control, reduced narcotic medication use, and enhanced quality of life. This review also includes case studies demonstrating the use of medical marijuana by patients with neuropathic low-back pain, neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. While significant preclinical data have demonstrated the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating pain in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, and cancer, further studies are needed with randomized controlled trials and larger study populations to identify the specific strains and concentrations that will work best with selected cohorts. PMID:27757048

  1. The strongest links : the Canadian coal chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, E.

    2008-09-15

    Issues related to the transportation of coal in Canada were discussed. Coal mines in Alberta and British Columbia are often required to transport their products over 1000 km for export at Pacific ports to countries in Asia or power plants in Ontario. The effectiveness of the supply chain is dependent on the inter-relationships between mine, rail, terminals, and ship transport. Coal customers are typically required to hire shipping companies and nominate vessels for terminals that have contracts with coal suppliers. Mines typically inform railway lines of the amounts of coal that will need to be transported each month. Many railways have increased the amounts of coal they are transporting by using lighter-weight aluminum train cars. Further efficiencies have been realized due to new braking and power distribution technologies in trains. Multiple locomotives are now also being used to provide improved control over the cars that carry the coal. Despite advances in rail technologies, coal deliveries are often delayed by harsh weather conditions and rain. It was concluded that the Canadian coal industry's success relies on its ability to transport large amounts of coal across long distances. 2 figs.

  2. Integrated environmental impact assessment: a Canadian example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Roy E; Ooi, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The Canadian federal process for environmental impact assessment (EIA) integrates health, social, and environmental aspects into either a screening, comprehensive study, or a review by a public panel, depending on the expected severity of potential adverse environmental effects. In this example, a Public Review Panel considered a proposed diamond mining project in Canada's northern territories, where 50% of the population are Aboriginals. The Panel specifically instructed the project proposer to determine how to incorporate traditional knowledge into the gathering of baseline information, preparing impact prediction, and planning mitigation and monitoring. Traditional knowledge is defined as the knowledge, innovations and practices of indigenous and/or local communities developed from experience gained over the centuries and adapted to local culture and environment. The mining company was asked to consider in its EIA: health, demographics, social and cultural patterns; services and infrastructure; local, regional and territorial economy; land and resource use; employment, education and training; government; and other matters. Cooperative efforts between government, industry and the community led to a project that coordinated the concerns of all interested stakeholders and the needs of present and future generations, thereby meeting the goals of sustainable development. The mitigation measures that were implemented take into account: income and social status, social support networks, education, employment and working conditions, physical environments, personal health practices and coping skills, and health services.

  3. Discovery of herpesviruses in Canadian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Chimoné S; van de Rakt, Karen; Fahlman, Åsa; Ruckstuhl, Kathreen; Neuhaus, Peter; Popko, Richard; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank

    2017-02-01

    Herpesviruses (HVs) have a wide range of hosts in the animal kingdom. The result of infection with HVs can vary from asymptomatic to fatal diseases depending on subtype, strain, and host. To date, little is known about HVs naturally circulating in wildlife species and the impact of these viruses on other species. In our study, we used genetic and comparative approaches to increase our understanding of circulating HVs in Canadian wildlife. Using nested polymerase chain reaction targeting a conserved region of the HV DNA polymerase gene, we analyzed material derived from wildlife of western and northern Canada collected between February 2009 and Sept 2014. For classification of new virus sequences, we compared our viral sequences with published sequences in GenBank to identify conserved residues and motifs that are unique to each subfamily, alongside phylogenetic analysis. All alphaherpesviruses shared a conserved tryptophan (W856) and tyrosine (Y880), betaherpesviruses all shared a serine (S836), and gammaherpesviruses had a conserved glutamic acid (E835). Most of our wildlife HV sequences grouped together with HVs from taxonomically related host species. From Martes americana, we detected previously uncharacterized alpha- and beta-herpesviruses.

