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Sample records for canadian consensus conference

  1. Canadian Asthma Consensus Conference Summary of Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Ernst

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The Asthma Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society invited a group of Canadian physicians with a particular interest in asthma to meet in Montebello, Quebec, March 9-12, 1995 to arrive at a consensus statement on the optimal approach to the management of asthma in the pediatric and adult ambulatory care settings. The societies and associations represented are listed in the appendix with the names of the contributors to this document. The objectives of the Montebello conference were: 1. To review the current ambulatory care management of asthma in Canada; 2. To develop guidelines with the participation of family physicians and specialists; 3. To develop guidelines which are evidence-based; 4. In creating evidence-based guidelines to focus attention on aspects of asthma management that are currently not supported by randomized controlled trials; 5. To develop strategies that allow for the implementation of rational guidelines at a local level. Recommendations were based on a critical review of the scientific literature by small groups prior to the meeting and are categorized according to the strength of the scientific evidence supporting each recommendation (Table 1.

  2. Report from the 13th annual Western canadian gastrointestinal cancer consensus conference; calgary, alberta; september 8-10, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, M M; Pasieka, J; Dixon, E; McEwan, S; McKay, A; Renouf, D; Schellenberg, D; Ruether, D

    2012-12-01

    The 13th annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Calgary, Alberta, September 8-10, 2011. Health care professionals involved in the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purposes of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses current issues in the management neuroendocrine tumours and locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  3. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    Our results point to significant national variation both in terms of the perceived aim of consensus conferences, expectations to conference outcomes, conceptions of the roles of lay people and experts, and in terms of the way in which the role of public deliberation is interpreted. Interestingly...

  4. Report from the 13th Annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference; Calgary, Alberta; September 8–10, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, M.M.; Pasieka, J.; Dixon, E.; McEwan, S.; McKay, A.; Renouf, D.; Schellenberg, D.; Ruether, D.

    2012-01-01

    The 13th annual Western Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Calgary, Alberta, September 8–10, 2011. Health care professionals involved in the care of patients with gastrointestinal cancers participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purposes of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses current issues in the management neuroendocrine tumours and locally advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:23300370

  5. The Management of Chronic Viral Hepatitis: A Canadian Consensus Conference 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Sherman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several government and nongovernment organizations held a consensus conference on the management of acute and chronic viral hepatitis to update previous management recommendations. The conference became necessary because of the introduction of new forms of therapy for both hepatitis B and hepatitis C. The conference issued recommendations on the investigation and management of chronic hepatitis B, including the use of lamivudine, adefovir and interferon. The treatment of hepatitis B in several special situations was also discussed. There were also recommendations on the investigation and treatment of chronic hepatitis C and hepatitis C-HIV coinfection. In addition, the document makes some recommendations about the provision of services by provincial governments to facilitate the delivery of care to patients with hepatitis virus infection. The present document is meant to be used by practitioners and other health care providers, including public health staff and others not directly involved in patient care.

  6. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Marelli, Ariane; Beauchesne, Luc; Dore, Annie; Kiess, Marla; Salehian, Omid; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death.Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single-ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the late outcomes, genetics, medical therapy and interventional approaches in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present executive summary is a brief overview of the new guidelines and includes the recommendations for interventions. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up requirements. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  7. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: complex congenital cardiac lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Salehian, Omid; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. Part III of the guidelines includes recommendations for the care of patients with complete transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, Fontan operations and single ventricles, Eisenmenger's syndrome, and cyanotic heart disease. Topics addressed include genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy risk and follow-up requirements. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  8. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the Approach to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents – an Evidence-Based Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L Jones

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H pylori infection; H pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two

  9. 2003 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Allan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the last 15 years; however, there has been little focus on issues relating to asthma in childhood. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies, particularly in children, have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines. The objectives of this article are to review the literature on asthma published between January 2000 and June 2003 and to evaluate the influence of new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and its 2001 update, with a major focus on pediatric issues. Methods The diagnosis of asthma in young children and prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy, inhalation devices, immunotherapy, and asthma education were selected for review by small expert resource groups. The reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Network For Asthma Care and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Data published through December 2004 were subsequently reviewed by the individual expert resource groups. Results This report evaluates early-life prevention strategies and focuses on treatment of asthma in children, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and preventive therapy, the benefits of additional therapy, and the essential role of asthma education. Conclusion We generally support previous recommendations and focus on new issues, particularly those relevant to children and their families. This document is a guide for asthma management based on the best available published data and the opinion of health care professionals, including asthma experts and educators.

  10. Population conference: consensus and conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, P D

    1984-01-01

    The United Nations-sponsored International Conference on Population held in Mexico City was both a rejection and an affirmation of a new policy of the Reagan administration. The policy denies international family planning funds to nongovernmental organizations that perform or actively promote abortion as a family planning method in other nations. A compromise statement was accepted urging governments to take appropriate measures to discourage abortion as a family planning method and when possible to provide for the humane treatment and counseling of women ho resorted to abortion. The statement on abortion was 1 of 88 reccomendations approved by the conference. The commitment expressed in the 10-year-old World Population Plan of Action to the rights and responsiblity to all people as reaffirmed. The conference also endorsed family life education and sex education as well as suitable family planning, information and services for adolescents, with due consideration given to the role, rights and obligations of parents. Increased support for international population and family planning programs was urged and World Bank President, Clausen, urged a 4-fold increase in international funding by the year 2000. Most of the conference's recommendations re devoted to the broad range of population policy issues, including morbidity and mortality, international and internal migration, the relationship between population and economic development and the status of women. The purpose of the recommendations is to increase the momentum of international support. The Mexico City conference was characterized by a remarkable degree of consensus about population policies with respect to integration with economic development, the need to respect individual rights and the recognition that all nations have sovereign rights to develop and implement their own population policies. Conflict and controversy arose in the areas of the arms race and the Middle East. The US position on abortion funding

  11. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan

    2016-01-01

    on the effects of physical activity on children’s and youth’s fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process......From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term...

  12. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan;

    2016-01-01

    that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord...

  13. ESMO consensus conference on malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladetto, M; Buske, C; Hutchings, M;

    2016-01-01

    into three working groups; each group focused on one of these areas in order to address four clinically relevant questions relating to that topic. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, each working group developed...

  14. Contribution of medical decision-making to consensus development conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, N.S.; Casparie, A.F.; Everdingen, J.J.E.

    1987-01-01

    A description is given of the consensus development conference as a method for either technology assessment or quality assurance in health care. The general features of the methodology are discussed, the Dutch approach is explained in more detail, and medical decision analysis and its potential cont

  15. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic;

    2015-01-01

    panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent......The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary...

  16. A failed platform: The Citizen Consensus Conference travels to Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureta, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    This article starts by reviewing the setbacks that the recent Science and Technology Studies literature has identified in the functioning of technologies of democracy, the different arrangements that look to enact deliberation on technoscientific issues. Putting a focus on the Citizen Consensus Conference, it then proposes that several of these setbacks are related to the kind of "work" that these technologies are expected to do, identifying two kinds of it: performing a laboratory-based experiment and constituting a platform for the dissemination of facts. It then applies this framework to study a Citizen Consensus Conference carried out in Chile in 2003. After a detailed genealogy of the planning, implementation and afterlife of this exercise, the article concludes that several of the limitations experienced are derived from a "successful outcome" conceived as solely running a neat lab-based experiment, arguing for the need to incorporate its functioning as a platform with all the associated transformations and messiness.

  17. Canadian Athletic Therapists' Association Education Task Force Consensus Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafave, Mark R.; Bergeron, Glen; Klassen, Connie; Parr, Kelly; Valdez, Dennis; Elliott, Jacqueline; Peeler, Jason; Orecchio, Elsa; McKenzie, Kirsty; Streed, Kristin; DeMont, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Context: A published commentary from 2 of the current authors acted as a catalyst for raising some key issues that have arisen in athletic therapy education in Canada over the years. Objective: The purpose of this article is to report on the process followed to establish a number of consensus statements related to postsecondary athletic therapy…

  18. Management of Hepatitis B: A Longitudinal National Survey – Impact of the Canadian Hepatitis B Consensus Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Marotta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver, and The Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Canada, jointly developed the Canadian Chronic Hepatitis B (HBV Consensus Guidelines to assist practitioners involved in the management of this complex disease. These guidelines were published in The Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology in June 2007 and distributed to all Canadian gastroenterologists and hepatologists.

  19. Abstracts of the 48. Canadian chemical engineering conference : technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The conference was organized into six concurrent sessions devoted to fluidized bed technology, multi-phase reactors, catalysis, environmental technology, new developments, and biotechnology. A total of 491 papers were presented. Papers of particular interest to energy technology emphasized new technologies and chemical engineering techniques involved in processing petroleum products. Fluidized beds for hydro-treatment and biochemical processing, conversion of biomass to bio-oils and strategies for reducing emissions from Canadian energy facilities were some of the topics addressed.

  20. [Vasculitis: New nomenclature of the Chapel Hill consensus conference 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl-Ulrich, K

    2014-11-01

    Within the last years, many advances have been made in the understanding of the etiopathology of vasculitis as well as of different disease courses. The revised 2012 Chapel Hill consensus conference (CHCC) nomenclature reflects current knowledge on the etiopathology in addition to the descriptive principles of vessel size and types of inflammation. The anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated forms of vasculitis have been separated as a group, as opposed to immune complex small vessel vasculitis. When consensus was achieved eponyms have been replaced by systematic names, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's granulomatosis) or eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome). Moreover, clinically important but less well-known types of vasculitis have now been included in the CHCC nomenclature. This article presents the changes and summarizes the results of important new articles on the clinical picture and morphology of vasculitis.

  1. [Vasculitis. New nomenclature of the Chapel Hill consensus conference 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl-Ulrich, K

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, many advances have been made in our understanding of vasculitis etiopathology as well as of different disease courses. The revised Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) 2012 nomenclature reflects current knowledge about etiopathology, in addition to the descriptive principles of vessel size and type of inflammation. Anti-neutrophil cyptoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides have been classified as a separate group, as opposed to immune complex small vessel vasculitis. In cases where consensus was achieved, eponyms have been replaced by systematic names, such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's) or eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss syndrome). Moreover, clinically important but less well-known types of vasculitis have now been included in the CHCC nomenclature. This article presents the changes, focussing on those types that are relevant to the histopathologist, and summarizes the results of important new articles on morphology and clinical picture of vasculitis.

  2. A consensus development conference model for establishing health policy for surveillance and screening of antimicrobial-resistant organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buick, Steve; Joffe, A Mark; Taylor, Geoffrey; Conly, John

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian Consensus Development Conference on Surveillance and Screening for Antimicrobial-Resistant Organisms (AROs) was sponsored by the Alberta Ministry of Health to provide evidence to update policies for ARO screening in acute care settings. A rigorous evidence-based literature review completed before the conference concluded that that neither universal nor targeted screening of patients was associated with a reduction in hospital-acquired ARO colonization, infection, morbidity, or mortality. Leading international clinicians, scientists, academics, policy makers, and administrators presented current evidence and clinical experience, focusing on whether and how hospitals should screen patients for AROs as part of broader ARO control strategies. An unbiased and independent "jury" with a broad base of expertise from complementary disciplines considered the evidence and released a consensus statement of 22 recommendations. Policy highlights included developing an integrated "One Health" strategy, fully resourcing basic infection control practices, not performing universal screening, and focusing original research to determine what works.

  3. [Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Zaterka, Schlioma

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one the five main topics of the meeting: H. pylori and dyspepsia, H. pylori and NSAIDs, H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, H. pylori treatment, and H. pylori retreatment. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. The results were presented during a special session on the VI Brazilian Week of Digestive System, in Recife, PE (October 2004), and this publication represents the summary of the main recommendations and conclusions emerged from the meeting.

  4. Management of dysfunctional tear syndrome: a Canadian consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W Bruce

    2009-08-01

    Dry eye complaints are common, have a diverse etiology, and result from disruption of the normal tear film; hence, the term "dysfunctional tear syndrome." Recent research has shown that ocular surface disorders have an inflammatory origin, that inflammation of the ocular surface does not always manifest as "red eye," and that a patient does not have to have a systemic autoimmune disease to experience a local, ocular autoimmune event. A panel of Canadian cornea and external disease subspecialists met and developed a questionnaire and treatment algorithm to aid the comprehensive ophthalmologist. Management of ocular surface disorders begins with a review of the patient's medical history, with particular attention to medication use, and a thorough ophthalmological examination. Use of a simple questionnaire can aid in the diagnosis. A variety of treatment modalities are available, the most effective of which are those that target the underlying inflammatory process with the goal of restoring the normal tear film. A treatment algorithm is presented that matches the severity of symptoms with the intensity of treatment. Lifestyle modifications, regular hygiene, and tear supplements may be sufficient in patients with mild symptoms. Anti-inflammatory medications (topical cyclosporin A, short courses of topical steroids, and [or] oral tetracyclines) and physical measures (punctal plugs, moisture-retaining eye wear) are implemented for those with moderate-to-severe symptoms. Autologous serum tears, scleral contact lenses, and surgery are reserved for patients with severe symptoms who have an unsatisfactory response to anti-inflammatory medications. Patients with lid disease or rosacea and those with allergic conditions should be identified during the initial encounter and should receive specific therapy to relieve their symptoms.

  5. 13th Conference of the Canadian Number Theory Association

    CERN Document Server

    Alaca, Şaban; Williams, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The theory of numbers continues to occupy a central place in modern mathematics because of both its long history over many centuries as well as its many diverse applications to other fields such as discrete mathematics, cryptography, and coding theory. The proof by Andrew Wiles (with Richard Taylor) of Fermat’s last theorem published in 1995 illustrates the high level of difficulty of problems encountered in number-theoretic research as well as the usefulness of the new ideas arising from its proof. The thirteenth conference of the Canadian Number Theory Association was held at Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada from June 16 to 20, 2014. Ninety-nine talks were presented at the conference on the theme of advances in the theory of numbers. Topics of the talks reflected the diversity of current trends and activities in modern number theory. These topics included modular forms, hypergeometric functions, elliptic curves, distribution of prime numbers, diophantine equations, L-functions, Diophantine app...

  6. 48th Canadian Chemical Engineering conference: technical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This is the official CD-ROM for the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering annual conference. The documents on the disk can be navigated in the same way as a Web site on the Internet. Web pages are located on the disk. A Web browser is required to view most of the files. The conference program contains abstracts of the more than 300 papers presented at 78 sessions covering all aspects of chemical engineering: fluidized bed, reaction catalysis, environment, new developments, biotechnology, process control, polymers, fluid mechanics, pulp and paper, thermodynamics, multiphase reactors, reaction catalysis, rheology, chemical engineering fundamentals, chemical technology, oil and gas, education, and industrial issues. Five of the abstracts have been abstracted separately.

  7. Italian consensus conference for colonic diverticulosis and diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Rosario; Barbara, Giovanni; Pace, Fabio; Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio; Binda, Gian Andrea; Casetti, Tino; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide; Fiocca, Roberto; Laghi, Andrea; Maconi, Giovanni; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    The statements produced by the Consensus Conference on Diverticular Disease promoted by GRIMAD (Gruppo Italiano Malattia Diverticolare, Italian Group on Diverticular Diseases) are reported. Topics such as epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of diverticular disease (DD) in patients with uncomplicated and complicated DD were reviewed by a scientific board of experts who proposed 55 statements graded according to level of evidence and strength of recommendation, and approved by an independent jury. Each topic was explored focusing on the more relevant clinical questions. Comparison and discussion of expert opinions, pertinent statements and replies to specific questions, were presented and approved based on a systematic literature search of the available evidence. Comments were added explaining the basis for grading the evidence, particularly for controversial areas.

  8. 75 FR 2551 - NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance... Consensus Development Conference: Lactose Intolerance and Health'' to be held February 22-24, 2010, in the..., abdominal pain, and diarrhea. These symptoms of lactose intolerance are caused by intestinal...

  9. 75 FR 3745 - NIH Consensus Development Conference on Vaginal Birth After Cesarean: New Insights; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health NIH Consensus Development Conference on Vaginal Birth After... ``NIH Consensus Development Conference on Vaginal Birth After Cesarean: New Insights'' to be held March... baby through an incision made in the abdominal wall and uterus), many clinicians believed that all...

  10. Canadian society of transplantation consensus workshop on cytomegalovirus management in solid organ transplantation final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiksaitis, Jutta K; Brennan, Daniel C; Fishman, Jay; Allen, Upton

    2005-02-01

    The Canadian Society of Transplantation sponsored a Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Consensus Working Group that met on March 19, 2003. The objectives of this group were to determine the current burden of CMV-associated disease in the setting of solid organ transplantation in Canada, make recommendations regarding optimal strategies for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of CMV infection and disease, highlight gaps in knowledge and outline priorities for research and other initiatives that might further reduce the burden of CMV-associated effects in this setting. This report summarizes the recommendations of the working group including ratings of the strength of evidence supporting the recommendations.

  11. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compérat, Eva; Camparo, Philippe; Srigley, John; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens issued recommendations for standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. The conference addressed specimen handling, T2 substaging, prostate cancer volume, extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastases and surgical margins. This review summarizes the conclusions and recommendations resulting from the consensus process.

  12. Epigenetics, eh! A meeting summary of the Canadian Conference on Epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenhiser, David I; Bérubé, Nathalie G; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2011-10-01

    In May 2011, the Canadian Conference on Epigenetics: Epigenetics Eh! was held in London, Canada. The objectives of this conference were to showcase the breadth of epigenetic research on environment and health across Canada and to provide the catalyst to develop collaborative Canadian epigenetic research opportunities, similar to existing international epigenetic initiatives in the US and Europe. With ten platform sessions and two sessions with over 100 poster presentations, this conference featured cutting-edge epigenetic research, presented by Canadian and international principal investigators and their trainees in the field of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics. An EpigenART competition included ten artists, creating a unique opportunity for artists and scientists to interact and explore their individual interpretations of this scientific discipline. The conference provided a unique venue for a significant cross-section of Canadian epigenetic researchers from diverse disciplines to meet, interact, collaborate and strategize at the national level.

  13. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the e...

  14. Revised classification/nomenclature of vitiligo and related issues: the Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    During the 2011 International Pigment Cell Conference (IPCC), the Vitiligo European Taskforce (VETF) convened a consensus conference on issues of global importance for vitiligo clinical research. As suggested by an international panel of experts, the conference focused on four topics: classification and nomenclature; definition of stable disease; definition of Koebner’s phenomenon (KP); and ‘autoimmune vitiligo’. These topics were discussed in seven working groups representing different geogr...

  15. 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims : Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, Hans Konrad; Aggett, Peter J.; Anton, Robert; Bernstein, Paul S.; Blumberg, Jeffrey; Heaney, Robert P.; Henry, Jeya; Nolan, John M.; Richardson, David P.; van Ommen, Ben; Witkamp, Renger F.; Rijkers, Ger T.; Zoellner, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures: The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term "Hohenheim Consensus Conference" defines conferences dealing with n

  16. 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Aggett, P.J.; Anton, R.; Bernstein, P.S.; Blumberg, J.; Heaney, R.P.; Henry, J.; Nolan, J.M.; Richardson, D.P.; Ommen, B. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rijkers, G.T.; Zöllner, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures: The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term "Hohenheim Consensus Conference" defines conferences dealing with n

  17. NIH Blood and Marrow Transplant Late Effects Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    This day and a half symposium will bring together experts in blood and marrow transplantation, late effects, and health care delivery to discuss current evidence and knowledge gaps, develop consensus guidelines, and inform future research in the BMT survivor population.

  18. Evaluating the 2008 consensus conference on genetically modified foods in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mei-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Genetically modified foods have become one of the most popular topics for deliberative exercises involving ordinary citizens worldwide. This paper examines the Taiwanese consensus conference on GM foods held in June 2008, and the implications and limitations of the public deliberations. The consensus conference facilitated multiparty dialogues and enhanced citizens' knowledge, and affected their attitudes. This study demonstrates the ways contextual factors have influenced the outcome of the citizens' deliberative practices, including the government's conventional technocratic decision-making style, the strong influence of the U.S. government, the political and technological culture, the government's framing of economic development concerns, and a lack of pressure from civil society to compel the government to formally respond to their concerns. The consensus conference had a limited effect on policy decision-making, and seemed to serve as a socio-political experiment.

  19. [Renal tumors: The International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) 2012 consensus conference recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Ferran, Algaba; Mahul, Amin; Argani, Pedram; Billis, Athanase; Bonsib, Stephen; Cheng, Liang; Cheville, John; Eble, John; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Humphrey, Peter; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Martignoni, Guido; McKenney, Jesse; Merino, Maria; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Netto, George; Reuter, Viktor; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Shen, Steven; Srigley, John; Tamboli, Pheroze; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tickoo, Satish; Trpkov, Kiril; Zhou, Ming; Delahunt, Brett; Comperat, Eva

    2014-12-01

    During the last 30 years many advances have been made in kidney tumor pathology. In 1981, 9 entities were recognized in the WHO Classification. In the latest classification of 2004, 50 different types have been recognized. Additional tumor entities have been described since and a wide variety of prognostic parameters have been investigated with variable success; however, much attention has centered upon the importance of features relating to both stage and grade. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) recommends after consensus conferences the development of reporting guidelines, which have been adopted worldwide ISUP undertook to review all aspects of the pathology of adult renal malignancy through an international consensus conference to be held in 2012. As in the past, participation in this consensus conference was restricted to acknowledged experts in the field.

  20. Summary of the 2010 AHPBA/SSO/SSAT Consensus Conference on HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitonga Munene

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the auspices of the American Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, an expert consensus conference was convened in January 2010 on the multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma. The goals of the conference were to address knowledge gaps in the optimal preparation of patients with HCC for operative therapy, best methods to control HCC while awaiting liver transplantation, and developing a multidisciplinary approach to these patients with implementation of novel systemic therapies.

  1. Identifying gaps in the locoregional management of early breast cancer: highlights from the kyoto consensus conference.

    OpenAIRE

    Toi, Masakazu; Winer, Eric P.; INAMOTO, TAKASHI; BENSON, JOHN R.; Forbes, John F.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Robertson, John F. R.; Sasano, Hironobu; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Yamauchi, Akira; KLIMBERG, V. SUZANNE

    2011-01-01

    A consensus conference was held to investigate issues related to the local management of early breast cancer. Here, we highlight the major topics discussed at the conference and propose ideas for future studies. Regarding axillary management, we examined three major issues. First, we discussed whether the use of axillary reverse mapping could clarify the lymphatic system of breast and whether the ipsilateral arm might help avoid lymphedema. Second, the use of an indocyanine green fluorescent ...

  2. [The 2014 consensus conference of the ISUP on Gleason grading of prostatic carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, G; Egevad, L; Amin, M; Delahunt, B; Srigley, J R; Humphrey, P A; Epstein, J I

    2016-02-01

    In 2005 the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) held a concensus conference on Gleason grading in order to bring this grading system up to the current state of contemporary practice; however, it became clear that further modifications on the grading of prostatic carcinoma were necessary. The International Society of Urological Pathology therefore held a further consensus conference in 2014 to clarify these points. This article presents the essential results of the Chicago grading meeting.

  3. What Is New Since the Last (1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present document is to review the impact of new information on the recommendations made in the last (1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines. It includes relevant published studies and observations or comments regarding what are considered to be the main issues in asthma management in children and adults in office, emergency department, hospital and clinical settings. Asthma is still insufficiently controlled in a large number of patients, and practice guidelines need to be integrated better with current care. This report re-emphasises the need for the following: objective measures of airflow obstruction to confirm the diagnosis of asthma suggested by the clinical evaluation; identification of contributing factors; and the establishment of a treatment plan to rapidly obtain and maintain optimal asthma control according to specific criteria. Recent publications support the essential role of asthma education and environmental control in asthma management. They further support the role of inhaled corticosteroids as the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy of asthma, and of both long acting beta2-agonists and leukotriene antagonists as effective means to improve asthma control when inhaled corticosteroids are insufficient. New developments, such as combination therapy, and recent major trials, such as the Children’s Asthma Management Project (CAMP study, are discussed.

  4. Cardio-renal syndromes : report from the consensus conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter; Anker, Stefan D.; Anand, Inder; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Berl, Tomas; Bobek, Ilona; Cruz, Dinna N.; Daliento, Luciano; Davenport, Andrew; Haapio, Mikko; Hillege, Hans; House, Andrew A.; Katz, Nevin; Maisel, Alan; Mankad, Sunil; Zanco, Pierluigi; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ronco, Federico; Shaw, Andrew; Sheinfeld, Geoff; Soni, Sachin; Vescovo, Giorgio; Zamperetti, Nereo; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    A consensus conference on cardio-renal syndromes (CRS) was held in Venice Italy, in September 2008 under the auspices of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI). The following topics were matter of discussion after a systematic literature review and the appraisal of the best available evidence:

  5. ERS/ELS/ACCP 2013 international consensus conference nomenclature on inducible laryngeal obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille M. Christensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals reporting episodes of breathing problems caused by re-occurring variable airflow obstructions in the larynx have been described in an increasing number of publications, with more than 40 different terms being used without consensus on definitions. This lack of an international consensus on nomenclature is a serious obstacle for the development of the area, as knowledge from different centres cannot be matched, pooled or readily utilised by others. Thus, an international Task Force has been created, led by the European Respiratory Society/European Laryngological Society/American College of Chest Physicians. This review describes the methods used to reach an international consensus on the subject and the resulting nomenclature, the 2013 international consensus conference nomenclature.

  6. 2014 consensus statement from the first Economics of Physical Inactivity Consensus (EPIC) conference (Vancouver).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer C; Verhagen, Evert; Bryan, Stirling; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Borland, Jeff; Buchner, David; Hendriks, Marike R C; Weiler, Richard; Morrow, James R; van Mechelen, Willem; Blair, Steven N; Pratt, Mike; Windt, Johann; al-Tunaiji, Hashel; Macri, Erin; Khan, Karim M

    2014-06-01

    This article describes major topics discussed from the 'Economics of Physical Inactivity Consensus Workshop' (EPIC), held in Vancouver, Canada, in April 2011. Specifically, we (1) detail existing evidence on effective physical inactivity prevention strategies; (2) introduce economic evaluation and its role in health policy decisions; (3) discuss key challenges in establishing and building health economic evaluation evidence (including accurate and reliable costs and clinical outcome measurement) and (4) provide insight into interpretation of economic evaluations in this critically important field. We found that most methodological challenges are related to (1) accurately and objectively valuing outcomes; (2) determining meaningful clinically important differences in objective measures of physical inactivity; (3) estimating investment and disinvestment costs and (4) addressing barriers to implementation. We propose that guidelines specific for economic evaluations of physical inactivity intervention studies are developed to ensure that related costs and effects are robustly, consistently and accurately measured. This will also facilitate comparisons among future economic evidence.

  7. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation: rationale and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamburin S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Tamburin,1 Stefano Paolucci,2 Francesca Magrinelli,1 Massimo Musicco,2,3 Giorgio Sandrini4,5 On behalf of the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN 1Department of Neurological, Biomedical and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, 2Santa Lucia Foundation, IRCCS, Rome, 3Institute of Biomedical Technologies (IBT National Research Council of Italy (CNR, Segrate, Milan, 4C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology Foundation, IRCCS, 5Department of Brain and Behavioural Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Pain is very common in the neurorehabilitation setting, where it may not only represent a target for treatment but can also negatively influence rehabilitation procedures directly or through the side effects of painkillers. To date, there are neither guidelines nor consensus on how to assess and treat pain in neurorehabilitation. Because of the very scanty pieces of evidence on this topic, the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN was promoted under the auspices of different scientific societies. This article illustrates the rationale, methodology, and topics of the ICCPN. The recommendations of the ICCPN will offer some information on how to deal with pain in neurorehabilitation and may represent the starting point for further studies.Keywords: assessment, consensus conference, neurology, pain, rehabilitation, treatment

  8. Revised classification/nomenclature of vitiligo and related issues: the Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, K; Lim, H W; Suzuki, T; Katayama, I; Hamzavi, I; Lan, C C E; Goh, B K; Anbar, T; Silva de Castro, C; Lee, A Y; Parsad, D; van Geel, N; Le Poole, I C; Oiso, N; Benzekri, L; Spritz, R; Gauthier, Y; Hann, S K; Picardo, M; Taieb, A

    2012-05-01

    During the 2011 International Pigment Cell Conference (IPCC), the Vitiligo European Taskforce (VETF) convened a consensus conference on issues of global importance for vitiligo clinical research. As suggested by an international panel of experts, the conference focused on four topics: classification and nomenclature; definition of stable disease; definition of Koebner's phenomenon (KP); and 'autoimmune vitiligo'. These topics were discussed in seven working groups representing different geographical regions. A consensus emerged that segmental vitiligo be classified separately from all other forms of vitiligo and that the term 'vitiligo' be used as an umbrella term for all non-segmental forms of vitiligo, including 'mixed vitiligo' in which segmental and non-segmental vitiligo are combined and which is considered a subgroup of vitiligo. Further, the conference recommends that disease stability be best assessed based on the stability of individual lesions rather than the overall stability of the disease as the latter is difficult to define precisely and reliably. The conference also endorsed the classification of KP for vitiligo as proposed by the VETF (history based, clinical observation based, or experimentally induced). Lastly, the conference agreed that 'autoimmune vitiligo' should not be used as a separate classification as published evidence indicates that the pathophysiology of all forms of vitiligo likely involves autoimmune or inflammatory mechanisms.

  9. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    , the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference...

  10. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016: children, youth, and physical activity in schools and during leisure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan; Hillman, Charles; Andersen, Lars Bo; Weiss, Maureen; Williams, Craig A; Lintunen, Taru; Green, Ken; Hansen, Peter Riis; Naylor, Patti-Jean; Ericsson, Ingegerd; Nielsen, Glen; Froberg, Karsten; Bugge, Anna; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Schipperijn, Jasper; Dagkas, Symeon; Agergaard, Sine; von Seelen, Jesper; Østergaard, Charlotte; Skovgaard, Thomas; Busch, Henrik; Elbe, Anne-Marie

    2016-10-01

    From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord on the effects of physical activity on children's and youth's fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process that began with presentation of the state-of-the art in each domain followed by plenary and group discussions. Ultimately, Consensus Conference participants reached agreement on the 21-item consensus statement.

  11. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016: children, youth, and physical activity in schools and during leisure time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Duda, Joan; Hillman, Charles; Andersen, Lars Bo; Weiss, Maureen; Williams, Craig A; Lintunen, Taru; Green, Ken; Hansen, Peter Riis; Naylor, Patti-Jean; Ericsson, Ingegerd; Nielsen, Glen; Froberg, Karsten; Bugge, Anna; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Dagkas, Symeon; Agergaard, Sine; von Seelen, Jesper; Østergaard, Charlotte; Skovgaard, Thomas; Busch, Henrik; Elbe, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord on the effects of physical activity on children's and youth's fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process that began with presentation of the state-of-the art in each domain followed by plenary and group discussions. Ultimately, Consensus Conference participants reached agreement on the 21-item consensus statement. PMID:27354718

  12. Publication outcomes for research presented at a Canadian surgical conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sean A.; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Background The failure of investigators to publish research in peer-reviewed journals following acceptance at a national or international meeting can lead to significant publication biases in the literature. Our objective was to evaluate the abstract to manuscript conversion rate for abstracts presented at the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery (CSVS) annual meeting and to evaluate the conversion rate for CSVS-awarded research grants. Methods We searched for authors of abstracts accepted at the CSVS Annual Meeting (2007–2013) and recipients of CSVS research awards (2005–2013) on Scopus and PubMed databases to identify related publications. Results We identified 84 publications from 188 research abstracts (45%) and 17 publications from 39 research grants (44%). The mean time to publication was 1.8 years and the mean impact factor was 2.7. Studies related to endovascular therapies demonstrated a trend toward a higher rate of publication relative to open surgical therapies (64 [56%] v. 37 [27%]). Additionally, we observed a similar trend in research grant topics related to endovascular therapies relative to open surgical therapies (9 [67%] v. 8 [38%]). Finally, CSVS research grant recipients who subsequently published had a significantly higher h-index at the time of receipt than those who had not published. Conclusion The CSVS annual meeting’s abstract to publication conversion rate is comparable to that of its Canadian peers as well as to other medical specialties; however, a substantial publication gap remains. We identified several potential areas that may help to improve the effectiveness of CSVS research grants. PMID:28234220

  13. Handling and staging of renal cell carcinoma: the International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus (ISUP) conference recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trpkov, K.; Grignon, D.J.; Bonsib, S.M.; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Lopez-Beltran, A.; Samaratunga, H.; Tamboli, P.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Montironi, R.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Society of Urologic Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference on renal cancer, through working group 3, focused on the issues of staging and specimen handling of renal tumors. The conference was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urologic Pathology members, and

  14. American Burn Association consensus conference to define sepsis and infection in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, David G; Saffle, Jeffrey R; Holmes, James H; Gamelli, Richard L; Palmieri, Tina L; Horton, Jureta W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Traber, Daniel L; Mozingo, David W; Deitch, Edwin A; Goodwin, Cleon W; Herndon, David N; Gallagher, James J; Sanford, Art P; Jeng, James C; Ahrenholz, David H; Neely, Alice N; O'Mara, Michael S; Wolf, Steven E; Purdue, Gary F; Garner, Warren L; Yowler, Charles J; Latenser, Barbara A

    2007-01-01

    Because of their extensive wounds, burn patients are chronically exposed to inflammatory mediators. Thus, burn patients, by definition, already have "systemic inflammatory response syndrome." Current definitions for sepsis and infection have many criteria (fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, leukocytosis) that are routinely found in patients with extensive burns, making these current definitions less applicable to the burn population. Experts in burn care and research, all members of the American Burn Association, were asked to review the literature and prepare a potential definition on one topic related to sepsis or infection in burn patients. On January 20, 2007, the participants met in Tucson, Arizona to develop consensus for these definitions. After review of the definitions, a summary of the proceedings was prepared. The goal of the consensus conference was to develop and publish standardized definitions for sepsis and infection-related diagnoses in the burn population. Standardized definitions will improve the capability of performing more meaningful multicenter trials among burn centers.

  15. Cologne Consensus Conference, Management of Conflict of Interest, 12 and 13 September 2014, Cologne, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Simper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On 12–13 September 2014 the third annual Cologne Consensus Conference (CCC was held in Cologne, Germany. The two-day educational event was organised by the European Cardiology Section Foundation (ECSF and the European Board for Accreditation in Cardiology (EBAC, a specialty CME-CPD accreditation board of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS. The conference was planned in cooperation with an impressive group of international organisations and faculty members representing leading European and North American institutions. Each year, the CCC is organised around a specific topic area. For the conference’s third iteration, the management of conflicts of interest (COI was the focus. The CCC 2014 was an exceptional opportunity for international experts and leadership to gather and learn from one another through both the formal presentations and lively group discussions. This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions from the educational event.

  16. On the path to translation: Highlights from the 2010 Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thériault Brigitte L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer continues to be the most lethal of the gynaecologic malignancies due to the lack of early detection, screening strategies and ineffective therapeutics for late-stage metastatic disease, particularly in the recurrent setting. The gathering of researchers investigating fundamental pathobiology of ovarian cancer and the clinicians who treat patients with this insidious disease is paramount to meeting the challenges we face. Since 2002, the Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research, held every two years, has served this essential purpose. The objectives of this conference have been to disseminate new information arising from the most recent ovarian cancer research and identify the most pressing challenges we still face as scientists and clinicians. This is best accomplished through direct encounters and exchanges of innovative ideas among colleagues and trainees from the realms of basic science and clinical disciplines. This meeting has and continues to successfully facilitate rapid networking and establish new collaborations from across Canada. This year, more guest speakers and participants from other countries have extended the breadth of the research on ovarian cancer that was discussed at the meeting. This report summarizes the key findings presented at the fifth biennial Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research held in Toronto, Ontario, and includes the important issues and challenges we still face in the years ahead to make a significant impact on this devastating disease.

  17. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens: rationale and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. The activities of the conference were coordinated through five workgroups. The results are presented in five separate reports covering (1) specimen handling, (2) T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume, (3) extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease, (4) seminal vesicles and lymph node metastases and (5) surgical margins. In this introductory article we describe some novel features of the organization of the consensus process. Following the completion of a pre-meeting survey conference, participants discussed and voted on 43 specific issues of contention relating to the pathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Consensus, defined as agreement by at least 65% of participants present, was achieved for 30 questions.

  18. Canadian Association of Radiologists: consensus guidelines and standards for cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennie, C.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: cdennie@toh.on.ca; Leipsic, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Div. of Cardiology, Univ. of British Columbia and St Paul' s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Brydie, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Dalhousie Univ. and Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Invasive coronary angiography remains the gold standard for imaging of the coronary arteries. Because of poor temporal and spatial resolution, noninvasive imaging of the heart using computed tomography (CT) had remained a challenge until the recent past. Since 1999, and the advent of 4-detector electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated CT, there have been rapid technical developments in CT technology and postprocessing tools, thus enabling an accurate noninvasive assessment of cardiac anatomy including the coronary arteries as well as cardiac function. Today, this relatively new technique increasingly is being requested and performed on a routine basis. Although guidelines and standards for the performance of cardiac CT (CCT) have been published by other societies outside of Canada [1-5], the Canadian Association of Radiologists recognizes that Canadian radiologists play a leading and pivotal role in the safe and proper implementation of CCT throughout the country, as well as in the training and continuing medical education of physicians performing and interpreting CCT studies. This comprehensive article reviews the current evidence for CCT to date and outlines the standards for the implementation of a CCT program. Based on the review of the current literature and on expert opinion, recommendations regarding indications and contraindications for CCT also are provided. (author)

  19. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Consensus Guidelines on Safety and Quality Indicators in Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several organizations worldwide have developed procedure-based guidelines and/or position statements regarding various aspects of quality and safety indicators, and credentialing for endoscopy. Although important, they do not specifically address patient needs or provide a framework for their adoption in the context of endoscopy services. The consensus guidelines reported in this article, however, aimed to identify processes and indicators relevant to the provision of high-quality endoscopy services that will support ongoing quality improvement across many jurisdictions, specifically in the areas of ethics, facility standards and policies, quality assurance, training and education, reporting standards and patient perceptions.

  20. [Vasculitis 2013. What are the changes introduced in the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeher, Margit

    2013-10-06

    Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of rare disorders in which inflammation of blood vessels is the common feature. Due to the increasing number of diseases as well as overlaps and gaps in the definition and nomenclature, the classification criteria were constantly changing in the past decades. The classifications were based essentially on the size of affected blood vessels and pathologic characteristics of inflamed vessel walls. The standard procedures and validated diagnostic criteria are missing from the diagnostics of vasculitis, thus in clinical practice the classification criteria are applicable. The 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference brought a change in the definition, nomenclature and classification of previously uncategorized diseases. The definitions of subgroups accurately determine the diagnosis of the specific disease, and they are suitable for establishing homogeneous disease groups. By better understanding of the etiopathogenetic factors, further diseases and subgroups may be defined in the near future.

  1. Second Italian consensus conference on malignant pleural mesothelioma: state of the art and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Carmine; Novello, Silvia; Torri, Valter; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Casalini, Gianni Angelo; Fava, Cesare; Fubini, Bice; Magnani, Corrado; Mirabelli, Dario; Papotti, Mauro; Ricardi, Umberto; Rocco, Gaetano; Pastorino, Ugo; Tassi, Gianfranco; Trodella, Lucio; Zompatori, Maurizio; Scagliotti, Giorgio

    2013-06-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a relevant public health issue. A large amount of data indicate a relationship between mesothelioma and asbestos exposure. MPM incidence has considerably and constantly increased over the past two decades in industrialized countries and is expected to peak in 2010-2020. In Italy, the standardized incidence rate in 2008 was 3.6 and 1.3 per 100,000 in men and women respectively, with wide differences from one region to another. The approach to this disease remains difficult and complex in terms of pathogenic mechanism, diagnosis, staging and treatment thus an optimal strategy has not yet been clearly defined. The Second Italian Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference on Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma was held in Turin (Italy) on November 24-25, 2011: recommendations on MPM management for public health institutions, clinicians and patients are presented in this report.

  2. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colorectal cancer clinical management: the pathologists expert review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirke, P; West, N P; Nagtegaal, I D

    2014-02-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20 years; however, a considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of Cancer Care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012, the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about cancer of the colon and rectum was held. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organizations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries.

  3. Advances in renal neoplasia: recommendations from the 2012 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding the classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. There was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as novel tumors: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor-family translocation RCC [in particular t(6; 11) RCC], and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, 3 rare epithelial carcinomas were considered emerging or provisional entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation RCC. There were also a number of suggested modifications to existing World Health Organization 2004 categories, with the new classification to be known as the ISUP Vancouver Classification. Tumor morphotype, sarcomatoid/rhabdoid differentiation, and tumor necrosis were identified as significant prognostic parameters for RCC. The ISUP Grading System was accepted with grades 1-3 of clear cell and papillary RCC being based on nucleolar prominence, whereas extreme nuclear pleomorphism or sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation defined grade 4 tumors. It was agreed that chromophobe RCC should not be graded. Consensus guidelines were formulated for specimen handling, and it was agreed that renal sinus invasion is present when tumor is in direct contact with fat or loose connective tissue of the sinus or if there is involvement of endothelial-lined spaces within the renal sinus, regardless of the size. The role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors was considered, and panels of immunohistochemical markers were identified for use in specific differential diagnostic scenarios.

  4. Proctection by Flavonal-Rich foods against vascular dysfunction and oxidative damage: 27th Hohenheim consensus conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sies, H.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Grune, T.; Stahl, W.

    2012-01-01

    Criteria for assessing the purported protection by flavanol-rich foods against vascular dysfunction and oxidative damage to biomolecules was the subject of the 27th Hohenheim Consensus Conference held on July 11, 2011. State-of-the-art evidence was put into perspective, focusing on several questions

  5. Identifying gaps in the locoregional management of early breast cancer: highlights from the Kyoto Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toi, Masakazu; Winer, Eric P; Inamoto, Takashi; Benson, John R; Forbes, John F; Mitsumori, Michihide; Robertson, John F R; Sasano, Hironobu; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Yamauchi, Akira; Klimberg, V Suzanne

    2011-10-01

    A consensus conference was held to investigate issues related to the local management of early breast cancer. Here, we highlight the major topics discussed at the conference and propose ideas for future studies. Regarding axillary management, we examined three major issues. First, we discussed whether the use of axillary reverse mapping could clarify the lymphatic system of breast and whether the ipsilateral arm might help avoid lymphedema. Second, the use of an indocyanine green fluorescent navigation system was discussed for intraoperative lymphatic mapping. These new issues should be examined further in practice. Finally, some agreement was reached on the importance of "four-node diagnosis" to aid in the diagnostic accuracy of sentinel nodes. Regarding breast treatment, there was general agreement that the clinical value of surgical margins in predicting local failure was dependent on the tumor's intrinsic biology and subtypes. For patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy, less extensive excision may be feasible in those who respond to systemic therapy in an acceptable manner. Most trials of preoperative chemotherapy lack outcome data on local recurrence. Therefore, there is a need for such data for overview analysis. We also agreed that radiation after mastectomy may be beneficial in node-positive cases where more than four nodes are involved. Throughout the discussions for both invasive and noninvasive disease, the investigation of nomograms was justified for major issues in the decision-making process, such as the presence or absence of microinvasion and the involvement of nonsentinel nodes in sentinel node-positive patients.

  6. Practical Approaches to the Use of Lenalidomide in Multiple Myeloma: A Canadian Consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Reece

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Canada, lenalidomide combined with dexamethasone (Len/Dex is approved for use in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM. Our expert panel sought to provide an up-to-date practical guide on the use of lenalidomide in the managing RRMM within the Canadian clinical setting, including management of common adverse events (AEs. The panel concluded that safe, effective administration of Len/Dex treatment involves the following steps: (1 lenalidomide dose adjustment based on creatinine clearance and the extent of neutropenia or thrombocytopenia, (2 dexamethasone administered at 20–40 mg/week, and (3 continuation of treatment until disease progression or until toxicity persists despite dose reduction. Based on available evidence, the following precautions should reduce the risk of common Len/Dex AEs: (1 all patients treated with Len/Dex should receive thromboprophylaxis, (2 erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs should be used cautiously, and (3 females of child-bearing potential and males in contact with such females must use multiple contraception methods. Finally, while Len/Dex can be administered irrespective of prior therapy and in all prognostic subsets, patients with chromosomal deletion 17(p13 have less favorable outcomes with all treatments, including Len/Dex. New directions for the use of lenalidomide in RRMM are also considered.

  7. Diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: An evidence-based Canadian consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Simron; Asa, Sylvia L; Dey, Chris; Kennecke, Hagen; Laidley, David; Law, Calvin; Asmis, Timothy; Chan, David; Ezzat, Shereen; Goodwin, Rachel; Mete, Ozgur; Pasieka, Janice; Rivera, Juan; Wong, Ralph; Segelov, Eva; Rayson, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The majority of neuroendocrine tumors originate in the digestive system and incidence is increasing within Canada and globally. Due to rapidly evolving evidence related to diagnosis and clinical management, updated guidance on the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are of clinical importance. Well-differentiated GI-NETs may exhibit indolent clinical behavior and are often metastatic at diagnosis. Some NET patients will develop secretory disease requiring symptom control to optimize quality of life and clinical outcomes. Optimal management of GI-NETs is in a multidisciplinary environment and is multimodal, requiring collaboration between medical, surgical, imaging and pathology specialties. Clinical application of advances in pathological classification and diagnostic technologies, along with evolving surgical, radiotherapeutic and medical therapies are critical to the advancement of patient care. We performed a systematic literature search to update our last set of published guidelines (2010) and identified new level 1 evidence for novel therapies, including telotristat etiprate (TELESTAR), lanreotide (CLARINET), everolimus (RADIANT-2; RADIANT-4) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT; NETTER-1). Integrating these data with the clinical knowledge of 16 multi-disciplinary experts, we devised consensus recommendations to guide state of the art clinical management of GI-NETs.

  8. Conference Scene: epigenetics eh! The first formal meeting of the Canadian epigenetics community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Alan; Hendzel, Michael J

    2011-08-01

    In recognition of Canada's longstanding interest in epigenetics - and a particular linguistic interjection - the inaugural 'Epigenetics, Eh!' conference was held between 4-7 May 2011 in London, Ontario. The meeting struck an excellent balance between Canadian and international leaders in epigenetic research while also providing a venue to showcase up-and-coming talent. Almost without exception, presentations touched on the wide-ranging and severe consequences of epigenetic dysfunction, as well as current and emerging therapeutic opportunities. While gaining a deeper understanding of how DNA and histone modifications, together with multiple classes of ncRNAs, act to functionalize our genome, participants were also provided with a glimpse of the astounding complexity of chromatin structure, challenging existing dogma.

