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Sample records for canadian consensus conference

  1. Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference Update: Infections in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RH Hunt

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference took place in April 1997. The initial recommendations of the conference were published in early 1998. An update meeting was held in June 1998, and the present paper updates and complements the earlier recommendations. Key changes included the following: the recommendation for testing and treating H pylori infection in patients with known peptic ulcer disease was extended to testing and treating patients with ulcer-like dyspepsia; it was decided that the urea breath test (not serology should be used for routine diagnosis of H pylori infection unless endoscopy is indicated for another reason; and recommended therapies were a twice daily, seven-day regimen of a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, pantoprazole 40 mg or ranitidine bismuth citrate 400 mg, plus clarithromycin 500 mg and amoxicillin 1000 mg, or plus clarithromycin 500 or 250 mg and metronidazole 500 mg. The need was reiterated to have funding for readily accessible, accurate testing for H pylori infection with the urea breath test. It was strongly recommended that regional centres be established to monitor the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant H pylori infections. The initial consensus document referred to pediatric issues that were not addressed in this update but were the subject of a subsequent Canadian Helicobacter Study Group meeting, and will be published later in 1999.

  2. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Ariane; Beauchesne, Luc; Mital, Seema; Therrien, Judith; Silversides, Candice K

    2010-03-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society consensus conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present introductory section is a summary of the epidemiology and scope of adult CHD in Canada, the structure of the Canadian health care system and adult congenital cardiac health services in Canada. The recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis and genetic evaluation in this population are included. The complete document consists of four manuscripts, which are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, outcomes, diagnostic workups, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up recommendations. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org.

  3. Consensus conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annika Porsborg; Lassen, Jesper

    , the differing perceptions are each in their own way rooted in an argument for democratic legitimacy. We therefore argue that national interpretations of consensus conferences, and of their ability to functions as a tool for public participation, depend to a great extent on the dominant ideals of democratic...

  4. The Management of Chronic Viral Hepatitis: A Canadian Consensus Conference 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Sherman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several government and nongovernment organizations held a consensus conference on the management of acute and chronic viral hepatitis to update previous management recommendations. The conference became necessary because of the introduction of new forms of therapy for both hepatitis B and hepatitis C. The conference issued recommendations on the investigation and management of chronic hepatitis B, including the use of lamivudine, adefovir and interferon. The treatment of hepatitis B in several special situations was also discussed. There were also recommendations on the investigation and treatment of chronic hepatitis C and hepatitis C-HIV coinfection. In addition, the document makes some recommendations about the provision of services by provincial governments to facilitate the delivery of care to patients with hepatitis virus infection. The present document is meant to be used by practitioners and other health care providers, including public health staff and others not directly involved in patient care.

  5. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Candice K; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Muhll, Isabelle Vonder; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and their cardiac disease can be associated with pulmonary hypertension, thromboemboli, complex arrhythmias and sudden death. Medical aspects that need to be considered relate to the long-term and multisystemic effects of single-ventricle physiology, cyanosis, systemic right ventricles, complex intracardiac baffles and failing subpulmonary right ventricles. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference report on the management of adults with CHD, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the late outcomes, genetics, medical therapy and interventional approaches in the field of adult CHD. Therefore, new clinical guidelines have been written by Canadian adult CHD physicians in collaboration with an international panel of experts in the field. The present executive summary is a brief overview of the new guidelines and includes the recommendations for interventions. The complete document consists of four manuscripts that are published online in the present issue of The Canadian Journal of Cardiology, including sections on genetics, clinical outcomes, recommended diagnostic workup, surgical and interventional options, treatment of arrhythmias, assessment of pregnancy and contraception risks, and follow-up requirements. The complete document and references can also be found at www.ccs.ca or www.cachnet.org. PMID:20352134

  6. Report of the Canadian Hypertension Society Consensus Conference: 3. Pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, E; LeLorier, J; Burgess, E; Lange, I R; Leduc, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide Canadian physicians with evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. OPTIONS: No medication, or treatment with antihypertensive or anticonvulsant drugs. OUTCOMES: Prevention of maternal complications, and prevention of perinatal complications and death. EVIDENCE: Pertinent articles published from 1962 to September 1996 retrieved from the Pregnancy and Childbirth Module of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews an...

  7. Report of the Canadian Hypertension Society Consensus Conference: 3. Pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, E; LeLorier, J; Burgess, E; Lange, I R; Leduc, L

    1997-11-01

    To provide Canadian physicians with evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. No medication, or treatment with antihypertensive or anticonvulsant drugs. Prevention of maternal complications, and prevention of perinatal complications and death. Pertinent articles published from 1962 to September 1996 retrieved from the Pregnancy and Childbirth Module of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and from MEDLINE; additional articles retrieved through a manual search of bibliographies; and expert opinion. Recommendations were graded according to levels of evidence. Maternal and fetal well-being were equally valued, with the belief that treatment side effects should be minimized. Reduction in the rate of adverse perinatal outcomes, including death. Potential side effects of antihypertensive drugs include placental hypoperfusion, intrauterine growth retardation and long-term effects on the infant. A systolic blood pressure greater than 169 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure greater than 109 mm Hg in a pregnant woman should be considered an emergency and pharmacologic treatment with hydralazine, labetalol or nifedipine started. Otherwise, the thresholds at which to start antihypertensive treatment are a systolic pressure of 140 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 90 mm Hg in women with gestational hypertension without proteinuria or pre-existing hypertension before 28 weeks' gestation, those with gestational hypertension and proteinuria or symptoms at any time during the pregnancy, those with pre-existing hypertension and underlying conditions or target-organ damage, and those with pre-existing hypertension and superimposed gestational hypertension. The thresholds in other circumstances are a systolic pressure of 150 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 95 mm Hg. For nonsevere hypertension, methyldopa is the first-line drug; labetalol, pindolol, oxprenolol and nifedipine are second-line drugs. Fetal distress attributed to

  8. Propionic acidemia consensus conference summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Summar, Marshall L

    2012-01-01

    In January 2011, Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. hosted a consensus conference to discuss and develop recommendations for the diagnosis and management of propionic acidemia. Several resulting manuscripts from this conference are included in this issue. Topics covered include recommendations for acute management of metabolic decompensations, recommendations for chronic management and health monitoring, natural history of disease in patients with propionic acidemia, and neurologic complications in propionic acidemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Canadian Helicobacter Study Group Consensus Conference: Update on the Approach to Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Children and Adolescents – an Evidence-Based Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L Jones

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As an update to previously published recommendations for the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, an evidence-based appraisal of 14 topics was undertaken in a consensus conference sponsored by the Canadian Helicobacter Study Group. The goal was to update guidelines based on the best available evidence using an established and uniform methodology to address and formulate recommendations for each topic. The degree of consensus for each recommendation is also presented. The clinical issues addressed and recommendations made were: population-based screening for H pylori in asymptomatic children to prevent gastric cancer is not warranted; testing for H pylori in children should be considered if there is a family history of gastric cancer; the goal of diagnostic interventions should be to determine the cause of presenting gastrointestinal symptoms and not the presence of H pylori infection; recurrent abdominal pain of childhood is not an indication to test for H pylori infection; H pylori testing is not required in patients with newly diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease; H pylori testing may be considered before the use of long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy; testing for H pylori infection should be considered in children with refractory iron deficiency anemia when no other cause has been found; when investigation of pediatric patients with persistent or severe upper abdominal symptoms is indicated, upper endoscopy with biopsy is the investigation of choice; the 13C-urea breath test is currently the best noninvasive diagnostic test for H pylori infection in children; there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend stool antigen tests as acceptable diagnostic tools for H pylori infection; serological antibody tests are not recommended as diagnostic tools for H pylori infection in children; first-line therapy for H pylori infection in children is a twice-daily, triple-drug regimen comprised of a proton pump inhibitor plus two

  10. 2003 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines Executive Summary

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    Becker Allan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the last 15 years; however, there has been little focus on issues relating to asthma in childhood. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies, particularly in children, have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines. The objectives of this article are to review the literature on asthma published between January 2000 and June 2003 and to evaluate the influence of new evidence on the recommendations made in the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report and its 2001 update, with a major focus on pediatric issues. Methods The diagnosis of asthma in young children and prevention strategies, pharmacotherapy, inhalation devices, immunotherapy, and asthma education were selected for review by small expert resource groups. The reviews were discussed in June 2003 at a meeting under the auspices of the Canadian Network For Asthma Care and the Canadian Thoracic Society. Data published through December 2004 were subsequently reviewed by the individual expert resource groups. Results This report evaluates early-life prevention strategies and focuses on treatment of asthma in children, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and preventive therapy, the benefits of additional therapy, and the essential role of asthma education. Conclusion We generally support previous recommendations and focus on new issues, particularly those relevant to children and their families. This document is a guide for asthma management based on the best available published data and the opinion of health care professionals, including asthma experts and educators.

  11. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan

    2016-01-01

    that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord......From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term...... on the effects of physical activity on children’s and youth’s fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process...

  12. testing a consensus conference method by discussing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-10-10

    Oct 10, 2000 ... controversial subjects(1-3). Consensus conference methods were developed by the ... Selection of the topic: The current topic was selected after observing the treatment modalities of traumatic dental injuries ... require improvement. The topic was considered appropriate and of potential importance to dental ...

  13. Consensus statement: the development of a national Canadian Migraine Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, W J; Christie, S N; Mackie, G; Cooper, P

    2010-07-01

    Migraine is a significant cause of suffering and disability in the Canadian population, and imposes a major cost on Canadian Society. Based on current medical science, much more could be done to provide better comprehensive medical care to the millions of individuals with migraine in Canada. To propose and design a national Canadian Migraine Strategy which could be implemented to reduce migraine related disability in Canada. A multidisciplinary task force of the Canadian Headache Society met for a Canadian Migraine Summit Meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia in June, 2009. Pertinent literature was reviewed and a consensus document was produced based upon the round table discussion at the meeting. The outline of a national Canadian Migraine Strategy was created. This strategy is based on the chronic disease management model, and would include: an outline of what constitutes appropriate migraine care for Canadians, educational programs (for health care professionals, individuals with migraine, and the general public), research programs, and the development of the necessary organizations and partnerships to develop further and implement the Canadian Migraine Strategy. Based upon the medical literature and expert discussion at the meeting, a national Canadian Migraine Strategy with a patient self-management focus has the potential to improve patient care and reduce headache related disability in Canada.

  14. ESMO Consensus Conference on malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buske, C; Hutchings, M; Ladetto, M

    2018-01-01

    into three working groups; each group focused on one of these areas in order to address clinically-relevant questions relating to that topic. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, each working group developed...... of the three key areas identified. This manuscript presents the consensus recommendations regarding the clinical management of elderly patients diagnosed with malignant lymphoma. Four clinically-relevant topics identified by the panel were: 1) how to define patient fitness, 2) assessing quality of life, 3......) diagnostic work-up and 4) clinical management of elderly patients with lymphoma. Each of these key topics is addressed in the context of five different lymphoma entities, namely: CLL, follicular lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Results, including...

  15. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 2 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    To provide guidelines for health care providers on the use of contraceptive methods to prevent pregnancy and on the promotion of healthy sexuality. Guidance for Canadian practitioners on overall effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, non-contraceptive benefits, side effects and risks, and initiation of cited contraceptive methods; family planning in the context of sexual health and general well-being; contraceptive counselling methods; and access to, and availability of, cited contraceptive methods in Canada. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Database from January 1994 to January 2015 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., contraception, sexuality, sexual health) and key words (e.g., contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English from January 1994 to January 2015. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to June 2015. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of the evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Chapter 1: Contraception in Canada Summary Statements  1. Canadian women spend a significant portion of their lives at risk of an unintended pregnancy. (II-2)  2. Effective contraceptive methods are underutilized in Canada, particularly among vulnerable populations. (II-2)  3. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, including contraceptive implants and intrauterine contraception (copper-releasing and levonorgestrel

  16. Canadian Contraception Consensus (Part 1 of 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Amanda; Guilbert, Edith; Costescu, Dustin; Dunn, Sheila; Fisher, William; Kives, Sari; Mirosh, Melissa; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Reid, Robert; Roy, Geneviève; Varto, Hannah; Waddington, Ashley; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Whelan, Anne Marie; Ferguson, Carrie; Fortin, Claude; Kielly, Maria; Mansouri, Shireen; Todd, Nicole

    2015-10-01

    To provide guidelines for health care providers on the use of contraceptive methods to prevent pregnancy and on the promotion of healthy sexuality. Guidance for Canadian practitioners on overall effectiveness, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, non-contraceptive benefits, side effects and risks, and initiation of cited contraceptive methods; family planning in the context of sexual health and general well-being; contraceptive counselling methods; and access to, and availability of, cited contraceptive methods in Canada. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline and The Cochrane Database from January 1994 to January 2015 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., contraception, sexuality, sexual health) and key words (e.g., contraception, family planning, hormonal contraception, emergency contraception). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in English from January 1994 to January 2015. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to June 2015. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of the evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Chapter 1: Contraception in Canada Summary Statements 1. Canadian women spend a significant portion of their lives at risk of an unintended pregnancy. (II-2) 2. Effective contraceptive methods are underutilized in Canada, particularly among vulnerable populations. (II-2) 3. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods, including contraceptive implants and intrauterine contraception (copper-releasing and levonorgestrel

  17. Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm For the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Tom; Cicardi, Marco; Farkas, Henriette; Bork, Konrad; Kreuz, Wolfhart; Zingale, Lorenza; Varga, Lilian; Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada; Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Binkley, Karen; Zuraw, Bruce; Davis, Alvin; Hebert, Jacques; Ritchie, Bruce; Burnham, Jeanne; Castaldo, Anthony; Menendez, Alejandra; Nagy, Istvan; Harmat, George; Bucher, Christoph; Lacuesta, Gina; Issekutz, Andrew; Warrington, Richard; Yang, William; Dean, John; Kanani, Amin; Stark, Donald; McCusker, Christine; Wagner, Eric; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; Leith, Eric; Tsai, Ellie; MacSween, Michael; Lyanga, John; Serushago, Bazir; Leznoff, Art; Waserman, Susan; de Serres, Jean

    2004-09-01

    C1 inhibitor deficiency (hereditary angioedema [HAE]) is a rare disorder for which there is a lack of consensus concerning diagnosis, therapy, and management, particularly in Canada. European initiatives have driven the approach to managing HAE with 3 C1-INH Deficiency Workshops held every 2 years in Hungary starting in 1999, with the third Workshop having recently been held in May 2003. The European Contact Board has established a European HAE Registry that will hopefully advance our knowledge of this disorder. The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Society/Société d'Angioédème Héréditaire du Canada organized a Canadian International Consensus Conference held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on October 24 to 26, 2003, to foster consensus between major European and North American HAE treatment centers. Papers were presented by investigators from Europe and North America, and this consensus algorithm approach was discussed. There is a paucity of double-blind placebo-controlled trials in the treatment of HAE, making levels of evidence to support the algorithm less than optimal. Enclosed is the consensus algorithm approach recommended for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of HAE and agreed to by the authors of this article. This document is only a consensus algorithm approach and requires validation. As such, participants agreed to make this a living 2003 algorithm (ie, a work in progress) and agreed to review its content at future international HAE meetings. The consensus, however, has strength in that it was arrived at by the meeting of patient-care providers along with patient group representatives and individual patients reviewing information available to date and reaching agreement on how to approach the diagnosis, therapy, and management of HAE circa 2003. Hopefully evidence to support approaches to the management of HAE will approach the level of meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in the near future.

  18. Canadian student leaders' perspective on interprofessional education: A consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicorelli, Jennifer; Dennie, Anik; Heinrich, Christina; Hinchey, Blake; Honarparvar, Faraz; Jennings, Morgan; Keefe, Chad; Metro, Trisha Lee; Peel, Celeste; Snowdon, Cordelia; Tempelman, Justine; Wong, Melody Elise; Forbes, Susan L; Livingston, Lori A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on the outcomes of an interprofessional education (IPE) consensus-building exercise amongst student leaders enrolled in health science-related degree programs. The 12 participants included undergraduate and graduate students from eight different universities situated in five Canadian provinces. Their areas of study spanned a broad range of professions and disciplines including child and youth care, health promotion, nursing, kinesiology, medicine, physical education, psychology, and social work. A consensus statement regarding IPE and, more specifically, "what we know," "what we don't know," and "where do we go from here" is presented. These insights are unique, and a willingness to embrace them may be critical in building the next generation of improved IPE offerings across the country.

  19. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11–13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article. PMID:26645990

  20. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference: individualized therapy and patient factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGee, J.; Bookman, M.; Harter, P.; Marth, C.; McNeish, I.; Moore, K.N.; Poveda, A.; Hilpert, F.; Hasegawa, K.; Bacon, M.; Gatsonis, C.; Kridelka, F.; Berek, J.; Ottevanger, N.; Levy, T.; Silverberg, S.; Kim, B.G.; Hirte, H.; Okamoto, A.; Stuart, G.; Ochiai, K.

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript reports the consensus statements regarding the design and conduct of clinical trials in patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), following deliberation at the Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (OCCC), held in Tokyo in November 2015. Three

  1. ECHM Consensus Conference and levels of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, Susannah

    2017-06-01

    The ECHM Consensus Conference on indications for hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) was a welcome update of the evidence for HBOT use. However, clarification is requested in relation to how the GRADE system (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) was modified and how levels of evidence were applied in the case of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL). GRADE has a low kappa value for inter-observer agreement, so is modification valid? The original GRADE criteria, using consensus, grades evidence (defined as high, low and very low) and uses this to adjust the strength of recommendations. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) score highly. The ECHM have modified the GRADE system without explanation, assigning grades as levels 1 to 4 and have asserted that RCTs which are double-blinded constitute level 1 or 2 evidence. This has important implications for HBOT research. The term double-blinded is not used in the abstract, which leads the reader to wonder; where do RCTs which are not double-blinded fit in? The ECHM, by including the term double blinded as a requirement for level 1 or 2, has lifted the evidence bar. Does this constitute a form of research "bracket creep"? Double-blinding is viewed by many to require a 'sham' treatment in hyperbaric research. Many conditions require multiple doses requiring daily hospital attendance with associated costs of lost time from work and daily transport costs. Even with a crossover after the sham, a requirement of many ethics committees, the lost time for a patient is a considerable burden. Delaying HBOT until crossover in those randomised to the control group in a disease that has a narrow therapeutic temporal window, such as idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), may affect the chance of recovery. Double blinding is logistically difficult with HBOT. A sham treatment may be achieved by using air instead of oxygen; however, this exposes the non-intervention group to a risk

  2. Management of anaphylaxis in primary care: Canadian expert consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waserman, S; Chad, Z; Francoeur, M J; Small, P; Stark, D; Vander Leek, T K; Kaplan, A; Kastner, M

    2010-09-01

    Anaphylaxis is often managed inadequately. We used findings from a systematic review of gaps in anaphylaxis management to develop evidence-based recommendations for gaps rated as clinically important by a panel of Canadian allergy experts. The nominal group technique (NGT) consensus methodology was used to develop evidence-based recommendations for the management of anaphylaxis in primary care. Physician-specific gaps from our systematic review were prioritized by consensus meeting participants in two rounds, which involved the rating, discussion, and re-rating of gaps. Using current anaphylaxis guidelines, recommendations were then developed for each category of gaps that were identified by the panel as clinically important. Thirty unique physician gaps from the systematic review were categorized according to gaps of knowledge and anaphylaxis practice behaviors. The panel rated diagnosis of anaphylaxis, and when and how to use epinephrine auto-injectors as clinically important knowledge gaps; and rated infrequent or delayed epinephrine administration, low rate of auto-injector prescription, and infrequent or no referrals to allergy specialists after a reaction as important practice behavior gaps. Evidence from four guidelines was used to support the consensus recommendation statements for three resulting categories of gap themes: anaphylaxis management, epinephrine use, and follow-up care. We used an NGT consensus methodology to develop an educational resource for primary care physicians and allergists to better understand how to manage patients with anaphylaxis. Next steps include testing our findings against observed data in primary care settings and to develop other strategies or tools to overcome gaps in anaphylaxis management.

  3. French consensus conference on hepatitis C: screening and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmiche, J P

    1998-06-01

    CORRESPONDENCE TO: Professor J P Galmiche, Hépato-Gastroentérologie, Hôtel Dieu, CHU de Nantes, 44035 Nantes Cedex, France (email: galmiche@easynet.fr). This consensus conference followed the rules developed by the French Agence Nationale pour le Développement de l'Evaluation Médicale (ANDEM). Briefly, this required an organising committee, a working group whose task was to make a comprehensive critical review of the literature before the conference was held, a panel of experts, and a jury. The conference was held over two days and included (a) a public session with presentations by experts working in areas relevant to the consensus questions, (b) questions and statements from conference attendees, and (c) deliberation by the jury, followed by the drafting of conclusions and recommendations. (GUT 1998;:892-898)

  4. CRV 2008: Fifth Canadian Conference on Computerand Robot Vision, Windsor, ON, Canada, May 2008:Conference participation

    OpenAIRE

    Fihl, Preben

    2008-01-01

    This technical report will cover the participation in the fifth Canadian Conference on Computer and Robot Vision in May 2008. The report will give a concise description of the topics presented at the conference, focusing on the work related to the HERMES project and human motion and action recognition. Our contribution to the conference will also be described and discussed.

  5. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: outflow tract obstruction, coarctation of the aorta, tetralogy of Fallot, Ebstein anomaly and Marfan's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silversides, Candice K.; Kiess, Marla; Beauchesne, Luc; Bradley, Timothy; Connelly, Michael; Niwa, Koichiro; Mulder, Barbara; Webb, Gary; Colman, Jack; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. Since the 2001 Canadian Cardiovascular Society

  6. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary...... panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent...

  7. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary management: European consensus conference colon & rectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Boelens, Petra G; Borras, Josep M; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cervantes, Andres; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; van den Broek, Colette B M; Brown, Gina; Van Cutsem, Eric; Espin, Eloy; Haustermans, Karin; Glimelius, Bengt; Iversen, Lene H; van Krieken, J Han; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Henning, Geoffrey; Gore-Booth, Jola; Meldolesi, Elisa; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Påhlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Rödel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans J; Smith, Jason J; Tanis, Pieter J; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Wiggers, Theo; Gambacorta, Maria A; Aristei, Cynthia; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20years; however considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe. Therefore, EURECCA, which is the acronym of European Registration of Cancer Care, is aiming at defining core treatment strategies and developing a European audit structure in order to improve the quality of care for all patients with colon and rectal cancer. In December 2012, the first multidisciplinary consensus conference about cancer of the colon and rectum was held. The expert panel consisted of representatives of European scientific organisations involved in cancer care of patients with colon and rectal cancer and representatives of national colorectal registries. The expert panel had delegates of the European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO), European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), European Society of Pathology (ESP), European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Radiology (ESR), European Society of Coloproctology (ESCP), European CanCer Organisation (ECCO), European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) and the European Colorectal Cancer Patient Organisation (EuropaColon), as well as delegates from national registries or audits. Consensus was achieved using the Delphi method. For the Delphi process, multidisciplinary experts were invited to comment and vote three web-based online voting rounds and to lecture on the subjects during the meeting (13th-15th December 2012). The sentences in the consensus document were available during the meeting and a televoting round during the conference by all participants was performed. This manuscript covers all sentences of the consensus document with the result of the voting. The consensus document represents sections on diagnostics, pathology, surgery, medical oncology, radiotherapy, and follow-up where

  8. Consensus Conference on Clinical Management of pediatric Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Elena; Neri, Iria; Ricci, Giampaolo; Baldo, Ermanno; Barone, Maurizio; Belloni Fortina, Anna; Bernardini, Roberto; Berti, Irene; Caffarelli, Carlo; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Capra, Lucetta; Carello, Rossella; Cipriani, Francesca; Comberiati, Pasquale; Diociaiuti, Andrea; El Hachem, Maya; Fontana, Elena; Gruber, Michaela; Haddock, Ellen; Maiello, Nunzia; Meglio, Paolo; Patrizi, Annalisa; Peroni, Diego; Scarponi, Dorella; Wielander, Ingrid; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2016-03-02

    The Italian Consensus Conference on clinical management of atopic dermatitis in children reflects the best and most recent scientific evidence, with the aim to provide specialists with a useful tool for managing this common, but complex clinical condition. Thanks to the contribution of experts in the field and members of the Italian Society of Pediatric Allergology and Immunology (SIAIP) and the Italian Society of Pediatric Dermatology (SIDerP), this Consensus statement integrates the basic principles of the most recent guidelines for the management of atopic dermatitis to facilitate a practical approach to the disease. The therapeutical approach should be adapted to the clinical severity and requires a tailored strategy to ensure good compliance by children and their parents. In this Consensus, levels and models of intervention are also enriched by the Italian experience to facilitate a practical approach to the disease.

  9. [Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Zaterka, Schlioma

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one the five main topics of the meeting: H. pylori and dyspepsia, H. pylori and NSAIDs, H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, H. pylori treatment, and H. pylori retreatment. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. The results were presented during a special session on the VI Brazilian Week of Digestive System, in Recife, PE (October 2004), and this publication represents the summary of the main recommendations and conclusions emerged from the meeting.

  10. European consensus conference on faecal microbiota transplantation in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Giovanni; Ianiro, Gianluca; Tilg, Herbert; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Kump, Patrizia; Satokari, Reetta; Sokol, Harry; Arkkila, Perttu; Pintus, Cristina; Hart, Ailsa; Segal, Jonathan; Aloi, Marina; Masucci, Luca; Molinaro, Antonio; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Lopez-Sanroman, Antonio; Link, Alexander; de Groot, Pieter; de Vos, Willem M; Högenauer, Christoph; Malfertheiner, Peter; Mattila, Eero; Milosavljević, Tomica; Nieuwdorp, Max; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Simren, Magnus; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an important therapeutic option for Clostridium difficile infection. Promising findings suggest that FMT may play a role also in the management of other disorders associated with the alteration of gut microbiota. Although the health community is assessing FMT with renewed interest and patients are becoming more aware, there are technical and logistical issues in establishing such a non-standardised treatment into the clinical practice with safety and proper governance. In view of this, an evidence-based recommendation is needed to drive the practical implementation of FMT. In this European Consensus Conference, 28 experts from 10 countries collaborated, in separate working groups and through an evidence-based process, to provide statements on the following key issues: FMT indications; donor selection; preparation of faecal material; clinical management and faecal delivery and basic requirements for implementing an FMT centre. Statements developed by each working group were evaluated and voted by all members, first through an electronic Delphi process, and then in a plenary consensus conference. The recommendations were released according to best available evidence, in order to act as guidance for physicians who plan to implement FMT, aiming at supporting the broad availability of the procedure, discussing other issues relevant to FMT and promoting future clinical research in the area of gut microbiota manipulation. This consensus report strongly recommends the implementation of FMT centres for the treatment of C. difficile infection as well as traces the guidelines of technicality, regulatory, administrative and laboratory requirements. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Management of Hepatitis B: A Longitudinal National Survey – Impact of the Canadian Hepatitis B Consensus Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Marotta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver, and The Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Canada, jointly developed the Canadian Chronic Hepatitis B (HBV Consensus Guidelines to assist practitioners involved in the management of this complex disease. These guidelines were published in The Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology in June 2007 and distributed to all Canadian gastroenterologists and hepatologists.

  12. Canadian Paediatric Neurology Workforce Survey and Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Orr, Serena L; McMillan, Hugh J; Kirton, Adam; Brna, Paula; Esser, Michael; Tang-Wai, Richard; Major, Philippe; Poulin, Chantal; Prasad, Narayan; Selby, Kathryn; Weiss, Shelly K; Yeh, E Ann; Callen, David Ja

    2016-05-01

    Little knowledge exists on the availability of academic and community paediatric neurology positions. This knowledge is crucial for making workforce decisions. Our study aimed to: 1) obtain information regarding the availability of positions for paediatric neurologists in academic centres; 2) survey paediatric neurology trainees regarding their perceptions of employment issues and career plans; 3) survey practicing community paediatric neurologists 4) convene a group of paediatric neurologists to develop consensus regarding how to address these workforce issues. Surveys addressing workforce issues regarding paediatric neurology in Canada were sent to: 1) all paediatric neurology program directors in Canada (n=9) who then solicited information from division heads and from paediatric neurologists in surrounding areas; 2) paediatric neurology trainees in Canada (n=57) and; 3) community paediatric neurologists (n=27). A meeting was held with relevant stakeholders to develop a consensus on how to approach employment issues. The response rate was 100% from program directors, 57.9% from residents and 44% from community paediatric neurologists. We found that the number of projected positions in academic paediatric neurology is fewer than the number of paediatric neurologists that are being trained over the next five to ten years, despite a clinical need for paediatric neurologists. Paediatric neurology residents are concerned about job availability and desire more career counselling. There is a current and projected clinical demand for paediatric neurologists despite a lack of academic positions. Training programs should focus on community neurology as a viable career option.

  13. ECHM Consensus Conference and levels of evidence - Reply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Daniel; Marroni, Alessandro; Kot, Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Dr Sherlock asks for clarification on the approach adopted by the European Committee on Hyperbaric Medicine (ECHM) to assessing evidence for establishing indications for hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT). Firstly, regardless of the strict process of editing and proof-reading of tables included in the above-mentioned publication, we received comments from some readers that identified imperfect layout of Table 1 and incorrect layout of Table 2 which significantly changed the conclusions to be drawn from them. This concerned both the details of the methodology used and description of the ECHM recommendations and associated levels of evidence. Therefore, those tables are republished in their correct forms in this issue, hoping that this will explain at least some of the doubts and misunderstandings. Both the Editor and ourselves apologise for these errors of publication. Secondly, in the ECHM Consensus Conference methodology, we scored the evidence for clinical studies requiring double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCT) as Level A and B when, at the same time, some scoring scales require simply 'RCT', as correctly pointed out by Dr Sherlock. Long experience in organising evidence based medicine (EBM) meetings and discussions has taught us that RCTs that are not double blinded are often criticised as having serious potential bias and so are denied as level A evidence. Although we acknowledge that double blinding a clinical study in HBOT is a source of difficulty, we chose a priori to consider only double-blinded RCTs in our grading scale to avoid endless discussions about this potential bias. We are well aware that doing so means that Level A evidence is a difficult target for the hyperbaric community. We agree that many evidence scoring systems have a low level of inter-observer agreement. This is why we treat the Consensus Conference as a valuable tool that provides a better opportunity for discussing the evidence than analysis by a small group of 'experts

  14. 13th Conference of the Canadian Number Theory Association

    CERN Document Server

    Alaca, Şaban; Williams, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The theory of numbers continues to occupy a central place in modern mathematics because of both its long history over many centuries as well as its many diverse applications to other fields such as discrete mathematics, cryptography, and coding theory. The proof by Andrew Wiles (with Richard Taylor) of Fermat’s last theorem published in 1995 illustrates the high level of difficulty of problems encountered in number-theoretic research as well as the usefulness of the new ideas arising from its proof. The thirteenth conference of the Canadian Number Theory Association was held at Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada from June 16 to 20, 2014. Ninety-nine talks were presented at the conference on the theme of advances in the theory of numbers. Topics of the talks reflected the diversity of current trends and activities in modern number theory. These topics included modular forms, hypergeometric functions, elliptic curves, distribution of prime numbers, diophantine equations, L-functions, Diophantine app...

  15. Proceedings of GeoCalgary 2010 : the 63. Canadian geotechnical conference and 6. Canadian permafrost conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, C. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Moorman, B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Armstrong, R. [AECOM, Calgary, AB (Canada); Henderson, J. [Associated Geosciences Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)] (comps.) (and others)

    2010-07-01

    More than 500 delegates from industry, government, universities and research centres attended this conference to exchange professional knowledge on research and development that affects all sectors of geotechnical engineering, applied geology and hydrogeology. The conference also highlighted recent geoenvironmental achievements. The geotechnical sessions were entitled: transportation geotechniques; soil mechanics; foundations; infrastructure design and operations in permafrost; mining in permafrost; oil sands geotechnology; rock mechanics; landslides; permafrost foundation design and slope stability; groundwater and slope stability; seepage and hydrogeology; harbour and shoreline geotechniques; mine drainage; mine site remediation; climate change; ground ice; geophysics and remote sensing; geoenvironmental sustainability; Mackenzie Delta Rock Glaciers; engineering geology; geohazards; waste soils and soil stabilization. The conference featured more than 230 presentations, of which 33 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  16. Canadian integrative oncology research priorities: results of a consensus-building process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, L.C.; Seely, D.; Balneaves, L.G.; Boon, H.S.; Leis, A.; Oneschuk, D.; Sagar, S.M.; Verhoef, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada, many diverse models of integrative oncology care have emerged in response to the growing number of cancer patients who combine complementary therapies with their conventional medical treatments. The increasing interest in integrative oncology emphasizes the need to engage stakeholders and to work toward consensus on research priorities and a collaborative research agenda. The Integrative Canadian Oncology Research Initiative initiated a consensus-building process to meet that need and to develop an action plan that will implement a Canadian research agenda. Methods A two-day consensus workshop was held after completion of a Delphi survey and stakeholder interviews. Results Five interrelated priority research areas were identified as the foundation for a Canadian research agenda: EffectivenessSafetyResource and health services utilizationKnowledge translationDeveloping integrative oncology models Research is needed within each priority area from a range of different perspectives (for example, patient, practitioner, health system) and in a way that reflects a continuum of integration from the addition of a single complementary intervention within conventional cancer care to systemic change. Strategies to implement a Canadian integrative oncology research agenda were identified, and working groups are actively developing projects in line with those strategic areas. Of note is the intention to develop a national network for integrative oncology research and knowledge translation. Conclusions The identified research priorities reflect the needs and perspectives of a spectrum of integrative oncology stakeholders. Ongoing stakeholder consultation, including engagement from new stakeholders, is needed to ensure appropriate uptake and implementation of a Canadian research agenda. PMID:23904767

  17. Advancing Pain Education in Canadian Physiotherapy Programmes: Results of a Consensus-Generating Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, Timothy H; Miller, Jordan; Bostick, Geoff; Thomas, Aliki; Bussières, André

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on a national stakeholder workshop that focused on advancing pain education in physiotherapy programmes across Canada. Methods: Workshop participants included national leaders from the following stakeholder groups: people living with pain; physiotherapy students and recent graduates; pain educators; physiotherapy programme administrators; and representatives from the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators, Physiotherapy Education Accreditation Canada, Canadian Physiotherapy Association, and Physiotherapy Practice Profile project. During the workshop, barriers to, facilitators of, and strategies for advancing pain education were discussed, and a stakeholder-endorsed consensus statement was generated. The workshop was recorded, and data were thematically analyzed. Results: Participants identified important barriers and facilitators associated with the field of pain, standards and regulatory processes, physiotherapy programmes, and physiotherapy students and people living with pain. Strategies for advancing pain education included integrating pain competencies into standards and regulatory policy, encouraging the development of best teaching practices, partnering with people living with pain, building awareness, and setting goals and assessing clear outcomes. The consensus statement highlighted the central importance of pain education for physiotherapists and the need for a reference standard to guide its implementation in the Canadian context. Conclusion: This was the first initiative to specifically explore national stakeholders' perceptions of pain education. The workshop outcomes provide a strong mandate and direction for advancing pain education across Canadian physiotherapy programmes.

  18. Report of the international consensus development conference on female sexual dysfunction: definitions and classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basson, R.; Berman, J.; Burnett, A.; Derogatis, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fourcroy, J.; Goldstein, I.; Graziottin, A.; Heiman, J.; Laan, E.; Leiblum, S.; Padma-Nathan, H.; Rosen, R.; Segraves, K.; Segraves, R. T.; Shabsigh, R.; Sipski, M.; Wagner, G.; Whipple, B.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Female sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent but not well defined or understood. We evaluated and revised existing definitions and classifications of female sexual dysfunction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An interdisciplinary consensus conference panel consisting of 19 experts in female sexual

  19. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer: Diagnosis, treatment and follow-up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    ...) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer...

  20. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer: diagnosis, treatment and follow-up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colombo, N; Creutzberg, C; Amant, F; Bosse, T; González-Martín, A; Ledermann, J; Marth, C; Nout, R; Querleu, D; Mirza, M R; Sessa, C

    2016-01-01

    ...) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer...

  1. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, M K; Pujade-Lauraine, E; Aoki, D

    2017-01-01

    This manuscript reports the consensus statements regarding recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC), reached at the fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (OCCC), which was held in Tokyo, Japan, in November 2015. Three important questions were identified: (i) What are the subgroups for clinical trials i...

  2. Epigenetics, eh! A meeting summary of the Canadian Conference on Epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenhiser, David I; Bérubé, Nathalie G; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2011-10-01

    In May 2011, the Canadian Conference on Epigenetics: Epigenetics Eh! was held in London, Canada. The objectives of this conference were to showcase the breadth of epigenetic research on environment and health across Canada and to provide the catalyst to develop collaborative Canadian epigenetic research opportunities, similar to existing international epigenetic initiatives in the US and Europe. With ten platform sessions and two sessions with over 100 poster presentations, this conference featured cutting-edge epigenetic research, presented by Canadian and international principal investigators and their trainees in the field of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics. An EpigenART competition included ten artists, creating a unique opportunity for artists and scientists to interact and explore their individual interpretations of this scientific discipline. The conference provided a unique venue for a significant cross-section of Canadian epigenetic researchers from diverse disciplines to meet, interact, collaborate and strategize at the national level.