  4. Spatial Characteristics of Edible Wild Fern Harvesting in Mountainous Villages in Northeastern Japan Using GPS Tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Matsuura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Wild plants in forests provide valuable living resources for rural communities. The location where local people harvest various species is important to the wise use of forest ecosystem services. Using global positioning system (GPS tracking of harvesters’ activities as well as geographic information system (GIS and a generalized linear model (GLM, this study analyzed the spatial differences among harvesting sites of three popular edible ferns, i.e., ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris, bracken (Pteridium aquilinum, and royal fern (Osmunda japonica, in mountainous villages of Northeastern Japan. The explanatory variables used were vegetation classes, terrain features, and proximity to roadways. The GLM yielded clear differences in harvesting sites among species that were affected by both the species’ ecological characteristics and human behavior. Ostrich fern was harvested mainly in canopy openings along valley floors, whereas royal fern harvest sites were frequently located in snow avalanche scrublands. Bracken was mainly harvested in deforested areas or young conifer plantations. Whereas ostrich fern and bracken harvest sites were restricted by the accessibility from roadways, this was not the case for royal fern. Potential harvest sites of ferns were estimated with the highest value for bracken. Our results suggest that local harvesters seriously consider various natural and anthropogenic factors to maintain effective and sustainable harvesting.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE WATER QUALITY IN AN ARSENIC CONTAMINATED VILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud C. Saikia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination of ground water has occurred in various parts of the world, becoming a menace in the Ganga-Meghna-Brahmaputra basin (West Bengal and Assam in India and Bangladesh. Recently arsenic has been detected in Cachar and Karimganj districts of barak valley, Assam, bordering Bangladesh. In this area coli form contamination comprises the major constraint towards utilization of its otherwise ample surface water resources. The local water management exploited ground water sources using a centralized piped water delivery scheme without taking into account the geologically arsenic-prone nature of the sediments and aquifers in this area. Thus surface water was the suggestive alternative for drinking water in this area. The present study investigated surface water quality and availability in a village of Karimganj district, Assam, India contaminated with arsenic for identifying the potential problems of surface water quality maintenance so that with effective management safe drinking water could be provided. The study revealed that the area was rich in freshwater ecosystems which had all physico-chemical variables such as water temperature, pH, DO, total alkalinity, free CO2, heavy metals like lead, chromium and cadmium within WHO standards. In contrast, coli form bacteria count was found far beyond permissible limit in all the sources. Around 60% people of the village preferred ground water for drinking and only 6% were aware of arsenic related problems. The problem of bacterial contamination could be controlled by implementing some ameliorative measures so that people can safely use surface water. Inhabitants of the two districts should be given proper education regarding arsenic contamination and associated health risk. Effluents should be treated to acceptable levels and standards before discharging them into natural streams.

  6. Implementing E-Health through CHI: A Very Canadian Solution to a Very Canadian Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Daniels

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Canada Health Infoway (CHI was established as an arms-length body by the federal government in 2001 to provide funding to provinces for the development of interoperable e-health systems. CHI was established in response to a number of reports calling on the government to act to make use of technological advances to improve health care quality and provide more rigorous data. In addition to these explicit goals, through establishing CHI the federal government also sought to avoid potential criticism if the implementation of e-health failed, increase its own popularity ahead of the 2000 election and subtly redistribute wealth between the provinces. The paper suggests that the major influence behind the policy to establish CHI came from Canadian institutions and the fact that the federal government was hamstrung by the Canadian Constitution and Canada Health Act. Evaluation of the reform shows that progress has been made by CHI in implementing e-health solutions, but that Canada still lags behind other comparable health systems in the use of technologies. SWOT analysis of the CHI implementation highlights the criticism that CHI could stifle provincial innovation but recognizes that it also offers the opportunity for best practice dissemination across Canada and ensures that ring-fenced funding is available for e-health implementation across the provinces. In conclusion, the paper suggests that, because of constitutional constraints, the federal government was limited in options to implement e-health and that CHI represents a fair compromise.