  9. Initiation and use of propranolol for infantile hemangioma: report of a consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Beth A; Frommelt, Peter C; Chamlin, Sarah L; Haggstrom, Anita; Bauman, Nancy M; Chiu, Yvonne E; Chun, Robert H; Garzon, Maria C; Holland, Kristen E; Liberman, Leonardo; MacLellan-Tobert, Susan; Mancini, Anthony J; Metry, Denise; Puttgen, Katherine B; Seefeldt, Marcia; Sidbury, Robert; Ward, Kendra M; Blei, Francine; Baselga, Eulalia; Cassidy, Laura; Darrow, David H; Joachim, Shawna; Kwon, Eun-Kyung M; Martin, Kari; Perkins, Jonathan; Siegel, Dawn H; Boucek, Robert J; Frieden, Ilona J

    2013-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are common neoplasms composed of proliferating endothelial-like cells. Despite the relative frequency of IH and the potential severity of complications, there are currently no uniform guidelines for treatment. Although propranolol has rapidly been adopted, there is significant uncertainty and divergence of opinion regarding safety monitoring, dose escalation, and its use in PHACE syndrome (PHACE = posterior fossa, hemangioma, arterial lesions, cardiac abnormalities, eye abnormalities; a cutaneous neurovascular syndrome characterized by large, segmental hemangiomas of the head and neck along with congenital anomalies of the brain, heart, eyes and/or chest wall). A consensus conference was held on December 9, 2011. The multidisciplinary team reviewed existing data on the pharmacologic properties of propranolol and all published reports pertaining to the use of propranolol in pediatric patients. Workgroups were assigned specific topics to propose protocols on the following subjects: contraindications, special populations, pretreatment evaluation, dose escalation, and monitoring. Consensus protocols were recorded during the meeting and refined after the meeting. When appropriate, protocol clarifications and revision were made and agreed upon by the group via teleconference. Because of the absence of high-quality clinical research data, evidence-based recommendations are not possible at present. However, the team agreed on a number of recommendations that arose from a review of existing evidence, including when to treat complicated IH; contraindications and pretreatment evaluation protocols; propranolol use in PHACE syndrome; formulation, target dose, and frequency of propranolol; initiation of propranolol in infants; cardiovascular monitoring; ongoing monitoring; and prevention of hypoglycemia. Where there was considerable controversy, the more conservative approach was selected. We acknowledge that the recommendations are conservative in

  10. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  11. Guidelines for the practical stability studies of anticancer drugs: a European consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, C; Astier, A; Vulto, A; Sewell, G; Vigneron, J; Trittler, R; Daouphars, M; Paul, M; Trojniak, M; Pinguet, F

    2011-07-01

    Stability studies performed by the pharmaceutical industry are only designed to fulfill licensing requirements. Thus, post-dilution or -reconstitution stability data are frequently limited to 24h only for bacteriological reasons regardless of the true chemical stability which could, in many cases, be longer. In practice, the pharmacy-based centralized preparation may require infusions to be made several days in advance to provide, for example, the filling of ambulatory devices for continuous infusions or batch preparations for dose banding. Furthermore, a non-justified limited stability for expensive products is obviously very costly. Thus, there is a compelling need for additional stability data covering practical uses of anticancer drugs. A European conference consensus was held in France, May 2010, under the auspices of the French Society of Oncology Pharmacy (SFPO) to propose adapted rules on stability in practical situations and guidelines to perform corresponding stability studies. For each anticancer drug, considering their therapeutic index, the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) variability, specific clinical use and risks related to degradation products, the classical limit of 10% of degradation can be inappropriate. Therefore, acceptance limits must be clinically relevant and should be defined for each drug individually. Design of stability studies has to reflect the different needs of the clinical practice (preparation for the week-ends, outpatient transportations, implantable devices, dose banding…). It is essential to use validated stability-indicating methods, separating degradation products being formed in the practical use of the drug. Sequential temperature designs should be encouraged to replicate problems seen in daily practice such as rupture of the cold-chain or temperature-cycling between refrigerated storage and ambient in-use conditions. Stressed conditions are recommended to evaluate not only the role of classical variables (p

  12. Advancing Treatment for Metastatic Bone Cancer: Consensus Recommendations from the Second Cambridge Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Robert E.; Guise, Theresa A.; Lipton, Allan; Roodman, G. David; Berenson, James R.; Body, Jean-Jacques; Boyce, Brendan F.; Calvi, Laura M.; Hadji, Peyman; McCloskey, Eugene V.; Saad, Fred; Smith, Matthew R.; Suva, Larry J.; Taichman, Russell S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Summarize current knowledge, critical gaps in knowledge, and recommendations to advance the field of metastatic bone cancer. Experimental Design A multidisciplinary consensus conference was convened to review recent progress in basic and clinical research, assess critical gaps in current knowledge, and prioritize recommendations to advance research in the next 5 years. The program addressed three principal topics: biology of metastasis, preserving normal bone health, and optimizing bone-targeted therapies. Results A variety of specific recommendations were identified as important to advance research and clinical care over the next 5 years. Conclusions Priorities for research in bone biology include characterizing components of the stem cell niche in bone, developing oncogenic immunocompetent animal models of bone metastasis, and investigating the unique contribution of the bone microenvironment to tumor growth and dormancy. Priorities for research in preserving normal bone health include developing methods to measure and characterize disseminating tumor cells, assessing outcomes from the major prevention trials currently in progress, and improving methodologies to assess risks and benefits of treatment. Priorities for optimizing bone-targeted therapies include advancing studies of serum proteomics and genomics to reliably identify patients who will develop bone metastases, enhancing imaging for early detection of bone metastases and early response evaluation, and developing new tests to evaluate response to bone-directed treatments. PMID:18927277

  13. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Tom; Cicardi, Marco; Farkas, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency) and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007...... International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. OBJECTIVE: To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010). METHODS: The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN...... approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. RESULTS: This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. CONCLUSIONS: Consensus approach is only...

  14. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magi-Galluzzi, C.; Evans, A.J.; Delahunt, B.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.L.; Humphrey, P.A.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a

  15. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 4: seminal vesicles and lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berney, D.M.; Wheeler, T.M.; Grignon, D.J.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Montironi, R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the infiltration of tumor into the seminal vesicles and regional lymph nodes were coo

  16. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 1: specimen handling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samaratunga, H.; Montironi, R.; True, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the handling and processing of radical prostatectomy specimens were coordinated by wo

  17. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 5: surgical margins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, P.H.; Cheng, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to surgical margin assessment were coordinated by working group 5. Pathologists agreed

  18. Optimal Use of Raltegravir (Isentress® in the Treatment of HIV-Infected Adults – Canadian Consensus Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Rachlis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A meeting of a Canadian group with significant experience and knowledge in HIV management, consisting of five physicians, a pharmacist and an AIDS researcher, was convened. Their goal was to develop guidance for Canadian HIV-treating physicians on the appropriate use of raltegravir (MK-0518, Isentress®, Merck Frosst Canada Inc in HIV-infected adults.

  19. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012 : Science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, C. J. H.; Boelens, P. G.; Tanis, P. J.; Espin, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Naredi, P.; Pahlman, L.; Ortiz, H.; Rutten, H. J.; Breugom, A. J.; Smith, J. J.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Valentini, V.

    2014-01-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the c

  20. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship : highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Classen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germa Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J.T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  1. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: Highlights from the third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Beyer (Jörg); P. Albers (Peter); R. Altena (Renske); J. Aparicio (Jorge); C. Bokemeyer; J. Busch (Jamie); R. Cathomas (Richard); E. Cavallin-Stahl (Eva); N.W. Clarke (Noel); J. Claßen (Johannes); G. Cohn-Cedermark (Gabriella); A.A. Dahl; G. Daugaard (Gedske); U. de Giorgi (Ugo); M. de Santis (Maria); M. De Wit (Meike); R. de Wit (Ronald); K.P. Dieckmann; M. Fenner (Martin); K. Fizazi (Karim); A. Flechon (Aude); S.D. Fossa (Sophie); J.R. Germá Lluch (José Ramón); J.A. Gietema (Jourik); S. Gillessen (Silke); A. Giwercman (Aleksander); J.T. Hartmann; A. Heidenreich (Axel); M. Hentrich (Marcus); F.U. Honecker (Friedemann); A. Horwich; R.A. Huddart (Robbert); S. Kliesch (Sabine); C. Kollmannsberger (Christian); S. Krege (Susanne); M.P. Laguna (Maria Pilar); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); A. Lorch (Anja); J.P. Lotz (Jean Pierre); F. Mayer; A. Necchi (Andrea); N. Nicolai (Nicola); J. Nuver (Janine); K. Oechsle (Karin); J. Oldenburg (Jan); J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); T. Powles (Tom); E. Rajpert-De Meyts (Ewa); O. Rick (Oliver); G. Rosti (Giovanni); R. Salvioni (Roberto); C. Winter (Christopher); C. Wittekind (Christian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et a

  2. Guidelines for the provision of echocardiography in Canada: recommendations of a joint Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Echocardiography Consensus Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Anthony J; Bewick, David; Chan, K L; Cujec, Bibiana; Dumesnil, J G; Honos, George; Munt, Brad; Sasson, Zion; Tam, James; Tomlinson, Charles; Aboguddah, Ayman; Ahmed, Shaheeda; Ali, Mohamed; Arsenault, Marie; Ascah, Kathryn; Ashton, Tom; Baird, Michael; Basmadjian, Arsene; Beique, Francois; Blakeley, Michael; Blais, Marie-Josee; Burggraf, Gary; Burwash, Ian; Cochrane, Jessica; Fagan, Susan; Giannoccaro, Peter; Hughes, William; Jones, Alan; Jue, John; Koilpillai, Chris; Leblanc, Marie-Helene; Londry, Colleen; Morgan, Dennis; O'Reilly, Michael; Sawchuk, Corey; Siu, Samuel; Sochowski, Randy; Tremblay, Guy; Welikovitch, Lisa; Yu, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Recognizing the central role of echocardiographic examinations in the assessment of most cardiac disorders and the need to ensure the provision of these services in a highly reliable, timely, economical and safe manner, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Canadian Society of Echocardiography undertook a comprehensive review of all aspects influencing the provision of echocardiographic services in Canada. Five regional panels were established to develop preliminary recommendations in the five component areas, which included the echocardiographic examination, the echocardiographic laboratory and report, the physician, the sonographer and indications for examinations. Membership in the panels was structured to recognize the regional professional diversity of individuals involved in the provision of echocardiography. In addition, a focus group of cardiac sonograhers was recruited to review aspects of the document impacting on sonographer responsibilities and qualification. The document is intended to be used as a comprehensive and practical reference for all of those involved in the provision of echocardiography in Canada.

  3. Research in assessment: Consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuwirth, Lambert; Colliver, Jerry; Gruppen, Larry;

    2011-01-01

    educational research, a plethora of methodologies is available to cater to many different research questions. This article contains consensus positions and suggestions on various elements of medical education (assessment) research. Overarching is the position that without a good theoretical underpinning...

  4. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 4: seminal vesicles and lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Daniel M; Wheeler, Thomas M; Grignon, David J; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; Humphrey, Peter A; van der Kwast, Theo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the infiltration of tumor into the seminal vesicles and regional lymph nodes were coordinated by working group 4. There was a consensus that complete blocking of the seminal vesicles was not necessary, although sampling of the junction of the seminal vesicles and prostate was mandatory. There was consensus that sampling of the vas deferens margins was not obligatory. There was also consensus that muscular wall invasion of the extraprostatic seminal vesicle only should be regarded as seminal vesicle invasion. Categorization into types of seminal vesicle spread was agreed by consensus to be not necessary. For examination of lymph nodes, there was consensus that special techniques such as frozen sectioning were of use only in high-risk cases. There was no consensus on the optimal sampling method for pelvic lymph node dissection specimens, although there was consensus that all lymph nodes should be completely blocked as a minimum. There was also a consensus that a count of the number of lymph nodes harvested should be attempted. In view of recent evidence, there was consensus that the diameter of the largest lymph node metastasis should be measured. These consensus decisions will hopefully clarify the difficult areas of pathological assessment in radical prostatectomy evaluation and improve the concordance of research series to allow more accurate assessment of patient prognosis.

  5. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J; Albers, P; Altena, R; Aparicio, J; Bokemeyer, C; Busch, J; Cathomas, R; Cavallin-Stahl, E; Clarke, N W; Claßen, J; Cohn-Cedermark, G; Dahl, A A; Daugaard, G; De Giorgi, U; De Santis, M; De Wit, M; De Wit, R; Dieckmann, K P; Fenner, M; Fizazi, K; Flechon, A; Fossa, S D; Germá Lluch, J R; Gietema, J A; Gillessen, S; Giwercman, A; Hartmann, J T; Heidenreich, A; Hentrich, M; Honecker, F; Horwich, A; Huddart, R A; Kliesch, S; Kollmannsberger, C; Krege, S; Laguna, M P; Looijenga, L H J; Lorch, A; Lotz, J P; Mayer, F; Necchi, A; Nicolai, N; Nuver, J; Oechsle, K; Oldenburg, J; Oosterhuis, J W; Powles, T; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Rick, O; Rosti, G; Salvioni, R; Schrader, M; Schweyer, S; Sedlmayer, F; Sohaib, A; Souchon, R; Tandstad, T; Winter, C; Wittekind, C

    2013-04-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377-1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478-496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497-513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements.

  6. Compression of digital images in radiology. Results of a consensus conference; Kompression digitaler Bilddaten in der Radiologie. Ergebnisse einer Konsensuskonferenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loose, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Braunschweig, R. [BG Kliniken Bergmannstrost, Halle/Saale (Germany). Klinik fuer Bildgebende Diagnostik und Interventionsradiologie; Kotter, E. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Mildenberger, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Simmler, R.; Wucherer, M. [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Recommendations for lossy compression of digital radiological DICOM images in Germany by means of a consensus conference. The compression of digital radiological images was evaluated in many studies. Even though the results demonstrate full diagnostic image quality of modality-dependent compression between 1:5 and 1:200, there are only a few clinical applications. Materials and Methods: A consensus conference with approx. 80 interested participants (radiology, industry, physics, and agencies) without individual invitation was organized by the working groups AGIT and APT of the German Roentgen Society DRG to determine compression factors without loss of diagnostic image quality for different anatomical regions for CT, CR/DR, MR, RF/XA examinations. The consent level was specified as at least 66 %. Results: For individual modalities the following compression factors were recommended: CT (brain) 1:5, CT (all other applications) 1:8, CR/DR (all applications except mammography) 1:10, CR/DR (mammography) 1:15, MR (all applications) 1:7, RF/XA (fluoroscopy, DSA, cardiac angio) 1:6. The recommended compression ratios are valid for JPEG and JPEG 2000 /Wavelet compressions. Conclusion: The results may be understood as recommendations and indicate limits of compression factors with no expected reduction of diagnostic image quality. They are similar to the current national recommendations for Canada and England. (orig.)

  7. Red blood cell exchange: 2015 American Society for Apheresis consensus conference on the management of patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Ravi; Ballas, Samir K; Garcia, Alicia; Kim, Haewon C; King, Karen; Sachais, Bruce; Williams, Lance A

    2016-10-09

    The American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) conducted a one-day consensus conference on red blood cell exchange (RBCx) in sickle cell disease (SCD) during its annual meeting in San Antonio, TX, on May 5, 2015. The authors of this article, a subcommittee of ASFA's Clinical Applications Committee, developed several questions with regard to pathophysiology of SCD and use of RBCx in the management of various complications. These questions were provided to the seven invited speakers who are the experts in the field of SCD. Two experts in the field moderated the proceedings of the conference, which was attended by more than 150 participants. After each presentation, there was a summary of the main points by the moderators and an open discussion with questions from the audience. A video recording of the proceedings, as well as each presentation, was made available to the authors. Each author's summary was reviewed and approved by the respective speaker before submission of this manuscript. The subcommittee also developed several key questions to generate a consensus amongst the speakers on key issues for using RBCx for patients with SCD.

  8. Handling and staging of renal cell carcinoma: the International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus (ISUP) conference recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpkov, Kiril; Grignon, David J; Bonsib, Stephen M; Amin, Mahul B; Billis, Athanase; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Tamboli, Pheroze; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Srigley, John R

    2013-10-01

    The International Society of Urologic Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference on renal cancer, through working group 3, focused on the issues of staging and specimen handling of renal tumors. The conference was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urologic Pathology members, and the results of this were used to inform the focus of conference discussion. On formal voting a ≥65% majority was considered a consensus agreement. For specimen handling it was agreed that with radical nephrectomy specimens the initial cut should be made along the long axis and that both radical and partial nephrectomy specimens should be inked. It was recommended that sampling of renal tumors should follow a general guideline of sampling 1 block/cm with a minimum of 3 blocks (subject to modification as needed in individual cases). When measuring a renal tumor, the length of a renal vein/caval thrombus should not be part of the measurement of the main tumor mass. In cases with multiple tumors, sampling should include at a minimum the 5 largest tumors. There was a consensus that perinephric fat invasion should be determined by examining multiple perpendicular sections of the tumor/perinephric fat interface and by sampling areas suspicious for invasion. Perinephric fat invasion was defined as either the tumor touching the fat or extending as irregular tongues into the perinephric tissue, with or without desmoplasia. It was agreed upon that renal sinus invasion is present when the tumor is in direct contact with the sinus fat or the loose connective tissue of the sinus, clearly beyond the renal parenchyma, or if there is involvement of any endothelium-lined spaces within the renal sinus, regardless of the size. When invasion of the renal sinus is uncertain, it was recommended that at least 3 blocks of the tumor-renal sinus interface should be submitted. If invasion is grossly evident, or obviously not present (small peripheral tumor), it was agreed that only 1 block was

  9. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  10. Management of hereditary angioedema: 2010 Canadian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract C1-inhibitor (C1-INH deficiency is a rare blood disorder resulting in angioedema attacks that are debilitating and may be life-threatening. Prophylaxis and therapy of events has changed since our first Canadian Consensus Conference on the diagnosis, therapy and management of HAE. We have formed the Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'Angioédème Héréditaire (RCAH - http://www.haecanada.com to advance care of patients with this disorder in Canada. We here present a review of management of HAE in Canada.

  11. Canadian Consensus Guidelines on Use of Amyloid Imaging in Canada: Update and Future Directions from the Specialized Task Force on Amyloid imaging in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforce, Robert; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Rabinovici, Gil D; Dubois, Bruno; Gauthier, S

    2016-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of brain amyloid beta is now clinically available in several countries including the United States and the United Kingdom, but not Canada. It has become an established technique in the field of neuroimaging of aging and dementia, with data incorporated in the new consensus guidelines for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease and predementia Alzheimer's disease-related conditions. At this point, there are three US Food and Drug Administration- and European Union-approved tracers. Guided by appropriate use criteria developed in 2013 by the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the utility of amyloid imaging in medical practice is now supported by a growing body of research. In this paper, we aimed to provide an update on the 2012 Canadian consensus guidelines to dementia care practitioners on proper use of amyloid imaging. We also wished to generate momentum for the industry to submit a new drug proposal to Health Canada. A group of local, national, and international dementia experts and imaging specialists met to discuss scenarios in which amyloid PET could be used appropriately. Peer-reviewed and published literature between January 2004 and May 2015 was searched. Technical and regulatory considerations pertaining to Canada were considered. The results of a survey of current practices in Canadian dementia centers were considered. A set of specific clinical and research guidelines was agreed on that defines the types of patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used in Canada. Future research directions were also outlined, notably the importance of studies that would assess the pharmaco-economics of amyloid imaging.

  12. Developing a Research Agenda to Optimize Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: An Executive Summary of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization" was held on May 12, 2015, with the goal of developing a high-priority research agenda on which to base future research. The specific aims of the conference were to (1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging use and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; (2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and (3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Over a 2-year period, the executive committee and other experts in the field convened regularly to identify specific areas in need of future research. Six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging were identified before the conference and served as the breakout groups on which consensus was achieved: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use. The executive committee invited key stakeholders to assist with the planning and to participate in the consensus conference to generate a multidisciplinary agenda. There were a total of 164 individuals involved in the conference and spanned various specialties, including general emergency medicine, pediatric emergency medicine, radiology, surgery, medical physics, and the decision sciences.

  13. Hereditary angioedema: beyond international consensus - circa December 2010 - The Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Dr. David McCourtie Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema was published earlier this year in this Journal (Bowen et al. Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2010, 6:24 - http://www.aacijournal.com/content/6/1/24. Since that publication, there have been multiple phase III clinical trials published on either prophylaxis or therapy of hereditary angioedema and some of these products have changed approval status in various countries. This manuscript was prepared to review and update the management of hereditary angioedema. Objective To review approaches for the diagnosis and management of hereditary angioedema (HAE circa December 2010 and present thoughts on moving from HAE management from international evidence-based consensus to facilitate more local health unit considerations balancing costs, efficacies of treatments, and risk benefits. Thoughts will reflect Canadian and international experiences. Methods PubMed searches including hereditary angioedema and diagnosis, therapy, management and consensus were reviewed as well as press releases from various pharmaceutical companies to early December 2010. Results The 2010 International Consensus Algorithms for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema is reviewed in light of the newly published phase III Clinical trials for prevention and therapy of HAE. Management approaches and models are discussed. Conclusions Consensus approach and double-blind placebo controlled trials are only interim guides to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase IV clinical trials, meta analyses, data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, safety, and head-to-head clinical trials investigating superiority or non-inferiority comparisons of available approaches. Since not all therapeutic products are available in all jurisdictions

  14. Information beyond the forum: Motivations, strategies, and impacts of citizen participants seeking information during a consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ashley A; Delborne, Jason; Kleinman, Daniel Lee

    2013-11-01

    During traditional consensus conferences, organizers control the formal information available to participants-by compiling structured background materials and recruiting expert panelists. Less formally, however, participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences into the deliberations, and in doing so, they often seek outside information. We explore this heretofore understudied phenomenon of information seeking during a deliberative event: the U.S. National Citizens' Technology Forum (2008), which addressed the convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science on the potential development of human-enhancement technologies. Through interviews with participants and observation of in-person and online deliberations, we identify outside information-seeking strategies and motivations. Our study demonstrates that conceptualizing models of deliberation as standalone settings of communication exchange ignores the reality of the complex information environment from which deliberative participants draw when making sense of technical issues. Future citizen deliberations must incorporate outside information seeking in the design of the exercises.

  15. [Vancouver classification of renal tumors: Recommendations of the 2012 consensus conference of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, G; Delahunt, B; Srigley, J R; Lüders, C; Lunkenheimer, J-M; Gevensleben, H; Thiesler, T; Montironi, R; Egevad, L

    2015-05-01

    The 2012 consensus conference of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) has formulated recommendations on classification, prognostic factors and staging as well as immunohistochemistry and molecular pathology of renal tumors. Agreement was reached on the recognition of five new tumor entities: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic kidney disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor family RCC, in particular t(6;11) RCC and hereditary leiomyomatosis-associated RCC. In addition three rare forms of carcinoma were considered as emerging or provisional entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation RCC. In the new ISUP Vancouver classification, modifications to the existing 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) specifications are also suggested. Tumor morphology, a differentiation between sarcomatoid and rhabdoid and tumor necrosis were emphasized as being significant prognostic parameters for RCC. The consensus ISUP grading system assigns clear cell and papillary RCCs to grades 1-3 due to nucleolar prominence and grade 4 is reserved for cases with extreme nuclear pleomorphism, sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation. Furthermore, consensus guidelines were established for the preparation of samples. For example, agreement was also reached that renal sinus invasion is diagnosed when the tumor is in direct contact with the fatty tissue or loose connective tissue of the sinus (intrarenal peripelvic fat) or when endothelialized cavities within the renal sinus are invaded by the tumor, independent of the size. The importance of biomarkers for the diagnostics or prognosis of renal tumors was also emphasized and marker profiles were formulated for use in specific differential diagnostics.

  16. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, T.H. van der; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.; Delahunt, B.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporti

  17. Pathogenesis of Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure : Workgroup Statements from the Eleventh Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haase, Michael; Mueller, Christian; Damman, Kevin; Murray, Patrick T.; Kellum, John A.; Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter A.; McCullough, PA; Kellum, JA; Mehta, RL; Murray, PT; Ronco, C

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiorenal syndromes (CRS) types 1-5 are still sparsely characterized. In an attempt to address this issue, a consensus conference on CRS was held in Venice, Italy, in November 2012 under the auspices of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI). Working group 1

  18. Proceedings of GeoHalifax 2009 : the 62. Canadian geotechnical conference and 10. joint CGS/IAH-CNC groundwater conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, C.; Fenton, G. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada); Taylor, B. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada); Ferguson, G. [Saint Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada)] (comps.) (and others)

    2009-07-01

    More than 500 delegates from industry, government, universities and research centres attended this conference to exchange professional knowledge on research and development that affects all sectors of geotechnical engineering, applied geology and hydrogeology. The conference also highlighted recent geoenvironmental achievements. The geotechnical sessions were entitled: soil mechanics; soil mechanics and brownfields; foundation engineering; landslide and slopes engineering; rock mechanics; risk assessment; reliability-based design; geoenvironmental issues; transportation geotechniques; marine geotechniques and geohazards; non-textbook soils and waste soils; covers and liners; instrumentation; harbour and shoreline geotechniques; geosynthetic mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) systems; cold regions and climate change; computer applications; regional hydrogeology; groundwater-surface water interaction; well hydraulics; radioactive waste management; groundwater sustainability; source water protection; mine waters; field techniques in hydrogeology; and hydrogeology of fractured rocks. The conference featured more than 230 presentations, of which 37 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. "To change the world." Cairo conference reaches consensus on plan to stabilize world growth by 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    After 6 days of debate and 200 speakers during September 5-13, 1994, participants from 180 countries at the Cairo International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) agreed on a strategy for curbing global population growth over the next 20 years. The objective was sustained economic growth and sustainable development. In his opening remarks, UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali said that the objective was to balance humanity and the environment with the means to sustain life, and that the efficacy of the world economic order depended to some extent on the ICPD. Participants were urged to use rigor, tolerance, and conscience in conference deliberations. Men and women should have the right and the means to choose their families' futures. The preamble stated that the ICPD would probably be the last opportunity in the twentieth century to address globally the issues relating to population and development. UN Population Fund Executive Director Nafis Sadik remarked that the ICPD had the potential to change the world. Egyptian President Mohamed Hosni Mubarak was elected president of the ICPD. Mubarak stated that solutions to population problems must go beyond demographic accounting and incorporate change in social, economic, and cultural conditions. Norway's Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland stated that development in many countries never reached many women. She called it a hypocritical morality that allowed women to suffer and die from unwanted pregnancies, illegal abortions, and miserable living conditions. US Vice President Albert Gore called for comprehensive and holistic solutions. The essential features of social change would involve democracy, economic reform, low rates of inflation, low levels of corruption, sound environmental management, free and open markets, and access to developed country markets. Pakistan's Prime Minister Benazir urged the empowerment of women. Many expressed the concern about unsustainable consumption in industrialized

  20. STRATEGIC PRIORITIES FOR INCREASING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG ADULTS AGE 50 AND OLDER: THE NATIONAL BLUEPRINT CONSENSUS CONFERENCE SUMMARY REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Bazzarre

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available On May 1, 2001, a coalition of national organizations released a major planning document designed to develop a national strategy for the promotion of physically active lifestyles among the mid-life and older adult population. The National Blueprint: Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older was developed with input from 46 organizations with expertise in health, medicine, social and behavioral sciences, epidemiology, gerontology/geriatrics, clinical science, public policy, marketing, medical systems, community organization, and environmental issues. The Blueprint notes that, despite a wealth of evidence about the benefits of physical activity for mid-life and older persons, there has been little success in convincing age 50+ Americans to adopt physically active lifestyles. The Blueprint identifies barriers in the areas of research, home and community programs, medical systems, public policy and advocacy, and marketing and communications. In addition to identifying barriers, the Blueprint proposes a number of concrete strategies that could be employed in order to overcome the barriers to physical activity in society at large. This report summarizes the outcome of the National Blueprint Consensus Conference that was held in October 2002. In this conference, representatives of more than 50 national organizations convened in Washington, D.C. with the goal of identifying high priority and high feasibility strategies which would advance the National Blueprint and which could be initiated within the next 12 to 24 months. Participants in the consensus conference were assigned to one of five breakout groups: home and community, marketing, medical systems, public policy, and research. Each breakout group was charged with identifying the three highest priority strategies within their area for effectively increasing physical activity levels in the mid-life and older adult population. In addition to the 15 strategies identified by the

  1. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. de; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Ares, L.P.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the Amst

  2. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  3. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of ...

  4. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A...

  5. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P;

    2011-01-01

    the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer to be addressed through discussion......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before...

  6. [Consensus Meeting of the 9th International Conference on Primary Therapy of Early Breast Cancer (St. Gall, January 26-29, 2005)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thürlimann, B; Senn, H J

    2005-06-01

    More than 4,000 participants attended the congress and the consensus conference 2005, an increase of more than 1,000 participants. The conference had 2 highlights. (1) The presentation of the first results of the study BIG 1-98 -- letrozole as adjuvant, endocrine therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer -- showed a relative risk reduction in the disease-free survival of 19% when compared to tamoxifen. (2) The consensus conference adopted 2 new relevant developments: endocrine responsiveness as criterion for both chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. The newly introduced electronic voting system allowed the audience to observe the forming of the panelists' opinions on more than 100 predefined questions.

  7. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship: highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Claßen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germá Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J. T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J. W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Winter, C.; Wittekind, C.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European consensus on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG). Ann Oncol 2004; 15: 1377–1399; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 478–496; Krege S, Beyer J, Souchon R et al. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ-Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part II. Eur Urol 2008; 53: 497–513]. A panel of 56 of 60 invited GCC experts from all across Europe discussed all aspects on diagnosis and treatment of GCC, with a particular focus on acute and late toxic effects as well as on survivorship issues. The panel consisted of oncologists, urologic surgeons, radiooncologists, pathologists and basic scientists, who are all actively involved in care of GCC patients. Panelists were chosen based on the publication activity in recent years. Before the meeting, panelists were asked to review the literature published since 2006 in 20 major areas concerning all aspects of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of GCC patients, and to prepare an updated version of the previous recommendations to be discussed at the conference. In addition, ∼50 E-vote questions were drafted and presented at the conference to address the most controversial areas for a poll of expert opinions. Here, we present the main recommendations and controversies of this meeting. The votes of the panelists are added as online supplements. PMID:23152360

  8. Abstracts from the 7th Canadian Conference on Dementia (CCD) held in Vancouver, October 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, S.; Wangsgaard, J.; Koenig, J.; Pathak, K; Jude, A.; Cytryn, K.N.; Qian, W.; Schweizer, T.; Fernandes, C.; Hung, L; Loewen, E.; Bindley, B.; Mclaren, D; Feist, T.; Phinney, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose: As of 2011, approximately 747,000 Canadians suffer from some form of dementia; Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one such form. AD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by significant neuronal death. Neuronal death has been associated with two pathophysiological features: 1) neurofibrillary tangles within the neurons, and 2) amyloid beta plaque formation between neurons. Excessive production of these two features is manifested by severe cognitive impairment. One of the mo...

  9. Digital technologies to support planning, treatment, and fabrication processes and outcome assessments in implant dentistry. Summary and consensus statements. The 4th EAO consensus conference 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Cordaro, Luca; van Assche, Nele

    2015-01-01

    AND METHODS: Three reviews were available for assessing the current literature and provided the basis for the discussions and the consensus report. One review dealt with the use of computers to plan implant therapy and to place implants in partially and fully edentulous patients. A second one focused on novel...... techniques and methods to assess treatment outcomes and the third compared CAD/CAM-fabricated reconstructions to conventionally fabricated ones. RESULTS: The consensus statements, the clinical recommendations, and the implications for research, all of them after approval by the plenum of the consensus...

  10. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colon & rectal cancer multidisciplinary management: the radiology experts review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudyka, V; Blomqvist, L; Beets-Tan, R G H; Boelens, P G; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J; Dieguez, A; Brown, G

    2014-04-01

    Some interesting shifts have taken place in the diagnostic approach for detection of colorectal lesions over the past decade. This article accompanies the recent EURECCA consensus group reccomendations for optimal management of colon and rectal cancers. In summary, imaging has a crucial role to play in the diagnosis, staging assessment and follow up of patients with colon and rectal cancer. Recent advances include the use of CT colonography instead of Barium Enema in the diagnosis of colonoic cancer and as an alternative to colonoscopy. Modern mutlidetector CT scanning techniques have also shown improvements in prognostic stratification of patients with colonic cancer and clinical trials are underway testing the selective use of neoadjuvant therapy for imaging identified high risk colon cancers. In rectal cancer, high resolution MRI with a voxel size less or equal to 3 × 1 × 1 mm3 on T2-weighted images has a proven ability to accurately stage patients with rectal cancer. Moreover, preoperative identification of prognostic features allows stratification of patients into different prognostic groups based on assessment of depth of extramural spread, relationship of the tumour edge to the mesorectal fascia (MRF) and extramural venous invasion (EMVI). These poor prognostic features predict an increased risk of local recurrence and/or metastatic disease and should form the basis for preoperative local staging and multidisciplinary preoperative discussion of patient treatment options.

  11. Brain Health: The Importance of Recognizing Cognitive Impairment: An IAGG Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E.; Morris, John C.; Berg-Weger, Marla; Borson, Soo; Carpenter, Brian D.; del Campo, Natalia; Dubois, Bruno; Fargo, Keith; Fitten, L. Jaime; Flaherty, Joseph H.; Ganguli, Mary; Grossberg, George T.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Petersen, Ronald D.; Rodriguez, Carroll; Saykin, Andrew J.; Scheltens, Philip; Tangalos, Eric G.; Verghese, Joe; Wilcock, Gordon; Winblad, Bengt; Woo, Jean; Vellas, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment creates significant challenges for patients, their families and friends, and clinicians who provide their health care. Early recognition allows for diagnosis and appropriate treatment, education, psychosocial support, and engagement in shared decision-making regarding life planning, health care, involvement in research, and financial matters. An IAGG-GARN consensus panel examined the importance of early recognition of impaired cognitive health. Their major conclusion was that case-finding by physicians and health professionals is an important step toward enhancing brain health for aging populations throughout the world. This conclusion is in keeping with the position of the United States’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that reimburses for detection of cognitive impairment as part the of Medicare Annual Wellness Visit and with the international call for early detection of cognitive impairment as a patient’s right. The panel agreed on the following specific findings: (1) validated screening tests are available that take 3 to 7 minutes to administer; (2) a combination of patient- and informant-based screens is the most appropriate approach for identifying early cognitive impairment; (3) early cognitive impairment may have treatable components; and (4) emerging data support a combination of medical and lifestyle interventions as a potential way to delay or reduce cognitive decline. PMID:26315321

  12. Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation: Reducing Financial Barriers to Live Kidney Donation--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tushla, Lara; Rudow, Dianne LaPointe; Milton, Jennifer; Rodrigue, James R; Schold, Jesse D; Hays, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Live-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is the best treatment for eligible people with late-stage kidney disease. Despite this, living kidney donation rates have declined in the United States in recent years. A potential source of this decline is the financial impact on potential and actual living kidney donors (LKDs). Recent evidence indicates that the economic climate may be associated with the decline in LDKT and that there are nontrivial financial ramifications for some LKDs. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation's Live Donor Community of Practice convened a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation. The conference included transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders (with the financial support of 10 other organizations) and sought to identify best practices, knowledge gaps, and opportunities pertaining to living kidney donation. This workgroup was tasked with exploring systemic and financial barriers to living kidney donation. The workgroup reviewed literature that assessed the financial effect of living kidney donation, analyzed employment and insurance factors, discussed international models for addressing direct and indirect costs faced by LKDs, and summarized current available resources. The workgroup developed the following series of recommendations to reduce financial and systemic barriers and achieve financial neutrality for LKDs: (1) allocate resources for standardized reimbursement of LKDs' lost wages and incidental costs; (2) pass legislation to offer employment and insurability protections to LKDs; (3) create an LKD financial toolkit to provide standardized, vetted education to donors and providers about options to maximize donor coverage and minimize financial effect within the current climate; and (4) promote further research to identify systemic barriers to living donation and LDKT to ensure the creation of mitigation strategies.

  13. Proceedings of the 2009 annual general conference and associated specialty conferences of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering : on the leading edge[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lye, L.; Burrell, B.; Snow, M.; Hussein, A.; Thomas, M.; Isgor, B.; Elliott, C.; Christian, J.; Rankin, J. [Canadian Society for Civil Engineering, Montreal, PQ (Canada)] (eds.)

    2009-07-01

    This 2009 international conference of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (CSCE) focused on the findings of the latest research and the emergence of the civil engineering profession. It was held in conjunction with the following specialty conferences: the first international and first engineering mechanics and materials (IEMM)specialty conference; the first international and third international hydrotechnical coastal estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference (IHSC); the second international and eighth construction specialty (ICS) conference; and the forum on professional practice and career development (FPD). The conference and associated specialty conferences provided a forum to discuss recent developments in all areas of civil engineering. Delegates from industrial, research, and academic institutions presented innovative technologies in the different areas of civil engineering and identified future directions for sustainable development. The presentations addressed a broad range of issues, such as the need for sustainable infrastructure while improving the safety of roads, dams, water supply and sewage treatment systems. Technical sessions addressed infrastructure management issues, risk assessment, hydrotechnical engineering and transportation engineering. The conference featured 182 presentations, of which 19 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  14. Technology-enabled assessment of health professions education: consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Zubair; Boulet, John R; Cook, David A;

    2011-01-01

    The uptake of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in health professions education can have far-reaching consequences on assessment. The medical education community still needs to develop a deeper understanding of how technology can underpin and extend assessment practices. This arti......The uptake of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in health professions education can have far-reaching consequences on assessment. The medical education community still needs to develop a deeper understanding of how technology can underpin and extend assessment practices....... This article was developed by the 2010 Ottawa Conference Consensus Group on technology-enabled assessment to guide practitioners and researchers working in this area. This article highlights the changing nature of ICTs in assessment, the importance of aligning technology-enabled assessment with local context...... health professional education. Recommendations include adhering to principles of good assessment, the need for developing coherent institutional policy, using technologies to broaden the competencies to be assessed, linking patient-outcome data to assessment of practitioner performance, and capitalizing...

  15. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation: Proceedings from the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne; Al Khatib, Sana; Apostolakis, Stavros; Auricchio, Angelo; Bailleul, Christophe; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boersma, Lucas; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Casadei, Barbara; Clemens, Andreas; Crijns, Harry; Derwand, Roland; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ezekowitz, Michael; Fetsch, Thomas; Gerth, Andrea; Gillis, Anne; Gulizia, Michele; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Häusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Hernandez-Brichis, Jessica; Jais, Pierre; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kautzner, Joseph; Kim, Steven; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Lane, Deirdre; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Moses, Gregory; Mueller, Markus; Münzel, Felix; Näbauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Oeff, Michael; Oto, Ali; Pieske, Burkert; Pisters, Ron; Potpara, Tatjana; Rasmussen, Lars; Ravens, Ursula; Reiffel, James; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Schäfer, Herbert; Schotten, Ulrich; Stegink, Wim; Stein, Kenneth; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Szumowski, Lukasz; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Thomitzek, Karen; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; von Stritzky, Berndt; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2013-11-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has seen marked changes in past years, with the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, new antiarrhythmic drugs, and the emergence of catheter ablation as a common intervention for rhythm control. Furthermore, new technologies enhance our ability to detect AF. Most clinical management decisions in AF patients can be based on validated parameters that encompass type of presentation, clinical factors, electrocardiogram analysis, and cardiac imaging. Despite these advances, patients with AF are still at increased risk for death, stroke, heart failure, and hospitalizations. During the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association (AFNET/EHRA) consensus conference, we identified the following opportunities to personalize management of AF in a better manner with a view to improve outcomes by integrating atrial morphology and damage, brain imaging, information on genetic predisposition, systemic or local inflammation, and markers for cardiac strain. Each of these promising avenues requires validation in the context of existing risk factors in patients. More importantly, a new taxonomy of AF may be needed based on the pathophysiological type of AF to allow personalized management of AF to come to full fruition. Continued translational research efforts are needed to personalize management of this prevalent disease in a better manner. All the efforts are expected to improve the management of patients with AF based on personalized therapy.

  16. Proceedings of the Canadian Dam Association conference 2010: partnering for a safer future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    New and numerous challenges faced by the the dam safety community and dams were discussed at this conference. Hydraulic resources availability, the durability of the installations, modes of operation and processes, the business environment and human resources in the dam safety community are factors which will influence and impact these challenges. New types of dams have been constructed or are being built. Research is needed and knowledge sharing needs to be promoted to ensure the development of safe and reliable projects. This conference brought together samll dam owners and larger utilities looking for the latest in technology developments.

  17. Tenth European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine: recommendations for accepted and non-accepted clinical indications and practice of hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Daniel; Marroni, Alessandro; Kot, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    The tenth European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine took place in April 2016, attended by a large delegation of experts from Europe and elsewhere. The focus of the meeting was the revision of the European Committee on Hyperbaric Medicine (ECHM) list of accepted indications for hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT), based on a thorough review of the best available research and evidence-based medicine (EBM). For this scope, the modified GRADE system for evidence analysis, together with the DELPHI system for consensus evaluation, were adopted. The indications for HBOT, including those promulgated by the ECHM previously, were analysed by selected experts, based on an extensive review of the literature and of the available EBM studies. The indications were divided as follows: Type 1, where HBOT is strongly indicated as a primary treatment method, as it is supported by sufficiently strong evidence; Type 2, where HBOT is suggested as it is supported by acceptable levels of evidence; Type 3, where HBOT can be considered as a possible/optional measure, but it is not yet supported by sufficiently strong evidence. For each type, three levels of evidence were considered: A, when the number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is considered sufficient; B, when there are some RCTs in favour of the indication and there is ample expert consensus; C, when the conditions do not allow for proper RCTs but there is ample and international expert consensus. For the first time, the conference also issued 'negative' recommendations for those conditions where there is Type 1 evidence that HBOT is not indicated. The conference also gave consensus-agreed recommendations for the standard of practice of HBOT.

  18. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Complex congenital cardiac lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Silversides, Candice K.; Oechslin, Erwin; Schwerzmann, Markus; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Khairy, Paul; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Warnes, Carole; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and mult...

  19. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Executive summary

    OpenAIRE

    Silversides, Candice K.; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and mul...

  20. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 1: specimen handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaratunga, Hemamali; Montironi, Rodolfo; True, Lawrence; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; Humphrey, Peter A; van der Kwast, Theo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the handling and processing of radical prostatectomy specimens were coordinated by working group 1. Most uropathologists followed similar procedures for fixation of radical prostatectomy specimens, with 51% of respondents transporting tissue in formalin. There was also consensus that the prostate weight without the seminal vesicles should be recorded. There was consensus that the surface of the prostate should be painted. It was agreed that both the prostate apex and base should be examined by the cone method with sagittal sectioning of the tissue sample. There was consensus that the gland should be fully fixed before sectioning. Both partial and complete embedding of prostates was considered to be acceptable as long as the method of partial embedding is stated. No consensus was determined regarding the necessity of weighing and measuring the length of the seminal vesicles, the preparation of whole mounts rather than standardized blocks and the methodology for sampling of fresh tissue for research purposes, and it was agreed that these should be left to the discretion of the working pathologist.

  1. Searching for an Operational Definition of Frailty: A Delphi Method Based Consensus Statement. The Frailty Operative Definition-Consensus Conference Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Féart, Catherine; Mann, Giovanni; Viña, Jose; Chatterji, Somnath; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek; Gonzalez-Colaço Harmand, Magali; Bergman, Howard; Carcaillon, Laure; Nicholson, Caroline; Scuteri, Angelo; Sinclair, Alan; Pelaez, Martha; Van der Cammen, Tischa; Beland, François; Bickenbach, Jerome; Delamarche, Paul; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fried, Linda P.; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel; Rockwood, Kenneth; Rodríguez Artalejo, Fernando; Serviddio, Gaetano; Vega, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Background. There is no consensus regarding the definition of frailty for clinical uses. Methods. A modified Delphi process was used to attempt to achieve consensus definition. Experts were selected from different fields and organized into five Focus Groups. A questionnaire was developed and sent to experts in the area of frailty. Responses and comments were analyzed using a pre-established strategy. Statements with an agreement more than or equal to 80% were accepted. Results. Overall, 44% of the statements regarding the concept of frailty and 18% of the statements regarding diagnostic criteria were accepted. There was consensus on the value of screening for frailty and about the identification of six domains of frailty for inclusion in a clinical definition, but no agreement was reached concerning a specific set of clinical/laboratory biomarkers useful for diagnosis. Conclusions. There is agreement on the usefulness of defining frailty in clinical settings as well as on its main dimensions. However, additional research is needed before an operative definition of frailty can be established. PMID:22511289

  2. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kwast, Theo H; Amin, Mahul B; Billis, Athanase; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David; Humphrey, Peter A; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars; Delahunt, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporting of tumor size/volume and zonal location of prostate cancers were coordinated by working group 2. A survey circulated before the consensus conference demonstrated that 74% of the 157 participants considered pT2 substaging of prostate cancer to be of clinical and/or academic relevance. The survey also revealed a considerable variation in the frequency of reporting of pT2b substage prostate cancer, which was likely a consequence of the variable methodologies used to distinguish pT2a from pT2b tumors. Overview of the literature indicates that current pT2 substaging criteria lack clinical relevance and the majority (65.5%) of conference attendees wished to discontinue pT2 substaging. Therefore, the consensus was that reporting of pT2 substages should, at present, be optional. Several studies have shown that prostate cancer volume is significantly correlated with other clinicopathological features, including Gleason score and extraprostatic extension of tumor; however, most studies fail to demonstrate this to have prognostic significance on multivariate analysis. Consensus was reached with regard to the reporting of some quantitative measure of the volume of tumor in a prostatectomy specimen, without prescribing a specific methodology. Incorporation of the zonal and/or anterior location of the dominant/index tumor in the pathology report was accepted by most participants, but a formal definition of the identifying features of the dominant/index tumor remained undecided.

  3. Proceedings of the APPrO 2006 18. annual Canadian power conference and trade show : Green Power Conference : Canada's leading renewable energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J. [Association of Power Producers of Ontario, Toronto, ON (Canada)] (ed.)