  3. Rome Consensus Conference - statement; human papilloma virus diseases in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Andrea; Mirone, Vincenzo; Gentile, Vincenzo; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Foresta, Carlo; Mariani, Luciano; Mazzoli, Sandra; Parisi, Saverio G; Perino, Antonio; Picardo, Mauro; Zotti, Carla Maria

    2013-02-07

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a very resistant, ubiquitous virus that can survive in the environment without a host. The decision to analyse HPV-related diseases in males was due to the broad dissemination of the virus, and, above all, by the need to stress the importance of primary and secondary prevention measures (currently available for women exclusively). The objective of the Consensus Conference was to make evidence-based recommendations that were designed to facilitate the adoption of a standard approach in clinical practice in Italy. The Sponsoring Panel put a series of questions to the members of the Scientific Committee who prepared a summary of the currently available information, relevant for each question, after the review and grading of the existing scientific literature. The summaries were presented to a Jury, also called multidisciplinary Consensus Panel, who drafted a series of recommendations. The prevalence of HPV in males ranges between 1.3-72.9%;. The prevalence curve in males is much higher than that in females and does not tend to decline with age. Women appear to have a higher probability of acquiring HPV genotypes associated with a high oncogenic risk, whereas in males the probability of acquiring low- or high-risk genotypes is similar. The HPV-related diseases that affect males are anogenital warts and cancers of the penis, anus and oropharynx. The quadrivalent vaccine against HPV has proved to be effective in preventing external genital lesions in males aged 16-26 years in 90.4%; (95%; CI: 69.2-98.1) of cases. It has also proved to be effective in preventing precancerous anal lesions in 77.5%; (95%; CI: 39.6-93.3) of cases in a per-protocol analysis and in 91.7%; (95%; CI: 44.6-99.8) of cases in a post-hoc analysis. Early ecological studies demonstrate reduction of genital warts in vaccinated females and some herd immunity in males when vaccine coverage is high, although males who have sex with males gained no benefit at all. Males with

  4. International consensus conference on open abdomen in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Osvaldo; Cimbanassi, Stefania; Biffl, Walter; Leppaniemi, Ari; Henry, Sharon; Scalea, Thomas M; Catena, Fausto; Ansaloni, Luca; Chieregato, Arturo; de Blasio, Elvio; Gambale, Giorgio; Gordini, Giovanni; Nardi, Guiseppe; Paldalino, Pietro; Gossetti, Francesco; Dionigi, Paolo; Noschese, Giuseppe; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ribaldi, Sergio; Sgardello, Sebastian; Magnone, Stefano; Rausei, Stefano; Mariani, Anna; Mengoli, Francesca; di Saverio, Salomone; Castriconi, Maurizio; Coccolini, Federico; Negreanu, Joseph; Razzi, Salvatore; Coniglio, Carlo; Morelli, Francesco; Buonanno, Maurizio; Lippi, Monica; Trotta, Liliana; Volpi, Annalisa; Fattori, Luca; Zago, Mauro; de Rai, Paolo; Sammartano, Fabrizio; Manfredi, Roberto; Cingolani, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A part of damage-control laparotomy is to leave the fascial edges and the skin open to avoid abdominal compartment syndrome and allow further explorations. This condition, known as open abdomen (OA), although effective, is associated with severe complications. Our aim was to develop evidence-based recommendations to define indications for OA, techniques for temporary abdominal closure, management of enteric fistulas, and methods of definitive wall closure. The literature from 1990 to 2014 was systematically screened according to PRISMA [Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses] protocol. Seventy-six articles were reviewed by a panel of experts to assign grade of recommendations (GoR) and level of evidence (LoE) using the GRADE [Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation] system, and an international consensus conference was held. OA in trauma is indicated at the end of damage-control laparotomy, in the presence of visceral swelling, for a second look in vascular injuries or gross contamination, in the case of abdominal wall loss, and if medical treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome has failed (GoR B, LoE II). Negative-pressure wound therapy is the recommended temporary abdominal closure technique to drain peritoneal fluid, improve nursing, and prevent fascial retraction (GoR B, LoE I). Lack of OA closure within 8 days (GoR C, LoE II), bowel injuries, high-volume replacement, and use of polypropylene mesh over the bowel (GoR C, LoE I) are risk factors for frozen abdomen and fistula formation. Negative-pressure wound therapy allows to isolate the fistula and protect the surrounding tissues from spillage until granulation (GoR C, LoE II). Correction of fistula is performed after 6 months to 12 months. Definitive closure of OA has to be obtained early (GoR C, LoE I) with direct suture, traction devices, component separation with or without mesh. Biologic meshes are an option for wall reinforcement if bacterial

  5. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy: the consensus conference statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Paola; Donati, Serena; Colombo, Cinzia; Mele, Alfonso; Liberati, Alessandro; Satolli, Roberto

    2009-05-29

    The risks/benefits balance of hormone replacement therapy is controversial. Information can influence consumers' knowledge and behavior; research findings about hormone replacement therapy are uncertain and the messages provided by the media are of poor quality and incomplete, preventing a fully informed decision making process. We therefore felt that an explicit, rigorous and structured assessment of the information needs on this issue was urgent and we opted for the organisation of a national consensus conference (CC) to assess the current status of the quality of information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and re-visit recent research findings on its risks/benefits. We chose a structured approach based on the traditional CC method combined with a structured preparatory work supervised by an organising committee (OC) and a scientific board (SB). The OC and SB chose the members of the CC's jury and appointed three multidisciplinary working groups (MWG) which were asked to review clinical issues and different aspects of the quality of information. Before the CC, the three MWGs carried out: a literature review on the risk/benefit profile of HRT and two surveys on the quality of information on lay press and booklets targeted to women. A population survey on women's knowledge, attitude and practice was also carried out. The jury received the documents in advance, listened the presentations during the two-day meeting of the CCs, met immediately after in a closed-door meeting and prepared the final document. Participants were researchers, clinicians, journalists as well as consumers' representatives. Key messages in the CC's deliberation were: a) women need to be fully informed about the transient nature of menopausal symptoms, about HRT risks and benefits and about the availability of non-pharmacological interventions; b) HRT is not recommended to prevent menopausal symptoms; c) the term "HRT" is misleading and "post menopausal hormone therapy" should be the

  6. Informing women about hormone replacement therapy: the consensus conference statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberati Alessandro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risks/benefits balance of hormone replacement therapy is controversial. Information can influence consumers' knowledge and behavior; research findings about hormone replacement therapy are uncertain and the messages provided by the media are of poor quality and incomplete, preventing a fully informed decision making process. We therefore felt that an explicit, rigorous and structured assessment of the information needs on this issue was urgent and we opted for the organisation of a national consensus conference (CC to assess the current status of the quality of information on hormone replacement therapy (HRT and re-visit recent research findings on its risks/benefits. Methods We chose a structured approach based on the traditional CC method combined with a structured preparatory work supervised by an organising committee (OC and a scientific board (SB. The OC and SB chose the members of the CC's jury and appointed three multidisciplinary working groups (MWG which were asked to review clinical issues and different aspects of the quality of information. Before the CC, the three MWGs carried out: a literature review on the risk/benefit profile of HRT and two surveys on the quality of information on lay press and booklets targeted to women. A population survey on women's knowledge, attitude and practice was also carried out. The jury received the documents in advance, listened the presentations during the two-day meeting of the CCs, met immediately after in a closed-door meeting and prepared the final document. Participants were researchers, clinicians, journalists as well as consumers' representatives. Results Key messages in the CC's deliberation were: a women need to be fully informed about the transient nature of menopausal symptoms, about HRT risks and benefits and about the availability of non-pharmacological interventions; b HRT is not recommended to prevent menopausal symptoms; c the term "HRT" is misleading and "post

  7. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference...

  8. NIH Blood and Marrow Transplant Late Effects Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    This day and a half symposium will bring together experts in blood and marrow transplantation, late effects, and health care delivery to discuss current evidence and knowledge gaps, develop consensus guidelines, and inform future research in the BMT survivor population.

  9. 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Aggett, P.J.; Anton, R.; Bernstein, P.S.; Blumberg, J.; Heaney, R.P.; Henry, J.; Nolan, J.M.; Richardson, D.P.; Ommen, B. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rijkers, G.T.; Zöllner, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures: The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term "Hohenheim Consensus Conference" defines conferences dealing with

  10. CRV 2008: Fifth Canadian Conference on Computerand Robot Vision, Windsor, ON, Canada, May 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben

    This technical report will cover the participation in the fifth Canadian Conference on Computer and Robot Vision in May 2008. The report will give a concise description of the topics presented at the conference, focusing on the work related to the HERMES project and human motion and action...

  11. Testing a consensus conference method by discussing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in Tanzania by discussing the management of traumatic dental injuries, and to reach consensus on the feasibility of the treatment modalities of traumatic dental injuries recommended in western countries in the. Tanzanian situation. Study participants: Fifteen dentists as representatives of the profession and two lay people ...

  12. Evaluating the 2008 consensus conference on genetically modified foods in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mei-Fang

    2015-07-01

    Genetically modified foods have become one of the most popular topics for deliberative exercises involving ordinary citizens worldwide. This paper examines the Taiwanese consensus conference on GM foods held in June 2008, and the implications and limitations of the public deliberations. The consensus conference facilitated multiparty dialogues and enhanced citizens' knowledge, and affected their attitudes. This study demonstrates the ways contextual factors have influenced the outcome of the citizens' deliberative practices, including the government's conventional technocratic decision-making style, the strong influence of the U.S. government, the political and technological culture, the government's framing of economic development concerns, and a lack of pressure from civil society to compel the government to formally respond to their concerns. The consensus conference had a limited effect on policy decision-making, and seemed to serve as a socio-political experiment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Consensus on precision medicine for metastatic cancers: a report from the MAP conference

    OpenAIRE

    Swanton, C.; Soria, J.-C.; Bardelli, A.; Biankin, A.; Caldas, C.; Chandarlapaty, S.; de Koning, L.; Dive, C.; Feunteun, J.; Leung, S.-Y.; Marais, R.; Mardis, E. R.; McGranahan, N.; Middleton, G.; Quezada, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in biotechnologies have led to the development of multiplex genomic and proteomic analyses for clinical use. Nevertheless, guidelines are currently lacking to determine which molecular assays should be implemented in metastatic cancers. The first MAP conference was dedicated to exploring the use of genomics to better select therapies in the treatment of metastatic cancers. Sixteen consensus items were covered. There was a consensus that new technologies like next-generation se...

  14. Consensus Report of the 2015 Weinman International Conference on Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    On November 9 and 10, 2015, the International Conference on Mesothelioma in Populations Exposed to Naturally Occurring Asbestiform Fibers was held at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. The meeting was cosponsored by the International Association for the S...

  15. An Update on the Management of Chronic Hepatitis C: 2015 Consensus Guidelines from the Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Myers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C remains a significant medical and economic burden in Canada, affecting nearly 1% of the population. Since the last Canadian consensus conference on the management of chronic hepatitis C, major advances have occurred that warrant a review of recommended management approaches for these patients. Specifically, direct-acting antiviral agents with dramatically improved rates of virological clearance compared with standard therapy have been developed and interferon-free, all-oral antiviral regimens have been approved. In light of this new evidence, an update to the 2012 Canadian Association for the Study of the Liver consensus guidelines on the management of hepatitis C was produced. The present document reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis C in Canada, preferred diagnostic testing approaches and recommendations for the treatment of chronically infected patients with the newly approved antiviral agents, including those who have previously failed peginterferon and ribavirin-based therapy. In addition, recommendations are made regarding approaches to reducing the burden of hepatitis C in Canada.

  16. ESMO Consensus conferences : guidelines on malignant lymphoma. part 2: marginal zone lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreyling, M.; Thieblemont, C.; Gallamini, A.; Arcaini, L.; Campo, E.; Hermine, O.; Kluin-Nelemans, J. C.; Ladetto, M.; Le Gouill, S.; Iannitto, E.; Pileri, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wotherspoon, A.; Zinzani, P.; Zucca, E.

    To complement the existing treatment guidelines for all tumour types, ESMO organizes consensus conferences to focus on specific issues in each type of tumour. In this setting, a consensus conference on the management of lymphoma was held on 18 June 2011 in Lugano, next to the 11th International

  17. Cardio-renal syndromes : report from the consensus conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter; Anker, Stefan D.; Anand, Inder; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Berl, Tomas; Bobek, Ilona; Cruz, Dinna N.; Daliento, Luciano; Davenport, Andrew; Haapio, Mikko; Hillege, Hans; House, Andrew A.; Katz, Nevin; Maisel, Alan; Mankad, Sunil; Zanco, Pierluigi; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ronco, Federico; Shaw, Andrew; Sheinfeld, Geoff; Soni, Sachin; Vescovo, Giorgio; Zamperetti, Nereo; Ponikowski, Piotr

    A consensus conference on cardio-renal syndromes (CRS) was held in Venice Italy, in September 2008 under the auspices of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI). The following topics were matter of discussion after a systematic literature review and the appraisal of the best available evidence:

  18. Recommendations for liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: an international consensus conference report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Lesurtel, Mickael; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Gores, Gregory J.; Langer, Bernard; Perrier, Arnaud; Abecassis, M.; Balabaud, C.; Bhoori, S.; Breitenstein, S.; Broelsch, C.; Burra, P.; Cherqui, D.; Colombo, M.; d'Albuquerque, C.; D'Alessandro, A.; de Santibanes, E.; Dufour, J. F.; Durand, F.; Dutkowski, P.; El-Serag, H.; Fan, S. T.; Fisher, R.; Forner, A.; Fung, J.; Geier, A.; Germani, G.; Gouw, A. S. H.; Gurusamy, K.; Heaton, N.; Heim, M.; Hemming, A.; Hubscher, S.; Ichida, T.; Kahn, D.; Kew, M.; Kita, Y.; Kiuchi, T.; Kudo, M.; Lee, S. G.; Lencioni, R.; Livraghi, T.; Lodge, P.; McCaughan, G.; Madoff, D.; Marrero, J.; Mergental, H.; Merle, P.; Miksad, R.; Mornex, F.; Paradis, V.; Pestalozzi, B.; Poon, R.; Porte, R.; Prasad, K. R.; Roskams, T.; Rossi, M.; Schlitt, H.; Shaked, A.; Sherman, M.; Siegler, M.; Suh, K.; Todo, S.; Toso, C.; Trevisani, F.; Valdecasas, J. C. G.; Vauthey, J. N.; Vilgrain, V.; Villamil, F.; Wald, C.; Weber, A.; Wiesner, R.; Wright, L.; Zheng, S.; Zucman-Rossi, J.; Bertschi, V.; Clavien, P. A.; Meyer, M.; Müllhaupt, B.; Munson, A.; Lesurtel, M.; Raptis, D.; Vonlanthen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Although liver transplantation is a widely accepted treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), much controversy remains and there is no generally accepted set of guidelines. An international consensus conference was held on Dec 2-4, 2010, in Zurich, Switzerland, with the aim of reviewing current

  19. 75 FR 3745 - NIH Consensus Development Conference on Vaginal Birth After Cesarean: New Insights; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... Cesarean: New Insights; Notice Notice is hereby given by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the ``NIH Consensus Development Conference on Vaginal Birth After Cesarean: New Insights'' to be held March... complications of an unsuccessful attempt at VBAC, medico-legal concerns, personal preferences of patients and...

  20. [Impact of the consensus conference on the ambulatory treatment of bronchiolitis in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halna, Muriel; Leblond, Pierre; Aissi, Euridyce; Dumonceaux, Anne; Delepoulle, Florence; El Kohen, Rachid; Hue, Valérie; Martinot, Alain

    2005-02-26

    To assess the impact of guidelines of the consensus conference in September 2000 on the ambulatory management of acute bronchiolitis in infants. Prospective multicenter study, in four hospitals in the North department in France, during three epidemic periods: the winter preceding the consensus conference and the two following winters. All the infants between 30 days and 2 years of age, admitted to an emergency care unit for a first or second episode of bronchiolitis were included. The infants' characteristics and ambulatory treatments prescribed were collected. Six hundred thirty-eight infants were included: 169 before the conference and 469 after. Seventy-seven percent had consulted previously and a prescription had been drawn-up for 77%. There was no difference in the frequency of drug prescriptions or physiotherapy between the three periods. After the conferences, inhaled beta(2) agonists were still prescribed in 21% of cases, inhaled corticosteroids in 15%, oral corticosteroids in 34%, antibiotics in 53% and mucolytics in 54%. Physiotherapy was prescribed for 58% of the infants. Two years after the consensus conference, the ambulatory treatment of bronchiolitis has no changed, corticosteroids, beta(2) agonists, antibiotics and mucolytics are still prescribed in excess. Further studies, within a few years, are required to reassess the application of the guidelines, not only in outpatient but also in inpatient management.

  1. Treatment of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): revised Canadian consensus guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandwein, Joseph M; Zhu, Nancy; Kumar, Rajat; Leber, Brian; Sabloff, Mitchell; Sandhu, Irwindeep; Kassis, Jeannine; Olney, Harold J; Elemary, Mohamed; Schuh, Andre C

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older patients is undergoing rapid changes, with a number of important publications in the past five years. Because of this, a group of Canadian leukemia experts has produced an update to the Canadian Consensus Guidelines that were published in 2013, with several new agents recommended, subject to availability. Recent studies have supported the survival benefit of induction chemotherapy for patients under age 80, except those with major co-morbidities or those with adverse risk cytogenetics who are not candidates for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Midostaurin should be added to induction therapy for patients up to age 70 with a FLT3 mutation, and gemtuzumab ozogamicin for de novo AML up to age 70 with favorable or intermediate risk cytogenetics. Daunorubicin 60 mg/m2 is the recommended dose for 3+7 induction therapy. Acute promyelocytic leukemia should be treated with arsenic trioxide plus all-trans retinoic acid, regardless of age, with cytotoxic therapy added upfront only for those with initial white blood count > 10. HSCT may be considered for selected suitable patients up to age 70-75. Haploidentical donor transplants may be considered for older patients. For non-induction candidates, azacitidine is recommended for those with adverse risk cytogenetics, while either a hypomethylating agent (HMA) or low-dose cytarabine can be used for others. HMA may also be used for relapsed/refractory disease after chemotherapy. For patients with secondary AML, CPX-351 is recommended for fit patients age 60-75. PMID:28804680

  2. Canadian consensus statement on HIV and its transmission in the context of criminal law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutfy, Mona; Tyndall, Mark; Baril, Jean-Guy; Montaner, Julio Sg; Kaul, Rupert; Hankins, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    A poor appreciation of the science related to HIV contributes to an overly broad use of the criminal law against individuals living with HIV in cases of HIV nondisclosure. To promote an evidence-informed application of the law in Canada, a team of six Canadian medical experts on HIV and transmission led the development of a consensus statement on HIV sexual transmission, HIV transmission associated with biting and spitting, and the natural history of HIV infection. The statement is based on a literature review of the most recent and relevant scientific evidence (current as of December 2013) regarding HIV and its transmission. It has been endorsed by >70 additional Canadian HIV experts and the Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada. Scientific and medical evidence clearly indicate that HIV is difficult to transmit during sex. For the purpose of informing the justice system, the per-act possibility of HIV transmission through sex, biting or spitting is described along a continuum from low possibility, to negligible possibility, to no possibility of transmission. This possibility takes into account the impact of factors such as the type of sexual acts, condom use, antiretroviral therapy and viral load. Dramatic advances in HIV therapy have transformed HIV infection into a chronic manageable condition. HIV physicians and scientists have a professional and ethical responsibility to assist those in the criminal justice system to understand and interpret the science regarding HIV. This is critical to prevent miscarriage of justice and to remove unnecessary barriers to evidence-based HIV prevention strategies.

  3. ERS/ELS/ACCP 2013 international consensus conference nomenclature on inducible laryngeal obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille M. Christensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals reporting episodes of breathing problems caused by re-occurring variable airflow obstructions in the larynx have been described in an increasing number of publications, with more than 40 different terms being used without consensus on definitions. This lack of an international consensus on nomenclature is a serious obstacle for the development of the area, as knowledge from different centres cannot be matched, pooled or readily utilised by others. Thus, an international Task Force has been created, led by the European Respiratory Society/European Laryngological Society/American College of Chest Physicians. This review describes the methods used to reach an international consensus on the subject and the resulting nomenclature, the 2013 international consensus conference nomenclature.

  4. Revised classification/nomenclature of vitiligo and related issues: the Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, K.; Lim, H. W.; Suzuki, T.; Katayama, I.; Hamzavi, I.; Lan, C. C. E.; Goh, B. K.; Anbar, T.; de Castro, C. Silva; Lee, A. Y.; Parsad, D.; van Geel, N.; Le Poole, I. C.; Oiso, N.; Benzekri, L.; Spritz, R.; Gauthier, Y.; Hann, S. K.; Picardo, M.; Taieb, A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary During the 2011 International Pigment Cell Conference (IPCC), the Vitiligo European Taskforce (VETF) convened a consensus conference on issues of global importance for vitiligo clinical research. As suggested by an international panel of experts, the conference focused on four topics: classification and nomenclature; definition of stable disease; definition of Koebner’s phenomenon (KP); and ‘autoimmune vitiligo’. These topics were discussed in seven working groups representing different geographical regions. A consensus emerged that segmental vitiligo be classified separately from all other forms of vitiligo and that the term ‘vitiligo’ be used as an umbrella term for all non-segmental forms of vitiligo, including ‘mixed vitiligo’ in which segmental and non-segmental vitiligo are combined and which is considered a subgroup of vitiligo. Further, the conference recommends that disease stability be best assessed based on the stability of individual lesions rather than the overall stability of the disease as the latter is difficult to define precisely and reliably. The conference also endorsed the classification of KP for vitiligo as proposed by the VETF (history based, clinical observation based, or experimentally induced). Lastly, the conference agreed that ‘autoimmune vitiligo’ should not be used as a separate classification as published evidence indicates that the pathophysiology of all forms of vitiligo likely involves autoimmune or inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:22417114

  5. What Is New Since the Last (1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe Boulet

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present document is to review the impact of new information on the recommendations made in the last (1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines. It includes relevant published studies and observations or comments regarding what are considered to be the main issues in asthma management in children and adults in office, emergency department, hospital and clinical settings. Asthma is still insufficiently controlled in a large number of patients, and practice guidelines need to be integrated better with current care. This report re-emphasises the need for the following: objective measures of airflow obstruction to confirm the diagnosis of asthma suggested by the clinical evaluation; identification of contributing factors; and the establishment of a treatment plan to rapidly obtain and maintain optimal asthma control according to specific criteria. Recent publications support the essential role of asthma education and environmental control in asthma management. They further support the role of inhaled corticosteroids as the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy of asthma, and of both long acting beta2-agonists and leukotriene antagonists as effective means to improve asthma control when inhaled corticosteroids are insufficient. New developments, such as combination therapy, and recent major trials, such as the Children’s Asthma Management Project (CAMP study, are discussed.

  6. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation: rationale and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamburin S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Tamburin,1 Stefano Paolucci,2 Francesca Magrinelli,1 Massimo Musicco,2,3 Giorgio Sandrini4,5 On behalf of the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN 1Department of Neurological, Biomedical and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, 2Santa Lucia Foundation, IRCCS, Rome, 3Institute of Biomedical Technologies (IBT National Research Council of Italy (CNR, Segrate, Milan, 4C. Mondino National Institute of Neurology Foundation, IRCCS, 5Department of Brain and Behavioural Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Abstract: Pain is very common in the neurorehabilitation setting, where it may not only represent a target for treatment but can also negatively influence rehabilitation procedures directly or through the side effects of painkillers. To date, there are neither guidelines nor consensus on how to assess and treat pain in neurorehabilitation. Because of the very scanty pieces of evidence on this topic, the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN was promoted under the auspices of different scientific societies. This article illustrates the rationale, methodology, and topics of the ICCPN. The recommendations of the ICCPN will offer some information on how to deal with pain in neurorehabilitation and may represent the starting point for further studies.Keywords: assessment, consensus conference, neurology, pain, rehabilitation, treatment

  7. Reaching consensus on drug resistance conferring mutations (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M Cirillo

    2016-01-01

    A user-friendly interface designed for nonexpert or expert operability.A standardized and validated analysis pipeline for variant analyses of M. tuberculosis next-generation sequencing (NGS data.Access to data beyond the published literature with dynamic and iterative updates of new data generated by global surveillance and clinical trials.A well-developed legal structure to ensure intellectual property rights and data ownership remain with contributors.A structured data-sharing architecture to restrict access to sensitive or unpublished data sets.Metadata standardization using CDISC: supports global, platform-independent data standards that enable information system interoperability.An emphasis on data quality and rigorous, expert curation with multiple quality control checks for whole-genome sequencing and other metadata.Validation of NGS analysis output by an expert committee with grading of resistance conferring mutations based on rigorous statistical standards.Regulatory-compliant analysis pipeline and database architecture. Successful execution of such an extensive database platform requires substantial collaboration from scientists investigating the genetic basis for drug resistance worldwide, and from developers with expertise in database design and implementation.

  8. Pharmacological Management of Chronic Neuropathic Pain – Consensus Statement and Guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE Moulin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NeP, generated by disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system, can be particularly severe and disabling. Prevalence estimates indicate that 2% to 3% of the population in the developed world suffer from NeP, which suggests that up to one million Canadians have this disabling condition. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of NeP are therefore urgently needed. Randomized, controlled trials, systematic reviews and existing guidelines focusing on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications are recommended in the guidelines if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound, randomized, controlled trial showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment are based on degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are certain antidepressants (tricyclics and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin. Second-line treatments recommended are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and topical lidocaine. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as third-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Recommended fourth-line treatments include cannabinoids, methadone and anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy, such as lamotrigine, topiramate and valproic acid. Treatment must be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Further studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes, and treatment of pediatric and central NeP.

  9. Risk analysis by citizens? Analysis of the first consensus conference held in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marris, C. [Universite de Versailles-Saint-Quentin, Centre d' Economie et d' Ethique pour l' Environnement et le Developpement, 78 - Versailles (France); Joly, P.B. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), Sociologie et Economie de la Recherche et Developpement, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1998-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: the French Parliamentary Office for the evaluation of scientific and technological choices (OPECST) is currently organizing a consensus conference. Following the model developed by the Danish Board of Technology, a panel of 15 French citizens is being asked to evaluate the use of genetically modified organisms in agriculture and food. This Danish model for direct citizen participation in technology assessment has gained growing support in other European countries and even further afield, such as Japan and Australia. This is, however, a novel experience for France, which has very little tradition for participatory technology assessment. The final and public phase of the 'conference citoyenne' will take place in Paris on 20-22 June 1998, therefore it is too early to outline our results in this abstract. Our paper will present an analysis of the impact and role of this conference in the wider public debate in France about agricultural bio-technologies. This will be based on interviews with key actors in this debate (scientists, consumer and environmental organisations, politicians), media reports, and video footage of the entire procedure of the consensus conference. (authors)

  10. The Copenhagen Consensus Conference 2016: children, youth, and physical activity in schools and during leisure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter; Duda, Joan; Hillman, Charles; Andersen, Lars Bo; Weiss, Maureen; Williams, Craig A; Lintunen, Taru; Green, Ken; Hansen, Peter Riis; Naylor, Patti-Jean; Ericsson, Ingegerd; Nielsen, Glen; Froberg, Karsten; Bugge, Anna; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Schipperijn, Jasper; Dagkas, Symeon; Agergaard, Sine; von Seelen, Jesper; Østergaard, Charlotte; Skovgaard, Thomas; Busch, Henrik; Elbe, Anne-Marie

    2016-10-01

    From 4 to 7 April 2016, 24 researchers from 8 countries and from a variety of academic disciplines gathered in Snekkersten, Denmark, to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity in children and youth, that is, individuals between 6 and 18 years. Physical activity is an overarching term that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organised sport, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programmes, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking. This consensus statement presents the accord on the effects of physical activity on children's and youth's fitness, health, cognitive functioning, engagement, motivation, psychological well-being and social inclusion, as well as presenting educational and physical activity implementation strategies. The consensus was obtained through an iterative process that began with presentation of the state-of-the art in each domain followed by plenary and group discussions. Ultimately, Consensus Conference participants reached agreement on the 21-item consensus statement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Canadian Consensus Recommendations for the Optimal Use of Enfuvirtide in HIV/AIDS Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Rachlis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: An eight-member group consisting of Canadian infectious disease and immunology specialists and a family physician with significant experience in HIV management was convened to update existing recommendations, specifically intended for use by Canadian HIV-treating physicians, on the appropriate use of enfuvirtide in HIV/AIDS patients with resistance to other antiretroviral drugs.

  12. Recommendations for mechanical ventilation of critically ill children from the Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneyber, Martin C J; de Luca, Daniele; Calderini, Edoardo; Jarreau, Pierre-Henri; Javouhey, Etienne; Lopez-Herce, Jesus; Hammer, Jürg; Macrae, Duncan; Markhorst, Dick G; Medina, Alberto; Pons-Odena, Marti; Racca, Fabrizio; Wolf, Gerhard; Biban, Paolo; Brierley, Joe; Rimensberger, Peter C

    2017-12-01

    Much of the common practice in paediatric mechanical ventilation is based on personal experiences and what paediatric critical care practitioners have adopted from adult and neonatal experience. This presents a barrier to planning and interpretation of clinical trials on the use of specific and targeted interventions. We aim to establish a European consensus guideline on mechanical ventilation of critically children. The European Society for Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care initiated a consensus conference of international European experts in paediatric mechanical ventilation to provide recommendations using the Research and Development/University of California, Los Angeles, appropriateness method. An electronic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed using a combination of medical subject heading terms and text words related to mechanical ventilation and disease-specific terms. The Paediatric Mechanical Ventilation Consensus Conference (PEMVECC) consisted of a panel of 15 experts who developed and voted on 152 recommendations related to the following topics: (1) general recommendations, (2) monitoring, (3) targets of oxygenation and ventilation, (4) supportive measures, (5) weaning and extubation readiness, (6) normal lungs, (7) obstructive diseases, (8) restrictive diseases, (9) mixed diseases, (10) chronically ventilated patients, (11) cardiac patients and (12) lung hypoplasia syndromes. There were 142 (93.4%) recommendations with "strong agreement". The final iteration of the recommendations had none with equipoise or disagreement. These recommendations should help to harmonise the approach to paediatric mechanical ventilation and can be proposed as a standard-of-care applicable in daily clinical practice and clinical research.

  13. Repigmentation in vitiligo: position paper of the Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Emily Y; Eleftheriadou, Viktoria; Esmat, Samia; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Passeron, Thierry; Böhm, Markus; Anbar, Tag; Goh, Boon Kee; Lan, Cheng-Che E; Lui, Harvey; Ramam, M; Raboobee, Noufal; Katayama, Ichiro; Suzuki, Tamio; Parsad, Davinder; Seth, Vaneeta; Lim, Henry W; van Geel, Nanja; Mulekar, Sanjeev; Harris, John; Wittal, Richard; Benzekri, Laila; Gauthier, Yvon; Kumarasinghe, Prasad; Thng, Steven T G; Silva de Castro, Caio Cesar; Abdallah, Marwa; Vrijman, Charlotte; Bekkenk, Marcel; Seneschal, Julien; Pandya, Amit G; Ezzedine, Khaled; Picardo, Mauro; Taïeb, Alain

    2017-01-01

    The Vitiligo Global Issues Consensus Conference (VGICC), through an international e-Delphi consensus, concluded that 'repigmentation' and 'maintenance of gained repigmentation' are essential core outcome measures in future vitiligo trials. This VGICC position paper addresses these core topics in two sections and includes an atlas depicting vitiligo repigmentation patterns and color match. The first section delineates mechanisms and characteristics of vitiligo repigmentation, and the second section summarizes the outcomes of international meeting discussions and two e-surveys on vitiligo repigmentation, which had been carried out over 3 yr. Treatment is defined as successful if repigmentation exceeds 80% and at least 80% of the gained repigmentation is maintained for over 6 months. No agreement was found on the best outcome measure for assessing target or global repigmentation, therefore highlighting the limitations of e-surveys in addressing clinical measurements. Until there is a clear consensus, existing tools should be selected according to the specific needs of each study. A workshop will be conducted to address the remaining issues so as to achieve a consensus. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Proceedings of GeoSask 2005 : The 58. Canadian Geotechnical Conference and 6. Joint CGS-IAH Groundwater Specialty Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The Canadian and international geotechnical community gathered at this conference to exchange information on recent research and development concerning all sectors of geotechnical engineering, applied geology and hydrogeology. The technical sessions addressed a wide range of geotechnical engineering issues such as soil mechanics and geodynamics; geoenvironmental issues associated with contaminant transport in landfills; hydrogeology issues such as aquifer properties, hydrogeochemistry, groundwater resources, hydrogeological mapping, contaminants and remediation; geosynthetics; geotechnical modelling; rock engineering; engineering geology; mining geotechnics; buried structures; unsaturated soils and aquitards. The presentations included several geotechnical case studies that focused on broad issues such as hydraulic properties of sedimentary rock aquifers, design criteria for geotextile filters used in agricultural drainage, the long term performance of containment systems, slope stability analysis of landfills, methane emissions from landfills, shear zones in weak rocks and tailings at oil sands operations. The conference featured approximately 200 presentations, of which 17 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  15. A new spin on research translation: the Boston Consensus Conference on Human Biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica W; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Altman, Rebecca Gasior; Webster, Thomas F; Ozonoff, David M

    2009-04-01

    Translating research to make it more understandable and effective (research translation) has been declared a priority in environmental health but does not always include communication to the public or residents of communities affected by environmental hazards. Their unique perspectives are also commonly missing from discussions about science and technology policy. The consensus conference process, developed in Denmark, offers a way to address this gap. The Boston Consensus Conference on Human Biomonitoring, held in Boston, Massachusetts, in the fall of 2006, was designed to educate and elicit input from 15 Boston-area residents on the scientifically complex topic of human biomonitoring for environmental chemicals. This lay panel considered the many ethical, legal, and scientific issues surrounding biomonitoring and prepared a report expressing their views. The lay panel's findings provide a distinct and important voice on the expanding use of biomonitoring. In some cases, such as a call for opt-in reporting of biomonitoring results to study participants, they mirror recommendations raised elsewhere. Other conclusions have not been heard previously, including the recommendation that an individual's results should be statutorily exempted from the medical record unless permission is granted, and the opportunity to use biomonitoring data to stimulate green chemistry. The consensus conference model addresses both aspects of a broader conception of research translation: engaging the public in scientific questions, and bringing their unique perspectives to bear on public health research, practice, and policy. In this specific application, a lay panel's recommendations on biomonitoring surveillance, communication, and ethics have practical implications for the conduct of biomonitoring studies and surveillance programs.

  16. Mortality reduction in cardiac anesthesia and intensive care: results of the first International Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, G; Augoustides, J G; Guarracino, F; Santini, F; Ponschab, M; Pasero, D; Rodseth, R N; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Silvay, G; Salvi, L; Camporesi, E; Comis, M; Conte, M; Bevilacqua, S; Cabrini, L; Cariello, C; Caramelli, F; De Santis, V; Del Sarto, P; Dini, D; Forti, A; Galdieri, N; Giordano, G; Gottin, L; Greco, M; Maglioni, E; Mantovani, L; Manzato, A; Meli, M; Paternoster, G; Pittarello, D; Rana, K N; Ruggeri, L; Salandin, V; Sangalli, F; Zambon, M; Zucchetti, M; Bignami, E; Alfieri, O; Zangrillo, A

    2011-03-01

    There is no consensus on which drugs/techniques/strategies can affect mortality in the perioperative period of cardiac surgery. With the aim of identifying these measures, and suggesting measures for prioritized future investigation we performed the first International Consensus Conference on this topic. The consensus was a continuous international internet-based process with a final meeting on 28 June 2010 in Milan at the Vita-Salute University. Participants included 340 cardiac anesthesiologists, cardiac surgeons, and cardiologists from 65 countries all over the world. A comprehensive literature review was performed to identify topics that subsequently generated position statements for discussion, voting, and ranking. Of the 17 major topics with a documented mortality effect, seven were subsequently excluded after further evaluation due to concerns about clinical applicability and/or study methodology. The following topics are documented as reducing mortality: administration of insulin, levosimendan, volatile anesthetics, statins, chronic β-blockade, early aspirin therapy, the use of pre-operative intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, and referral to high-volume centers. The following are documented as increasing mortality: administration of aprotinin and aged red blood cell transfusion. These interventions were classified according to the level of evidence and effect on mortality and a position statement was generated. This International Consensus Conference has identified the non-surgical interventions that merit urgent study to achieve further reductions in mortality after cardiac surgery: insulin, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, levosimendan, volatile anesthetics, statins, chronic β-blockade, early aspirin therapy, and referral to high-volume centers. The use of aprotinin and aged red blood cells may result in increased mortality. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica. © 2011 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  17. CT features of vasculitides based on the 2012 international chapel hill consensus conference revised classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Jee Hye; Chun, Eun Ju; Kim, Hae Young; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Kyung Won [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kwang, Hyon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Vasculitis, characterized by inflammation of vessel walls, is comprised of heterogeneous clinicopathological entities, and thus poses a diagnostic challenge. The most widely used approach for classifying vasculitides is based on the International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature system. Based on the recently revised CHCC 2012, we propose computed tomography (CT) features of vasculitides and a differential diagnosis based on location and morphological characteristics. Finally, vasculitis mimics should be differentiated, because erroneous application of immunosuppressive drugs on vasculitis mimics may be ineffective, even deteriorating. This article presents the utility of CT in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of vasculitides.

  18. Cologne Consensus Conference, Management of Conflict of Interest, 12 and 13 September 2014, Cologne, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Simper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On 12–13 September 2014 the third annual Cologne Consensus Conference (CCC was held in Cologne, Germany. The two-day educational event was organised by the European Cardiology Section Foundation (ECSF and the European Board for Accreditation in Cardiology (EBAC, a specialty CME-CPD accreditation board of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS. The conference was planned in cooperation with an impressive group of international organisations and faculty members representing leading European and North American institutions. Each year, the CCC is organised around a specific topic area. For the conference’s third iteration, the management of conflicts of interest (COI was the focus. The CCC 2014 was an exceptional opportunity for international experts and leadership to gather and learn from one another through both the formal presentations and lively group discussions. This report provides a summary of the presentations and discussions from the educational event.

  19. 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: evidence-based nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesalski, Hans Konrad; Aggett, Peter J; Anton, Robert; Bernstein, Paul S; Blumberg, Jeffrey; Heaney, Robert P; Henry, Jeya; Nolan, John M; Richardson, David P; van Ommen, Ben; Witkamp, Renger F; Rijkers, Ger T; Zöllner, Iris

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term "Hohenheim Consensus Conference" defines conferences dealing with nutrition-related topics. The major aim of the conference is to review the state of the art of a given topic with experts from different areas (basic science, clinicians, epidemiologists, etc.). Based on eight to 12 questions, the experts discuss short answers and try to come to a consensus. A scientifically based text is formulated that justifies the consensus answer. To discuss the requirements for the scientific substantiation of claims, the 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference gathered the views of many academic experts in the field of nutritional research and asked these experts to address the various aspects of a claims substantiation process and the possibilities and limitations of the different approaches. The experts spent a day presenting and discussing their views and arrived at several consensus statements that can serve as guidance for bodies performing claims assessments in the framework of regulatory systems. The 26th Hohenheim Consensus Conference addresses some general aspects and describes the current scientific status from the point of view of six case studies to illustrate specific areas of scientific interest: carotenoids and vitamin A in relation to age-related macular degeneration, the quality of carbohydrates (as expressed by the glycemic index) in relation to health and well-being, probiotics in relation to intestinal and immune functions, micronutrient intake and maintenance of normal body functions, and food components with antioxidative properties and health benefits. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. [Consensus conference on providing information of adverse events to patients and relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Delgado, M C; Fernández-Maillo, M; Bañeres-Amella, J; Campillo-Artero, C; Cabré-Pericas, L; Anglés-Coll, R; Gutiérrez-Fernández, R; Aranaz-Andrés, J M; Pardo-Hernández, A; Wu, A

    2013-01-01

    To develop recommendations regarding «Information about adverse events to patients and their families», through the implementation of a consensus conference. A literature review was conducted to identify all relevant articles, the major policies and international guidelines, and the specific legislation developed in some countries on this process. The literature review was the basis for responding to a series of questions posed in a public session. A group of experts presented the best available evidence, interacting with stakeholders. At the end of the session, an interdisciplinary and multi-professional jury established the final recommendations of the consensus conference. The main recommendations advocate the need to develop policies and institutional guidelines in our field, favouring the patient adverse events disclosure process. The recommendations emphasize the need for the training of professionals in communication skills and patient safety, as well as the development of strategies for supporting professionals who are involved in an adverse event. The assessment of the interest and impact of specific legislation that would help the implementation of these policies was also considered. A cultural change is needed at all levels, nuanced and adapted to the specific social and cultural aspects of our social and health spheres, and involves all stakeholders in the system to create a framework of trust and credibility in which the processing of information about adverse events may become effective. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. On the path to translation: Highlights from the 2010 Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thériault Brigitte L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer continues to be the most lethal of the gynaecologic malignancies due to the lack of early detection, screening strategies and ineffective therapeutics for late-stage metastatic disease, particularly in the recurrent setting. The gathering of researchers investigating fundamental pathobiology of ovarian cancer and the clinicians who treat patients with this insidious disease is paramount to meeting the challenges we face. Since 2002, the Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research, held every two years, has served this essential purpose. The objectives of this conference have been to disseminate new information arising from the most recent ovarian cancer research and identify the most pressing challenges we still face as scientists and clinicians. This is best accomplished through direct encounters and exchanges of innovative ideas among colleagues and trainees from the realms of basic science and clinical disciplines. This meeting has and continues to successfully facilitate rapid networking and establish new collaborations from across Canada. This year, more guest speakers and participants from other countries have extended the breadth of the research on ovarian cancer that was discussed at the meeting. This report summarizes the key findings presented at the fifth biennial Canadian Conference on Ovarian Cancer Research held in Toronto, Ontario, and includes the important issues and challenges we still face in the years ahead to make a significant impact on this devastating disease.