  7. Implementing e-Health through CHI: A Very Canadian Solution to a Very Canadian Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Daniels

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Canada Health Infoway (CHI was established as an arms-length body by the federal government in 2001 to provide funding to provinces for the development of interoperable e-health systems. CHI was established in response to a number of reports calling on the government to act to make use of technological advances to improve health care quality and provide more rigorous data. In addition to these explicit goals, through establishing CHI the federal government also sought to avoid potential criticism if the implementation of e-health failed, increase its own popularity ahead of the 2000 election and subtly redistribute wealth between the provinces. The paper suggests that the major influence behind the policy to establish CHI came from Canadian institutions and the fact that the federal government was hamstrung by the Canadian Constitution and Canada Health Act. Evaluation of the reform shows that progress has been made by CHI in implementing e-health solutions, but that Canada still lags behind other comparable health systems in the use of technologies. SWOT analysis of the CHI implementation highlights the criticism that CHI could stifle provincial innovation but recognizes that it also offers the opportunity for best practice dissemination across Canada and ensures that ring-fenced funding is available for e-health implementation across the provinces. In conclusion, the paper suggests that, because of constitutional constraints, the federal government was limited in options to implement e-health and that CHI represents a fair compromise.

  8. Global Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    2013-01-01

    Global strategy differs from domestic strategy in terms of content and process as well as context and structure. The content of global strategy can contain five key elements, while the process of global strategy can have six major stages. These are expounded below. Global strategy is influenced...... by rich and complementary local contexts with diverse resource pools and game rules at the national level to form a broad ecosystem at the global level. Further, global strategy dictates the interaction or balance between different entry strategies at the levels of internal and external networks....

  9. Global trends, local impact: the new era of skilled worker migration and the implications for nursing mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sioban

    2013-01-01

    The global movement towards free trade and market integration has enabled greater mobility for skilled professionals, including nurses. As of 2015, newly graduated Canadian nurses will enter the register with an exam prepared by the US-based National Council of State Boards of Nursing, making Canadian nurses possibly the most mobile skilled workers in North America. But given the fragmentation of Canada's internal labour market, it is the United States that stands to benefit most from greater nurse mobility.

  10. Human–dog interactions and behavioural responses ofvillage dogs in coastal villages in Michoacán, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Izaguirre, E.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.; Bokkers, E.A.M.; Ortolani, A.; Ortega-Pacheco, A.; Boer, I.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    tIn Mexican villages, most households keep dogs that roam freely. Therefore, socialisationof village dogs occurs in a different context than that of companion dogs in developedcountries. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess village dogs’ behavioural responsestowards familiar and unfamili

  11. The Strategy to Increase Women Farmer's Participation in the Program of Village Food Barn in East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliatia, Yayuk; Iskaskar, Riyanti

    2016-01-01

    Food Barn Village Programme is one of the government's efforts in achieving household food security which includes four components. The purpose of this study was to develop a strategy to increase women's participation in the Food Barn Village Programme. This research was conducted in three villages in the district of Malang, namely: Village…

  12. The effects of outdoor air pollution on the respiratory health of Canadian children: A systematic review of epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Villamizar, Laura A; Magico, Adam; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Rowe, Brian H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outdoor air pollution is a global problem with serious effects on human health, and children are considered to be highly susceptible to the effects of air pollution. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a comprehensive and updated systematic review of the literature reporting the effects of outdoor air pollution on the respiratory health of children in Canada. METHODS: Searches of four electronic databases between January 2004 and November 2014 were conducted to identify epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of exposure to outdoor air pollutants on respiratory symptoms, lung function measurements and the use of health services due to respiratory conditions in Canadian children. The selection process and quality assessment, using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, were conducted independently by two reviewers. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies that were heterogeneous with regard to study design, population, respiratory outcome and air pollution exposure were identified. Overall, the included studies reported adverse effects of outdoor air pollution at concentrations that were below Canadian and United States standards. Heterogeneous effects of air pollutants were reported according to city, sex, socioeconomic status and seasonality. The present review also describes trends in research related to the effect of air pollution on Canadian children over the past 25 years. CONCLUSION: The present study reconfirms the adverse effects of outdoor air pollution on the respiratory health of children in Canada. It will help researchers, clinicians and environmental health authorities identify the available evidence of the adverse effect of outdoor air pollution, research gaps and the limitations for further research. PMID:25961280