    2007-07-01

    This conference provided a forum for members of the Association of Power Producers of Ontario to discuss recent developments in renewable energy and the electric power industry. An overview of Ontario's renewable standard offer program was provided. Members of the conference also discussed case studies of Ontario renewable energy projects including micro-hydro; anaerobic digesters; stand-alone wind power; and solar energy. The economics of wind power were discussed, and current capital costs for renewable energy technology projects were reviewed. Other topics included the use of base-load nuclear and hydro-electricity; the closing down of coal-fired generation; the integration of wind power; and natural gas and cogeneration. Issues related to interconnected power supplies were also reviewed. Discussions were divided into 5 topics : (1) an introduction to the standard offer program; (2) provincial procurement of green power; (3) case studies of stand-alone project; (4) distributed generation and the standard offer process; and distribution approval and connection issues. refs., tabs., figs.

  4. Experts reviews of the multidisciplinary consensus conference colon and rectal cancer 2012: science, opinions and experiences from the experts of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, C J H; Boelens, P G; Tanis, P J; Espin, E; Mroczkowski, P; Naredi, P; Pahlman, L; Ortiz, H; Rutten, H J; Breugom, A J; Smith, J J; Wibe, A; Wiggers, T; Valentini, V

    2014-04-01

    The first multidisciplinary consensus conference on colon and rectal cancer was held in December 2012, achieving a majority of consensus for diagnostic and treatment decisions using the Delphi Method. This article will give a critical appraisal of the topics discussed during the meeting and in the consensus document by well-known leaders in surgery that were involved in this multidisciplinary consensus process. Scientific evidence, experience and opinions are collected to support multidisciplinary teams (MDT) with arguments for medical decision-making in diagnosis, staging and treatment strategies for patients with colon or rectal cancer. Surgery is the cornerstone of curative treatment for colon and rectal cancer. Standardizing treatment is an effective instrument to improve outcome of multidisciplinary cancer care for patients with colon and rectal cancer. In this article, a review of the following focuses; Perioperative care, age and colorectal surgery, obstructive colorectal cancer, stenting, surgical anatomical considerations, total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery and training, surgical considerations for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and local recurrent rectal cancer (LRRC), surgery in stage IV colorectal cancer, definitions of quality of surgery, transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM), laparoscopic colon and rectal surgery, preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy, and how about functional outcome after surgery?

  5. Best practices recommendations in the application of immunohistochemistry in urologic pathology: report from the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mahul B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ulbright, Thomas M; Humphrey, Peter A; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Grignon, David; Trpkov, Kiril; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram; Delahunt, Brett; Berney, Daniel M; Srigley, John R; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E

    2014-08-01

    Members of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) participated in a half-day consensus conference to discuss guidelines and recommendations regarding best practice approaches to use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differential diagnostic situations in urologic pathology, including bladder, prostate, testis and, kidney lesions. Four working groups, selected by the ISUP leadership, identified several high-interest topics based on common or relevant challenging diagnostic situations and proposed best practice recommendations, which were discussed by the membership. The overall summary of the discussions and the consensus opinion forms the basis of a series of articles, one for each organ site. This Special Article summarizes the overall recommendations made by the four working groups. It is anticipated that this ISUP effort will be valuable to the entire practicing community in the appropriate use of IHC in diagnostic urologic pathology.

  6. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group II - Peri-Implantitis Diagnostics and Decision Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Erhan; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; López-Martínez, Jesús; O'Valle, Francisco; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Ramanauskaite, Ausra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction The task of Group 2 was to review and update the existing data concerning clinical and genetic methods of diagnostics of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) overview including analysis of enzymes and biomarkers and microbial profiles from implants. Material and Methods The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis) Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article. PMID:27833736

  7. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group III - Peri-Implantitis Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria e Almeida, Ricardo; Cicciù, Marco; Daugela, Povilas; Ramanauskaite, Ausra; Saulacic, Nikola; Tervonen, Tellervo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Yu, Shan-Huey

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction The task of Group 3 was to review and update the existing data concerning non-surgical, surgical non-regenerative and surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the preventive and supporting therapy in case of peri-implantitis. Material and Methods The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis) Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article. PMID:27833741

  8. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group II - Peri-Implantitis Diagnostics and Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Fikret Tözüm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 2 was to review and update the existing data concerning clinical and genetic methods of diagnostics of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF overview including analysis of enzymes and biomarkers and microbial profiles from implants. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  9. 55th Annual Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Conference on Epigenetics and Genomic Stability. Whistler, British Columbia, Canada, 14–18 March 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher J; Ausió, Juan

    2012-06-01

    The 55th Annual Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Conference on Epigenetics and Genomic Stability in Whistler, Canada, 14-18 March 2012, brought together 31 speakers from different nationalities. The organizing committee, led by Jim Davie (Chair) at the University of Manitoba (Manitoba, Canada), consisted of several established researchers in the fields of chromatin and epigenetics from across Canada. The meeting was centered on the contribution of epigenetics to gene expression, DNA damage and repair, and the role of environmental factors. A few interesting talks on replication added some insightful information on the controversial issue of histone post-translational modifications as genuine epigenetic marks that are inherited through cell division.

  10. The process and criteria for diagnosing specific learning disorders: indications from the Consensus Conference promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Lorusso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A Consensus Conference on Specific Learning Disorders has been promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS. The Consensus Conference consisted in a systematic review of the international literature addressing the issues of diagnosis, risk factors and prognosis, treatment, service delivery and organizational models for Specific Learning Disorders (reading, spelling/writing, calculation. Selected papers were examined by a group of Evaluators and then discussed by a Scientific and Technical Committee, whose conclusions were examined and approved by a Jury Panel. The part on diagnostic issues is presented here, encompassing a systematic discussion of the use and appropriateness of diagnostic criteria, parameters, tasks and psychometric indexes as illustrated in the literature, and providing recommendations for clinical practice. Special attention has been devoted to the collection, analysis and discussion of published data concerning languages with transparent orthography. Controversial issues such as discrepancy criteria, role of reading comprehension and importance of accuracy and fluency are discussed.

  11. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 5: surgical margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Puay Hoon; Cheng, Liang; Srigley, John R; Griffiths, David; Humphrey, Peter A; van der Kwast, Theodore H; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to surgical margin assessment were coordinated by working group 5. Pathologists agreed that tumor extending close to the 'capsular' margin, yet not to it, should be reported as a negative margin, and that locations of positive margins should be indicated as either posterior, posterolateral, lateral, anterior at the prostatic apex, mid-prostate or base. Other items of consensus included specifying the extent of any positive margin as millimeters of involvement; tumor in skeletal muscle at the apical perpendicular margin section, in the absence of accompanying benign glands, to be considered organ confined; and that proximal and distal margins be uniformly referred to as bladder neck and prostatic apex, respectively. Grading of tumor at positive margins was to be left to the discretion of the reporting pathologists. There was no consensus as to how the surgical margin should be regarded when tumor is present at the inked edge of the tissue, in the absence of transected benign glands at the apical margin. Pathologists also did not achieve agreement on the reporting approach to benign prostatic glands at an inked surgical margin in which no carcinoma is present.

  12. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Evans, Andrew J; Delahunt, Brett; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; van der Kwast, Theo H; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars L; Humphrey, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a disease), bladder neck invasion, lymphovascular invasion and the definition of pT4 were coordinated by working group 3. It was agreed that prostate cancer can be categorized as pT3a in the absence of adipose tissue involvement when cancer bulges beyond the contour of the gland or beyond the condensed smooth muscle of the prostate at posterior and posterolateral sites. Extraprostatic extension can also be identified anteriorly. It was agreed that the location of extraprostatic extension should be reported. Although there was consensus that the amount of extraprostatic extension should be quantitated, there was no agreement as to which method of quantitation should be employed. There was overwhelming consensus that microscopic urinary bladder neck invasion by carcinoma should be reported as stage pT3a and that lymphovascular invasion by carcinoma should be reported. It is recommended that these elements are considered in the development of practice guidelines and in the daily practice of urological surgical pathology.

  13. "Identifying the hospitalised patient in crisis"--a consensus conference on the afferent limb of rapid response systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVita, Michael A; Smith, Gary B; Adam, Sheila K

    2010-01-01

    Most reports of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) focus on the efferent, response component of the system, although evidence suggests that improved vital sign monitoring and recognition of a clinical crisis may have outcome benefits. There is no consensus regarding how best to detect patient deteriora......Most reports of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) focus on the efferent, response component of the system, although evidence suggests that improved vital sign monitoring and recognition of a clinical crisis may have outcome benefits. There is no consensus regarding how best to detect patient...

  14. Gender differences in acute and chronic pain in the emergency department: results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference pain section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the life span; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  15. "Identifying the hospitalised patient in crisis"-A consensus conference on the afferent limb of Rapid Response Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devita, M.A.; Smith, G.B.; Adam, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most reports of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) focus on the efferent, response component of the system, although evidence suggests that improved vital sign monitoring and recognition of a clinical crisis may have outcome benefits. There is no consensus regarding how best to detect patient...

  16. Safety and effectiveness of the herpes zoster vaccine to prevent postherpetic neuralgia: 2014 Update and consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canadian Pain Society Study Day participants

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Pain Society (CPS hosted its first Study Day in Toronto in July 2014, attended by experts in various fields of pain management and research (listed below. The aim was to review the National Advisory Committee on Immunization guidelines and to prepare a CPS position statement concerning the use of the zoster vaccine in Canada.

  17. Collective knowledge: Using a Consensus Conference approach to develop recommendations for physical activity and nutrition programs for persons with Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya eBerry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this consensus conference was to have a lay panel of persons with type 2 diabetes (T2D work in collaboration with an expert panel of diabetes professionals to develop strategies designed to improve dietary and physical activity adherence in persons with T2D. Lay panel participants were 15 people living with T2D. The seven experts had expertise in exercise management, cardiovascular risk factors, community-based lifestyle interventions, healthy weight strategies, the glycemic index, exercise motivation, and social, environmental and cultural interactions. All meetings were facilitated by a professional, neutral facilitator. During the conference each expert gave a 15-minute presentation answering questions developed by the lay panel and all panel members worked to generate suggestions for programs and ways in which the needs of persons with T2D may be better met. A subgroup of the lay panel used the suggestions created from the conference to generate a final list of recommendations. Recommendations were categorized into 1 diagnosis/awareness (e.g., increasing awareness about T2D in the general public, need for lifelong self-monitoring post-diagnosis; 2 education for the person with diabetes (e.g., periodic refresher courses, professionals (e.g., regular interactions between researchers and persons with T2D so researchers better understand the needs of the affected population, and the community (e.g., support for families and employers; and 3 ongoing support (e.g., peer support groups. The recommendations from the conference can be used by researchers to design and evaluate physical activity and nutrition programs. The results can also be of use to policy makers and health promoters interested in increasing adherence to physical activity and nutrition guidelines among persons with T2D.

  18. Collective knowledge: using a consensus conference approach to develop recommendations for physical activity and nutrition programs for persons with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tanya R.; Chan, Catherine B.; Bell, Rhonda C.; Walker, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this consensus conference was to have a lay panel of persons with type 2 diabetes (T2D) work in collaboration with an expert panel of diabetes professionals to develop strategies designed to improve dietary and physical activity adherence in persons with T2D. Lay panel participants were 15 people living with T2D. The seven experts had expertise in exercise management, cardiovascular risk factors, community-based lifestyle interventions, healthy weight strategies, the glycemic index, exercise motivation, and social, environmental and cultural interactions. All meetings were facilitated by a professional, neutral facilitator. During the conference each expert gave a 15-min presentation answering questions developed by the lay panel and all panel members worked to generate suggestions for programs and ways in which the needs of persons with T2D may be better met. A subgroup of the lay panel used the suggestions created from the conference to generate a final list of recommendations. Recommendations were categorized into (1) diagnosis/awareness (e.g., increasing awareness about T2D in the general public, need for lifelong self-monitoring post-diagnosis); (2) education for the person with diabetes (e.g., periodic “refresher” courses), professionals (e.g., regular interactions between researchers and persons with T2D so researchers better understand the needs of the affected population), and the community (e.g., support for families and employers); and (3) ongoing support (e.g., peer support groups). The recommendations from the conference can be used by researchers to design and evaluate physical activity and nutrition programs. The results can also be of use to policy makers and health promoters interested in increasing adherence to physical activity and nutrition guidelines among persons with T2D. PMID:23248617

  19. Implementation of Novel Biomarkers in the Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Management of Acute Kidney Injury: Executive Summary from the Tenth Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A.; Bouchard, Josee; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Siew, Edward D.; Endre, Zoltan H.; Goldstein, Stuart L.; Koyner, Jay L.; Macedo, Etienne; Doi, Kent; Di Somma, Salvatore; Lewington, Andrew; Thadhani, Ravi; Chakravarthi, Raj; Ice, Can; Okusa, Mark D.; Duranteau, Jacques; Doran, Peter; Yang, Li; Jaber, Bertrand L.; Meehan, Shane; Kellum, John A.; Haase, Michael; Murray, Patrick T.; Cruz, Dinna; Maisel, Alan; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Mehta, Ravindra L.; Shaw, Andrew D.; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Detection of acute kidney injury is undergoing a dynamic revolution of biomarker technology allowing greater, earlier, and more accurate determination of diagnosis, prognosis, and with powerful implication for management. Biomarkers can be broadly considered as any measurable biologic entity or process that allows differentiation between normal function and injury or disease. The ADQI (Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative) had its Ninth Consensus Conference dedicated to synthesis and formulation of the existing literature on biomarkers for the detection of acute kidney injury in a variety of settings. In the papers that accompany this summary, ADQI workgroups fully develop key concepts from a summary of the literature in the domains of early diagnosis, differential diagnosis, prognosis and management, and concurrent physiologic and imaging measures. PMID:23689652

  20. Acute kidney injury in the era of big data: the 15(th) Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A

    2016-01-01

    The world is immersed in "big data". Big data has brought about radical innovations in the methods used to capture, transfer, store and analyze the vast quantities of data generated every minute of every day. At the same time; however, it has also become far easier and relatively inexpensive to do so. Rapidly transforming, integrating and applying this large volume and variety of data are what underlie the future of big data. The application of big data and predictive analytics in healthcare holds great promise to drive innovation, reduce cost and improve patient outcomes, health services operations and value. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be an ideal syndrome from which various dimensions and applications built within the context of big data may influence the structure of services delivery, care processes and outcomes for patients. The use of innovative forms of "information technology" was originally identified by the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) in 2002 as a core concept in need of attention to improve the care and outcomes for patients with AKI. For this 15(th) ADQI consensus meeting held on September 6-8, 2015 in Banff, Canada, five topics focused on AKI and acute renal replacement therapy were developed where extensive applications for use of big data were recognized and/or foreseen. In this series of articles in the Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, we describe the output from these discussions.

  1. Results from the International Consensus Conference on myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol in Obstetrics and Gynecology--assisted reproduction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Arturo; Carlomagno, Gianfranco; Gerli, Sandro; Montanino Oliva, Mario; Devroey, Paul; Lanzone, Antonio; Soulange, Christophe; Facchinetti, Fabio; Carlo Di Renzo, Gian; Bizzarri, Mariano; Hod, Moshe; Cavalli, Pietro; D'Anna, Rosario; Benvenga, Salvatore; Chiu, Tony T; Kamenov, Zdravko A

    2015-06-01

    A substantial body of research on mammalian gametogenesis and human reproduction has recently investigated the effect of myo-inositol (MyoIns) on oocyte and sperm cell quality, due to its possible application to medically assisted reproduction. With a growing number of both clinical and basic research papers, the meaning of several observations now needs to be interpreted under a solid and rigorous physiological framework. The 2013 Florence International Consensus Conference on Myo- and D-chiro-inositol in obstetrics and gynecology has answered a number of research questions concerning the use of the two stereoisomers in assisted reproductive technologies. Available clinical trials and studies on the physiological and pharmacological effects of these molecules have been surveyed. Specifically, the physiological involvement of MyoIns in oocyte maturation and sperm cell functions has been discussed, providing an answer to the following questions: (1) Are inositols physiologically involved in oocyte maturation? (2) Are inositols involved in the physiology of spermatozoa function? (3) Is treatment with inositols helpful within assisted reproduction technology cycles? (4) Are there any differences in clinical efficacy between MyoIns and D-chiro-inositol? The conclusions of this Conference, drawn depending on expert panel opinions and shared with all the participants, are summarized in this review paper.

  2. Outcome Criteria for Discharging the Patient With a New Ostomy From Home Health Care: A WOCN Society Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Janice C; Kupsick, Phyllis T; McNichol, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society hosted a consensus panel of expert ostomy clinicians who were tasked with identifying minimal discharge criteria for home care patients with a new fecal or urinary diversion. Shortened hospital inpatient stays, higher patient acuity, and limited access to ostomy specialists send patients with new ostomies home with multiple educational and adjustment needs related to a new stoma. The Society recognized the lack of evidence-based ostomy practice and supported the work of the panel to develop statements that defined elements of the care plan for the patient or caregiver in home care who is adapting to living with a stoma. Eighteen statements were developed that provide minimum discharge criteria for the patient with a new ostomy in the home care setting. Support based upon current evidence as well as expert opinion with implementation strategies are offered for each statement.

  3. The 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma: Definition of Grading Patterns and Proposal for a New Grading System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jonathan I; Egevad, Lars; Amin, Mahul B; Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Humphrey, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    In November, 2014, 65 prostate cancer pathology experts, along with 17 clinicians including urologists, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists from 19 different countries gathered in a consensus conference to update the grading of prostate cancer, last revised in 2005. The major conclusions were: (1) Cribriform glands should be assigned a Gleason pattern 4, regardless of morphology; (2) Glomeruloid glands should be assigned a Gleason pattern 4, regardless of morphology; (3) Grading of mucinous carcinoma of the prostate should be based on its underlying growth pattern rather than grading them all as pattern 4; and (4) Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate without invasive carcinoma should not be assigned a Gleason grade and a comment as to its invariable association with aggressive prostate cancer should be made. Regarding morphologies of Gleason patterns, there was clear consensus on: (1) Gleason pattern 4 includes cribriform, fused, and poorly formed glands; (2) The term hypernephromatoid cancer should not be used; (3) For a diagnosis of Gleason pattern 4, it needs to be seen at 10x lens magnification; (4) Occasional/seemingly poorly formed or fused glands between well-formed glands is insufficient for a diagnosis of pattern 4; (5) In cases with borderline morphology between Gleason pattern 3 and pattern 4 and crush artifacts, the lower grade should be favored; (6) Branched glands are allowed in Gleason pattern 3; (7) Small solid cylinders represent Gleason pattern 5; (8) Solid medium to large nests with rosette-like spaces should be considered to represent Gleason pattern 5; and (9) Presence of unequivocal comedonecrosis, even if focal is indicative of Gleason pattern 5. It was recognized by both pathologists and clinicians that despite the above changes, there were deficiencies with the Gleason system. The Gleason grading system ranges from 2 to 10, yet 6 is the lowest score currently assigned. When patients are told that they have a Gleason score 6 out

  4. Psychological treatments and psychotherapies in the neurorehabilitation of pain: evidences and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt is increasingly recognized that treating pain is crucial for an effective care of the person in the setting of the neurological rehabilitation. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation was constituted with the purpose to identify the best practices that can be used in this context. Along with drug therapies and physical interventions, psychological treatments have been proven to be some of the most valuable tools that can be used within a multidisciplinary approach for fostering a reduction in pain intensity. However, there is the need to elucidate what forms of psychotherapy could be matched with the specific pathologies that are taken in charge by the neurorehabilitation teams.ObjectivesTo extensively assess the available evidence which supports the use of psychological therapies for pain reduction in neurological diseases. MethodsA systematic review of the studies evaluating the effect of psychotherapies on pain intensity in neurological disorders was performed through an electronic search using PUBMED, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Based on the level of evidence of the included studies, recommendations were outlined separately for the different conditions.ResultsThe literature search yielded 2352 results and the final database included 400 articles. The overall strength of the recommendations was medium/low. The different forms of psychological interventions, including Cognitive – Behavioral Therapy, cognitive or behavioral techniques, Mindfulness, hypnosis, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Brief Interpersonal Therapy, virtual reality interventions, the different forms of biofeedback and mirror therapy were found to be effective for pain reduction in pathologies such as musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Central Post – Stroke pain, Phantom Limb Pain, pain secondary to Spinal Cord Injury, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating syndromes

  5. Psychological Treatments and Psychotherapies in the Neurorehabilitation of Pain: Evidences and Recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Giusti, Emanuele M.; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Saviola, Donatella; Gatti, Arianna; Gabrielli, Samantha; Lacerenza, Marco; Pietrabissa, Giada; Cattivelli, Roberto; Spatola, Chiara A. M.; Corti, Stefania; Novelli, Margherita; Villa, Valentina; Cottini, Andrea; Lai, Carlo; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelli, Lorys; Tavola, Mario; Torta, Riccardo; Arreghini, Marco; Zanini, Loredana; Brunani, Amelia; Capodaglio, Paolo; D'Aniello, Guido E.; Scarpina, Federica; Brioschi, Andrea; Priano, Lorenzo; Mauro, Alessandro; Riva, Giuseppe; Repetto, Claudia; Regalia, Camillo; Molinari, Enrico; Notaro, Paolo; Paolucci, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Simpson, Susan G.; Wiederhold, Brenda; Tamburin, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is increasingly recognized that treating pain is crucial for effective care within neurological rehabilitation in the setting of the neurological rehabilitation. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation was constituted with the purpose identifying best practices for us in this context. Along with drug therapies and physical interventions, psychological treatments have been proven to be some of the most valuable tools that can be used within a multidisciplinary approach for fostering a reduction in pain intensity. However, there is a need to elucidate what forms of psychotherapy could be effectively matched with the specific pathologies that are typically addressed by neurorehabilitation teams. Objectives: To extensively assess the available evidence which supports the use of psychological therapies for pain reduction in neurological diseases. Methods: A systematic review of the studies evaluating the effect of psychotherapies on pain intensity in neurological disorders was performed through an electronic search using PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Based on the level of evidence of the included studies, recommendations were outlined separately for the different conditions. Results: The literature search yielded 2352 results and the final database included 400 articles. The overall strength of the recommendations was medium/low. The different forms of psychological interventions, including Cognitive—Behavioral Therapy, cognitive or behavioral techniques, Mindfulness, hypnosis, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Brief Interpersonal Therapy, virtual reality interventions, various forms of biofeedback and mirror therapy were found to be effective for pain reduction in pathologies such as musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Central Post—Stroke pain, Phantom Limb Pain, pain secondary to Spinal Cord Injury, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating syndromes

  6. Hormonal contraception and the risk of venous thrombosis: Management recommendations from the Piedmont Region and the Consensus Conference of the Italian National Institute of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Donvito

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal methods are used by many fertile women who require contraception. They are highly effective, but their use is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. This report summarizes the recommendations of the Public Health Service of Italy’s Piedmont Region for the prescription of hormonal contraception (November 2007 and the results of the Consensus Conference of the Italian National Health Institute on the prevention of thromboembolism related to hormonal contraception (July 2009. Although hormonal contraception increases the relative risk for venous thromboembolism, both documents agreed that the absolute risk remains very small. Assessments of eligibility for hormonal contraception must be based on complete medical history that include medical conditions, drugs used, and family history. Unnecessary medical barriers, such as routine screening for thrombophilia, are not recommended. Most women can safely use hormonal contraception. Physicians and women should discuss the risks, benefits, and uncertainties associated with hormonal contraception so that women will be able to make informed decisions regarding their use.

  7. Adult Asthma Consensus Guidelines Update 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lemière

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several sets of Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the past 15 years. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines.

  8. Current treatment and future prospects for the management of acute coronary syndromes: consensus recommendations of the 1997 ushuaia conference, tierra del fuego, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurfinkel, E

    1998-01-01

    Management of acute coronary syndromes, particularly unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction and non-Q-wave myocardial infarction, is one of the most common and costly problems facing modern medicine. Furthermore, the increasing availability of new research and clinical information relevant to the treatment of these conditions means that continuing reappraisal of management strategies is necessary. Accordingly, the Ushuaia conference, Tierra Del Fuego, Argentina, was convened to discuss current approaches and future treatment prospects for patients with these conditions. The conference was comprised of leading Argentinian cardiologists whose primary aim was to formulate consensus recommendations regarding the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes. The first of the major recommendations for the pharmacological management of acute coronary syndromes arising from the Ushuaia Consensus Conference was that aspirin (200 to 500mg initially, then 100 to 325 mg/day) should be administered to all patients except those for whom aspirin is absolutely (or relatively, depending on the clinician's discretion) contraindicated. In such cases, ticlopidine is a suitable alternative. Intravenous nitrates are indicated for patients with angina pain (24 to 48 hours' duration), ECG changes, recurrence of angina, or signs of heart failure; in other cases, oral, transdermal or sublingual nitrates may be administered. Use of beta-blockers is recommended except when absolutely contraindicated or when there is a strong suspicion of vasospasm as a dominant mechanism in angina. Intravenous administration of these agents is preferred in patients with tachycardia, arterial hypertension or angina. Calcium antagonists are generally not recommended as first choice therapy, but can be indicated (preferably using agents that decrease heart rate) when beta-blockers are contraindicated or when there is a strong suspicion of vasospasm as a dominant mechanism in angina. Calcium

  9. Abstracts of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering annual conference including the general conference, the 1. international structural specialty conference, the 1. international construction specialty conference, and the 1. specialty conference on disaster mitigation : towards a sustainable future[General Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Badry, M.; Loov, R.E.; Ruwanpura, J.; El-Hacha, R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Kroman, J. [City of Calgary, AB (Canada); Rankin, J. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Dunaszegi, L. [Earth Tech Canada Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)] (eds.)

    2006-07-01

    This conference provided a forum for national and international practicing engineers, researchers and technical experts to discuss sustainable solutions to infrastructure development. Discussions focused on recent developments in new technologies for building more economic and sustainable infrastructure, while improving the safety of buildings, bridges, roads, water supply and sewage treatment systems. The conference was held in conjunction with associated specialty conferences, including a first international structures specialty conference, a first international construction specialty conference, and a first specialty conference on disaster mitigation. This book of abstracts highlights all the specialty conferences and accompanies a CD-ROM that has the full text of all the papers. Manuscripts of the full papers submitted to the specialty conferences were peer-reviewed by international scientific committees. The general conference provided a forum to learn about new technologies and future directions in various areas of civil engineering. It included a special theme session on sustainable development and a special session on innovation and information technology. Other technical sessions focused on topics such as civil engineering history and education; infrastructure management and renewal; asset management; risk assessment and management; engineering materials and mechanics; environmental engineering and science; hydrotechnical engineering; cold region engineering; and, transportation engineering. The general conference featured 88 presentations, of which 15 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database.

  10. Proceedings of the 6. Canadian Urban Forest Conference : fires, storms, and pests : crisis in our urban forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    There is an increasing awareness in Canada of the benefits and values of urban forests in environmental, social and economic terms. However, the mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation in British Columbia (BC) has infected vast tracts of the province's forest lands over the last several years, and there is evidence that the beetle plague is now causing major devastation in urban areas. Fires are increasing in size and moving from surrounding forest lands into towns and cities in the province and have taken a toll on people and properties in urban areas. Storms and hurricanes have imposed damage on trees in urban areas in the Maritimes, Quebec and Ontario. This conference presented strategies for urban forest managers faced with a variety of disturbances. Issues concerning emergency preparedness and the role of utilities in urban forestry matters were examined and tools for valuing and marketing the urban forest were reviewed. Landscaping for the mitigation of fires was discussed along with tree hazard assessment techniques. The positive financial impact made to communities by their urban forests was emphasized and guidelines and support tools to help municipalities maintain and enhance their urban forests were outlined. The establishment of research priorities for urban forestry was recommended, as well as the identification of unique and threatened habitats both in, and near, large and small municipalities. Twenty-four presentations were given at this conference, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  11. Management of the hypertensive patient with elevated heart rate: Statement of the Second Consensus Conference endorsed by the European Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatini, Paolo; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Casiglia, Edoardo; Chalmers, John; Ferrari, Roberto; Grassi, Guido; Inoue, Teruo; Jelakovic, Bojan; Jensen, Magnus T; Julius, Stevo; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco; Pauletto, Paolo; Stella, Andrea; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    In June 2015, a panel of experts gathered in a consensus conference to plan updating recommendations on the management of the hypertensive patient with elevated heart rate (HR), previously released in 2006. The issues examined during that meeting and further discussed by the participants during the following months involved the assessment of HR, the relevance of HR as a cardiovascular risk factor, the definition of tachycardia and the treatment of the hypertensive patient with high HR. For the measurement of resting HR the panel experts recommended that scientific investigations focusing on HR should report information on length of resting period before measurement, information about temperature and environment, method of measurement, duration of measurement, number of readings, time interval between measurements, body position and type of observer. According to the panellists there is convincing evidence that HR is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and they suggest to routinely include HR measurement in the assessment of the hypertensive patient. Regarding the definition of tachycardia, the panellists acknowledged that in the absence of convincing data any threshold used to define tachycardia is arbitrary. Similarly, as there are no outcome studies of HR lowering in tachycardia hypertension, the panellists could not make practical therapeutic suggestions for the management of such patients. However, the experts remarked that absence of evidence does not mean evidence against the importance of tachycardia as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that long-term exposure to a potentially important risk factor may impair the patient's prognosis. The main aims of the present document are to alert researchers and physicians about the importance of measuring HR in hypertensive patients, and to stimulate research to clarify unresolved issues.

  12. Results from the International Consensus Conference on Myo-inositol and d-chiro-inositol in Obstetrics and Gynecology: the link between metabolic syndrome and PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchinetti, Fabio; Bizzarri, Mariano; Benvenga, Salvatore; D'Anna, Rosario; Lanzone, Antonio; Soulage, Christophe; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Hod, Moshe; Cavalli, Pietro; Chiu, Tony T; Kamenov, Zdravko A; Bevilacqua, Arturo; Carlomagno, Gianfranco; Gerli, Sandro; Oliva, Mario Montanino; Devroey, Paul

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, interest has been focused to the study of the two major inositol stereoisomers: myo-inositol (MI) and d-chiro-inositol (DCI), because of their involvement, as second messengers of insulin, in several insulin-dependent processes, such as metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome. Although these molecules have different functions, very often their roles have been confused, while the meaning of several observations still needs to be interpreted under a more rigorous physiological framework. With the aim of clarifying this issue, the 2013 International Consensus Conference on MI and DCI in Obstetrics and Gynecology identified opinion leaders in all fields related to this area of research. They examined seminal experimental papers and randomized clinical trials reporting the role and the use of inositol(s) in clinical practice. The main topics were the relation between inositol(s) and metabolic syndrome, polycystic ovary syndrome (with a focus on both metabolic and reproductive aspects), congenital anomalies, gestational diabetes. Clinical trials demonstrated that inositol(s) supplementation could fruitfully affect different pathophysiological aspects of disorders pertaining Obstetrics and Gynecology. The treatment of PCOS women as well as the prevention of GDM seem those clinical conditions which take more advantages from MI supplementation, when used at a dose of 2g twice/day. The clinical experience with MI is largely superior to the one with DCI. However, the existence of tissue-specific ratios, namely in the ovary, has prompted researchers to recently develop a treatment based on both molecules in the proportion of 40 (MI) to 1 (DCI).

  13. I Conferencia Nacional de Consenso sobre el Injerto Óseo del Seno Maxilar 1st National Consensus Conference on maxillar sinus bone grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Villarreal

    2010-06-01

    en el seno maxilar.Objective: The objectives of the first Spanish Consensus Conference on Sinus Bone Graft were trying to reach agreements points on the major controversies of this technique, and translate them in a summary document. Material and method: During the 17th and 18th of October of 2008 took place in Oviedo (Spain the Conference, sponsored by the Spanish Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. There, 50 national and international speakers reviewed in 6 workshops the major controversies of sinus bone grafts. Following the conferences, the moderators proposed the main conclusions of each workshop and opened a round of discussion where all attendees participated. Results: This document and its conclusions emanate from the presentations made by the speakers and the discussions and agreements of each workshop. Both have been approved after several corrections by all authors before being submitted for publication. They have also obtained the official scientific recognition of the Spanish Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and should serve as a basis for future scientific studies and meetings. Conclusions: The main objective when we perform a sinus bone graft is vital bone formation in the maxillary sinus, to achieve long-term survival of the implants after prosthetic loading. To do this, the technique and sequence of treatment should aim to achieve predictable and stable results over time, although this involves a longer waiting time. The initial implant stability is the key factor for osseointegration and should be the main criterion to indicate simultaneous or delayed implants in the maxillary sinus.

  14. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 2 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices aux fournisseurs de soins quant à l’utilisation de modes de contraception pour la prévention de la grossesse et quant à la promotion d’une sexualité saine. Issues : Orientation des praticiens canadiens en ce qui concerne l’efficacité globale, le mécanisme d’action, les indications, les contre-indications, les avantages n’étant pas liés à la contraception, les effets indésirables, les risques et le protocole de mise en œuvre des modes de contraception abordés; planification familiale dans le contexte de la santé sexuelle et du bien-être général; méthodes de counseling en matière de contraception; et accessibilité et disponibilité des modes de contraception abordés au Canada. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. contraception, sexuality, sexual health) et de mots clés (p. ex. contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2015. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau). Chapitre 1 : Contraception au Canada Déclarations sommaires  1. Les Canadiennes sont exposées à des risques de grossesse non planifiée pendant une partie considérable de leur vie. (II-2)  2. Les modes efficaces de contraception sont sous-utilisés au Canada, particulièrement au sein des populations vulnérables. (II-2)  3. Les modes de contraception réversible à action prolongée, dont les implants contraceptifs et la contraception intra-utérine (dispositifs / systèmes à libération de cuivre ou de lévonorgestrel), sont les modes de contraception réversible les plus efficaces; de plus, ils comptent les taux les plus élevés de poursuite du traitement. (II-1)  4. Au Canada à l’heure actuelle, nous ne recueillons pas de données fiables qui permettraient d’établir le taux d’utilisation des modes de contraception, le taux d’avortement et la prévalence des grossesses non planifiées chez les femmes en âge de procréer. (II-2)  5. L’octroi d’une subvention universelle destinée aux modes de contraception, à l’instar de bon nombre d’autres pays et de quelques provinces canadiennes, pourrait générer des économies pour le système de santé. (II-2)  6. Dans le cas des contraceptifs, les processus d’homologation de Santé Canada ont été moins efficaces que ceux d’autres organismes d’homologation, en plus d’être moins efficaces que les processus qu’elle a elle-même mis en vigueur en ce qui concerne d’autres catégories de produits pharmaceutiques. (II-2)  7. L’offre de contraceptifs et de services de planification familiale par des professionnels paramédicaux (tels que les sages-femmes, les infirmières autorisées, les infirmières praticiennes et les pharmaciens) ayant bénéficié d’une formation adéquate est faisable et sûre. (II-2) Recommandations  1. Les services de counseling traitant de la contraception devraient comprendre une discussion au sujet des taux d’échec liés à l’utilisation typique et de l’importance d’utiliser régulièrement et correctement le mode de contraception choisi, de façon à éviter la grossesse. (II-2A)  2. Les services de counseling offerts aux femmes qui cherchent à se prévaloir d’un mode de contraception devraient porter sur la vaste gamme des modes efficaces disponibles, y compris sur les modes de contraception réversible à action prolongée. Ces derniers sont les modes les plus efficaces de contraception réversible, comptent des taux élevés de poursuite du traitement et devraient être pris en considération, pour toutes les femmes en âge de procréer, au moment d’aborder avec celles-ci les options de contraception qui s’offrent à elles. (II-2A)  3. Les services de counseling en matière de planification familiale devraient aborder la question du déclin de la fertilité qui est associé au vieillissement chez la femme. (III-A)  4. Les décideurs canadiens du domaine de la santé devraient envisager la mise en œuvre de politiques de santé soutenant l’offre universelle d’une subvention à la contraception et de stratégies visant à promouvoir l’adoption de modes de contraception grandement efficaces, et ce, à titre de mesures de réduction des coûts permettant l’amélioration de la santé et de l’équité en matière de santé. (III-B)  5. Les territoires de compétence canadiens en matière de santé devraient envisager d’élargir le champ de pratique d’autres professionnels formés (comme les infirmières, les infirmières praticiennes, les sages-femmes et les pharmaciens) et de promouvoir le partage des tâches en planification familiale. (II-2B)  6. L’Enquête sur la santé dans les collectivités canadiennes devrait englober des indicateurs adéquats en matière de santé génésique, de façon à pouvoir permettre aux fournisseurs de soins de santé et aux décideurs de prendre des décisions opportunes à l’égard des politiques et des services de santé génésique au Canada. (III-B)  7. Les processus et les politiques de Santé Canada devraient être passés en revue pour que l’on puisse s’assurer qu’ils ne nuisent pas indûment à l’offre d’une vaste gamme de modes de contraception modernes aux Canadiennes. (III-B) Chapitre 2 : Soins en matière de contraception et accès à la contraception Déclarations sommaires  8. Bien que le Canada compte de nombreuses options en matière de contraception, les modes de contraception couramment utilisés par les femmes en âge de procréer sont issus d’une gamme restreinte. (II-3)  9. L’utilisation du condom diminue au fur et à mesure que se poursuit une relation et lorsque le partenaire sexuel est considéré comme étant le partenaire principal, probablement en raison d’une baisse du risque perçu d’infections transmissibles sexuellement au sein de la relation en question. L’utilisation du condom pourrait, de façon fortuite, également connaître une baisse marquée à la suite de la mise en œuvre d’un mode de contraception efficace ne faisant pas partie des méthodes de barrière (comme la contraception hormonale ou intra-utérine). (II-3) 10. Le counseling en matière de planification familiale peut naturellement mener au dépistage de la violence conjugale et des problèmes liés à la fonction sexuelle. (III) 11. Les personnes bien renseignées et bien motivées qui ont acquis les compétences nécessaires à la pratique de comportements sexuels à risques réduits sont plus susceptibles d’utiliser des modes de contraception et des pratiques sexuelles à risques réduits de façon efficace et systématique. (II-2) Recommandations  8. Des services exhaustifs de planification familiale (y compris des services d’avortement) devraient être offerts à tous les Canadiens, peu importe leur emplacement géographique. Ces services devraient être confidentiels et assurer le respect de la vie privée et des contextes culturels des personnes qui les utilisent. (III-A)  9. Les consultations en matière de contraception devraient comprendre une anamnèse, un dépistage des contre-indications, l’offre ou la prescription d’un mode de contraception, ainsi que l’exploration des choix en matière de contraception et des facteurs associés à l’observance dans le cadre élargi du comportement sexuel, des risques liés à la santé génésique, du contexte social et des croyances de la femme en question. (III-B) 10. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient offrir des renseignements pratiques sur la vaste gamme des options en matière de contraception et sur leurs avantages potentiels n’étant pas liés à la contraception, en plus d’aider les femmes et leurs partenaires à choisir le mode de contraception étant le mieux adapté à leurs besoins. (III-B) 11. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient aider les femmes et les hommes à acquérir les compétences nécessaires à la négociation du recours à la contraception, ainsi qu’à l’utilisation correcte et systématique du moyen de contraception choisi. (III-B) 12. Les soins en matière de contraception devraient aborder les risques de contracter des infections transmissibles sexuellement et en assurer la prise en charge; ils devraient, à ce chapitre, être fondés sur la formulation de recommandations appropriées en ce qui concerne l’utilisation de condoms et d’une protection double, le dépistage des infections transmissibles sexuellement, la prophylaxie post-exposition et la vaccination contre l’hépatite B et le virus du papillome humain. (III-B) 13. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient souligner que l’utilisation de condoms n’a pas seulement pour but de conférer une protection contre les infections transmissibles sexuellement, mais qu’elle agit également à titre de méthode d’appoint lorsque l’observance envers un contraceptif hormonal pourrait être sous-optimale. (I-A) 14. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient se tenir au fait des controverses médiatiques qui font rage dans le domaine de la santé génésique et obtenir les données factuelles pertinentes qui pourront être communiquées (de façon brève et directe) à leurs patientes. (III-B) 15. Des ressources spécialisées en ce qui concerne la violence conjugale, les infections transmissibles sexuellement, le dysfonctionnement sexuel, les services d’avortement provoqué et les services de protection de l’enfance devraient être disponibles pour aider les cliniciens à offrir des soins en matière de contraception dans le contexte élargi de la santé des femmes. (III-B) Chapitre 3 : Contraception d’urgence Déclarations sommaires 12. Le dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre constitue la méthode de contraception d’urgence la plus efficace. (II-2) 13. Un dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre peut être utilisé à des fins de contraception d’urgence jusqu’à sept jours à la suite d’une relation sexuelle non protégée, pour autant que la présence d’une grossesse ait été écartée et qu’il n’existe aucune autre contre-indication à son insertion. (II-2) 14. La contraception d’urgence au lévonorgestrel est efficace jusqu’à cinq jours (120 heures) à la suite d’une relation sexuelle non protégée; son efficacité diminue au fur et à mesure que s’allonge le délai entre la relation sexuelle non protégée et son administration. (II-2) 15. La contraception d’urgence à l’acétate d’ulipristal est plus efficace que celle qui fait appel au lévonorgestrel, et ce, jusqu’à cinq jours à la suite d’une relation sexuelle non protégée. Cette différence en matière d’efficacité devient plus prononcée au fur et à mesure que s’allonge le délai entre la relation sexuelle non protégée et l’administration, particulièrement après 72 heures. (I) 16. La contraception d’urgence hormonale (au lévonorgestrel ou à l’acétate d’ulipristal) n’est pas efficace lorsqu’elle est administrée le jour de l’ovulation ou par la suite. (II-2) 17. La contraception d’urgence au lévonorgestrel pourrait être moins efficace chez les femmes dont l’indice de masse corporelle est supérieur à 25 kg/m2, tandis que la contraception d’urgence à l’acétate d’ulipristal pourrait être moins efficace chez les femmes dont l’indice de masse corporelle est de 35 kg/m2 ou plus. Quoi qu’il en soit, la contraception d’urgence hormonale pourrait tout de même conserver une certaine efficacité, peu importe le poids ou l’indice de masse corporelle de la femme qui en fait la demande. (II-2) 18. La contraception d’urgence hormonale est associée à des taux d’échec plus élevés lorsque les femmes qui l’utilisent continuent par la suite à connaître des relations sexuelles non protégées. (II-2) 19. Une contraception hormonale peut être entamée le jour de l’utilisation d’une contraception d’urgence au lévonorgestrel, ou le jour suivant celle-ci, en s’assurant de mettre en œuvre une contraception d’appoint pendant les sept premiers jours. (III) 20. Une contraception hormonale peut être entamée cinq jours à la suite de l’utilisation d’une contraception d’urgence à l’acétate d’ulipristal, en s’assurant de mettre en œuvre une contraception d’appoint pendant les quatorze premiers jours. (III) Recommandations 16. La contraception d’urgence, toutes méthodes confondues, devrait être mise en œuvre dès que possible à la suite d’une relation sexuelle non protégée. (II-2A) 17. Les femmes devraient être avisées que le dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre constitue la méthode de contraception d’urgence la plus efficace et que ce dispositif peut être utilisé par toute femme qui ne présente pas de contre-indications à son utilisation. (II-3A) 18. Les fournisseurs de soins ne devraient pas déconseiller l’utilisation de la contraception d’urgence hormonale en fonction de l’indice de masse corporelle de la femme qui en fait la demande. L’utilisation d’un dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre à des fins de contraception d’urgence devrait être recommandée pour les femmes présentant un indice de masse corporelle supérieur à 30 kg/m2 qui sollicitent une contraception d’urgence. En présence de conditions favorables en matière d’accessibilité et de coût, la contraception d’urgence faisant appel à l’acétate d’ulipristal devrait constituer l’option de première intention à offrir aux femmes présentant un indice de masse corporelle de 25 kg/m2 ou plus qui préfèrent avoir recours à une contraception d’urgence hormonale. (II-2B) 19. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient discuter d’un plan visant la mise en œuvre d’une contraception continue avec les femmes qui en viennent à utiliser des pilules de contraception d’urgence; ils devraient également offrir des modes adéquats de contraception continue à ces femmes, lorsque celles-ci s’y montrent intéressées. La contraception hormonale devrait être entamée dans les 24 heures suivant l’administration d’une contraception d’urgence faisant appel au lévonorgestrel; de plus, une contraception d’appoint (ou l’abstinence) devrait être mise en œuvre pendant les sept premiers jours suivant le début de l’utilisation d’une contraception hormonale. (III-B) Dans le cas de la contraception d’urgence faisant appel à l’acétate d’ulipristal, la contraception hormonale devrait être entamée cinq jours après l’administration de la contraception d’urgence. Une contraception d’appoint (ou l’abstinence) doit être mise en œuvre pendant les cinq premiers jours suivant l’administration d’une contraception d’urgence faisant appel à l’acétate d’ulipristal, puis pendant les 14 premiers jours suivant le début de l’utilisation d’une contraception hormonale. (III-B) 20. L’acétate d’ulipristal et le lévonorgestrel ne devraient pas être utilisés de façon concomitante à des fins de contraception d’urgence. (III-B) 21. Un test de grossesse devrait être mené en l’absence de menstruations dans les 21 jours suivant l’utilisation de pilules ou l’insertion d’un dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre à des fins de contraception d’urgence. (III-A) 22. Des services de santé devraient être élaborés pour permettre aux Canadiennes d’obtenir un accès en temps opportun à toutes les méthodes efficaces de contraception d’urgence. (III-B).