  2. Abstracts of Go-Expo 2003 : Gas and oil exposition and Canadian international petroleum conference 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The Go-Expo 2003 gas and oil exposition, held in conjunction with the Canadian international petroleum conference, showcased some of the newest technologies, products and services available to the petroleum industry. The more than 30 presentations featured case studies on new technologies pertaining to exploration, drilling and production, environmental strategies, information technology and e-commerce. The presenters represented academia, industry, as well as provincial and territorial governments. Some of the topics discussed included: coalbed methane drilling procedures, upgrading processes, in-line separation techniques, reducing emissions under the Kyoto Protocol, safety and pollution prevention in the industry, water abatement in gas wells, and integrated crisis management.

  3. Digital technologies to support planning, treatment, and fabrication processes and outcome assessments in implant dentistry. Summary and consensus statements. The 4th EAO consensus conference 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Cordaro, Luca; van Assche, Nele; Benic, Goran I; Bornstein, Michael; Gamper, Felix; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Harris, David; Hürzeler, Marc; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Kapos, Theodoros; Kohal, Ralf J; Patzelt, Sebastian B M; Sailer, Irena; Tahmaseb, Ali; Vercruyssen, Marjolein; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The task of this working group was to assess the existing knowledge in computer-assisted implant planning and placement, fabrication of reconstructions applying computers compared to traditional fabrication, and assessments of treatment outcomes using novel imaging techniques. Three reviews were available for assessing the current literature and provided the basis for the discussions and the consensus report. One review dealt with the use of computers to plan implant therapy and to place implants in partially and fully edentulous patients. A second one focused on novel techniques and methods to assess treatment outcomes and the third compared CAD/CAM-fabricated reconstructions to conventionally fabricated ones. The consensus statements, the clinical recommendations, and the implications for research, all of them after approval by the plenum of the consensus conference, are described in this article. The three articles by Vercruyssen et al., Patzelt & Kohal, and Benic et al. are presented separately as part of the supplement of this consensus conference. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Critical thinking in health professions education: summary and consensus statements of the Millennium Conference 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace C; Newman, Lori R; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking is central to the function of health care professionals. However, this topic is not explicitly taught or assessed within current programs, yet the need is greater than ever, in an era of information explosion, spiraling health care costs, and increased understanding about metacognition. To address the importance of teaching critical thinking in health professions education, the Shapiro Institute for Education and Research and the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation jointly sponsored the Millennium Conference 2011 on Critical Thinking. Teams of physician and nurse educators were selected through an application process. Attendees proposed strategies for integrating principles of critical thinking more explicitly into health professions curricula. Working in interprofessional, multi-institutional groups, participants tackled questions about teaching, assessment, and faculty development. Deliberations were summarized into consensus statements. Educational leaders participated in a structured dialogue about the enhancement of critical thinking in health professions education and recommend strategies to teach critical thinking.

  5. Online consensus conferences for clinical guidelines development - a survey among participants from the International Guidelines for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Ricardo N; Jacobs, Anja; Rosumeck, Stefanie; Nast, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Guideline development requires considerable time and financial resources. New technical devices such as software for online conferences may help to reduce time and financial efforts of guidelines development. The present survey may serve as an explorative pilot for a future study to determine the technical feasibility, acceptability and possible weaknesses of online consensus conferences for clinical guidelines development. An anonymous online survey was conducted among participants in the online consensus conference of the International League of Dermatological Societies (ILDS) Guidelines for the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis. The majority of participants reported no technical problems with the participation in the online consensus conference; one participant had substantial technical problems accountable to a regional telephone breakdown. The majority of participants would not have preferred a traditional face-to-face conference, and all participants rated online consensus conferences for international guidelines as absolutely acceptable. Rates of acceptance were particularly high among those participants with prior experience with consensus conferences. Certain aspects, particularly the possibilities of debating, were rated as possibly superior in face-to-face conferences by some participants. The data from the online survey indicate that online consensus conferences may be an appropriate alternative to traditional face-to-face consensus conferences, especially within the frame of international guidelines that would require high travel costs and time. Further research is necessary to confirm the data from this explorative pilot study. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Impact of consensus development conference guidelines on primary care of bronchiolitis: are national guidelines being followed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzet, Sandrine; Réfabert, Luc; Letrilliart, Laurent; Ortolan, Bernard; Colin, Cyrille

    2007-08-01

    To measure the impact of French national consensus guidelines on the clinical practices of primary care paediatricians and general practitioners. Non-randomized intervention study, with a first survey 1 year before the consensus development conference and a second survey 1 year after. Implementation of bronchiolitis management guidelines through the medical press and the Internet. Paediatricians and general practitioners treating infants 1 year of age and under consulting for a first-time episode of bronchiolitis. Ninety-three doctors and 510 infants were included during the first phase of the study and 96 doctors and 394 infants during the second phase. This study showed a slight increase in adherence to the guidelines for non-validated drugs (6.6% adherence before and 14.3% after), general advice (29.0% adherence before and 57.1% after) and flow modulation respiratory physical therapy (91.9% adherence before and 98.8% after). Increase in adherence to guidelines for other practices, that is, hospitalization, prescribing antibiotics and complementary examinations, was not statistically significant. Adherence to the guidelines on providing general advice increased the most between the two studies. The guidelines helped practitioners evolve slightly in their approach to the treatment of bronchiolitis. Non-validated drugs remain frequently used. Additional resources for implementing the guidelines should be provided to improve primary care doctors' practices.

  7. Consensus on precision medicine for metastatic cancers: a report from the MAP conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanton, C; Soria, J-C; Bardelli, A; Biankin, A; Caldas, C; Chandarlapaty, S; de Koning, L; Dive, C; Feunteun, J; Leung, S-Y; Marais, R; Mardis, E R; McGranahan, N; Middleton, G; Quezada, S A; Rodón, J; Rosenfeld, N; Sotiriou, C; André, F

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in biotechnologies have led to the development of multiplex genomic and proteomic analyses for clinical use. Nevertheless, guidelines are currently lacking to determine which molecular assays should be implemented in metastatic cancers. The first MAP conference was dedicated to exploring the use of genomics to better select therapies in the treatment of metastatic cancers. Sixteen consensus items were covered. There was a consensus that new technologies like next-generation sequencing of tumors and ddPCR on circulating free DNA have convincing analytical validity. Further work needs to be undertaken to establish the clinical utility of liquid biopsies and the added clinical value of expanding from individual gene tests into large gene panels. Experts agreed that standardized bioinformatics methods for biological interpretation of genomic data are needed and that precision medicine trials should be stratified based on the level of evidence available for the genomic alterations identified. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. European consensus conference on unruptured brain AVMs treatment (Supported by EANS, ESMINT, EGKS, and SINCH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenzato, Marco; Boccardi, Edoardo; Beghi, Ettore; Vajkoczy, Peter; Szikora, Istvan; Motti, Enrico; Regli, Luca; Raabe, Andreas; Eliava, Shalva; Gruber, Andreas; Meling, Torstein R; Niemela, Mika; Pasqualin, Alberto; Golanov, Andrey; Karlsson, Bengt; Kemeny, Andras; Liscak, Roman; Lippitz, Bodo; Radatz, Matthias; La Camera, Alessandro; Chapot, René; Islak, Civan; Spelle, Laurent; Debernardi, Alberto; Agostoni, Elio; Revay, Martina; Morgan, Michael K

    2017-06-01

    In December of 2016, a Consensus Conference on unruptured AVM treatment, involving 24 members of the three European societies dealing with the treatment of cerebral AVMs (EANS, ESMINT, and EGKS) was held in Milan, Italy. The panel made the following statements and general recommendations: (1) Brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a complex disease associated with potentially severe natural history; (2) The results of a randomized trial (ARUBA) cannot be applied equally for all unruptured brain arteriovenous malformation (uBAVM) and for all treatment modalities; (3) Considering the multiple treatment modalities available, patients with uBAVMs should be evaluated by an interdisciplinary neurovascular team consisting of neurosurgeons, neurointerventionalists, radiosurgeons, and neurologists experienced in the diagnosis and treatment of brain AVM; (4) Balancing the risk of hemorrhage and the associated restrictions of everyday activities related to untreated unruptured AVMs against the risk of treatment, there are sufficient indications to treat unruptured AVMs grade 1 and 2 (Spetzler-Martin); (5) There may be indications for treating patients with higher grades, based on a case-to-case consensus decision of the experienced team; (6) If treatment is indicated, the primary strategy should be defined by the multidisciplinary team prior to the beginning of the treatment and should aim at complete eradication of the uBAVM; (7) After having considered the pros and cons of a randomized trial vs. a registry, the panel proposed a prospective European Multidisciplinary Registry.

  9. Imaging Algorithms for Evaluating Suspected Rotator Cuff Disease: Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound Consensus Conference Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jon A.; Benson, Carol B.; Bancroft, Laura W.; Bedi, Asheesh; McShane, John M.; Miller, Theodore T.; Parker, Laurence; Smith, Jay; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Thiele, Ralf G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Wise, James N.; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a panel of specialists from a variety of medical disciplines to reach a consensus about the recommended imaging evaluation of painful shoulders with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease. The panel met in Chicago, Ill, on October 18 and 19, 2011, and created this consensus statement regarding the roles of radiography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography. The consensus panel consisted of two co-moderators, a facilitator, a statistician and health care economist, and 10 physicians who have specialty expertise in shoulder pain evaluation and/or treatment. Of the 13 physicians on the panel, nine were radiologists who were chosen to represent a broad range of skill sets in diagnostic imaging, different practice types (private and academic), and different geographical regions of the United States. Five of the radiologists routinely performed musculoskeletal US as part of their practice and four did not. There was also one representative from each of the following clinical specialties: rheumatology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and nonoperative sports medicine. The goal of this conference was to construct several algorithms with which to guide the imaging evaluation of suspected rotator cuff disease in patients with a native rotator cuff, patients with a repaired rotator cuff, and patients who have undergone shoulder replacement. The panel hopes that these recommendations will lead to greater uniformity in rotator cuff imaging and more cost-effective care for patients suspected of having rotator cuff abnormality. © RSNA, 2013 PMID:23401583

  10. ESMO Guidelines consensus conference on malignant lymphoma 2011 part 1 : diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghielmini, M; Vitolo, U; Kimby, E; Montoto, S; Walewski, J; Pfreundschuh, M; Federico, M; Hoskin, P; McNamara, C; Caligaris-Cappio, F; Stilgenbauer, S; Marcus, R; Trneny, M; Dreger, P; Montserrat, E; Dreyling, M; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.

    To complete the existing treatment guidelines for all tumor types, ESMO organizes consensus conferences to better clarify open issues in each disease. In this setting, a consensus conference on the management of lymphoma was held on 18 June 2011 in Lugano, immediately after the end of the 11th

  11. Domains of Core Competency, Standards, and Quality Assurance for Building Global Capacity in Health Promotion: The Galway Consensus Conference Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrante, John P.; Barry, Margaret M.; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O.; Auld, M. Elaine; Collins, Janet L.; Lamarre, Marie-Claude; Magnusson, Gudjon; McQueen, David V.; Mittelmark, Maurice B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the outcome of the Galway Consensus Conference, an effort undertaken as a first step toward international collaboration on credentialing in health promotion and health education. Twenty-nine leading authorities in health promotion, health education, and public health convened a 2-day meeting in Galway, Ireland, during which the…

  12. 3rd St. Gallen EORTC Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference: Consensus recommendations on controversial issues in the primary treatment of pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, M.P. (Manfred P.); J. Zalcberg (John); M. Ducreux (Michel); G. Aust (Gabriela); M.J. Bruno (Marco); M.W. Buchler (M.); Delpero, J.-R. (Jean-Robert); Gloor, B. (Beat); R. Glynne-Jones; Hartwig, W. (Werner); Huguet, F. (Florence); P. Laurent-Puig (Pierre); F. Lordick (Florian); P. Maisonneuve (Patrick); J. Mayerle (Julia); Martignoni, M. (Marc); J.P. Neoptolemos (John); Rhim, A.D. (Andrew D.); Schmied, B.M. (Bruno M.); T. Seufferlein (Thomas); Werner, J. (Jens); van Laethem, J.-L. (Jean-Luc); F. Otto (Florian)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe primary treatment of pancreatic cancer was the topic of the 3rd St. Gallen Conference 2016. A multidisciplinary panel reviewed the current evidence and discussed controversial issues in a moderated consensus session. Here we report on the key expert recommendations. It was generally

  13. Technology-enabled assessment of health professions education: consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Zubair; Boulet, John R; Cook, David A

    2011-01-01

    . This article was developed by the 2010 Ottawa Conference Consensus Group on technology-enabled assessment to guide practitioners and researchers working in this area. This article highlights the changing nature of ICTs in assessment, the importance of aligning technology-enabled assessment with local context...

  14. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Consensus Guidelines on Safety and Quality Indicators in Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Armstrong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several organizations worldwide have developed procedure-based guidelines and/or position statements regarding various aspects of quality and safety indicators, and credentialing for endoscopy. Although important, they do not specifically address patient needs or provide a framework for their adoption in the context of endoscopy services. The consensus guidelines reported in this article, however, aimed to identify processes and indicators relevant to the provision of high-quality endoscopy services that will support ongoing quality improvement across many jurisdictions, specifically in the areas of ethics, facility standards and policies, quality assurance, training and education, reporting standards and patient perceptions.

  15. Initiation and Use of Propranolol for Infantile Hemangioma: Report of a Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommelt, Peter C.; Chamlin, Sarah L.; Haggstrom, Anita; Bauman, Nancy M.; Chiu, Yvonne E.; Chun, Robert H.; Garzon, Maria C.; Holland, Kristen E.; Liberman, Leonardo; MacLellan-Tobert, Susan; Mancini, Anthony J.; Metry, Denise; Puttgen, Katherine B.; Seefeldt, Marcia; Sidbury, Robert; Ward, Kendra M.; Blei, Francine; Baselga, Eulalia; Cassidy, Laura; Darrow, David H.; Joachim, Shawna; Kwon, Eun-Kyung M.; Martin, Kari; Perkins, Jonathan; Siegel, Dawn H.; Boucek, Robert J.; Frieden, Ilona J.

    2013-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are common neoplasms composed of proliferating endothelial-like cells. Despite the relative frequency of IH and the potential severity of complications, there are currently no uniform guidelines for treatment. Although propranolol has rapidly been adopted, there is significant uncertainty and divergence of opinion regarding safety monitoring, dose escalation, and its use in PHACE syndrome (PHACE = posterior fossa, hemangioma, arterial lesions, cardiac abnormalities, eye abnormalities; a cutaneous neurovascular syndrome characterized by large, segmental hemangiomas of the head and neck along with congenital anomalies of the brain, heart, eyes and/or chest wall). A consensus conference was held on December 9, 2011. The multidisciplinary team reviewed existing data on the pharmacologic properties of propranolol and all published reports pertaining to the use of propranolol in pediatric patients. Workgroups were assigned specific topics to propose protocols on the following subjects: contraindications, special populations, pretreatment evaluation, dose escalation, and monitoring. Consensus protocols were recorded during the meeting and refined after the meeting. When appropriate, protocol clarifications and revision were made and agreed upon by the group via teleconference. Because of the absence of high-quality clinical research data, evidence-based recommendations are not possible at present. However, the team agreed on a number of recommendations that arose from a review of existing evidence, including when to treat complicated IH; contraindications and pretreatment evaluation protocols; propranolol use in PHACE syndrome; formulation, target dose, and frequency of propranolol; initiation of propranolol in infants; cardiovascular monitoring; ongoing monitoring; and prevention of hypoglycemia. Where there was considerable controversy, the more conservative approach was selected. We acknowledge that the recommendations are conservative in

  16. Conference Scene: epigenetics eh! The first formal meeting of the Canadian epigenetics community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Alan; Hendzel, Michael J

    2011-08-01

    In recognition of Canada's longstanding interest in epigenetics - and a particular linguistic interjection - the inaugural 'Epigenetics, Eh!' conference was held between 4-7 May 2011 in London, Ontario. The meeting struck an excellent balance between Canadian and international leaders in epigenetic research while also providing a venue to showcase up-and-coming talent. Almost without exception, presentations touched on the wide-ranging and severe consequences of epigenetic dysfunction, as well as current and emerging therapeutic opportunities. While gaining a deeper understanding of how DNA and histone modifications, together with multiple classes of ncRNAs, act to functionalize our genome, participants were also provided with a glimpse of the astounding complexity of chromatin structure, challenging existing dogma.

  17. Laparoscopic ventral/incisional hernia repair: updated Consensus Development Conference based guidelines [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silecchia, Gianfranco; Campanile, Fabio Cesare; Sanchez, Luis; Ceccarelli, Graziano; Antinori, Armando; Ansaloni, Luca; Olmi, Stefano; Ferrari, Giovanni Carlo; Cuccurullo, Diego; Baccari, Paolo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Vettoretto, Nereo; Piccoli, Micaela

    2015-09-01

    The Executive board of the Italian Society for Endoscopic Surgery (SICE) promoted an update of the first evidence-based Italian Consensus Conference Guidelines 2010 because a large amount of literature has been published in the last 4 years about the topics examined and new relevant issues. The scientific committee selected the topics to be addressed: indications to surgical treatment including special conditions (obesity, cirrhosis, diastasis recti abdominis, acute presentation); safety and outcome of intraperitoneal meshes (synthetic and biologic); fixing devices (absorbable/non-absorbable); abdominal border and parastomal hernia; intraoperative and perioperative complications; and recurrent ventral/incisional hernia. All the recommendations are the result of a careful and complete literature review examined with autonomous judgment by the entire panel. The process was supervised by experts in methodology and epidemiology from the most qualified Italian institution. Two external reviewers were designed by the EAES and EHS to guarantee the most objective, transparent, and reliable work. The Oxford hierarchy (OCEBM Levels of Evidence Working Group*. "The Oxford 2011 Levels of Evidence") was used by the panel to grade clinical outcomes according to levels of evidence. The recommendations were based on the grading system suggested by the GRADE working group. The availability of recent level 1 evidence (a meta-analysis of 10 RCTs) allowed to recommend that not only laparoscopic repair is an acceptable alternative to the open repair, but also it is advantageous in terms of shorter hospital stay and wound infection rate. This conclusion appears to be extremely relevant in a clinical setting. Indications about specific conditions could also be issued: laparoscopy is recommended for the treatment of recurrent ventral hernias and obese patients, while it is a potential option for compensated cirrhotic and childbearing-age female patients. Many relevant and controversial

  18. Practical Approaches to the Use of Lenalidomide in Multiple Myeloma: A Canadian Consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Reece

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Canada, lenalidomide combined with dexamethasone (Len/Dex is approved for use in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM. Our expert panel sought to provide an up-to-date practical guide on the use of lenalidomide in the managing RRMM within the Canadian clinical setting, including management of common adverse events (AEs. The panel concluded that safe, effective administration of Len/Dex treatment involves the following steps: (1 lenalidomide dose adjustment based on creatinine clearance and the extent of neutropenia or thrombocytopenia, (2 dexamethasone administered at 20–40 mg/week, and (3 continuation of treatment until disease progression or until toxicity persists despite dose reduction. Based on available evidence, the following precautions should reduce the risk of common Len/Dex AEs: (1 all patients treated with Len/Dex should receive thromboprophylaxis, (2 erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs should be used cautiously, and (3 females of child-bearing potential and males in contact with such females must use multiple contraception methods. Finally, while Len/Dex can be administered irrespective of prior therapy and in all prognostic subsets, patients with chromosomal deletion 17(p13 have less favorable outcomes with all treatments, including Len/Dex. New directions for the use of lenalidomide in RRMM are also considered.

  19. Integrating new approaches to atrial fibrillation management: the 6th AFNET/EHRA Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Dipak; Breithardt, Günter; Camm, A John; Lip, Gregory Y H; Schotten, Ulrich; Ahlsson, Anders; Arnar, David; Atar, Dan; Auricchio, Angelo; Bax, Jeroen; Benussi, Stefano; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Borggrefe, Martin; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Calkins, Hugh; Casadei, Barbara; Castellá, Manuel; Chua, Winnie; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Fabritz, Larissa; Feuring, Martin; Freedman, Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Haase, Doreen; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbuchel, Hein; Hendriks, Jeroen; Hunter, Craig; Kääb, Stefan; Kespohl, Stefanie; Landmesser, Ulf; Lane, Deirdre A; Lewalter, Thorsten; Mont, Lluís; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Pison, Laurent; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Rienstra, Michiel; Savelieva, Irina; Schnabel, Renate; Sinner, Moritz F; Sommer, Philipp; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Vardas, Panagiotis E; Verma, Atul; Wakili, Reza; Weber, Evelyn; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, André; Hindricks, Gerhard; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2018-01-02

    There are major challenges ahead for clinicians treating patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The population with AF is expected to expand considerably and yet, apart from anticoagulation, therapies used in AF have not been shown to consistently impact on mortality or reduce adverse cardiovascular events. New approaches to AF management, including the use of novel technologies and structured, integrated care, have the potential to enhance clinical phenotyping or result in better treatment selection and stratified therapy. Here, we report the outcomes of the 6th Consensus Conference of the Atrial Fibrillation Network (AFNET) and the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), held at the European Society of Cardiology Heart House in Sophia Antipolis, France, 17-19 January 2017. Sixty-two global specialists in AF and 13 industry partners met to develop innovative solutions based on new approaches to screening and diagnosis, enhancing integration of AF care, developing clinical pathways for treating complex patients, improving stroke prevention strategies, and better patient selection for heart rate and rhythm control. Ultimately, these approaches can lead to better outcomes for patients with AF. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  20. A Canadian consensus on the management of newly diagnosed and relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seftel, M.D.; Barnett, M.J.; Couban, S.; Leber, B.; Storring, J.; Assaily, W.; Fuerth, B.; Christofides, A.; Schuh, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of all-trans-retinoic acid (atra) and anthracyclines (with or without cytarabine) in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (apl) has dramatically changed the management and outcome of the disease over the past few decades. The addition of arsenic trioxide (ato) in the relapsed setting—and, more recently, in reduced-chemotherapy or chemotherapy-free approaches in the first-line setting—continues to improve treatment outcomes by reducing some of the toxicities associated with anthracycline-based approaches. Despite those successes, a high rate of early death from complications of coagulopathy remains the primary cause of treatment failure before treatment begins. In addition to that pressing issue, clarity is needed about the use of ato in the first-line setting and the role of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (hsct) in the relapsed setting. The aim for the present consensus was to provide guidance to health care professionals about strategies to reduce the early death rate, information on the indications for hsct and on the use of ato in induction and consolidation in low-to-intermediate–risk and high-risk apl patients. PMID:25302032

  1. Immunology for rheumatology residents: working toward a Canadian national curriculum consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Shirley L; Herman-Kideckel, Sari; Mahendira, Dharini; McDonald-Blumer, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Immunologic mechanisms play an integral role in understanding the pathogenesis and management of rheumatic conditions. Currently, there is limited access to formal instruction in immunology for rheumatology trainees across Canada. The aims of this study were (1) to describe current immunology curricula among adult rheumatology training programs across Canada and (2) to compare the perceived learning needs of rheumatology trainees from the perspective of program directors and trainees to help develop a focused nationwide immunology curriculum. Rheumatology trainees and program directors from adult rheumatology programs across Canada completed an online questionnaire and were asked to rank a comprehensive list of immunology topics. A modified Delphi approach was implemented to obtain consensus on immunology topics. Only 42% of program directors and 31% of trainees felt the current method of teaching immunology was effective. Results illustrate concordance between program directors and trainees for the highest-ranked immunology topics including innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and cells and tissues of the immune system. However, there was discordance among other topics, such as diagnostic laboratory immunology and therapeutics. There is a need to improve immunology teaching in rheumatology training programs. Results show high concordance between the basic immunology topics. This study provides the groundwork for development of future immunology curricula.

  2. The Berlin 2016 process: a summary of methodology for the 5th International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeuwisse, Willem H; Schneider, Kathryn J; Dvořák, Jiří; Omu, Onutobor Tobi; Finch, Caroline F; Hayden, K Alix; McCrory, Paul

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarise the methodology for the 5th International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport. The 18 months of preparation included engagement of a scientific committee, an expert panel of 33 individuals in the field of concussion and a modified Delphi technique to determine the primary questions to be answered. The methodology also involved the writing of 12 systematic reviews to inform the consensus conference and submission and review of scientific abstracts. The meeting itself followed a 2-day open format, a 1-day closed expert panel meeting and two additional half day meetings to develop the Concussion Recognition Tool 5 (Pocket CRT5), Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 5 (SCAT5) and Child SCAT5. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Ventilatory support in children with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimensberger, Peter C; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2015-06-01

    To describe the recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference for mechanical ventilation management of pediatric patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Consensus Conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. The Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference experts developed and voted on a total of 27 recommendations focused on the optimal mechanical ventilation approach of the patient with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Topics included ventilator mode, tidal volume delivery, inspiratory plateau pressure, high-frequency ventilation, cuffed endotracheal tubes, and gas exchange goals. When experimental data were lacking, a modified Delphi approach emphasizing the strong professional agreement was used. There were 17 recommendations with strong agreement and 10 recommendations with weak agreement. There were no recommendations with equipoise or disagreement. There was weak agreement on recommendations concerning approach to tidal volume and inspiratory pressure limitation (88% to 72% agreement, respectively), whereas strong agreement could be achieved for accepting permissive hypercapnia. Using positive end-expiratory pressure levels greater than 15 cm H2O in severe pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, under the condition that the markers of oxygen delivery, respiratory system compliance, and hemodynamics are closely monitored as positive end-expiratory pressure is increased, is strongly recommended. The concept of exploring the effects of careful recruitment maneuvers during conventional ventilation met an agreement level of 88%, whereas the use of recruitment maneuvers during rescue high-frequency oscillatory ventilation is highly recommended (strong agreement). The Consensus Conference developed pediatric-specific recommendations regarding mechanical ventilation of the patient with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as well as future research priorities. These recommendations are

  4. Protection by flavanol-rich foods against vascular dysfunction and oxidative damage: 27th Hohenheim Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sies, Helmut; Hollman, Peter C H; Grune, Tilman; Stahl, Wilhelm; Biesalski, Hans K; Williamson, Gary

    2012-03-01

    Criteria for assessing the purported protection by flavanol-rich foods against vascular dysfunction and oxidative damage to biomolecules was the subject of the 27th Hohenheim Consensus Conference held on July 11, 2011. State-of-the-art evidence was put into perspective, focusing on several questions that were followed by a consensus answer. Among the topics addressed were the major sources of flavanols in the human diet, the bioavailability of flavanols, biomarkers for "health benefit," and the biological function of flavanols. Consensus was reached on these topics. No conclusion was reached on the design of randomized, controlled trials for substantiation of health claims for flavanol-rich foods as to the necessity of a study arm with an isolated pharmacologically active compound, e.g., (-)-epicatechin.

  5. Protection by Flavanol-Rich Foods Against Vascular Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage: 27th Hohenheim Consensus Conference1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sies, Helmut; Hollman, Peter C.H.; Grune, Tilman; Stahl, Wilhelm; Biesalski, Hans K.; Williamson, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Criteria for assessing the purported protection by flavanol-rich foods against vascular dysfunction and oxidative damage to biomolecules was the subject of the 27th Hohenheim Consensus Conference held on July 11, 2011. State-of-the-art evidence was put into perspective, focusing on several questions that were followed by a consensus answer. Among the topics addressed were the major sources of flavanols in the human diet, the bioavailability of flavanols, biomarkers for “health benefit,” and the biological function of flavanols. Consensus was reached on these topics. No conclusion was reached on the design of randomized, controlled trials for substantiation of health claims for flavanol-rich foods as to the necessity of a study arm with an isolated pharmacologically active compound, e.g., (−)-epicatechin. PMID:22516731

  6. College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference on good laboratory practices in gynecologic cytology: background, rationale, and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tworek, Joseph A; Henry, Michael R; Blond, Barbara; Jones, Bruce Allen

    2013-02-01

    Gynecologic cytopathology is a heavily regulated field, with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 mandating the collection of many quality metrics. There is a lack of consensus regarding methods to collect, monitor, and benchmark these data and how these data should be used in a quality assurance program. Furthermore, the introduction of human papilloma virus testing and proficiency testing has provided more data to monitor. To determine good laboratory practices in quality assurance of gynecologic cytopathology. Data were collected through a written survey consisting of 98 questions submitted to 1245 Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-licensed or Department of Defense laboratories. There were 541 usable responses. Additional input was sought through a Web posting of results and questions on the College of American Pathologists Web site. Four senior authors who authored the survey and 28 cytopathologists and cytotechnologists were assigned to 5 working groups to analyze data and present statements on good laboratory practices in gynecologic cytopathology at the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference. Ninety-eight attendees at the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference discussed and voted on good laboratory practice statements to obtain consensus. This paper describes the rationale, background, process, and strengths and limitations of a series of papers that summarize good laboratory practice statements in quality assurance in gynecologic cytopathology.

  7. Gender Differences in Acute and Chronic Pain in the Emergency Department: Results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Pain Section

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts‐Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A; Cone, David C

    2014-01-01

    .... The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED...

  8. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the confer......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before...... the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer to be addressed through discussion...... at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement on three of these areas: NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, the treatment of first...

  9. The process and criteria for diagnosing specific learning disorders: indications from the Consensus Conference promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Luisa Lorusso; Mirta Vernice; Marina Dieterich; Daniela Brizzolara; Enrica Mariani; Salvatore De Masi; Franca D'Angelo; Eleonora Lacorte; Alfonso Mele

    2014-01-01

    A Consensus Conference on Specific Learning Disorders has been promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS). The Consensus Conference consisted in a systematic review of the international literature addressing the issues of diagnosis, risk factors and prognosis, treatment, service delivery and organizational models for Specific Learning Disorders (reading, spelling/writing, calculation). Selected papers were examined by a group of Evaluators and the...

  10. Polyanalgesic Consensus Conference 2003: an update on the management of pain by intraspinal drug delivery-- report of an expert panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassenbusch, Samuel J; Portenoy, Russell K; Cousins, Michael; Buchser, Eric; Deer, Timothy R; Du Pen, Stuart L; Eisenach, James; Follett, Kenneth A; Hildebrand, Keith R; Krames, Elliot S; Levy, Robert M; Palmer, Pamela P; Rathmell, James P; Rauck, Richard L; Staats, Peter S; Stearns, Lisa; Willis, K Dean

    2004-06-01

    Intraspinal drug infusion using fully implantable pump and catheter systems is a safe and effective therapy for selected patients with chronic pain. The options for this approach are increasing, as drugs that are commercially available for systemic administration are adapted to this use and other drugs that are in development specifically for intraspinal administration become available. In 2000 a Polyanalgesic Consensus Conference was organized to evaluate the existing literature and develop guidelines for drug selection. The major outcome of this effort, an algorithm for drug selection, was based on the best available evidence at the time. Rapid changes have occurred in the science and practice of intraspinal infusion and a Polyanalgesic Consensus Conference 2003 was organized to pursue the following goals: 1) to review the literature on intraspinal drug infusion since 1999, 2) to revise the 2000 drug-selection algorithm, 3) to develop guidelines for optimizing drug dosage and concentration, 4) to create a process for documenting minimum evidence supporting the use of a drug for intraspinal infusion, and 5) to clarify issues pertaining to compounding of drugs. Based on the best available evidence and expert opinion, consensus recommendations were developed in all these areas. The panel's conclusions may provide a foundation for clinical practice and a rational basis for new research.

  11. Maintaining success, reducing treatment burden, focusing on survivorship : highlights from the third European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ-cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, J.; Albers, P.; Altena, R.; Aparicio, J.; Bokemeyer, C.; Busch, J.; Cathomas, R.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Clarke, N. W.; Classen, J.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Dahl, A. A.; Daugaard, G.; De Giorgi, U.; De Santis, M.; De Wit, M.; De Wit, R.; Dieckmann, K. P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S. D.; Germa Lluch, J. R.; Gietema, J. A.; Gillessen, S.; Giwercman, A.; Hartmann, J.T.; Heidenreich, A.; Hentrich, M.; Honecker, F.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R. A.; Kliesch, S.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Krege, S.; Laguna, M. P.; Looijenga, L. H. J.; Lorch, A.; Lotz, J. P.; Mayer, F.; Necchi, A.; Nicolai, N.; Nuver, J.; Oechsle, K.; Oldenburg, J.; Oosterhuis, J.W.; Powles, T.; Rajpert-De Meyts, E.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Schrader, M.; Schweyer, S.; Sedlmayer, F.; Sohaib, A.; Souchon, R.; Tandstad, T.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.

    In November 2011, the Third European Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Germ-Cell Cancer (GCC) was held in Berlin, Germany. This third conference followed similar meetings in 2003 (Essen, Germany) and 2006 (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) [Schmoll H-J, Souchon R, Krege S et al. European

  12. Towards a European consensus on conducting and reporting health economic evaluations--a report from the ISPOR Inaugural European Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetghebeur, M M; Rindress, D

    1999-01-01

    This report is a summary of key issues in consensus development regarding the conduct and reporting of health economic research in the European context, presented and discussed at the ISPOR Inaugural European Conference in Cologne, Germany, December 1998. Recommendations of the Harmonization by Consensus of the Methodology for Economic Evaluation of Health Care Technologies in the European Union (HARMET) project were presented, as well as two instruments under development: software for Reporting Economic Evaluation Results (REER) and software for collecting and managing cost data called the Health Cost Database Software (HCDS). Working independently, but interrelated with the objectives of the HARMET initiative, preliminary results from the ongoing European Network on Methodology and Application of Economic Evaluation Techniques (EUROMET) project were presented. Each presentation was followed by an expert discussion panel with audience participation. Issues raised included the development of standards and related topics such as usefulness to European decision-makers, and education and training in health economics in Europe.

  13. Consensus in the Management of Multiple Myeloma in India at Myeloma State of the Art 2016 Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra, Uday; Khattry, Navin; Kumar, Shaji; Raje, Noopur; Jain, Arihant; Jagannath, Sundar; Menon, Hari; Kumar, Lalit; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash; Saikia, Tapan; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2017-03-01

    The science of multiple myeloma (MM) and related plasma cell disorders is rapidly evolving with increased understanding of the disease biology and recent approval of the newer drugs widening the therapeutic armamentarium. Despite multiple international guidelines regarding the management of this disease, the practice of managing MM is not uniform amongst Indian physicians. There are challenges in management which are unique to the Indian patients. This review discusses these challenges and the consensus of the nation-wide experts in dealing with the same. We also briefly highlighted the perspective of international experts as discussed in the Myeloma State of the Art conference held in September 2016 at PGI, Chandigarh. An Indian Myeloma Academic Groupe (IMAGe) group was formed to strengthen the research, create awareness about myeloma and related disorders and form consensus guidelines/ recommendations that can be adapted to the Indian Scenario.

  14. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer but a standardized method for its assessment has been lacking. The primary aim of the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) was to reach agreement on an international, evidence......-based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used...... to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: Tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1...

  15. Optimal Use of Raltegravir (Isentress® in the Treatment of HIV-Infected Adults – Canadian Consensus Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Rachlis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: A meeting of a Canadian group with significant experience and knowledge in HIV management, consisting of five physicians, a pharmacist and an AIDS researcher, was convened. Their goal was to develop guidance for Canadian HIV-treating physicians on the appropriate use of raltegravir (MK-0518, Isentress®, Merck Frosst Canada Inc in HIV-infected adults.

  16. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before the confer......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before......-line, and second-line/third-line therapy in metastatic NSCLC are reported in this article. The recommendations detailed here are based on an expert consensus after careful review of published data. All participants have approved this final update....

  17. Recruitment and communication process for participation in the 2005 AEM Consensus Conference on the Ethical Conduct of Resuscitation Research: methodology, challenges, lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baren, Jill M; Nathanson, Pam G

    2005-11-01

    The 2005 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, "Ethical Conduct of Resuscitation Research," was designed with the goal of developing consensus on important issues for human subjects and researchers surrounding the 1996 federal regulations jointly published by the Department of Health and Human Services and the Food and Drug Administration and known as the Final Rule. These regulations, which guide the conduct of research using the emergency exception from informed consent or waiver of informed consent, have been the subject of much debate in the resuscitation research community. Therefore, the editorial board of Academic Emergency Medicine chose this topic as the subject of their annual consensus conference. This report outlines the methods by which individuals and organizations were recruited to participate, how the conference was advertised, and the way in which participants and nonparticipants were encouraged to communicate before and after the conference. The limitations and potential biases of these methods and activities are also presented.

  18. Historic Landmarks in Clinical Transplantation: Conclusions from the Consensus Conference at the University of California, Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Leslie B.; Calne, Roy Y.; Dausset, Jean B.; Good, Robert A.; Murray, Joseph E.; Shumway, Norman E.; Schwartz, Robert S.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Terasaki, Paul I.; Thomas, E. Donnall; van Rood, Jon J.

    2010-01-01

    The transplantation of organs, cells, and tissues has burgeoned during the last quarter century, with the development of multiple new specialty fields. However, the basic principles that made this possible were established over a three-decade period, beginning during World War II and ending in 1974. At the historical consensus conference held at UCLA in March 1999, 11 early workers in the basic science or clinical practice of transplantation (or both) reached agreement on the most significant contributions of this era that ultimately made transplantation the robust clinical discipline it is today. These discoveries and achievements are summarized here in six tables and annotated with references. PMID:10833252

  19. Management of Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer: The Report of the Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference APCCC 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillessen, Silke; Attard, Gerhardt; Beer, Tomasz M; Beltran, Himisha; Bossi, Alberto; Bristow, Rob; Carver, Brett; Castellano, Daniel; Chung, Byung Ha; Clarke, Noel; Daugaard, Gedske; Davis, Ian D; de Bono, Johann; Dos Reis, Rodolfo Borges; Drake, Charles G; Eeles, Ros; Efstathiou, Eleni; Evans, Christopher P; Fanti, Stefano; Feng, Felix; Fizazi, Karim; Frydenberg, Mark; Gleave, Martin; Halabi, Susan; Heidenreich, Axel; Higano, Celestia S; James, Nicolas; Kantoff, Philip; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Khauli, Raja B; Kramer, Gero; Logothetis, Chris; Maluf, Fernando; Morgans, Alicia K; Morris, Michael J; Mottet, Nicolas; Murthy, Vedang; Oh, William; Ost, Piet; Padhani, Anwar R; Parker, Chris; Pritchard, Colin C; Roach, Mack; Rubin, Mark A; Ryan, Charles; Saad, Fred; Sartor, Oliver; Scher, Howard; Sella, Avishay; Shore, Neal; Smith, Matthew; Soule, Howard; Sternberg, Cora N; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Sweeney, Christopher; Sydes, Matthew R; Tannock, Ian; Tombal, Bertrand; Valdagni, Riccardo; Wiegel, Thomas; Omlin, Aurelius

    2017-06-24

    In advanced prostate cancer (APC), successful drug development as well as advances in imaging and molecular characterisation have resulted in multiple areas where there is lack of evidence or low level of evidence. The Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus Conference (APCCC) 2017 addressed some of these topics. To present the report of APCCC 2017. Ten important areas of controversy in APC management were identified: high-risk localised and locally advanced prostate cancer; "oligometastatic" prostate cancer; castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer; the role of imaging in APC; osteoclast-targeted therapy; molecular characterisation of blood and tissue; genetic counselling/testing; side effects of systemic treatment(s); global access to prostate cancer drugs. A panel of 60 international prostate cancer experts developed the program and the consensus questions. The panel voted publicly but anonymously on 150 predefined questions, which have been developed following a modified Delphi process. Voting is based on panellist opinion, and thus is not based on a standard literature review or meta-analysis. The outcomes of the voting had varying degrees of support, as reflected in the wording of this article, as well as in the detailed voting results recorded in Supplementary data. The presented expert voting results can be used for support in areas of management of men with APC where there is no high-level evidence, but individualised treatment decisions should as always be based on all of the data available, including disease extent and location, prior therapies regardless of type, host factors including comorbidities, as well as patient preferences, current and emerging evidence, and logistical and economic constraints. Inclusion of men with APC in clinical trials should be strongly encouraged. Importantly, APCCC 2017 again identified important areas in need of trials specifically designed to address them. The second Advanced Prostate Cancer Consensus

  20. Research in assessment: Consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuwirth, Lambert; Colliver, Jerry; Gruppen, Larry

    2011-01-01

    educational research, a plethora of methodologies is available to cater to many different research questions. This article contains consensus positions and suggestions on various elements of medical education (assessment) research. Overarching is the position that without a good theoretical underpinning...