  13. Teaching global engineering in Canada, learning informality of the Global South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopakumar, Govind

    2014-07-01

    Globalisation has inspired a wide assortment of curricular initiatives within engineering education in the USA and Europe. This interest could be categorised in multiple directions - international exposure, service learning, or critical understanding and praxis. In Canada, however, there has been far less consideration for integrating globalisation within the engineering curriculum. The recent episode of reform initiated by the Canadian Board of Engineering Accreditation could usher in changes on this front. Situating the development of a course titled Development and Global Engineering within these broader conceptual and organisational impulses, this paper will illuminate a pathway towards understanding globalisation, especially within the Global South, through a comprehension of complexity and informality.

  14. Mining Legal and Business Resources on Canadian Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Johal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the distinct nature of the Canadian banking system, it is important for novice researchers to know which business and legal resources to consult in order to quickly find information that is particular to Canadian banking. However, there are very few articles or monographs in the library literature that describe how to find information sources exclusively on this subject from a Canadian perspective. Most available publications tend to specialize in sources for the US banking and Federal Reserve System with little attention to Canada. The paper begins with a brief introduction to Canadian banking. From there, the authors demonstrate where researchers can find primary sources such as legislation, regulations and case law. In addition, this article identifies and discusses the different types of information found on the websites of associations and government agencies such as the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions, which supervises and regulates various areas of Canada’s financial system. Also discussed are secondary sources such as industry research and reports that are available from reliable websites and subscription-based resources. This paper also explores the best business and legal databases for researchers. Based on results from searching in periodical directories and indexes, the paper additionally provides a description of the most pertinent academic, trade and general publications relevant to the Canadian banking system and where their contents are indexed.

  15. A scoping review of interprofessional education within Canadian nursing literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Rachel Elizabeth; Goldman, Joanne; LeGrow, Karen; MacMillan, Kathleen M; van Soeren, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this scoping review is to examine the nature of the interprofessional education (IPE) discussion that the Canadian nursing profession is having within the Canadian peer-reviewed nursing literature. An electronic database search of CINAHL was conducted using a modified Arksey & O'Malley scoping review framework. Peer-reviewed, English-language articles published in Canadian nursing journals from January 1981 to February 2016 were retrieved. Articles were included if they discussed IPE, or described an educational activity that met our conceptual definition of IPE. A total of 88 articles were screened, and 11 articles were eligible for analysis. Analysis revealed that this body of literature does not seem to be purposefully engaging Canadian nurses in a critical discourse about the role of IPE. The majority of articles located were reflective or commentaries. At the time of this review, there was a paucity of theoretically informed empirical research articles on IPE in the nursing literature. While IPE may be viewed by some critical scholars as a means of shifting the control of healthcare delivery traditionally held by medicine to other professions, our results suggest that this may not be the case in the Canadian nursing profession.

  16. Global Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... globalhealth/what/default.htm) CDC protects Americans through global health. frame support disabled and/or not supported ... Public Health Emergencies More stories Infographic More infographics Global Health & You OUTBREAKS DISEASES & CONDITIONS TRAVEL CDC JOBS ...

  17. Globalization & technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narula, Rajneesh

    Technology and globalization are interdependent processes. Globalization has a fundamental influence on the creation and diffusion of technology, which, in turn, affects the interdependence of firms and locations. This volume examines the international aspect of this interdependence at two levels...

  18. Home Economics/Family Studies Education in Canadian Schools: A Position Paper = L'enseignement de l'economie familiale/etudes familiales dans les ecoles canadiennes: Expose de principes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Home Economics Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    English and French versions of the Canadian Home Economics Association's position paper describe the place of home economics/family studies (HEFS) in education and worldwide trends indicating the need for HEFS. Suggests it is the only subject with the primary focus on preparing students for everyday life in an increasingly complex global society.…

  19. PEMANASAN GLOBAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Triana

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Pemanasan global (global warming pada dasarnya merupakan fenomena peningkatan temperature global dari tahun ke tahun karena terjadinya efek rumah kaca (greenhouse effect yang disebabkan oleh meningkatnya emisi gas-gas seperti karbondioksida (CO2, metana (CH4, dinitrooksida (N2O dan CFC sehingga energy matahari terperangkap dalam atmosfer bumi. Berbagai literatur menunjukkan kenaikan temperatur global termasuk Indonesia yang terjadi pada kisaran 1,5 – 40 °C pada akhir abad 21.