  15. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 1 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices aux fournisseurs de soins quant à l’utilisation de modes de contraception pour la prévention de la grossesse et quant à la promotion d’une sexualité saine. Issues : Orientation des praticiens canadiens en ce qui concerne l’efficacité globale, le mécanisme d’action, les indications, les contre-indications, les avantages n’étant pas liés à la contraception, les effets indésirables, les risques et le protocole de mise en œuvre des modes de contraception abordés; planification familiale dans le contexte de la santé sexuelle et du bien-être général; méthodes de counseling en matière de contraception; et accessibilité et disponibilité des modes de contraception abordés au Canada. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. contraception, sexuality, sexual health) et de mots clés (p. ex. contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 1994 et janvier 2015. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en juin 2015. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats a été évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau). Chapitre 1 : Contraception au Canada Déclarations sommaires  1. Les Canadiennes sont exposées à des risques de grossesse non planifiée pendant une partie considérable de leur vie. (II-2)  2. Les modes efficaces de contraception sont sous-utilisés au Canada, particulièrement au sein des populations vulnérables. (II-2)  3. Les modes de contraception réversible à action prolongée, dont les implants contraceptifs et la contraception intra-utérine (dispositifs / systèmes à libération de cuivre ou de lévonorgestrel), sont les modes de contraception réversible les plus efficaces; de plus, ils comptent les taux les plus élevés de poursuite du traitement. (II-1)  4. Au Canada à l’heure actuelle, nous ne recueillons pas de données fiables qui permettraient d’établir le taux d’utilisation des modes de contraception, le taux d’avortement et la prévalence des grossesses non planifiées chez les femmes en âge de procréer. (II-2)  5. L’octroi d’une subvention universelle destinée aux modes de contraception, à l’instar de bon nombre d’autres pays et de quelques provinces canadiennes, pourrait générer des économies pour le système de santé. (II-2)  6. Dans le cas des contraceptifs, les processus d’homologation de Santé Canada ont été moins efficaces que ceux d’autres organismes d’homologation, en plus d’être moins efficaces que les processus qu’elle a elle-même mis en vigueur en ce qui concerne d’autres catégories de produits pharmaceutiques. (II-2)  7. L’offre de contraceptifs et de services de planification familiale par des professionnels paramédicaux (tels que les sages-femmes, les infirmières autorisées, les infirmières praticiennes et les pharmaciens) ayant bénéficié d’une formation adéquate est faisable et sûre. (II-2) Recommandations  1. Les services de counseling traitant de la contraception devraient comprendre une discussion au sujet des taux d’échec liés à l’utilisation typique et de l’importance d’utiliser régulièrement et correctement le mode de contraception choisi, de façon à éviter la grossesse. (II-2A)  2. Les services de counseling offerts aux femmes qui cherchent à se prévaloir d’un mode de contraception devraient porter sur la vaste gamme des modes efficaces disponibles, y compris sur les modes de contraception réversible à action prolongée. Ces derniers sont les modes les plus efficaces de contraception réversible, comptent des taux élevés de poursuite du traitement et devraient être pris en considération, pour toutes les femmes en âge de procréer, au moment d’aborder avec celles-ci les options de contraception qui s’offrent à elles. (II-2A)  3. Les services de counseling en matière de planification familiale devraient aborder la question du déclin de la fertilité qui est associé au vieillissement chez la femme. (III-A)  4. Les décideurs canadiens du domaine de la santé devraient envisager la mise en œuvre de politiques de santé soutenant l’offre universelle d’une subvention à la contraception et de stratégies visant à promouvoir l’adoption de modes de contraception grandement efficaces, et ce, à titre de mesures de réduction des coûts permettant l’amélioration de la santé et de l’équité en matière de santé. (III-B)  5. Les territoires de compétence canadiens en matière de santé devraient envisager d’élargir le champ de pratique d’autres professionnels formés (comme les infirmières, les infirmières praticiennes, les sages-femmes et les pharmaciens) et de promouvoir le partage des tâches en planification familiale. (II-2B)  6. L’Enquête sur la santé dans les collectivités canadiennes devrait englober des indicateurs adéquats en matière de santé génésique, de façon à pouvoir permettre aux fournisseurs de soins de santé et aux décideurs de prendre des décisions opportunes à l’égard des politiques et des services de santé génésique au Canada. (III-B)  7. Les processus et les politiques de Santé Canada devraient être passés en revue pour que l’on puisse s’assurer qu’ils ne nuisent pas indûment à l’offre d’une vaste gamme de modes de contraception modernes aux Canadiennes. (III-B) Chapitre 2 : Soins en matière de contraception et accès à la contraception Déclarations sommaires  8. Bien que le Canada compte de nombreuses options en matière de contraception, les modes de contraception couramment utilisés par les femmes en âge de procréer sont issus d’une gamme restreinte. (II-3)  9. L’utilisation du condom diminue au fur et à mesure que se poursuit une relation et lorsque le partenaire sexuel est considéré comme étant le partenaire principal, probablement en raison d’une baisse du risque perçu d’infections transmissibles sexuellement au sein de la relation en question. L’utilisation du condom pourrait, de façon fortuite, également connaître une baisse marquée à la suite de la mise en œuvre d’un mode de contraception efficace ne faisant pas partie des méthodes de barrière (comme la contraception hormonale ou intra-utérine). (II-3) 10. Le counseling en matière de planification familiale peut naturellement mener au dépistage de la violence conjugale et des problèmes liés à la fonction sexuelle. (III) 11. Les personnes bien renseignées et bien motivées qui ont acquis les compétences nécessaires à la pratique de comportements sexuels à risques réduits sont plus susceptibles d’utiliser des modes de contraception et des pratiques sexuelles à risques réduits de façon efficace et systématique. (II-2) Recommandations  8. Des services exhaustifs de planification familiale (y compris des services d’avortement) devraient être offerts à tous les Canadiens, peu importe leur emplacement géographique. Ces services devraient être confidentiels et assurer le respect de la vie privée et des contextes culturels des personnes qui les utilisent. (III-A)  9. Les consultations en matière de contraception devraient comprendre une anamnèse, un dépistage des contre-indications, l’offre ou la prescription d’un mode de contraception, ainsi que l’exploration des choix en matière de contraception et des facteurs associés à l’observance dans le cadre élargi du comportement sexuel, des risques liés à la santé génésique, du contexte social et des croyances de la femme en question. (III-B) 10. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient offrir des renseignements pratiques sur la vaste gamme des options en matière de contraception et sur leurs avantages potentiels n’étant pas liés à la contraception, en plus d’aider les femmes et leurs partenaires à choisir le mode de contraception étant le mieux adapté à leurs besoins. (III-B) 11. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient aider les femmes et les hommes à acquérir les compétences nécessaires à la négociation du recours à la contraception, ainsi qu’à l’utilisation correcte et systématique du moyen de contraception choisi. (III-B) 12. Les soins en matière de contraception devraient aborder les risques de contracter des infections transmissibles sexuellement et en assurer la prise en charge; ils devraient, à ce chapitre, être fondés sur la formulation de recommandations appropriées en ce qui concerne l’utilisation de condoms et d’une protection double, le dépistage des infections transmissibles sexuellement, la prophylaxie post-exposition et la vaccination contre l’hépatite B et le virus du papillome humain. (III-B) 13. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient souligner que l’utilisation de condoms n’a pas seulement pour but de conférer une protection contre les infections transmissibles sexuellement, mais qu’elle agit également à titre de méthode d’appoint lorsque l’observance envers un contraceptif hormonal pourrait être sous-optimale. (I-A) 14. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient se tenir au fait des controverses médiatiques qui font rage dans le domaine de la santé génésique et obtenir les données factuelles pertinentes qui pourront être communiquées (de façon brève et directe) à leurs patientes. (III-B) 15. Des ressources spécialisées en ce qui concerne la violence conjugale, les infections transmissibles sexuellement, le dysfonctionnement sexuel, les services d’avortement provoqué et les services de protection de l’enfance devraient être disponibles pour aider les cliniciens à offrir des soins en matière de contraception dans le contexte élargi de la santé des femmes. (III-B) Chapitre 3 : Contraception d’urgence Déclarations sommaires 12. Le dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre constitue la méthode de contraception d’urgence la plus efficace. (II-2) 13. Un dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre peut être utilisé à des fins de contraception d’urgence jusqu’à sept jours à la suite d’une relation sexuelle non protégée, pour autant que la présence d’une grossesse ait été écartée et qu’il n’existe aucune autre contre-indication à son insertion. (II-2) 14. La contraception d’urgence au lévonorgestrel est efficace jusqu’à cinq jours (120 heures) à la suite d’une relation sexuelle non protégée; son efficacité diminue au fur et à mesure que s’allonge le délai entre la relation sexuelle non protégée et son administration. (II-2) 15. La contraception d’urgence à l’acétate d’ulipristal est plus efficace que celle qui fait appel au lévonorgestrel, et ce, jusqu’à cinq jours à la suite d’une relation sexuelle non protégée. Cette différence en matière d’efficacité devient plus prononcée au fur et à mesure que s’allonge le délai entre la relation sexuelle non protégée et l’administration, particulièrement après 72 heures. (I) 16. La contraception d’urgence hormonale (au lévonorgestrel ou à l’acétate d’ulipristal) n’est pas efficace lorsqu’elle est administrée le jour de l’ovulation ou par la suite. (II-2) 17. La contraception d’urgence au lévonorgestrel pourrait être moins efficace chez les femmes dont l’indice de masse corporelle est supérieur à 25 kg/m2, tandis que la contraception d’urgence à l’acétate d’ulipristal pourrait être moins efficace chez les femmes dont l’indice de masse corporelle est de 35 kg/m2 ou plus. Quoi qu’il en soit, la contraception d’urgence hormonale pourrait tout de même conserver une certaine efficacité, peu importe le poids ou l’indice de masse corporelle de la femme qui en fait la demande. (II-2) 18. La contraception d’urgence hormonale est associée à des taux d’échec plus élevés lorsque les femmes qui l’utilisent continuent par la suite à connaître des relations sexuelles non protégées. (II-2) 19. Une contraception hormonale peut être entamée le jour de l’utilisation d’une contraception d’urgence au lévonorgestrel, ou le jour suivant celle-ci, en s’assurant de mettre en œuvre une contraception d’appoint pendant les sept premiers jours. (III) 20. Une contraception hormonale peut être entamée cinq jours à la suite de l’utilisation d’une contraception d’urgence à l’acétate d’ulipristal, en s’assurant de mettre en œuvre une contraception d’appoint pendant les quatorze premiers jours. (III) Recommandations 16. La contraception d’urgence, toutes méthodes confondues, devrait être mise en œuvre dès que possible à la suite d’une relation sexuelle non protégée. (II-2A) 17. Les femmes devraient être avisées que le dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre constitue la méthode de contraception d’urgence la plus efficace et que ce dispositif peut être utilisé par toute femme qui ne présente pas de contre-indications à son utilisation. (II-3A) 18. Les fournisseurs de soins ne devraient pas déconseiller l’utilisation de la contraception d’urgence hormonale en fonction de l’indice de masse corporelle de la femme qui en fait la demande. L’utilisation d’un dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre à des fins de contraception d’urgence devrait être recommandée pour les femmes présentant un indice de masse corporelle supérieur à 30 kg/m2 qui sollicitent une contraception d’urgence. En présence de conditions favorables en matière d’accessibilité et de coût, la contraception d’urgence faisant appel à l’acétate d’ulipristal devrait constituer l’option de première intention à offrir aux femmes présentant un indice de masse corporelle de 25 kg/m2 ou plus qui préfèrent avoir recours à une contraception d’urgence hormonale. (II-2B) 19. Les fournisseurs de soins devraient discuter d’un plan visant la mise en œuvre d’une contraception continue avec les femmes qui en viennent à utiliser des pilules de contraception d’urgence; ils devraient également offrir des modes adéquats de contraception continue à ces femmes, lorsque celles-ci s’y montrent intéressées. La contraception hormonale devrait être entamée dans les 24 heures suivant l’administration d’une contraception d’urgence faisant appel au lévonorgestrel; de plus, une contraception d’appoint (ou l’abstinence) devrait être mise en œuvre pendant les sept premiers jours suivant le début de l’utilisation d’une contraception hormonale. (III-B) Dans le cas de la contraception d’urgence faisant appel à l’acétate d’ulipristal, la contraception hormonale devrait être entamée cinq jours après l’administration de la contraception d’urgence. Une contraception d’appoint (ou l’abstinence) doit être mise en œuvre pendant les cinq premiers jours suivant l’administration d’une contraception d’urgence faisant appel à l’acétate d’ulipristal, puis pendant les 14 premiers jours suivant le début de l’utilisation d’une contraception hormonale. (III-B) 20. L’acétate d’ulipristal et le lévonorgestrel ne devraient pas être utilisés de façon concomitante à des fins de contraception d’urgence. (III-B) 21. Un test de grossesse devrait être mené en l’absence de menstruations dans les 21 jours suivant l’utilisation de pilules ou l’insertion d’un dispositif intra-utérin au cuivre à des fins de contraception d’urgence. (III-A) 22. Des services de santé devraient être élaborés pour permettre aux Canadiennes d’obtenir un accès en temps opportun à toutes les méthodes efficaces de contraception d’urgence. (III-B).

  16. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-09-01

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators’ concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: - quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; - are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; - are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and - believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites.

  17. Contemporary Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma: An Update With Discussion on Practical Issues to Implement the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jonathan I; Amin, Mahul B; Reuter, Victor E; Humphrey, Peter A

    2017-02-07

    The primary proceedings of the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology Grading Conference were published promptly in 2015 and dealt with: (1) definition of various grading patterns of usual acinar carcinoma, (2) grading of intraductal carcinoma; and (3) support for the previously proposed new Grade Groups. The current manuscript in addition to highlighting practical issues to implement the 2014 recommendations, provides an updated perspective based on numerous studies published after the 2014 meeting. A major new recommendation that came from the 2014 Consensus Conference was to report percent pattern 4 with Gleason score 7 in both needle biopsies and radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens. This manuscript gives the options how to record percentage pattern 4 and under which situations recording this information may not be necessary. Another consensus from the 2014 meeting was to replace the term tertiary-grade pattern with minor high-grade pattern. Minor high-grade indicates that the term tertiary should not merely be just the third most common pattern but that it should be minor or limited in extent. Although a specific cutoff of 5% was not voted on in the 2014 Consensus meeting, the only quantification of minor high-grade pattern that has been used in the literature with evidence-based data correlating with outcome has been the 5% cutoff. At the 2014 Consensus Conference, there was agreement that the grading rule proposed in the 2005 Consensus Conference on needle biopsies be followed, that tertiary be not used, and that the most common and highest grade patterns be summed together as the Gleason score. Therefore, the term tertiary or minor high-grade pattern should only be used in RP specimens when there are 3 grade patterns, such as with 3+4=7 or 4+3=7 with <5% Gleason pattern 5. It was recommended at the 2014 Conference that for the foreseeable future, the new Grade Groups would be reported along with the Gleason system. The minor high-grade patterns

  18. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group I - Peri-Implantitis Aetiology, Risk Factors and Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolsek, Francesca; Astramskaite, Inesa; Berton, Federico; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Frassetto, Andrea; Gomes, Pedro de Sousa; Guobis, Zygimantas; Jimbo, Ryo; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Khoury, Aiman; Kubilius, Ricardas; Kuoppala, Ritva; Lombardi, Teresa; Maminskas, Julius; Pacauskiene, Ingrida; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Poskevicius, Lukas; Pranskunas, Mindaugas; Puisys, Algirdas; Raustia, Aune

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction The task of Group 1 was to review and update the existing data concerning aetiology, risk factors and pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Previous history of periodontitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking and presence of general diseases have been considered among the aetiological risk factors for the onset of peri-implant pathologies, while late dental implant failures are commonly associated with peri-implantitis and/or with the application of incorrect biomechanical forces. Special interest was paid to the bone cells dynamics as part of the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Material and Methods The main areas indagated by this group were as follows: influence of smoking, history of periodontitis and general diseases on peri-implantitis development, bio-mechanics of implant loading and its influence on peri-implant bone and cellular dynamics related to the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. The systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was screened and reported following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis) Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. Method of preparation of the systematic reviews, based on comprehensive search strategies, was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses is presented in Preface chapter. Results The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. One systematic review with meta-analysis, three systematic reviews and one theoretical analysis were performed. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article. PMID:27833732

  19. Why Consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Polletta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activists have long justified their egalitarian organizational forms in prefigurative terms. Making decisions by consensus, decentralizing organization, and rotating leadership serves to model the radically democratic society that activists hope to bring into being. Our comparison of consensus-based decision-making in three historical periods, however, shows that activists have understood the purposes of prefiguration in very different ways. Whereas radical pacifists in the 1940s saw their cooperative organizations as sustaining movement stalwarts in a period of political repression, new left activists in the 1960s imagined that their radically democratic practices would be adopted by ever-widening circles. Along with the political conditions in which they have operated, activists’ distinctive understandings of equality have also shaped the way they have made decisions. Our interviews with 30 leftist activists today reveal a view of decision-making as a place to work through inequalities that are informal, unacknowledged, and pervasive.

  20. 2014 Female Athlete Triad Coalition consensus statement on treatment and return to play of the female athlete triad: 1st International Conference held in San Francisco, CA, May 2012, and 2nd International Conference held in Indianapolis, IN, May 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Mary Jane; Nattiv, Aurelia; Joy, Elizabeth; Misra, Madhusmita; Williams, Nancy I; Mallinson, Rebecca J; Gibbs, Jenna C; Olmsted, Marion; Goolsby, Marci; Matheson, Gordon

    2014-03-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a medical condition often observed in physically active girls and women, and involves 3 components: (1) low energy availability with or without disordered eating, (2) menstrual dysfunction, and (3) low bone mineral density. Female athletes often present with 1 or more of the 3 Triad components, and an early intervention is essential to prevent its progression to serious endpoints that include clinical eating disorders, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. This consensus statement represents a set of recommendations developed following the first (San Francisco, California) and second (Indianapolis, Indianna) International Symposia on the Female Athlete Triad. It is intended to provide clinical guidelines for physicians, athletic trainers, and other health care providers for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of the Female Athlete Triad and to provide clear recommendations for return to play. The 2014 Female Athlete Triad Coalition Consensus Statement on Treatment and Return to Play of the Female Athlete Triad Expert Panel has proposed a risk stratification point system that takes into account magnitude of risk to assist the physician in decision-making regarding sport participation, clearance, and return to play. Guidelines are offered for clearance categories, management by a multidisciplinary team, and implementation of treatment contracts. This consensus paper has been endorsed by The Female Athlete Triad Coalition, an International Consortium of leading Triad researchers, physicians, and other health care professionals, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine.

  1. 2014 Female Athlete Triad Coalition Consensus Statement on Treatment and Return to Play of the Female Athlete Triad: 1st International Conference held in San Francisco, California, May 2012 and 2nd International Conference held in Indianapolis, Indiana, May 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Mary Jane; Nattiv, Aurelia; Joy, Elizabeth; Misra, Madhusmita; Williams, Nancy I; Mallinson, Rebecca J; Gibbs, Jenna C; Olmsted, Marion; Goolsby, Marci; Matheson, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a medical condition often observed in physically active girls and women, and involves three components: (1) low energy availability with or without disordered eating, (2) menstrual dysfunction and (3) low bone mineral density. Female athletes often present with one or more of the three Triad components, and an early intervention is essential to prevent its progression to serious endpoints that include clinical eating disorders, amenorrhoea and osteoporosis. This consensus statement represents a set of recommendations developed following the 1st (San Francisco, California, USA) and 2nd (Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) International Symposia on the Female Athlete Triad. It is intended to provide clinical guidelines for physicians, athletic trainers and other healthcare providers for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of the Female Athlete Triad and to provide clear recommendations for return to play. The 2014 Female Athlete Triad Coalition Consensus Statement on Treatment and Return to Play of the Female Athlete Triad expert panel has proposed a risk stratification point system that takes into account magnitude of risk to assist the physician in decision-making regarding sport participation, clearance and return to play. Guidelines are offered for clearance categories, management by a multidisciplinary team and implementation of treatment contracts. This consensus paper has been endorsed by the Female Athlete Triad Coalition, an International Consortium of leading Triad researchers, physicians and other healthcare professionals, the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine.

  2. Proceedings [of the] 1994 annual conference [of the] Canadian Society for Civil Engineering. Comptes rendus [du] congres annuel 1994 [de la] Societe Canadienne de Genie Civil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The first of four volumes of a conference on civil engineering presented papers on hydrotechnical engineering, construction, transportation, cold regions, history, and sustainable development. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 15 papers from the volume.

  3. Canadian 12^th National Metropolis Conference and Canadian Multiculturalism in Time of the Post - Economical Crisis%从加拿大第12次全国大都市会议看后经济危机背景下的加拿大多元文化主义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓莹

    2011-01-01

    The 12^th National Metropolis Conference was held in Montreal in March, 2010. Its major priorities includ Citizenship and social, cultural, linguistic and civic integration; Economic and labor market integration; Family, children, youth; The role of the host communities for new- comers and minorities; Justice, policing and security; Housing, neighborhoods and the urban environment. The paper follows the reports on Conference priorities, discusses the significance of Canadian federal multicuhural policies in the time of the post -economic crisis, exams the fresh requirements and challenges prompted by the new historical and international circumstances, tries to cast a would - be panorama of the integrated Canadian society to come, and sees how its multicuhural ideology contributes to the human society at large.%2010年3月在加拿大的蒙特利尔市举行的第12次全国大都市会议围绕社会文化融合、经济与劳动力市场协调、家庭及青少年问题、住房、社区、城乡环境、社会公正和安全保障等六项议题展开研讨,以此次会议的宗旨和要义为主线,审视独特的加拿大多元文化主义治国策略在后经济危机背景下所发挥的作用,分析新历史条件和国际形势对多元文化主义政策的要求和挑战,展望理解、宽容、和谐、共荣的加拿大社会理念的发展愿景,以及对人类社会整体进步的促进和推动。

  4. Febrile Seizures: Controversy and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Omer A.

    1983-01-01

    Although febrile convulsions are a relatively common complaint, the approach to their management is far from uniform and highly controversial. This article reviews the consensus statement on febrile convulsions arrived at by the Consensus Development Conference held in 1980 by the National Institutes of Health, together with other literature of interest to family physicians. Guidelines are given for the assessment, diagnosis and emergency treatment of febrile seizures. Epilepsy and atypical febrile convulsions are distinguished from simple febrile seizures. Prognosis, prevention, and the importance of counselling parents are discussed, as well as the controversial issue of prophylactic treatment. PMID:21286583

  5. Rectal cancer radiotherapy: Towards European consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Vincenzo (Cattedra di Radioterapia, Univ. Cattolica S.Cuore, Rome (Italy)), E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Glimelius, Bengt (Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Background and purpose. During the first decade of the 21st century several important European randomized studies in rectal cancer have been published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Treatment: Looking for an European Consensus' (EURECA-CC2) was organized. This article summarizes the consensus about imaging and radiotherapy of rectal cancer and gives an update until May 2010. Methods. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. Eight chapters were identified: epidemiology, diagnostics, pathology, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, treatment toxicity and quality of life, follow-up, and research questions. Each chapter was subdivided by topic, and a series of statements were developed. Each committee member commented and voted, sentence by sentence three times. Sentences which did not reach agreement after voting round no 2 were openly debated during the Conference in Perugia (Italy) December 2008. The Executive Committee scored percentage consensus based on three categories: 'large consensus', 'moderate consensus', 'minimum consensus'. Results. The total number of the voted sentences was 207. Of the 207, 86% achieved large consensus, 13% achieved moderate consensus, and only three (1%) resulted in minimum consensus. No statement was disagreed by more than 50% of members. All chapters were voted on by at least 75% of the members, and the majority was voted on by >85%. Considerable progress has been made in staging and treatment, including radiation treatment of rectal cancer. Conclusions. This Consensus Conference represents an expertise opinion process that may help shape future programs, investigational protocols, and guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer throughout Europe. In spite of substantial progress, many research challenges remain

  6. Proceedings of the APPrO 2006 18. annual Canadian power conference and trade show : crafting the critical connections to ensure system stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J. [Association of Power Producers of Ontario, Toronto, ON (Canada)] (ed.)

    2007-07-01

    This conference provided a forum for members of the Association of Power Producers of Ontario to discuss recent developments in electric power management, supply and distribution. The conference also included discussions related to the integrated power system plan (IPSP). Options for new and improved Ontario Power Authority (OPA) procurement mechanisms were reviewed and transmission policy decisions for the future were investigated. Other topics included risk management; natural gas futures; and Ontario's standard offer program. New sources of supply were discussed, as well as methods of securing reliable supply relationships. The implications of Ontario's nuclear reconstruction for transmission system development were evaluated. A transmission forum was held to review transmission issues related to generators and provincial transmission planning. The conference also included a roundtable of industry experts who discussed major directional issues related to the electric power industry. Presentations were followed by breakout sessions on OPA procurement mechanisms and electricity alignment issues. This conference was held in conjunction with the APPrO green power conference. refs., tabs., figs.

  7. Proceedings [of the] 1994 annual conference [of the] Canadian Society for Civil Engineering. Comptes rendus [du] congres annuel 1994 [de la] Societe Canadienne de Genie Civil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The third of four volumes of a conference on civil engineering presented papers on environmental engineering, including water and wastewater treatment, water quality management, solid and liquid waste treatment, non-point source pollution and hydraulics, urban drainage problems, and soil and groundwater contamination. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 6 papers from the volume.

  8. Exploring Canadian Identity through Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2001-01-01

    Considers what commonplaces of culture and identity are being, could be, transmitted through the use of children's literature in classrooms. Explores what is Canadian about Canadian children's literature. Describes a study which involved Canadian elementary school children who read Canadian children's books. Concludes that literature plays a…

  9. Proceedings of the 2. annual Canadian Institute conference on human resources planning for the energy industry : implementing practical and proactive strategies for managing workforce supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This conference discussed issues and approaches concerning human resources in various industries in Canada. A review of human resources issues and employment opportunities in the electricity sector was presented along with opportunities in the petroleum geoscience profession. Various corporations in the oil and gas industry were reviewed in relation to management and human resources development. Reviews of good employers were presented. Various management issues concerning the contingent workforce were also addressed along with issues concerning Aboriginal people seeking employment. Partnerships with educational institutions and the development of apprenticeship programs were discussed. Optimal succession planning strategies were reviewed and best practices in training were examined, including various health and safety programs. The development of employee skills was discussed, as well as performance optimization among employees. The avoidance of wage wars and total compensation strategies were also reviewed. The conference featured 20 presentations, of which 8 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  10. Proceedings [of the] 1994 annual conference [of the] Canadian Society for Civil Engineering. Comptes rendus [du] congres annuel 1994 [de la] Societe Canadienne de Genie Civil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The fourth of four volumes of a conference on civil engineering presented papers on engineering mechanics, including dynamics and vibrations, computational modelling, porous media, geomechanics, fluid mechanics, finite element methods, structural dynamics, mechanics of materials, computer-aided engineering and optimization, boundary element methods, stress analysis, mechanics of composites and damage, and structural stability. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 12 papers from the volume.

  11. Proceedings of the symposium on air pollution and public health[Organized under the auspices of the Conference of New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoen, D.; Drouin, L. [National Public Health Inst. of Quebec, PQ (Canada)]|[Direction de la sante publique de Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2003-09-01

    Air pollution levels throughout New England and southeastern Canada generally exceed U.S. and Canadian ambient air quality limits, most notably for ozone and particulate matter. The pollutants can reduce respiratory function and trigger asthma attacks. Acute effects are also associated with short-term peaks in air pollution levels. This two-day symposium featured presentations by scientists from Canada, the United States and Europe who described recent advances in their areas of expertise and presented recommendations to reduce air pollution and its impact on human health. The recommendations, which were compiled according to individual presentations as well as the plenary sessions of the symposium, have been classified as follows: improving the air quality database; epidemiological and toxicological research needs; and, concrete intervention to reduce air pollution-related health impacts. The six sessions were entitled as follows: (1) levels and sources of air pollution in northeastern America, (2) specific sources of air pollution, (3) human health effects, (4) air pollution and asthma, (5) epidemiology, and (6) scientific basis for regulatory approaches to air pollution standards. refs.

  12. I Am Canadian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joe

    2011-01-01

    "I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness......."I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness....

  13. 2016 updated MASCC/ESMO consensus recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roila, Fausto; Warr, David; Hesketh, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: An update of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute and delayed emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy published after the last MASCC/ESMO antiemetic consensus conference in 2009 has been carried out. METHODS: A systematic literature search using PubMed from January...

  14. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence. A consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society, endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, S.R. [Imperial College London, Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, SW3 6NP, London (United Kingdom); Anagnostopoulos, C. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, SW3 6NP, London (United Kingdom); Cerqueira, M. [Georgetown University Medical Center, 3800 Reservoir Road NW, WA 20007-2197, Washington DC (United States); Ell, P.J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, The Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Flint, E.J. [Dudley Group of Hospitals, Wordsley Hospital, DY8 5QX, Stourbridge, West Midlands (United Kingdom); Harbinson, M. [Antrim Area Hospital, Bush Road, Co Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Kelion, A.D. [Harefield Hospital, Hill End Road, UB9 6JH, Harefield, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Al-Mohammad, A. [Northern General Hospital, Herries Road, S5 7AU, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Prvulovich, E.M. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, The Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Shaw, L.J. [Suite 225, Atlanta Cardiovascular Research Institute, 5665 Peachtree Dunwoody Road NE, 30342, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Tweddel, A.C. [Castle Hill Hospital, Castle Road, HU16 5JQ, Cottingham, E Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  15. Psychological Considerations in the Assessment and Treatment of Pain in Neurorehabilitation and Psychological Factors Predictive of Therapeutic Response: Evidence and Recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Giusti, Emanuele M.; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Saviola, Donatella; Gatti, Arianna; Gabrielli, Samantha; Lacerenza, Marco; Pietrabissa, Giada; Cattivelli, Roberto; Spatola, Chiara A. M.; Corti, Stefania; Novelli, Margherita; Villa, Valentina; Cottini, Andrea; Lai, Carlo; Pagnini, Francesco; Castelli, Lorys; Tavola, Mario; Torta, Riccardo; Arreghini, Marco; Zanini, Loredana; Brunani, Amelia; Capodaglio, Paolo; D'Aniello, Guido E.; Scarpina, Federica; Brioschi, Andrea; Priano, Lorenzo; Mauro, Alessandro; Riva, Giuseppe; Repetto, Claudia; Regalia, Camillo; Molinari, Enrico; Notaro, Paolo; Paolucci, Stefano; Sandrini, Giorgio; Simpson, Susan G.; Wiederhold, Brenda; Tamburin, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to provide effective care to patients suffering from chronic pain secondary to neurological diseases, health professionals must appraise the role of the psychosocial factors in the genesis and maintenance of this condition whilst considering how emotions and cognitions influence the course of treatment. Furthermore, it is important not only to recognize the psychological reactions to pain that are common to the various conditions, but also to evaluate how these syndromes differ with regards to the psychological factors that may be involved. As an extensive evaluation of these factors is still lacking, the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN) aimed to collate the evidence available across these topics. Objectives: To determine the psychological factors which are associated with or predictive of pain secondary to neurological conditions and to assess the influence of these aspects on the outcome of neurorehabilitation. Methods: Two reviews were performed. In the first, a PUBMED search of the studies assessing the association between psychological factors and pain or the predictive value of these aspects with respect to chronic pain was conducted. The included papers were then rated with regards to their methodological quality and recommendations were made accordingly. In the second study, the same methodology was used to collect the available evidence on the predictive role of psychological factors on the therapeutic response to pain treatments in the setting of neurorehabilitation. Results: The first literature search identified 1170 results and the final database included 189 articles. Factors such as depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, coping strategies, and cognitive functions were found to be associated with pain across the various conditions. However, there are differences between chronic musculoskeletal pain, migraine, neuropathy, and conditions associated with complex disability with regards to the

  16. Psychological considerations in the assessment and treatment of pain in neurorehabilitation and psychological factors predictive of therapeutic response: evidence and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn order to provide effective care to patients suffering from chronic pain secondary to neurological diseases, health professionals must appraise the role of the psychosocial factors in the genesis and maintenance of this condition whilst considering how emotions and cognitions influence the course of treatment. Furthermore, it is important not only to recognize the psychological reactions to pain that are common to the various conditions, but also to evaluate how these syndromes differ with regards to the psychological factors that may be involved. As an extensive evaluation of these factors is still lacking, the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation aimed to collate the evidence available across these topics. ObjectivesTo determine the psychological factors which are associated with or predictive of pain secondary to neurological conditions and to assess the influence of these aspects on the outcome of neurorehabilitation. MethodsTwo reviews were performed. In the first, a PUBMED search of the studies assessing the association between psychological factors and pain or the predictive value of these aspects with respect to chronic pain was conducted. The included papers were then rated with regards to their methodological quality and recommendations were made accordingly. In the second study, the same methodology was used to collect the available evidence on the predictive role of psychological factors on the therapeutic response to pain treatments in the setting of neurorehabilitation.ResultsThe first literature search identified 1170 results and the final database included 189 articles. Factors such as depression, anxiety, pain catastrophizing, coping strategies and cognitive functions were found to be associated with pain across the various conditions. However, there are differences between chronic musculoskeletal pain, migraine, neuropathy and conditions associated with complex disability with regards to the

  17. Coming to consensus on policy to create supportive built environments and community design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Kim D; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Spence, John C; Neary, Neil E; Nykiforuk, Candace I J

    2012-01-01

    In April 2011, a conference with invited experts from research, policy and practice was held to build consensus around policy levers to address environmental determinants of obesity. The gap between existing policy tools and what can promote health through community design is a major policy opportunity. This commentary represents a consensus of next actions towards creating built environments that support healthy active living. The policy environment and Canadian evidence are reviewed. Issues and challenges to policy change are discussed. Recommendations to create supportive built environments that encourage healthy active living in communities include the following: 1) empower planning authorities to change bylaws that impede healthy active living, protect and increase access to green space, introduce zoning to increase high density, mixed land use, and influence the location and distribution of food stores; 2) establish stable funding for infrastructure promoting active transportation and opportunities for recreation; 3) evaluate the effectiveness of programs to improve the built environment so that successful interventions can be identified and disseminated; 4) mandate health impact assessment of planning, development and transportation policies to ensure that legislative changes promote health and safety; 5) frame issues to dispel myths and to promote protection from obesity risk factors.

  18. The "Canadian" in Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Wolodko, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Notes that a rich body of Canadian children's literature exists that reflects the country's literary and socio-cultural values, beliefs, themes and images, including those of geography, history, language and identity. Discusses how Canadians tend to identify themselves first by region or province and then by nation. (SG)

  19. Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Libraries in Canada, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Includes 15 articles that relate to Canadian children's literature, including the power of literature; using Canadian literature in Canada; the principal's role in promoting literacy; Canadian Children's Book Centre; the National Library of Canada's children's literature collection; book promotion; selection guide; publisher's perspective; and…

  20. Conference Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveros, P. A.; Dutrizac, J. E. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] [eds.

    2001-07-01

    This workshop is part of a continuing series of joint workshops organized by CANMET of Natural Resources Canada and the Research Directorate-General of the European Commission in the areas of sustainable metallurgical processing, recycling and environmental protection. The program presented at this conference also benefited from the organizational support of the Canadian Association of Recycling Industries. Over the past twenty years these workshops served as a valuable forum for the discussion of the technological issues associated with metallurgical processing, recycling and compliance with environmental regulations within the framework of sustainable development. The program this year was organized in five sessions. A total of 32 papers were presented. Session One emphasized the international dimension of modern research as illustrated by the Intelligent Manufacturing System (MIS) program. Session Two dealt with recycling, with special attention to the recycling of plastics and construction materials. Session Three was devoted to highlighting European efforts to treat chromium-bearing solutions or to find alternatives to chromium salts in surface treatment operations. Session Four emphasized primary and secondary zinc processing and the importance of energy conservation. The final session reviewed waste management practices and the utilization of waste materials. Opening addresses by representatives of the sponsoring organizations and a list of conference attendees and their affiliations are also included.

  1. 3rd Brazilian Consensus on Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga; Maguinilk, Ismael; Zaterka, Schlioma; Parente, José Miguel; do Carmo Friche Passos, Maria; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2013-04-01

    Signicant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  2. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  3. The Limits of Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, John B.

    Dynamics in the education policy arena suggest that, despite two generations of researchers extolling democratic leadership styles and consensus building over autocratic techniques, wide participation in policymaking and the broadest possible consensus are not always productive: American society has not yet agreed on what schools should…

  4. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce "rational consensus", that is, "mathematical aggregation", by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  5. Current Knowledge and Priorities for Future Research in Late Effects after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes: Consensus Statement from the Second Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium International Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Andrew C; Mehta, Parinda A; Vlachos, Adrianna; Savage, Sharon A; Bresters, Dorine; Tolar, Jakub; Boulad, Farid; Dalle, Jean Hugues; Bonfim, Carmem; de la Fuente, Josu; Duncan, Christine N; Baker, K Scott; Pulsipher, Michael A; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Wagner, John E; Alter, Blanche P

    2017-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC), and Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) are 3 of the most common inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS), in which the hematologic manifestations can be cured with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Later in life, these patients face a variety of medical conditions, which may be a manifestation of underlying disease or due to pre-HCT therapy, the HCT, or a combination of all these elements. Very limited long-term follow-up data exist in these populations, with FA the only IBMFS that has specific published data. During the international consensus conference sponsored by the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium entitled "Late Effects Screening and Recommendations following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT) for Immune Deficiency and Nonmalignant Hematologic Disease" held in Minneapolis, Minnesota in May of 2016, a half-day session was focused specifically on the unmet needs for these patients with IBMFS. A multidisciplinary group of experts discussed what is currently known, outlined an agenda for future research, and laid out long-term follow-up guidelines based on a combination of evidence in the literature as well as expert opinion. This article addresses the state of science in that area as well as consensus regarding the agenda for future research, with specific screening guidelines to follow in the next article from this group.

  6. Practical Techniques for Achieving Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, John A.

    Consensus is important in the making of a policy decision. If a decision is reached without consensus, morale and unit satisfaction may both suffer. With genuine consensus, a unit tends to willingly support and implement the new policy. After analyzing how observed small groups had actually reached consensus, the following ten techniques were…

  7. Heat exposure in the Canadian workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2010-08-01

    Exposure to excessive heat is a physical hazard that threatens Canadian workers. As patterns of global climate change suggest an increased frequency of heat waves, the potential impact of these extreme climate events on the health and well-being of the Canadian workforce is a new and growing challenge. Increasingly, industries rely on available technology and information to ensure the safety of their workers. Current Canadian labor codes in all provinces employ the guidelines recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) that are Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) based upon Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT). The TLVs are set so that core body temperature of the workers supposedly does not exceed 38.0 degrees C. Legislation in most Canadian provinces also requires employers to install engineering and administrative controls to reduce the heat stress risk of their working environment should it exceed the levels permissible under the WBGT system. There are however severe limitations using the WGBT system because it only directly evaluates the environmental parameters and merely incorporates personal factors such as clothing insulation and metabolic heat production through simple correction factors for broadly generalized groups. An improved awareness of the strengths and limitations of TLVs and the WGBT index can minimize preventable measurement errors and improve their utilization in workplaces. Work is on-going, particularly in the European Union to develop an improved individualized heat stress risk assessment tool. More work is required to improve the predictive capacity of these indices.

  8. Commentary on the Children Forgotten in the Interdisciplinary Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Kathleen Coulborn

    1994-01-01

    Challenges some of the assertions made in a consensus statement by an international conference on child sexual abuse. The statement does not adequately address children who will not talk because of adult-protective behaviors and the difficulty of disclosure. (JPS)

  9. Implants and/or teeth: consensus statements and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Carlsson, G E; Jokstad, A

    2008-01-01

    In August 23-25, 2007, the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry in collaboration with the Danish Society of Oral Implantology arranged a consensus conference on the topic 'Implants and/or teeth'. It was preceded by a workshop in which eight focused questions were raised and answered...

  10. The Consensus: Another View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    Comments on the seven points of consensus presented in "A Theoretical Basis for Teaching the Receptive Skills" by Stephen Krashen, et al., particularly on the terminology that is derived from Krashen's other writings. Offers eight statements which reflect in more general terms an interpretation of Krashen's theories for language teachers…

  11. Making Consensus Tractable

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2010-01-01

    The process of consensus voting has many distinct advantages: it fosters discussion and participation, empowers minorities and independent thinkers, and is more likely, after a decision has been made, to secure the participants' support for the chosen course of action. The disadvantage of consensus decision making is, of course, the difficulty of reaching consensus. While this challenge is largely overcome in many theoretical settings such as Aumann's ``agree to disagree'' result, a hitherto unsolved difficulty is the lack of a framework offering rational (i.e., Bayesian) consensus decision making that can be performed using simple and efficient calculations. We propose a model featuring two possible states of the world and a finite number of individuals. The group has to come to a binary decision, where the merit of each of the two possible courses of action depends on the state of the world. Each member of the group has a private and independent signal at his or her disposal, giving some indication as to wh...

  12. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce “rational consensus”, that is, “mathematical aggregation”, by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  13. Worksite health and wellness programs: Canadian achievements & prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Alméras, Natalie; Gauvin, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Canada has experienced a substantial reduction in mortality related to cardiovascular disease (CVD). There is a general consensus that more effective and widespread health promotion interventions may lead to further reductions in CVD risk factors and actual disease states. In this paper, we briefly outline the prevalence of selected risk factors for CVD in Canada, describe characteristics of the Canadian labor market and workforce, and depict what is known about health and wellness program delivery systems in Canadian workplaces. Our review indicates that there have been numerous and diverse relevant legislative and policy initiatives to create a context conducive to improve the healthfulness of Canadian workplaces. However, there is still a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of the delivery system and the actual impact of workplace health and wellness programs in reducing CVD risk in Canada. Thus, while a promising model, more research is needed in this area.

  14. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  15. Continuity and consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In Danish family policy, changes initiated by the present conservative-liberal government differ little from those proposed by the opposition. Recent changes are minor, but significant ones occurred in the 1960s, when childcare was universalized, and in the 1980s, when parental leave substituted...... policy reflect changing conditions for employment and the minding of children and that there has been a high degree of continuity and consensus about the change, as indicated by the strong increase in female labour market involvement....

  16. Spanish Consensus Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2016-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  17. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  18. Papers of a Canadian Institute conference on successfully creating win-win Aboriginal-energy industry joint ventures : bridging cultural gaps, negotiating impact benefit agreements and securing long-term success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This conference focused on creating and maintaining relationships and business partners with industry and Aboriginal communities. It covered topics such as financing joint ventures, perception of investors on Aboriginal projects, managing risks and potential ownership schemes for joint ventures. The conference also addressed the issue of the duty to consult Aboriginal peoples regarding any actions that affect their right, treaty right, or Aboriginal title. First Nation involvement is directed at local employment and economic participation around traditional lands. Trends indicate increased business involvement and opportunities for employment for First Nations. This paper describes the elements of a prosperous partnership. It was emphasized that the basis of a successful joint venture with a First Nation lies on achieving a good relationship while achieving a mutual goal. Three papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the database. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. The Study of Canadian Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Eli

    1971-01-01

    Discussed are Canadian novels, short stories, poems and a film which revolve around man's confrontation with nature, the depression, the problem of isolation, realism in Canadian literature. (Author/AF)

  20. Teaching Canadian Literature: An Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, W. John

    1984-01-01

    Suggests granting greater recognition to the artistic integrity of Canadian literature by removing it from the broader context of Canadian studies. Indicates that understanding and appreciation of Canadian literature as a representation of reality filtered through the perception of an author should be focus of literature in schools. (NEC)

  1. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  2. Twitter and Canadian Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Max

    2012-01-01

    An emerging group of leaders in Canadian education has attracted thousands of followers. They've made Twitter an extension of their lives, delivering twenty or more tweets a day that can include, for example, links to media articles, research, new ideas from education bloggers, or to their own, or simply a personal thought. At their best,…

  3. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional…

  4. Community rights and corporate responsibility : Canadian mining and oil companies in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, L.; Clark, T.D.; Patroni, V. (eds.)

    2006-07-01

    This book presented papers given at a conference on Canadian mining companies in Latin America which was held at York University in 2002. The conference raised awareness about the impact of mining on the ecosystems and communities of Latin America. The conference provided a forum for non governmental organizations (NGOs), social activists, and academics to debate the growth of the mining industry in various Latin American countries. Issues related to international mining and community relations were discussed, and strategies for resolving conflicts between mining companies and communities were examined. The current regulatory environment surrounding mining was reviewed. Issues related to oppression and social resistance were also discussed. The activities of various Canadian mining companies were also discussed, as well as Canadian oil investment in Colombia. Issues related to corporate responsibility were also examined. refs., tabs., figs.

  5. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the relevant recommendations and references related to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. The goal was to provide the clinician with concise, evidence-based contemporary recommendations, and the supporting documentation to encourage their application. The full text includes disclosure of all relevant relationships with industry for each writing committee member. A fundamental aspect of all expert consensus statements is that these carefully developed, evidence-based documents can neither encompass all clinical circumstances, nor replace the judgment of individual physicians in management of each patient. The science of medicine is rooted in evidence, and the art of medicine is based on the application of this evidence to the individual patient. This expert consensus statement has adhered to these principles for optimal management of patients requiring percutaneous mechanical circulatory support.

  6. Expert consensus document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boehm, Ulrich; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc; Dattani, Mehul T;

    2015-01-01

    migration of GnRH-synthesizing neurons. CHH can be challenging to diagnose, particularly when attempting to differentiate it from constitutional delay of puberty. A timely diagnosis and treatment to induce puberty can be beneficial for sexual, bone and metabolic health, and might help minimize some......Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare disorder caused by the deficient production, secretion or action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which is the master hormone regulating the reproductive axis. CHH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, with >25 different...... of the psychological effects of CHH. In most cases, fertility can be induced using specialized treatment regimens and several predictors of outcome have been identified. Patients typically require lifelong treatment, yet ∼10-20% of patients exhibit a spontaneous recovery of reproductive function. This Consensus...

  7. On consensus biomarker selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambin Anna

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent development of mass spectrometry technology enabled the analysis of complex peptide mixtures. A lot of effort is currently devoted to the identification of biomarkers in human body fluids like serum or plasma, based on which new diagnostic tests for different diseases could be constructed. Various biomarker selection procedures have been exploited in recent studies. It has been noted that they often lead to different biomarker lists and as a consequence, the patient classification may also vary. Results Here we propose a new approach to the biomarker selection problem: to apply several competing feature ranking procedures and compute a consensus list of features based on their outcomes. We validate our methods on two proteomic datasets for the diagnosis of ovarian and prostate cancer. Conclusion The proposed methodology can improve the classification results and at the same time provide a unified biomarker list for further biological examinations and interpretation.

  8. Conflict or Consensus?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Poulsen, Birgitte

    forms of institutional design of citizen participation processes, less attention has been paid to the role of public administrators, and their role in facilitating processes of citizen participation. Public administrators have to work with diverse groups of citizens with diverging, and often conflicting......, interests. However, many public administrators have not been adequately exposed to the rationales of conflicts and the skills in resolving conflicts. The aim of this paper is to analyse the different types of conflicts that public administrators experience in formal processes of citizen involvement. Whereas...... the literature of deliberative democracy claims that consensus is most often the result of rational deliberative processes, the claim of this paper is that conflicts is more likely a natural and integrated part of such deliberative acts. Conflicts are, thus, seen as inevitable. Also conflicts may function...

  9. Political Consensus and Fiscal Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg, Kurt; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming difficult to maintain consensus in a period of economic austerity, and this possibly challenges the ability of democratic institutions to take decisions on tough economic questions. In order to find out how political consensus influences fiscal outcomes, this article sets out...

  10. Main: ANAERO5CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO5CONSENSUS S000481 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO5CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  11. Main: ANAERO3CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO3CONSENSUS S000479 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO3CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00048

  12. Main: ANAERO4CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO4CONSENSUS S000480 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO4CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000478, S00047

  13. Main: ANAERO1CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO1CONSENSUS S000477 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO1CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000478, S000479, S00048

  14. Main: ANAERO2CONSENSUS [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ANAERO2CONSENSUS S000478 05-November-2005 (last modified) kehi One of 16 motifs fou...ty et al., 2005); Arbitrary named ANAERO2CONSENSUS by the PLACEdb curator; See also S000477, S000479, S00048

  15. CANLIT (Canadian Literature) Teachers' Crash Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CANLIT, Toronto (Ontario).