  1. Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Overcoming Disparities in Live Kidney Donation in the US--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, James R; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Hays, Rebecca; LaPointe Rudow, Dianne; Baliga, Prabhakar

    2015-09-04

    Despite its superior outcomes relative to chronic dialysis and deceased donor kidney transplantation, live donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is less likely to occur in minorities, older adults, and poor patients than in those who are white, younger, and have higher household income. In addition, there is considerable geographic variability in LDKT rates. Concomitantly, in recent years, the rate of living kidney donation (LKD) has stopped increasing and is declining, after decades of consistent growth. Particularly noteworthy is the decline in LKD among black, younger, male, and lower-income adults. The Live Donor Community of Practice within the American Society of Transplantation, with financial support from 10 other organizations, held a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation in June 2014. The purpose of this meeting was to identify LKD best practices and knowledge gaps that might influence LDKT, with a focus on patient and donor education, evaluation efficiencies, disparities, and systemic barriers to LKD. In this article, we discuss trends in LDKT/LKD and emerging novel strategies for attenuating disparities, and we offer specific recommendations for future clinical practice, education, research, and policy from the Consensus Conference Workgroup focused on disparities. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Compression of digital images in radiology. Results of a consensus conference; Kompression digitaler Bilddaten in der Radiologie. Ergebnisse einer Konsensuskonferenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loose, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Braunschweig, R. [BG Kliniken Bergmannstrost, Halle/Saale (Germany). Klinik fuer Bildgebende Diagnostik und Interventionsradiologie; Kotter, E. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Abt. Roentgendiagnostik; Mildenberger, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Simmler, R.; Wucherer, M. [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Recommendations for lossy compression of digital radiological DICOM images in Germany by means of a consensus conference. The compression of digital radiological images was evaluated in many studies. Even though the results demonstrate full diagnostic image quality of modality-dependent compression between 1:5 and 1:200, there are only a few clinical applications. Materials and Methods: A consensus conference with approx. 80 interested participants (radiology, industry, physics, and agencies) without individual invitation was organized by the working groups AGIT and APT of the German Roentgen Society DRG to determine compression factors without loss of diagnostic image quality for different anatomical regions for CT, CR/DR, MR, RF/XA examinations. The consent level was specified as at least 66 %. Results: For individual modalities the following compression factors were recommended: CT (brain) 1:5, CT (all other applications) 1:8, CR/DR (all applications except mammography) 1:10, CR/DR (mammography) 1:15, MR (all applications) 1:7, RF/XA (fluoroscopy, DSA, cardiac angio) 1:6. The recommended compression ratios are valid for JPEG and JPEG 2000 /Wavelet compressions. Conclusion: The results may be understood as recommendations and indicate limits of compression factors with no expected reduction of diagnostic image quality. They are similar to the current national recommendations for Canada and England. (orig.)

  3. Overcoming burdens in the regulation of clinical research in children. Proceedings of a consensus conference, in historical context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many investigators are concerned that the modes of implementation and enforcement of the federal regulations designed to protect children are unduly impeding pediatric clinical research. Objective To assess regulatory impediments to clinical research involving children and to develop recommendations to ameliorate them. Participants The Pediatric Endocrine Society and The Endocrine Society convened a consensus conference involving experts and stakeholders in patient-oriented research involving children and adolescents in 2008. Consensus process Following presentations that reviewed problematic issues around key regulations, participants divided into working groups to develop potential solutions that could be adopted at local and federal levels. Presentations to the full assembly were then debated. A writing committee then drafted a summary of the discussions and main conclusions, placing them in historical context, and submitted it to all participants for comment with the aim of developing consensus. Conclusions Recommendations designed to facilitate the ethical conduct of research involving children addressed the interpretation of ambiguous regulatory terms such as "minimal risk" and "condition" and called for the development by professional societies of best practice primers for common research procedures that would be informative to both investigators and institutional review boards. A call was issued for improved guidance from the Office for Human Research Protections and Food and Drug Administration as well as for the development by professional societies of a process to monitor progress in improving human subject research regulation. Finally, a need for systematic research to define the nature and extent of institutional obstacles to pediatric research was recognized.

  4. 75 FR 12252 - Conference Call Meeting of the Manufactured Housing Consensus Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. EST. Conference Call: Members of the public who wish to join the call may call... INFORMATION CONTACT: William W. Matchneer III, Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Regulatory...

  5. Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Improving Education Outside of Transplant Centers about Live Donor Transplantation--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Amy D; Morgievich, Marie; Cohen, David J; Butt, Zeeshan; Chakkera, Harini A; Lindower, Carrie; Hays, Rebecca E; Hiller, Janet M; Lentine, Krista L; Matas, Arthur J; Poggio, Emilio D; Rees, Michael A; Rodrigue, James R; LaPointe Rudow, Dianne

    2015-09-04

    Living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) offers better quality of life and clinical outcomes, including patient survival, compared with remaining on dialysis or receiving a deceased donor kidney transplant. Although LDKT education within transplant centers for both potential recipients and living donors is very important, outreach and education to kidney patients in settings other than transplant centers and to the general public is also critical to increase access to this highly beneficial treatment. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation's Live Donor Community of Practice, with the support of 10 additional sponsors, convened a consensus conference to determine best practices in LDKT, including a workgroup focused on developing a set of recommendations for optimizing outreach and LDKT education outside of transplant centers. Members of this workgroup performed a structured literature review, conducted teleconference meetings, and met in person at the 2-day conference. Their efforts resulted in consensus around the following recommendations. First, preemptive transplantation should be promoted through increased LDKT education by primary care physicians and community nephrologists. Second, dialysis providers should be trained to educate their own patients about LDKT and deceased donor kidney transplantation. Third, partnerships between community organizations, organ procurement organizations, religious organizations, and transplant centers should be fostered to support transplantation. Fourth, use of technology should be improved or expanded to better educate kidney patients and their support networks. Fifth, LDKT education and outreach should be improved for kidney patients in rural areas. Finally, a consensus-driven, evidence-based public message about LDKT should be developed. Discussion of the effect and potential for implementation around each recommendation is featured, particularly regarding reducing racial and socioeconomic disparities in

  6. Laparoscopic surgery for pancreatic neoplasms: the European association for endoscopic surgery clinical consensus conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwin, Bjørn; Sahakyan, Mushegh A.; Abu Hilal, Mohammad; Besselink, Marc G.; Braga, Marco; Fabre, Jean-Michel; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Gayet, Brice; Kim, Song Cheol; Khatkov, Igor E.; Baichorov, Magomet E.; de Rooij, Thijs; Genç, Cansu G.; Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Izrailov, Roman E.; Khisamov, Arthur A.; Sánchez-Cabús, Santiago; Souche, Régis; van Hilst, Jony

    2017-01-01

    Introduced more than 20 years ago, laparoscopic pancreatic surgery (LAPS) has not reached a uniform acceptance among HPB surgeons. As a result, there is no consensus regarding its use in patients with pancreatic neoplasms. This study, organized by the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery

  7. 78 FR 11210 - Notice of NIH Consensus Development Conference: Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... 888-644-2667 or by sending an email to Prevention@mail.nih.gov . The Information Center's mailing... available on the NIH Consensus Development Program Web site at http://prevention.nih.gov/cdp... and delivery include preeclampsia (high blood pressure and excess protein in the urine), cesarean...

  8. Proceedings of Sea to Sky Geotechnique 2006 : The 59. Canadian Geotechnical Conference and 7. Joint CGS-IAH-CNC Groundwater Specialty Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This conference was attended by members of the Canadian and international geotechnical communities to exchange information on research and development that affects all sectors of geotechnical engineering, applied geology and hydrogeology. A wide range of topics were addressed, including special sessions on infrastructure and geotechnical mining methods that are of particular local or national relevance to the fields of geotechnical and groundwater engineering. The Canadian Geotechnical Society sessions covered oil mechanics and foundation engineering; engineering geology and geophysical investigation; seismology and earthquake engineering; landslide and slope engineering; soft soils engineering; forestry geotechnical issues; rock mechanics and rock engineering; mining; aging infrastructure; geo-environmental engineering; geosynthetics and cold regions geotechnology. The sessions of the International Association of Hydrogeologists covered groundwater protection and sustainability; groundwater and slope failures; fractured rock hydrogeology; mine water geochemistry and hydrology; hydrogeology of the Fraser Lowlands and data collection successes and failures. Many themes associated with major civil engineering works were also explored. The conference featured approximately 250 presentations, of which 17 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  9. Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer Management: 2nd European Rectal Cancer Consensus Conference (EURECA-CC2).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, V.; Aristei, C.; Glimelius, B.; Minsky, B.D.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Borras, J.M.; Haustermans, K.; Maingon, P.; Overgaard, J.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Schmoll, H.J.; Sebag-Montefiore, D.; Taylor, I.; Cutsem, E. van; Velde, C. van de; Cellini, N.; Latini, P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the first decade of the 21st century a number of important European randomized studies were published. In order to help shape clinical practice based on best scientific evidence from the literature, the International Conference on 'Multidisciplinary Rectal Cancer

  10. Technology-enabled assessment of health professions education: consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Zubair; Boulet, John R; Cook, David A

    2011-01-01

    The uptake of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in health professions education can have far-reaching consequences on assessment. The medical education community still needs to develop a deeper understanding of how technology can underpin and extend assessment practices....... This article was developed by the 2010 Ottawa Conference Consensus Group on technology-enabled assessment to guide practitioners and researchers working in this area. This article highlights the changing nature of ICTs in assessment, the importance of aligning technology-enabled assessment with local context...... and needs, the need for better evidence to support use of technologies in health profession education assessment, and a number of challenges, particularly validity threats, that need to be addressed while incorporating technology in assessment. Our recommendations are intended for all practitioners across...

  11. Proceedings of GeoHalifax 2009 : the 62. Canadian geotechnical conference and 10. joint CGS/IAH-CNC groundwater conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, C.; Fenton, G. [Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS (Canada); Taylor, B. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada); Ferguson, G. [Saint Francis Xavier Univ., Antigonish, NS (Canada)] (comps.) (and others)

    2009-07-01

    More than 500 delegates from industry, government, universities and research centres attended this conference to exchange professional knowledge on research and development that affects all sectors of geotechnical engineering, applied geology and hydrogeology. The conference also highlighted recent geoenvironmental achievements. The geotechnical sessions were entitled: soil mechanics; soil mechanics and brownfields; foundation engineering; landslide and slopes engineering; rock mechanics; risk assessment; reliability-based design; geoenvironmental issues; transportation geotechniques; marine geotechniques and geohazards; non-textbook soils and waste soils; covers and liners; instrumentation; harbour and shoreline geotechniques; geosynthetic mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) systems; cold regions and climate change; computer applications; regional hydrogeology; groundwater-surface water interaction; well hydraulics; radioactive waste management; groundwater sustainability; source water protection; mine waters; field techniques in hydrogeology; and hydrogeology of fractured rocks. The conference featured more than 230 presentations, of which 37 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  12. The Consensus from the Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP Conference 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Todd Kuenstner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available On March 24 and 25, 2017 researchers and clinicians from around the world met at Temple University in Philadelphia to discuss the current knowledge of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP and its relationship to human disease. The conference was held because of shared concern that MAP is a zoonotic bacterium that poses a threat not only to animal health but also human health. In order to further study this problem, the conferees discussed ways to improve MAP diagnostic tests and discussed potential future anti-MAP clinical trials. The conference proceedings may be viewed on the www.Humanpara.org website. A summary of the salient work in this field is followed by recommendations from a majority of the conferees.

  13. The Consensus from theMycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis(MAP) Conference 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenstner, J Todd; Naser, Saleh; Chamberlin, William; Borody, Thomas; Graham, David Y; McNees, Adrienne; Hermon-Taylor, John; Hermon-Taylor, Amy; Dow, C Thomas; Thayer, Walter; Biesecker, James; Collins, Michael T; Sechi, Leonardo A; Singh, Shoor Vir; Zhang, Peilin; Shafran, Ira; Weg, Stuart; Telega, Grzegorz; Rothstein, Robert; Oken, Harry; Schimpff, Stephen; Bach, Horacio; Bull, Tim; Grant, Irene; Ellingson, Jay; Dahmen, Heinrich; Lipton, Judith; Gupta, Saurabh; Chaubey, Kundan; Singh, Manju; Agarwal, Prabhat; Kumar, Ashok; Misri, Jyoti; Sohal, Jagdip; Dhama, Kuldeep; Hemati, Zahra; Davis, William; Hier, Michael; Aitken, John; Pierce, Ellen; Parrish, Nicole; Goldberg, Neil; Kali, Maher; Bendre, Sachin; Agrawal, Gaurav; Baldassano, Robert; Linn, Preston; Sweeney, Raymond W; Fecteau, Marie; Hofstaedter, Casey; Potula, Raghava; Timofeeva, Olga; Geier, Steven; John, Kuruvilla; Zayanni, Najah; Malaty, Hoda M; Kahlenborn, Christopher; Kravitz, Amanda; Bulfon, Adriano; Daskalopoulos, George; Mitchell, Hazel; Neilan, Brett; Timms, Verlaine; Cossu, Davide; Mameli, Giuseppe; Angermeier, Paul; Jelic, Tomislav; Goethe, Ralph; Juste, Ramon A; Kuenstner, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    On March 24 and 25, 2017 researchers and clinicians from around the world met at Temple University in Philadelphia to discuss the current knowledge of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and its relationship to human disease. The conference was held because of shared concern that MAP is a zoonotic bacterium that poses a threat not only to animal health but also human health. In order to further study this problem, the conferees discussed ways to improve MAP diagnostic tests and discussed potential future anti-MAP clinical trials. The conference proceedings may be viewed on the www.Humanpara.org website. A summary of the salient work in this field is followed by recommendations from a majority of the conferees.

  14. The Consensus from the Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Conference 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenstner, J. Todd; Naser, Saleh; Chamberlin, William; Borody, Thomas; Graham, David Y.; McNees, Adrienne; Hermon-Taylor, John; Hermon-Taylor, Amy; Dow, C. Thomas; Thayer, Walter; Biesecker, James; Collins, Michael T.; Sechi, Leonardo A.; Singh, Shoor Vir; Zhang, Peilin; Shafran, Ira; Weg, Stuart; Telega, Grzegorz; Rothstein, Robert; Oken, Harry; Schimpff, Stephen; Bach, Horacio; Bull, Tim; Grant, Irene; Ellingson, Jay; Dahmen, Heinrich; Lipton, Judith; Gupta, Saurabh; Chaubey, Kundan; Singh, Manju; Agarwal, Prabhat; Kumar, Ashok; Misri, Jyoti; Sohal, Jagdip; Dhama, Kuldeep; Hemati, Zahra; Davis, William; Hier, Michael; Aitken, John; Pierce, Ellen; Parrish, Nicole; Goldberg, Neil; Kali, Maher; Bendre, Sachin; Agrawal, Gaurav; Baldassano, Robert; Linn, Preston; Sweeney, Raymond W.; Fecteau, Marie; Hofstaedter, Casey; Potula, Raghava; Timofeeva, Olga; Geier, Steven; John, Kuruvilla; Zayanni, Najah; Malaty, Hoda M.; Kahlenborn, Christopher; Kravitz, Amanda; Bulfon, Adriano; Daskalopoulos, George; Mitchell, Hazel; Neilan, Brett; Timms, Verlaine; Cossu, Davide; Mameli, Giuseppe; Angermeier, Paul; Jelic, Tomislav; Goethe, Ralph; Juste, Ramon A.; Kuenstner, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    On March 24 and 25, 2017 researchers and clinicians from around the world met at Temple University in Philadelphia to discuss the current knowledge of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and its relationship to human disease. The conference was held because of shared concern that MAP is a zoonotic bacterium that poses a threat not only to animal health but also human health. In order to further study this problem, the conferees discussed ways to improve MAP diagnostic tests and discussed potential future anti-MAP clinical trials. The conference proceedings may be viewed on the www.Humanpara.org website. A summary of the salient work in this field is followed by recommendations from a majority of the conferees. PMID:29021977

  15. "To change the world." Cairo conference reaches consensus on plan to stabilize world growth by 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    After 6 days of debate and 200 speakers during September 5-13, 1994, participants from 180 countries at the Cairo International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) agreed on a strategy for curbing global population growth over the next 20 years. The objective was sustained economic growth and sustainable development. In his opening remarks, UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali said that the objective was to balance humanity and the environment with the means to sustain life, and that the efficacy of the world economic order depended to some extent on the ICPD. Participants were urged to use rigor, tolerance, and conscience in conference deliberations. Men and women should have the right and the means to choose their families' futures. The preamble stated that the ICPD would probably be the last opportunity in the twentieth century to address globally the issues relating to population and development. UN Population Fund Executive Director Nafis Sadik remarked that the ICPD had the potential to change the world. Egyptian President Mohamed Hosni Mubarak was elected president of the ICPD. Mubarak stated that solutions to population problems must go beyond demographic accounting and incorporate change in social, economic, and cultural conditions. Norway's Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland stated that development in many countries never reached many women. She called it a hypocritical morality that allowed women to suffer and die from unwanted pregnancies, illegal abortions, and miserable living conditions. US Vice President Albert Gore called for comprehensive and holistic solutions. The essential features of social change would involve democracy, economic reform, low rates of inflation, low levels of corruption, sound environmental management, free and open markets, and access to developed country markets. Pakistan's Prime Minister Benazir urged the empowerment of women. Many expressed the concern about unsustainable consumption in industrialized

  16. Consensus conference on core radiological parameters to describe lumbar stenosis - an initiative for structured reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Winklhofer, Sebastian F.X. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Deyo, Richard A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Jarvik, Jeffrey G. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Porchet, Francois [Schulthess Klinik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Steurer, Johann [University Hospital Zurich, Horten Center for patient oriented research and knowledge transfer, Zurich (Switzerland); Collaboration: On behalf of the LSOS working group

    2014-12-15

    To define radiological criteria and parameters as a minimum standard in a structured radiological report for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to identify criteria and parameters for research purposes. All available radiological criteria and parameters for LSS were identified using systematic literature reviews and a Delphi survey. We invited to the consensus meeting, and provided data, to 15 internationally renowned experts from different countries. During the meeting, these experts reached consensus in a structured and systematic discussion about a core list of radiological criteria and parameters for standard reporting. We identified a total of 27 radiological criteria and parameters for LSS. During the meeting, the experts identified five of these as core items for a structured report. For central stenosis, these were ''compromise of the central zone'' and ''relation between fluid and cauda equina''. For lateral stenosis, the group agreed that ''nerve root compression in the lateral recess'' was a core item. For foraminal stenosis, we included ''nerve root impingement'' and ''compromise of the foraminal zone''. As a minimum standard, five radiological criteria should be used in a structured radiological report in LSS. Other parameters are well suited for research. (orig.)

  17. Consensus conference on core radiological parameters to describe lumbar stenosis - an initiative for structured reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Deyo, Richard A; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Porchet, Francois; Winklhofer, Sebastian F X; Steurer, Johann

    2014-12-01

    To define radiological criteria and parameters as a minimum standard in a structured radiological report for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to identify criteria and parameters for research purposes. All available radiological criteria and parameters for LSS were identified using systematic literature reviews and a Delphi survey. We invited to the consensus meeting, and provided data, to 15 internationally renowned experts from different countries. During the meeting, these experts reached consensus in a structured and systematic discussion about a core list of radiological criteria and parameters for standard reporting. We identified a total of 27 radiological criteria and parameters for LSS. During the meeting, the experts identified five of these as core items for a structured report. For central stenosis, these were "compromise of the central zone" and "relation between fluid and cauda equina". For lateral stenosis, the group agreed that "nerve root compression in the lateral recess" was a core item. For foraminal stenosis, we included "nerve root impingement" and "compromise of the foraminal zone". As a minimum standard, five radiological criteria should be used in a structured radiological report in LSS. Other parameters are well suited for research. The five most important radiological criteria for standard clinical reporting were selected. The five most important quantitative radiological parameters for research purposes were selected. These core criteria could help standardize the communication between health care providers.

  18. Pathogenesis of Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure : Workgroup Statements from the Eleventh Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haase, Michael; Mueller, Christian; Damman, Kevin; Murray, Patrick T.; Kellum, John A.; Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter A.; McCullough, PA; Kellum, JA; Mehta, RL; Murray, PT; Ronco, C

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiorenal syndromes (CRS) types 1-5 are still sparsely characterized. In an attempt to address this issue, a consensus conference on CRS was held in Venice, Italy, in November 2012 under the auspices of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI). Working group 1

  19. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We published the Canadian 2003 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (HAE; C1 inhibitor [C1-INH] deficiency and updated this as Hereditary angioedema: a current state-of-the-art review: Canadian Hungarian 2007 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy, and Management of Hereditary Angioedema. Objective To update the International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema (circa 2010. Methods The Canadian Hereditary Angioedema Network (CHAEN/Réseau Canadien d'angioédème héréditaire (RCAH http://www.haecanada.com and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus approach. The Consensus document was reviewed at the meeting and then circulated for review. Results This manuscript is the 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema that resulted from that conference. Conclusions Consensus approach is only an interim guide to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase III and IV clinical trials, meta analyses, and using data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, followed by large head-to-head clinical trials and then evidence-based guidelines and standards for HAE disease management.

  20. STRATEGIC PRIORITIES FOR INCREASING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG ADULTS AGE 50 AND OLDER: THE NATIONAL BLUEPRINT CONSENSUS CONFERENCE SUMMARY REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Bazzarre

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available On May 1, 2001, a coalition of national organizations released a major planning document designed to develop a national strategy for the promotion of physically active lifestyles among the mid-life and older adult population. The National Blueprint: Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older was developed with input from 46 organizations with expertise in health, medicine, social and behavioral sciences, epidemiology, gerontology/geriatrics, clinical science, public policy, marketing, medical systems, community organization, and environmental issues. The Blueprint notes that, despite a wealth of evidence about the benefits of physical activity for mid-life and older persons, there has been little success in convincing age 50+ Americans to adopt physically active lifestyles. The Blueprint identifies barriers in the areas of research, home and community programs, medical systems, public policy and advocacy, and marketing and communications. In addition to identifying barriers, the Blueprint proposes a number of concrete strategies that could be employed in order to overcome the barriers to physical activity in society at large. This report summarizes the outcome of the National Blueprint Consensus Conference that was held in October 2002. In this conference, representatives of more than 50 national organizations convened in Washington, D.C. with the goal of identifying high priority and high feasibility strategies which would advance the National Blueprint and which could be initiated within the next 12 to 24 months. Participants in the consensus conference were assigned to one of five breakout groups: home and community, marketing, medical systems, public policy, and research. Each breakout group was charged with identifying the three highest priority strategies within their area for effectively increasing physical activity levels in the mid-life and older adult population. In addition to the 15 strategies identified by the

  1. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. de; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Ares, L.P.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  2. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krege, S.; Beyer, J.; Souchon, R.; Albers, P.; Albrecht, W.; Algaba, F.; Bamberg, M.; Bodrogi, I.; Bokemeyer, C.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Classen, J.; Clemm, C.; Cohn-Cedermark, G.; Culine, S.; Daugaard, G.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Santis, M. De; Wit, M. de; Wit, R. de; Derigs, H.G.; Dieckmann, K.P.; Dieing, A.; Droz, J.P.; Fenner, M.; Fizazi, K.; Flechon, A.; Fossa, S.D.; Muro, X.G. del; Gauler, T.; Geczi, L.; Gerl, A.; Germa-Lluch, J.R.; Gillessen, S.; Hartmann, J.T.; Hartmann, M.; Heidenreich, A.; Hoeltl, W.; Horwich, A.; Huddart, R.; Jewett, M.; Joffe, J.; Jones, W.G.; Kisbenedek, L.; Klepp, O.; Kliesch, S.; Koehrmann, K.U.; Kollmannsberger, C.; Kuczyk, M.; Laguna, P.; Galvis, O.L.; Loy, V.; Mason, M.D.; Mead, G.M.; Mueller, R.; Nichols, C.; Nicolai, N.; Oliver, T.; Ondrus, D.; Oosterhof, G.O.; Paz-Ares, L.; Pizzocaro, G.; Pont, J.; Pottek, T.; Powles, T.; Rick, O.; Rosti, G.; Salvioni, R.; Scheiderbauer, J.; Schmelz, H.U.; Schmidberger, H.; Schmoll, H.J.; Schrader, M.; Sedlmayer, F.; Skakkebaek, N.E.; Sohaib, A.; Tjulandin, S.; Warde, P.; Weinknecht, S.; Weissbach, L.; Wittekind, C.; Winter, E.; Wood, L.; Maase, H. von der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the

  3. Hereditary angioedema: beyond international consensus - circa December 2010 - The Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Dr. David McCourtie Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Tom

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2010 International Consensus Algorithm for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema was published earlier this year in this Journal (Bowen et al. Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2010, 6:24 - http://www.aacijournal.com/content/6/1/24. Since that publication, there have been multiple phase III clinical trials published on either prophylaxis or therapy of hereditary angioedema and some of these products have changed approval status in various countries. This manuscript was prepared to review and update the management of hereditary angioedema. Objective To review approaches for the diagnosis and management of hereditary angioedema (HAE circa December 2010 and present thoughts on moving from HAE management from international evidence-based consensus to facilitate more local health unit considerations balancing costs, efficacies of treatments, and risk benefits. Thoughts will reflect Canadian and international experiences. Methods PubMed searches including hereditary angioedema and diagnosis, therapy, management and consensus were reviewed as well as press releases from various pharmaceutical companies to early December 2010. Results The 2010 International Consensus Algorithms for the Diagnosis, Therapy and Management of Hereditary Angioedema is reviewed in light of the newly published phase III Clinical trials for prevention and therapy of HAE. Management approaches and models are discussed. Conclusions Consensus approach and double-blind placebo controlled trials are only interim guides to a complex disorder such as HAE and should be replaced as soon as possible with large phase IV clinical trials, meta analyses, data base registry validation of approaches including quality of life and cost benefit analyses, safety, and head-to-head clinical trials investigating superiority or non-inferiority comparisons of available approaches. Since not all therapeutic products are available in all jurisdictions

  4. Treatment recommendations for radioimmunotherapy in follicular lymphoma: a consensus conference report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzig, Thomas E; Fishkin, Paul; Gordon, Leo I; Gregory, Stephanie A; Jacobs, Samuel; Macklis, Roger; McLaughlin, Peter; Press, Oliver; Zelenetz, Andrew D

    2011-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan or (131)I-tositumomab combines a radiation-emitting radionuclide with an antibody targeting CD20 to treat B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Multiple studies demonstrate favorable RIT efficacy and safety profiles in follicular lymphoma (FL). The primary toxicity is reversible myelosuppression. Various FL treatment options include single-agent immunotherapy, radiation, chemoimmunotherapy, and RIT. Examining RIT clinical effects and position within treatment algorithms is important to optimal patient benefit. Clinical studies support using single-agent RIT in relapsed/refractory FL, in selected patients with new, untreated FL, and as consolidation after induction chemotherapy or chemoimmunotherapy. RIT as consolidation enhances response rates (with conversion of partial to complete responses following induction therapy) and prolongs disease control versus observation. The overall response rate is 60-80% in the relapsed setting. Time to progression is longer with low-bulk disease, fewer prior therapies, and retained rituximab sensitivity. RIT apparently does not preclude subsequent therapies or increase risk of secondary malignancies compared with chemotherapy's known risk. This article summarizes consensus recommendations for RIT and presents RIT treatment algorithms developed by hematologists/oncologists who regularly treat patients with FL. Maximizing RIT benefit requires healthcare providers to utilize algorithms assisting with treatment decisions.

  5. Proceedings of the Third Annual National Conference of the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CANWEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacey, V.P. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    A conference was held on various aspects of wind energy in Canda. Papers were presented in the areas of wind resource assessment, wind turbine generation projects, small wind energy conversion systems, turbine design, wind turbine inventory, wind test sites, water pumping, energy policy, research programs and demonstration projects, commercialization, financial aspects, and interconnection with electric utilities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 25 papers from this conference.

  6. Developments in Surge Research Priorities: A Systematic Review of the Literature Following the Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, 2007-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Melinda J; DeAugustinis, Matthew L; Velasquez, Christina A; Singh, Sonal; Kelen, Gabor D

    2015-11-01

    In 2006, Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) published a special issue summarizing the proceedings of the AEM consensus conference on the "Science of Surge." One major goal of the conference was to establish research priorities in the field of "disasters" surge. For this review, we wished to determine the progress toward the conference's identified research priorities: 1) defining criteria and methods for allocation of scarce resources, 2) identifying effective triage protocols, 3) determining decision-makers and means to evaluate response efficacy, 4) developing communication and information sharing strategies, and 5) identifying methods for evaluating workforce needs. Specific criteria were developed in conjunction with library search experts. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library databases were queried for peer-reviewed articles from 2007 to 2015 addressing scientific advances related to the above five research priorities identified by AEM consensus conference. Abstracts and foreign language articles were excluded. Only articles with quantitative data on predefined outcomes were included; consensus panel recommendations on the above priorities were also included for the purposes of this review. Included study designs were randomized controlled trials, prospective, retrospective, qualitative (consensus panel), observational, cohort, case-control, or controlled before-and-after studies. Quality assessment was performed using a standardized tool for quantitative studies. Of the 2,484 unique articles identified by the search strategy, 313 articles appeared to be related to disaster surge. Following detailed text review, 50 articles with quantitative data and 11 concept papers (consensus conference recommendations) addressed at least one AEM consensus conference surge research priority. Outcomes included validation of the benchmark of 500 beds/million of population for disaster surge capacity, effectiveness of simulation- and Internet

  7. Methodology for randomized trials of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: recommendations from an international consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Loren; Spiegel, Brennan; Rostom, Alaa; Moayyedi, Paul; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bardou, Marc; Sung, Joseph; Barkun, Alan N

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this document is to provide a methodological framework for the design, performance, analysis, interpretation, and communication of randomized trials that assess management of patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Literature searches were performed and an iterative process with electronic and face-to-face meetings was used to achieve consensus among panel members as part of an International Consensus Conference on Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding. Recommendations of the panel include the following. Randomized trials must explicitly state their primary hypothesis. A nonmanipulable randomization schedule with concealed allocation should be used. Stratification (e.g., for age and stigmata of hemorrhage) may be considered, especially in smaller studies. The patient and personnel providing care or recording information should be blinded. Inclusion criteria should be overt bleeding with endoscopy performed within 24 h or less. One type of lesion (e.g., ulcer) should be studied with stigmata to be included predefined. Use of placebo/no therapy vs. active controls depends on current standard practice. Standardizing study and key non-study interventions should ensure uniform provision of interventions. Criteria for repeat endoscopy and subsequent interventions should be predefined. The primary end point should be further bleeding (persistent and recurrent bleeding) with primary assessment at 7 days; mortality, with primary assessment at 30 days, would be appropriate in very large trials. Sample size calculation based on assumptions regarding primary end point results with regard to study intervention and control must be provided, and all patients enrolled must be accounted for. In general, the primary population for analysis is all patients randomized, although a per-protocol population may be used if this is the more conservative approach (e.g., equivalence study).

  8. Abstracts from the 7th Canadian Conference on Dementia (CCD) held in Vancouver, October 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, S.; Wangsgaard, J.; Koenig, J.; Jeremy,; Pathak, K.; Jude, A.; Davidson, S.; Rice, J.; Cytryn, K.N.; Lungu, O.; Voyer, P.; Wilchesky, M.; Qian, W.; Schweizer, T.; Fischer, C.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Purpose: As of 2011, approximately 747,000 Canadians suffer from some form of dementia; Alzheimer?s disease (AD) is one such form. AD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by significant neuronal death. Neuronal death has been associated with two pathophysiological features: 1) neurofibrillary tangles within the neurons, and 2) amyloid beta plaque formation between neurons. Excessive production of these two features is manifested by severe cognitive impairment. One of the mo...

  9. 2010 International consensus algorithm for the diagnosis, therapy and management of hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Tom; Cicardi, Marco; Farkas, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    )/Reseau Canadien d'angioedeme hereditaire (RCAH) (www.haecanada.com) and cosponsors University of Calgary and the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (with an unrestricted educational grant from CSL Behring) held our third Conference May 15th to 16th, 2010 in Toronto Canada to update our consensus...

  10. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi; Bosman, Fred; Cathomas, Gieri; Dawson, Heather; El Zimaity, Hala; Fléjou, Jean-François; Hansen, Tine Plato; Hartmann, Arndt; Kakar, Sanjay; Langner, Cord; Nagtegaal, Iris; Puppa, Giacomo; Riddell, Robert; Ristimäki, Ari; Sheahan, Kieran; Smyrk, Thomas; Sugihara, Kenichi; Terris, Benoît; Ueno, Hideki; Vieth, Michael; Zlobec, Inti; Quirke, Phil

    2017-09-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established independent prognostic factor in colorectal cancer but a standardized method for its assessment has been lacking. The primary aim of the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) was to reach agreement on an international, evidence-based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The 'Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used to determine the strength of recommendations and quality of evidence. The following 10 statements achieved consensus: tumor budding is defined as a single tumor cell or a cell cluster consisting of four tumor cells or less (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of lymph node metastases in pT1 colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of survival in stage II colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be taken into account along with other clinicopathological features in a multidisciplinary setting (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is counted on H&E (19/22, 86%). Intratumoral budding exists in colorectal cancer and has been shown to be related to lymph node metastasis (22/22, 100%). Tumor budding is assessed in one hotspot (in a field measuring 0.785 mm(2)) at the invasive front (22/22, 100%). A three-tier system should be used along with the budding count in order to facilitate risk stratification in colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding and tumor grade are not the same (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be included in guidelines/protocols for colorectal cancer reporting (23/23, 100%). Members of the ITBCC were able to reach strong consensus on a single international, evidence-based method for tumor budding assessment and reporting. It is proposed that this method be incorporated into colorectal cancer

  11. Quality improvement opportunities in gynecologic cytologic-histologic correlations: findings from the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference working group 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, Barbara A; Jones, Bruce A; Cahill, Leigh Ann; Moriarty, Ann T; Mody, Dina R; Tench, William D; Souers, Rhona J

    2013-02-01

    Cytopathology experts, interested stakeholders, and representatives from the College of American Pathologists, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Society of Cytopathology, the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology, the American Society for Clinical Pathology, and the American Society of Cytotechnology convened the Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference to present preliminary consensus statements developed by working groups, including the Cytologic-Histologic Correlations Working Group 4, using results from surveys and literature review. Conference participants voted on statements, suggested changes where consensus was not achieved, and voted on proposed changes. To document existing practices in gynecologic cytologic-histologic correlation, to develop consensus statements on appropriate practices, to explore standardization, and to suggest improvement in these practices. The material is based on survey results from 546 US laboratories, review of the literature from 1988 to 2011, and the College of American Pathologists Web site for consensus comments and additional survey questions. Cytologic-histologic correlations can be performed retrospectively, during initial case review, or both. At minimum, all available slides should be reviewed for a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion Papanicolaou test with negative biopsies. The preferred monitor for correlations is the positive predictive value of a Papanicolaou test. Laboratories should design cytologic-histologic correlation programs to explore existing or perceived quality deficiencies.

  12. 3rd St. Gallen EORTC Gastrointestinal Cancer Conference: Consensus recommendations on controversial issues in the primary treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Manfred P; Zalcberg, John R; Ducreux, Michel; Aust, Daniela; Bruno, Marco J; Büchler, Markus W; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Gloor, Beat; Glynne-Jones, Rob; Hartwig, Werner; Huguet, Florence; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lordick, Florian; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Mayerle, Julia; Martignoni, Marc; Neoptolemos, John; Rhim, Andrew D; Schmied, Bruno M; Seufferlein, Thomas; Werner, Jens; van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Otto, Florian

    2017-07-01

    The primary treatment of pancreatic cancer was the topic of the 3rd St. Gallen Conference 2016. A multidisciplinary panel reviewed the current evidence and discussed controversial issues in a moderated consensus session. Here we report on the key expert recommendations. It was generally accepted that radical surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy offers the only evidence-based treatment with a chance for cure. Initial staging should classify localised tumours as resectable or unresectable (i.e. locally advanced pancreatic cancer) although there remains a large grey-zone of potentially resectable disease between these two categories which has recently been named as borderline resectable, a concept which was generally accepted by the panel members. However, the definition of these borderline-resectable (BR) tumours varies between classifications due to their focus on either (i) technical hurdles (e.g. the feasibility of vascular resection) or (ii) oncological outcome (e.g. predicting the risk of a R1 resection and/or occult metastases). The resulting expert discussion focussed on imaging standards as well as the value of pretherapeutic laparoscopy. Indications for biliary drainage were seen especially before neoadjuvant therapy. Following standard resection, the panel unanimously voted for the use of adjuvant chemotherapy after R0 resection and considered it as a reasonable standard of care after R1 resection, even though the optimal pathologic evaluation and the definition of R0/R1 was the issue of an ongoing debate. The general concept of BR tumours was considered as a good basis to select patients for preoperative therapy, albeit its current impact on the therapeutic strategy was far less clear. Main focus of the conference was to discuss the limits of surgical resection and to identify ways to standardise procedures and to improve curative outcome, including adjuvant and perioperative treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  13. Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation: Reducing Financial Barriers to Live Kidney Donation--Recommendations from a Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tushla, Lara; Rudow, Dianne LaPointe; Milton, Jennifer; Rodrigue, James R; Schold, Jesse D; Hays, Rebecca

    2015-09-04

    Live-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is the best treatment for eligible people with late-stage kidney disease. Despite this, living kidney donation rates have declined in the United States in recent years. A potential source of this decline is the financial impact on potential and actual living kidney donors (LKDs). Recent evidence indicates that the economic climate may be associated with the decline in LDKT and that there are nontrivial financial ramifications for some LKDs. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation's Live Donor Community of Practice convened a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation. The conference included transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders (with the financial support of 10 other organizations) and sought to identify best practices, knowledge gaps, and opportunities pertaining to living kidney donation. This workgroup was tasked with exploring systemic and financial barriers to living kidney donation. The workgroup reviewed literature that assessed the financial effect of living kidney donation, analyzed employment and insurance factors, discussed international models for addressing direct and indirect costs faced by LKDs, and summarized current available resources. The workgroup developed the following series of recommendations to reduce financial and systemic barriers and achieve financial neutrality for LKDs: (1) allocate resources for standardized reimbursement of LKDs' lost wages and incidental costs; (2) pass legislation to offer employment and insurability protections to LKDs; (3) create an LKD financial toolkit to provide standardized, vetted education to donors and providers about options to maximize donor coverage and minimize financial effect within the current climate; and (4) promote further research to identify systemic barriers to living donation and LDKT to ensure the creation of mitigation strategies. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  14. Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation: Reducing Financial Barriers to Live Kidney Donation—Recommendations from a Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudow, Dianne LaPointe; Milton, Jennifer; Rodrigue, James R.; Schold, Jesse D.; Hays, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Live-donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) is the best treatment for eligible people with late-stage kidney disease. Despite this, living kidney donation rates have declined in the United States in recent years. A potential source of this decline is the financial impact on potential and actual living kidney donors (LKDs). Recent evidence indicates that the economic climate may be associated with the decline in LDKT and that there are nontrivial financial ramifications for some LKDs. In June 2014, the American Society of Transplantation’s Live Donor Community of Practice convened a Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation. The conference included transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders (with the financial support of 10 other organizations) and sought to identify best practices, knowledge gaps, and opportunities pertaining to living kidney donation. This workgroup was tasked with exploring systemic and financial barriers to living kidney donation. The workgroup reviewed literature that assessed the financial effect of living kidney donation, analyzed employment and insurance factors, discussed international models for addressing direct and indirect costs faced by LKDs, and summarized current available resources. The workgroup developed the following series of recommendations to reduce financial and systemic barriers and achieve financial neutrality for LKDs: (1) allocate resources for standardized reimbursement of LKDs' lost wages and incidental costs; (2) pass legislation to offer employment and insurability protections to LKDs; (3) create an LKD financial toolkit to provide standardized, vetted education to donors and providers about options to maximize donor coverage and minimize financial effect within the current climate; and (4) promote further research to identify systemic barriers to living donation and LDKT to ensure the creation of mitigation strategies. PMID:26002904

  15. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus group (EGCCCG): part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology of the A......OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in the year 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology...... in 2004 remain valid 3 yr later, refinements in the treatment of early- and advanced-stage testicular cancer have emerged from clinical trials. Despite technical improvements, expert clinical skills will continue to be one of the major determinants for the prognosis of patients with germ cell cancer...