  20. Canadian EdGEO National Workshop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, L. A.; Haidl, F. M.; Hymers, L. A.; van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Established in the early 1970s, EdGEO supports locally driven geosciences workshops for Canadian teachers. Workshops are organized by geoscientists and teachers, and typically have field, laboratory and classroom components. Grants of up to $3000 per workshop are available from the National EdGEO Program. By providing educational opportunities for today's teachers and, through them, their students, EdGEO seeks to cultivate a heightened awareness of our planet. EdGEO workshops provide teachers with potential fieldtrip sites for their students and the knowledge, enthusiasm and materials to inspire their students to engage in geoscience. Networking opportunities with local experts promote the importance of the geoscience profession. The expected result is an improved capacity on the part of Canadians to understand the Earth and to make informed decisions, especially with regard to the use of mineral and energy resources, the maintenance and remediation of the environment, and response to geological hazards. There exists a critical need to provide teachers with training and resources to tackle their Earth science curricula. In 2008, EdGEO supported fourteen workshops, with an unprecedented 521 teachers attending. These teachers then used our resources to reach an estimated 14,000 students during that single academic year. EdGEO workshops are locally driven and are therefore very diverse. Workshops are strongly tied to the provincial curriculum, focus on a specific geoscience topic, or may be largely field-based to demonstrate and practice how field activities could be incorporated into Earth science teaching. Many strive to include all of these important components. Geoscientists and teachers work collaboratively to develop and deliver EdGEO workshops to ensure that the activities can be effectively used in the classroom. The length of these professional development opportunities range from two-hour sessions to several days, and can generally accommodate up to twenty

  1. Global Europa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian

    2010-01-01

    at the mythology of ‘global Europa' - the EU in the world. It concludes with a reflection on the way in which the many diverse myths of global Europa compete for daily attention, whether as lore, ideology, or pleasure. In this respect the mythology of global Europa is part of our everyday existence, part of the EU...

  2. Research of Reconstruction of Village in the Urban Fringe Based on Urbanization Quality Improving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the process of urban-rural integration, it is an acute and urgent challenge for the destiny of farmers and the development of village in the urban fringe in the developed area. Based on the “urbanization quality improving” this new perspective and through the analysis of experience and practice of Village renovation of Xi’nan Village of Zengcheng county, this article summarizes the meaning of urbanization quality in developed areas and finds the villages in the urban fringe’s reconstruction strategy. The study shows that as to the distinction of the urbanization of the old and the new areas, the special feature of the re-construction of the villages on the edge of the cities, the government needs to make far-sighted lay-out design and carry out strictly with a high standard in mind. The government must set up social security system, push forward the welfare of the residents, construct a new model of urban-rural relations, attaches great importance to sustainable development, promote the quality of the villagers, maintain regional cultural characters, and form a strong management team. All in all, in the designing and building the regions, great importance must be attached to verified ways and new creative cooperative development mechanism with a powerful leadership and sustainable village construction.

  3. Xia Futou's public bathhouse--a sustainable urbanization experiment in a Chinese village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongyi; Li, Limin; Zhang, Hua

    2008-04-01

    Xia Futou, a small Chinese village with a unique cultural landscape, consists of two unbalanced parts, an old village up the hill and a new one down the hill. In order to upgrade and preserve the unique cultural landscape of the older village and rebalance the dislocation of the two parts, a small public bathhouse project has been carried out according to sustainable architecture principles. Based on the current cultural landscape of the bathhouse and its surroundings, this approach is attempting to localize an informed, balance-seeking, design process in the village and in so doing develop a series of diverse possibilities and beneficial paths. The experiment of the public bathhouse's design and construction led to two key conceptual questions that need to be examined, the one is to research a village with a dynamic system conception instead of a static one; the other is to research a village with a self-organizing system conception1 instead of an organized one. Furthermore, we can give the sustainable path for the future that such naturally evolved Chinese villages evolve into sustainable towns and cities.