    As a result of a study of the situation of Canadian literature in Canadian high schools and universities, this course was developed to provide teachers with useful information about Canadian literature. Included in this kit are sections on Canadian literature (the great debate about the importance of Canadian content), history and sources…

  16. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  17. Canadian identity: Implications for international social work by Canadians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    This paper is in response to recent calls to conceptualize and articulate Canadian perspectives and experiences in international social work, given that the Canadian standpoint has been lacking in international social work literature. This paper contends that it is imperative, first of all......, to critically examine and unpack our ‘Canadian’ identity in order to practice international work that is socially just and anti-imperialist. Drawing on the work of post-colonial authors, critical race theorists, and those who study national myth-making, this essay revisits Canadian identity because...... it is this identity that Canadian social workers often carry into their international work....

  18. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  19. Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John; Oreskes, Naomi; Doran, Peter T.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Verheggen, Bart; Maibach, Ed W.; Carlton, J. Stuart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Skuce, Andrew G.; Green, Sarah A.; Nuccitelli, Dana; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Winkler, Bärbel; Painting, Rob; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%-100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 048001) comes to a different conclusion using results from surveys of non-experts such as economic geologists and a self-selected group of those who reject the consensus. We demonstrate that this outcome is not unexpected because the level of consensus correlates with expertise in climate science. At one point, Tol also reduces the apparent consensus by assuming that abstracts that do not explicitly state the cause of global warming (‘no position’) represent non-endorsement, an approach that if applied elsewhere would reject consensus on well-established theories such as plate tectonics. We examine the available studies and conclude that the finding of 97% consensus in published climate research is robust and consistent with other surveys of climate scientists and peer-reviewed studies.

  20. Between consensus and contestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices.

  1. The Use of Phallometric Evidence in Canadian Criminal Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Michael S; Chandler, Jennifer A; Fedoroff, J Paul

    2015-06-01

    The use of phallometric evidence by Canadian criminal courts has steadily increased since the early 1980s. Phallometry was initially considered by courts to be a potentially useful tool in the determination of accused persons' culpability; however, its contemporary use is limited to the postconviction contexts of sentencing and dangerous and long-term offender applications, as one of several means of diagnosing offenders, determining recidivism risk, and assessing treatment prospects. We provide an overview and assessment of the use of phallometric evidence by Canadian criminal courts and conclude that its contemporary application appears to be consistent with the expert psychiatric consensus on its proper role and function in the forensic context. We further identify potential difficulties associated with the adequacy of offenders' consent and the occasional divergence of expert opinion about the reliability and validity of phallometry for diagnosis and risk assessment.

  2. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary management: European consensus conference colon & rectum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, C.J. van de; Boelens, P.G.; Borras, J.M.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Cervantes, A.; Blomqvist, L.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Broek, C.B. van den; Brown, G.; Cutsem, E. van; Espin, E.; Haustermans, K.; Glimelius, B.; Iversen, L.H.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Marijnen, C.A.; Henning, G.; Gore-Booth, J.; Meldolesi, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Naredi, P.; Ortiz, H.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Rodel, C.; Roth, A.; Rutten, H; Schmoll, H.J.; Smith, J.J.; Tanis, P.J.; Taylor, C.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Gambacorta, M.A.; Aristei, C.; Valentini, V.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20years; however considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Th

  3. Interventions for Necrotizing Pancreatitis Summary of a Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Martin L.; Werner, Jens; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Baron, Todd H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Windsor, John A.; Horvath, Karen D.; vanSonnenberg, Eric; Bollen, Thomas L.; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis may result in significant morbidity and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Many recommendations have been made for management of necrotizing pancreatitis, but no published guidelines have incorporated the many recent developments in minimally invasi

  4. European Consensus Conference for external quality assessment in molecular pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krieken, J. H.; Siebers, A. G.; Normanno, N.; Timens, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Molecular testing of tumor samples to guide treatment decisions is of increasing importance. Several drugs have been approved for treatment of molecularly defined subgroups of patients, and the number of agents requiring companion diagnostics for their prescription is expected to rapidly increase. T

  5. EURECCA colorectal : Multidisciplinary management: European consensus conference colon & rectum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Boelens, Petra G.; Borras, Josep M.; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cervantes, Andres; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; van den Broek, Colette B. M.; Brown, Gina; Van Cutsem, Eric; Espin, Eloy; Haustermans, Karin; Glimelius, Bengt; Iversen, Lene H.; van Krieken, J. Han; Marijnen, Corrie A. M.; Henning, Geoffrey; Gore-Booth, Jola; Meldolesi, Elisa; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Pahlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Roedel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans J.; Smith, Jason J.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Wiggers, Theo; Gambacorta, Maria A.; Aristei, Cynthia; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20 years; however considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. T

  6. Canadian political science and medicare: six decades of inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Michael A; McGuinty, Dylan; Teskey, Bryan

    2011-05-01

    Based on an extensive sample of the literature, this critical review dissects the principal themes that have animated the Canadian political science profession on the topic of medicare. The review considers the coincidence of economic eras and how these are reflected in the methodological approaches to the study of medicare. As is to be expected, most of the scholarly activity coincides with the economic era marked by fiscal restraint and decreases in social investments (1993-2003). At the same time, the review notes the prevalence of institutionalism as an approach to the topic and the scholarly community's near-consensus on medicare as a defining characteristic of the country and its people.

  7. Is There a Consensus on Consensus Methodology? Descriptions and Recommendations for Future Consensus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jane; Carline, Jan D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    The authors of this article reviewed the methodology of three common consensus methods: nominal group process, consensus development panels, and the Delphi technique. The authors set out to determine how a majority of researchers are conducting these studies, how they are analyzing results, and subsequently the manner in which they are reporting their findings. The authors conclude with a set of guidelines and suggestions designed to aid researchers who choose to use the consensus methodology in their work.Overall, researchers need to describe their inclusion criteria. In addition to this, on the basis of the current literature the authors found that a panel size of 5 to 11 members was most beneficial across all consensus methods described. Lastly, the authors agreed that the statistical analyses done in consensus method studies should be as rigorous as possible and that the predetermined definition of consensus must be included in the ultimate manuscript. More specific recommendations are given for each of the three consensus methods described in the article.

  8. 26th Hohenheim Concensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Aggett, P.J.; Anton, R.; Bernstein, P.S.; Blumberg, J.; Heaney, R.P.; Henry, J.; Nolan, J.M.; Richardson, D.P.; Ommen, van B.; Witkamp, R.F.; Rijkers, G.T.; Zollner, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term “Hohenheim Consensus Conference” defines conferences dealing with nut

  9. Consensus report - reconstructions on implants. The Third EAO Consensus Conference 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Wiskott, Anselm

    2012-01-01

    This group was assigned the task to review the current knowledge in the areas of implant connections to abutments/reconstructions, fixation methods (cement vs. screw retained) for implant-supported reconstructions, as well as the optimal number of implants for fixed dental prosthesis and implant...

  10. On Realities of Canadian Multiculturalism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦辰

    2013-01-01

    Canada is a multicultural country which was mainly established by immigrants. Just because of that, Canadian govern⁃ment has carried out the policy of multiculturalism since1970s. However, it has encountered many problems such as policy con⁃flicts, national identity, democracy-inquiry and racial discrimination, etc. Hence the Canadian multiculturalism has been in a di⁃lemma.

  11. Nostradamus conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rössler, Otto; Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Emilio; Nostradamus: Modern Methods of Prediction, Modeling and Analysis of Nonlinear Systems

    2013-01-01

    This proceeding book of Nostradamus conference (http://nostradamus-conference.org) contains accepted papers presented at this event in 2012. Nostradamus conference was held in the one of the biggest and historic city of Ostrava (the Czech Republic, http://www.ostrava.cz/en), in September 2012. Conference topics are focused on classical as well as modern methods for prediction of dynamical systems with applications in science, engineering and economy. Topics are (but not limited to): prediction by classical and novel methods, predictive control, deterministic chaos and its control, complex systems, modelling and prediction of its dynamics and much more.

  12. Ending overly broad HIV criminalization: Canadian scientists and clinicians stand for justice

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Kazatchkine; Edwin Bernard; Patrick Eba

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, people living with HIV who do not disclose their HIV status prior to sexual acts risk prosecution for aggravated sexual assault even if they have sex with a condom or while having a low (or undetectable) viral load, they had no intent to transmit HIV, and no transmission occurred. In 2013, six distinguished Canadian HIV scientists and clinicians took ground-breaking action to advance justice by co-authoring the “Canadian consensus statement on HIV and its transmission in the contex...

  13. Canadian construction industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich, M.

    2001-07-01

    The principal sectors of the Canadian construction industry - commercial, industrial, institutional and residential - are examined with regard to their technical considerations concerning the subject of sustainability. Apart from the different needs of each of the sectors of the industry there are also regional differences caused by population distribution, and differences in climate, that have to be identified and accommodated in considering attitudes to recycling and sustainable development. Some indications that there is growing awareness of recycling and reuse are: the increasing frequency of life cycle costing in the commercial and institutional sectors, the use of recycled or otherwise waste materials in concrete, examples of using steel supporting structures and roof joists salvaged from previous uncompleted projects in the industrial sector, improved building envelope and indoor air quality concerns, collective ground source heating, and new basement and framing technologies and construction materials in the residential sector. These improvements notwithstanding, there remains much to be done. The new objective-based National Building Code, for which comments are now being solicited across the country, is expected to identify new and innovative solutions and to kick-start serious efforts to come up with solutions towards increasing overall sustainability in all sectors of the Canadian construction industry.

  14. Grade 3 Students Explore the Question, "What's Canadian about Canadian Children's Literature?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2000-01-01

    Explores third graders' responses to the question "What's Canadian about Canadian Children's Literature?" Describes 6 picture books and summarizes students' responses to each. Finds students mentioned geographical aspects as characteristic of Canadian literature, and they felt Canadian children's literature should reflect Canadian "experiences."…

  15. Problems in the Study of Canadian Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Barry

    1980-01-01

    Considers reasons for studying Canadian literature. Notes the relative infancy of Canadian literature and the need for maintaining objectivity in the study of Canadian literature. Proposes that teachers of Canadian literature focus on individual, contemporary works, examining language, form, and craftsmanship. (RL)

  16. [Canadian Literature. "Featuring: CanLit."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock, Ken, Ed.; Haycock, Carol-Ann, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The feature articles in this journal issue deal with various aspects of Canadian literature. The articles include: (1) a discussion of who's who and what's what in Canadian literature; (2) reviews of worthwhile but overlooked Canadian children's literature; (3) a list of resource guides to Canadian literature and a short quiz over famous first…

  17. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocular allergy" was proposed as the general term to describe ocular allergic diseases. Consensus regarding classification was not reached. Signs and symptoms were considered extremely important for the diagnosis. It was consensus that a staging system should be proposed based on the disease severity. Environmental control, avoidance of allergens and the use of artificial tears were recommended as first line treatment. The secondary treatment should include topical anti-histamines, mast cell stabilizers and multi actions drugs. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictors were not recommended. Topical corticosteroids were recommended as third line of treatment for the most severe keratoconjunctivitis. Consensus was not reached regarding the use of systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressant. Surgical approach and unconventional treatments were not recommended as routine. CONCLUSION: The task of creating guidelines for ocular allergies showed to be very complex. Many controversial topics remain unsolved. A larger consensus including experts from different groups around the world may be needed to further improve the current recommendations for several aspects of ocular allergy.

  18. Update of the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy Endpoints for Future Clinical Trials in Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hoskin, Peter [Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mitera, Gunita; Zeng Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Lutz, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Blanchard Valley Regional Cancer Center, Findlay, OH (United States); Roos, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Linden, Yvette van der [Radiotherapeutic Institute Friesland, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Hartsell, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advocate Good Samaritan Cancer Center, Downers Grove, IL (United States); Kumar, Eshwar [Department of Oncology, Atlantic Health Sciences Cancer Centre, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, NB (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To update the international consensus on palliative radiotherapy endpoints for future clinical trials in bone metastases by surveying international experts regarding previous uncertainties within the 2002 consensus, changes that may be necessary based on practice pattern changes and research findings since that time. Methods and Materials: A two-phase survey was used to determine revisions and new additions to the 2002 consensus. A total of 49 experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology who are directly involved in the care of patients with bone metastases participated in this survey. Results: Consensus was established in areas involving response definitions, eligibility criteria for future trials, reirradiation, changes in systemic therapy, radiation techniques, parameters at follow-up, and timing of assessments. Conclusion: An outline for trials in bone metastases was updated based on survey and consensus. Investigators leading trials in bone metastases are encouraged to adopt the revised guideline to promote consistent reporting. Areas for future research were identified. It is intended for the consensus to be re-examined in the future on a regular basis.

  19. Consensus clustering in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; 10.1038/srep00336

    2012-01-01

    The community structure of complex networks reveals both their organization and hidden relationships among their constituents. Most community detection methods currently available are not deterministic, and their results typically depend on the specific random seeds, initial conditions and tie-break rules adopted for their execution. Consensus clustering is used in data analysis to generate stable results out of a set of partitions delivered by stochastic methods. Here we show that consensus clustering can be combined with any existing method in a self-consistent way, enhancing considerably both the stability and the accuracy of the resulting partitions. This framework is also particularly suitable to monitor the evolution of community structure in temporal networks. An application of consensus clustering to a large citation network of physics papers demonstrates its capability to keep track of the birth, death and diversification of topics.

  20. Consensus paper on post-operative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Morgan, Angela T; Lux, Andrew L

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Confusion has surrounded the description of post-operative mutism and associated morbidity in pediatric patients with cerebellar tumors for years. The heterogeneity of definitions and diagnostic features has hampered research progress within the field, and to date, no international...... guidelines exist on diagnosis, prevention, treatment, or follow-up of this debilitating condition. An international group of clinicians and researchers from multiple relevant disciplines recently formed a cohesive panel to formulate a new working definition and agree upon standardized methods for diagnosis...... and follow-up. METHODS: Consensus was obtained using the modified nominal group technique, involving four rounds of online Delphi questionnaires interspersed with a structured consensus conference with lectures, group work, and open discussion sessions. RESULTS: A new, proposed definition of "post-operative...

  1. Consensus report on the future of animal-free systemic toxicity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a multi-authored consensus report from conferences held in 2011-2012. Complete author listing is as follows: Marcel Leist1,2, Nina Hasiwa1, Costanza Rovida1, Mardas Daneshian1, David Basketter3, Ian Kimber4, Harvey Clewell5, Tilman Gocht6, Alan Goldberg7, Derek Knight8, G...

  2. C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Matthew C; D'Agati, Vivette D; Nester, Carla M; Smith, Richard J; Haas, Mark; Appel, Gerald B; Alpers, Charles E; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bedrosian, Camille; Braun, Michael; Doyle, Mittie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fogo, Agnes B; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Gale, Daniel P; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Griffin, Gene; Harris, Claire L; Holers, V Michael; Johnson, Sally; Lavin, Peter J; Medjeral-Thomas, Nicholas; Paul Morgan, B; Nast, Cynthia C; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Peters, D Keith; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Servais, Aude; Sethi, Sanjeev; Song, Wen-Chao; Tamburini, Paul; Thurman, Joshua M; Zavros, Michael; Cook, H Terence

    2013-01-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the definition of C3 glomerulopathy, appropriate complement investigations that should be performed in these patients, and how complement therapeutics should be explored in the condition. This meeting report represents the current consensus view of the group. PMID:24172683

  3. Canadian National Vegetation Classification (CNVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The mandate of the CNVC is to comprehensively classify and describe natural and semi-natural Canadian vegetation in an ecologically meaningful manner. The...

  4. Canadian Literature Is Comparative Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, E. D.

    1988-01-01

    Argues that the way out of worn out analogies of Canadian literature is found not only by acquiring knowledge of other cultures, but also by abandoning the deceptive parallelisms that overcome differences only by hiding them. (RAE)

  5. Canadian inter-laboratory organically bound tritium (OBT) analysis exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Olfert, J; Baglan, N; St-Amant, N; Carter, B; Clark, I; Bucur, C

    2015-12-01

    Tritium emissions are one of the main concerns with regard to CANDU reactors and Canadian nuclear facilities. After the Fukushima accident, the Canadian Nuclear Regulatory Commission suggested that models used in risk assessment of Canadian nuclear facilities be firmly based on measured data. Procedures for measurement of tritium as HTO (tritiated water) are well established, but there are no standard methods and certified reference materials for measurement of organically bound tritium (OBT) in environmental samples. This paper describes and discusses an inter-laboratory comparison study in which OBT in three different dried environmental samples (fish, Swiss chard and potato) was measured to evaluate OBT analysis methods currently used by CANDU Owners Group (COG) members. The variations in the measured OBT activity concentrations between all laboratories were less than approximately 20%, with a total uncertainty between 11 and 17%. Based on the results using the dried samples, the current OBT analysis methods for combustion, distillation and counting are generally acceptable. However, a complete consensus OBT analysis methodology with respect to freeze-drying, rinsing, combustion, distillation and counting is required. Also, an exercise using low-level tritium samples (less than 100 Bq/L or 20 Bq/kg-fresh) would be useful in the near future to more fully evaluate the current OBT analysis methods.

  6. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of anxiety, posttraumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Katzman, Martin A.; Bleau, Pierre; Blier, Pierre; Chokka, Pratap; Kjernisted, Kevin; van Ameringen, Michael; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and related disorders are among the most common mental disorders, with lifetime prevalence reportedly as high as 31%. Unfortunately, anxiety disorders are under-diagnosed and under-treated. Methods These guidelines were developed by Canadian experts in anxiety and related disorders through a consensus process. Data on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment (psychological and pharmacological) were obtained through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and manual searches (1980–2012). Treat...

  7. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 Guideline Update: Diagnosis and Management of Asthma in Preschoolers, Children and Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Diane Lougheed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines.

  8. Balancing multiple roles through consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates how participants in haircutting sessions merge different roles during one of the most sensitive moments of an encounter: requesting and/or making revisions to a new cut. During the process of arriving at a consensus of whether or not changes need to be made to the new cut,...

  9. Quantized average consensus with delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jafarian, Matin; De Persis, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Average consensus problem is a special case of cooperative control in which the agents of the network asymptotically converge to the average state (i.e., position) of the network by transferring information via a communication topology. One of the issues of the large scale networks is the cost of co

  10. Sarcopenia With Limited Mobility: An International Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E.; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Argiles, Josep M.; Baracos, Vickie; Bauer, Juergen; Bhasin, Shalender; Cederholm, Tommy; Stewart Coats, Andrew J.; Cummings, Steven R.; Evans, William J.; Fearon, Kenneth; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fielding, Roger A.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Inui, Akio; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Mantovani, Giovanni; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Newman, Anne B.; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo; Rosano, Giuseppe M. C.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Schambelan, Morris; Sokol, Gerald H.; Storer, Thomas W.; Vellas, Bruno; von Haehling, Stephan; Yeh, Shing-Shing; Anker, Stefan D.

    2016-01-01

    A consensus conference convened by the Society of Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders has concluded that “Sarcopenia, ie, reduced muscle mass, with limited mobility” should be considered an important clinical entity and that most older persons should be screened for this condition. “Sarcopenia with limited mobility” is defined as a person with muscle loss whose walking speed is equal to or less than 1 m/s or who walks less than 400 m during a 6-minute walk, and who has a lean appendicular mass corrected for height squared of 2 standard deviations or more below the mean of healthy persons between 20 and 30 years of age of the same ethnic group. The limitation in mobility should not clearly be a result of otherwise defined specific diseases of muscle, peripheral vascular disease with intermittent claudication, central and peripheral nervous system disorders, or cachexia. Clinically significant interventions are defined as an increase in the 6-minute walk of at least 50 meters or an increase of walking speed of at least 0.1 m/s. “A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged; it is the skin of a living thought and may vary greatly in color and content according to the circumstances and the time when it is used.”—Oliver Wendell Holmes PMID:21640657

  11. Indications, diagnostic tests and Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: Recommendations by the 2nd Spanish Consensus Conference Indicaciones, métodos diagnósticos y tratamiento erradicador de Helicobacter pylori: Recomendaciones de la II Conferencia Española de Consenso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Monés

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of the 2nd Spanish Consensus Conference for appropriate practice regarding indications for eradication, diagnostic tests, and therapy regimens for Helicobacter pylori infection are summarized. The Conference was based on literature searches in Medline, abstracts from three international meetings, and abstracts from national meetings. Results were agreed upon and approved by the whole group. Results are supplemented by evidence grades and recommendation levels according to the classification used in the Clinical Practice Guidelines issued by Cochrane Collaboration. Convincing indications (peptic ulcer, duodenal erosions with no history of ASA or NSAIDs, MALT lymphoma, and not so convincing indications (functional dyspepsia, patients receiving low-dose ASA for platelet aggregation, gastrectomy stump in patients operated on for gastric cancer, first-degree relatives of patients with gastric cancer, lymphocytic gastritis, and Ménétrier's disease for H. pylori eradication are discussed. Diagnostic recommendations for various clinical conditions (peptic ulcer, digestive hemorrhage secondary to ulcer, eradication control, patients currently or recently receiving antibiotic or antisecretory therapy, as well as diagnostic tests requiring biopsy collection (histology, urease fast test, and culture when endoscopy is needed for clinical diagnosis, and non-invasive tests requiring no biopsy collection (13C-urea breath test, serologic tests, and fecal antigen tests when endoscopy is not needed are also discussed. As regards treatment, first-choice therapies (triple therapy using a PPI and two antibiotics, therapy length, quadruple therapy, and a number of novel antibiotic options as "rescue" therapy are prioritized, the fact that prolonging PPI therapy following effective eradication is unnecessary for patients with duodenal ulcer but not for all gastric ulcers is documented, the fact that cultures and antibiograms are not needed for all

  12. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  13. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a decide-announce-defend'' approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other's positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a safe'' context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  14. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a ``decide-announce-defend`` approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other`s positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a ``safe`` context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  15. Harvey Cushing's Canadian connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feindel, William

    2003-01-01

    During his surgical career between 1896 and 1934, Harvey Cushing made eight visits to Canada. He had a broad impact on Canadian medicine and neurosurgery. Cushing's students Wilder Penfield and Kenneth McKenzie became outstanding leaders of the two major centers in Canada for neurosurgical treatment and training. On his first trip to Canada, shortly after completing his surgical internship in August 1896, Cushing traveled with members of his family through the Maritime Provinces and visited hospitals in Quebec and Montreal. Eight years later, in February 1904, as a successful young neurosurgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, he reported to the Montreal Medico-Chirurgical Society on his surgical experience in 20 cases of removal of the trigeminal ganglion for neuralgia. In 1922, as the Charles Mickle Lecturer at the University of Toronto, Cushing assigned his honorarium of $1000 to support a neurosurgical fellowship at Harvard. This was awarded to McKenzie, then a general practitioner, for a year's training with Cushing in 1922-1923. McKenzie returned to initiate the neurosurgical services at the Toronto General Hospital, where he developed into a master surgeon and teacher. On Cushing's second visit to McGill University in October 1922, he and Sir Charles Sherrington inaugurated the new Biology Building of McGill's Medical School, marking the first stage of a Rockefeller-McGill program of modernization. In May 1929, Cushing attended the dedication of the Osler Library at McGill. In September 1934, responding to the invitation of Penfield, Cushing presented a Foundation Lecture-one of his finest addresses on the philosophy of neurosurgery-at the opening of the Montreal Neurological Institute. On that same trip, Cushing's revisit to McGill's Osler Library convinced him to turn over his own treasure of historical books to Yale University.

  16. How Should Canadian Literature Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colborne, Garnet

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for and several approaches to teaching Canadian literature, including a cultural and regional approach to Canadian literature, a comparative approach, and a language study approach. (HTH)

  17. Conference Notification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Roskill Information Services and Metal Events Ltd areorganizing the 2nd International Rare Earths Conference,which will be held at the Conrad Hotel in Hong Kong onFebruary 28 to March 2 2006.The program is structured tocover all the main aspects of the rare earths industry,including development of Chinese rare earth industry; trendsin rare earths demand; potential constraints on supply;research on potential capacity of rare earths supply chain.Global rare earths consumers will attend the conference.Registra...

  18. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  19. Developing palliative care competencies for the education of entry level baccalaureate prepared Canadian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacono, Brenda; Young, Lynne; Baker, Cynthia; Richardson, Holly R L; Cable-Williams, Beryl; Jewers, Heather; Lavoie, Mireille; Librach, Larry; Bidgood, Darcee; Mitchell, Mitzi Grace

    2011-08-15

    Educational preparation of health professionals for Palliative and End of Life Care (PEOLC) is inadequate, and nurses are no exception. In 2004, the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing struck a Task Force to develop PEOLC competencies to address this issue. The development of national PEOLC nursing competencies involved a multi-step, emergent, interactive, and iterative process. An overarching principle guiding this process was building national consensus about the essential PEOLC specific competencies for nurses among experts in this field while simultaneously generating, revising, and refining them. There have been three stages in this iterative, multi-step process: 1) Generating a preliminary set of competencies, 2) Building a national consensus among educators and experts in the field on PEOLC specific competencies for nurses, and 3) Refining the consensus based competencies for curriculum development. Ongoing follow up work for this project is focusing on the integration of these competencies into nursing curricula.

  20. Management of hemodynamically unstable pelvic trauma: results of the first Italian consensus conference (cooperative guidelines of the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology -Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology- and the World Society of Emergency Surgery).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Stefano; Coccolini, Federico; Manfredi, Roberto; Piazzalunga, Dario; Agazzi, Roberto; Arici, Claudio; Barozzi, Marco; Bellanova, Giovanni; Belluati, Alberto; Berlot, Giorgio; Biffl, Walter; Camagni, Stefania; Campanati, Luca; Castelli, Claudio Carlo; Catena, Fausto; Chiara, Osvaldo; Colaianni, Nicola; De Masi, Salvatore; Di Saverio, Salomone; Dodi, Giuseppe; Fabbri, Andrea; Faustinelli, Giovanni; Gambale, Giorgio; Capponi, Michela Giulii; Lotti, Marco; Marchesi, Gianmariano; Massè, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Tiziana; Nardi, Giuseppe; Niola, Raffaella; Nita, Gabriela Elisa; Pisano, Michele; Poiasina, Elia; Poletti, Eugenio; Rampoldi, Antonio; Ribaldi, Sergio; Rispoli, Gennaro; Rizzi, Luigi; Sonzogni, Valter; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2014-03-07

    Hemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Trauma is a major problem in blunt traumatic injury. No cosensus has been reached in literature on the optimal treatment of this condition. We present the results of the First Italian Consensus Conference on Pelvic Trauma which took place in Bergamo on April 13 2013. An extensive review of the literature has been undertaken by the Organizing Committee (OC) and forwarded to the Scientific Committee (SC) and the Panel (JP). Members of them were appointed by surgery, critical care, radiology, emergency medicine and orthopedics Italian and International societies: the Italian Society of Surgery, the Italian Association of Hospital Surgeons, the Multi-specialist Italian Society of Young Surgeons, the Italian Society of Emergency Surgery and Trauma, the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care, the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine, the Italian Society of Medical Radiology, Section of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and the World Society of Emergency Surgery. From November 2012 to January 2013 the SC undertook the critical revision and prepared the presentation to the audience and the Panel on the day of the Conference. Then 3 recommendations were presented according to the 3 submitted questions. The Panel voted the recommendations after discussion and amendments with the audience. Later on a email debate took place until December 2013 to reach a unanimous consent. We present results on the 3 following questions: which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an extraperitoneal pelvic packing? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs an external fixation? Which hemodynamically unstable patient needs emergent angiography? No longer angiography is considered the first therapeutic maneuver in such a patient. Preperitoneal pelvic packing and external fixation, preceded by pelvic binder have a pivotal role in the management of these patients

  1. Responsible Canadian energy progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) represents oil and gas companies throughout Canada; its members produce over 90% of Canada's natural gas and crude oil output. The aim of the Association is to improve the economics of the Canadian upstream petroleum sector in an environmentally and socially responsible way. The aim of this Responsible Canadian Energy report is to present the performance data of CAPP's members for the year 2009. Data, trends, and performance analyses are provided throughout the document. This analysis makes it possible to determine where progress has been made and where performance improvement is necessary. It also presents success stories and best practices so that other companies can learn from them how to improve their own performance. This paper provides useful information on the performance of the upstream petroleum industry in Canada and highlights where the focus should be for further improvement in its performance.

  2. Birth of the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Ivan T.

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Digestive Disease Foundation, renamed the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation -- Fondation canadienne pour la promotion de la santé digestive -- in December 2001, is the culmination of ongoing efforts by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology to establish an independent charitable organization. In February 2001, it was officially endorsed as the Foundation for the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. The initial efforts to establish this Foundation, led by Dr Richa...

  3. A Topography for Canadian Curriculum Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Cynthia

    1999-01-01

    Presents challenges to Canadian curriculum theorists: (1) to create curriculum languages and genres that represent all of Canada; (2) to use Canadian scholars and indigenous languages to find these curriculum languages and genres; (3) to seek interpretive tools to understand what it means to be Canadian; and (4) to create curriculum theory that…

  4. Canadian Children's Literature: An Alberta Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Carbonaro, Mike; Green, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an online survey administered to Alberta elementary school teachers in 2000-2001. The survey explored the teachers' knowledge and use of Canadian children's literature and their thoughts about the role of Canadian literature in elementary school classrooms. Canadian children's trade books espouse particular…

  5. The Ideological Orientations of Canadian University Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaie, M. Reza; Brym, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the ideological orientations of Canadian university professors based on a unique 2000 study of a representative sample of Canadian academics (n=3,318). After summarizing methodological problems with extant research on this subject, and tentatively comparing the political views of Canadian and American academics, the paper…

  6. Expert consensus v. evidence-based approaches in the revision of the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Solomon, M

    2016-08-01

    The development of DSM-III through DSM-5 has relied heavily on expert consensus. In this essay, we provide an historical and critical perspective on this process. Over the last 40 years, medicine has struggled to find appropriate methods for summarizing research results and making clinical recommendations. When such recommendations are issued by authorized organizations, they can have widespread influence (i.e. DSM-III and its successors). In the 1970s, expert consensus conferences, led by the NIH, reviewed research about controversial medical issues and successfully disseminated results. However, these consensus conferences struggled with aggregating the complex available evidence. In the 1990s, the rise of evidence-based medicine cast doubt on the reliability of expert consensus. Since then, medicine has increasingly relied on systematic reviews, as developed by the evidence-based medicine movement, and advocated for their early incorporation in expert consensus efforts. With the partial exception of DSM-IV, such systematic evidence-based reviews have not been consistently integrated into the development of the DSMs, leaving their development out of step with the larger medical field. Like the recommendations made for the NIH consensus conferences, we argue that the DSM process should be modified to require systematic evidence-based reviews before Work Groups make their assessments. Our suggestions - which would require leadership and additional resources to set standards for appropriate evidence hierarchies, carry out systematic reviews, and upgrade the group process - should improve the objectivity of the DSM, increase the validity of its results, and improve the reception of any changes in nosology.

  7. Transnational archives: the Canadian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Creet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the concept of the transnational archive as a counterpoint to the idea that a national archive is necessarily a locus of a static idea of nation. The Canadian national archives is used as a case study of an archives that was transnational in its inception, and one that has continued to change in its mandate and materials as a response to patterns in migration and changing notions of multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy. It introduces the most recent formation of the transnational archive and its denizens: the genealogical archive inhabited by family historians.

  8. Conference Report: CAQD Conference 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Silver

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nestled on the banks of the river Lahn in central Germany, the 15th CAQD conference was held at Marburg. A beautiful provincial town, it is one of very few that was spared the bombings of WWII; now providing the perfect backdrop for meeting to discuss developments in qualitative technology. This was the second international conference in the series with more than 140 delegates from 14 countries, including: Canada, Brazil, Portugal, the UK, as well as Germany. Hosted by MAGMA, the Marburg Research Group for Methodology and Evaluation, in partnership with Philipps-University Marburg, CAQD prioritizes a user-focus which balances practical and methodological workshops with conference presentations. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1302249

  9. Conference Hopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Annual conference outlines tasks for 2010 to solidify China’s economic recovery through rational investment and increasing consumptionc hina will adhere to a consistent and stable economic strategy, putting in place a proactive fiscal policy and an accommodative monetary policy for the 2010 fiscal year-the macro-economic course mapped out during China’s Central

  10. "We Got Our Heads Together and Came up with a Plan": Young Children's Perceptions of Curriculum Development in One Canadian Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated young children's perceptions of their role in curriculum development in one Canadian preschool. There is no consensus that children have a role to play in developing curriculum. However, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) confirms children's right to be listened to about all aspects of their…

  11. Eliciting Public Attitudes Regarding Bioremediation Cleanup Technologies: Lessons Learned from a Consensus Workshop in Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denise Lach, Principle Investigator; Stephanie Sanford, Co-P.I.

    2003-03-01

    During the summer of 2002, we developed and implemented a ''consensus workshop'' with Idaho citizens to elicit their concerns and issues regarding the use of bioremediation as a cleanup technology for radioactive nuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The consensus workshop is a derivation of a technology assessment method designed to ensure dialogue between experts and lay people. It has its origins in the United States in the form of ''consensus development conferences'' used by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to elicit professional knowledge and concerns about new medical treatments. Over the last 25 years, NIH has conducted over 100 consensus development conferences. (Jorgensen 1995). The consensus conference is grounded in the idea that technology assessment and policy needs to be socially negotiated among many different stakeholders and groups rather than narrowly defined by a group of experts. To successfully implement new technology, the public requires access to information that addresses a full complement of issues including understanding the organization proposing the technology. The consensus conference method creates an informed dialogue, making technology understandable to the general public and sets it within perspectives and priorities that may differ radically from those of the expert community. While specific outcomes differ depending on the overall context of a conference, one expected outcome is that citizen panel members develop greater knowledge of the technology during the conference process and, sometimes, the entire panel experiences a change in attitude toward the technology and/or the organization proposing its use (Kluver 1995). The purpose of this research project was to explore the efficacy of the consensus conference model as a way to elicit the input of the general public about bioremediation of radionuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy sites

  12. Canadian contributions studies for the WFIRST instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, J.-F.; Rowlands, N.; Grandmont, F. J.; Lafrenière, D.; Marois, C.; Daigle, O.; Thibault, S.; Schade, D.; Artigau, É.; Brousseau, D.; Maire, J.; Cretot-Richert, G.; Ducharme, M.-È.; Levesque, L. E.; Laurin, D.; Dupuis, J.

    2016-07-01

    WFIRST-AFTA is the NASA's highest ranked astrophysics mission for the next decade that was identified in the New World, New Horizon survey. The mission scientific drivers correspond to some of the deep questions identified in the Canadian LRP2010, and are also of great interest for the Canadian scientists. Given that there is also a great interest in having an international collaboration in this mission, the Canadian Space Agency awarded two contracts to study a Canadian participation in the mission, one related to each instrument. This paper presents a summary of the technical contributions that were considered for a Canadian contribution to the coronagraph and wide field instruments.

  13. The 1998 Canadian Contraception Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William A.; Boroditsky, Richard; Bridges, Martha L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the 1998 Canadian Contraception Study, a mailed survey which asked women about contraceptive practices past, present, and future (including use of oral contraceptives, condoms, and sterilization); familiarity with and opinion about different contraception methods; and general sexual and reproductive health. The paper also examines…

  14. Universal values of Canadian astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brcic, Jelena; Della-Rossa, Irina

    2012-11-01

    Values are desirable, trans-situational goals, varying in importance, that guide behavior. Research has demonstrated that universal values may alter in importance as a result of major life events. The present study examines the effect of spaceflight and the demands of astronauts' job position as life circumstances that affect value priorities. We employed thematic content analysis for references to Schwartz's well-established value markers in narratives (media interviews, journals, and pre-flight interviews) of seven Canadian astronauts and compared the results to the values of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Russian Space Agency (RKA) astronauts. Space flight did alter the level of importance of Canadian astronauts' values. We found a U-shaped pattern for the values of Achievement and Tradition before, during, and after flight, and a linear decrease in the value of Stimulation. The most frequently mentioned values were Achievement, Universalism, Security, and Self-Direction. Achievement and Self Direction are also within the top 4 values of all other astronauts; however, Universalism was significantly higher among the Canadian astronauts. Within the value hierarchy of Canadian astronauts, Security was the third most frequently mentioned value, while it is in seventh place for all other astronauts. Interestingly, the most often mentioned value marker (sub-category) in this category was Patriotism. The findings have important implications in understanding multi-national crew relations during training, flight, and reintegration into society.

  15. Canadian Government Electronic Information Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Kirsti

    1993-01-01

    Examines development and evolution of Canadian government information policy in response to issues of preservation of data, information industry involvement in government data development and marketing, role of Crown copyright, and public access to government information in electronic formats. Six key information policy instruments are also…

  16. Canadian Literature in American Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. Robert

    1973-01-01

    Acquisition of Canadian literature by American libraries was investigated in three ways: questionnaires were sent to selected large libraries, titles were checked against the National Union Catalog'' and published literature describing major collections was examined. With the exception of the Library of Congress, American libraries purchase…

  17. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  18. Algorithm development for corticosteroid management in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis trial using consensus methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilowite Norman T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of background corticosteroid therapy in rheumatology clinical trials poses a major challenge. We describe the consensus methodology used to design an algorithm to standardize changes in corticosteroid dosing during the Randomized Placebo Phase Study of Rilonacept in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Trial (RAPPORT. Methods The 20 RAPPORT site principal investigators (PIs and 4 topic specialists constituted an expert panel that participated in the consensus process. The panel used a modified Delphi Method consisting of an on-line questionnaire, followed by a one day face-to-face consensus conference. Consensus was defined as ≥ 75% agreement. For items deemed essential but when consensus on critical values was not achieved, simple majority vote drove the final decision. Results The panel identified criteria for initiating or increasing corticosteroids. These included the presence or development of anemia, myocarditis, pericarditis, pleuritis, peritonitis, and either complete or incomplete macrophage activation syndrome (MAS. The panel also identified criteria for tapering corticosteroids which included absence of fever for ≥ 3 days in the previous week, absence of poor physical functioning, and seven laboratory criteria. A tapering schedule was also defined. Conclusion The expert panel established consensus regarding corticosteroid management and an algorithm for steroid dosing that was well accepted and used by RAPPORT investigators. Developed specifically for the RAPPORT trial, further study of the algorithm is needed before recommendation for more general clinical use.

  19. Consensus on Control of Risky Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Taiwan with National Health Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Shyang Sheu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. To compose upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB consensus from a nationwide scale to improve the control of UGIB, especially for the high-risk comorbidity group. Methods. The steering committee defined the consensus scope to cover preendoscopy, endoscopy, postendoscopy, and overview from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD assessments for UGIB. The expert group comprised thirty-two Taiwan experts of UGIB to conduct the consensus conference by a modified Delphi process through two separate iterations to modify the draft statements and to vote anonymously to reach consensus with an agreement ≥80% for each statement and to set the recommendation grade. Results. The consensus included 17 statements to highlight that patients with comorbidities, including liver cirrhosis, end-stage renal disease, probable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes, are at high risk of peptic ulcer bleeding and rebleeding. Special considerations are recommended for such risky patients, including raising hematocrit to 30% in uremia or acute myocardial infarction, aggressive acid secretory control in high Rockall scores, monitoring delayed rebleeding in uremia or cirrhosis, considering cycloxygenase-2 inhibitors plus PPI for pain control, and early resumption of antiplatelets plus PPI in coronary artery disease or stroke. Conclusions. The consensus comprises recommendations to improve care of UGIB, especially for high-risk comorbidities.

  20. Conference information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Thermag Ⅳ- The 4th International Conference on Magnetic Refrigeration at Room Temperature of IIR Refrigeration technology is widely used today. However, traditional vapor compression/expansion refrigeration technology has some disadvantages, such as low conversion efficiency of vapor compressor, and emission of the ozonosphere depletion gas and greenhouse effect gas, etc. Magnetic refrigeration is a new cooling technology with huge potential application prospect, characterized by high efficiency, energy saving and environmental friendly.

  1. Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations: Managing transitions of care following Stroke, Guidelines Update 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jill I; O'Connell, Colleen; Foley, Norine; Salter, Katherine; Booth, Rhonda; Boyle, Rosemary; Cheung, Donna; Cooper, Nancy; Corriveau, Helene; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Dulude, Annie; Flaherty, Patti; Glasser, Ev; Gubitz, Gord; Hebert, Debbie; Holzmann, Jacquie; Hurteau, Patrick; Lamy, Elise; LeClaire, Suzanne; McMillan, Taylor; Murray, Judy; Scarfone, David; Smith, Eric E; Shum, Vivian; Taylor, Kim; Taylor, Trudy; Yanchula, Catherine; Teasell, Robert; Lindsay, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Every year, approximately 62,000 people with stroke and transient ischemic attack are treated in Canadian hospitals. For patients, families and caregivers, this can be a difficult time of adjustment. The 2016 update of the Canadian Managing Transitions of Care following Stroke guideline is a comprehensive summary of current evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations appropriate for use by clinicians who provide care to patients following stroke across a broad range of settings. The focus of these recommendations is on support, education and skills training for patients, families and caregivers; effective discharge planning; interprofessional communication; adaptation in resuming activities of daily living; and transition to long-term care for patients who are unable to return to or remain at home. Unlike other modules contained in the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Recommendations (such as acute inpatient care), many of these recommendations are based on consensus opinion, or evidence level C, highlighting the absence of conventional evidence (i.e. randomized controlled trials) in this area of stroke care. The quality of care transitions between stages and settings may have a direct impact on patient and family outcomes such as coping, readmissions and functional recovery. While many qualitative and non-controlled studies were reviewed, this gap in evidence combined with the fact that mortality from stoke is decreasing and more people are living with the effects of stroke, underscores the need to channel a portion of available research funds to recovery and adaptation following the acute phase of stroke.

  2. Consensus of Hybrid Multi-Agent Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshi; Ma, Jingying; Wang, Long

    2017-01-27

    In this brief, we consider the consensus problem of hybrid multiagent systems. First, the hybrid multiagent system is proposed, which is composed of continuous-time and discrete-time dynamic agents. Then, three kinds of consensus protocols are presented for the hybrid multiagent system. The analysis tool developed in this brief is based on the matrix theory and graph theory. With different restrictions of the sampling period, some necessary and sufficient conditions are established for solving the consensus of the hybrid multiagent system. The consensus states are also obtained under different protocols. Finally, simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  3. Theories about consensus-based conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, William D

    2006-04-01

    "Conservation and the Myth of Consensus" (Peterson et al. 2005) levels several serious indictments against consensus-based approaches to environmental decision making. Namely, the authors argue that consensus processes (1) reinforce apathy and ignorance of conservation issues; (2) legitimize damage to the environment; (3) quash public debate about conservation; (4) solidify the existing balance of power in favor of prodevelopment forces; and (5) block progress toward an ecologically sustainable future. Careful scrutiny of consensus-based approaches is important, especially considering their surging use in conservation policy. In the spirit of advancing the debate further, I review some of the limitations of the essay and its modes of inquiry.

  4. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading of prostate cancer - An ISUP consensus on contemporary grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egevad, Lars; Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Samaratunga, Hemamali

    2016-06-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) has issued guidelines for the grading of prostate cancer based on a consensus conference held in 2014. The recommendations resulting from the 2014 consensus conference were a further development of 2005 ISUP modified Gleason grading. In the 2014 system, morphological criteria are clarified, including updated definitions of Gleason pattern 4. In addition to the continued reporting of Gleason scores, we also recommend that Gleason scores ≤6, 3 + 4 = 7, 4 + 3 = 7, 8 and 9-10, respectively, be reported as five groups, i.e. ISUP grades 1-5. This new grading system has the dual benefit of predicting patient outcome as well as facilitating patient communication.

  5. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 Guideline Update: Diagnosis and Management of Asthma in Preschoolers, Children and Adults: Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Diane Lougheed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines.

  6. Management of Helicobacter pylori infection--the Maastricht IV/ Florence Consensus Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfertheiner, Peter; Megraud, Francis; O'Morain, Colm A; Atherton, John; Axon, Anthony T R; Bazzoli, Franco; Gensini, Gian Franco; Gisbert, Javier P; Graham, David Y; Rokkas, Theodore; El-Omar, Emad M; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2012-05-01

    Management of Helicobacter pylori infection is evolving and in this 4th edition of the Maastricht consensus report aspects related to the clinical role of H pylori were looked at again in 2010. In the 4th Maastricht/Florence Consensus Conference 44 experts from 24 countries took active part and examined key clinical aspects in three subdivided workshops: (1) Indications and contraindications for diagnosis and treatment, focusing on dyspepsia, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or aspirin use, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and extraintestinal manifestations of the infection. (2) Diagnostic tests and treatment of infection. (3) Prevention of gastric cancer and other complications. The results of the individual workshops were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Recommendations are provided on the basis of the best current evidence and plausibility to guide doctors involved in the management of this infection associated with various clinical conditions.

  7. Learning consensus in adversarial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvoudakis, Kyriakos G.; García Carrillo, Luis R.; Hespanha, João. P.

    2013-05-01

    This work presents a game theory-based consensus problem for leaderless multi-agent systems in the presence of adversarial inputs that are introducing disturbance to the dynamics. Given the presence of enemy components and the possibility of malicious cyber attacks compromising the security of networked teams, a position agreement must be reached by the networked mobile team based on environmental changes. The problem is addressed under a distributed decision making framework that is robust to possible cyber attacks, which has an advantage over centralized decision making in the sense that a decision maker is not required to access information from all the other decision makers. The proposed framework derives three tuning laws for every agent; one associated with the cost, one associated with the controller, and one with the adversarial input.

  8. Humanitarian war: a new consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, S L

    2001-12-01

    The NATO bombing operation Allied Force against Yugoslavia in March-June 1999 represents the final disappearance of the narrowing divide between humanitarianism and politics: a war initiated and justified on humanitarian grounds. Although unlikely to be repeated any time soon, the Kosovo case appears to have cemented an ideological shift on the international right and even necessity of sing military force to protect civilians within sovereign states. Rather than humanitarians acknowledging the political context and consequences of their work, however, the case suggests the embrace of humanitarian principles of universality and neutrality by military organisations. This article discusses some consequences of the new consensus: neglect of the political context (both local and foreign) of such operations, interaction between the operational dynamics of relief operations and the logic of war and the political consequences of using the humanitarian legitimation and mission in such cases.