  16. Consensus treatments for moderate juvenile dermatomyositis: beyond the first two months. Results of the second Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Adam M; Robinson, Angela B; Reed, Ann M; Abramson, Leslie; Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Carrasco, Ruy; Curran, Megan; Feldman, Brian M; Gewanter, Harry; Griffin, Thomas; Haines, Kathleen; Hoeltzel, Mark F; Isgro, Josephine; Kahn, Philip; Lang, Bianca; Lawler, Patti; Shaham, Bracha; Schmeling, Heinrike; Scuccimarri, Rosie; Shishov, Michael; Stringer, Elizabeth; Wohrley, Julie; Ilowite, Norman T; Wallace, Carol

    2012-04-01

    To use consensus methods and the considerable expertise contained within the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) organization to extend the 3 previously developed treatment plans for moderate juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) to span the full course of treatment. A consensus meeting was held in Chicago on April 23-24, 2010, involving 30 pediatric rheumatologists and 4 lay participants. Nominal group technique was used to achieve consensus on treatment plans that represented typical management of moderate juvenile DM. A preconference survey of CARRA, completed by 151 (56%) of 272 members, was used to provide additional guidance to the discussion. Consensus was reached on timing and rate of steroid tapering, duration of steroid therapy, and actions to be taken if patients were unchanged, worsening, or experiencing medication side effects or disease complications. Of particular importance, a single consensus steroid taper was developed. We were able to develop consensus treatment plans that describe therapy for moderate juvenile DM throughout the treatment course. These treatment plans can now be used clinically, and data collected prospectively regarding treatment effectiveness and toxicity. This will allow comparison of these treatment plans and facilitate the development of evidence-based treatment recommendations for moderate juvenile DM. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Tenth European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine: recommendations for accepted and non-accepted clinical indications and practice of hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Daniel; Marroni, Alessandro; Kot, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    The tenth European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine took place in April 2016, attended by a large delegation of experts from Europe and elsewhere. The focus of the meeting was the revision of the European Committee on Hyperbaric Medicine (ECHM) list of accepted indications for hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT), based on a thorough review of the best available research and evidence-based medicine (EBM). For this scope, the modified GRADE system for evidence analysis, together with the DELPHI system for consensus evaluation, were adopted. The indications for HBOT, including those promulgated by the ECHM previously, were analysed by selected experts, based on an extensive review of the literature and of the available EBM studies. The indications were divided as follows: Type 1, where HBOT is strongly indicated as a primary treatment method, as it is supported by sufficiently strong evidence; Type 2, where HBOT is suggested as it is supported by acceptable levels of evidence; Type 3, where HBOT can be considered as a possible/optional measure, but it is not yet supported by sufficiently strong evidence. For each type, three levels of evidence were considered: A, when the number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is considered sufficient; B, when there are some RCTs in favour of the indication and there is ample expert consensus; C, when the conditions do not allow for proper RCTs but there is ample and international expert consensus. For the first time, the conference also issued 'negative' recommendations for those conditions where there is Type 1 evidence that HBOT is not indicated. The conference also gave consensus-agreed recommendations for the standard of practice of HBOT.

  18. Psychological treatments and psychotherapies in the neurorehabilitation of pain: evidences and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    OpenAIRE

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo; Gianluca eCastelnuovo; Emanuele eGiusti; Gian Mauro eManzoni; Gian Mauro eManzoni; Donatella eSaviola; Arianna eGatti; Samantha eGabrielli; Marco eLacerenza; Giada ePietrabissa; Giada ePietrabissa; Roberto eCattivelli; Roberto eCattivelli; Chiara Anna Maria Spatola; Chiara Anna Maria Spatola

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundIt is increasingly recognized that treating pain is crucial for an effective care of the person in the setting of the neurological rehabilitation. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation was constituted with the purpose to identify the best practices that can be used in this context. Along with drug therapies and physical interventions, psychological treatments have been proven to be some of the most valuable tools that can be used within a multidisciplinary ...

  19. Psychological Treatments and Psychotherapies in the Neurorehabilitation of Pain: Evidences and Recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Giusti, Emanuele M.; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Saviola, Donatella; Gatti, Arianna; Gabrielli, Samantha; Lacerenza, Marco; Pietrabissa, Giada; Cattivelli, Roberto; Spatola, Chiara A. M.; Corti, Stefania; Novelli, Margherita; Villa, Valentina; Cottini, Andrea; Lai, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is increasingly recognized that treating pain is crucial for effective care within neurological rehabilitation in the setting of the neurological rehabilitation. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation was constituted with the purpose identifying best practices for us in this context. Along with drug therapies and physical interventions, psychological treatments have been proven to be some of the most valuable tools that can be used within a multidiscipl...

  20. European consensus conference on diagnosis and treatment of germ cell cancer: a report of the second meeting of the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG): part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krege, Susanne; Beyer, Jörg; Souchon, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The first consensus report that had been presented by the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group (EGCCCG) in 2004 has found widespread approval by many colleagues throughout the world. In November 2006, the group met a second time under the auspices of the Department of Urology...... trials. Despite technical improvements, expert clinical skills will continue to be one of the major determinants for the prognosis of patients with germ cell cancer. In addition, the particular needs of testicular cancer survivors have been acknowledged Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  1. Assessing Risk of Disease Progression and Pharmacological Management of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Canadian Expert Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Steven; Alam, Ahsan; Bevilacqua, Micheli; Girard, Louis-Philippe; Komenda, Paul; Loertscher, Rolf; McFarlane, Philip; Pandeya, Sanjaya; Tam, Paul; Bichet, Daniel G

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal disorder worldwide. The disease is characterized by renal cysts and progressive renal failure due to progressive enlargement of cysts and renal fibrosis. An estimated 45% to 70% of patients with ADPKD progress to end-stage renal disease by age 65 years. Although both targeted and nontargeted therapies have been tested in patients with ADPKD, tolvaptan is currently the only pharmacological therapy approved in Canada for the treatment of ADPKD. The purpose of this consensus recommendation is to develop an evidence-informed recommendation for the optimal management of adult patients with ADPKD. This document focuses on the role of genetic testing, the role of renal imaging, predicting the risk of disease progression, and pharmacological treatment options for ADPKD. These areas of focus were derived from 2 national surveys that were disseminated to nephrologists and patients with ADPKD with the aim of identifying unmet needs in the management of ADPKD in Canada. Specific recommendations are provided for the treatment of ADPKD with tolvaptan.

  2. Fertilizing a Patient Engagement Ecosystem to Innovate Healthcare: Toward the First Italian Consensus Conference on Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffigna, Guendalina; Barello, Serena; Riva, Giuseppe; Savarese, Mariarosaria; Menichetti, Julia; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Corbo, Massimo; Tzannis, Alessandra; Aglione, Antonio; Bettega, Donato; Bertoni, Anna; Bigi, Sarah; Bruttomesso, Daniela; Carzaniga, Claudia; Del Campo, Laura; Donato, Silvia; Gilardi, Silvia; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Gulizia, Michele; Lastretti, Mara; Mastrilli, Valeria; Mazzone, Antonino; Muttillo, Giovanni; Ostuzzi, Silvia; Perseghin, Gianluca; Piana, Natalia; Pitacco, Giuliana; Polvani, Gianluca; Pozzi, Massimo; Provenzi, Livio; Quaglini, Giulia; Rossi, Mariagrazia; Varese, Paola; Visalli, Natalia; Vegni, Elena; Ricciardi, Walter; Bosio, A Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Currently we observe a gap between theory and practices of patient engagement. If both scholars and health practitioners do agree on the urgency to realize patient engagement, no shared guidelines exist so far to orient clinical practice. Despite a supportive policy context, progress to achieve greater patient engagement is patchy and slow and often concentrated at the level of policy regulation without dialoguing with practitioners from the clinical field as well as patients and families. Though individual clinicians, care teams and health organizations may be interested and deeply committed to engage patients and family members in the medical course, they may lack clarity about how to achieve this goal. This contributes to a wide "system" inertia-really difficult to be overcome-and put at risk any form of innovation in this filed. As a result, patient engagement risk today to be a buzz words, rather than a real guidance for practice. To make the field clearer, we promoted an Italian Consensus Conference on Patient Engagement (ICCPE) in order to set the ground for drafting recommendations for the provision of effective patient engagement interventions. The ICCPE will conclude in June 2017. This document reports on the preliminary phases of this process. In the paper, we advise the importance of "fertilizing a patient engagement ecosystem": an oversimplifying approach to patient engagement promotion appears the result of a common illusion. Patient "disengagement" is a symptom that needs a more holistic and complex approach to solve its underlined causes. Preliminary principles to promote a patient engagement ecosystem are provided in the paper.

  3. Fertilizing a Patient Engagement Ecosystem to Innovate Healthcare: Toward the First Italian Consensus Conference on Patient Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guendalina Graffigna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently we observe a gap between theory and practices of patient engagement. If both scholars and health practitioners do agree on the urgency to realize patient engagement, no shared guidelines exist so far to orient clinical practice. Despite a supportive policy context, progress to achieve greater patient engagement is patchy and slow and often concentrated at the level of policy regulation without dialoguing with practitioners from the clinical field as well as patients and families. Though individual clinicians, care teams and health organizations may be interested and deeply committed to engage patients and family members in the medical course, they may lack clarity about how to achieve this goal. This contributes to a wide “system” inertia—really difficult to be overcome—and put at risk any form of innovation in this filed. As a result, patient engagement risk today to be a buzz words, rather than a real guidance for practice. To make the field clearer, we promoted an Italian Consensus Conference on Patient Engagement (ICCPE in order to set the ground for drafting recommendations for the provision of effective patient engagement interventions. The ICCPE will conclude in June 2017. This document reports on the preliminary phases of this process. In the paper, we advise the importance of “fertilizing a patient engagement ecosystem”: an oversimplifying approach to patient engagement promotion appears the result of a common illusion. Patient “disengagement” is a symptom that needs a more holistic and complex approach to solve its underlined causes. Preliminary principles to promote a patient engagement ecosystem are provided in the paper.

  4. Canadian Cardiovascular Society 2009 Consensus Conference on the management of adults with congenital heart disease: executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silversides, Candice K.; Marelli, Ariane; Beauchesne, Luc; Dore, Annie; Kiess, Marla; Salehian, Omid; Bradley, Timothy; Colman, Jack; Connelly, Michael; Harris, Louise; Khairy, Paul; Mital, Seema; Niwa, Koichiro; Oechslin, Erwin; Poirier, Nancy; Schwerzmann, Markus; Taylor, Dylan; Vonder Muhll, Isabelle; Baumgartner, Helmut; Benson, Lee; Celermajer, David; Greutmann, Matthias; Horlick, Eric; Landzberg, Mike; Meijboom, Folkert; Mulder, Barbara; Warnes, Carole; Webb, Gary; Therrien, Judith

    2010-01-01

    With advances in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, the population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased. In the current era, there are more adults with CHD than children. This population has many unique issues and needs. They have distinctive forms of heart failure, and

  5. Metabolic bone diseases in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: report from the Consensus Conference on Clinical Practice in chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautmann, Anke Heidewig; Elad, Sharon; Lawitschka, Anita; Greinix, Hildegard; Bertz, Hartmut; Halter, Joerg; Faraci, Maura; Hofbauer, Lorenz Christian; Lee, Stephanie; Wolff, Daniel; Holler, Ernst

    2011-09-01

    With improved outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for hematologic malignancies, long-term complications gain greater importance. Skeletal complications such as osteoporosis or avascular necrosis (AVN) occur frequently in allogeneic recipients with a cumulative incidence of diminished bone mineral density of 24-50% between 2 and 12 months after allo-SCT and a cumulative incidence of AVN in as many as 19% of patients 3 years after allo-SCT. Here, we present a review as part of the German, Austrian, and Swiss Consensus Conference on clinical practice in chronic graft-versus-host disease, held 2009 in Regensburg. The Consensus Conference aimed to achieve a consensus on the current evidence of diagnosis, prevention, and therapeutic options of late complications after allo-SCT summarizing and discussing the literature on these topics. In this report, we provide recommendations for metabolic bone diseases agreed upon by the working party. This includes guidelines for diagnosis, prevention, and therapeutic options in patients with low bone mass or AVN. © 2011 The Authors. Transplant International © 2011 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  6. Proceedings of NewERA's 1. annual Canadian policy conference on decentralised energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This conference focused on the role of decentralised energy (DE) in meeting future electricity needs at a time when Canada's energy industry is undergoing transformation. Energy plans are currently in favour of the DE industry which is supportive of the Kyoto Protocol commitments for the development of clean energy technologies. The presentations were directed at learning more about the federal, provincial and municipal positions on DE, as well as the perspectives of industry stakeholders. Decentralised energy is defined as the production, management and storage of heat and/or power, regardless of generator size, fuel or technology; that is located close to a customer's load and point of consumption. Grid-connected or off-grid DE complements traditional, centralized, large-scale power generation plants which are typically located far from end-users and connected to customers via bulk transmission systems or grids. The issues that need immediate attention in DE include price instability; diminishing available capacity; an aging infrastructure and changing regulatory environments. The advantages offered by DE in terms of economics, energy security, fuel efficiency, health and safety, emissions reductions and power quality were also discussed. refs., tabs., figs.

  7. PREFACE. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lihuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 9 - 10 September 2016, Kaunas, Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintaras Juodzbalys

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baltic Ossoeintegration Academy (BOA together with the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences (LSMU and Universities from Europe and USA organized their first Consensus Conference (CC devoted to the topic of peri-implantitis. BOA - LSMU consensus development group (CDG was seeking to review the dental literature on a topical area in implantology and to produce high-quality, unbiased evidence-based guidelines and consensus statement (CS. CDG as the responsible body formulated the task of developing CS devoted to the topic of peri-implantitis to Gintaras Juodzbalys (Lithuania. CS Panel members were invited by the chairman. They are representatives of Universities, experts in a field and made every effort to produce nonbiased, independent, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. Panel members had no conflicts of interest and signed a Panel Member Agreement (PMA. Working groups were established and following clinically relevant topics suitable for consensus discussion were identified: Peri-Implantitis Aetiology, Risk Factors and Pathology (group leader: Claudio Stacchi [1]. Peri-Implantitis Diagnostics and Decision Tree (group leader: Tolga Fikret Tözüm [2]. Peri-Implantitis Treatment (group leader: Fernando Suárez-López del Amo [3].

  8. Best practices recommendations in the application of immunohistochemistry in urologic pathology: report from the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mahul B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ulbright, Thomas M; Humphrey, Peter A; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Grignon, David; Trpkov, Kiril; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram; Delahunt, Brett; Berney, Daniel M; Srigley, John R; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E

    2014-08-01

    Members of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) participated in a half-day consensus conference to discuss guidelines and recommendations regarding best practice approaches to use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differential diagnostic situations in urologic pathology, including bladder, prostate, testis and, kidney lesions. Four working groups, selected by the ISUP leadership, identified several high-interest topics based on common or relevant challenging diagnostic situations and proposed best practice recommendations, which were discussed by the membership. The overall summary of the discussions and the consensus opinion forms the basis of a series of articles, one for each organ site. This Special Article summarizes the overall recommendations made by the four working groups. It is anticipated that this ISUP effort will be valuable to the entire practicing community in the appropriate use of IHC in diagnostic urologic pathology.

  9. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group III - Peri-Implantitis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Suárez-López del Amo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 3 was to review and update the existing data concerning non-surgical, surgical non-regenerative and surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the preventive and supporting therapy in case of peri-implantitis. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  10. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group II - Peri-Implantitis Diagnostics and Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Fikret Tözüm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 2 was to review and update the existing data concerning clinical and genetic methods of diagnostics of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF overview including analysis of enzymes and biomarkers and microbial profiles from implants. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  11. The process and criteria for diagnosing specific learning disorders: indications from the Consensus Conference promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Lorusso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A Consensus Conference on Specific Learning Disorders has been promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS. The Consensus Conference consisted in a systematic review of the international literature addressing the issues of diagnosis, risk factors and prognosis, treatment, service delivery and organizational models for Specific Learning Disorders (reading, spelling/writing, calculation. Selected papers were examined by a group of Evaluators and then discussed by a Scientific and Technical Committee, whose conclusions were examined and approved by a Jury Panel. The part on diagnostic issues is presented here, encompassing a systematic discussion of the use and appropriateness of diagnostic criteria, parameters, tasks and psychometric indexes as illustrated in the literature, and providing recommendations for clinical practice. Special attention has been devoted to the collection, analysis and discussion of published data concerning languages with transparent orthography. Controversial issues such as discrepancy criteria, role of reading comprehension and importance of accuracy and fluency are discussed.

  12. 55th Annual Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Conference on Epigenetics and Genomic Stability. Whistler, British Columbia, Canada, 14–18 March 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher J; Ausió, Juan

    2012-06-01

    The 55th Annual Canadian Society for Molecular Biosciences Conference on Epigenetics and Genomic Stability in Whistler, Canada, 14-18 March 2012, brought together 31 speakers from different nationalities. The organizing committee, led by Jim Davie (Chair) at the University of Manitoba (Manitoba, Canada), consisted of several established researchers in the fields of chromatin and epigenetics from across Canada. The meeting was centered on the contribution of epigenetics to gene expression, DNA damage and repair, and the role of environmental factors. A few interesting talks on replication added some insightful information on the controversial issue of histone post-translational modifications as genuine epigenetic marks that are inherited through cell division.

  13. Monitoring and ordering practices for human papillomavirus in cervical cytology: findings from the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference working group 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Christine N; Bashleben, Christine; Filomena, Carol A; Means, Marilee M; Wasserman, Patricia G; Souers, Rhona J; Henry, Michael R

    2013-02-01

    The association of certain types of human papillomavirus with cervical carcinoma is well established. Human papillomavirus testing is now routinely used to screen for cervical carcinoma and precursor lesions of the cervix (cotesting and reflex testing) and these results are considered in patient triage and management. To provide information about current laboratory practices in human papillomavirus testing and consensus best practice statements based on results from the College of American Pathologists' laboratory-based survey funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The College of American Pathologists submitted a paper-based survey to 1245 laboratories in the United States. After review of the initial results, follow-up Web-based survey results, and a literature review by an expert working group, consensus best practice statements were constructed by working group members for presentation at a national consensus conference. These best practice statements were discussed and then voted upon by conference participants. A total of 525 laboratories responded to survey questions about human papillomavirus ordering and monitoring practices, whereas 546 responded to the overall survey. In most laboratories (87.6%), the high-risk human papillomavirus test is ordered as a reflex test by providers. A minority of laboratories (11.9%) routinely bundle low- and high-risk human papillomavirus tests. Most laboratories (84.4%) do not limit testing in patients with atypical squamous cells to women older than 20 years. More than half of laboratories (53.3%) monitor human papillomavirus positive rates in Papanicolaou tests with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance. It is not appropriate for laboratories to offer low-risk human papillomavirus testing for any clinical circumstance in gynecologic cytology. Laboratories should not order human papillomavirus testing to resolve diagnostic discrepancies. It is a valuable broad measure of laboratory quality

  14. Prospective and retrospective review of gynecologic cytopathology: findings from the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference working group 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, Jennifer A; Birdsong, George G; Elsheikh, Tarik M; Hartley, David A; Naik, Kalyani; Neal, Margaret H; Souers, Rhona J; Henry, Michael R

    2013-02-01

    Two quality metrics for gynecologic cytology are the subject of this review: "prospective rescreening" and "retrospective rescreening." To offer consensus best practice approaches based on the College of American Pathologists' laboratory-based survey funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The College of American Pathologists submitted a paper-based survey to 1245 laboratories. After review of initial results, follow-up Web-based survey results, and a literature review, consensus best practice statements were presented at a national consensus conference. These statements were discussed and voted upon by conference participants. Results.-A total of 541 laboratories responded to survey questions about prospective and retrospective rescreening. Most laboratories (>85%) prospectively rescreen more than 10% of Pap tests interpreted as negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy. Most (72%) report inclusion of less than 20% high-risk cases. Most laboratories use multiple measures to define "high risk." Most laboratories (96.2%) retrospectively rescreen Pap tests from the preceding 5 years only. In most laboratories (71.4%) only Pap test results with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse prompt retrospective review. The number of Pap tests from high-risk patients should be maximized in prospective and retrospective rescreening. Unsatisfactory Pap tests should also be included. All readily identifiable high-risk human papillomavirus-positive cases with an interpretation of negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy should be prospectively rescreened. Cervical biopsy results with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or worse (CIN 2+) should trigger retrospective rescreening. Regular feedback should be provided to cytotechnologists and cytopathologists. Upgraded diagnoses from negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy to atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, should be

  15. Defining biochemical failure following radiotherapy with or without hormonal therapy in men with clinically localized prostate cancer: recommendations of the RTOG-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Mack; Hanks, Gerald; Thames, Howard; Schellhammer, Paul; Shipley, William U; Sokol, Gerald H; Sandler, Howard

    2006-07-15

    In 1996 the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) sponsored a Consensus Conference to establish a definition of biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The ASTRO definition defined prostate specific antigen (PSA) failure as occurring after three consecutive PSA rises after a nadir with the date of failure as the point halfway between the nadir date and the first rise or any rise great enough to provoke initiation of therapy. This definition was not linked to clinical progression or survival; it performed poorly in patients undergoing hormonal therapy (HT), and backdating biased the Kaplan-Meier estimates of event-free survival. A second Consensus Conference was sponsored by ASTRO and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group in Phoenix, Arizona, on January 21, 2005, to revise the ASTRO definition. The panel recommended: (1) a rise by 2 ng/mL or more above the nadir PSA be considered the standard definition for biochemical failure after EBRT with or without HT; (2) the date of failure be determined "at call" (not backdated). They recommended that investigators be allowed to use the ASTRO Consensus Definition after EBRT alone (no hormonal therapy) with strict adherence to guidelines as to "adequate follow-up." To avoid the artifacts resulting from short follow-up, the reported date of control should be listed as 2 years short of the median follow-up. For example, if the median follow-up is 5 years, control rates at 3 years should be cited. Retaining a strict version of the ASTRO definition would allow comparisons with a large existing body of literature.

  16. Gender differences in acute and chronic pain in the emergency department: results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference pain section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the life span; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  17. "Identifying the hospitalised patient in crisis"-A consensus conference on the afferent limb of Rapid Response Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devita, M.A.; Smith, G.B.; Adam, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most reports of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) focus on the efferent, response component of the system, although evidence suggests that improved vital sign monitoring and recognition of a clinical crisis may have outcome benefits. There is no consensus regarding how best to detect patie...

  18. "Identifying the hospitalised patient in crisis"--a consensus conference on the afferent limb of rapid response systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVita, Michael A; Smith, Gary B; Adam, Sheila K

    2010-01-01

    Most reports of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) focus on the efferent, response component of the system, although evidence suggests that improved vital sign monitoring and recognition of a clinical crisis may have outcome benefits. There is no consensus regarding how best to detect patient deteriora...

  19. Polar science, technology and information: Tenth anniversary conference of ACUNS (Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies), Ryerson Polytechnical Institute. La science, la technologie et l'information polaires: Dixieme conference anniversaire de l'AUCEN (Association Universitaire Canadienne d'Etudes Nordiques), Institut Polytechnique Ryerson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, P.; Duerden, F. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    A conference was held on the subject of polar science, technology and information, by the Association of Canadian Universities for Northern Studies (ACUNS). Papers were presented on varied subjects under the categories of technology and the north, polar science, information and the north, and ACUNS related activiities. Separate abstracts have been prepared for five papers from this conference.

  20. Proceedings of OttawaGeo 2007 : the Diamond Jubilee 60. Canadian Geotechnical Conference and 8. Joint CGS/IAH-CNC Groundwater Conference : Breaking Ground in the Nation's Capital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This conference provided a forum for more than 600 delegates from industry, government universities and research centres to share their professional knowledge on research and development that affects all sectors of geotechnical engineering, applied geology and hydrogeology. Accomplishments in the geoenvironmental field were also highlighted. The geotechnical themes included buried structures; cold region engineering; computer modelling; earthquake engineering; engineering geology; foundation engineering; landfills and contaminated sites; mining geotechniques and the environment; slope stability/landslides; unsaturated soils; geosynthetics; problematic soils; rock mechanics; soil dynamics and liquefaction; and, soil-structure interactions. The hydrogeology themes included applications of geophysics to hydrogeology; aquifer case studies; hydrogeology of the Canadian Shield; hydrogeology of the Great Lakes Basin and St. Lawrence Lowlands; quantitative performance assessment of contaminant remediation; radioactive waste management; and, source water protection. The conference featured more than 320 presentations, of which 35 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of pain in plexopathy, radiculopathy, peripheral neuropathy and phantom limb pain. Evidence and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain on Neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Francesco; Jacopetti, Marco; Spallone, Vincenza; Padua, Luca; Traballesi, Marco; Brunelli, Stefano; Cantarella, Cristina; Ciotti, Cristina; Coraci, Daniele; Dalla Toffola, Elena; Mandrini, Silvia; Morone, Giovanni; Pazzaglia, Costanza; Romano, Marcello; Schenone, Angelo; Togni, Rossella; Tamburin, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Pain may affect all aspects of social life and reduce the quality of life. Neuropathic pain (NP) is common in patients affected by plexopathy, radiculopathy, mononeuropathy, peripheral neuropathy. Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a painful sensation that is common after amputation, and its pathophysiological mechanisms involve changes in the peripheral and central nervous system. Given the lack of conclusive evidence and specific guidelines on these topics, the aim of the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain on Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN) was to collect evidence and offer recommendations to answer currently open questions on the assessment and treatment of NP associated with the above conditions and PLP. When no evidence was available, recommendations were based on consensus between expert opinions. Current guidelines on the assessment and pharmacological treatment of NP can be applied to plexopathy, radiculopathy, mononeuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, while evidence for invasive treatments and physical therapy is generally poor because of the low quality of studies. Treatment of PLP is still unsatisfactory. Data on the functional outcome and impact of pain on neurorehabilitation outcome in these conditions are lacking. In most cases, a multidisciplinary approach is recommended to offer a better outcome and reduce side effects. High quality studies are requested to address the unmet needs in this field.

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing surgical-site infection in plastic surgery: an evidence-based consensus conference statement from the American Association of Plastic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyan, Stephan; Martin, Janet; Lal, Avtar; Cheng, Davy; Borah, Gregory L; Chung, Kevin C; Conly, John; Havlik, Robert; Lee, W P Andrew; McGrath, Mary H; Pribaz, Julian; Young, V Leroy

    2015-06-01

    There is a growing concern for microbial resistance as a result of overuse of antibiotics. Although guidelines have focused on the use of antibiotics for surgery in general, few have addressed plastic surgery specifically. The objective of this expert consensus conference was to evaluate the evidence for efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in plastic surgical procedures. THE AUTHORS: searched for existing high-quality systematic reviews for antibiotic prophylaxis in the literature from the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase databases. All synonyms for antibiotics were combined with terms for relevant plastic surgery procedures. The searches were not limited by language, and included all study designs. In addition, supplemental hand searches were performed of bibliographies of relevant articles, and extensive "related articles." Meta-analyses were performed and reviewed by experts selected by the American Association of Plastic Surgeons to reach consensus recommendations. Database searches identified 4300 articles, from which 2042 full-text articles were identified for eligibility. De novo meta-analyses were performed for each plastic surgical category. In total, 67 studies met the inclusion criteria, including nine for breast surgery, 17 for head and neck surgery, 10 for orthognathic surgery, seven for rhinoplasty/septoplasty, 19 for hand surgery, five for skin surgery, and two for abdominoplasty. Systemic antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for clean breast surgery and for contaminated surgery of the hand or the head and neck. It is not recommended to reduce infection in clean surgical cases of the hand, skin, head and neck, or abdominoplasty.

  3. Healthy food procurement and nutrition standards in public facilities: evidence synthesis and consensus policy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Kim D; Atkey, Kayla; Olstad, Dana Lee; Ferdinands, Alexa R; Beaulieu, Dominique; Buhler, Susan; Campbell, Norm; Cook, Brian; L'Abbé, Mary; Lederer, Ashley; Mowat, David; Maharaj, Joshna; Nykiforuk, Candace; Shelley, Jacob; Street, Jacqueline

    2018-01-01

    Unhealthy foods are widely available in public settings across Canada, contributing to diet-related chronic diseases, such as obesity. This is a concern given that public facilities often provide a significant amount of food for consumption by vulnerable groups, including children and seniors. Healthy food procurement policies, which support procuring, distributing, selling, and/or serving healthier foods, have recently emerged as a promising strategy to counter this public health issue by increasing access to healthier foods. Although numerous Canadian health and scientific organizations have recommended such policies, they have not yet been broadly implemented in Canada. To inform further policy action on healthy food procurement in a Canadian context, we: (1) conducted an evidence synthesis to assess the impact of healthy food procurement policies on health outcomes and sales, intake, and availability of healthier food, and (2) hosted a consensus conference in September 2014. The consensus conference invited experts with public health/nutrition policy research expertise, as well as health services and food services practitioner experience, to review evidence, share experiences, and develop a consensus statement/recommendations on healthy food procurement in Canada. Findings from the evidence synthesis and consensus recommendations for healthy food procurement in Canada are described. Specifically, we outline recommendations for governments, publicly funded institutions, decision-makers and professionals, citizens, and researchers. Implementation of healthy food procurement policies can increase Canadians' access to healthier foods as part of a broader vision for food policy in Canada.

  4. A roadmap to improve the quality of atrial fibrillation management: proceedings from the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Bax, Jeroen; Benninger, Gerlinde; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Boriani, Giuseppe; Brandes, Axel; Brown, Helen; Brueckmann, Martina; Calkins, Hugh; Calvert, Melanie; Christoffels, Vincent; Crijns, Harry; Dobrev, Dobromir; Ellinor, Patrick; Fabritz, Larissa; Fetsch, Thomas; Freedman, S Ben; Gerth, Andrea; Goette, Andreas; Guasch, Eduard; Hack, Guido; Haegeli, Laurent; Hatem, Stephane; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Heidbüchel, Hein; Heinrich-Nols, Jutta; Hidden-Lucet, Francoise; Hindricks, Gerd; Juul-Möller, Steen; Kääb, Stefan; Kappenberger, Lukas; Kespohl, Stefanie; Kotecha, Dipak; Lane, Deirdre A; Leute, Angelika; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meyer, Ralf; Mont, Lluis; Münzel, Felix; Nabauer, Michael; Nielsen, Jens C; Oeff, Michael; Oldgren, Jonas; Oto, Ali; Piccini, Jonathan P; Pilmeyer, Art; Potpara, Tatjana; Ravens, Ursula; Reinecke, Holger; Rostock, Thomas; Rustige, Joerg; Savelieva, Irene; Schnabel, Renate; Schotten, Ulrich; Schwichtenberg, Lars; Sinner, Moritz F; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Stoll, Monika; Tavazzi, Luigi; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Tse, Hung Fat; Van Gelder, Isabelle C; Vardas, Panagiotis E; Varpula, Timo; Vincent, Alphons; Werring, David; Willems, Stephan; Ziegler, André; Lip, Gregory Y H; Camm, A John

    2016-01-01

    At least 30 million people worldwide carry a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF), and many more suffer from undiagnosed, subclinical, or 'silent' AF. Atrial fibrillation-related cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, including cardiovascular deaths, heart failure, stroke, and hospitalizations, remain unacceptably high, even when evidence-based therapies such as anticoagulation and rate control are used. Furthermore, it is still necessary to define how best to prevent AF, largely due to a lack of clinical measures that would allow identification of treatable causes of AF in any given patient. Hence, there are important unmet clinical and research needs in the evaluation and management of AF patients. The ensuing needs and opportunities for improving the quality of AF care were discussed during the fifth Atrial Fibrillation Network/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference in Nice, France, on 22 and 23 January 2015. Here, we report the outcome of this conference, with a focus on (i) learning from our 'neighbours' to improve AF care, (ii) patient-centred approaches to AF management, (iii) structured care of AF patients, (iv) improving the quality of AF treatment, and (v) personalization of AF management. This report ends with a list of priorities for research in AF patients. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Acute kidney injury in the era of big data: the 15(th) Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A

    2016-01-01

    The world is immersed in "big data". Big data has brought about radical innovations in the methods used to capture, transfer, store and analyze the vast quantities of data generated every minute of every day. At the same time; however, it has also become far easier and relatively inexpensive to do so. Rapidly transforming, integrating and applying this large volume and variety of data are what underlie the future of big data. The application of big data and predictive analytics in healthcare holds great promise to drive innovation, reduce cost and improve patient outcomes, health services operations and value. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be an ideal syndrome from which various dimensions and applications built within the context of big data may influence the structure of services delivery, care processes and outcomes for patients. The use of innovative forms of "information technology" was originally identified by the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) in 2002 as a core concept in need of attention to improve the care and outcomes for patients with AKI. For this 15(th) ADQI consensus meeting held on September 6-8, 2015 in Banff, Canada, five topics focused on AKI and acute renal replacement therapy were developed where extensive applications for use of big data were recognized and/or foreseen. In this series of articles in the Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, we describe the output from these discussions.

  6. Safety and effectiveness of the herpes zoster vaccine to prevent postherpetic neuralgia: 2014 Update and consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canadian Pain Society Study Day participants

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Pain Society (CPS hosted its first Study Day in Toronto in July 2014, attended by experts in various fields of pain management and research (listed below. The aim was to review the National Advisory Committee on Immunization guidelines and to prepare a CPS position statement concerning the use of the zoster vaccine in Canada.

  7. Outcome Criteria for Discharging the Patient With a New Ostomy From Home Health Care: A WOCN Society Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Janice C; Kupsick, Phyllis T; McNichol, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society hosted a consensus panel of expert ostomy clinicians who were tasked with identifying minimal discharge criteria for home care patients with a new fecal or urinary diversion. Shortened hospital inpatient stays, higher patient acuity, and limited access to ostomy specialists send patients with new ostomies home with multiple educational and adjustment needs related to a new stoma. The Society recognized the lack of evidence-based ostomy practice and supported the work of the panel to develop statements that defined elements of the care plan for the patient or caregiver in home care who is adapting to living with a stoma. Eighteen statements were developed that provide minimum discharge criteria for the patient with a new ostomy in the home care setting. Support based upon current evidence as well as expert opinion with implementation strategies are offered for each statement.

  8. Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine (SHARC-FM): Creating a national consensus on relevant and practical training for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, David A; Scott, Ian; Sylvester, Michael; Tan, Amy; Horrey, Kathleen; Weston, W Wayne

    2017-04-01

    In 2006, leaders of undergraduate family medicine education programs faced a series of increasing curriculum mandates in the context of limited time and financial resources. Additionally, it became apparent that a hidden curriculum against family medicine as a career choice was active in medical schools. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine was developed by the Canadian Undergraduate Family Medicine Education Directors and supported by the College of Family Physicians of Canada as a national collaborative project to support medical student training in family medicine clerkship. Its key objective is to enable education leaders to meet their educational mandates, while at the same time countering the hidden curriculum and providing a route to scholarship. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine is an open-access, shared, national curriculum ( www.sharcfm.ca ). It contains 23 core clinical topics (determined through a modified Delphi process) with demonstrable objectives for each. It also includes low- and medium-fidelity virtual patient cases, point-of-care learning resources (clinical cards), and assessment tools, all aligned with the core topics. French translation of the resources is ongoing. The core topics, objectives, and educational resources have been adopted by medical schools across Canada, according to their needs. The lessons learned from mounting this multi-institutional collaborative project will help others develop their own collaborative curricula. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  9. Management of Viral Hepatitis: Clinical and Public Health Perspectives – A Consensus Statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sherman

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Liver Foundation convened a two-day conference in September 1996, at which experts from across Canada were invited to discuss various aspects of viral hepatitis and to issue guidelines to assist practitioners in caring for patients with these diseases. The proceedings of this conference were transcribed and submitted to all participants for approval before being submitted for publication. The views expressed in this article represent the consensus opinion of the group. Where there was significant difference of opinion this is explicitly stated, and opposing points of view are given.