  4. Non-professional Agricultural Production Villages Establishing a New Rural Cooperative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The article analyzes problems in the agricultural development of non-professional agricultural production villages of Fenghua City.Firstly,low technical and scientific content of production and low standardization level.Secondly,scattered sales and non-fixed marketing channels.Thirdly,difficulties in group cooperation of farm crops with special benefits.Fourthly,imperfect service of rural committees of non-professional agricultural production villages in Fenghua City.A new rural cooperative is to be founded to help villagers in non-professional agricultural production villages of Fenghua City to be engaged in agricultural production and management activities,and to improve their overall incomes.On the one hand,a perfect and scientific cooperative operating system is to be built specifically including three functions.Firstly,fully playing the leading and bridging role of rural primary organizations.Secondly,fully carrying out the pushing role of capable persons in the administrative village.Lastly,fully playing the role of active participation and cooperation of villagers.On the other hand,constructions of normalization,standardization and brand orientation with special emphasis should be achieved under the guidance of local governments.The key of building a cooperative of non-professional agricultural production villages in Fenghua City is discussed.One is that rural cadres should have strong awareness of serving the people.The other is that governments at all levels should energetically support the establishment and management of rural cooperatives.

  5. From the Fur Trade to Acid Rain: A Study of Canadian Natural Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Presents a teaching module for upper elementary students that devotes eight class periods of study to Canadian resources. Includes study of the Canadian fur trade, fishing industry, forestry, and the problems caused by acid rain. Includes the unit evaluation. (DB)

  6. Canadian Content in School Texts and the Changing Goals of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orpwood, Graham

    1980-01-01

    The lack of "Canadian content" in Canadian public school textbooks can be more easily explained by changing national educational goals than by foreign ownership of the publishing industry. Science textbooks are used to illustrate. (SB)

  7. Application of OpenStreetMap (OSM) to Support the Mapping Village in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swasti Kanthi, Nurin; Hery Purwanto, Taufik

    2016-11-01

    Geospatial Information is a important thing in this era, because the need for location information is needed to know the condition of a region. In 2015 the Indonesian government release detailed mapping in village level and their Parent maps Indonesian state regulatory standards set forth in Rule form Norm Standards, Procedures and Criteria for Mapping Village (NSPK). Over time Web and Mobile GIS was developed with a wide range of applications. The merger between detailed mapping and Web GIS is still rarely performed and not used optimally. OpenStreetMap (OSM) is a WebGIS which can be utilized as Mobile GIS providing sufficient information to the representative levels of the building and can be used for mapping the village.Mapping Village using OSM was conducted using remote sensing approach and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), which's to interpret remote sensing imagery from OSM. The study was conducted to analyzed how far the role of OSM to support the mapping of the village, it's done by entering the house number data, administrative boundaries, public facilities and land use into OSM with reference data and data image Village Plan. The results of the mapping portion villages in OSM as a reference map-making village and analyzed in accordance with NSPK for detailed mapping Rukun Warga (RW) is part of the village mapping. The use of OSM greatly assists the process of mapping the details of the region with data sources in the form of images and can be accessed for Open Source. But still need their care and updating the data source to maintain the validity of the data.

  8. Economic Development and Competitive Village Elections%经济发展与竞争性的村委会选举

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡荣

    2005-01-01

    The 2001 survey in the rural area of Fujian Provice of China revealed that economic development, village collective revenues in particular, played a positive role in the elections of village councilors. With the economic development came an increase in collective revenues as well as differentiation in villagers' interests. Village election thus became an important institutional channel for villagers to articulate their interests. The survey results indicated that it was the collective revenues and the villagers' relative living standards that had stimulated the election participation from the villagers as voters or candidates, which had promoted the effecting of the election system. The following variables were all found to be positively correlated: degree of economic development, amount of the village revenues under collective control, election-benefit connection, election participation by villagers, village election competitiveness, and actuation of the village council election system.