  9. International Consensus on drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoly, P; Adkinson, N F; Brockow, K; Castells, M; Chiriac, A M; Greenberger, P A; Khan, D A; Lang, D M; Park, H-S; Pichler, W; Sanchez-Borges, M; Shiohara, T; Thong, B Y- H

    2014-04-01

    When drug reactions resembling allergy occur, they are called drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) before showing the evidence of either drug-specific antibodies or T cells. DHRs may be allergic or nonallergic in nature, with drug allergies being immunologically mediated DHRs. These reactions are typically unpredictable. They can be life-threatening, may require or prolong hospitalization, and may necessitate changes in subsequent therapy. Both underdiagnosis (due to under-reporting) and overdiagnosis (due to an overuse of the term ‘allergy’) are common. A definitive diagnosis of such reactions is required in order to institute adequate treatment options and proper preventive measures. Misclassification based solely on the DHR history without further testing may affect treatment options, result in adverse consequences, and lead to the use of more-expensive or less-effective drugs, in contrast to patients who had undergone a complete drug allergy workup. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents on general or specific drug class-induced DHRs are available to support the medical decision process. The use of standardized systematic approaches for the diagnosis and management of DHRs carries the potential to improve outcomes and should thus be disseminated and implemented. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), and the World Allergy Organization (WAO), has decided to issue an International CONsensus (ICON) on drug allergy. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences and deficiencies of evidence, thus providing a comprehensive reference document for the diagnosis and management of

  10. From the Canadian Experiment of the 1990’s:A New Consensus on Monetary Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Le Heron

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Analizando los documentos publicados por el banco de Canadá, comienza a emerger una nueva y original política monetaria. La política monetaria canadiense intenta mantener su autonomía, mientras que al mismo tiempo respeta el tipo de cambio flotante. Las numerosas innovaciones son la fundación de un nuevo consenso en la política monetaria. Lejos del dilema de regla versus discreción de los anteriores métodos monetaristas y keynesianos, el nuevo dilema será el de credibilidad versus confianza. Aquí, las anticipaciones de los agentes económicos, el comportamiento de los mercados financieros y el precio de los activos desempeñan un papel dominante. Las características del nuevo consenso serán explicadas de acuerdo con el experimento innovador del banco de Canadá durante los noventa. Lejos de hacer a los bancos centrales independientes de algunas instituciones de alto poder, los muestra, más bien, como “estatuas con pies de arcilla”

  11. Treatment of acne vulgaris and prevention of acne scarring: canadian consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, W S; Landells, I D; Poulin, Y; Searles, G E; Smith, K C; Tan, J K; Toole, J; Zip, C M; Degreef, H

    2000-06-01

    Acne affects approximately 95% of the population at some point during their lifetime.1 This common disorder can range from mild to severe forms, cause sometimes extensive scarring, and can last well into the fourth and fifth decades. Effective therapeutic agents are available to both treat acne and prevent ongoing disease. Despite this, dermatologists frequently see patients with significant acne scarring because many patients delay seeking medical attention for acne and many practitioners procrastinate over using effective antiscarring options. In patients who already demonstrate scarring, repeated courses of antibiotics only result in recurring acne and additional scarring. This, in turn, exacerbates the despair and other adverse psychosocial effects of the disease. There are a variety of agents and devices to help acne patients with scarring. However, successful treatment cannot be guaranteed, and in most cases residual scarring will be evident. Thus, the most effective way of managing acne scarring is to prevent its occurrence in the first place. Although we currently have a number of effective antiacne agents to control the disease, such as antibiotics and hormonal agents, isotretinoina is the only agent that has been shown to induce long-term drug-free remission and curative potential.

  12. Canadian Content in Video Games

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Leonard

    2005-01-01

    THEME: Internationalism: Worlds at Play Topics: Internationalism, Identity in Gaming and Learning to Play Abstract: How does Canada fit into the global cultural context of video games? This paper investigates the culture being reflected in video games being produced in Canada as Canada is one of the world's leading producers of video games. It examines the how Canadian culture is represented in current new media artistic output against the culture, or lack of culture, being represented in vid...

  13. Strategic consensus mapping : A new method for testing and visualizing strategic consensus within and between teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarakci, M.; Ates, N.Y.; Porck, J.P.; van Knippenberg, D.; Groenen, P.J.F.; de Haas, M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on strategic consensus focuses primarily on the extent of agreement among team members regarding organizational strategy. It does not include elements such as the content of the agreement, between-group consensus, or the significance of differences in consensus (e.g., for evaluating the eff

  14. NATO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, W

    1975-01-01

    The contents of this volume involve selection, emendation and up-dating of papers presented at the NATO Conference "Mathe­ matical Analysis of Decision problems in Ecology" in Istanbul, Turkey, July 9-13, 1973. It was sponsored by the System Sciences Division of NATO directed by Dr. B. Bayraktar with local arrange­ ments administered by Dr. Ilhami Karayalcin, professor of the Department of Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul. It was organized by A. Charnes, University professor across the University of Texas System, and Walter R.Lynn, Di­ rector of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell Unjversity. The objective of the conference was to bring together a group of leading researchers from the major sciences involved in eco­ logical problems and to present the current state of progress in research of a mathematical nature which might assist in the solu­ tion of these problems. Although their presentations are not herein recorded, the key­ note address of Dr....

  15. EGC Conferences

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschard, Gilbert; Pinaud, Bruno; Venturini, Gilles; Zighed, Djamel; Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Management

    This book is a collection of representative and novel works done in Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Clustering and Classification that were originally presented in French at the EGC'2012 Conference held in Bordeaux, France, on January 2012. This conference was the 12th edition of this event, which takes place each year and which is now successful and well-known in the French-speaking community. This community was structured in 2003 by the foundation of the French-speaking EGC society (EGC in French stands for ``Extraction et Gestion des Connaissances'' and means ``Knowledge Discovery and Management'', or KDM). This book is intended to be read by all researchers interested in these fields, including PhD or MSc students, and researchers from public or private laboratories. It concerns both theoretical and practical aspects of KDM. The book is structured in two parts called ``Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining'' and ``Classification and Feature Extraction or Selection''. The first part (6 chapters) deals with...

  16. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Ahlberg, J.; Glaros, A.G.; Kato, T.; Koyano, K.; Lavigne, G.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Manfredini, D.; Svensson, P.; Winocur, E.

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined

  17. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen;

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...

  18. Nordic consensus on treatment of undescended testes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritzén, E Martin; Bergh, A; Bjerknes, R;

    2007-01-01

    To reach consensus among specialists from the Nordic countries on the present state-of-the-art in treatment of undescended testicles.......To reach consensus among specialists from the Nordic countries on the present state-of-the-art in treatment of undescended testicles....

  19. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...

  20. Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhou; N. Hu; C.J. Spanos

    2016-01-01

    We propose Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning (VCMKL), a novel way of combining multiple kernels such that one class of samples is described by the logical intersection (consensus) of base kernelized decision rules, whereas the other classes by the union (veto) of their complements. The propose

  1. Contexts for Ethnic Identity of Japanese Canadians

    OpenAIRE

    浦田, 葉子; Yoko, URATA

    1997-01-01

    In this paper I reviewed the literature in order to gain a broad understanding of the contexts for ethnic identity of Japanese Canadians guided by the premise that ethnic identity is a situational as well as a primordial phenomenon. Two main areas were reviewed - the pattern of distribution of resources in Canadian society and the particular situation in which Japanese Canadians are placed. In the distribution of material resources, individual meritocracy for mass and social closure for elite...

  2. International Conference held at the University of Alberta

    CERN Document Server

    Strobeck, Curtis

    1983-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the International Conference in Population Biology held at The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada from June 22 to June 30, 1982. The Conference was sponsored by The University of Alberta and The Canadian Applied Mathematics Society, and overlapped with the summer meeting of CAMS. The main objectives of this Conference were: to bring mathematicians and biologists together so that they may interact for their mutual benefit; to bring those researchers interested in modelling in ecology and those interested in modelling in genetics together; to bring in keynote speakers in the delineated areas; to have sessions of contributed papers; and to present the opportunity for researchers to conduct workshops. With the exception of the last one, the objec­ tives were carried out. In order to lend some focus to the Conference, the following themes were adopted: models of species growth, predator-prey, competition, mutualism, food webs, dispersion, age structure, stability, evol...

  3. MUSME Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of MUSME 2014, held at Huatulco in Oaxaca, Mexico, October 2014. Topics include analysis and synthesis of mechanisms; dynamics of multibody systems; design algorithms for mechatronic systems; simulation procedures and results; prototypes and their performance; robots and micromachines; experimental validations; theory of mechatronic simulation; mechatronic systems; and control of mechatronic systems. The MUSME symposium on Multibody Systems and Mechatronics was held under the auspices of IFToMM, the International Federation for Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science, and FeIbIM, the Iberoamerican Federation of Mechanical Engineering. Since the first symposium in 2002, MUSME events have been characterised by the way they stimulate the integration between the various mechatronics and multibody systems dynamics disciplines, present a forum for facilitating contacts among researchers and students mainly in South American countries, and serve as a joint conference for the ...

  4. Conferences point to growing concern about possible links between breast cancer, environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, B

    1996-01-01

    Evidence is growing that there may be a connection between certain chemicals in the environment and the rising incidence of breast cancer in North America. Two recent Canadian conferences have been held to disseminate information and another is planned for 1996. "We have a situation that is similar to global warming, " Devra Lee Davis, founder of the US Breast Cancer Prevention Collaborative Research Group, warned people attending a conference in Niagara Falls, Ont. "Breast cancer continues t...

  5. A Cross-Sectional Study to Compare Caregiver Distress Among Korean Canadian, Chinese Canadian, and Other Canadian Home Care Clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Wook Chang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the health of elderly Korean Canadians in home care and investigates the risk factors for caregiver distress of families caring for their elderly relatives. Korean Canadians, Chinese Canadians, and other Canadian home care clients were compared using the Resident Assessment Instrument–Home Care (RAI-HC. The assessments were done as a part of normal clinical practice between January 2002 and December 2010 within Ontario. A sample of 58,557 home care clients was analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis at the bivariate level and multiple logistic regression models. The major finding of the present study is that Korean clients had higher physical impairments and higher prevalence of major chronic diseases, but they were less likely to receive personal support or nursing services. Moreover, the results provide clear evidence of the importance of language barriers for all linguistic minorities, including Korean Canadians.

  6. Consensus statement on genetic research in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, M.G. Olde; der, V van; Burns, A.

    2008-01-01

    to analyze relevant stakeholders' positions by describing their statements on the possibilities and limitations of research into genetic determinants of Alzheimer disease and to describe and analyze the moral desirability of genetic research on Alzheimer disease. The conclusions drawn from the Delphi......In this article, the authors describe how the European Dementia Consensus Network developed a consensus on research ethics in dementia, taking into account the questions posed by the era of genetic research and its new research methods. The consensus process started with a Delphi procedure...

  7. A Study On Distributed Model Predictive Consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Keviczky, Tamas

    2008-01-01

    We investigate convergence properties of a proposed distributed model predictive control (DMPC) scheme, where agents negotiate to compute an optimal consensus point using an incremental subgradient method based on primal decomposition as described in Johansson et al. [2006, 2007]. The objective of the distributed control strategy is to agree upon and achieve an optimal common output value for a group of agents in the presence of constraints on the agent dynamics using local predictive controllers. Stability analysis using a receding horizon implementation of the distributed optimal consensus scheme is performed. Conditions are given under which convergence can be obtained even if the negotiations do not reach full consensus.

  8. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... treatment protocols, 1) is based on current published evidence-based literature, 2) considers the current legal framework of the cascade regulation for the prescription of veterinary drugs in Europe, and 3) reflects the authors' experience. With this paper it is aimed to provide a consensus...

  9. Medication use among Canadian seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Mark; Ji, Hong; Hunt, Jordan; Ranger, Rob; Gula, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    As they age, many seniors develop a progressively more complex mix of health conditions. Multiple prescription medications are often required to help manage these conditions and control symptoms, with the goal of maintaining seniors' health for as long as possible. This article explores trends in the number and types of medications used by seniors on public drug programs in Canada. Our findings suggest that a high proportion of Canadian seniors are taking several medications, highlighting the need for medication management systems focusing on this population.

  10. REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CANADIAN ENGLISH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Modern English is an international language inthe world.Besides Great Britain,English is spokenas first language in 39 countries.These countries arelocated in different regions with different naturalfeatures,history development and cultural character-istics.Thus,English used in these different regionscarries its own regional character—forming Englishregional varieties.The main English regional varieties are:BritishEnglish,American English,Canadian English andSouth African English.Canada is a rich country inNorth America with its own characteristics,which of

  11. Rural Canadian Youth Exposed to Physical Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laye, Adele M.; Mykota, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to physical violence is an unfortunate reality for many Canadian youth as it is associated with numerous negative psychosocial effects. The study aims to assist in understanding resilience in rural Canadian youth exposed to physical violence. This is accomplished by identifying the importance of protective factors, as measured by the…

  12. DATA MINING IN CANADIAN LYNX TIME SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Karnaboopathy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper sums up the applications of Statistical model such as ARIMA family timeseries models in Canadian lynx data time series analysis and introduces the method of datamining combined with Statistical knowledge to analysis Canadian lynx data series.

  13. A Boost for Sino-Canadian Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU XUECHENG

    2010-01-01

    @@ If Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper's visit to China last December led to a thaw in the frozen Sino-Canadian relations in recent years, Chinese President Hu Jintao's latest trip to Ottawa appeared to usher in yet another warm period for these deep-rooted relations.

  14. Canadian Library Integrated Systems: Second Annual Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merilees, Bobbie

    1988-01-01

    Reports the results of a survey of the Canadian integrated library systems market. The analysis includes comparisons of large versus microcomputer-based installations by type of library and across all libraries, foreign sales by Canadian vendors, and trends in the library systems market. (CLB)

  15. 七千人大会前的共识与歧见——一九六一年北京会议、庐山会议若干议题述评%Consensus and Difference before the 7,000 - Person Conference: A Review of Some Items in the Agenda of the CentralWorking Conferences Held in Beijing and Lushan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王素莉

    2012-01-01

    1961年五六月间的北京中央工作会议初步总结了“大跃进”以来的经验教训,刘少奇对粮食问题及“三分天灾,七分人祸”的分析,凸显了困难成因及农轻重比例失调的严重后果。八九月问的庐山中央工作会议确定了工业高指标坚决退够的政策。毛泽东认为形势从此“一天天向上”。但各地粮食短缺表明最困难时期还没有过去,不充分认识困难就不能正确制定调整任务的目标。由此,七千人大会进一步总结经验教训。%The working conference convened by the Central Committee of the CPC in Beijing in May and June 1961 had a preliminary summary of the experience and lessons since the "Great Leap Forward. " At the conference Liu Shaoqi' s analysis of the grain problem and his judgment that the difficulties were caused mainly by manmade calamities brought into bold relief the grave consequences of the imbalance of agriculture, light industry and heavy industry. At the central working conference held in Lushan in August and September of the same year the policy was adopted to firmly cut back what should have been cut back with regard to the high industrial quotas. Mao Zedong' s view of the economic situation was that "We are going up day by day ," but he admitted that the shortage of food across the country indicated that the most difficult time was not over yet and that the readjustment could not be successfully carried out without fully realizing the difficulties. Then the 7,000-person conference was convened to further sum up the experience and lessons.

  16. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  17. The Fourth World Conference on Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Fourth World Conference on Women held in Beijing during September 4-15, 1995, was a major success. The platform for action adopted by consensus at the conference is comprised of the mission statement, a global framework, critical areas of concern, strategic objectives and actions, and institutional and financial arrangements. The conference was an extension of other large international conferences organized under UN initiative over the past 15 years. The Beijing platform of action aims to remove all obstacles to women's active participation in all spheres of public and private life through a full and equal share in economic, social, cultural, and political decision-making. The following concerns were defined by the conference: eradicating poverty, increasing school enrollment and eliminating gender inequalities in access to education, improving access to health care and eliminating gender inequalities in access to services, eliminating violence against women, mitigating the consequences of armed conflicts against women, securing equal access of men and women to economic resources and employment, providing equal participation of men and women in power structures and decision making, enhancing national mechanisms to promote the advancement of women, protecting the rights of girls and women, eradicating stereotypes about women, participating in the management of natural resources and environmental protection, and improving the status of girls.

  18. OGC Consensus: How Successful Standards Are Made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Reed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the history, background, and current status of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards development consensus process. The roots of the formation of the OGC lie in the early 1990s when a very strong market requirement for exchanging GIS data content was clearly stated. At that time, each GIS vendor had their own formats for publishing and/or exchanging their GIS data. There was no mechanism or organization that provided a forum for the GIS vendors and GIS data users to collaborate and agree on how to share GIS data. That requirement, along with the vision of a few individuals, led to the formation of the OGC. This paper describes the early development of the consensus process in the OGC, how this process has evolved over time, why consensus is so important for defining open standards that are implemented in the marketplace, and the future of the OGC consensus process.

  19. Collaborating across borders: an American-Canadian dialogue on interprofessional health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Barbara F; Gilbert, John

    2007-01-01

    For more than 35 years, interprofessional collaboration across the health and human service professions has been promoted as an important means to advance patient- or client-centered practice. Evidence demonstrates that collaborative care in certain circumstances can be more effective and efficient than other models. Over the past decade, in response to national calls to action, American and Canadian health and human service professionals and educators have renewed their focus on interprofessional education (IPE). As a result, recent investments have been made, and many interprofessional initiatives in higher education and health systems are underway to improve learning and health outcomes. These efforts are resulting in new evidence about student learning outcomes, team care and collaboration, lessons learned, curricular design, faculty development, and assessment and evaluation strategies. In spite of these efforts, there is a question as to whether much has really changed about the way health professionals are educated. In an effort to address the issue from an international perspective, professionals from a number of countries have been collaborating and sharing ideas on how to improve the situation. A very important effort is now being planned for an American-Canadian conference to be held October 24-26, 2007 at the University of Minnesota. Called Collaborating Across Borders: An American-Canadian Dialogue on Interprofessional Health Education, the conference will bring together leaders in the field to share best practices and chart a course to improve collaboration in health care.

  20. Pragmatism and Political Pluralism - Consensus and Pluralism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marsonet

    2015-07-01

    In our day the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has in a way revived these Peircean insights, putting forward an influential theory to the effect that consensus indeed plays a key role in human praxis, so that the primary task of philosophy is to foster it by eliminating the disagreement which we constantly have to face in the course of our daily life. In his “communicative theory of consensus,” furthermore, he claims that human communication rests on an implicit commitment to a sort of “ideal speech situation” which is the normative foundation of agreement in linguistic matters. Consequently, the quest for consensus is a constitutive feature of our nature of (rational human beings: rationality and consensus are tied together. A very strong consequence derives from Habermas’ premises: were we to abandon the search for consensus we would lose rationality, too, and this makes us understand that he views the pursuit of consensus as a regulative principle (rather than as a merely practical objective. Rescher opposes both Peirce’s eschatological view and Habermas’ regulative and idealized one.

  1. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was…

  2. Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlgren, N; Moreira, T.; Michel, P.; Steiner, T.; Jansen, O; Cognard, C; Mattle, H P; van Zwam, W.; Holmin, S.; Tatlisumak, T.; Petersson, J; Caso, V.; Hacke, W; Mazighi, M.; Arnold, M.

    2016-01-01

    The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16–18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then bee...

  3. Current Results and Future Research Priorities in Late Effects after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with Sickle Cell Disease and Thalassemia: A Consensus Statement from the Second Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium International Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Shalini; Angelucci, Emanuele; Arnold, Staci D; Baker, K Scott; Bhatia, Monica; Bresters, Dorine; Dietz, Andrew C; De La Fuente, Josu; Duncan, Christine; Gaziev, Javid; King, Allison A; Pulsipher, Michael A; Smith, Angela R; Walters, Mark C

    2017-04-01

    Sustained donor engraftment after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) converts to healthy donor hemoglobin synthesis and halts disease symptoms in patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia major. A disease-free survival probability that exceeds 90% has been reported when HCT using an HLA-matched sibling donor is performed in young patients with low-risk disease or treatment-related risk factors. Alternate donor HCT and HCT in adults is performed infrequently because of a higher risk profile. Transplant-specific risks include conditioning regimen-related toxicity, graft-versus-host disease, graft rejection with marrow aplasia or disease recurrence, and infections associated with immunosuppression and delayed immune reconstitution. The magnitude of risk depends on patient age, clinical status of the underlying disease (eg, organ injury from vasculopathy and iron overload), donor source, and intensity of the conditioning regimen. These risks are commonly monitored and reported in the short term. Documenting very late outcomes is important, but these data are rarely reported because of challenges imposed by patient drop-out and insufficient resources. This report summarizes long-term follow-up results after HCT for hemoglobin disorders, identifies gaps in knowledge, and discusses opportunities for future investigations. This consensus summary will be followed by a second article detailing comprehensive long-term follow-up recommendations to aid in maintaining health in these individuals and identifying late complication risks that could facilitate interventions to improve outcomes.

  4. Canadian EdGEO National Workshop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, L. A.; Haidl, F. M.; Hymers, L. A.; van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Established in the early 1970s, EdGEO supports locally driven geosciences workshops for Canadian teachers. Workshops are organized by geoscientists and teachers, and typically have field, laboratory and classroom components. Grants of up to $3000 per workshop are available from the National EdGEO Program. By providing educational opportunities for today's teachers and, through them, their students, EdGEO seeks to cultivate a heightened awareness of our planet. EdGEO workshops provide teachers with potential fieldtrip sites for their students and the knowledge, enthusiasm and materials to inspire their students to engage in geoscience. Networking opportunities with local experts promote the importance of the geoscience profession. The expected result is an improved capacity on the part of Canadians to understand the Earth and to make informed decisions, especially with regard to the use of mineral and energy resources, the maintenance and remediation of the environment, and response to geological hazards. There exists a critical need to provide teachers with training and resources to tackle their Earth science curricula. In 2008, EdGEO supported fourteen workshops, with an unprecedented 521 teachers attending. These teachers then used our resources to reach an estimated 14,000 students during that single academic year. EdGEO workshops are locally driven and are therefore very diverse. Workshops are strongly tied to the provincial curriculum, focus on a specific geoscience topic, or may be largely field-based to demonstrate and practice how field activities could be incorporated into Earth science teaching. Many strive to include all of these important components. Geoscientists and teachers work collaboratively to develop and deliver EdGEO workshops to ensure that the activities can be effectively used in the classroom. The length of these professional development opportunities range from two-hour sessions to several days, and can generally accommodate up to twenty

  5. Conference this! Lead Pipers compare conference experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As library travel budgets are increasingly slashed around the country, it’s a tough time for conference-going. In this group post, we compare notes about the conferences we’ve attended, which have been our favorites, and why. We hope this will generate creative ideas on good conferences (online or in-person to look forward to, and maybe offer [...

  6. A perspective on Canadian shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mike; Davidson, Jim; Mortensen, Paul

    2010-09-15

    In a relatively new development over just the past few years, shale formations are being targeted for natural gas production. Based on initial results, there may be significant potential for shale gas in various regions of Canada, not only in traditional areas of conventional production but also non-traditional areas. However, there is much uncertainty because most Canadian shale gas production is currently in experimental or early developmental stages. Thus, its full potential will not be known for some time. If exploitation proves to be successful, Canadian shale gas may partially offset projected long-term declines in Canadian conventional natural gas production.

  7. Chinese Feelings Cherished By Canadians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>On March 30, "The Chinese Feelings Across the Pacific-The Century Exhibition of the Old Photos Treasured by the Canadians" was open in the Lu Xun Museum in Beijing. The exhibition lasted for one week. At the exhibition some old photos taken in the early 20th century were on display, showing James G. Endicott, envoy of world peace, together with Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai; the family of O. L. Kilborn, one of the founders of West China Union University, together with Chinese women with bound feet: O. L. Kilborn treating the wounded soldiers during the Revolution of 1911; Leslie Earl Willmott in Chinese tunic suit and his wife reluctant to bid farewell to China, as well as photos of Ashley Woodward Lindesay, founder of China’s modern

  8. THE CANADIAN POLITICAL BUSINESS CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Libby

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss the existence of a Canadian Political Business Cycle (PBC during the period 1946-1989. Logit analysis was used to determine if changes in the unemployment rate, growth of real GNE and the rate of inflation are significantly different in the period before an election than during the rest of the electoral term. It was found that the rate of growth in the unemployment rate declines and the rate of growth of real GNP increases in the four quarters before an election. The behavior of these variables reverses in the period after an election. These findings are consistent with a political business cycle. Policy variables, under a majority government, also behave in a manner associated with a PBC, with the government stimulating the economy approximately two years into its term so that good economic news will occur before it has to call an election. Minority governments tend to simulate the economy immediately after taking office.

  9. Exit competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine for graduating medical students: the Canadian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason; Pambrun, Chantale

    2015-05-01

    Physicians in every medical and surgical field must be able to use pathology concepts and skills in their practice: for example, they must order and interpret the correct laboratory tests, they must use their understanding of pathogenesis to diagnose and treat, and they must work with the laboratory to care for their patients. These important concepts and skills may be ignored by medical schools and even national/international organizations setting graduation expectations for medical students. There is an evolving international consensus about the importance of exit competencies for medical school graduates, which define the measurable or observable behaviors each graduate must be able to demonstrate. The Canadian Association of Pathologists (CAP) Education Group set out to establish the basic competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine which should be expected of every medical graduate: not competencies for pathologists, but for medical graduates who intend to enter any residency program. We defined 4 targets for pathology and laboratory medicine exit competencies: that they represent only measurable behaviors, that they be clinically focused, that they be generalizable to every medical graduate, and that the final competency document be user-friendly. A set of competencies was developed iteratively and underwent final revision at the 2012 CAP annual meeting. These competencies were subsequently endorsed by the CAP executive and the Canadian Leadership Council on Laboratory Medicine. This clinically focused consensus document provides the first comprehensive list of exit competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine for undergraduate medical education.

  10. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November 29... addressing risks to reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences....

  11. Dynamic Average Consensus and Consensusability of General Linear Multiagent Systems with Random Packet Dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Min Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the consensus problem of general linear discrete-time multiagent systems (MASs with random packet dropout that happens during information exchange between agents. The packet dropout phenomenon is characterized as being a Bernoulli random process. A distributed consensus protocol with weighted graph is proposed to address the packet dropout phenomenon. Through introducing a new disagreement vector, a new framework is established to solve the consensus problem. Based on the control theory, the perturbation argument, and the matrix theory, the necessary and sufficient condition for MASs to reach mean-square consensus is derived in terms of stability of an array of low-dimensional matrices. Moreover, mean-square consensusable conditions with regard to network topology and agent dynamic structure are also provided. Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated through an illustrative example.

  12. Canadian national nuclear forensics capability project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.; Dimayuga, I., E-mail: joanne.ball@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Summerell, I. [Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Totland, M. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Jonkmans, G. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Whitlock, J. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); El-jaby, A. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Inrig, E. [Defence Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Following the 2010 Nuclear Security Summit, Canada expanded its existing capability for nuclear forensics by establishing a national nuclear forensics laboratory network, which would include a capability to perform forensic analysis on nuclear and other radioactive material, as well as on traditional evidence contaminated with radioactive material. At the same time, the need for a national nuclear forensics library of signatures of nuclear and radioactive materials under Canadian regulatory control was recognized. The Canadian Safety and Security Program, administered by Defence Research and Development Canada's Centre for Security Science (DRDC CSS), funds science and technology initiatives to enhance Canada's preparedness for prevention of and response to potential threats. DRDC CSS, with assistance from Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, formerly Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is leading the Canadian National Nuclear Forensics Capability Project to develop a coordinated, comprehensive, and timely national nuclear forensics capability. (author)

  13. Canadian Law Schools: In Search of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakman, Leon E.

    1980-01-01

    Academically, Canadian education is at the crossroads between formalism and functionalism, with the latter prevailing in recent years. There now arises a demand for a more integrated approach, linking legal theory with legal practice. (MSE)

  14. Facts about Canadian musk-oxen

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses the historical and current status of the Canadian musk-oxen. The musk-oxen's distribution, social structure, food and range, and breeding...

  15. Canadian Business Schools: Going out of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobni, Dawn; Dobni, Brooke

    1996-01-01

    Using Porter's five-forces model (potential entrants, suppliers, buyers, rivalry, substitutes) to analyze competition in Canadian university business schools, the authors conclude that schools are becoming increasingly vulnerable to competitive pressures and that strategic reorientation is necessary. (SK)

  16. Interdisciplinary Canadian guidelines on the use of metal stents in the gastrointestinal tract for oncological indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baerlocher, M.O. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca; Asch, M.R. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Lakeridge Health Corp., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Dixon, P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Durham Regional Cancer Centre, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Dept. of Oncology, Queen' s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Kortan, P. [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Medicine, St. Michael' s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Myers, A. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Lakeridge Health Corp., Oshawa, Ontario (Canada); Law, C. [Dept. of Surgical Oncology, Div. of General Surgery, Sunnybrook HSC, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-06-15

    To provide evidence-based guidelines regarding the appropriate use of gastrointestinal stents for oncologic indications. This document describes the use of gastrointestinal stents by appropriately trained physicians. This document is based on a review of the published evidence and supplemented by consensus expert opinion. Gastrointestinal stenting has been evaluated in terms of technical success, complications, patient satisfaction, clinical outcome, and cost-benefit analysis. This document was approved by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association; approval from the other relevant Canadian societies is pending. Gastrointestinal stenting has a valuable role in the management of the gastrointestinal malignancy. The decision to use such devices should be taken after comprehensive multidisciplinary clinical, endoscopic, and radiologic evaluation. This interdisciplinary Canadian guideline on the use of metal stents in the gastrointestinal tract for ontological indications is based on a scientific literature review and relevant clinical experience. This guideline attempts to define principles of practice for most circumstances, though adherence to this guideline will not, of course, produce successful outcomes in every case. (author)

  17. Canadian National Identity and Anti-Americanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭万宏

    2015-01-01

    Canadian national identity is closely related to antiAmericanism and for Canadians,comparing with America has become the main way to identify themselves.So some scholars argue that Canada lacks a real national identity and this is the main reason of its anti-American tradition.However,the author remarks Canada has its national identity.In this paper,the author will present three reasons to support her view.

  18. Canadian National Identity and Anti-Americanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭万宏

    2015-01-01

    Canadian national identity is closely related to anti-Americanism and for Canadians,comparing with America has become the main way to identify themselves.So some scholars argue that Canada lacks a real national identity and this is the main reason of its anti-American tradition.However,the author remarks Canada has its national identity.In this paper,the author will present three reasons to support her view.

  19. Reaching Consensus by Allowing Moments of Indecision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Swami, A.

    2015-10-01

    Group decision-making processes often turn into a drawn out and costly battle between two opposing subgroups. Using analytical arguments based on a master equation description of the opinion dynamics occurring in a three-state model of cooperatively interacting units, we show how the capability of a social group to reach consensus can be enhanced when there is an intermediate state for indecisive individuals to pass through. The time spent in the intermediate state must be relatively short compared to that of the two polar states in order to create the beneficial effect. Furthermore, the cooperation between individuals must not be too low, as the benefit to consensus is possible only when the cooperation level exceeds a specific threshold. We also discuss how zealots, agents that remain in one state forever, can affect the consensus among the rest of the population by counteracting the benefit of the intermediate state or making it virtually impossible for an opposition to form.

  20. Consensus-oriented group peer review: a new process to review radiologist work output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkasab, Tarik K; Harvey, H Benjamin; Gowda, Vrushab; Thrall, James H; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Gazelle, G Scott

    2014-02-01

    The Joint Commission and other regulatory bodies have mandated that health care organizations implement processes for ongoing physician performance review. Software solutions, such as RADPEER™, have been created to meet this need efficiently. However, the authors believe that available systems are not optimally designed to produce changes in practice and overlook many important aspects of quality by excessive focus on diagnosis. The authors present a new model of peer review known as consensus-oriented group review, which is based on group discussion of cases in a conference setting and places greater emphasis on feedback than traditional systems of radiology peer review. By focusing on the process of peer review, consensus-oriented group review is intended to optimize performance improvement and foster group standards of practice. The authors also describe the software tool developed to implement this process of enriched peer review.

  1. Asia-Pacific consensus statements on Crohn's disease. Part 2: Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Choon Jin; Makharia, Govind K; Hilmi, Ida; Gibson, Peter R; Fock, Kwong Ming; Ahuja, Vineet; Ling, Khoon Lin; Lim, Wee Chian; Thia, Kelvin T; Wei, Shu-chen; Leung, Wai Keung; Koh, Poh Koon; Gearry, Richard B; Goh, Khean Lee; Ouyang, Qin; Sollano, Jose; Manatsathit, Sathaporn; de Silva, H Janaka; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Pisespongsa, Pises; Abu Hassan, Muhamad Radzi; Sung, Joseph; Hibi, Toshifumi; Boey, Christopher C M; Moran, Neil; Leong, Rupert W L

    2016-01-01

    The Asia Pacific Working Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease was established in Cebu, Philippines, at the Asia Pacific Digestive Week conference in 2006 under the auspices of the Asian Pacific Association of Gastroenterology (APAGE) with the goal of developing best management practices, coordinating research and raising awareness of IBD in the region. The consensus group previously published recommendations for the diagnosis and management of ulcerative colitis (UC) with specific relevance to the Asia-Pacific region. The present consensus statements were developed following a similar process to address the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease (CD). The goals of these statements are to pool the pertinent literature specifically highlighting relevant data and conditions in the Asia-Pacific region relating to the economy, health systems, background infectious diseases, differential diagnoses and treatment availability. It does not intend to be all-comprehensive and future revisions are likely to be required in this ever-changing field.

  2. Consensus statement on the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carel, Jean-Claude; Eugster, Erica A; Rogol, Alan;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs revolutionized the treatment of central precocious puberty. However, questions remain regarding their optimal use in central precocious puberty and other conditions. The Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society and the European Society...... for Pediatric Endocrinology convened a consensus conference to review the clinical use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in children and adolescents. PARTICIPANTS: When selecting the 30 participants, consideration was given to equal representation from North America (United States and Canada) and Europe...... assembly for final review. If consensus could not be reached, conclusions were based on majority vote. All participants approved the final statement. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in increasing adult height is undisputed only in early-onset (girls

  3. Overlapping community detection using weighted consensus clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LINTAO YANG; ZETAI YU; JING QIAN; SHOUYIN LIU

    2016-10-01

    Many overlapping community detection algorithms have been proposed. Most of them are unstable and behave non-deterministically. In this paper, we use weighted consensus clustering for combining multiple base covers obtained by classic non-deterministic algorithms to improve the quality of the results. We first evaluate a reliability measure for each community in all base covers and assign a proportional weight to each one. Then we redefine the consensus matrix that takes into account not only the common membership of nodes, but also the reliability of the communities. Experimental results on both artificial and real-world networks show that our algorithm can find overlapping communities accurately.

  4. On Conditions for Convergence to Consensus

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, Jan

    2008-01-01

    A new theorem on conditions for convergence to consensus of a multiagent time-dependent time-discrete dynamical system is presented. The theorem is build up on the notion of averaging maps. We compare this theorem to Moreau's Theorem and his proposed set-valued Lyapunov theory (IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 50, no. 2, 2005). We give examples that point out differences of approaches including examples where Moreau's theorem is not applicable but ours is. Further on, we give examples that demonstrate that the theory of convergence to consensus is still not complete.

  5. Canadian suppliers of mining goods and services: Links between Canadian mining companies and selected sectors of the Canadian economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemieux, A. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Economic links between Canada's minerals and metals industry and Canadian suppliers of mining goods and services are examined to provide an insight into the interdependencies of these two key resource-related components of Canada's economy. The impact of globalization of the mining industry, estimates of its economic potential and the potential for exporting goods and services in conjunction with Canadian mining projects abroad are also assessed. The study concludes that the links between Canadian mining companies and the rest of the economy are difficult to quantify, due to the absence of statistical data that would differentiate supplier transactions with mining companies from those with other areas of the economy. At best, the approaches used in this study give but an imperfect understanding of the complex relationships between mining companies and their suppliers. It is clear, however, that as much of the demand for mining products is global, so is the supply, therefore, globalization of the mining industry, while creating unprecedented opportunities for Canadian suppliers to provide expertise, goods and services to Canadian and other customers offshore, the fact remains that mining multinationals buy a lot of their supplies locally. As a result, only some of the opportunities created by mining companies based in Canada and elsewhere will translate into sales for Canadian suppliers. Nevertheless, Canadian suppliers appear to have considerable depth in products related to underground mining, environment protection, exploration, feasibility studies, mineral processing, and mine automation. There appear to be considerable opportunities to derive further benefits from these areas of expertise. Appendices contain information about methodological aspects of the survey. 8 tabs., 32 figs., 6 appendices.

  6. Ninth International Conference draws 15000 to Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    defeatism. Charges that the AIDS Conferences are a waste of money were countered by the argument that the problem of AIDS must be considered in a world forum to allow the exchange of intersectoral and interdisciplinary information and the development of a consensus on strategies and politics. After the Tenth International Conference on AIDS in Yokohama, Japan, in August 1994, the international conferences will take place biannually.

  7. UK-China Dialogue on Climate Ethics:Finding Consensus Review of the Fourth International Conference on Climate Change and Public Policy%中英气候伦理对话:从分歧走向共识--第四届气候变化与公共政策国际学术会议综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史军

    2014-01-01

    The Fourth International Conference on Climate Change and Public Policy, and UK⁃China Net⁃work on Climate Ethics was held on 21 and 22 September 2014 at University of Reading and on 23 September 2014 at the University of Oxford. The five groups of topics were as follow: intergenerational and intra⁃genera⁃tional Climate justice; climate poverty and consumer choice; equity and development; international institutions;new problems and new solutions. There was also extensive discussion on Chinese moral perspective on climate governance between UK and Chinese scholars.%2014年9月21日至23日,第四届气候变化与公共政策国际学术会议暨中英气候伦理与政策研讨会在英国雷丁大学和牛津大学召开。会议围绕五组主题展开:代际气候正义与代内气候正义,气候贫困与消费者选择,平等与发展,国际法律与国际制度,新问题与新技术方案。此次会议对中英学者在应对气候变化问题上增进了解、求同存异、寻找共识起到了重要作用,进一步提升了我国学者参与国际气候问题交流与合作的水平和能力。

  8. Theorizing Gender in Contemporary Canadian Citizenship: Lessons Learned from the CBC's "Greatest Canadian" Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubas, Kaela

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I have used the 2004 Greatest Canadian contest as an example of media's educational function. Contrary to mainstream discourse of gender-neutral citizenship, this contest reiterates a notion of Canadian citizenship as masculinized, classed, and raced. Gramsci's concepts of "hegemony," "ideology", and…

  9. Toward an international consensus on public information practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouve, Andre A. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    At the 2005 IAEA general conference, several member states have asked the other members to engage in using the International Nuclear Event Scale (Ines) as a key harmonized element in public information practices. Created in 1989 to communicate on nuclear events at nuclear installations, this scale was recently upgraded to include the radiological risk as well as defects in safety provisions for radioactive sources or the transport of radioactive material. Even if communication tools should not be used to compare regulatory performances or enforce regulatory provisions the awareness of the public on the radiation risk is a positive contributor to the improvement of radiation protection. The experience feed back from the trial period of use of the upgraded Ines scale (July 2004- June 2006) demonstrates that a same tool allows an homogenous communication on a wide range of events, from nuclear safety events in nuclear power plants to deterministic effects of radiation among industrial radiographers. The next step for the extension of the Ines scale will be focused on medical events. - A prerequisite to any attempt to rank events in a scale is to define what should be considered as an event. This is not obvious as far as medical events are considered. The French Nuclear Safety Authority is currently working on a list of criteria to be used by licensees to determine the categories of events to be notified to the regulatory Authority. It is intended to organize the widest possible consultation among all stakeholders. The European IRPA conference is a good opportunity to discuss this issue and a way forward finding an international consensus on public information practices. (author)

  10. International Conference on Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    OMICS International, (conference series) the World Class Open Access Publisher and Scientific Event Organizer is hosting “International Conference on physics” which is going to be the biggest conference dedicated to Physics. The theme “Highlighting innovations and challenges in the field of Physics” and it features a three day conference addressing the major breakthroughs, challenges and the solutions adopted. The conference will be held during June 27-29, 2016 at New Orleans, USA. Will be published in: http://physics.conferenceseries.com/

  11. Medical cannabis - the Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gordon D; Bober, Sara L; Mindra, Sean; Moreau, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been widely used as a medicinal agent in Eastern medicine with earliest evidence in ancient Chinese practice dating back to 2700 BC. Over time, the use of medical cannabis has been increasingly adopted by Western medicine and is thus a rapidly emerging field that all pain physicians need to be aware of. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a significant and dose-dependent relationship between neuropathic pain relief and tetrahydrocannabinol - the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. Despite this, barriers exist to use from both the patient perspective (cost, addiction, social stigma, lack of understanding regarding safe administration) and the physician perspective (credibility, criminality, clinical evidence, patient addiction, and policy from the governing medical colleges). This review addresses these barriers and draws attention to key concerns in the Canadian medical system, providing updated treatment approaches to help clinicians work with their patients in achieving adequate pain control, reduced narcotic medication use, and enhanced quality of life. This review also includes case studies demonstrating the use of medical marijuana by patients with neuropathic low-back pain, neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. While significant preclinical data have demonstrated the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating pain in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, and cancer, further studies are needed with randomized controlled trials and larger study populations to identify the specific strains and concentrations that will work best with selected cohorts.

  12. Consensus over peri-implantaire infecties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkelhoff, A J

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, in a workshop of the European Federation on Periodontology, a consensus was reached concerning oral peri-implant infections on the basis of the state of the art in the relevant sciences. Important conclusions were that peri-implant mucositis occurs in 80% of subjects with oral implants, and

  13. Health Promoting Schools: Consensus, Strategies, and Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Andrew J.; Gagnon, Faith A.; Stewart, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize a consensus statement generated on the current challenges, strategies, and potential of health promoting schools (HPS) at a 2011 colloquium at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study where 40 people from five continents came together to share their global and regional experience surrounding…

  14. Discontinuities and hysteresis in quantized average consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceragioli, Francesca; Persis, Claudio De; Frasca, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    We consider continuous-time average consensus dynamics in which the agents’ states are communicated through uniform quantizers. Solutions to the resulting system are defined in the Krasowskii sense and are proven to converge to conditions of ‘‘practical consensus’’. To cope with undesired chattering

  15. The Overreliance of Accreditors on Consensus Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Frank B.

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the legitimacy of accreditation in teacher education is rooted in political consensus, power, and scholarship. Because these roots are fragile, there is no accepted concept of educational malpractice. The legitimacy of accreditation should be rooted in scholarly evidence that the program has fulfilled the claim that its graduates are…

  16. Introduction: experts and consensus in social science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans; C. Martini

    2014-01-01

    The ideals of science as objectivity and consensus are - unsurprisingly - not so easy to attain in scientific practice. Science is ultimately a product of individual scientists with their own personal backgrounds and experiences, and there is no unique methodology to de-personalize and objectify kno

  17. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates. To introduce an alternative, the ?learning conference,? that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes. Design....../methodology/approach: A typical full-day conference is analyzed. It has six hours of podium talk and twenty-five minutes for delegates to become involved. What model of learning can possibly lie behind this? The transfer model, which assumes learners to be empty vessels. An alternative view is that conference delegates...... are active professionals in search of inspiration, and they also want to share knowledge with their peers at the conference. A theory of the conference as a forum for mutual inspiration and human co-flourishing is proposed, as are four design principles for a learning conference: 1. Presentations must...

  18. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an al-ternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum...... and facilitate a variety of simple learning techniques at thirty one- and two-day conferences of up to 300 participants each. We present ten of these techniques and data evaluating them. We conclude that if conference organizers allocate a fraction of the total conference time to facilitated processes...... for learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We offer five design principles that specify how conferences may engage participants more and hence increase their learning. In the research-and-development effort reported here, our team collaborated with conference organizers in Denmark to introduce...

  19. Expert consensus document: A consensus on the medical treatment of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustina, Andrea; Chanson, Philippe; Kleinberg, David; Bronstein, Marcello D; Clemmons, David R; Klibanski, Anne; van der Lely, Aart J; Strasburger, Christian J; Lamberts, Steven W; Ho, Ken K Y; Casanueva, Felipe F; Melmed, Shlomo

    2014-04-01

    In March 2013, the Acromegaly Consensus Group met to revise and update guidelines for the medical treatment of acromegaly. The meeting comprised experts skilled in the medical management of acromegaly. The group considered treatment goals covering biochemical, clinical and tumour volume outcomes, and the place in guidelines of somatostatin receptor ligands, growth hormone receptor antagonists and dopamine agonists, and alternative modalities for treatment including combination therapy and novel treatments. This document represents the conclusions of the workshop consensus.

  20. JUDGING SELECTION: APPOINTING CANADIAN JUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter McCormick

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970s, the appointment of trial judges in Canada has generally involved an arms-length committee of professionals, although the structure of these committees and their role in the process has varied from province to province, as well as evolving over time. Yet these “new” structures and “new” processes did not prevent a major judicial appointment scandal in the province of Quebec in 2010, culminating in the formation of the Bastarache Committee to recommend changes. This paper summarizes the forty-year history of Canadian judicial appointment committees, identifies the major challenges that face those committees, and suggests the basic values toward which reforms to the appointment process might be directed. Depuis les années 1970, la nomination des juges de première instance au Canada a généralement mis à contribution un comité de professionnels indépendants, bien que la structure de ce comité et son rôle dans le processus de nomination aient varié d’une province à l’autre et évolué avec le temps. Ces « nouvelles » structures et « nouveaux » processus n’ont certes pas empêché l’éclatement du scandale sur la nomination des juges au Québec en 2010. Ce scandale a donné lieu à la formation de la Commission Bastarache qui avait notamment le mandat de recommander des changements. La présent document résume les quarante ans d’histoire des comités canadiens de nomination des juges, recense les principaux défis que ces comités doivent relever, et propose les valeurs fondamentales qui devraient inspirer les réformes du processus de nomination.

  1. Consensus Through Conversation How to Achieve High-Commitment Decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dressler, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Facilitation expert Larry Dressler's Consensus Through Conversation is a guide for the effective facilitation and practice of one of business's most popular - but most widely misunderstood - decision-making models: consensus.

  2. The minutes of Beijing-Tianjin seminar of Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology experts'-consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma%CSCO骨肉瘤诊治专家共识北京-天津研讨会会议纪要

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙扬; 金韬; 张清

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach a consensus on the standardized clinical diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma and lay the foundation for the future Chinese version of "Experts' Consensus of the Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteosarcoma", the Beijing-Tianjin seminar of Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) experts' consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma was held at the China National Convention Centre on April 20, 2012. More than 40 representatives from over 20 hospitals nationwide attended the conference. Insisting on the aim of multidisciplinary mutual learning, communication and enhancement, in the conference there was a heated exchange and discussion in the area of the standardized clinical diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma.