  10. Fifth Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup: Recommendations on incorporating patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Florence; Hilpert, Felix; Okamoto, Aikou; Stuart, Gavin; Ochiai, Kasunori; Friedlander, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Despite the support for including patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and health-related quality of life in clinical trials, there have been deficiencies in how these have been assessed and reported in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) clinical trials. To redress this, the 5th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference, included a plenary session entitled 'How to include PROs in clinical trials'. The perspective is a summary of the recommendations made by the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup unanimously agreed on the importance of PROs and PRO end-points in EOC clinical trials. They recognised that effort must be made to ensure the integrity of collection of PRO data and to avoid missing data. PRO end-points should be based on the PRO hypotheses, be context specific and reflect the patient population and the objectives of treatment (e.g. first line, maintenance therapy, early or late relapse). The PRO end-points inform the choice of PRO measures used in the trial and how the results are analysed and reported. There was agreement that progression-free survival should be supported by PROs among patients with late relapse (platinum sensitive) and that progression-free survival alone was not sufficient as the primary end-point of clinical trials in patients with platinum resistant/refractory EOC and PROs should be included as either the primary/co-primary end-point in this subset of patients. Novel approaches to measure the benefit of palliative chemotherapy such as time until definitive deterioration of Health-Related Quality of Life were recommended. There was consensus to endorse the ISOQOL and CONSORT-PRO guidelines on the inclusion and reporting of PRO endpoints in protocols and that all future EOC Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup trials should adhere to these. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychological treatments and psychotherapies in the neurorehabilitation of pain: evidences and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt is increasingly recognized that treating pain is crucial for an effective care of the person in the setting of the neurological rehabilitation. The Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation was constituted with the purpose to identify the best practices that can be used in this context. Along with drug therapies and physical interventions, psychological treatments have been proven to be some of the most valuable tools that can be used within a multidisciplinary approach for fostering a reduction in pain intensity. However, there is the need to elucidate what forms of psychotherapy could be matched with the specific pathologies that are taken in charge by the neurorehabilitation teams.ObjectivesTo extensively assess the available evidence which supports the use of psychological therapies for pain reduction in neurological diseases. MethodsA systematic review of the studies evaluating the effect of psychotherapies on pain intensity in neurological disorders was performed through an electronic search using PUBMED, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Based on the level of evidence of the included studies, recommendations were outlined separately for the different conditions.ResultsThe literature search yielded 2352 results and the final database included 400 articles. The overall strength of the recommendations was medium/low. The different forms of psychological interventions, including Cognitive – Behavioral Therapy, cognitive or behavioral techniques, Mindfulness, hypnosis, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Brief Interpersonal Therapy, virtual reality interventions, the different forms of biofeedback and mirror therapy were found to be effective for pain reduction in pathologies such as musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Central Post – Stroke pain, Phantom Limb Pain, pain secondary to Spinal Cord Injury, multiple sclerosis and other debilitating syndromes

  12. Gender-specific research for emergency diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease: proceedings from the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Cardiovascular Research Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; Nagurney, John T; Anise, Ayodola; DeVon, Holli A; D'Onofrio, Gail; Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E; Legato, Mariane J; McGregor, Alyson J; Scott, Jane; Tewelde, Semhar; Diercks, Deborah B

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of death for both men and women. However, over the years, emergency physicians, cardiologists, and other health care practitioners have observed varying outcomes in men and women with symptomatic CAD. Women in general are 10 to 15 years older than men when they develop CAD, but suffer worse postinfarction outcomes compared to age-matched men. This article was developed by the cardiovascular workgroup at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference to identify sex- and gender-specific gaps in the key themes and research questions related to emergency cardiac ischemia care. The workgroup had diverse stakeholder representation from emergency medicine, cardiology, critical care, nursing, emergency medical services, patients, and major policy-makers in government, academia, and patient care. We implemented the nominal group technique to identify and prioritize themes and research questions using electronic mail, monthly conference calls, in-person meetings, and Web-based surveys between June 2013 and May 2014. Through three rounds of nomination and refinement, followed by an in-person meeting on May 13, 2014, we achieved consensus on five priority themes and 30 research questions. The overarching themes were as follows: 1) the full spectrum of sex-specific risk as well as presentation of cardiac ischemia may not be captured by our standard definition of CAD and needs to incorporate other forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD); 2) diagnosis is further challenged by sex/gender differences in presentation and variable sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers, imaging, and risk scores; 3) sex-specific pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia extends beyond conventional obstructive CAD to include other causes such as microvascular dysfunction, takotsubo, and coronary artery dissection, better recognized as IHD; 4) treatment and prognosis are influenced by sex-specific variations in biology, as well as patient

  13. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: definition, incidence, and epidemiology: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemani, Robinder G; Smith, Lincoln S; Zimmerman, Jerry J; Erickson, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Although there are similarities in the pathophysiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults and children, pediatric-specific practice patterns, comorbidities, and differences in outcome necessitate a pediatric-specific definition. We sought to create such a definition. A subgroup of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome investigators who drafted a pediatric-specific definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome based on consensus opinion and supported by detailed literature review tested elements of the definition with patient data from previously published investigations. International PICUs. Children enrolled in published investigations of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. None. Several aspects of the proposed pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome definition align with the Berlin Definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults: timing of acute respiratory distress syndrome after a known risk factor, the potential for acute respiratory distress syndrome to coexist with left ventricular dysfunction, and the importance of identifying a group of patients at risk to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. There are insufficient data to support any specific age for "adult" acute respiratory distress syndrome compared with "pediatric" acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, children with perinatal-related respiratory failure should be excluded from the definition of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Larger departures from the Berlin Definition surround 1) simplification of chest imaging criteria to eliminate bilateral infiltrates; 2) use of pulse oximetry-based criteria when PaO2 is unavailable; 3) inclusion of oxygenation index and oxygen saturation index instead of PaO2/FIO2 ratio with a minimum positive end-expiratory pressure level for invasively ventilated patients; 4) and specific inclusion of children with preexisting chronic lung disease or cyanotic congenital heart disease. This

  14. Proceedings of GeoEdmonton 2008 : the 61. Canadian geotechnical conference and 9. joint CGS/IAH-CNC groundwater conference : a heritage of innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Skirrow, R. [Alberta Transportation, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Froese, C. [Alberta Geological Survey, Edmonton, AB (Canada)] (comps.) (and others)

    2008-07-01

    This conference provided a forum for more than 500 delegates from industry, government universities and research centres to share their professional knowledge on research and development that affects all sectors of geotechnical engineering, applied geology and hydrogeology. Accomplishments in the geoenvironmental field were also highlighted. The geotechnical sessions were entitled: pile foundations and load testing; excavations and special foundation issues; reinforced soil and soil-structure interactions; advances in modelling, constitutive issues; advances in modelling, consolidation and other applications; advances in modelling, discrete elements and slope stability; embankments and dams; landfills and barriers; fundamental soil mechanics; soil mechanics and ground movement; GIS and remote sensing; landslides and slopes; cone penetration tests and liquefaction assessment; rock mechanics; engineering geology; geoenvironmental sustainability; oilsand and petroleum geomechanics; and, oilsand tailings. The hydrogeology sessions were entitled: paste tailings and cemented paste backfill; acid mine drainage and containment issues; contaminated sites; cold regions; instrumentation, insitu testing and field applications; transportation geotechniques; urban geohazards; staff retention and motivation; geotechnical education for modern practice; regional issues and studies; policy, regulation and conservation; groundwater and development; groundwater and surface water interactions; groundwater and terrain interactions; aquicludes and aquitards; general hydrogeology; and, geochemistry and contaminant hydrogeology. The conference featured more than 250 presentations, of which 42 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  15. Italian Society of Cardiovascular Echography (SIEC) Consensus Conference on the state of the art of contrast echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    refilling phase after complete microbubble destruction. There are not enough data in the literature showing the additional role of quantitative analysis for clinical purposes. Thus, at present, quantitative softwares should be considered as research tools. Conversely, there is a general consensus based on experimental and clinical studies on the use of myocardial contrast echo in patients with acute myocardial infarction by means of qualitative or semi-quantitative analysis. Important information on the infarct area extension, on the efficacy of reperfusion therapy, on the presence and extension of the no-reflow phenomenon and on the extent of residual tissue viability may be derived from the routine use of myocardial contrast echo. The reference technique still remains myocardial scintigraphy even though many theoretical problems are being discussed. Part 8: Implementing ultrasound contrast in the echocardiography laboratory. Contrast echocardiography should be considered an extension of the existing echocardiographic examination. Standard laboratory equipment is sufficient to run a contrast echocardiography program. However, cultural and technological upgrading is mandatory to obtain good results in contrast echocardiography. Intravenous infusion is easier during stress echocardiography than during rest study, because the time and cost for the venous line are comprised. In this setting, the cost-effectiveness for the addition of contrast agent is optimal, but patient selection is a critical point. The economic issue (contrast agent and personnel costs, and time needed) of contrast echocardiography determines the fact that without adequate reimbursement there is no incentive to perform the procedure.

  16. Breast conservation in early breast cancer - indication and consequences. Results of a multidisciplinary consensus development conference. Brusterhaltende Therapie beim Mammakarzinom - Indikation und Konsequenzen. Ergebnisse einer multidisziplinaeren Konsensus-Tagung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellriegel, K.P. (Krankenhaus Moabit, Berlin (Germany, F.R.). Innere Abt.)

    1991-02-01

    A multidisciplinary consensus development conference on the management of breast preserving treatment in early breast cancer was organized in November 1989 in Berlin. Following a two-day discussion of data presented, conclusions and recommendations were achieved on the indication and limitation of breast conservation, the optimal technique as well as the diagnostic requirements and therapeutic strategies in context with breast conservation including follow-up. (orig.).

  17. Healthy food procurement and nutrition standards in public facilities: evidence synthesis and consensus policy recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D. Raine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unhealthy foods are widely available in public settings across Canada, contributing to diet-related chronic diseases, such as obesity. This is a concern given that public facilities often provide a significant amount of food for consumption by vulnerable groups, including children and seniors. Healthy food procurement policies, which support procuring, distributing, selling, and/or serving healthier foods, have recently emerged as a promising strategy to counter this public health issue by increasing access to healthier foods. Although numerous Canadian health and scientific organizations have recommended such policies, they have not yet been broadly implemented in Canada. Methods: To inform further policy action on healthy food procurement in a Canadian context, we: (1 conducted an evidence synthesis to assess the impact of healthy food procurement policies on health outcomes and sales, intake, and availability of healthier food, and (2 hosted a consensus conference in September 2014. The consensus conference invited experts with public health/nutrition policy research expertise, as well as health services and food services practitioner experience, to review evidence, share experiences, and develop a consensus statement/recommendations on healthy food procurement in Canada. Results: Findings from the evidence synthesis and consensus recommendations for healthy food procurement in Canada are described. Specifically, we outline recommendations for governments, publicly funded institutions, decision-makers and professionals, citizens, and researchers. Conclusion: Implementation of healthy food procurement policies can increase Canadians’ access to healthier foods as part of a broader vision for food policy in Canada.

  18. Proceedings of the 6. Canadian Urban Forest Conference : fires, storms, and pests : crisis in our urban forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    There is an increasing awareness in Canada of the benefits and values of urban forests in environmental, social and economic terms. However, the mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation in British Columbia (BC) has infected vast tracts of the province's forest lands over the last several years, and there is evidence that the beetle plague is now causing major devastation in urban areas. Fires are increasing in size and moving from surrounding forest lands into towns and cities in the province and have taken a toll on people and properties in urban areas. Storms and hurricanes have imposed damage on trees in urban areas in the Maritimes, Quebec and Ontario. This conference presented strategies for urban forest managers faced with a variety of disturbances. Issues concerning emergency preparedness and the role of utilities in urban forestry matters were examined and tools for valuing and marketing the urban forest were reviewed. Landscaping for the mitigation of fires was discussed along with tree hazard assessment techniques. The positive financial impact made to communities by their urban forests was emphasized and guidelines and support tools to help municipalities maintain and enhance their urban forests were outlined. The establishment of research priorities for urban forestry was recommended, as well as the identification of unique and threatened habitats both in, and near, large and small municipalities. Twenty-four presentations were given at this conference, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. Proceedings of the 56. annual Canadian Geotechnical and 4. joint IAH-CNC and CGS groundwater specialty conference : Two rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenyon, R. (ed.) [KGS Group, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This conference provided a forum for more than 400 participants to exchange information on the latest advances and new technologies regarding geotechnical aspects of hydrogeology and groundwater recharge with particular emphasis on the Two Rivers theme, examining the history of the founding of the City of Winnipeg at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers. There were 47 technical sessions with more than 200 papers presented. The sessions of the conference were entitled as follows: containment hydrogeology I, Manitoba hydrogeology I and II, Prairie hydrogeology I-III, dams and water retaining structures I and II, geoenvironmental engineering I and II, shallow foundations, earth reinforcement, use of groundwater in heating/cooling systems, permafrost, rock mechanics, hydraulics, hydrogeology case studies, underground nuclear waste storage I and II, soil mechanics I and II, hydraulics and bioengineering, contaminant hydrogeology II, groundwater resource evaluation I and II, radioactive waste management I-III(IAH), site characterization, slope stability, reinforced earth, geoenvironmental, agricultural impact on groundwater, unsaturated soils, mining, NAGS student competition, modeling and geostatistics, deep foundations, site characterization and slope stability, networking session for women, contaminant hydrogeology III, groundwater management and protection I and II, embankments and retaining walls, transportation applications, and mining and rock mechanics. Several short courses and technical tours were added to the technical program. A total of 27 papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the database. refs., tabs., figs.

  20. The role of proficiency testing in ensuring quality: findings from the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference working group 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Lydia Pleotis; Nayar, Ritu; Savaloja, Lynnette; Tabbara, Sana; Thomas, Nicole; Winkler, Barbara; Tworek, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    Implementation of proficiency testing for gynecologic cytology was delayed 20 years because of challenges addressing the subjective nature of cytologic interpretation and replicating normal working conditions. Concern remains regarding test scoring, slide validation, test environment, and other issues. How these test results are, or should be, used in quality management has never been explored. To provide information on good laboratory practices for gynecologic cytology proficiency testing based on findings from the College of American Pathologists' survey-based project funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An expert working group evaluated results from a Web-based, national laboratory survey plus responses from follow-up questions and findings from the literature. The group created statements on good laboratory practices pertinent to proficiency testing and its role in quality management, which were discussed and voted on at a consensus conference. Two-thirds of laboratories report having an individual with an unsuccessful proficiency testing score. More than 90% did not initiate any remedial action for 1 or 2 unsuccessful tests; 84% of laboratories reported they actively monitored results from proficiency testing, but most laboratories did not initiate any remedial action for cytotechnologists (81.4%; 376 of 462) or pathologists (87.7%; 405 of 462) who passed a proficiency test but who did not score 100%. Proficiency testing pass-fail rates should be monitored globally for the laboratory and for each individual. Proficiency testing slides should be prescreened by cytotechnologists for pathologists who are not primary screeners. Remedial action should not be required for a passed, but imperfect, test. No remedial action is required for an unsuccessful, first proficiency test result before retesting.

  1. Optimizing Administrative Datasets to Examine Acute Kidney Injury in the Era of Big Data: Workgroup Statement from the 15 ADQI Consensus Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward D. Siew

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to report how administrative data have been used to study AKI, identify current limitations, and suggest how these data sources might be enhanced to address knowledge gaps in the field. Objectives: 1 To review the existing evidence-base on how AKI is coded across administrative datasets, 2 To identify limitations, gaps in knowledge, and major barriers to scientific progress in AKI related to coding in administrative data, 3 To discuss how administrative data for AKI might be enhanced to enable “communication” and “translation” within and across administrative jurisdictions, and 4 To suggest how administrative databases might be configured to inform ‘registry-based’ pragmatic studies. Source of information: Literature review of English language articles through PubMed search for relevant AKI literature focusing on the validation of AKI in administrative data or used administrative data to describe the epidemiology of AKI. Setting: Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI Consensus Conference September 6-7 th , 2015, Banff, Canada Patients: Hospitalized patients with AKI Key messages: The coding structure for AKI in many administrative datasets limits understanding of true disease burden (especially less severe AKI its temporal trends and clinical phenotyping. Important opportunities exist to improve the quality and coding of AKI data to better address critical knowledge gaps in AKI and improve care. Methods: A modified Delphi consensus building process consisting of review of the literature and summary statements were developed through a series of alternating breakout and plenary sessions. Results: Administrative codes for AKI are limited by poor sensitivity, lack of standardization to classify severity, and poor contextual phenotyping. These limitations are further hampered by reduced awareness of AKI among providers and the subjective nature of reporting. While an idealized definition

  2. Consensus conference definitions and recommendations on intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)--the long road to the final publications, how did we get there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbrain, M L N G; De laet, I; Cheatham, M

    2007-01-01

    There has been an exponentially increasing interest in intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) over the last decade, and different definitions have been suggested. Nevertheless, there has been an impetus from experts in the field to modify these definitions to reflect our current understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes. An international multidisciplinary group of interested doctors met with the goal of agreeing on a set of definitions that could be applied to patients with IAH and ACS. The goal of this consensus group was to provide a conceptual and practical framework to further define ACS, a progressive injurious process that falls under the generalized term 'IAH' and that includes IAH-associated organ dysfunction. In total, 21 North American, Australasian and European surgical, trauma and critical care specialists agreed to standardize the current definitions for IAH, ACS and related conditions in preparation for the second World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WCACS). The WCACS-meeting was endorsed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the World Society on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS). The consensus conference (Noosa, Australia; December 7, 2004) was attended by 21 specialists from Europe, Australasia and North America and approximately 70 other congress participants. In advance of the conference, a blueprint for the various definitions was suggested. After the conference the participants corresponded electronically with feedback. A writing committee was formed at the conference and developed the final manuscript based on executive summary documents generated by each participant. The final report of the 2004 International ACS Consensus Definitions Conference has recently been published. This article will describe the long road towards this final publication with the evolution of the different definitions and recommendations from the initial suggestions in 2004

  3. Consensus conference definitions and recommendations on intra-abdominal hypertension (iah) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (acs) - the long road to the final publications, how did we get there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbrain, M L N G; De Laet, I; Cheatham, M

    2007-01-01

    There has been an exponentially increasing interest in intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) over the last decade, and different definitions have been suggested. Nevertheless, there has been an impetus from experts in the field to modify these definitions to reflect our current understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes. An international multidisciplinary group of interested doctors met with the goal of agreeing on a set of definitions that could be applied to patients with IAH and ACS. The goal of this consensus group was to provide a conceptual and practical framework to further define ACS, a progressive injurious process that falls under the generalized term 'IAH' and that includes IAH-associated organ dysfunction. In total, 21 North American, Australasian and European surgical, trauma and critical care specialists agreed to standardize the current definitions for IAH, ACS and related conditions in preparation for the second World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WCACS). The WCACS-meeting was endorsed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the World Society on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS). The consensus conference (Noosa, Australia; December 7, 2004) was attended by 21 specialists from Europe, Australasia and North America and approximately 70 other congress participants. In advance of the conference, a blueprint for the various definitions was suggested. After the conference the participants corresponded electronically with feedback. A writing committee was formed at the conference and developed the final manuscript based on executive summary documents generated by each participant. The final report of the 2004 International ACS Consensus Definitions Conference has recently been published. This article will describe the long road towards this final publication with the evolution of the different definitions and recommendations from the initial suggestions in 2004

  4. I Conferencia Nacional de Consenso sobre el Injerto Óseo del Seno Maxilar 1st National Consensus Conference on maxillar sinus bone grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M. Villarreal

    2010-06-01

    en el seno maxilar.Objective: The objectives of the first Spanish Consensus Conference on Sinus Bone Graft were trying to reach agreements points on the major controversies of this technique, and translate them in a summary document. Material and method: During the 17th and 18th of October of 2008 took place in Oviedo (Spain the Conference, sponsored by the Spanish Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. There, 50 national and international speakers reviewed in 6 workshops the major controversies of sinus bone grafts. Following the conferences, the moderators proposed the main conclusions of each workshop and opened a round of discussion where all attendees participated. Results: This document and its conclusions emanate from the presentations made by the speakers and the discussions and agreements of each workshop. Both have been approved after several corrections by all authors before being submitted for publication. They have also obtained the official scientific recognition of the Spanish Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and should serve as a basis for future scientific studies and meetings. Conclusions: The main objective when we perform a sinus bone graft is vital bone formation in the maxillary sinus, to achieve long-term survival of the implants after prosthetic loading. To do this, the technique and sequence of treatment should aim to achieve predictable and stable results over time, although this involves a longer waiting time. The initial implant stability is the key factor for osseointegration and should be the main criterion to indicate simultaneous or delayed implants in the maxillary sinus.

  5. Adult Asthma Consensus Guidelines Update 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lemière

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several sets of Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma have been published over the past 15 years. Since the last revision of the 1999 Canadian Asthma Consensus Report, important new studies have highlighted the need to incorporate new information into the asthma guidelines.

  6. Diagnostic standards for dopaminergic augmentation of restless legs syndrome: report from a World Association of Sleep Medicine-International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group consensus conference at the Max Planck Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Borreguero, Diego; Allen, Richard P; Kohnen, Ralf; Högl, Birgit; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Oertel, Wolfgang; Hening, Wayne A; Paulus, Walter; Rye, David; Walters, Arthur; Winkelmann, Juliane; Earley, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    Augmentation of symptom severity is the main complication of dopaminergic treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). The current article reports on the considerations of augmentation that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored Consensus Conference in April 2006 at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) in Munich, Germany, the conclusions of which were endorsed by the International RLS Study Group (IRLSSG) and the World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM). The Consensus Conference sought to develop a better understanding of augmentation and generate a better operational definition for its clinical identification. Current concepts of the pathophysiology, clinical features, and therapy of RLS augmentation were evaluated by subgroups who presented a summary of their findings for general consideration and discussion. Recent data indicating sensitivity and specificity of augmentation features for identification of augmentation were also evaluated. The diagnostic criteria of augmentation developed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conference in 2002 were reviewed in light of current data and theoretical understanding of augmentation. The diagnostic value and criteria for each of the accepted features of augmentation were considered by the group. A consensus was then developed for a revised statement of the diagnostic criteria for augmentation. Five major diagnostic features of augmentation were identified: usual time of RLS symptom onset each day, number of body parts with RLS symptoms, latency to symptoms at rest, severity of the symptoms when they occur, and effects of dopaminergic medication on symptoms. The quantitative data available relating the time of RLS onset and the presence of other features indicated optimal augmentation criteria of either a 4-h advance in usual starting time for RLS symptoms or a combination of the occurrence of other features. A paradoxical response to changes in medication dose also indicates

  7. Comprehensive risk reduction in patients with atrial fibrillation: emerging diagnostic and therapeutic options--a report from the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation Competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association consensus conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Lip, Gregory Y H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2012-01-01

    the proceedings of the 3rd Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET)/European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) consensus conference that convened over 60 scientists and representatives from industry to jointly discuss emerging therapeutic and diagnostic improvements to achieve better management of AF patients. The paper...... covers four chapters: (i) risk factors and risk markers for AF; (ii) pathophysiological classification of AF; (iii) relevance of monitored AF duration for AF-related outcomes; and (iv) perspectives and needs for implementing better antithrombotic therapy. Relevant published literature for each section...

  8. The role of monitoring interpretive rates, concordance between cytotechnologist and pathologist interpretations before sign-out, and turnaround time in gynecologic cytology quality assurance: findings from the College of American Pathologists Gynecologic Cytopathology Quality Consensus Conference working group 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Karen M; Davey, Diane D; Naryshkin, Sonya; Austin, R Marshall; Thomas, Nicole; Chmara, Beth Anne; Sugrue, Chiara; Tworek, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    The College of American Pathologists (CAP) conducted a national survey of gynecologic cytology quality assurance (QA) practices. Experts in gynecologic cytology were asked to join 5 working groups that studied the survey data on different aspects of QA. Evaluating the survey data and follow-up questions online, together with a review of pertinent literature, the working groups developed a series of preliminary statements on good laboratory practices in cytology QA. These were presented at a consensus conference and electronic voting occurred. To evaluate a set of QA monitors in gynecologic cytology. Working group 1 evaluated (1) monitoring interpretive rate categories for Papanicolaou tests (Pap tests), (2) concordance of cytotechnologist and pathologist interpretations before sign-out, and (3) turnaround time for Pap tests. The statements are based on a survey of gynecologic cytology QA practice patterns and of opinions from working group members and consensus conference attendees. The outcomes of this process demonstrate the current state of practice patterns in gynecologic cytology QA. Monitoring interpretive rates for all Bethesda System categories is potentially useful, and it is most useful to monitor interpretive rates for cytotechnologists individually and in comparison to the entire laboratory. Laboratories need to determine what level of discrepancy between cytotechnologist and pathologist interpretations of Pap tests is important to track. Laboratories should consider formalizing procedures and policies to adjudicate such discrepant interpretations. Turnaround time should be monitored in gynecologic cytology, but individual laboratories should determine how to measure and use turnaround time internally.

  9. Contemporary Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma: An Update With Discussion on Practical Issues to Implement the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jonathan I; Amin, Mahul B; Reuter, Victor E; Humphrey, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    The primary proceedings of the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology Grading Conference were published promptly in 2015 and dealt with: (1) definition of various grading patterns of usual acinar carcinoma, (2) grading of intraductal carcinoma; and (3) support for the previously proposed new Grade Groups. The current manuscript in addition to highlighting practical issues to implement the 2014 recommendations, provides an updated perspective based on numerous studies published after the 2014 meeting. A major new recommendation that came from the 2014 Consensus Conference was to report percent pattern 4 with Gleason score 7 in both needle biopsies and radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens. This manuscript gives the options how to record percentage pattern 4 and under which situations recording this information may not be necessary. Another consensus from the 2014 meeting was to replace the term tertiary-grade pattern with minor high-grade pattern. Minor high-grade indicates that the term tertiary should not merely be just the third most common pattern but that it should be minor or limited in extent. Although a specific cutoff of 5% was not voted on in the 2014 Consensus meeting, the only quantification of minor high-grade pattern that has been used in the literature with evidence-based data correlating with outcome has been the 5% cutoff. At the 2014 Consensus Conference, there was agreement that the grading rule proposed in the 2005 Consensus Conference on needle biopsies be followed, that tertiary be not used, and that the most common and highest grade patterns be summed together as the Gleason score. Therefore, the term tertiary or minor high-grade pattern should only be used in RP specimens when there are 3 grade patterns, such as with 3+4=7 or 4+3=7 with Groups would be reported along with the Gleason system. The minor high-grade patterns do not change the Grade Groups, such that in current practice one would, for example, report Gleason score 3

  10. Correction to Mathieu D, Marroni A, Kot J: Tenth European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine: recommendations for accepted and non-accepted clinical indications and practice of hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Diving Hyperb Med. 2017 Mar;47(1):24-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Daniel; Marroni, Alessandro; Kot, Jacek

    2017-06-01

    Consistent with the Committee on Publication Ethics guidelines, we the above authors are initiating a partial retraction and correction of our paper: Mathieu D, Marroni A, Kot J: Tenth European Consensus Conference on Hyperbaric Medicine: recommendations for accepted and non-accepted clinical indications and practice of hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Diving Hyperb Med. 2017 Mar;47(1):24-32. We wish to make the following statement: "Regardless of the strict process of editing and proof-reading of tables included in the above-mentioned publication, we received some comments from readers which showed us that imperfect layout of Table 1 and incorrect layout of Table 2 changed significantly the conclusions which could be drawn from them. Table 1 described the relation between strength of recommendations given by the Jury of the Consensus Conference and the level of evidence based on the GRADE system. There should be a clear and straight relation showing that Level 1 "strong recommendation" should be based on GRADE A "high level of evidence (LOE)", Level 2 "weak recommendation" should be based on GRADE B "moderate LOE", Level 3 "neutral recommendation" should be based on GRADE C "low LOE" and finally no recommendation should be given when only GRADE D "very low LOE" are present. Note that there is no change to the content of the table, but only visual representation of this relationship. Table 2 has been incorrectly printed. In fact, there is no GRADE A LOE. All X marks placed in the column A should be moved to the right, to GRADE B LOE. In the same way, all X marks placed in the column B should be moved to the right, to GRADE C LOE. We voluntarily retract these tables from the above-mentioned publication, expressing our regret for the situation."

  11. Assessing and treating pain in movement disorders, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, severe acquired brain injury, disorders of consciousness, dementia, oncology and neuroinfectivology. Evidence and recommendations from the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Michelangelo; Chiò, Adriano; Ferrari, Sergio; Tassorelli, Cristina; Tamburin, Stefano; Avenali, Micol; Azicnuda, Eva; Calvo, Andrea; Caraceni, Augusto T; Defazio, Giovanni; DE Icco, Roberto; Formisano, Rita; Franzoni, Simone; Greco, Elena; Jedrychowska, Iwona; Magrinelli, Francesca; Manera, Umberto; Marchioni, Enrico; Mariotto, Sara; Monaco, Salvatore; Pace, Andrea; Saviola, Donatella; Springhetti, Isabella; Tinazzi, Michele; DE Tanti, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    Pain is an important non-motor symptom in several neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, cervical dystonia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, severe acquired brain injury, disorders of consciousness and dementia, as well as in oncology and neuroinfectivology. To overcome the lack of evidence-based data on pain management in these diseases, the Italian Consensus Conference on Pain in Neurorehabilitation (ICCPN) has defined criteria for good clinical practice among Italian neurorehabilitation professionals. Here a review of the literature (PubMed, EMBASE and gray literature) on pain characteristics, treatment and impact of pain in a neurorehabilitation setting is provided. Despite the heterogeneity of data, a consensus was reached on pain management for patients with these diseases: it is an approach originating from an analysis of the available data on pain characteristics in each disease, the evolution of pain in relation to the natural course of the disease and the impact of pain on the overall process of rehabilitation. There was unanimous consensus regarding the utility of a multidisciplinary approach to pain therapy, combining the benefits of pharmacological therapy with the techniques of physiotherapy and neurorehabilitation for all the conditions considered. While some treatments could be different depending on pathology, a progressive approach to the pharmacological treatment of pain is advisable, starting with non-opioid analgesics (paracetamol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as a first-line treatment, and opioid analgesics as a second-line treatment. In cases of pain secondary to spasticity, botulinum neurotoxin, and, in some cases, intrathecal baclofen infusion should be considered. Randomized controlled trials and prospective multicenter studies aimed at documenting the efficacy of pain treatment and their risk-benefit profile are recommended for these conditions.

  12. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group I - Peri-Implantitis Aetiology, Risk Factors and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Stacchi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 1 was to review and update the existing data concerning aetiology, risk factors and pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Previous history of periodontitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking and presence of general diseases have been considered among the aetiological risk factors for the onset of peri-implant pathologies, while late dental implant failures are commonly associated with peri-implantitis and/or with the application of incorrect biomechanical forces. Special interest was paid to the bone cells dynamics as part of the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Material and Methods: The main areas indagated by this group were as follows: influence of smoking, history of periodontitis and general diseases on peri-implantitis development, bio-mechanics of implant loading and its influence on peri-implant bone and cellular dynamics related to the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. The systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was screened and reported following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. Method of preparation of the systematic reviews, based on comprehensive search strategies, was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. One systematic review with meta-analysis, three systematic reviews and one theoretical analysis were performed. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  13. Mandibular condyle fractures : a consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, RRM; Booth, RPW; de Bont, LGM

    A consensus was obtained following a two-day international conference to review the management of mandibular condyle fractures. Whilst areas of disagreement still exist, there are many areas of agreement. It is hoped this editorial will stimulate debate leading to internationally accepted

  14. The Gestalt of functioning in autism spectrum disorder: Results of the international conference to develop final consensus International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health core sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölte, Sven; Mahdi, Soheil; de Vries, Petrus J; Granlund, Mats; Robison, John E; Shulman, Cory; Swedo, Susan; Tonge, Bruce; Wong, Virginia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Segerer, Wolfgang; Selb, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is associated with diverse social, educational, and occupational challenges. To date, no standardized, internationally accepted tools exist to assess autism spectrum disorder-related functioning. World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health can serve as foundation for developing such tools. This study aimed to identify a comprehensive, a common brief, and three age-appropriate brief autism spectrum disorder Core Sets. Four international preparatory studies yielded in total 164 second-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health candidate categories. Based on this evidence, 20 international autism spectrum disorder experts applied an established iterative decision-making consensus process to select from the candidate categories the most relevant ones to constitute the autism spectrum disorder Core Sets. The consensus process generated 111 second-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories in the Comprehensive Core Set for autism spectrum disorder-one body structure, 20 body functions, 59 activities and participation categories, and 31 environmental factors. The Common Brief Core Set comprised 60 categories, while the age-appropriate core sets included 73 categories in the preschool version (0- to 5-year-old children), 81 in the school-age version (6- to 16-year-old children and adolescents), and 79 in the older adolescent and adult version (⩾17-year-old individuals). The autism spectrum disorder Core Sets mark a milestone toward the standardized assessment of autism spectrum disorder-related functioning in educational, administrative, clinical, and research settings.

  15. [Diagnosis and therapy of chronic urticaria-what is expected from the revision and update of the international guidelines? A report of the public consensus conference "URTICARIA 2012"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, M; Magerl, M; Metz, M; Zuberbier, T

    2013-09-01

    In November 2012, the 4th International Consensus Meeting on Urticaria ("URTICARIA 2012") took place in Berlin with more than 300 participants. The international and the German guidelines for the definition, classification, diagnosis and management of urticaria are currently being developed based on this meeting. At the time of publication of this article, the guidelines are in the final process of international coordination. The previous international guidelines were updated based on prepared questions as well as a systematic review of the literature by an expert panel. The individual aspects were then discussed with all participants and decided upon, based on the Delphi method with general discussion and open poll. Here, at least a 75 % agreement was required. The new consensus modifies the previous international guidelines on classification and diagnosis and especially on therapy. The treatment algorithm has been changed to a three step approach. The first step is a second generation H1 antihistamine in standard dosage. The second step is increasing the dose up to 4 times the standard dose. In the third step, additional treatment with omalizumab, cyclosporine A or montelukast is recommended as well as possibly systemic corticosteroids for a maximum of 7-10 days. H2 antihistamines and dapsone, which were included in the previous guideline as standard therapies, are no longer recommended for use by the updated and revised guidelines.

  16. Treatment of severe psoriasis with fumaric acid esters: scientific background and guidelines for therapeutic use. The German Fumaric Acid Ester Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowietz, U; Christophers, E; Altmeyer, P

    1999-09-01

    Fumaric acid ester (FAE) therapy has proved to be safe and effective in patients with severe psoriasis vulgaris. This treatment was introduced nearly 30 years ago, but is only now gaining renewed interest among dermatologists. FAE therapy is licensed in Germany and registration is pending in many European countries. Multicentre trials have confirmed the beneficial effect of FAE in psoriasis and have defined the spectrum of its adverse effects. Although the mode of action of FAEs in the treatment of psoriasis is not fully understood, recent experimental data point towards a skewing of the Th1-dominated T-cell response in psoriasis to a Th2-like pattern, and inhibition of proliferation of keratinocytes. This article reviews the experimental and clinical information on FAEs in psoriasis and provides guidelines for the clinical use of FAEs derived from a consensus meeting of leading experts.

  17. Reaching Consensus Is a Difficult Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Carolyn

    1994-01-01

    Critiques the consensus statement of an international conference on child abuse. Criticism includes lack of true interdisciplinary representation at the conference, lack of acknowledgement of the possible trauma of multiple interviews for children, and lack of a more comprehensive statement on medical examinations. (JPS)

  18. Meeting report: consensus statement-Parkinson's disease and the environment: collaborative on health and the environment and Parkinson's Action Network (CHE PAN) conference 26-28 June 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstein, Jeff; Carvey, Paul; Chen, Honglei; Cory-Slechta, Deborah; DiMonte, Donato; Duda, John; English, Paul; Goldman, Samuel; Grate, Stephen; Hansen, Johnni; Hoppin, Jane; Jewell, Sarah; Kamel, Freya; Koroshetz, Walter; Langston, James W; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Nelson, Lorene; Ravina, Bernard; Rocca, Walter; Ross, George W; Schettler, Ted; Schwarzschild, Michael; Scott, Bill; Seegal, Richard; Singleton, Andrew; Steenland, Kyle; Tanner, Caroline M; Van Den Eeden, Stephen; Weisskopf, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. People with PD, their families, scientists, health care providers, and the general public are increasingly interested in identifying environmental contributors to PD risk. In June 2007, a multidisciplinary group of experts gathered in Sunnyvale, California, USA, to assess what is known about the contribution of environmental factors to PD. We describe the conclusions around which they came to consensus with respect to environmental contributors to PD risk. We conclude with a brief summary of research needs. PD is a complex disorder, and multiple different pathogenic pathways and mechanisms can ultimately lead to PD. Within the individual there are many determinants of PD risk, and within populations, the causes of PD are heterogeneous. Although rare recognized genetic mutations are sufficient to cause PD, these account for < 10% of PD in the U.S. population, and incomplete penetrance suggests that environmental factors may be involved. Indeed, interplay among environmental factors and genetic makeup likely influences the risk of developing PD. There is a need for further understanding of how risk factors interact, and studying PD is likely to increase understanding of other neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Classroom Testing in Canada. Proceedings of the Canadian Conference on Classroom Testing (2nd, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, June 1-2, 1990).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, David J., Ed.