  9. 水与村落关系的生态学思考%Consideration on Ecology Relationship between Water and Villages in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王智平; 杨居荣

    2001-01-01

    Water is the fundamental resource of human subsistence and a natural factor with substantial influence on villages.Based on the investigation of traditional villages in China,this paper gives a consideration on ecology relationship between water and villages in China.Some aspects such as ancient Fengshui theory and village,rainfall and village,well and village,water road and village,inundation or water shortage and village ,and water and village distribution show the intensive relationship between water and traditional villages in china,the rationality of ecology,and the harmony of anthropo-ecology.It is necessary that village ecology is to be studied on accounto of its influences of urbanization and town construction.

  10. Worksite health and wellness programs: Canadian achievements & prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Alméras, Natalie; Gauvin, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Canada has experienced a substantial reduction in mortality related to cardiovascular disease (CVD). There is a general consensus that more effective and widespread health promotion interventions may lead to further reductions in CVD risk factors and actual disease states. In this paper, we briefly outline the prevalence of selected risk factors for CVD in Canada, describe characteristics of the Canadian labor market and workforce, and depict what is known about health and wellness program delivery systems in Canadian workplaces. Our review indicates that there have been numerous and diverse relevant legislative and policy initiatives to create a context conducive to improve the healthfulness of Canadian workplaces. However, there is still a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of the delivery system and the actual impact of workplace health and wellness programs in reducing CVD risk in Canada. Thus, while a promising model, more research is needed in this area.

  11. Political Ideology and Economic Freedom across Canadian Provinces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian; Potrafke, Niklas

    This paper examines how political ideology influenced economic freedom in the Canadian provinces. We analyze the dataset of economic freedom indicators compiled by the Fraser Institute in 10 Canadian provinces over the 1981-2005 period and introduce two different indices of political ideology: go...... leftist and rightwing governments concerning the role of government in the economy and (2) indicates that ideological polarization concerns governments but less parliamentary fractions in the Canadian provinces. ......: government and parliament ideology. The results suggest that government ideology influenced labor market reforms: market-oriented governments promoted liberalization of the labor market. Parliamentary ideology did not influence economic liberalization at all. This finding (1) identifies differences between...

  12. Residential water demand with endogenous pricing: The Canadian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Arnaud; Renzetti, Steven; Villeneuve, Michel

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we show that the rate structure endogeneity may result in a misspecification of the residential water demand function. We propose to solve this endogeneity problem by estimating a probabilistic model describing how water rates are chosen by local communities. This model is estimated on a sample of Canadian local communities. We first show that the pricing structure choice reflects efficiency considerations, equity concerns, and, in some cases, a strategy of price discrimination across consumers by Canadian communities. Hence estimating the residential water demand without taking into account the pricing structures' endogeneity leads to a biased estimation of price and income elasticities. We also demonstrate that the pricing structure per se plays a significant role in influencing price responsiveness of Canadian residential consumers.

  13. Reference Values of Pulmonary Function Tests for Canadian Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gutierrez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A multicentre, cross-sectional study was carried out in six centres across Canada to establish a national standard for pulmonary function tests using healthy, lifetime nonsmokers, with each centre aiming to test 10 men and 10 women from each decade from 20 to 80 years of age. Data from each centre were used to derive prediction equations for each centre, and pooled data from all centres (total: 327 women and 300 men were used to derive Canadian predicted equations. The predictive models were compared with three widely used published models for selected tests. It was found that, in general, the equations modelled for each centre could be replaced by the models obtained when pooling all data (Canadian model. Comparisons with the published references showed good agreement and similar slopes for most tests. The results suggest that pulmonary function test results obtained from different centres in Canada were comparable and that standards currently used remain valid for Canadian Caucasians.