  3. A Roadmap for Canadian Submillimetre Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Tracy; Di Francesco, James; Matthews, Brenda; Murray, Norm; Scott, Douglas; Wilson, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We survey the present landscape in submillimetre astronomy for Canada and describe a plan for continued engagement in observational facilities to ~2020. Building on Canada's decadal Long Range Plan process, we emphasize that continued involvement in a large, single-dish facility is crucial given Canada's substantial investment in ALMA and numerous PI-led submillimetre experiments. In particular, we recommend: i) an extension of Canadian participation in the JCMT until at least the unique JCMT Legacy Survey program is able to realize the full scientific potential provided by the world-leading SCUBA-2 instrument; and ii) involvement of the entire Canadian community in CCAT, with a large enough share in the partnership for Canadian astronomers to participate at all levels of the facility. We further recommend continued participation in ALMA development, involvement in many focused PI-led submillimetre experiments, and partnership in SPICA.

  4. Phenylketonuria Scientific Review Conference : State of the science and future research needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Kathryn M.; Parisi, Melissa A.; Acosta, Phyllis B.; Berry, Gerard. T.; Bilder, Deborah A.; Blau, Nenad; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Brosco, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Christine S.; Burlina, Alberto B.; Burton, Barbara K.; Chang, Christine S.; Coates, Paul M.; Cunningham, Amy C.; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Ferguson, John H.; Franklin, Thomas D.; Frazier, Dianne M.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Greene, Carol L.; Groft, Stephen C.; Harding, Cary O.; Howell, R. Rodney; Huntington, Kathleen L.; Hyatt-Knorr, Henrietta D.; Jevaji, Indira P.; Levy, Harvey L.; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A.; Matalon, Kimberlee; MacDonald, Anita; McPheeters, Melissa L.; Mitchell, John J.; Mofidi, Shideh; Moseley, Kathryn D.; Mueller, Christine M.; Mulberg, Andrew E.; Nerurkar, Lata S.; Ogata, Beth N.; Pariser, Anne R.; Prasad, Suyash; Pridjian, Gabriella; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Reddy, Uma M.; Rohr, Frances J.; Singh, Rani H.; Sirrs, Sandra M.; Stremer, Stephanie E.; Tagle, Danilo A.; Thompson, Susan M.; Urv, Tiina K.; Utz, Jeanine R.; van Spronsen, Francjan; Vockley, Jerry; Waisbren, Susan E.; Weglicki, Linda S.; White, Desiree A.; Whitley, Chester B.; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Yannicelli, Steven; Young, Justin M.

    2014-01-01

    New developments in the treatment and management of phenylketonuria (PKU) as well as advances in molecular testing have emerged since the National Institutes of Health 2000 PKU Consensus Statement was released. An NIH State-of-the-Science Conference was convened in 2012 to address new findings, part

  5. Birth of the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ivan T

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Digestive Disease Foundation, renamed the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation--Fondation canadienne pour la promotion de la santé digestive--in December 2001, is the culmination of ongoing efforts by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology to establish an independent charitable organization. In February 2001, it was officially endorsed as the Foundation for the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology. The initial efforts to establish this Foundation, led by Dr Richard McKenna in 1963, were unsuccessful. In 1991, Glaxo Canada (now GlaxoSmithKline) became a founding donor, and with the four founding physicians--Drs Ivan T Beck, Richard H Hunt, Suzanne E Lemire and Alan BR Thomson--the expenses to establish the Foundation were met. A charitable number was obtained in 1995 (0997427-11). The second founding donor was Janssen Canada (now Janssen-Ortho), and public education support came from Astra Canada (now AstraZeneca Canada). The Foundation initially relied on corporate donors, but now approaches physicians, patients and the general public. The objectives of the Foundation are to advance the science of gastroenterology and to provide knowledge of digestive diseases and nutrition to the general public, to enhance the quality of life of persons who are afflicted with these disorders. The major achievements of the Foundation are the provision of one-year operating grants to new investigators, which have allowed them to accumulate early data and subsequently obtain support from other major granting organizations. It also provides Fellowships and studentship support grants, in conjunction with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the pharmaceutical industry. The education committee found that there was little research support in this field, considering the large economic burden of digestive disease and the amount of outstanding work done by Canadian researchers. A bilingual Web site, a web-based specialist's discussion program and bilingual

  6. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  7. Consensus formation in science modeled by aggregated bibliographic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    The level of consensus in science has traditionally been measured by a number of different methods. The variety is important as each method measures different aspects of science and consensus. Citation analytical studies have previously measured the level of consensus using the scientific journal...

  8. A Course in Canadian Film for U.S. Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenko, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Canadian Film will be a new course in the Communications Studies department at the University of Missouri at Kansas City particularly designed for non-Canadian Midwestern US students. It will not only introduce students to the richness and significance of Canadian film as both art and entertainment (which is virtually unrecognized around here),…

  9. 47 CFR 101.1423 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1423... GHz Band § 101.1423 Canadian and Mexican coordination. Pursuant to § 2.301 of this chapter, MVDDS systems in the United States within 56 km (35 miles) of the Canadian and Mexican border will be...

  10. Expectations for Cancun Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING ZHITAO

    2010-01-01

    Compared with the great hopes raised by the Copenhagen Climate Conference in 2009, the 2010 UN Climate Change Conference in Cancun aroused fewer expectations. However, the international community is still waiting for a positive outcome that will benefit humankind as a whole. The Cancun conference is another important opportunity for all the participants to advance the Bali Road Map negotiations after last year's meeting in Copenhagen, which failed to reach a legally binding treaty for the years beyond 2012.

  11. International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Cryocoolers 13

    2005-01-01

    This is the 13th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature super-capacitor applications.

  12. Statistics in action a Canadian outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Jerald F

    2014-01-01

    Commissioned by the Statistical Society of Canada (SSC), Statistics in Action: A Canadian Outlook helps both general readers and users of statistics better appreciate the scope and importance of statistics. It presents the ways in which statistics is used while highlighting key contributions that Canadian statisticians are making to science, technology, business, government, and other areas. The book emphasizes the role and impact of computing in statistical modeling and analysis, including the issues involved with the huge amounts of data being generated by automated processes.The first two c

  13. Police suicide research: conflict and consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violanti, John M

    2008-01-01

    Despite new frontiers in suicide research over the past ten years, police suicide remains a difficult, persistent, and controversial problem. Controversy appears to focus on the accuracy and validity of police suicide rates, but other controversies exist as well. This is likely due to studies that are methodologically flawed, incomplete, or specific to limited geographic areas. The objective of this paper is to review issues related to both conflicts and consensus on police suicide.

  14. Pragmatism and Political Pluralism - Consensus and Pluralism

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Marsonet

    2015-01-01

    A pragmatist thinker like Nicholas Rescher deems the idea that social harmony must be predicated in consensus to be both dangerous and misleading. An essential problem of our time is the creation of political and social institutions that enable people to live together in peaceful and productive ways, despite the presence of not eliminable disagreements about theoretical and practical issues. Such remarks, in turn, strictly recall the “practical” impossibility of settling philosophical dispute...

  15. Sarcopenia: European consensus on definition and diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso J Cruz-Jentoft; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Jürgen M Bauer; Boirie, Yves; Cederholm, Tommy; Landi, Francesco; Martin, Finbarr C; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Rolland, Yves; Schneider, Stéphane M; Topinková, Eva; Vandewoude, Maurits; Zamboni, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) developed a practical clinical definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for age-related sarcopenia. EWGSOP included representatives from four participant organisations, i.e. the European Geriatric Medicine Society, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics—European Region and the International Association of Nutrition and Aging. These organisation...

  16. Conference proceedings ISES 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Peerstrup Ahrendt, Line; Malmkvist, Jens

    The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers.......The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers....

  17. Consensus contact prediction by linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Bu, Dongbo; Li, Shuai Cheng; Li, Ming; Xu, Jinbo

    2007-01-01

    Protein inter-residue contacts are of great use for protein structure determination or prediction. Recent CASP events have shown that a few accurately predicted contacts can help improve both computational efficiency and prediction accuracy of the ab inito folding methods. This paper develops an integer linear programming (ILP) method for consensus-based contact prediction. In contrast to the simple "majority voting" method assuming that all the individual servers are equal and independent, our method evaluates their correlations using the maximum likelihood method and constructs some latent independent servers using the principal component analysis technique. Then, we use an integer linear programming model to assign weights to these latent servers in order to maximize the deviation between the correct contacts and incorrect ones; our consensus prediction server is the weighted combination of these latent servers. In addition to the consensus information, our method also uses server-independent correlated mutation (CM) as one of the prediction features. Experimental results demonstrate that our contact prediction server performs better than the "majority voting" method. The accuracy of our method for the top L/5 contacts on CASP7 targets is 73.41%, which is much higher than previously reported studies. On the 16 free modeling (FM) targets, our method achieves an accuracy of 37.21%.

  18. Proceedings of the WIN-Global 2008 conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    WiN-France hosted the 16. WIN-Global conference May 26-30, 2008, in Marseille, France. The conference was attended by over 150 delegates, representing 30 countries. Canadian participants, from many diverse backgrounds, attended the annual conference from AECL, Bruce Power, CNSC, NB Power and OPG. The theme: Maintaining Key Competencies, Arising Key Competencies for Nuclear Energy: A Challenge and Opportunity for Diversity Development, emphasized the challenges ahead in providing a skilled workforce for the nuclear renaissance, as new build projects and a vast number of retirements are expected around the world within the next 5 years. The conference addressed such questions as 'How will nuclear, attract, develop and retain staff?' A technical tour of Marcoule invited conference attendees to visit one of: Atalante, a high level nuclear chemistry laboratory; Phenix, a fast breeding research reactor; or AVM, a vitrification plant. A subsequent technical tour visited Cadarache providing the opportunity to view ITER, the international fusion research project.

  19. Consensus Formation in Science Modeled by Aggregated Bibliographic Coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Frandsen, Tove Faber

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The level of consensus in science has traditionally been measured by a number of different methods. The variety is important as each method measures different aspects of science and consensus. Citation analytical studies have previously measured the level of consensus using the scientific...... journal as their unit of analysis. To produce a more fine grained citation analysis one needs to study consensus formation on an even more detailed level – i.e. the scientific document or article. To do so, we have developed a new technique that measures consensus by aggregated bibliographic couplings...

  20. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  1. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation: Guidelines on Colon Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Leddin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer affecting both men and women in Canada. Many of these cancers are preventable, and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation (CDHF strongly support the establishment of screening programs for colorectal cancer. These guidelines discuss a number of screening options, listing the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ultimately, the test that is used for screening should be determined by patient preference, current evidence and local resources.

  2. The Canadian Hypertension Education Program – a unique Canadian knowledge translation program

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Touyz, Rhian M.; Campbell, Norm RC

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian Hypertension Education Program annually appraises data from hypertension research and updates clinical practice recommendation for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Enormous effort is devoted to disseminating these recommendations to target groups throughout the country and, through the use of institutional databases, to evaluating their effectiveness in improving the health of Canadians by lowering blood pressure in people with hypertension. The mission of the Canadi...

  3. Indigenous populations health protection: A Canadian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Katya L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The disproportionate effects of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic on many Canadian Aboriginal communities have drawn attention to the vulnerability of these communities in terms of health outcomes in the face of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases. Exploring the particular challenges facing these communities is essential to improving public health planning. In alignment with the objectives of the Pandemic Influenza Outbreak Research Modelling (Pan-InfORM team, a Canadian public health workshop was held at the Centre for Disease Modelling (CDM to: (i evaluate post-pandemic research findings; (ii identify existing gaps in knowledge that have yet to be addressed through ongoing research and collaborative activities; and (iii build upon existing partnerships within the research community to forge new collaborative links with Aboriginal health organizations. The workshop achieved its objectives in identifying main research findings and emerging information post pandemic, and highlighting key challenges that pose significant impediments to the health protection and promotion of Canadian Aboriginal populations. The health challenges faced by Canadian indigenous populations are unique and complex, and can only be addressed through active engagement with affected communities. The academic research community will need to develop a new interdisciplinary framework, building upon concepts from ‘Communities of Practice’, to ensure that the research priorities are identified and targeted, and the outcomes are translated into the context of community health to improve policy and practice.

  4. Canadian Ethnohistory: A Source for Social Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwire, Wendy

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of ethnohistory, a relatively new area of historical investigation that draws on anthropology, geography, and linguistics, as well as history, to document the pasts of predominantly indigenous peoples. Encourages social studies teachers to take notice of a major body of work being produced by Canadian ethnohistorians. (DSK)

  5. Who Are the Players in Canadian Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Geoffrey

    1987-01-01

    Labels range of persons advocating different theoretical positions of Canadian curriculum as "players." Describes players as "managers,""predictors,""transformers,""sleuths,""analysts." Values varied viewpoints for attention to language regarding curriculum, critical review of ideas/concepts, examination of current policies, awareness of history…

  6. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketovuori, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    This article is about a multidisciplinary R&D project in which a Canadian Learning Through The Arts (LTTA) program was imported to Finland in 2003-2004. Cultural differences in arts education in Finland and Canada are discussed. While Finland has a national school curriculum with all the arts included. Canada relies more on partnerships to…

  7. International surgery: definition, principles and Canadian practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, Ronald

    2003-10-01

    This article is dedicated to the Canadian international surgeon, Norman Bethune (1890-1939). International surgery is defined as a humanitarian branch of medicine concerned with the treatment of bodily injuries or disorders by incision or manipulations, emphasizing cooperation and understanding among nations and involving education, research, development and advocacy. In this article I review the colonial past, the dark ages following the Declaration of Alma-Ata, the progress made and the present challenges in international surgery. I present a definition of international surgery that recognizes the current era of surgical humanitarianism, validates a global understanding of surgical issues and promotes cooperation among nations. Included are the principles of international surgery: education, research, infrastructure development and advocacy. International surgical projects are classified according to type (clinical, relief, developmental) and integration strategy (vertical or horizontal). Also reviewed are the Canadian practice of international surgery by nongovernmental, professional and academic organizations and the requirements of international and Canadian funding agencies, the development concepts basic to all projects, including results-based management and the cross-cutting themes of gender equity, environmental protection and human safety. I recommend formalizing international surgery into a discipline as a means of promoting surgical care in low-income countries. If international surgery is to be sustained in Canada, infrastructure and support from Canadian surgeons is particularly important. An understanding of the history, definition and classification of international surgery should promote surgical care in low-income countries.

  8. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Writing recently in this journal, two of Canada's veteran adult educators contemplated the "death" of the Canadian adult education movement. I disagree and argue that adult education in Canada is as vital an activity as ever and one that still fully justifies being called a movement. Specifically, Selman and Selman (2009) list five…

  9. Canadian Adult Education: Still a Movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this journal's Fall 2009 issue, the Forum section included an article by Gordon Selman and Mark Selman arguing that although Canadian adult education had existed as a social movement in the middle part of the 20th century, it is no longer a social movement. They also speculated about the causes of this change. In the Spring 2011 issue, Tom…

  10. Canadian Children's Perceptions of Spirituality: Diverse Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelsey; Talwar, Victoria; Bosacki, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Few researchers have explored children's understandings of spirituality. Thus, Canadian children from different religious, spiritual and cultural backgrounds were asked open-ended questions concerning their spiritual thoughts, beliefs and experiences. Parents of participants completed a demographic questionnaire and reported children's religious…

  11. Canadian Perspectives on Equity in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlby, Brenda; Komlen, Mile

    2000-01-01

    Canadian school board administrators are increasingly expected to meet the needs of disabled or other students requiring specific types of accommodation. The duty to accommodate arises when otherwise legitimate school rules or policies affect the customs and observances of nonmajoritarian religions. (Contains 12 references.) (MLH)

  12. Asian and Pacific Migration: The Canadian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, T. John

    1994-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of landed immigrants (permanent settlers) from Asia, and explores their settlement, adaptation, and integration experience in Canada. It suggests that access to Canadian land does not always translate into equal opportunity in the economy and society, but notes that Canada may be more successful at assimilating Asian…

  13. Family Business Training: A Canadian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A. B.; Soufani, K.; Lam, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Family firms play an important role in the working of the Canadian economy; despite their importance to the economic activities and job creation it is observed that family businesses have lower survival rates than non-family firms, some argue that this can possibly be attributed (amongst other factors) to the lack of training. Most of the training…

  14. Canadian suicide mortality rates: first-generation immigrants versus Canadian-born.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, J; Johansen, H; Nair, C; Nargundkar, M

    1990-01-01

    This article examines suicide mortality rates and trends in Canada for first-generation immigrants and the Canadian-born population. Data are analyzed by age, sex and country of birth. Since 1950, suicide rates worldwide for both men and women have been increasing. In North America and most of Europe, suicide has been one of the major causes of death for many years. In Canada, suicide rates are also rising. However, this increase is due entirely to a rise in the rate for men; the rate for women has remained relatively stable. Several differences are apparent between the rates for the Canadian-born population and those for first-generation immigrants. For example, three times as many Canadian-born men as women commit suicide. For first-generation immigrants, the ratio is two to one. Suicide mortality rates for the Canadian-born are higher than those for first-generation immigrants in every age group except for the 65 and over groups. Canadian born males have higher ASMR than first generation immigrant males. The rates for women show that first-generation immigrant women have higher suicide mortality rates than their Canadian-born counterparts, and that the highest rate for all women is for immigrants born in Asia.

  15. Expectations for Cancun Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Compared with the great hopes raised by the Copenhagen Climate Conference in 2009, the 2010 UN Climate Change Conference in Cancun aroused fewer expectations. However, the international community is still waiting for a positive outcome that will benefit humankind as a whole.

  16. Radiation`96. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia.

  17. International consensus on ANA patterns (ICAP): the bumpy road towards a consensus on reporting ANA results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damoiseaux, Jan; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; Andrade, Luis E C; Chan, Edward K L; Conrad, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) was initiated as a workshop aiming to thoroughly discuss and achieve consensus regarding the morphological patterns observed in the indirect immunofluorescence assay on HEp-2 cells. One of the topics discussed at the second ICAP workshop, and addressed in this paper, was the harmonization of reporting ANA test results. This discussion centered on the issue if cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns should be reported as positive or negative. This report outlines the issues that impact on two major different reporting methods. Although it was appreciated by all participants that cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns are clinically relevant, implications for existing diagnostic/classification criteria for ANA-associated diseases in particular hampered a final consensus on this topic. Evidently, a more concerted action of all relevant stakeholders is required. Future ICAP workshops may help to facilitate this action.

  18. 3rd Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Louie, Berverly; McCarthy, Sandy

    1985-01-01

    Cryocoolers 3 documents the output of the Third Cryocooler Conference, held at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado, on September 17-18, 1984. About 140 people from 10 countries attended the conference representing industry, government, and academia. A total of 26 papers were presented orally at the conference and all appear in written form in the proceedings. The focus of this conference was on small cryocoolers in the temperature range of 4 - 80 K. Mechanical and nonmechanical types are discussed in the various papers. Applications of these small cryocoolers include the cooling of infrared detectors, cryopumps, small superconducting devices and magnets, and electronic devices. The conference proceedings reproduced here was published by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado as NBS Special Publication #698.

  19. Meeting Proceedings: Recommendations for Improved Acute Pain Services: Canadian Collaborative Acute Pain Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H Goldstein

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Collaborative Acute Pain Initiative, established in 2002, is a voluntary, multidisciplinary consortium of acute pain health professionals from across Canada whose goal is to improve acute pain management through discussion and consensus. The group met in January 2002 to define strategic areas related to the treatment of acute pain. The areas identified were: the definition of pain; the epidemiology of pain; the concept of an 'ideal' acute pain management service; education; therapeutic options; symptom management; and research and safety. In November 2002, a second meeting was held to develop objectives and recommendations for the management of acute pain based on the defined areas. The outcome of these discussions is summarized in this paper.

  20. International Consensus on Key Concepts and Data Definitions for Mass-gathering Health: Process and Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turris, Sheila A; Steenkamp, Malinda; Lund, Adam; Hutton, Alison; Ranse, Jamie; Bowles, Ron; Arbuthnott, Katherine; Anikeeva, Olga; Arbon, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Mass gatherings (MGs) occur worldwide on any given day, yet mass-gathering health (MGH) is a relatively new field of scientific inquiry. As the science underpinning the study of MGH continues to develop, there will be increasing opportunities to improve health and safety of those attending events. The emerging body of MG literature demonstrates considerable variation in the collection and reporting of data. This complicates comparison across settings and limits the value and utility of these reported data. Standardization of data points and/or reporting in relation to events would aid in creating a robust evidence base from which governments, researchers, clinicians, and event planners could benefit. Moving towards international consensus on any topic is a complex undertaking. This report describes a collaborative initiative to develop consensus on key concepts and data definitions for a MGH "Minimum Data Set." This report makes transparent the process undertaken, demonstrates a pragmatic way of managing international collaboration, and proposes a number of steps for progressing international consensus. The process included correspondence through a journal, face-to-face meetings at a conference, then a four-day working meeting; virtual meetings over a two-year period supported by online project management tools; consultation with an international group of MGH researchers via an online Delphi process; and a workshop delivered at the 19thWorld Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine held in Cape Town, South Africa in April 2015. This resulted in an agreement by workshop participants that there is a need for international consensus on key concepts and data definitions.

  1. Dupuytren contracture recurrence project: reaching consensus on a definition of recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, N; Marcoccio, I; Giunta, R; Haerle, M; Leclercq, C; Pajardi, G; Wilbrand, S; Georgescu, A V; Pess, G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a definition of recurrence of Dupuytren disease that could be utilized for the comparison of the results independently from the treatment used. 24 hand surgeons from 17 countries met in an international consensus conference. The participants used the Delphi method to evaluate a series of statements: (1) the need for defining recurrence, (2) the concept of recurrence applied to the Tubiana staging system, (3) the concept of recurrence applied to each single treated joint, and (4) the concept of recurrence applied to the finger ray. For each item, the possible answer was given on a scale of 1-5: 1=maximum disagreement; 2=disagreement; 3=agreement; 4=strong agreement; 5=absolute agreement. There was consensus on disagreement if 1 and 2 comprised at least 66% of the recorded answers and consensus on agreement if 3, 4 and 5 comprised at least 66% of the recorded answers. If a threshold of 66% was not reached, the related statement was considered "not defined". A need for a definition of recurrence was established. The presence of nodules or cords without finger contracture was not considered an indication of recurrence. The Tubiana staging system was considered inappropriate for reporting recurrence. Recurrence was best determined by the measurement of a specific joint, rather than a total ray. Time 0 occurred between 6 weeks and 3 months. Recurrence was defined as a PED of more than 20° for at least one of treated joint, in the presence of a palpable cord, compared to the result obtained at time 0. This study determined the need for a standard definition of recurrence and reached consensus on that definition, which we should become the standard for the reporting of recurrence. If utilized in subsequent publications, this will allow surgeons to compare different techniques and make is easier to help patients make an informed choice.

  2. Developing consensus criteria for sarcopenia: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Robert R; Kiel, Douglas P

    2015-04-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, is a major cause of impaired physical function, which contributes to mobility disability, falls and hospitalizations in older adults. Lower muscle mass and strength are also associated with lower bone mineral density and greater risk for osteoporotic fractures. Thus, identification of sarcopenia could be important for fracture prevention as it may help improve fracture risk assessment, and muscle mass and strength can be improved with exercise, even among the frailest older adults. Unfortunately, there are no consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia. Consequently there is no guidance to help clinicians identify older adults with clinically meaningful low muscle mass or weakness. Further, development of novel sarcopenia therapies is hindered not only due to the difficulty in identifying participants for clinical trials, and but also because there are no validated, clinically appropriate endpoints for assessment of treatment efficacy. There is currently a major push to establish a consensus definition of sarcopenia, and recent work holds promise that this goal may be within reach. This article discusses the evolution of the definition of sarcopenia, and focuses on the latest recommended diagnostic criteria proposed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project. While these empirically-based cut-points for clinically important low muscle mass and weakness are a significant step forward for the sarcopenia field, important questions remain to be answered before consensus diagnostic criteria can be definitively established. Ongoing work to refine sarcopenia criteria will further advance the field and bring this important contributor to falls, fractures and disability into the mainstream of clinical care and ultimately lead to better quality of life with aging.

  3. CSCE annual conference. Volume 5: sustainable development, environment, geotechnical engineering, transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leduc, R.; Johnson, C.; Gordon, M.; Lupien, C. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    Forty papers on sustainable development, environment, geotechnical engineering, and transportation are contained in this volume. Seven additional volumes contain 246 papers presented at the plenary sessions and sessions on history and education and the Confederation Bridge (volume 1); 2nd CSCE Construction Specialty Conference (volume 2); 13th Canadian Hydrotechnical Conference (volume 3); 2nd Symposium on Applied Mechanics, structures, and seismic engineering (volume 4); structures: composite materials, structural systems, and telecommunication towers (volume 6); structures: conception, concrete and reinforced concrete structures, and bridges (volume 7); and agricultural engineering, soil and water engineering, energy and processing/food engineering, machinery systems, waste management, and information and computer technologies (volume A).

  4. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference.

  5. Practice patterns in venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in thoracic surgery: a comprehensive Canadian Delphi survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agzarian, John; Linkins, Lori-Ann; Schneider, Laura; Hanna, Waël C.; Finley, Christian J.; Schieman, Colin; De Perrot, Marc; Crowther, Mark; Douketis, James

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE) after resection of thoracic malignancies can reach 15%, but prophylaxis guidelines are yet to be established. We aimed to survey Canadian practitioners regarding perioperative risk factors for VTE, impact of those factors on extended prophylaxis selection, type of preferred prophylaxis, and timing of initiation and duration of thromboprophylaxis. Methods A modified Delphi survey was undertaken over three rounds with thoracic surgeons, thoracic anesthesiologists and thrombosis experts across Canada. Participants were asked to rate each parameter on a ten-point scale. Agreement was determined a priori as an item reaching a coefficient of variation of ≤30% (0.3), with the item then discontinued from later rounds. Results In total, 72, 57 and 50 respondents participated in three consecutive rounds, respectively. Consensus was reached on previous VTE, age, cancer diagnosis, thrombophilia, poor mobilization, extended resections, and pre-operative chemotherapy as risk factors. Consensus on risk factors impacting extended prophylaxis decisions was achieved on cancer diagnosis, obesity, previous VTE and poor mobilization. With respect to perioperative prophylaxis, once daily low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was the only parameter that demonstrated agreement as a common practice pattern. No agreement was achieved regarding the role of mechanical prophylaxis, unfractionated heparin (UFH) or timing of initiation of peri-operative treatment. VTE prophylaxis until discharge reached agreement but there was substantial variability regarding the role of extended prophylaxis. Conclusions There is agreement between Canadian clinicians treating patients with thoracic malignancies regarding most risk factors for VTE, but there is no agreement on timing of initiation of prophylaxis, the agents used or factors mandating usage of extended prophylaxis. PMID:28203409

  6. Process makes product: Demonstration green building at Canadian university

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, J.; Pagani, F.; Perdue, J.

    1999-07-01

    In 1992 while in the midst of a C$500 million, ten-year capital expansion program, a Canadian university made a commitment to develop a demonstration green building. The building, which had been budgeted and scheduled prior to this commitment, is a 2,700 m{sup 2} (29,000 ft{sup 2}) office and seminar building, which was designed and constructed without any adjustments to the original budget or to the schedule due to green initiatives. At the outset of the project, the university convened a workshop with the consultants, subconsultants, users, and building operators to develop by consensus a set of targets for site ecology, energy use, water use, material reduction, and waste reduction. The building has met or exceeded the majority of the targets and is being monitored on an ongoing basis. Some of the specific achievements of the project team are a 69% reduction in electricity use from ASHRAE 90.1; a lighting intensity of 9 W/m{sup 2} (0.9 W/ft{sup 2}); on-site wastewater treatment through composting toilets and a constructed wetland for grey water; approximately 50% reused, recycled, and recyclable materials, natural stack ventilation supplemented by fans in temperature extremes; workstations next to operable windows with maximum access to natural light; a construction waste management plan to reduce waste from the site. Process innovations included the commitment from the owner, the establishment of targets by the entire project team, and the inclusion of the subconsultants in the design process from the beginning.

  7. Wireless sensor networks distributed consensus estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cailian; Guan, Xinping

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief evaluates the cooperative effort of sensor nodes to accomplish high-level tasks with sensing, data processing and communication. The metrics of network-wide convergence, unbiasedness, consistency and optimality are discussed through network topology, distributed estimation algorithms and consensus strategy. Systematic analysis reveals that proper deployment of sensor nodes and a small number of low-cost relays (without sensing function) can speed up the information fusion and thus improve the estimation capability of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This brief also investiga

  8. Multiple chemical sensitivity: a 1999 consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Consensus criteria for the definition of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) were first identified in a 1989 multidisciplinary survey of 89 clinicians and researchers with extensive experience in, but widely differing views of, MCS. A decade later, their top 5 consensus criteria (i.e., defining MCS as [1] a chronic condition [2] with symptoms that recur reproducibly [3] in response to low levels of exposure [4] to multiple unrelated chemicals and [5] improve or resolve when incitants are removed) are still unrefuted in published literature. Along with a 6th criterion that we now propose adding (i.e., requiring that symptoms occur in multiple organ systems), these criteria are all commonly encompassed by research definitions of MCS. Nonetheless, their standardized use in clinical settings is still lacking, long overdue, and greatly needed--especially in light of government studies in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada that revealed 2-4 times as many cases of chemical sensitivity among Gulf War veterans than undeployed controls. In addition, state health department surveys of civilians in New Mexico and California showed that 2-6%, respectively, already had been diagnosed with MCS and that 16% of the civilians reported an "unusual sensitivity" to common everyday chemicals. Given this high prevalence, as well as the 1994 consensus of the American Lung Association, American Medical Association, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission that "complaints [of MCS] should not be dismissed as psychogenic, and a thorough workup is essential," we recommend that MCS be formally diagnosed--in addition to any other disorders that may be present--in all cases in which the 6 aforementioned consensus criteria are met and no single other organic disorder (e.g., mastocytosis) can account for all the signs and symptoms associated with chemical exposure. The millions of civilians and tens of thousands of Gulf War veterans who

  9. Asia Pacific Consensus Statements on Crohn's disease. Part 1: Definition, diagnosis, and epidemiology: (Asia Pacific Crohn's Disease Consensus--Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Choon Jin; Makharia, Govind K; Hilmi, Ida; Gibson, Peter R; Fock, Kwong Ming; Ahuja, Vineet; Ling, Khoon Lin; Lim, Wee Chian; Thia, Kelvin T; Wei, Shu-chen; Leung, Wai Keung; Koh, Poh Koon; Gearry, Richard B; Goh, Khean Lee; Ouyang, Qin; Sollano, Jose; Manatsathit, Sathaporn; de Silva, H Janaka; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Pisespongsa, Pises; Abu Hassan, Muhamad Radzi; Sung, Joseph; Hibi, Toshifumi; Boey, Christopher C M; Moran, Neil; Leong, Rupert W L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was previously thought to be rare in Asia, but emerging data indicate rising incidence and prevalence of IBD in the region. The Asia Pacific Working Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease was established in Cebu, Philippines, at the Asia Pacific Digestive Week conference in 2006 under the auspices of the Asian Pacific Association of Gastroenterology with the goal of developing best management practices, coordinating research, and raising awareness of IBD in the region. The consensus group previously published recommendations for the diagnosis and management of ulcerative colitis with specific relevance to the Asia-Pacific region. The present consensus statements were developed following a similar process to address the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of Crohn's disease. The goals of these statements are to pool the pertinent literature specifically highlighting relevant data and conditions in the Asia-Pacific region relating to the economy, health systems, background infectious diseases, differential diagnoses, and treatment availability. It does not intend to be all comprehensive and future revisions are likely to be required in this ever-changing field.

  10. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Companion: Bridging Guidelines to Your Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Jonathan G; Chan, Michael; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Harkness, Karen; Heckman, George A; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Moe, Gordon W; O'Meara, Eileen; Abrams, Howard; Ducharme, Anique; Grzeslo, Adam; Hamilton, Peter G; Koshman, Sheri L; Lepage, Serge; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert; Rajda, Miroslaw; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Zieroth, Shelley

    2016-03-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Program has generated annual HF updates, including formal recommendations and supporting Practical Tips since 2006. Many clinicians indicate they routinely use the Canadian Cardiovascular Society HF Guidelines in their daily practice. However, many questions surrounding the actual implementation of the Guidelines into their daily practice remain. A consensus-based approach was used, including feedback from the Primary and Secondary HF Panels. This companion is intended to answer several key questions brought forth by HF practitioners such as appropriate timelines for initial assessments and subsequent reassessments of patients, the order in which medications should be added, how newer medications should be included in treatment algorithms, and when left ventricular function should be reassessed. A new treatment algorithm for HF with reduced ejection fraction is included. Several other practical issues are addressed such as an approach to management of hyperkalemia/hypokalemia, treatment of gout, when medications can be stopped, and whether a target blood pressure or heart rate is suggested. Finally, elements and teaching of self-care are described. This tool will hopefully function to allow better integration of the HF Guidelines into clinical practice.

  11. Ending overly broad HIV criminalization: Canadian scientists and clinicians stand for justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Kazatchkine

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In Canada, people living with HIV who do not disclose their HIV status prior to sexual acts risk prosecution for aggravated sexual assault even if they have sex with a condom or while having a low (or undetectable viral load, they had no intent to transmit HIV, and no transmission occurred. In 2013, six distinguished Canadian HIV scientists and clinicians took ground-breaking action to advance justice by co-authoring the “Canadian consensus statement on HIV and its transmission in the context of the criminal law.” This effort was born out of the belief that the application of criminal law to HIV non-disclosure was being driven by a poor appreciation of the science of HIV. More than 75 HIV scientists and clinicians Canada-wide have now endorsed the statement, agreeing that “[they] have a professional and ethical responsibility to assist those in the criminal justice system to understand and interpret current medical and scientific evidence regarding HIV.” As some 61 countries have adopted laws that specifically allow for HIV criminalization, and prosecutions for HIV non-disclosure, exposure and transmission have been reported in at least 49 countries, the authors hope that others around the world will take similar action.

  12. Ending overly broad HIV criminalization: Canadian scientists and clinicians stand for justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazatchkine, Cécile; Bernard, Edwin; Eba, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, people living with HIV who do not disclose their HIV status prior to sexual acts risk prosecution for aggravated sexual assault even if they have sex with a condom or while having a low (or undetectable) viral load, they had no intent to transmit HIV, and no transmission occurred. In 2013, six distinguished Canadian HIV scientists and clinicians took ground-breaking action to advance justice by co-authoring the “Canadian consensus statement on HIV and its transmission in the context of the criminal law.” This effort was born out of the belief that the application of criminal law to HIV non-disclosure was being driven by a poor appreciation of the science of HIV. More than 75 HIV scientists and clinicians Canada-wide have now endorsed the statement, agreeing that “[they] have a professional and ethical responsibility to assist those in the criminal justice system to understand and interpret current medical and scientific evidence regarding HIV.” As some 61 countries have adopted laws that specifically allow for HIV criminalization, and prosecutions for HIV non-disclosure, exposure and transmission have been reported in at least 49 countries, the authors hope that others around the world will take similar action. PMID:26194348

  13. Conference Report: Wyoming Invitational Conference on Instructional Applications of Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansky, Bob

    This report: (1) describes the organization of an invitational conference aimed at gathering direction from classroom teachers regarding instructional applications of computers; (2) provides copies of all materials used in organizing such a conference; and (3) reports the results of the conference in terms of conference products (resolutions,…

  14. Consensus statement on panic disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballenger, JC; Lecrubier, Y; Nutt, DJ; Baldwin, DS; den Boer, JA; Kasper, S; Shear, MK

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To provide primary care clinicians with a better understanding of management issues in panic disorder and guide clinical practice with recommendations for appropriate pharmacotherapy. Participants: The 4 members of the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety were James C.

  15. Consensus in networks of mobile communicating agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Populations of mobile and communicating agents describe a vast array of technological and natural systems, ranging from sensor networks to animal groups. Here, we investigate how a group-level agreement may emerge in the continuously evolving network defined by the local interactions of the moving individuals. We adopt a general scheme of motion in two dimensions and we let the individuals interact through the minimal naming game, a prototypical scheme to investigate social consensus. We distinguish different regimes of convergence determined by the emission range of the agents and by their mobility, and we identify the corresponding scaling behaviors of the consensus time. In the same way, we rationalize also the behavior of the maximum memory used during the convergence process, which determines the minimum cognitive/storage capacity needed by the individuals. Overall, we believe that the simple and general model presented in this paper can represent a helpful reference for a better understanding of the behavior of populations of mobile agents.

  16. Consensus in evolving networks of mobile agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-02-01

    Populations of mobile and communicating agents describe a vast array of technological and natural systems, ranging from sensor networks to animal groups. Here, we investigate how a group-level agreement may emerge in the continuously evolving networks defined by the local interactions of the moving individuals. We adopt a general scheme of motion in two dimensions and we let the individuals interact through the minimal naming game, a prototypical scheme to investigate social consensus. We distinguish different regimes of convergence determined by the emission range of the agents and by their mobility, and we identify the corresponding scaling behaviors of the consensus time. In the same way, we rationalize also the behavior of the maximum memory used during the convergence process, which determines the minimum cognitive/storage capacity needed by the individuals. Overall, we believe that the simple and general model presented in this talk can represent a helpful reference for a better understanding of the behavior of populations of mobile agents.

  17. International Consensus On (ICON) Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N. G.; Arakawa, H.; Carlsen, K.-H.; Custovic, A.; Gern, J.; Lemanske, R.; Le Souef, P.; Makela, M.; Roberts, G.; Wong, G.; Zar, H.; Akdis, C. A.; Bacharier, L. B.; Baraldi, E.; van Bever, H. P.; de Blic, J.; Boner, A.; Burks, W.; Casale, T. B.; Castro-Rodriguez, J. A.; Chen, Y. Z.; El-Gamal, Y. M.; Everard, M. L.; Frischer, T.; Geller, M.; Gereda, J.; Goh, D. Y.; Guilbert, T. W.; Hedlin, G.; Heymann, P. W.; Hong, S. J.; Hossny, E. M.; Huang, J. L.; Jackson, D. J.; de Jongste, J. C.; Kalayci, O.; Khaled, N.; Kling, S.; Kuna, P.; Lau, S.; Ledford, D. K.; Lee, S. I.; Liu, A. H.; Lockey, R. F.; Lodrup-Carlsen, K.; Lotvall, J.; Morikawa, A.; Nieto, A.; Paramesh, H.; Pawankar, R.; Pohunek, P.; Pongracic, J.; Price, D.; Robertson, C.; Rosario, N.; Rossenwasser, L. J.; Sly, P. D.; Stein, R.; Stick, S.; Szefler, S.; Taussig, L. M.; Valovirta, E.; Vichyanond, P.; Wallace, D.; Weinberg, E.; Wennergren, G.; Wildhaber, J.; Zeiger, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. In order to achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with health care professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent from chronic treatment. There is a trend towards considering phenotype specific treatment choices; however this goal has not yet been achieved. PMID:22702533

  18. International consensus on (ICON) pediatric asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N G; Arakawa, H; Carlsen, K-H; Custovic, A; Gern, J; Lemanske, R; Le Souef, P; Mäkelä, M; Roberts, G; Wong, G; Zar, H; Akdis, C A; Bacharier, L B; Baraldi, E; van Bever, H P; de Blic, J; Boner, A; Burks, W; Casale, T B; Castro-Rodriguez, J A; Chen, Y Z; El-Gamal, Y M; Everard, M L; Frischer, T; Geller, M; Gereda, J; Goh, D Y; Guilbert, T W; Hedlin, G; Heymann, P W; Hong, S J; Hossny, E M; Huang, J L; Jackson, D J; de Jongste, J C; Kalayci, O; Aït-Khaled, N; Kling, S; Kuna, P; Lau, S; Ledford, D K; Lee, S I; Liu, A H; Lockey, R F; Lødrup-Carlsen, K; Lötvall, J; Morikawa, A; Nieto, A; Paramesh, H; Pawankar, R; Pohunek, P; Pongracic, J; Price, D; Robertson, C; Rosario, N; Rossenwasser, L J; Sly, P D; Stein, R; Stick, S; Szefler, S; Taussig, L M; Valovirta, E; Vichyanond, P; Wallace, D; Weinberg, E; Wennergren, G; Wildhaber, J; Zeiger, R S

    2012-08-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic lower respiratory disease in childhood throughout the world. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents are available to support medical decisions on pediatric asthma. Although there is no doubt that the use of common systematic approaches for management can considerably improve outcomes, dissemination and implementation of these are still major challenges. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), recently formed by the EAACI, AAAAI, ACAAI, and WAO, has decided to propose an International Consensus on (ICON) Pediatric Asthma. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences, thus providing a concise reference. The principles of pediatric asthma management are generally accepted. Overall, the treatment goal is disease control. To achieve this, patients and their parents should be educated to optimally manage the disease, in collaboration with healthcare professionals. Identification and avoidance of triggers is also of significant importance. Assessment and monitoring should be performed regularly to re-evaluate and fine-tune treatment. Pharmacotherapy is the cornerstone of treatment. The optimal use of medication can, in most cases, help patients control symptoms and reduce the risk for future morbidity. The management of exacerbations is a major consideration, independent of chronic treatment. There is a trend toward considering phenotype-specific treatment choices; however, this goal has not yet been achieved.

  19. Frailty Consensus: A Call to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E.; Vellas, Bruno; van Kan, G. Abellan; Anker, Stefan D.; Bauer, Juergen M.; Bernabei, Roberto; Cesari, Matteo; Chumlea, W.C.; Doehner, Wolfram; Evans, Jonathan; Fried, Linda P.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Katz, Paul R.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; McCarter, Roger J.; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis M.; Rockwood, Ken; von Haehling, Stephan; Vandewoude, Maurits F.; Walston, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Frailty is a clinical state in which there is an increase in an individual’s vulnerability for developing increased dependency and/or mortality when exposed to a stressor. Frailty can occur as the result of a range of diseases and medical conditions. A consensus group consisting of delegates from 6 major international, European, and US societies created 4 major consensus points on a specific form of frailty: physical frailty. Physical frailty is an important medical syndrome. The group defined physical frailty as “a medical syndrome with multiple causes and contributors that is characterized by diminished strength, endurance, and reduced physiologic function that increases an individual’s vulnerability for developing increased dependency and/or death.”Physical frailty can potentially be prevented or treated with specific modalities, such as exercise, protein-calorie supplementation, vitamin D, and reduction of polypharmacy.Simple, rapid screening tests have been developed and validated, such as the simple FRAIL scale, to allow physicians to objectively recognize frail persons.For the purposes of optimally managing individuals with physical frailty, all persons older than 70 years and all individuals with significant weight loss (≥5%) due to chronic disease should be screened for frailty. PMID:23764209

  20. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  1. Establishing a national knowledge translation and generation network in kidney disease: the CAnadian KidNey KNowledge TraNslation and GEneration NeTwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Braden; Barrett, Brendan; Evans, Michael; Garg, Amit; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Kappel, Joanne; Klarenbach, Scott; Madore, Francois; Parfrey, Patrick; Samuel, Susan; Soroka, Steven; Suri, Rita; Tonelli, Marcello; Wald, Ron; Walsh, Michael; Zappitelli, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) do not always receive care consistent with guidelines, in part due to complexities in CKD management, lack of randomized trial data to inform care, and a failure to disseminate best practice. At a 2007 conference of key Canadian stakeholders in kidney disease, attendees noted that the impact of Canadian Society of Nephrology (CSN) guidelines was attenuated given limited formal linkages between the CSN Clinical Practice Guidelines Group, kidney researchers, decision makers and knowledge users, and that further knowledge was required to guide care in patients with kidney disease. The idea for the Canadian Kidney Knowledge Translation and Generation Network (CANN-NET) developed from this meeting. CANN-NET is a pan-Canadian network established in partnership with CSN, the Kidney Foundation of Canada and other professional societies to improve the care and outcomes of patients with and at risk for kidney disease. The initial priority areas for knowledge translation include improving optimal timing of dialysis initiation, and increasing the appropriate use of home dialysis. Given the urgent need for new knowledge, CANN-NET has also brought together a national group of experienced Canadian researchers to address knowledge gaps by encouraging and supporting multicentre randomized trials in priority areas, including management of cardiovascular disease in patients with kidney failure.

  2. Distributed Estimation using Bayesian Consensus Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-06

    Communication of probability distributions and computational methods for implementing the BCF algorithm are discussed along with a numerical example. I...Bayesian filters over Kalman filter–based methods for estimation of nonlinear target dynamic models is that no approximation is needed during the...states across the network. 2014 American Control Conference (ACC) June 4-6, 2014. Portland, Oregon, USA 978-1-4799-3274-0/$31.00 ©2014 AACC 634 Finally, we

  3. Seeing Oneself in a Book: The Changing Face of Canadian Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Fayjean, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Takes a look at children's literature over time, and its recent emergence as a respected body of literary work. Discusses what is Canadian about Canadian children's literature. Annotates six picture books. Notes that Canadian literature reflects the diversity of the Canadian population, the vast differences in the Canadian landscape, and the…

  4. ACUTE DIALYSIS QUALITY INITIATIVE (ADQI) XIV SEPSIS PHENOTYPES AND TARGETS FOR BLOOD PURIFICATION IN SEPSIS: THE BOGOTÁ CONSENSUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellum, John A; Gómez, Hernando; Gómez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Despite widespread use, there is currently no consensus on how extracorporeal blood purification therapies should be applied or studied in patients with sepsis. One major obstacle has been the lack of clear descriptions of specific sepsis phenotypes tied to mechanisms that would permit the identification of molecular targets. Current evidence suggests that sepsis-related morbidity and mortality involve widely different clinical phenotypes that variably include mitochondrial dysfunction, abnormalities of vascular biology including endothelial dysfunction and coagulopathy, epithelial dysfunction, and immune suppression and dysregulation. While most cases of sepsis involve some element of all of these pathobiologic processes, the magnitude of each varies greatly from patient to patient in part as a result of the pathogen and in part related to host-specific factors. Thus, the purpose of the fourteenth international consensus conference of acute dialysis quality initiative was to develop consensus for a conceptual model of sepsis-induced organ failure that can be treated by extracorporeal blood purification and possibly also with drugs or other therapies. We assembled a group of experts from around the world and used a modified Delphi method to reach consensus. Specific findings and recommendations for future research are provided in the four accompanying papers.

  5. 77 FR 38844 - Notice of NIH Consensus Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... disorders in pregnancy and is associated with an increased risk of complications for the mother and child.... Preventive Services Task Force found in 2008 that the evidence was insufficient to assess the balance...