    This document provides the following 13 conference papers: (1) "Introduction: Where Do We Go From Here?" (D. J. Bateson); (2) "The Context of Classroom Procedures in Evaluating Students" (R. J. Wilson); (3) "Student Evaluation in the Ungraded Primary School: The SCRP (Systematic Cumulative Record of Performance)…

  20. Proceedings of the 55. Canadian Geotechnical and 3. joint IAH-CNC and CGS groundwater specialty conference : ground and water : theory to practice. CD-ROM ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolle, D. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Piggott, A.R. [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, ON (Canada); Crowder, J.J. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    This conference provided a forum to exchange information on the latest advances and new technologies regarding geotechnical aspects of hydrogeology and groundwater recharge with particular reference to the intersection of ground and water issues. The 30 sessions of the conference were entitled: foundations; soil behaviour; geo-environmental issues; unsaturated flow and applications of geophysics; hydrogeology case studies; site investigation and monitoring; numerical analysis; geosynthetic and reinforced walls; mine waste; contaminant hydrogeology; landfill and collection systems; site investigation techniques; rock mechanics; selected topics in hydrogeology; geosynthetic applications; ground movement; groundwater management; groundwater remediation; earth structures; barriers and remediation; risk and probability considerations; contaminant hydrogeology; slope stability; landfill and geotechnical management; soil properties; and hydrogeology case studies. 33 papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the database. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Consensus development for healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kea, Bory; Sun, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Consensus development sprang from a desire to synthesize clinician and expert opinions on clinical practice and research agendas in the 1950s. And since the American Institute of Medicine formally defined “guidelines” in 1990, there has been a proliferation of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) both formally and informally. This modern decision making tool used by both physicians and patients, requires extensive planning to meet the challenges of consensus development while reaping its rewards. Consensus allows for a group approach with multiple experts sharing ideas to form consensus on topics ranging from appropriateness of procedures to research agenda development. Disagreements can shed light on areas of controversy and launch further discussions. It has five main components: three inputs (defining the task, participant identification and recruitment, and information synthesis), the approach (consensus development by explicit or implicit means), and the output (dissemination of results). Each aspect requires extensive planning a priori as they influence the entire process, from how information will be interpreted, the interaction of participants, the resulting judgment, to whether there will be uptake of results. Implicit approaches utilize qualitative methods and/or a simple voting structure of majority wins, and are used in informal consensus development methods and consensus development conferences. Explicit approaches aggregate results or judgments using explicit rules set a priori with definitions of “agreement” or consensus. Because the implicit process can be more opaque, unforeseen challenges can emerge such as the undue influence of a minority. And yet, the logistics of explicit approaches may be more time consuming and not appropriate when speed is a priority. In determining which method to use, it is important to understand the pros and cons of the different approaches and how it will affect the overall input, approach, and outcome. PMID

  2. Proceedings of an IWA specialist conference : moving forward wastewater biosolids sustainability : technical, managerial and public synergy[Held jointly with the 4. Canadian organic residuals and biosolids managment conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlanc, R.J. [Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission, Moncton, NB (Canada); Laughton, P.J. [R.V Anderson Associates Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Tyagi, R. [Quebec Univ., Quebec, PQ (Canada). Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Eau, Terre et Environnement] (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    This conference provided a forum for exchanging the latest information on technical legislative and public awareness issues associated with the sustainable management of organic residuals and biosolids Canada. It was attended by producers, managers, practitioners and regulators from across Canada who discussed various initiatives regarding the production, management use and disposal of organic residuals including municipal wastewater treatment of biosolids, animal manures and pulp and paper sludges. The integration of pollution prevention policies to reduce the introduction of pollutants into wastewater at the source was also discussed. The sessions of the conference were entitled: the global perspective; sludge characteristics, rheology, dewatering and pumping; emerging pollutants and impacts on biosolids; advanced treatment, emerging processes and innovations; sludge as a resource and value added processes; fate of hazardous and recalcitrant compounds during sludge treatment; pre- and post-treatment and treatment of reject waters; sludge dewatering, treatment and products; sludge treatment/hydrolysis to augment nutrient availability; odour control and other; history, marketing and public synergy stream; public perception, communications, consultation and education; future challenges and overall sustainable development approaches; and, history, marketing and biosolids management. The conference featured 150 presentations, of which 12 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  3. The Canadian experience: why Canada decided against an upper limit for cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bruce E

    2004-12-01

    Canada, like the United States, held a "consensus conference on cholesterol" in 1988. Although the final report of the consensus panel recommended that total dietary fat not exceed 30 percent and saturated fat not exceed 10 percent of total energy intake, it did not specify an upper limit for dietary cholesterol. Similarly, the 1990, Health Canada publication "Nutrition Recommendations: The Report of the Scientific Review Committee" specified upper limits for total and saturated fat in the diet but did not specify an upper limit for cholesterol. Canada's Guidelines for Healthy Eating, a companion publication from Health Canada, suggested that Canadians "choose low-fat dairy products, lean meats, and foods prepared with little or no fat" while enjoying "a variety of foods." Many factors contributed to this position but a primary element was the belief that total dietary fat and saturated fat were primary dietary determinants of serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, not dietary cholesterol. Hence, Canadian health authorities focused on reducing saturated fat and trans fats in the Canadian diet to help lower blood cholesterol levels rather than focusing on limiting dietary cholesterol. In an effort to allay consumer concern with the premise that blood cholesterol level is linked to dietary cholesterol, organizations such as the Canadian Egg Marketing Agency (CEMA) reminded health professionals, including registered dietitians, family physicians and nutrition educators, of the extensive data showing that there is little relationship between dietary cholesterol intake and cardiovascular mortality. In addition, it was pointed out that for most healthy individuals, endogenous synthesis of cholesterol by the liver adjusts to the level of dietary cholesterol intake. Educating health professionals about the relatively weak association between dietary cholesterol and the relatively strong association between serum cholesterol and saturated fat and

  4. ESMO consensus conference on malignant lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladetto, M; Buske, C; Hutchings, M

    2016-01-01

    topics [i.e. interim positron emission tomography (PET), TP53 mutations, cell of origin (COO) and minimal residual disease (MRD)] were primarily chosen because of the bulk of available data together with the lack of clear guidance regarding their use in clinical practice and within clinical trials...

  5. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence. A consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society, endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, S.R. [Imperial College London, Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, SW3 6NP, London (United Kingdom); Anagnostopoulos, C. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, SW3 6NP, London (United Kingdom); Cerqueira, M. [Georgetown University Medical Center, 3800 Reservoir Road NW, WA 20007-2197, Washington DC (United States); Ell, P.J. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, The Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Flint, E.J. [Dudley Group of Hospitals, Wordsley Hospital, DY8 5QX, Stourbridge, West Midlands (United Kingdom); Harbinson, M. [Antrim Area Hospital, Bush Road, Co Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Kelion, A.D. [Harefield Hospital, Hill End Road, UB9 6JH, Harefield, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Al-Mohammad, A. [Northern General Hospital, Herries Road, S5 7AU, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Prvulovich, E.M. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, The Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, W1T 3AA, London (United Kingdom); Shaw, L.J. [Suite 225, Atlanta Cardiovascular Research Institute, 5665 Peachtree Dunwoody Road NE, 30342, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Tweddel, A.C. [Castle Hill Hospital, Castle Road, HU16 5JQ, Cottingham, E Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  6. I Am Canadian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joe

    2011-01-01

    "I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness......."I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness....

  7. Evidence-based guidelines for the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in adults with Philadelphia chromosome–positive or BCR-ABL–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Canadian consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couban, S.; Savoie, L.; Mourad, Y. Abou; Leber, B.; Minden, M.; Turner, R.; Palada, V.; Shehata, N.; Christofides, A.; Lachance, S.

    2014-01-01

    Adult Philadelphia chromosome–positive (Ph+) or BCR-ABL–positive (BCR-ABL+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) is an acute leukemia previously associated with a high relapse rate, short disease-free survival, and poor overall survival. In adults, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant in first remission remains the only proven curative strategy for transplant-eligible patients. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tkis) in the treatment of patients with Ph+ or BCR-ABL+ all has significantly improved the depth and duration of complete remission, allowing more patients to proceed to transplantation. Although tkis are now considered a standard of care in this setting, few randomized trials have examined the optimal use of tkis in patients with Ph+ all. Questions of major importance remain, including the best way to administer these medications, the choice of tki to administer, and the schedule and the duration to use. We present the results of a systematic review of the literature with consensus recommendations based on the available evidence. PMID:24764712

  8. Clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology: Results of an interdisciplinary consensus conference; Klinische Wertigkeit der Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie (PET) bei onkologischen Fragestellungen: Ergebnisse einer interdisziplinaeren Konsensuskonferenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reske, S.N. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany); Bares, R. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Buell, U. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Guhlmann, A. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany); Moser, E. [Abt. Nuklearmedizin, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Wannenmacher, M.F. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    Clinical value of PET in oncology was evaluated by a panel of recognized experts in the framework of an interdisciplinary consensus conference. On the basis of PET studies, well documented in the international literature, the value of PET for solving clinical questions was classified according to the following categories `appropriate` (1a), `mostly acceptable` (1b), `helpful` (2a), `value as yet unknown` (2b), `useless` (3). 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) acts as the radiopharmaceutical of choice for PET in clinical oncology. PET is indicated (1a) for diagnosing relapse in high grade glioma (FDG) or low grade glioma (C-11 methionine or F-18 fluorotyrosine), differential diagnosis of solitary peripheral pulponary nodules in high risk patients and for diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. PET may be clinically used (1b): In `low-grade` glioma, search for unknown primary in head and neck tumors, suspicion of relapse in nonsmall cell bronchial carcinoma (NSCBC) and colorectal carcinoma, lymphnode staging in NSCBC, pancreatic carcinoma, muscle invasive bladder carcinoma and testicular cancer. Staging of Hodgkin`s disease (HD, stage I/II vs III), early therapy control in patients with a residual mass or suspicion of relapse in HD and in high grade NHL, lymph node staging and search for distant metastases in malignant melanoma (Breslow>1,5 mm), search for lymph node or distant metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer with elevated hTG and a negative radioiodide whole body scan. Many further indications are emerging, but are not yet sufficiently well documented in the literature. For most indications beside scientific studies, an individual cost benefit utility evaluation by the responsible physician is recommended. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen einer interdisziplinaeren Konferenz mit namhaften Experten wurde eine Wertung des gegenwaertigen Stands von PET in der Onkologie an Hand der in der Literatur dokumentierten Studienergebnisse erarbeitet. Angestrebt wurde eine

  9. The Canadian Atherosclerosis Society--history and present status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haust, M D

    1991-10-01

    Since its inception in 1983 the Canadian Atherosclerosis Society (CAS) has established itself firmly on the national and international scene as a forceful scientific voice. Its presence and activities have had their dominant expression at annual meetings held jointly with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) and the Canadian Society for Clinical Investigation (CSCI) and in sponsoring other scientific and educational events, the most important of which was the Canadian Consensus Conference on Cholesterol (Ottawa, March 1988). It provided a forum for interaction between the scientific community, government, funding agencies, industry and the general public, and culminated in concrete recommendations for the populace of Canada. It also 'induced' a continuum in governmental and public concern for health with respect to atherosclerosis, and beyond it, the field of cardiovascular diseases. This dialogue continues. As a member (Constituent Society) of the International Atherosclerosis Society (IAS), the CAS has a voice in the international community, its policies and activities. The membership increase from 69 in 1983 to 175 in 1991 reflects steady growth of the CAS. The Society has been active in other areas (publications, awards for young investigators, and common educational endeavours with other groups) and will be host to the 1994 International Symposium on Atherosclerosis. Over a short period of only eight years, all of the above attests to sufficient progress (or achievement) for any scientific society. And yet, there remain quite a few areas not addressed as yet and some sad experiences (eg, that with the Long Term Planning Committee) that must be quickly remedied, if the Society is to keep pace with the everchanging emphasis in research that in the final analysis aims at improving the overall well-being and health of all Canadians. Inherent in the definition of history is the premise that accounts be provided of facts only. Historians

  10. Knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and management of patients with tropical diseases presenting to Canadian emergency departments: are the gaps being met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nazanin; Misra, Shikha; Hunchak, Cheryl; Cleiman, Paula; Khan, Yasmin; Puchalski Ritchie, Lisa M

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a needs assessment to identify knowledge gaps in the management of tropical diseases by Canadian emergency physicians and identify available, related continuing medical education (CME) resources. A literature review was conducted to summarize challenges in the management of commonly encountered tropical diseases. An anonymous online survey was administered to Canadian emergency physicians using the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians survey deployment service in July and August 2012. The survey identified self-reported gaps in knowledge and assessed knowledge using case-based vignettes. A list of CME resources was generated from a review of major academic emergency medicine journals, online cases, and conference topics from emergency medicine associations during 2010-2011. Two independent reviewers assessed the relevance of the resources; differences were resolved by consensus. From 635 citations, 47 articles were selected for full review; the majority (66%) were retrospective chart reviews, few (10.6%) had an emergency medicine focus, and fewer still were Canadian (8.5%). In total, 1,128 surveys were distributed, and 296 (27%) participants were included in the study. Most respondents reported "no" (52.4%) or "some" (45.9%) training in tropical medicine. Most (69.9%) rated their comfort in managing patients with tropical diseases as "low." Few (11.1%) respondents reported a tropical disease being misdiagnosed or mismanaged; 44.1% indicated malaria. The perceived need for further training was high (76.7%). Conference workshops were the most highly requested CME modality, followed by case studies and podcasts. Correct answers to case vignettes ranged from 30.7 to 58.4%. Although 2,038 CME titles were extracted from extensive searches, only 6 were deemed relevant. Most Canadian emergency physicians have had minimal training in tropical diseases, reported a low comfort level in their management, and identified a high need for CME opportunities

  11. Dictionaries of Canadian English

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Technology

    ... Globe and Mail said, an enterprising publication. Despite the existence of the Winston dictionary, some Canadians were still, at the end of the 1950s, prepared to dismiss Canadian lexicography as pointless. When the idea of a Canadian dictionary was introduced to the Dean of Arts and Science at Dalhousie University in ...

  12. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  13. The Limits of Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, John B.

    Dynamics in the education policy arena suggest that, despite two generations of researchers extolling democratic leadership styles and consensus building over autocratic techniques, wide participation in policymaking and the broadest possible consensus are not always productive: American society has not yet agreed on what schools should…

  14. Current Knowledge and Priorities for Future Research in Late Effects after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes: Consensus Statement from the Second Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium International Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Andrew C; Mehta, Parinda A; Vlachos, Adrianna; Savage, Sharon A; Bresters, Dorine; Tolar, Jakub; Boulad, Farid; Dalle, Jean Hugues; Bonfim, Carmem; de la Fuente, Josu; Duncan, Christine N; Baker, K Scott; Pulsipher, Michael A; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Wagner, John E; Alter, Blanche P

    2017-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC), and Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) are 3 of the most common inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (IBMFS), in which the hematologic manifestations can be cured with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Later in life, these patients face a variety of medical conditions, which may be a manifestation of underlying disease or due to pre-HCT therapy, the HCT, or a combination of all these elements. Very limited long-term follow-up data exist in these populations, with FA the only IBMFS that has specific published data. During the international consensus conference sponsored by the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium entitled "Late Effects Screening and Recommendations following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT) for Immune Deficiency and Nonmalignant Hematologic Disease" held in Minneapolis, Minnesota in May of 2016, a half-day session was focused specifically on the unmet needs for these patients with IBMFS. A multidisciplinary group of experts discussed what is currently known, outlined an agenda for future research, and laid out long-term follow-up guidelines based on a combination of evidence in the literature as well as expert opinion. This article addresses the state of science in that area as well as consensus regarding the agenda for future research, with specific screening guidelines to follow in the next article from this group. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  15. Democracy-based consensus in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Massimiliano; Zangrillo, Alberto; Mucchetti, Marta; Nobile, Leda; Landoni, Paolo; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Landoni, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    High-quality evidence and derived guidelines, as typically published in major academic journals, are a major process that shapes physician decision-making worldwide. However, for many aspects of medical practice, there is a lack of High-quality evidence or an overload of somewhat contradictory low-quality information, which makes decision-making a difficult, uncertain, and unpredictable process. When the issues in question are important and evidence limited or controversial, the medical community seeks to establish common ground for "best practice" through consensus conferences and consensus statements or guidelines. Such consensus statements are seen as a useful tool to establish expert agreement, define the boundaries of acceptable practice, provide priorities for the research agenda, and obtain opinions from different countries and healthcare systems. This standard approach, however, can be criticized for being elitist, noninclusive, and poorly representative of the community of clinicians who will have to make decisions about the implementation of such recommendations. Accordingly, the authors propose a new model based on a combination of a local core meeting (detailed review and expert input) followed by a worldwide web-based network assessment (democracy-based consensus). The authors already have applied this approach to develop consensus on all nonsurgical interventions that increase or reduce perioperative mortality in critically ill patients and in those with acute kidney injury. The methodology was based on 5 sequential local and web-based steps. Both a panel of experts and a large number of professionals from all over the world were involved, giving birth to a new type of "democracy-based consensus." This new type of "democracy-based consensus" has the potential to increase grass-root clinician involvement, expand the reach to less-developed countries, provide a more global perspective on proposed interventions, and perhaps more importantly, increase

  16. Sedentary time in older men and women: an international consensus statement and research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Shilpa; Ashe, Maureen C; Biddle, Stuart J H; Brown, Wendy J; Buman, Matthew P; Chastin, Sebastien; Gardiner, Paul A; Inoue, Shigeru; Jefferis, Barbara J; Oka, Koichiro; Owen, Neville; Sardinha, Luís B; Skelton, Dawn A; Sugiyama, Takemi; Copeland, Jennifer L

    2017-11-01

    Sedentary time is a modifiable determinant of poor health, and in older adults, reducing sedentary time may be an important first step in adopting and maintaining a more active lifestyle. The primary purpose of this consensus statement is to provide an integrated perspective on current knowledge and expert opinion pertaining to sedentary behaviour in older adults on the topics of measurement, associations with health outcomes, and interventions. A secondary yet equally important purpose is to suggest priorities for future research and knowledge translation based on gaps identified. A five-step Delphi consensus process was used. Experts in the area of sedentary behaviour and older adults (n=15) participated in three surveys, an in-person consensus meeting, and a validation process. The surveys specifically probed measurement, health outcomes, interventions, and research priorities. The meeting was informed by a literature review and conference symposium, and it was used to create statements on each of the areas addressed in this document. Knowledge users (n=3) also participated in the consensus meeting. Statements were then sent to the experts for validation. It was agreed that self-report tools need to be developed for understanding the context in which sedentary time is accumulated. For health outcomes, it was agreed that the focus of sedentary time research in older adults needs to include geriatric-relevant health outcomes, that there is insufficient evidence to quantify the dose-response relationship, that there is a lack of evidence on sedentary time from older adults in assisted facilities, and that evidence on the association between sedentary time and sleep is lacking. For interventions, research is needed to assess the impact that reducing sedentary time, or breaking up prolonged bouts of sedentary time has on geriatric-relevant health outcomes. Research priorities listed for each of these areas should be considered by researchers and funding agencies

  17. Developing a standardized approach to the assessment of pain in children and youth presenting to pediatric rheumatology providers: a Delphi survey and consensus conference process followed by feasibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Jennifer N; Connelly, Mark; Jibb, Lindsay A; Schanberg, Laura E; Walco, Gary; Spiegel, Lynn R; Tse, Shirley Ml; Chalom, Elizabeth C; Chira, Peter; Rapoff, Michael

    2012-04-10

    Pain in children with rheumatic conditions such as arthritis is common. However, there is currently no standardized method for the assessment of this pain in children presenting to pediatric rheumatologists. A more consistent and comprehensive approach is needed to effectively assess, treat and monitor pain outcomes in the pediatric rheumatology population. The objectives of this study were to: (a) develop consensus regarding a standardized pain assessment tool for use in pediatric rheumatology practice and (b) test the feasibility of three mediums (paper, laptop, and handheld-based applications) for administration. In Phase 1, a 2-stage Delphi technique (pediatric rheumatologists and allied professionals) and consensus meeting (pediatric pain and rheumatology experts) were used to develop the self- and proxy-report pain measures. In Phase 2, 24 children aged 4-7 years (and their parents), and 77 youth, aged 8-18 years, with pain, were recruited during routine rheumatology clinic appointments and completed the pain measure using each medium (order randomly assigned). The participant's rheumatologist received a summary report prior to clinical assessment. Satisfaction surveys were completed by all participants. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the participant characteristics using means and standard deviations (for continuous variables) and frequencies and proportions (for categorical variables) Completing the measure using the handheld device took significantly longer for youth (M = 5.90 minutes) and parents (M = 7.00 minutes) compared to paper (M = 3.08 and 2.28 minutes respectively p = 0.001) and computer (M = 3.40 and 4.00 minutes respectively; p < 0.001). There was no difference in the number of missed responses between mediums for children or parents. For youth, the number of missed responses varied across mediums (p = 0.047) with the greatest number of missed responses occurring with the handheld device. Most children preferred the computer (65

  18. Abstracts and electronic proceedings of the Canadian Dam Association's 2008 annual conference : emerging technologies for dams; Resumes et actes electroniques du congres annuel 2008 de l'Association canadienne des barrages : technologies naissantes pour les barrages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This conference provided a national forum to explore and discuss emerging technologies which can be used to enhance dam safety and construction practices on both new and existing projects. Advancements in the fields of dam design, construction, and remedial works were reviewed as well as new techniques for dam monitoring programs. Engineers, geoscientists, dam owners and operators and other stakeholders exchanged ideas and information regarding the operation, maintenance and management of water and tailings dams. The conference sessions dealt with a variety of topics, including dam foundations; mining dams; dams and the environment; embankment dams; dams and seismicity; hydrotechnics; assessment and investigative technologies; dam instrumentation and monitoring; computational hydraulics; and dam safety. The conference featured 46 presentations, of which 37 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. Proceedings of the 31. annual meeting and conference of the Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA) and the 9. meeting of the International Affiliation of Land Reclamationists (IALR) : reclamation and remediation : policy to practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisch, B.; Macleod, A.; Rowsome, S.; Black, C. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories; Zimmerman, K. [Dufferin Aggregates, Concord, ON (Canada); White, P. [Ontario Stone, Sand and Gravel Assoc., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Beckett, P. [Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, ON (Canada); Mackasey, B. [WOM Geological Associates Inc., Sudbury, ON (Canada); Guenther, L. [Gartner-Lee Associates, ON (Canada)] (comps.)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this conference was to promote corporate involvement where remedial action or rehabilitation of disturbed lands is planned or implemented. The primary purpose for reclaiming lands disturbed by mineral extraction and processing or by other industrial activity is to return the land to a level that is equivalent to its pre-industrial activity level. The conference was attended by researchers and practitioners involved in mitigating problems in lands disturbed by industrial activity. The discussions incorporated advances from research and practical experience in land reclamation, planning and practice. A broad range of reclamation, restoration and remediation topics were discussed, including oil sand mining, coal mining, metals in soils, urban restoration and new technologies. The value gained in terms of biological recovery through the revegetation of contaminated soils was discussed with reference to bioremediation and phytoremediation techniques. The conference featured 76 presentations, of which 22 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  20. Framing Canadian federalism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saywell, John; Anastakis, Dimitry; Bryden, Penny E

    2009-01-01

    ... the pervasive effects that federalism has on Canadian politics, economics, culture, and history, and provide a detailed framework in which to understand contemporary federalism. Written in honour of John T. Saywell's half-century of accomplished and influential scholarly work and teaching, Framing Canadian Federalism is a timely and fitting t...

  1. Implants and/or teeth: consensus statements and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, K; Carlsson, G E; Jokstad, A

    2008-01-01

    In August 23-25, 2007, the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry in collaboration with the Danish Society of Oral Implantology arranged a consensus conference on the topic 'Implants and/or teeth'. It was preceded by a workshop in which eight focused questions were raised and answered...

  2. Consensus Moderation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei TOMA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper formulates a consensus moderation system based on the negotiation of the actors involved. There are a series of steps in the moderation process, the first of which is constructing a front of Pareto optimal solutions. Since this in itself will likely not lead to consensus in a real life scenario, Kaldor-Hicks compromises are then detected. Compromises are recommended at every iteration of the negotiation process which can lead to a lengthy negotiation time, which is addressed by using a recommendation engine based on the previous behavior of the actor.

  3. Management of Helicobacter pylori infection--the Maastricht IV/ Florence Consensus Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malfertheiner, Peter; Megraud, Francis; O'Morain, Colm A

    2012-01-01

    Management of Helicobacter pylori infection is evolving and in this 4th edition of the Maastricht consensus report aspects related to the clinical role of H pylori were looked at again in 2010. In the 4th Maastricht/Florence Consensus Conference 44 experts from 24 countries took active part...

  4. The Consensus: Another View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H. Douglas

    1984-01-01

    Comments on the seven points of consensus presented in "A Theoretical Basis for Teaching the Receptive Skills" by Stephen Krashen, et al., particularly on the terminology that is derived from Krashen's other writings. Offers eight statements which reflect in more general terms an interpretation of Krashen's theories for language teachers…

  5. Continuity and consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2010-01-01

    maternal leave. These changes can be explained as adjustments to post-industrial conditions within a political culture relying on class compromises and a broad consensus informed by expert advice coming from civil servants and ad hoc policy commissions. The paper concludes that changes in Danish family...

  6. FDG-PET for clinical use. Results of the 3rd German Interdisciplinary Consensus Conference, ''Onko-PET III'', 21 July and 19 September 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reske, S.N.; Kotzerke, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, University Clinic of Ulm (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most powerful molecular imaging technique currently available for clinical use. Because deranged tumour metabolism is a common finding in many malignancies, PET is frequently used for tissue characterisation, staging and therapy control. Four previous consensus studies in Germany, performed up to 1997, have established indications for fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET in oncology, neurology and cardiology. More than 10,000 references on FDG-PET have been published in the meantime, mostly on oncological issues. Therefore, it was the aim of the present paper to provide an update on the clinical use of FDG-PET in oncology. For this purpose a systematic literature search was performed in all common medical literature databases. All hits were manually checked and abstracts, case reports, technically oriented papers and reviews were excluded from analysis. A questionnaire comprising 24 items was developed for standardised quality assessment according to evidence-based medicine (EBM) criteria. We selected 533 papers for further review by an interdisciplinary panel of 58 experts from oncology, radiology and nuclear medicine. Clinical use was judged according to the following grading scheme: 1a, established clinical use; 1b, clinical use probable; 2, useful in individual cases; 3, not yet assessable owing to missing or incomplete data; 4, clinical use rare (either as inferred from theoretical considerations or as demonstrated by published studies). Of the 533 papers selected, 122 references with 7,092 documented patients fulfilled the EBM criteria for detailed review. The results of these studies were tabulated and are available at www.nucmed-ulm.de. Clinical indications (grade 1a or 1b) were established for differentiating benign from malignant lesions in pulmonary nodules, pancreatic masses and residual masses after chemotherapy in malignant lymphoma. Staging was improved by FDG-PET in oesophageal cancer, breast

  7. Conference Interpreters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leal Lobato, Ana Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Conference Interpreters: How to serve the cause of minorized communities in the new postmonolingual / ‘postmonodiscoursive’ order,......Conference Interpreters: How to serve the cause of minorized communities in the new postmonolingual / ‘postmonodiscoursive’ order,...

  8. CONFERENCE CALENDAR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2014-01-01

    .... 2nd Annual Integrated Health Conference March 20-22, 2015-Town and Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California The Integrated Health Conference provides the latest in integrative...

  9. Canadians' eating habits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garriguet, Didier

    2007-01-01

    This report is an overview of Canadians' eating habits: total calories consumed and the number of servings from the various food groups, as well as the percentage of total calories from fat, protein and carbohydrates...

  10. Conference Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, W. Warner, Ed.; Beckhard, Richard, Ed.

    This book, written to instruct in the use of a conference as a medium of social intercourse, is divided into four sections. Section I, which contains five articles, deals with factors to be considered in planning a conference. Specific techniques one can employ to improve a conference and several different techniques for evaluating the…

  11. Achieving diagnosis by consensus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the collaborative work conducted at a multidisciplinary medical team meeting, where a patient’s definitive diagnosis is agreed, by consensus. The features that distinguish this process of diagnostic work by consensus are examined in depth. The current use of technology to support this collaborative activity is described, and experienced deficiencies are identified. Emphasis is placed on the visual and perceptual difficulty for individual specialities in making interpretations, and on how, through collaboration in discussion, definitive diagnosis is actually achieved. The challenge for providing adequate support for the multidisciplinary team at their meeting is outlined, given the multifaceted nature of the setting, i.e. patient management, educational, organizational and social functions, that need to be satisfied.

  12. Overlapping Consensus in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Monsen, Mats

    2007-01-01

    An empirical study of how Malaysian pluralism is understood through Islam Hadhari, Article 11 and the Inter-faith Commission against the backdrop of current Malaysian political and social history, coupled with a theoretical analysis through John Rawls' Political Liberalism, with particular emphasis on the idea of Overlapping Consensus. The thesis is an attempt at applying Rawls' theory on the practical case of Malaysia, as a plural society, while at the same time using the practical case of M...

  13. Spanish Consensus Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2015-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  14. A Qualitative Study of Autism Policy in Canada: Seeking Consensus on Children's Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Cody A.; Waddell, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Canadian autism policy has been unusually contentious, with parents resorting to litigation to secure services for their children in several provinces. To ascertain whether consensus was possible on improving services, we conducted an in-depth qualitative interview study with 39 parents, policymakers and researchers across the country. Parents…

  15. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  16. Hereditary colorectal cancer registries in Canada: report from the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada consensus meeting; Montreal, Quebec; October 28, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenmund, H.; Singh, H.; Candas, B.; Chodirker, B.N.; Serfas, K.; Aronson, M.; Holter, S.; Volenik, A.; Green, J.; Dicks, E.; Woods, M.O.; Gilchrist, D.; Gryfe, R.; Cohen, Z.; Foulkes, W.D.

    2013-01-01

    At a consensus meeting held in Montreal, October 28, 2011, a multidisciplinary group of Canadian experts in the fields of genetics, gastroenterology, surgery, oncology, pathology, and health care services participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purpose of developing consensus statements pertaining to the development and maintenance of hereditary colorectal cancer registries in Canada. Five statements were approved by all participants. PMID:24155632

  17. Consensus paper on post-operative pediatric cerebellar mutism syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudrunardottir, Thora; Morgan, Angela T; Lux, Andrew L

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Confusion has surrounded the description of post-operative mutism and associated morbidity in pediatric patients with cerebellar tumors for years. The heterogeneity of definitions and diagnostic features has hampered research progress within the field, and to date, no international...... and follow-up. METHODS: Consensus was obtained using the modified nominal group technique, involving four rounds of online Delphi questionnaires interspersed with a structured consensus conference with lectures, group work, and open discussion sessions. RESULTS: A new, proposed definition of "post-operative...

  18. Nostradamus conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rössler, Otto; Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Emilio; Nostradamus: Modern Methods of Prediction, Modeling and Analysis of Nonlinear Systems

    2013-01-01

    This proceeding book of Nostradamus conference (http://nostradamus-conference.org) contains accepted papers presented at this event in 2012. Nostradamus conference was held in the one of the biggest and historic city of Ostrava (the Czech Republic, http://www.ostrava.cz/en), in September 2012. Conference topics are focused on classical as well as modern methods for prediction of dynamical systems with applications in science, engineering and economy. Topics are (but not limited to): prediction by classical and novel methods, predictive control, deterministic chaos and its control, complex systems, modelling and prediction of its dynamics and much more.

  19. Statement of consensus on Family Medicine in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert (Bob Mash

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Family Medicine is an emerging speciality in sub-Saharan Africa and yet potential interest in the contribution of Family Medicine to health, primary care and district health services is limited by the lack of a regional definition. Governments, health departments and academic institutions would benefit from a clearer understanding of Family Medicine in an African context.The 2nd African Regional WONCA (World Organisation of Family Doctors Conference, held in Rustenberg, South Africa in October 2009, engaged participants from sub-Saharan Africa in the development of a consensus statement on Family Medicine. The consensus statement agreed to by the conference defined the contribution of Family Medicine to equity, quality and primary health care within an African context, as well as the role and training requirements of the family physician. Particular attention was given to the contribution of women in Family Medicine.

  20. Twitter and Canadian Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Max

    2012-01-01

    An emerging group of leaders in Canadian education has attracted thousands of followers. They've made Twitter an extension of their lives, delivering twenty or more tweets a day that can include, for example, links to media articles, research, new ideas from education bloggers, or to their own, or simply a personal thought. At their best,…

  1. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the relevant recommendations and references related to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. The goal was to provide the clinician with concise, evidence-based contemporary recommendations, and the supporting documentation to encourage their application. The full text includes disclosure of all relevant relationships with industry for each writing committee member. A fundamental aspect of all expert consensus statements is that these carefully developed, evidence-based documents can neither encompass all clinical circumstances, nor replace the judgment of individual physicians in management of each patient. The science of medicine is rooted in evidence, and the art of medicine is based on the application of this evidence to the individual patient. This expert consensus statement has adhered to these principles for optimal management of patients requiring percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, the Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  2. Community rights and corporate responsibility : Canadian mining and oil companies in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, L.; Clark, T.D.; Patroni, V. (eds.)

    2006-07-01

    This book presented papers given at a conference on Canadian mining companies in Latin America which was held at York University in 2002. The conference raised awareness about the impact of mining on the ecosystems and communities of Latin America. The conference provided a forum for non governmental organizations (NGOs), social activists, and academics to debate the growth of the mining industry in various Latin American countries. Issues related to international mining and community relations were discussed, and strategies for resolving conflicts between mining companies and communities were examined. The current regulatory environment surrounding mining was reviewed. Issues related to oppression and social resistance were also discussed. The activities of various Canadian mining companies were also discussed, as well as Canadian oil investment in Colombia. Issues related to corporate responsibility were also examined. refs., tabs., figs.

  3. European Consensus Conference for external quality assessment in molecular pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krieken, J. H.; Siebers, A. G.; Normanno, N.; Timens, Wim

    Molecular testing of tumor samples to guide treatment decisions is of increasing importance. Several drugs have been approved for treatment of molecularly defined subgroups of patients, and the number of agents requiring companion diagnostics for their prescription is expected to rapidly increase.

  4. European consensus conference on faecal microbiota transplantation in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cammarota, Giovanni; Ianiro, Gianluca; Tilg, Herbert; Rajilić-stojanović, Mirjana; Kump, Patrizia; Satokari, Reetta; Sokol, Harry; Arkkila, Perttu; Pintus, Cristina; Hart, Ailsa; Vos, de Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an important therapeutic option for Clostridium difficile infection. Promising findings suggest that FMT may play a role also in the management of other disorders associated with the alteration of gut microbiota. Although the health community is assessing

  5. Quality standards for predialysis education: results from a consensus conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnard Bagnis, Corinne; Crepaldi, Carlo; Dean, Jessica; Goovaerts, Tony; Melander, Stefan; Nilsson, Eva-Lena; Prieto-Velasco, Mario; Trujillo, Carmen; Zambon, Roberto; Mooney, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This position statement was compiled following an expert meeting in March 2013, Zurich, Switzerland. Attendees were invited from a spread of European renal units with established and respected renal replacement therapy option education programmes. Discussions centred around optimal ways of creating an education team, setting realistic and meaningful objectives for patient education, and assessing the quality of education delivered. PMID:24957808

  6. Consensus conferences as ‘extended peer groups’

    OpenAIRE

    Jon Fixdal

    1997-01-01

    In the debate about lay involvement in science and technology policy-making it has been argued that, because of the uncertain and contested character of scientific advice used in policy contexts, we need new ‘extended peer groups’ These should be composed of citizens affected by decisions, who should be given an opportunity to criticise bodies of scientific knowledge. It is, however, unclear how the affected public should be defined, and how the groups should be organised. This paper examines...

  7. testing a consensus conference method by discussing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-10-10

    Oct 10, 2000 ... that he/she must have no established opinions on the technology under consideration. .... line or iron wire), do endodontic treatment Lack of thin wire, plastic. Open apex do follow up ... dirty, clean it with milk or normal saline.

  8. EURECCA colorectal: multidisciplinary management: European consensus conference colon & rectum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, C.J. van de; Boelens, P.G.; Borras, J.M.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Cervantes, A.; Blomqvist, L.; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Broek, C.B. van den; Brown, G.; Cutsem, E. van; Espin, E.; Haustermans, K.; Glimelius, B.; Iversen, L.H.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Marijnen, C.A.; Henning, G.; Gore-Booth, J.; Meldolesi, E.; Mroczkowski, P.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Naredi, P.; Ortiz, H.; Pahlman, L.; Quirke, P.; Rodel, C.; Roth, A.; Rutten, H; Schmoll, H.J.; Smith, J.J.; Tanis, P.J.; Taylor, C.; Wibe, A.; Wiggers, T.; Gambacorta, M.A.; Aristei, C.; Valentini, V.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20years; however considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe.

  9. EURECCA colorectal : Multidisciplinary management: European consensus conference colon & rectum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Boelens, Petra G.; Borras, Josep M.; Coebergh, Jan-Willem; Cervantes, Andres; Blomqvist, Lennart; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; van den Broek, Colette B. M.; Brown, Gina; Van Cutsem, Eric; Espin, Eloy; Haustermans, Karin; Glimelius, Bengt; Iversen, Lene H.; van Krieken, J. Han; Marijnen, Corrie A. M.; Henning, Geoffrey; Gore-Booth, Jola; Meldolesi, Elisa; Mroczkowski, Pawel; Nagtegaal, Iris; Naredi, Peter; Ortiz, Hector; Pahlman, Lars; Quirke, Philip; Roedel, Claus; Roth, Arnaud; Rutten, Harm; Schmoll, Hans J.; Smith, Jason J.; Tanis, Pieter J.; Taylor, Claire; Wibe, Arne; Wiggers, Theo; Gambacorta, Maria A.; Aristei, Cynthia; Valentini, Vincenzo

    Background: Care for patients with colon and rectal cancer has improved in the last 20 years; however considerable variation still exists in cancer management and outcome between European countries. Large variation is also apparent between national guidelines and patterns of cancer care in Europe.

  10. European consensus conference for external quality assessment in molecular pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Siebers, A.G.; Normanno, N.; Blackhall, F.; Boone, E.; Botti, G.; Carneiro, F.; Celik, I.; Ciardiello, F.; Cree, I.A.; Deans, Z.C.; Dequeker, E.; Edsjo, A.; Groenen, P.J.; Kamarainen, O.; Kreipe, H.H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Marchetti, A.; Murray, S.; Opdam, F.J.; Patterson, S.D.; Patton, S.; Pinto, C.; Rouleau, E.; Schuuring, E.; Sterck, S.; Taron, M.; Tejpar, S.; Timens, W.; Thunnissen, E.; Ven, P.M. van de

    2013-01-01

    Molecular testing of tumor samples to guide treatment decisions is of increasing importance. Several drugs have been approved for treatment of molecularly defined subgroups of patients, and the number of agents requiring companion diagnostics for their prescription is expected to rapidly increase.

  11. Political Consensus and Fiscal Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg, Kurt; Pedersen, Lene Holm

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: It is becoming difficult to maintain consensus in a period of economic austerity, and this possibly challenges the ability of democratic institutions to take decisions on tough economic questions. In order to find out how political consensus influences fiscal outcomes, this article sets...

  12. Consensus Theory and Religious Belief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bineham, Jeffery L.

    1989-01-01

    Refutes David Tukey's argument that the consensus theory of epistemic rhetoric reduces spiritual experience to a social construct which denies the possibility of a divine reality. Examines Walter Rauschenbusch's "A Theology for the Social Gospel" to prove that consensus theory accounts for religious beliefs, providing a useful framework…

  13. Consensus report - reconstructions on implants. The Third EAO Consensus Conference 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Wiskott, Anselm

    2012-01-01

    This group was assigned the task to review the current knowledge in the areas of implant connections to abutments/reconstructions, fixation methods (cement vs. screw retained) for implant-supported reconstructions, as well as the optimal number of implants for fixed dental prosthesis and implant...

  14. Between consensus and contestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices.

  15. Consensus Convolutional Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Biswarup

    2017-04-11

    Convolutional sparse coding (CSC) is a promising direction for unsupervised learning in computer vision. In contrast to recent supervised methods, CSC allows for convolutional image representations to be learned that are equally useful for high-level vision tasks and low-level image reconstruction and can be applied to a wide range of tasks without problem-specific retraining. Due to their extreme memory requirements, however, existing CSC solvers have so far been limited to low-dimensional problems and datasets using a handful of low-resolution example images at a time. In this paper, we propose a new approach to solving CSC as a consensus optimization problem, which lifts these limitations. By learning CSC features from large-scale image datasets for the first time, we achieve significant quality improvements in a number of imaging tasks. Moreover, the proposed method enables new applications in high dimensional feature learning that has been intractable using existing CSC methods. This is demonstrated for a variety of reconstruction problems across diverse problem domains, including 3D multispectral demosaickingand 4D light field view synthesis.

  16. Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; da Cunha, José Antônio Jabur; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection. PMID:25761256

  17. Consensus Convolutional Sparse Coding

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Biswarup

    2017-12-01

    Convolutional sparse coding (CSC) is a promising direction for unsupervised learning in computer vision. In contrast to recent supervised methods, CSC allows for convolutional image representations to be learned that are equally useful for high-level vision tasks and low-level image reconstruction and can be applied to a wide range of tasks without problem-specific retraining. Due to their extreme memory requirements, however, existing CSC solvers have so far been limited to low-dimensional problems and datasets using a handful of low-resolution example images at a time. In this paper, we propose a new approach to solving CSC as a consensus optimization problem, which lifts these limitations. By learning CSC features from large-scale image datasets for the first time, we achieve significant quality improvements in a number of imaging tasks. Moreover, the proposed method enables new applications in high-dimensional feature learning that has been intractable using existing CSC methods. This is demonstrated for a variety of reconstruction problems across diverse problem domains, including 3D multispectral demosaicing and 4D light field view synthesis.