  14. The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Education Committee Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald J Bridges

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available I am pleased to provide an update regarding the activities and future directions of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG Education Committee. The mandate of the CAG Education Committee is to facilitate, develop and promote excellence as it pertains to educational initiatives for the Canadian gastroenterology community. Professional education has long remained a priority of the CAG - a fact well recognized by the membership. The 2002 CAG Strategic Planning Survey showed that members rate Canadian Digestive Diseases Week (CDDW as the most important CAG service, on par with Digestive Diseases Week regarding its usefulness (1. CDDW 2004 offered delegates a variety of basic science and clinical symposia, the popular and well received 'Breakfast with the Expert' sessions and a comprehensive Postgraduate Course reviewing key developments in gastroenterology, nutrition and hepatology.

  15. Global usability

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The concept of usability has become an increasingly important consideration in the design of all kinds of technology. As more products are aimed at global markets and developed through internationally distributed teams, usability design needs to be addressed in global terms. Interest in usability as a design issue and specialist area of research and education has developed steadily in North America and Europe since the 1980's. However, it is only over the last ten years that it has emerged as a global concern. Global Usability provides an introduction to the important issues in globalizing des

  16. Natural gamma radioactivity in the villages of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Jeni Chandar; Basil Rose, M R

    2013-01-01

    In situ radiometric survey carried out in 81 revenue villages of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India, using a portable radiation dosemeter/detector, revealed the existence of radiation hotspots along the coastal belt. A close observation of the coastal villages specifically revealed high background radioactivity in 14 coastal villages. A very high intrinsic anomalous radioactivity of 41.03 μSv h(-1) was observed, in a famous tourist spot in the coastal belt of Kanyakumari District. This is the highest level of radiation registered in South India, which is extremely higher than the permissible world average and is suggestive of causing severe clinical problems on continuous and prolonged exposure.

  17. Morbidity and health care utilisation among elderly people in Mmankgodi village, Botswana

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, F.; SANDBERG, E.; Ingstad, B.; Hjortdahl, P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the health status among the elderly in a village in Botswana and their pattern of health care utilisation.
DESIGN—A descriptive study where all persons 60 years and older were invited to participate, including a medical examination, laboratory testing and a questionnaire aiming at gathering sociodemographic data.
SETTING—Mmankgodi village of Botswana.
SUBJECTS—419 persons were identified as elderly in the village, out of which 337 were included.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The...

  18. May All Good Things Gather Here - Life, Religion, and Marriage in a Mi nyag Tibetan Village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bkra shis bzang po

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work documents marriage customs and related oral traditions in Bang smad Village, Bang smad Township, Nyag rong County, Dkar mdzes Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province, China. Villagers speak the poorly documented Mi nyag language. This study provides novel linguistic and ethnographic data, including a Mi nyag-English word list, maps showing the distribution of Mi nyag-speaking communities, and numerous full-color photographs of village life and wedding festivities. Of special interest are the transcribed wedding speeches locally given in Mi nyag and Tibetan.

  19. ANTHROPOLOGIE DU DEVELOPPEMENT DES VILLAGES PLURIETHNIQUES DU BASSIN DE VANG VIENG AU LAOS

    OpenAIRE

    Charlet-Phommachanh, Marieke

    2010-01-01

    In Laos, the 1980-1990s were marked by important transformations of the peasantry, related on one hand, to the policy of resettlement of mountain villages in the lowlands and on the other, to the acceleration of the Laotian economy. These changes had different impacts on village societies and are examined here using an original approach, combining ethnography, human geography and rural economy as applied to six villages of one of the most dynamic intra-mountainous basins in the country, the V...

  20. What Do Employers Want? Views of Chinese and Canadian Job Seekers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Sun; M.W. Luke Chan; James H. Tiessen

    2006-01-01

    Rapid globalization has led to many studies of cross-cultural issues and their implications for management. As China's importance in the international economy rises, the level of international business cooperation continues to increase. This paper first identifies differences in the cultural orientations of Chinese and Canadians entering the job market and then examines how these orientations are related to their perceptions of the criteria employers use when hiring. The analyses show that the cultural differences are not consistent with Hofstede's previous work. Further, there are significant differences in the qualities that are considered important when seeking a job. The results of this study increase mutual understanding and improve business relationships between the two countries.