  6. 78 FR 11210 - Notice of NIH Consensus Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... adequately process carbohydrates (sugars and starches) into energy for the body, and develops or is first... standard method in the United States begins with a GCT, which involves drinking a sweetened liquid... potentially adverse effects of a ``high-risk'' label in pregnancy. In addition, women diagnosed with GDM...

  7. Biological therapies in the systemic management of psoriasis : International Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterry, W.; Barker, J.; Boehncke, W.H.; Bos, J.D.; Chimenti, S.; Christophers, E.; Brassinne, M. de la; Ferrandiz, C.; Griffiths, C.E.; Katsambas, A.; Kragballe, K.; Lynde, C.; Menter, A.; Ortonne, J.P.; Papp, K.A.; Prinz, J.C.; Rzany, B.; Ronnevig, J.; Saurat, J.H.; Stahle, M.; Stengel, F.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Voorhees, J.

    2004-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder that usually requires long-term treatment for control. Approximately 25% of patients have moderate to severe disease and require phototherapy, systemic therapy or both. Despite the availability of numerous therapeutic options, the long-term management

  8. Cardiorenal Syndromes : An Executive Summary from the Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter A.; Anker, Stefan D.; Anand, Inder; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Berl, Tomas; Bobek, Ilona; Cruz, Dinna N.; Daliento, Luciano; Davenport, Andrew; Haapio, Mikko; Hillege, Hans; House, Andrew; Katz, Nevin M.; Maisel, Alan; Mankad, Sunil; Zanco, Pierluigi; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ronco, Federico; Shaw, Andrew; Sheinfeld, Geoff; Soni, Sachin; Vescovo, Giorgio; Zamperetti, Nereo; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ronco, C; Bellomo, R; McCullough, PA

    2010-01-01

    The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is a disorder of the heart and kidneys whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other. The general definition has been expanded into five subtypes reflecting the primacy of organ dysfunction and the time-frame of

  9. EURECCA consensus conference highlights about colorectal cancer clinical management: the pathologists expert review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirke, P.; West, N.P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.

    2014-01-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20 years; however, a considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore,

  10. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  11. Canadian petroleum history bibliography. Release update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2010-01-07

    The petroleum history bibliography was created over several years as a record dedicated to preserving the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. It comprises a list of more than 5000 publications, including books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles and stories of the many companies that have come and gone. It aims to include all publications and audio visual products from the Social Sciences and Humanities on company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry and humour. An author index is included. Most government documents are excluded as they are accessible through Library and Archives Canada. This bibliography is an ongoing piece of work, and welcomes any additions relating to the study and preservation of Canadian petroleum industry history.

  12. Webpages on copyright in Canadian academic libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony G Horava

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Academic libraries value the web as being a vital channel for communicating information and policies to their user community. Designing a webpage on copyright is a challenging task that requires a consideration of the medium and the message. This article proposes a conceptual model and proactive approach for integrating policy objective and goals into the development of a copyright webpage, based on key elements of the library’s involvement in academia. To complement this theoretical approach, an analysis of Canadian academic library websites was conducted in order to gage the effectiveness of copyright webpages, in the Canadian legal context, according to the model as well as related design issues of visibility and access.

  13. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    The typical one-day conference attended by managers or professionals in search of inspiration is packed with PowerPoint presentations and offers little opportunity for involvement or knowledge sharing. Behind the conventional conference format lurks the transfer model of learning, which finds...... little support amongst serious students of learning. The professional conference as a forum for knowledge sharing is in dire need of a new learning theory and a more enlightened practice. The notion of human flourishing is offered as basis for theory, and four simple design principles for the so......-called “learning conference” are proposed: People go to conferences to 1. get concise input, 2. interpret it in the light of their ongoing concerns, 3. talk about their current projects and 4. meet the other attendees and be inspired by them. Six practical techniques that induce attendees to do these things...

  14. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  15. Ranking Operations Management Conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, Harm-Jan; Bruijn, de Erik Joost; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U.

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences

  16. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    are described: Individual reflection, the buzz dyad, ?You have won two consultants, free of charge?, facilitated group work, the knowledge exchange, and lunch with gaffer tape. Originality/value: This paper introduces modern learning theory and techniques into an educational context which has resisted......Purpose: To call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates. To introduce an alternative, the ?learning conference,? that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes. Design....../methodology/approach: A typical full-day conference is analyzed. It has six hours of podium talk and twenty-five minutes for delegates to become involved. What model of learning can possibly lie behind this? The transfer model, which assumes learners to be empty vessels. An alternative view is that conference delegates...

  17. Tackling conference carbon footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozier, Jim

    2016-12-01

    In reply to Margaret Harris's Lateral Thoughts article "Putting my foot down", which discussed the challenges of attending a conference with a physical disability (October p76) and a subsequent letter by Anna Wood (November p18).

  18. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  19. Consensus on Moving Neighborhood Model of Peterson Graph

    CERN Document Server

    Arendt, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the consensus problem of multiple agents on a kind of famous graph, Peterson graph. It is an undirected graph with 10 vertices and 15 edges. Each agent randomly walks on this graph and communicates with each other if and only if they coincide on a node at the same time. We conduct numerical study on the consensus problem in this framework and show that global consensus can be achieved.

  20. Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies. Progress report, October 1, 1992--March 31, 1994, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year five, we devoted much of our activities to completing fundamental research projects delayed because of the considerably stepped-up effort in consensus processes efforts during development of DOE`s Five Year Waste Plan (FYWP). Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders` Forum (both of which provide input to the Five Year Waste Plan), we compiled a literature overview of small-group consensus gaining and a handbook for consensus decision making. We also tested the effectiveness Of group decision support software, and designed a structured observation process and its related hard- and software. We completed studies on experts and the role of personality characteristics in consensus group influence. Results of these studies are included in this final report. In consensus processes research, we were unable to continue studying consensus groups in action. However, we did study ways to improve ways to improve DOE`s technological information exchange effectiveness. We also studied how a new administration identifies what its strategic mission is and how it gets support from existing EM managers. We identified selection criteria for locating the EM exhibit, and tested our audience selection model. We also further calibrated our consensus measure. Additional conference papers and papers for journal submission were completed during year five.

  1. Morbidity Experiences and Disability Among Canadian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMeules, Marie; Turner, Linda; Cho, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Health Issue Women are more frequently affected by chronic conditions and disability than men. Although some of these sex differences have been in part attributed to biological susceptibility, social determinants of health and other factors, these gaps have not been fully explained in the current literature. This chapter presents comparisons of hospitalization rates, and the prevalence of chronic conditions and physical disability between Canadian women and men and between various subgroups of women, adjusting for selected risk factors. The Canadian Hospital Morbidity Database (2000–2001) and Canadian Community Health Survey (2000–2001) were used to examine inpatient hospital morbidity, prevalence of chronic conditions and disability. Key Findings Hospitalization rates were 20% higher among women than men. This was due to the large number of hospitalizations for pregnancies and childbirth. When "normal" deliveries were excluded, hospitalization rates remained higher among women. Women had slightly lower rates of hospitalizations for ambulatory-care sensitive conditions than men. Prevalence of activity limitation (mild and severe) was higher among women than men, and differences remained after adjusting for age, chronic conditions, socio-economic status, and smoking. Women who reported a disability were less likely than men to be in a partnered relationship, have less tangible social support, and have lower income and employment rates. Data Gaps and Recommendations The impact of morbidity and disability on Canadian women is substantial. These results identify areas for interventions among more vulnerable subgroups, and point to the need for further research in the area of risk factors for the prevention of morbidity and disability in the population. PMID:15345073

  2. Canadian mercury inventories: the missing pieces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagreen, L.A.; Lourie, B.A. [Summerhill Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Research was conducted to determine the significance of the deliberate use of mercury in products in Canada and the associated releases from these sources. Through a combination of literature review and new calculations, the reservoir, flux, and releases of mercury from eight product sources were calculated, and these results compared to historical Canadian inventories. Mercury contributions from the waste sector were also assessed and compared to total Canadian mercury releases and to mercury releases from coal-fired generating stations. Results suggest the use and release of mercury associated with its use in products is 4.5 times what previous inventories indicate. Including dental amalgam and sewage sludge, the total releases of mercury to all environmental compartments in Canada totals 20 tonnes per year. This accounts for less than one-half of the 44 tonnes per year of mercury released from mercury waste disposal each year in Canada. Waste mercury contributions from hazardous waste imports, unknown product sources, and incomplete information on the use of mercury in known products may account for this discrepancy. Waste-related mercury releases and transfers for disposal and recycling are 11 times greater than that of electricity generation in Canada. Results indicate that Canadian inventories have underestimated the significance of mercury use and release associated with products, calling into question the current priorities for mercury management. This paper was developed as part of a panel session at the International Joint Commission 'Mercury in the Ecosystem' workshop, February 26-27, 2003, Windsor, ON, Canada, as a complement to the information on Canadian Inventories presented by Luke Trip (Senes Consulting, Ottawa, ON, Canada).

  3. Canadian Multiculturalism, Same as it ever Was?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hoyos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available After the Second World War ended, Canada was no longer mainly composed of its two dominant ethnocultural groups, French and English, but rather constituted by polyethnicity; meaning, Canadian culture was made up of many different ethnic groups. Since then, Canada has actively embraced multiculturalism and on 12 July 1988, the House of Commons passed Bill C-93, ‘An Act for the preservation and enhancement of multiculturalism in Canada’. The Canadian multicultural experience has been much portrayed as a celebration of ethnicity where different cultural groups share their customs and learn from each other. However, it is recently being rumoured that the multiculturalism hype is not all it is cut out to be and segregates communities rather than integrate. According to Canadian authors Keith Banting and Will Kymlicka, “in much of the world and particularly in Europe, there is a widespread perception that multiculturalism has failed” (44. In this paper, I examine some recent common issues of concern, especially, racism and discrimination, through the literary expression of Canadian playwrights and writers such as George F. Walker, Cecil Foster, and Mordecai Richler. These writers are not meant to represent any ethnic group as a whole, but rather try to project a general feeling about the nation in individual ways. I will finally explore the idea of how perhaps multiculturalism in Canada is evolving into another state since migratory patterns and the social circumstances that Canada is facing in the 21st century have changed. Today, the idea of celebrating different ethnicities and customs is no longer as important as celebrating the transcultural or “transnational” aspects of relations between individuals and groups of immigrants.

  4. The Canadian Assessment of Physical literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Claire E; Longmuir, Patricia E; Boyer, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Assessment of Physical Literacy (CAPL) was conceptualized as a tool to monitor children's physical literacy. The original model (fitness, activity behavior, knowledge, motor skill) required revision and relative weights for calculating/interpreting scores were required....... Methods: Nineteen childhood physical activity/fitness experts completed a 3-round Delphi process. Round 1 was open-ended questions. Subsequent rounds rated statements using a 5-point Likert scale. Recommendations were sought regarding protocol inclusion, relative importance within composite scores...

  5. Canadian Light Infantry in Adaptive Dispersed Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    Sources Bercuson, David . Significant Incident: Canada’s Army, the Airborne and the murder in Somalia. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1996. Bernier...36 David Bercuson, Significant Incident: Canada’s Army, the Airborne and the Murder in Somalia...Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1996), 54-58. 37 Bernd Horn and M. Wyczynski, Hook-up! The Canadian Airborne Compendium (St.Catharines: Vanwell

  6. 2nd SUMO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the conference proceedings of the Simulation of Urban Mobility (SUMO) conference 2014, Berlin. The included research papers cover a wide range of topics in traffic planning and simulation, including open data, vehicular communication, e-mobility, urban mobility, multimodal traffic as well as usage approaches. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.  

  7. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  8. Mainstreaming Multiculturalism in Canada: Challenges and Opportunities = Inscrire le multiculturalisme dans le courant canadien: Les defis et les promesses. Report of the Nottawasaga Thinkers' Conference (October 1983).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreath, Peter L.

    This is the report of a 1983 conference convened by an ad hoc group of Canadian educators who wished to reexamine the Federal Policy on Multiculturalism (promulgated in 1971) in light of present and future educational needs. The report is in both French and English. Chapter I describes multiculturalism as a part of mainstream Canada, rather than…

  9. Consensus and Stability Analysis of Networked Multiagent Predictive Control Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Ping

    2016-03-17

    This paper is concerned with the consensus and stability problem of multiagent control systems via networks with communication delays and data loss. A networked multiagent predictive control scheme is proposed to achieve output consensus and also compensate for the communication delays and data loss actively. The necessary and sufficient conditions of achieving both consensus and stability of the closed-loop networked multiagent control systems are derived. An important result that is obtained is that the consensus and stability of closed-loop networked multiagent predictive control systems are not related to the communication delays and data loss. An example illustrates the performance of the networked multiagent predictive control scheme.

  10. Finite-time consensus of heterogeneous multi-agent systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Ya-Kun; Guan Xin-Ping; Luo Xiao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the finite-time consensus problem for heterogeneous multi-agent systems composed of first-order and second-order agents.A novel continuous nonlinear distributed consensus protocol is constructed,and finite-time consensus criteria are obtained for the heterogeneous multi-agent systems.Compared with the existing results,the stationary and kinetic consensuses of the heterogeneous multi-agent systems can be achieved in a finite time respectively.Moreover,the leader can be a first-order or a second-order integrator agent.Finally,some simulation examples are employed to verify the efficiency of the theoretical results.

  11. Industry Response to the Challenge of Sustainability: The Case of the Canadian Nonferrous Mining Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez

    1998-07-01

    / The paper investigates how the Canadian nonferrous sector is tackling the challenge of sustainable development. Although there is no consensus as to what sustainable development means in practice for management in the sector, at least three dimensions must be taken into account: (1) metals are recyclable, the availability of this resource is not a concern for the foreseeable future; (2) the need to minimize environmental impacts of metals exploration, extraction, transformation, consumption, and recycling; and (3) production activities should not be socially or culturally disruptive. The nonferrous mining industry faces several environmental problems. Some of the most significant are acid mine drainage, sulfur emissions, recycling, and metals toxicity. The industry has developed a number of responses to address these specific concerns as well as other more general challenges. Six strategies are described and analyzed: (1) research and development, (2) an effort of consensus building among stakeholders known as the Whitehorse Mining Initiative, (3) international networking, (4) active involvement in the development of environmental management standards, (5) management reorganization and (6) voluntary agreements. The importance of external factors in the shaping of corporate environmental management practices is discussed, in particular the role of government. Progress has been achieved in three areas: (1) managerial practices and organization, (2) reducing the impacts of ongoing operations and (3) minimizing future liabilities, but two significant fields of conflict remain, namely mining in wilderness areas and projects on aboriginal lands.KEY WORDS: Canada; Environmental management; Minerals industry; Nonferrous metals; Sustainable development; Whitehorse Mining Initiative

  12. Science Traverses in the Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Marie-Claude

    2012-01-01

    The presentation is divided into three parts. Part I is an overview of early expeditions to the High Arctic, and their political consequences at the time. The focus then shifts to the Geological Survey of Canada s mapping program in the North (Operation Franklin), and to the Polar Continental Shelf Project (PCSP), a unique organization that resides within the Government of Canada s Department of Natural Resources, and supports mapping projects and science investigations. PCSP is highlighted throughout the presentation so a description of mandate, budgets, and support infrastructure is warranted. In Part II, the presenter describes the planning required in advance of scientific deployments carried out in the Canadian High Arctic from the perspective of government and university investigators. Field operations and challenges encountered while leading arctic field teams in fly camps are also described in this part of the presentation, with particular emphasis on the 2008 field season. Part III is a summary of preliminary results obtained from a Polar Survey questionnaire sent out to members of the Arctic research community in anticipation of the workshop. The last part of the talk is an update on the analog program at the Canadian Space Agency, specifically, the Canadian Analog Research Network (CARN) and current activities related to Analog missions, 2009-2010.

  13. Canadian oil and gas survey 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberge, R.B. [ed.

    1998-11-01

    The year 1997 brought record levels of financing for the Canadian oil and gas industry which led to record levels of capital spending and unprecedented merger and acquisition activity. Production records were achieved, but soft commodity prices in the fourth quarter resulted in a significant downturn in the equity markets. El Nino reduced demand for natural gas and heating oil, resulting in increased storage levels for both commodities. Record drilling and capital spending fueled the Canadian oilfield service industry as total market capitalization rose to $10 billion. As for the 1998 outlook, the industry has turned to natural gas as the favoured commodity, as indicated by the conclusion of the Alliance pipeline hearings and the Nova/TCPL merger. This survey presents a review of crude oil and natural gas production, prices, and capital spending for development and exploratory wells, and the financial and operating results for fiscal year 1997 of selected oil and gas companies and income trusts. All listed companies are Canadian public companies, or publicly traded income trusts, traded on one of the country`s four major stock exchanges. They are ranked according to gross oil and gas production revenue only (before royalties). Syncrude and oil sands production is also included. The remaining data in the financial statistics tables includes all business segments of each company included. The survey excluded companies that were wholly-owned subsidiaries, divisions or U.S. subsidiaries and private companies. tabs., figs.

  14. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  15. Conference Report: The BPS Annual Conference 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Roncaglia

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will review four papers presented at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference held this year in London held over a 3 day period. The Conference included a variety of scientific presentations and discussions through symposia, roundtable discussions, single papers and poster sessions. Although numerous papers took an experimental approach, few applied any type of qualitative methodology. The topics covered within the different psychological disciplines spanned from early childhood through old age; I have chosen four papers that covered a life course perspective and took into consideration clinical issues as well. The first paper discusses a grounded theory approach used to analyse a play therapy session between therapist and child. The second review reports some recent findings in the way the brains of people on the autistic spectrum disorder might function. The third paper discusses positive psychology and how such an emerging movement has influenced new research in the field. The last paper reviewed will discuss the issue of the ageing process, and I will present some arguments related to the useful application of qualitative methodologies within this area of research. In conclusion, I will highlight some personal reflections on the Conference and the need for a greater balance between qualitative and quantitative methodologies to be used in collaboration rather than as antagonists. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402176

  16. Evidence- and consensus-based practice guidelines for the therapy of primary myelodysplastic syndromes. A statement from the Italian Society of Hematology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Amadori, Sergio; Barosi, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    for the therapeutic strategy under scrutiny, according to the RAND technique. Finally, from September 2001 to January 2002, four Consensus Conferences conducted according to the Nominal Group Technique were held in Milan, Italy. The overall goal of the conferences was to take a final decision upon the appropriateness...... the optimal use and possible side effects of these treatments. The Italian Society of Hematology commissioned a project to develop guidelines for the therapy of MDS using evidence-based knowledge and consensus-formation techniques. DESIGN AND METHODS: An Advisory Council (AC) shaped the project around......, immunosuppressive therapy, hypomethylating agents and hematopoietic growth factors. Specific recommendations for supportive therapy, including iron chelation, were issued. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation was unanimously considered as the only curative treatment for MDS patients, and recommendations on its use...

  17. Installation of the Canadian Muon Cargo Inspection System at CRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Installation of the Canadian Muon Cargo Inspection System at CRL Prepared by: Guy Jonkmans Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Chalk River ON...INSTALLATION OF THE CANADIAN MUON CARGO INSPECTION SYSTEM AT CRL 153-30100-REPT-001 Revision 0 2013/02/19 UNRESTRICTED 2013/02/19 ILLIMITÉ 153...30100-REPT-001 2013/02/19 Report, General Installation of the Canadian Muon Cargo Inspection System at CRL Research and Development 153-30100

  18. Should investors prefer Canadian hedge funds or stocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Xiao Yan; Zhou, Weihui

    2007-01-01

    This paper updates Brulhart and Klein (2006) by comparing the magnitude of extreme returns from Tremont, HFRI hedge fund indices with stock indices. It also compares the magnitude of extreme returns from Canadian hedge fund indices with stock indices. We found that the results from Brulhart and Klein hold for the updated US data. However, the results do not hold for the Canadian hedge fund indices. The magnitude of extreme returns from Canadian hedge fund indices is lower than the magnitude o...

  19. Consensus document on European brain research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Luca, Monica; Baker, Mary; Corradetti, Renato;

    2011-01-01

    the economic and social challenge posed by management of brain diseases in European countries. To setup a platform for discussion, EBC published in 2006 a Consensus Document on European Brain Research, describing needs and achievements of research in Europe and presenting proposals for future research programs....... Since 2006, European research in neuroscience has advanced tremendously. The present document represents an update elaborated to reflect changes in research priorities and advances in brain research that have taken place since 2006. The same approach and format have been used here as in the previous......Psychiatric and neurological diseases combined represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. A recent study conducted by the European Brain Council (EBC) quantified the 'cost and burden' of major brain diseases in Europe, amounting to €386bn per year. Considering that these costs...

  20. Distributed consensus and fault tolerance - Lecture 1

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    In a world where clusters with thousands of nodes are becoming commonplace, we are often faced with the task of having them coordinate and share state. As the number of machines goes up, so does the probability that something goes wrong: a node could temporarily lose connectivity, crash because of some race condition, or have its hard drive fail. What are the challenges when designing fault-tolerant distributed systems, where a cluster is able to survive the loss of individual nodes? In this lecture, we will discuss some basics on this topic (consistency models, CAP theorem, failure modes, byzantine faults), detail the raft consensus algorithm, and showcase an interesting example of a highly resilient distributed system, bitcoin.

  1. Distributed consensus and fault tolerance - Lecture 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    In a world where clusters with thousands of nodes are becoming commonplace, we are often faced with the task of having them coordinate and share state. As the number of machines goes up, so does the probability that something goes wrong: a node could temporarily lose connectivity, crash because of some race condition, or have its hard drive fail. What are the challenges when designing fault-tolerant distributed systems, where a cluster is able to survive the loss of individual nodes? In this lecture, we will discuss some basics on this topic (consistency models, CAP theorem, failure modes, byzantine faults), detail the raft consensus algorithm, and showcase an interesting example of a highly resilient distributed system, bitcoin.

  2. Consensus control of flexible-joint robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Becerril, Sofía; Espinosa-Pérez, Gerardo; Panteley, Elena; Ortega, Romeo

    2015-06-01

    Synchronisation of networks composed by fully actuated robot manipulators has received a lot of attention from the control theory community. Unfortunately, the case of under-actuated robots has not been deeply studied. The aim of this paper is to extend previous results reported by the authors addressing the particular (but of practical interest) case of networks composed by flexible-joint robots. The main feature of the contribution is to consider a change of coordinates, first introduced in Nuno, Ortega, Basanes and Hill, to solve the consensus problem assuming the existence of unknown delays in the communication channels. The extension is twofold, namely: the presentation of a control scheme that, in contrast to the one considered in Avila-Becerril and Espinosa-Perez, does not require knowledge of the initial conditions and the proof that the controller can also be implemented in Cartesian coordinates. The usefulness of the contribution is illustrated through numerical simulations.

  3. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; MacDonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-05-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks.

  4. Cross-language acoustic similarity predicts perceptual assimilation of Canadian English and Canadian French vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Paola; Vasiliev, Polina

    2011-11-01

    Monolingual Peruvian Spanish listeners identified natural tokens of the Canadian French (CF) and Canadian English (CE) /ɛ/ and /æ/, produced in five consonantal contexts. The results demonstrate that while the CF vowels were mapped to two different native vowels, /e/ and /a/, in all consonantal contexts, the CE contrast was mapped to the single native vowel /a/ in four out of five contexts. Linear discriminant analysis revealed that acoustic similarity between native and target language vowels was a very good predictor of context-specific perceptual mappings. Predictions are made for Spanish learners of the /ɛ/-/æ/ contrast in CF and CE.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Driving: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Sleep Society Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najib Ayas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA experience sleep fragmentation and poor sleep quality that results in daytime sleepiness, which impairs performance during driving and leads to an increased risk for collisions. Not surprisingly, observational studies have shown that patients with OSA experience a two- to 10-fold higher risk for collision compared with healthy controls. Although treatment would clearly mitigate these risks, there is no current Canadian position on driving and OSA. This article, the first Canadian position statement addressing the issue, provides an overview of provincial regulations and proposes recommendations with regard to driving in patients with OSA.

  6. Developing Canadian oncology education goals and objectives for medical students: a national modified Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vincent C.; Ingledew, Paris-Ann; Berry, Scott; Verma, Sunil; Giuliani, Meredith E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that there is a deficiency in focused oncology teaching during medical school in Canada. This study aimed to develop oncology education goals and objectives for medical students through consensus of oncology educators from across Canada. Methods: In 2014 we created a comprehensive list of oncology education objectives using existing resources. Experts in oncology education and undergraduate medical education from all 17 Canadian medical schools were invited to participate in a 3-round modified Delphi process. In round 1, the participants scored the objectives on a 9-point Likert scale according to the degree to which they agreed an objective should be taught to medical students. Objectives with a mean score of 7.0 or greater were retained, those with a mean score of 1.0-3.9 were excluded, and those with a mean score of 4.0-6.9 were discussed at a round 2 Web meeting. In round 3, the participants voted on inclusion and exclusion of the round 2 objectives. Results: Thirty-four (92%) of the 37 invited oncology educators, representing 14 medical schools, participated in the study. They included oncologists, family physicians, members of undergraduate medical education curriculum committees and a psychologist. Of the 214 objectives reviewed in round 1, 146 received a mean score of 7.0 or greater, and 68 were scored 4.0-6.9; no objective received a mean score below 4.0. Nine new objectives were suggested. The main themes of participants' comments were to minimize the number of objectives and to aim objectives at the knowledge level required for family physicians. In round 2, the participants were able to combine 28 of the objectives with other existing objectives. In round 3, 7 of the 49 objectives received consensus of at least 75% for inclusion. The final Canadian Oncology Goals and Objectives for Medical Students contained 10 goals and 153 objectives. Interpretation: Through a systematic process, we created a comprehensive, consensus

  7. Methodological Quality of Consensus Guidelines in Implant Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Apaza, Karol; Ariza-Fritas, Tania; Málaga, Lilian; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Alarcón, Marco Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Consensus guidelines are useful to improve clinical decision making. Therefore, the methodological evaluation of these guidelines is of paramount importance. Low quality information may guide to inadequate or harmful clinical decisions. Objective To evaluate the methodological quality of consensus guidelines published in implant dentistry using a validated methodological instrument. Methods The six implant dentistry journals with impact factors were scrutinised for consensus guidelines related to implant dentistry. Two assessors independently selected consensus guidelines, and four assessors independently evaluated their methodological quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. Disagreements in the selection and evaluation of guidelines were resolved by consensus. First, the consensus guidelines were analysed alone. Then, systematic reviews conducted to support the guidelines were included in the analysis. Non-parametric statistics for dependent variables (Wilcoxon signed rank test) was used to compare both groups. Results Of 258 initially retrieved articles, 27 consensus guidelines were selected. Median scores in four domains (applicability, rigour of development, stakeholder involvement, and editorial independence), expressed as percentages of maximum possible domain scores, were below 50% (median, 26%, 30.70%, 41.70%, and 41.70%, respectively). The consensus guidelines and consensus guidelines + systematic reviews data sets could be compared for 19 guidelines, and the results showed significant improvements in all domain scores (p < 0.05). Conclusions Methodological improvement of consensus guidelines published in major implant dentistry journals is needed. The findings of the present study may help researchers to better develop consensus guidelines in implant dentistry, which will improve the quality and trust of information needed to make proper clinical decisions. PMID:28107405

  8. Mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: Consensus statement by ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update 2014/2015, supported by ESO, ESMINT, ESNR and EAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Nils; Moreira, Tiago; Michel, Patrik; Steiner, Thorsten; Jansen, Olav; Cognard, Christophe; Mattle, Heinrich P; van Zwam, Wim; Holmin, Staffan; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Petersson, Jesper; Caso, Valeria; Hacke, Werner; Mazighi, Mikael; Arnold, Marcel; Fischer, Urs; Szikora, Istvan; Pierot, Laurent; Fiehler, Jens; Gralla, Jan; Fazekas, Franz; Lees, Kennedy R

    2016-01-01

    The original version of this consensus statement on mechanical thrombectomy was approved at the European Stroke Organisation (ESO)-Karolinska Stroke Update conference in Stockholm, 16-18 November 2014. The statement has later, during 2015, been updated with new clinical trials data in accordance with a decision made at the conference. Revisions have been made at a face-to-face meeting during the ESO Winter School in Berne in February, through email exchanges and the final version has then been approved by each society. The recommendations are identical to the original version with evidence level upgraded by 20 February 2015 and confirmed by 15 May 2015. The purpose of the ESO-Karolinska Stroke Update meetings is to provide updates on recent stroke therapy research and to discuss how the results may be implemented into clinical routine. Selected topics are discussed at consensus sessions, for which a consensus statement is prepared and discussed by the participants at the meeting. The statements are advisory to the ESO guidelines committee. This consensus statement includes recommendations on mechanical thrombectomy after acute stroke. The statement is supported by ESO, European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT), European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), and European Academy of Neurology (EAN).

  9. Ensemble distribution models in conservation prioritization: from consensus predictions to consensus reserve networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Laura; Cabeza, Mar; Pironon, Samuel; Barbet-Massin, Morgane; Maiorano, Luigi; Georges, Damien; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Aim Conservation planning exercises increasingly rely on species distributions predicted either from one particular statistical model or, more recently, from an ensemble of models (i.e. ensemble forecasting). However, it has not yet been explored how different ways of summarizing ensemble predictions affect conservation planning outcomes. We evaluate these effects and compare commonplace consensus methods, applied before the conservation prioritization phase, to a novel method that applies consensus after reserve selection. Location Europe. Methods We used an ensemble of predicted distributions of 146 Western Palaearctic bird species in alternative ways: four different consensus methods, as well as distributions discounted with variability, were used to produce inputs for spatial conservation prioritization. In addition, we developed and tested a novel method, in which we built 100 datasets by sampling the ensemble of predicted distributions, ran a conservation prioritization analysis on each of them and averaged the resulting priority ranks. We evaluated the conservation outcome against three controls: (i) a null control, based on random ranking of cells; (2) the reference solution, based on an expert-refined dataset; and (3) the independent solution, based on an independent dataset. Results Networks based on predicted distributions were more representative of rare species than randomly selected networks. Alternative methods to summarize ensemble predictions differed in representativeness of resulting reserve networks. Our novel method resulted in better representation of rare species than pre-selection consensus methods. Main conclusions Retaining information about the variation in the predicted distributions throughout the conservation prioritization seems to provide better results than summarizing the predictions before conservation prioritization. Our results highlight the need to understand and consider model-based uncertainty when using predicted

  10. Consensus in Directed Networks of Agents With Nonlinear Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming; Qu, Z.

    2011-01-01

    This technical note studies the consensus problem for cooperative agents with nonlinear dynamics in a directed network. Both local and global consensus are defined and investigated. Techniques for studying the synchronization in such complex networks are exploited to establish various sufficient con

  11. The Consensus Definition Redefined from a Representational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand Scholten, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the author's critique to Paul E. Newton's article titled "Clarifying the consensus definition of validity." In his article, Newton not only clarifies but also redefines the consensus definition of validity. In this redefinition he omits the term "construct" and introduces the term "measurement." Both omission and introduction…

  12. A consensus on criteria for cure of acromegaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Giustina (Andrea); P. Chanson (Philippe); M.D. Bronstein; A. Klibanski; S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); F.F. Casanueva; P. Trainer; E. Ghigo (Ezio); K.K.Y. Ho; S. Melmed (Shlomo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The Acromegaly Consensus Group met in April 2009 to revisit the guidelines on criteria for cure as defined in 2000. Participants: Participants included 74 neurosurgeons and endocrinologists with extensive experience of treating acromegaly. Evidence/Consensus Process: Relevant

  13. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sugano (Kentaro); J. Tack (Jan); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); D.Y. Graham (David Y.); E. El-Omar; S. Miura (Soichiro); K. Haruma (Ken); M. Asaka (Masahiro); N. Uemura (Naomi); P. Malfertheiner

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate dia

  14. 77 FR 24251 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... availability of three new and three revised consensus standards relating to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004....

  15. 78 FR 35085 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... availability of one new and seven revised consensus standards relating to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM...

  16. Consensus of Multiagent Systems with Sampled Information and Noisy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Jun Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider consensus problems of first-order multiagent systems with sampled information and noisy measurements. A distributed stochastic approximation type algorithm is employed to attenuate the measurement noises. We provide conditions under which almost sure strong consensus is guaranteed for fixed and switching directed network topologies. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the theoretical results.

  17. Consensus networks with time-delays over finite fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuxian; Su, Housheng; Chen, Michael Z. Q.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the consensus problem in networks with time-delays over finite fields. The delays are categorised into three cases: single constant delay, multiple constant delays, and time-varying bounded delays. For all cases, some sufficient and necessary conditions for consensus are derived. Furthermore, assuming that the communication graph is strongly connected, some of the obtained necessary conditions reveal that the conditions for consensus with time-delays over finite fields depend not only on the diagonal entries but also on the off-diagonal entries, something that is intrinsically distinct from the case over real numbers (where having at least one nonzero diagonal entry is a sufficient and necessary condition to guarantee consensus). In addition, it is shown that delayed networks cannot achieve consensus when the interaction graph is a tree if the corresponding delay-free networks cannot reach consensus, which is consistent with the result over real numbers. As for average consensus, we show that it can never be achieved for delayed networks over finite fields, although it indeed can be reached under several conditions for delay-free networks over finite fields. Finally, networks with time-varying delays are discussed and one sufficient condition for consensus is presented by graph-theoretic method.

  18. 2nd Bozeman Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, John

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains a collection of papers delivered by the partici­ pants at the second Conference on Computation and Control held at Mon­ tana State University in Bozeman, Montana from August 1-7, 1990. The conference, as well as this proceedings, attests to the vitality and cohesion between the control theorist and the numerical analyst that was adver­ tised by the first Conference on Computation and Control in 1988. The proceedings of that initial conference was published by Birkhiiuser Boston as the first volume of this same series entitled Computation and Control, Proceedings of the Bozeman Conference, Bozeman, Montana, 1988. Control theory and numerical analysis are both, by their very nature, interdisciplinary subjects as evidenced by their interaction with other fields of mathematics and engineering. While it is clear that new control or es­ timation algorithms and new feedback design methodologies will need to be implemented computationally, it is likewise clear that new problems in computation...

  19. Restricting marketing to children: Consensus on policy interventions to address obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Kim D; Lobstein, Tim; Landon, Jane; Kent, Monique Potvin; Pellerin, Suzie; Caulfield, Timothy; Finegood, Diane; Mongeau, Lyne; Neary, Neil; Spence, John C

    2013-01-01

    Obesity presents major challenges for public health and the evidence is strong. Lessons from tobacco control indicate a need for changing the policy and environments to make healthy choices easier and to create more opportunities for children to achieve healthy weights. In April 2011, the Alberta Policy Coalition for Chronic Disease Prevention convened a consensus conference on environmental determinants of obesity such as marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages to children. We examine the political environment, evidence, issues, and challenges of placing restrictions on marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages within Canada. We recommend a national regulatory system prohibiting commercial marketing of foods and beverages to children and suggest that effective regulations must set minimum standards, monitor compliance, and enact penalties for non-compliance. PMID:23447026

  20. Quantum theory at the crossroads reconsidering the 1927 Solvay conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bacciagaluppi, Guido

    2009-01-01

    We reconsider the crucial 1927 Solvay conference in the context of current research in the foundations of quantum theory. Contrary to folklore, the interpretation question was not settled at this conference and no consensus was reached; instead, a range of sharply conflicting views were presented and extensively discussed. Today, there is no longer an established or dominant interpretation of quantum theory, so it is important to re-evaluate the historical sources and keep the interpretation debate open. In this spirit, we provide a complete English translation of the original proceedings (lectures and discussions), and give background essays on the three main interpretations presented: de Broglie's pilot-wave theory, Born and Heisenberg's quantum mechanics, and Schroedinger's wave mechanics. We provide an extensive analysis of the lectures and discussions that took place, in the light of current debates about the meaning of quantum theory. The proceedings contain much unexpected material, including extensive...

  1. Quantum Theory at the Crossroads: Reconsidering the 1927 Solvay Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bacciagaluppi, G; Bacciagaluppi, Guido; Valentini, Antony

    2006-01-01

    We reconsider the crucial 1927 Solvay conference in the context of current research in the foundations of quantum theory. Contrary to folklore, the interpretation question was not settled at this conference and no consensus was reached; instead, a range of sharply conflicting views were presented and extensively discussed. Today, there is no longer an established or dominant interpretation of quantum theory, so it is important to re-evaluate the historical sources and keep the interpretation debate open. In this spirit, we provide a complete English translation of the original proceedings (lectures and discussions), and give background essays on the three main interpretations presented: de Broglie's pilot-wave theory, Born and Heisenberg's quantum mechanics, and Schroedinger's wave mechanics. We provide an extensive analysis of the lectures and discussions that took place, in the light of current debates about the meaning of quantum theory. The proceedings contain much unexpected material, including extensive...

  2. Randomized Consensus Processing over Random Graphs: Independence and Convergence

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Guodong

    2011-01-01

    Various consensus algorithms over random networks have been investigated in the literature. In this paper, we focus on the role that randomized individual decision-making plays to consensus seeking under stochastic communications. At each time step, each node will independently choose to follow the consensus algorithm, or to stick to current state by a simple Bernoulli trial with time-dependent success probabilities. This node decision strategy characterizes the random node-failures on a communication networks, or a biased opinion selection in the belief evolution over social networks. Connectivity-independent and arc-independent graphs are defined, respectively, to capture the fundamental nature of random network processes with regard to the convergence of the consensus algorithms. A series of sufficient and/or necessary conditions are given on the success probability sequence for the network to reach a global consensus with probability one under different stochastic connectivity assumptions, by which a comp...

  3. The Canadian Teaching Commons: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Canadian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuetherick, Brad; Yu, Stan

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reports on a national study exploring the current state of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and assessing the perceptions of Canadian SoTL scholars at the micro (individual), meso (departmental), macro (institutional), and mega (disciplinary) contexts.

  4. Factors Impacting the Conversion of Abstracts Presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress Meetings to Full Publications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuzeid, W.; Fosbøl, E.; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the rate of conversion of scientific abstracts presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Conference (CCC), between 2006 and 2008, into peer reviewed manuscript publications within two years of their initial presentation. Moreover, we sought to identify factors...... associated with transition of abstracts to full publications.BackgroundThe rate of conversion of abstracts presented at scientific meetings into peer reviewed published manuscripts, has been a topic of interest for various medical specialties. Rapid translation of abstracts into manuscripts allows...... abstracts presented in the CCC between 2006 and 2010, including data on the type of presentation (oral vs poster), category (basic science vs clinical cardiology) and the number of authors. Publication rates, mean time to publication, the mean number of citations and mean journal impact factor were...

  5. The Canadian Niagara Power Company story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, N.R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2005-07-01

    This book chronicles the history and contributions of the Canadian Niagara Power Company and its employees toward the establishment of electricity generation and distribution in Niagara Falls and Fort Erie, Ontario, dating back to its founding in 1892. Through historical photographs, maps and drawings, the book demonstrates the impact of electricity on the Niagara region. It emphasizes the many skills and jobs required to run the company that generated electricity and maintained a complete system to deliver power, metering, and billing services through the depression, wars, and postwar booms, even during lightning, snow and ice storms. The company began producing power in 1905 with what had been the world's largest-capacity turbines and generators that supplied power to both sides of the Niagara River. Initially, most of the electricity was exported to New York State. The company eventually expanded its Canadian customer service area from Niagara Falls, Ontario, to Fort Erie, Bridgeburg, Amigari, Ridgeway, Stevensville, Crystal Beach and Point Abino. Throughout its history, the Canadian Niagara Power Company provided power at a lower cost than its neighbouring competitors. The William Birch Rankine Generating Station became an important tourist attraction, showcasing the latest electrical appliances of the time in an effort to promote the use of electricity in homes and offices. Today, the station remains a tribute to the fact that natural beauty can coincide with industry. The book also chronicles the difficult business challenges caused by restructuring in the electric power industry in the 1990s, repairing aging equipment and applying the latest in automation and remote sensing technology. Today, the company as FortisOntario is expanding to other communities around Ontario. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Influenza among adults in Latin America, current status, and future directions: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvehí, Pablo E; Istúriz, Raúl E; Labarca, Jaime A; Rüttimann, Ricardo W; Vidal, Edison I; Vilar-Compte, Diana

    2012-06-01

    In Latin America, adult influenza is a serious disease that exacts a heavy burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and cost. Although much has been written about the disease itself, relatively little information has been compiled on what could be done to reduce its impact across the region, particularly from the perspective of clinicians with first-hand experience in confronting its effects. To fill this data gap, in 2011, the Pan American Health and Education Foundation (PAHEF) and the U.S.-based nonprofit Fighting Infectious Diseases in Emerging Countries (FIDEC) organized a conference and convened a panel of Latin American scientist-clinicians with experience and expertise in adult influenza in the region tol) discuss the major issues related to the disease and 2) develop and produce a consensus statement summarizing its impact as well as current efforts to diagnose, prevent, and treat it. The consensus panel concluded a more concerted and better-coordinated effort was needed to reduce the adverse impact of seasonal influenza and future pandemics, including more surveillance, more active involvement by both governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and a much greater effort to vaccinate more adults, especially those at high risk of contracting the disease. In addition, a new approach for diagnosing influenza was recommended.

  7. PHYSICS FOR HEALTH: CONFERENCE

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    ICTR-PHE 2016 - International Conference on Translational Research in Radio-Oncology and Physics for Health -, co organized by CERN, aims at developing new strategies to better diagnose and treat cancer, by uniting biology and physics with clinics. Through the various sessions and symposia, the scientific programme offers the delegates the opportunity to discuss, in a friendly atmosphere, the latest progress in physics breakthroughs for health applications. The third edition of this conference took place at CICG (Centre International de Conférence Genève) from 15 to 19 Feb 2016.

  8. Chinese Oil Giants Eye Canadian Oil Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Bin

    2005-01-01

    @@ SinoCanada, a subsidiary of Sinopec International Petroleum Exploration and Development Corporation, and Canada-based Synenco Energy Inc announced on May 31 that they have inked a series of agreements to launch a joint venture for common development of the oil sand project located in Athabasca region of Northeast Canada's Alberta Province. Based on the agreements, Sinopec will pay 105 million Canadian dollars (US$84 million) for a stake in Canada's Northern Lights oil sands project while Synenco owns the remaining 60 percent share,and will operate the project as the managing partner.

  9. 2007: A Canadian Corporate Ownership Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsan, Calin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study documents a decline in the levels of corporate ownership concentration between 1996 and 2007. When compared to previous studies, the incidence of ownership stakes of 20% or larger has decreased form 60% to 41% of the total population of publicly listed Canadian firms. Regional disparities among provinces remain important. Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia have the most widely-held firms, while Quebec and Atlantic Canada show the most concentrated corporate ownership patterns. The interpretation of these results requires a complex understanding of historical, demographic, cultural, political and institutional factors.

  10. Reinventing an industry at Western Canadian Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.

    2006-09-15

    Western Canadian Coal is applying lessons learned from past disruptions to coal production operations in British Columbia in order to build a low cost, long term production operation. Northeast British Columbia has huge coal deposits and an established infrastructure that includes the town of Tumbler Ridge, rail facilities, and access to Port Rupert. The company is developing 50,000 hectares of coal-bearing property. Production commenced in 2004, and it is planned to produce four million tonnes of coal per year by the end of 2007, increasing to 10 million tonnes by 2012. Equipment, staffing, and activities at the Dillon, Wolverine, and Brule mines are described. 2 photos.

  11. Refugees and education in Canadian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprielian-Churchill, Isabel

    1996-07-01

    This article summarizes some of the findings and recommendations of a research project focusing on the nature and needs of refugee students in Canadian schools. The school performance of refugee students is examined under the following headings: immigration regulations; initial identification, assessment, placement and monitoring; unaccompanied youngsters; "at risk" students; academic needs; the conflict of cultures. In particular, the article discusses the changing role of the school in the light of recent immigration trends. Many of the findings are applicable to other national settings.

  12. 47 CFR 101.1527 - Canadian and Mexican coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian and Mexican coordination. 101.1527 Section 101.1527 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Canadian and Mexican coordination. (a) A licensee of bands 71.0-76.0, 81.0-86.0, 92-94 GHz and 94.1-95...

  13. International Disputes and Cultural Ideas in the Canadian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Danita Catherine

    of the Canadian-Arctic relationship. Using Canada as the focus for the analysis, the purpose of this project is to contribute to the existing Arctic studies and international relations literature by examining how interests and disputes in the Canadian Arctic region have been affected by domestic cultural...

  14. The Canadian Context: Monolingual Education in an "Officially" Multilingual Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    This article will examine the sociopolitical language contexts that exist in institutions of Canadian post-secondary education, through investigating how government policies affect the consumption and teaching of language in writing classrooms. A survey of Canadian multiculturalist policy, multilingualism, and post-secondary education in terms of…

  15. Attitudes Toward Oral Contraception Among Canadian University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardis, Panos D.

    The author conducted a cross-cultural survey of attitudes toward the pill among university students, part of this international sample being a group of young Canadians. The subjects were students from a southwestern Canadian university and were stratified as to sex and amount of education. The author employed his Pill Scale, a 25-item Likert type…

  16. Characters with Exceptionalities Portrayed in Contemporary Canadian Children's Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerson, Jean; Brenna, Beverley

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which exceptionality is addressed in Canadian children's literature, offering critical literacy as an avenue toward social justice. A content analysis (Berg, 2009) of 134 Canadian children's books offers a wide scope of contemporary titles to include in classrooms. We developed conceptual categories to explore…

  17. Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology and Child Health:A Canadian Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stuart Macleod

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction Canadian academic centres and children's hospitals have had a longstanding interest in the improvement of drug therapy for children through research conducted across the four pillars of activity identified as being of critical importance by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research(viz,basic research,clinical research,population health research,applied health and policy research)[1].

  18. Indigenous knowledge in Canadian science curricula: cases from Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-09-01

    To enhance Aboriginal students' educational opportunities in sciences, culturally relevant science curriculum has been examined and practiced in Western Canadian science classrooms. This article shares some examples of inclusion of indigenous knowledge in science curricula and discusses the improvement and challenges of culturally relevant science curricula in Canadian contexts.

  19. Seeking Internationalization: The State of Canadian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the internationalization of Canadian universities, with a focus on the rise of foreign postsecondary students in Canada, the economic impacts, and the various benefits, challenges, and adjustments that have been influenced by the continuing demographic shifts on Canadian campuses since 2000. Rooted in recent global and…

  20. How Canadian Universities Use Social Media to Brand Themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Charles H.; Bali, Suchita; Longden, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores social media marketing strategies applied by Canadian universities as a tool for institutional branding, recruitment and engagement of home and international students. The target sample involves the total population of Canadian university-status institutions ("N" = 106). Qualitative data were collected from two major…