  18. 26th Hohenheim Concensus Conference, September 11, 2010 Scientific substantiation of health claims: Evidence-based nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesalski, H.K.; Aggett, P.J.; Anton, R.; Bernstein, P.S.; Blumberg, J.; Heaney, R.P.; Henry, J.; Nolan, J.M.; Richardson, D.P.; Ommen, van B.; Witkamp, R.F.; Rijkers, G.T.; Zollner, I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective was to define the term evidence based nutrition on the basis of expert discussions and scientific evidence. Methods and procedures The method used is the established Hohenheim Consensus Conference. The term “Hohenheim Consensus Conference” defines conferences dealing with

  19. CONFERENCE REPORTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    imagining. Psychology in Africa. She asserted that psychology is very important in society because it brings out human perceptions and attitudes. In a unique keynote presentation, Sean Hagen, a lecturer at UNISA who organised the conference ...

  20. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  1. Canadian petroleum history bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2003-09-27

    The Petroleum History Bibliography includes a list of more than 2,000 publications that record the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. The list includes books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles, company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry, humour, and an author index. It was created over a period of several years to help with projects at the Petroleum History Society. It is an ongoing piece of work, and as such, invites comments and additions.

  2. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  3. Canadian identity: Implications for international social work by Canadians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2011-01-01

    This paper is in response to recent calls to conceptualize and articulate Canadian perspectives and experiences in international social work, given that the Canadian standpoint has been lacking in international social work literature. This paper contends that it is imperative, first of all......, to critically examine and unpack our ‘Canadian’ identity in order to practice international work that is socially just and anti-imperialist. Drawing on the work of post-colonial authors, critical race theorists, and those who study national myth-making, this essay revisits Canadian identity because...... it is this identity that Canadian social workers often carry into their international work....

  4. Mexican consensus on dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Carmona-Sánchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of the 2007 dyspepsia guidelines of the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología, there have been significant advances in the knowledge of this disease. A systematic search of the literature in PubMed (01/2007 to 06/2016 was carried out to review and update the 2007 guidelines and to provide new evidence-based recommendations. All high-quality articles in Spanish and English were included. Statements were formulated and voted upon using the Delphi method. The level of evidence and strength of recommendation of each statement were established according to the GRADE system. Thirty-one statements were formulated, voted upon, and graded. New definition, classification, epidemiology, and pathophysiology data were provided and include the following information: Endoscopy should be carried out in cases of uninvestigated dyspepsia when there are alarm symptoms or no response to treatment. Gastric and duodenal biopsies can confirm Helicobacter pylori infection and rule out celiac disease, respectively. Establishing a strong doctor-patient relationship, as well as dietary and lifestyle changes, are useful initial measures. H2-blockers, proton-pump inhibitors, prokinetics, and antidepressants are effective pharmacologic therapies. H. pylori eradication may be effective in a subgroup of patients. There is no evidence that complementary and alternative therapies are beneficial, with the exception of Iberogast and rikkunshito, nor is there evidence on the usefulness of prebiotics, probiotics, or psychologic therapies. The new consensus statements on dyspepsia provide guidelines based on up-to-date evidence. A discussion, level of evidence, and strength of recommendation are presented for each statement. Resumen: Desde la publicación de las guías de dispepsia 2007 de la Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología ha habido avances significativos en el conocimiento de esta enfermedad. Se realizó una revisión sistemática de la

  5. Mexican consensus on dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Sánchez, R; Gómez-Escudero, O; Zavala-Solares, M; Bielsa-Fernández, M V; Coss-Adame, E; Hernández-Guerrero, A I; Huerta-Iga, F; Icaza-Chávez, M E; Lira-Pedrín, M A; Lizárraga-López, J A; López-Colombo, A; Noble-Lugo, A; Pérez-Manauta, J; Raña-Garibay, R H; Remes-Troche, J M; Tamayo, J L; Uscanga, L F; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Valdovinos Díaz, M A; Velarde-Ruiz Velasco, J A

    Since the publication of the 2007 dyspepsia guidelines of the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología, there have been significant advances in the knowledge of this disease. A systematic search of the literature in PubMed (01/2007 to 06/2016) was carried out to review and update the 2007 guidelines and to provide new evidence-based recommendations. All high-quality articles in Spanish and English were included. Statements were formulated and voted upon using the Delphi method. The level of evidence and strength of recommendation of each statement were established according to the GRADE system. Thirty-one statements were formulated, voted upon, and graded. New definition, classification, epidemiology, and pathophysiology data were provided and include the following information: Endoscopy should be carried out in cases of uninvestigated dyspepsia when there are alarm symptoms or no response to treatment. Gastric and duodenal biopsies can confirm Helicobacter pylori infection and rule out celiac disease, respectively. Establishing a strong doctor-patient relationship, as well as dietary and lifestyle changes, are useful initial measures. H2-blockers, proton-pump inhibitors, prokinetics, and antidepressants are effective pharmacologic therapies. H.pylori eradication may be effective in a subgroup of patients. There is no evidence that complementary and alternative therapies are beneficial, with the exception of Iberogast and rikkunshito, nor is there evidence on the usefulness of prebiotics, probiotics, or psychologic therapies. The new consensus statements on dyspepsia provide guidelines based on up-to-date evidence. A discussion, level of evidence, and strength of recommendation are presented for each statement. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Toward a more effective approach to stroke: Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Patrice; Bayley, Mark; McDonald, Alison; Graham, Ian D.; Warner, Grace; Phillips, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Each year more than 50 000 Canadians experience a stroke and more than 300 000 currently live with its effects. Despite the evidence supporting best practices in stroke care, significant gaps in translating this knowledge into action remains in Canada. An interdisciplinary working group of the Canadian Stroke Strategy was formed to develop best-practice recommendations relevant to Canadian health care. The working group used a rigorous process to develop the guidelines, which included reviewing existing stroke recommendations and research literature, and consulting a national interprofessional consensus panel. The Canadian Best Practice Recommendations for Stroke Care consist of 24 recommendations based on the strongest evidence and address topics that span the full continuum of stroke care. Implementation and dissemination of these recommendations is in progress. Bringing about change will require political will and collaboration throughout the health care system. PMID:18490636

  7. Is There a Consensus on Consensus Methodology? Descriptions and Recommendations for Future Consensus Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jane; Carline, Jan D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    The authors of this article reviewed the methodology of three common consensus methods: nominal group process, consensus development panels, and the Delphi technique. The authors set out to determine how a majority of researchers are conducting these studies, how they are analyzing results, and subsequently the manner in which they are reporting their findings. The authors conclude with a set of guidelines and suggestions designed to aid researchers who choose to use the consensus methodology in their work.Overall, researchers need to describe their inclusion criteria. In addition to this, on the basis of the current literature the authors found that a panel size of 5 to 11 members was most beneficial across all consensus methods described. Lastly, the authors agreed that the statistical analyses done in consensus method studies should be as rigorous as possible and that the predetermined definition of consensus must be included in the ultimate manuscript. More specific recommendations are given for each of the three consensus methods described in the article.

  8. ESO-ESMO 3rd international consensus guidelines for breast cancer in young women (BCY3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Pagani, Olivia; Partridge, Ann H; Abulkhair, Omalkhair; Cardoso, Maria-João; Dent, Rebecca Alexandra; Gelmon, Karen; Gentilini, Oreste; Harbeck, Nadia; Margulies, Anita; Meirow, Dror; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Senkus, Elzbieta; Spanic, Tanja; Sutliff, Medha; Travado, Luzia; Peccatori, Fedro; Cardoso, Fatima

    2017-10-01

    The 3rd International Consensus Conference for Breast Cancer in Young Women (BCY3) took place in November 2016, in Lugano, Switzerland organized by the European School of Oncology (ESO) and the European Society of Medical Oncologists (ESMO). Consensus recommendations for the management of breast cancer in young women were updated from BCY2 with incorporation of new evidence to inform the guidelines, and areas of research priorities were identified. This manuscript summarizes the ESO-ESMO international consensus recommendations, which are also endorsed by the European Society of Breast Specialists (EUSOMA). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Russian National Consensus Statement on gestational diabetes: diagnostics, treatment and postnatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanovich Dedov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Current document presents the expert consensus of Russian Association of Endocrinologists and Russian Society of Obstetrician- Gynecologists on diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes and other glycemic disorders of pregnancy. The consensus is based on analysis of HAPO (Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes Study - a major multinational study, that included more than 23000 patients. Project of current consensus was repeatedly discussed during meetings of the research group and publicly addressed at 6th Pan-Russian Congress of Endocrinology with international participation «Modern Endocrine Technologies», as well as Pan-Russian Educational Interscience Conference «Complicated Pregnancy and Preterm Birth».

  10. Canadian Activities in Space Debris Mitigation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikanpour, Darius; Jiang, Xin Xiang; Goroshin, Samuel; Haddad, Emile; Kruzelecky, Roman; Hoa, Suong; Merle, Philippe; Kleiman, Jacob; Gendron, Stephane; Higgins, Andrew; Jamroz, Wes

    The space environment, and in particular the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), is becoming increasingly populated with space debris which include fragments of dysfunctional spacecraft parts and materials traveling at speeds up to 15 km per second. These pose an escalating potential threat to LEO spacecraft, the international space station, and manned missions. This paper presents the Canadian activities to address the concerns over space debris in terms of debris mitigation measures and technologies; these include novel spacecraft demise technologies to safely decommission the spacecraft at the end of the mission, integrated self-healing material technologies for spacecraft structures to facilitate self-repair and help maintain the spacecraft structural and thermal performance, hypervelocity ground test capability to predict the impact of space debris on spacecraft performance, and ways of raising awareness within the space community through participation in targeted Science and Technology conferences and international forums.

  11. The Use of Phallometric Evidence in Canadian Criminal Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Michael S; Chandler, Jennifer A; Fedoroff, J Paul

    2015-06-01

    The use of phallometric evidence by Canadian criminal courts has steadily increased since the early 1980s. Phallometry was initially considered by courts to be a potentially useful tool in the determination of accused persons' culpability; however, its contemporary use is limited to the postconviction contexts of sentencing and dangerous and long-term offender applications, as one of several means of diagnosing offenders, determining recidivism risk, and assessing treatment prospects. We provide an overview and assessment of the use of phallometric evidence by Canadian criminal courts and conclude that its contemporary application appears to be consistent with the expert psychiatric consensus on its proper role and function in the forensic context. We further identify potential difficulties associated with the adequacy of offenders' consent and the occasional divergence of expert opinion about the reliability and validity of phallometry for diagnosis and risk assessment. © 2015 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  12. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  13. Physical activity recommendations for patients with electrophysiologic and structural congenital heart disease: a survey of Canadian health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roston, Thomas M; De Souza, Astrid M; Sandor, George G S; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Potts, James E

    2013-08-01

    Determining safe levels of physical activity for children and adolescents with electrophysiologic and structural congenital heart disease is a challenging clinical problem. The body of evidence for making these recommendations is limited and likely based on expert opinion, medicolegal concerns, and perceived risks of sudden cardiac death (SCD) with activity. The Bethesda Conference has established consensus guidelines for determining the eligibility of athletes with cardiovascular abnormalities for competitive sports and their disqualification from them. However, literature on guidelines for noncompetitive physical activity is not available. A survey was designed to determine practice patterns for patients with electrophysiologic and structural congenital heart disease. Between July 2011 and December 2011, approximately 350 health care providers working with this group of patients were recruited by email or while attending professional meetings. The survey received 81 responses, primarily from pediatric cardiologists (70 %). The findings indicate that the majority of Canadian cardiac care providers surveyed are only partially implementing current recommendations. Areas of variance included physical activity recommendations for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and heart transplantation, among others. The development of comprehensive consensus guidelines for activity recommendations was supported by 96 % of the respondents. The heterogeneity of responses may be attributable to conflicting and poorly evidenced information in the literature, a lack of emphasis on recreational activity, an entrenched tendency toward bed rest in the cardiology community, and a lack of awareness by cardiac care providers regarding the actual risk associated with physical activity in electrophysiologic and structural congenital heart disease. A balanced discussion is required in considering both the significant benefit of

  14. Iron sufficiency of Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Marcia; Greene-Finestone, Linda; Lowell, Hélène; Levesque, Johanne; Robinson, Stacey

    2012-12-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world, but little is known about the iron status of people in Canada, where the last estimates are from 1970-1972. The data are from cycle 2 (2009 to 2011) of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, which collected blood samples from a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 3 to 79. Descriptive statistics (percentages, arithmetic means, geometric means) were used to estimate hemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations, and other markers of iron status. Analyses were performed by age/sex group, household income, self-perceived health, diet, and use of iron supplements. World Health Organization reference values (2001) were used to estimate the prevalence of iron sufficiency and anemia. The overall prevalence of anemia was low in the 2009-to-2011 period--97% of Canadians had sufficient hemoglobin levels. Generally, hemoglobin concentration increased compared with 1970-1972; however, at ages 65 to 79, rates of anemia were higher than in 1970-1972. Depleted iron stores were found in 13% of females aged 12 to 19 and 9% of females aged 20 to 49. Lower household income was associated with a lower prevalence of hemoglobin sufficiency, but was not related to lower serum ferritin sufficiency. Self-perceived health and diet were not significantly associated with hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels. The lack of a relationship between iron status and diet may be attributable to the use of questions about food consumption frequency that were not specifically designed to estimate dietary iron intake. Factors other than iron intake might have contributed to the increase in the prevalence of anemia among seniors.

  15. Canadian space robotic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallaberger, Christian; Space Plan Task Force, Canadian Space Agency

    The Canadian Space Agency has chosen space robotics as one of its key niche areas, and is currently preparing to deliver the first flight elements for the main robotic system of the international space station. The Mobile Servicing System (MSS) is the Canadian contribution to the international space station. It consists of three main elements. The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is a 7-metre, 7-dof, robotic arm. The Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a smaller 2-metre, 7-dof, robotic arm can be used independently, or attached to the end of the SSRMS. The Mobile Base System (MBS) will be used as a support platform and will also provide power and data links for both the SSRMS and the SPDM. A Space Vision System (SVS) has been tested on Shuttle flights, and is being further developed to enhance the autonomous capabilities of the MSS. The CSA also has a Strategic Technologies in Automation and Robotics Program which is developing new technologies to fulfill future robotic space mission needs. This program is currently developing in industry technological capabilities in the areas of automation of operations, autonomous robotics, vision systems, trajectory planning and object avoidance, tactile and proximity sensors, and ground control of space robots. Within the CSA, a robotic testbed and several research programs are also advancing technologies such as haptic devices, control via head-mounted displays, predictive and preview displays, and the dynamic characterization of robotic arms. Canada is also now developing its next Long Term Space Plan. In this context, a planetary exploration program is being considered, which would utilize Canadian space robotic technologies in this new arena.

  16. Unique Factors Affecting Canadian Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Robin H.

    In a background statement identifying what is unique about Canada and the issues it currently faces, this paper begins by discussing the concurrent movements toward Canadian nationalism and Quebec nationalism as an illustration of the problems caused by large size and great diversity. It then focuses on unique aspects of Canadian education,…

  17. Consensus-based training and assessment model for general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, P; Louridas, M; de Montbrun, S; Harris, K A; Grantcharov, T P

    2016-05-01

    Surgical education is becoming competency-based with the implementation of in-training milestones. Training guidelines should reflect these changes and determine the specific procedures for such milestone assessments. This study aimed to develop a consensus view regarding operative procedures and tasks considered appropriate for junior and senior trainees, and the procedures that can be used as technical milestone assessments for trainee progression in general surgery. A Delphi process was followed where questionnaires were distributed to all 17 Canadian general surgery programme directors. Items were ranked on a 5-point Likert scale, with consensus defined as Cronbach's α of at least 0·70. Items rated 4 or above on the 5-point Likert scale by 80 per cent of the programme directors were included in the models. Two Delphi rounds were completed, with 14 programme directors taking part in round one and 11 in round two. The overall consensus was high (Cronbach's α = 0·98). The training model included 101 unique procedures and tasks, 24 specific to junior trainees, 68 specific to senior trainees, and nine appropriate to all. The assessment model included four procedures. A system of operative procedures and tasks for junior- and senior-level trainees has been developed along with an assessment model for trainee progression. These can be used as milestones in competency-based assessments. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Taiwan consensus of pharmacological treatment for bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Mei Bai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is an important psychiatric disorder with different disease phases. The pharmacological treatment is complicated, and is updated frequently as new research evidence emerges. For the purpose of international collaboration, research, and education, the Taiwan consensus of pharmacological treatment for bipolar disorders was initiated by the Taiwanese Society of Biological Psychiatry and Neuropsychopharmacology (TSBPN – the Bipolar Chapter, which was established in August 2010 and approved as a member of International Society of Bipolar Disorder. TSBPN is the country member of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP. The development of the Taiwan consensus for bipolar disorder was mainly based on the template of WFSBP Guidelines, with references to other international guidelines including the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, and British Association for Psychopharmacology. We have also added Taiwanese experts’ experience, Taiwan national health insurance data, and the indications for the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder given by the Taiwan Department of Health, to emphasize the balance between efficacy and safety, and to make this consensus a concise, empirical, and important reference for clinical psychiatric practice.

  19. Conference Report: CAQD Conference 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Silver

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nestled on the banks of the river Lahn in central Germany, the 15th CAQD conference was held at Marburg. A beautiful provincial town, it is one of very few that was spared the bombings of WWII; now providing the perfect backdrop for meeting to discuss developments in qualitative technology. This was the second international conference in the series with more than 140 delegates from 14 countries, including: Canada, Brazil, Portugal, the UK, as well as Germany. Hosted by MAGMA, the Marburg Research Group for Methodology and Evaluation, in partnership with Philipps-University Marburg, CAQD prioritizes a user-focus which balances practical and methodological workshops with conference presentations. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1302249

  20. Conference Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, James L., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Celebrations and special events were in order this year as the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) Program and NASA's Minority University Research and Education Division (MURED) both reached their 10th anniversaries. In honor of this occasion, the 2000 Annual Users' Conference held at Morris Brown College (MBC) in Atlanta, Georgia, September 11-15, 2000, was the first to be jointly hosted by MU-SPIN and MURED. It was particularly fitting that this anniversary should fall in the year 2000. The start of the new millennium propelled us to push bold new ideas and renew our commitment to minority university participation in all areas of NASA. With the theme 'Celebrating Our Tenth Year With Our Eyes on the Prize,' the conference provided a national forum for showcasing successful MU-SPIN and MURED Program (MUREP) experiences to enhance faculty/student development in areas of scientific and technical research and education. Our NASA-relevant conference agenda resulted in a record-breaking 220 registered attendees. Using feedback from past participants, we designed a track of student activities closely tailored to their interests. The resulting showcase of technical assistance and best practices set a new standard for our conferences in the years to come. This year's poster session was our largest ever, with over 50 presentations from students, faculty, and teachers. Posters covered a broad range of NASA activities from 'A Study of the Spiral Galaxy M101' to 'Network Cabling Characteristics.'

  1. Conference report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    poster presentations on numerous disciplines, including: epidemiology, preventive medicine, public health, social ... The conference theme “from research to implementation” emphasised the importance of ... sustainable implementation were addressed in an honest and nuanced manner, leaving me with a sense of trouble ...

  2. CONFERENCE REPORTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Marfo

    dinner and, at this dinner, socialization was at its best, with some music and dancing and presentation of gifts from the host university. Some members of the .... Jean Monnet, a student hostel with conference facilities where most of the participants also stayed. The third and fourth days' sessions were held at the INALCO ...

  3. Objective consensus from decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putora, Paul Martin; Panje, Cedric M; Papachristofilou, Alexandros; Dal Pra, Alan; Hundsberger, Thomas; Plasswilm, Ludwig

    2014-12-05

    Consensus-based approaches provide an alternative to evidence-based decision making, especially in situations where high-level evidence is limited. Our aim was to demonstrate a novel source of information, objective consensus based on recommendations in decision tree format from multiple sources. Based on nine sample recommendations in decision tree format a representative analysis was performed. The most common (mode) recommendations for each eventuality (each permutation of parameters) were determined. The same procedure was applied to real clinical recommendations for primary radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Data was collected from 16 radiation oncology centres, converted into decision tree format and analyzed in order to determine the objective consensus. Based on information from multiple sources in decision tree format, treatment recommendations can be assessed for every parameter combination. An objective consensus can be determined by means of mode recommendations without compromise or confrontation among the parties. In the clinical example involving prostate cancer therapy, three parameters were used with two cut-off values each (Gleason score, PSA, T-stage) resulting in a total of 27 possible combinations per decision tree. Despite significant variations among the recommendations, a mode recommendation could be found for specific combinations of parameters. Recommendations represented as decision trees can serve as a basis for objective consensus among multiple parties.

  4. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocular allergy" was proposed as the general term to describe ocular allergic diseases. Consensus regarding classification was not reached. Signs and symptoms were considered extremely important for the diagnosis. It was consensus that a staging system should be proposed based on the disease severity. Environmental control, avoidance of allergens and the use of artificial tears were recommended as first line treatment. The secondary treatment should include topical anti-histamines, mast cell stabilizers and multi actions drugs. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictors were not recommended. Topical corticosteroids were recommended as third line of treatment for the most severe keratoconjunctivitis. Consensus was not reached regarding the use of systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressant. Surgical approach and unconventional treatments were not recommended as routine. CONCLUSION: The task of creating guidelines for ocular allergies showed to be very complex. Many controversial topics remain unsolved. A larger consensus including experts from different groups around the world may be needed to further improve the current recommendations for several aspects of ocular allergy.

  5. IDRC at the Canadian Conference on Global Health 2017 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-10-29

    Oct 29, 2017 ... IDRC and Cancer Research UK partner on innovative new tobacco control initiative. IDRC and Cancer Research UK are pleased to announce the launch of a new five-year initiative aimed at preventing tobacco-related diseases. View moreIDRC and Cancer Research UK partner on innovative new tobacco ...

  6. Global Consensus Recommendations on Prevention and Management of Nutritional Rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Craig F; Shaw, Nick; Kiely, Mairead; Specker, Bonny L; Thacher, Tom D; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi; Tiosano, Dov; Mughal, M Zulf; Mäkitie, Outi; Ramos-Abad, Lorna; Ward, Leanne; DiMeglio, Linda A; Atapattu, Navoda; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Braegger, Christian; Pettifor, John M; Seth, Anju; Idris, Hafsatu Wasagu; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi; Fu, Junfen; Goldberg, Gail; Sävendahl, Lars; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Pludowski, Pawel; Maddock, Jane; Hyppönen, Elina; Oduwole, Abiola; Frew, Emma; Aguiar, Magda; Tulchinsky, Ted; Butler, Gary; Högler, Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are common worldwide, causing nutritional rickets and osteomalacia, which have a major impact on health, growth, and development of infants, children, and adolescents; the consequences can be lethal or can last into adulthood. The goals of this evidence-based consensus document are to provide health care professionals with guidance for prevention, diagnosis, and management of nutritional rickets and to provide policy makers with a framework to work toward its eradication. A systematic literature search examining the definition, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nutritional rickets in children was conducted. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system that describe the strength of the recommendation and the quality of supporting evidence. Thirty-three nominated experts in pediatric endocrinology, pediatrics, nutrition, epidemiology, public health, and health economics evaluated the evidence on specific questions within five working groups. The consensus group, representing 11 international scientific organizations, participated in a multiday conference in May 2014 to reach a global evidence-based consensus. This consensus document defines nutritional rickets and its diagnostic criteria and describes the clinical management of rickets and osteomalacia. Risk factors, particularly in mothers and infants, are ranked, and specific prevention recommendations including food fortification and supplementation are offered for both the clinical and public health contexts. Rickets, osteomalacia, and vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are preventable global public health problems in infants, children, and adolescents. Implementation of international rickets prevention programs, including supplementation and food fortification, is urgently required.

  7. ISPMD consensus on the management of premenstrual disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Patrick Michael Shaughn; Bäckström, Torbjorn; Brown, Candace; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Endicott, Jean; Epperson, C. Neill; Eriksson, Elias; Freeman, Ellen W.; Halbreich, Uriel; Ismail, Khalid; Panay, Nicholas; Pearlstein, Teri; Rapkin, Andrea; Reid, Robert; Rubinow, David; Schmidt, Peter; Steiner, Meir; Studd, John; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Yonkers, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    The second consensus meeting of the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD) took place in London during March 2011. The primary goal was to evaluate the published evidence and consider the expert opinions of the ISPMD members to reach a consensus on advice for the management of premenstrual disorders. Gynaecologists, psychiatrists, psychologists and pharmacologists each formally presented the evidence within their area of expertise; this was followed by an in-depth discussion leading to consensus recommendations. This article provides a comprehensive review of the outcomes from the meeting. The group discussed and agreed that careful diagnosis based on the recommendations and classification derived from the first ISPMD consensus conference is essential and should underlie the appropriate management strategy. Options for the management of premenstrual disorders fall under two broad categories, (a) those influencing central nervous activity, particularly the modulation of the neurotransmitter serotonin and (b) those that suppress ovulation. Psychotropic medication, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, probably acts by dampening the influence of sex steroids on the brain. Oral contraceptives, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, danazol and estradiol all most likely function by ovulation suppression. The role of oophorectomy was also considered in this respect. Alternative therapies are also addressed, with, e.g. cognitive behavioural therapy, calcium supplements and Vitex agnus castus warranting further exploration. PMID:23624686

  8. Consensus statement on the use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carel, Jean-Claude; Eugster, Erica A; Rogol, Alan

    2009-01-01

    for Pediatric Endocrinology convened a consensus conference to review the clinical use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs in children and adolescents. PARTICIPANTS: When selecting the 30 participants, consideration was given to equal representation from North America (United States and Canada) and Europe...

  9. Consensus report on the future of animal-free systemic toxicity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a multi-authored consensus report from conferences held in 2011-2012. Complete author listing is as follows: Marcel Leist1,2, Nina Hasiwa1, Costanza Rovida1, Mardas Daneshian1, David Basketter3, Ian Kimber4, Harvey Clewell5, Tilman Gocht6, Alan Goldberg7, Derek Knight8, G...

  10. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  11. Indications, diagnostic tests and Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: Recommendations by the 2nd Spanish Consensus Conference Indicaciones, métodos diagnósticos y tratamiento erradicador de Helicobacter pylori: Recomendaciones de la II Conferencia Española de Consenso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Monés

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of the 2nd Spanish Consensus Conference for appropriate practice regarding indications for eradication, diagnostic tests, and therapy regimens for Helicobacter pylori infection are summarized. The Conference was based on literature searches in Medline, abstracts from three international meetings, and abstracts from national meetings. Results were agreed upon and approved by the whole group. Results are supplemented by evidence grades and recommendation levels according to the classification used in the Clinical Practice Guidelines issued by Cochrane Collaboration. Convincing indications (peptic ulcer, duodenal erosions with no history of ASA or NSAIDs, MALT lymphoma, and not so convincing indications (functional dyspepsia, patients receiving low-dose ASA for platelet aggregation, gastrectomy stump in patients operated on for gastric cancer, first-degree relatives of patients with gastric cancer, lymphocytic gastritis, and Ménétrier's disease for H. pylori eradication are discussed. Diagnostic recommendations for various clinical conditions (peptic ulcer, digestive hemorrhage secondary to ulcer, eradication control, patients currently or recently receiving antibiotic or antisecretory therapy, as well as diagnostic tests requiring biopsy collection (histology, urease fast test, and culture when endoscopy is needed for clinical diagnosis, and non-invasive tests requiring no biopsy collection (13C-urea breath test, serologic tests, and fecal antigen tests when endoscopy is not needed are also discussed. As regards treatment, first-choice therapies (triple therapy using a PPI and two antibiotics, therapy length, quadruple therapy, and a number of novel antibiotic options as "rescue" therapy are prioritized, the fact that prolonging PPI therapy following effective eradication is unnecessary for patients with duodenal ulcer but not for all gastric ulcers is documented, the fact that cultures and antibiograms are not needed for all

  12. Update of the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy Endpoints for Future Clinical Trials in Bone Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hoskin, Peter [Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mitera, Gunita; Zeng Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Lutz, Stephen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Blanchard Valley Regional Cancer Center, Findlay, OH (United States); Roos, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Linden, Yvette van der [Radiotherapeutic Institute Friesland, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Hartsell, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advocate Good Samaritan Cancer Center, Downers Grove, IL (United States); Kumar, Eshwar [Department of Oncology, Atlantic Health Sciences Cancer Centre, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, NB (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To update the international consensus on palliative radiotherapy endpoints for future clinical trials in bone metastases by surveying international experts regarding previous uncertainties within the 2002 consensus, changes that may be necessary based on practice pattern changes and research findings since that time. Methods and Materials: A two-phase survey was used to determine revisions and new additions to the 2002 consensus. A total of 49 experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology who are directly involved in the care of patients with bone metastases participated in this survey. Results: Consensus was established in areas involving response definitions, eligibility criteria for future trials, reirradiation, changes in systemic therapy, radiation techniques, parameters at follow-up, and timing of assessments. Conclusion: An outline for trials in bone metastases was updated based on survey and consensus. Investigators leading trials in bone metastases are encouraged to adopt the revised guideline to promote consistent reporting. Areas for future research were identified. It is intended for the consensus to be re-examined in the future on a regular basis.

  13. Sarcopenia With Limited Mobility: An International Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E.; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Argiles, Josep M.; Baracos, Vickie; Bauer, Juergen; Bhasin, Shalender; Cederholm, Tommy; Stewart Coats, Andrew J.; Cummings, Steven R.; Evans, William J.; Fearon, Kenneth; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fielding, Roger A.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Inui, Akio; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Mantovani, Giovanni; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Newman, Anne B.; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo; Rosano, Giuseppe M. C.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Schambelan, Morris; Sokol, Gerald H.; Storer, Thomas W.; Vellas, Bruno; von Haehling, Stephan; Yeh, Shing-Shing; Anker, Stefan D.

    2016-01-01

    A consensus conference convened by the Society of Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders has concluded that “Sarcopenia, ie, reduced muscle mass, with limited mobility” should be considered an important clinical entity and that most older persons should be screened for this condition. “Sarcopenia with limited mobility” is defined as a person with muscle loss whose walking speed is equal to or less than 1 m/s or who walks less than 400 m during a 6-minute walk, and who has a lean appendicular mass corrected for height squared of 2 standard deviations or more below the mean of healthy persons between 20 and 30 years of age of the same ethnic group. The limitation in mobility should not clearly be a result of otherwise defined specific diseases of muscle, peripheral vascular disease with intermittent claudication, central and peripheral nervous system disorders, or cachexia. Clinically significant interventions are defined as an increase in the 6-minute walk of at least 50 meters or an increase of walking speed of at least 0.1 m/s. “A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged; it is the skin of a living thought and may vary greatly in color and content according to the circumstances and the time when it is used.”—Oliver Wendell Holmes PMID:21640657

  14. Canadian National Vegetation Classification (CNVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The mandate of the CNVC is to comprehensively classify and describe natural and semi-natural Canadian vegetation in an ecologically meaningful manner. The...

  15. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    .... What contributes to this deterioration, and how can its effects be mitigated? Engendering Migrant Health brings together researchers from across Canada to address the intersections of gender, immigration, and health in the lives of new Canadians...

  16. Natural history of Canadian mammals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naughton, Donna; Banfield, A. W. F

    2012-01-01

    .... A complete revision of A.W.F. Banfield's classic text Mammals of Canada, it features brand-new, full-colour images of each species, as well as stunning photographs from Canadian Geographic magazine's national photography...

  17. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    "Voluntary migrants to Canada are generally healthier than the average Canadian, but after ten years in the country they report poorer health and higher rates of chronic disease than those born here...

  18. End-Of-Life Care for Persons with Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Report of a National Interdisciplinary Consensus Meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM Goodridge

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available While systemic shortcomings in meeting the needs of individuals with progressive chronic illnesses at the end of life have been well documented, there is growing interest in improving both care and quality of life for persons with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. For instance, the American Thoracic Society has issued an official statement on palliative care for patients with respiratory diseases, affirming that the prevention, relief, reduction and soothing of symptoms “without affecting a cure” must become an integral component of standard care. A recent Medline search located 1015 articles related to palliative or end-of-life care for people with COPD published between 2001 and 2008, compared with only 336 articles published before 2001. To address the needs of Canadian patients, an interdisciplinary consensus meeting, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and supported by the Canadian Thoracic Society, the Canadian Respiratory Health Professionals and the Canadian Lung Association was convened in Toronto, Ontario, on November 22, 2008, to begin examining the quality of end-of-life care for individuals with COPD in Canada. The present report summarizes the background to and outcomes of this consensus meeting.

  19. Consensus-based Recommendations for Research Priorities Related to Interventions to Safeguard Patient Safety in the Crowded Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Fee, Christopher; Hall, Kendall; Morrison, J. Bradley; Stephens, Robert; Cosby, Karen; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Youngberg, Barbara; Lenehan, Gail; Abualenain, Jameel; O’Connor, Kevin; Wears, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the results of the Interventions to Safeguard Safety breakout session of the 2011 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference entitled “Interventions to Assure Quality in the Crowded Emergency Department.” Using a multistep nominal group technique, experts in emergency department (ED) crowding, patient safety, and systems engineering defined knowledge gaps and priority research questions related to the maintenance of safety in the crowded ED. Consensus was re...

  20. Canadian leadership in energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-09-15

    Canada's energy is complex and an important resource as it fuels and funds the economy. The unique character of Canada's energy production and consumption provides strength to the country. The purpose of this booklet was to highlight Canada's energy production and consumption and to demonstrate Canada's rank globally with other major global energy players. The document also presented information on the value of Canada's energy exports, Canada's relationship with the United States, and Canada's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Specifically, the document discussed Canada's energy in a global context; the value of Canada's energy exports; domestic value of energy; Canada's unique energy mix; Canada's electricity mix; Canada's carbon dioxide emissions; energy strategies; and the importance of energy to Canadians. It was concluded that there are 14 federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions managing their respective energy resources. All of these regions, with the exception of Saskatchewan have produced an energy strategy document or a climate change action plan focusing on 8 areas of action, notably awareness; benefit; efficiency; development; diversification; electricity; and emissions. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 guideline update: Diagnosis and management of asthma in preschoolers, children and adults

    OpenAIRE

    M. Diane Lougheed; Catherine Lemiere; Ducharme, Francine M.; Chris Licskai; Dell, Sharon D; Rowe, Brian H.; Mark FitzGerald; Richard Leigh; Wade Watson; Louis-Philippe Boulet; Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Clinical Assembly

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines.METHODS: Four clinical questions were identified as a focus f...

  2. EGC Conferences

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschard, Gilbert; Pinaud, Bruno; Venturini, Gilles; Zighed, Djamel; Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Management

    This book is a collection of representative and novel works done in Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Clustering and Classification that were originally presented in French at the EGC'2012 Conference held in Bordeaux, France, on January 2012. This conference was the 12th edition of this event, which takes place each year and which is now successful and well-known in the French-speaking community. This community was structured in 2003 by the foundation of the French-speaking EGC society (EGC in French stands for ``Extraction et Gestion des Connaissances'' and means ``Knowledge Discovery and Management'', or KDM). This book is intended to be read by all researchers interested in these fields, including PhD or MSc students, and researchers from public or private laboratories. It concerns both theoretical and practical aspects of KDM. The book is structured in two parts called ``Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining'' and ``Classification and Feature Extraction or Selection''. The first part (6 chapters) deals with...

  3. NATO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, W

    1975-01-01

    The contents of this volume involve selection, emendation and up-dating of papers presented at the NATO Conference "Mathe­ matical Analysis of Decision problems in Ecology" in Istanbul, Turkey, July 9-13, 1973. It was sponsored by the System Sciences Division of NATO directed by Dr. B. Bayraktar with local arrange­ ments administered by Dr. Ilhami Karayalcin, professor of the Department of Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul. It was organized by A. Charnes, University professor across the University of Texas System, and Walter R.Lynn, Di­ rector of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell Unjversity. The objective of the conference was to bring together a group of leading researchers from the major sciences involved in eco­ logical problems and to present the current state of progress in research of a mathematical nature which might assist in the solu­ tion of these problems. Although their presentations are not herein recorded, the key­ note address of Dr....

  4. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a decide-announce-defend'' approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other's positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a safe'' context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  5. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a ``decide-announce-defend`` approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other`s positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a ``safe`` context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  6. International consensus on allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J; O'Hehir, Robin; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Santos, Alexandra F; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2015-09-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used to treat allergic disease since the early 1900s. Despite numerous clinical trials and meta-analyses proving AIT efficacious, it remains underused and is estimated to be used in less than 10% of patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma worldwide. In addition, there are large differences between regions, which are not only due to socioeconomic status. There is practically no controversy about the use of AIT in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, but for atopic dermatitis or food allergy, the indications for AIT are not well defined. The elaboration of a wider consensus is of utmost importance because AIT is the only treatment that can change the course of allergic disease by preventing the development of asthma and new allergen sensitizations and by inducing allergen-specific immune tolerance. Safer and more effective AIT strategies are being continuously developed both through elaboration of new allergen preparations and adjuvants and alternate routes of administration. A number of guidelines, consensus documents, or both are available on both the international and national levels. The international community of allergy specialists recognizes the need to develop a comprehensive consensus report to harmonize, disseminate, and implement the best AIT practice. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the World Allergy Organization, has decided to issue an international consensus on AIT. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. South Africa's Subimperial Futures: Washington Consensus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa's Subimperial Futures: Washington Consensus, Bandung Consensus, or Peoples' Consensus? WG Martin. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/asr.v12i1.43533 · AJOL African Journals ...

  8. Factors Impacting the Conversion of Abstracts Presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress Meetings to Full Publications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuzeid, W.; Fosbøl, E.; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2013-01-01

    that were eventually published, 4% publications were in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology. Mean duration from abstract presentation at CCC to full manuscript publication was 13 months.Conclusion:Publication rates of presented abstracts at the CCC (24%) is lower than that reported for abstracts presented......Objective: We sought to determine the rate of conversion of scientific abstracts presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Conference (CCC), between 2006 and 2008, into peer reviewed manuscript publications within two years of their initial presentation. Moreover, we sought to identify factors...

  9. Canadian synthetic resins industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margeson, J. [Industry Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    The growth of the synthetic resin industry in Canada is described. In 1999 the industry had shipments totalling $6.3 billion and employed about 9,000 people in 105 establishments. The industry is concentrated in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec. Plants in Alberta produce commodity-grade thermoplastic resins from raw materials derived mainly from natural gas, whereas plants in Ontario and Quebec produce both thermoplastic and thermoset resins using raw materials derived from both crude oil and natural gas. Sixty-four per cent of the synthetic reins produced in Canada, worth about $4.1 billion, are exported. This is offset by imports of 68 per cent of domestic consumption, (valued at $5.0 billion) reflecting rationalization and specialization of the resin industry on a continental basis. Process and product technologies used in Canada are up-to-date and licensed from parent or other foreign chemical companies. Capital investment in the Canadian resin industry is lagging behind investment in the United States, however, this is expected to change once the impact of recent investments in the industry in Alberta is reflected in the statistics. A five to seven per cent real average annual growth in world-wide consumption is predicted over the next five years. Growth in North America is projected to be in the three to four per cent range. The Alberta-based component of the industry, being relatively new, is expected to improve its ability to compete globally in commodity thermoplastics. In contrast, the plants in Ontario and Quebec suffer from the fact that they were built prior to the Free Trade Agreement and were designed to satisfy domestic requirements. They are attempting to compensate for their lack of economics of scale by developing strategies to supply niche products. 8 figs.

  10. MUSME Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of MUSME 2014, held at Huatulco in Oaxaca, Mexico, October 2014. Topics include analysis and synthesis of mechanisms; dynamics of multibody systems; design algorithms for mechatronic systems; simulation procedures and results; prototypes and their performance; robots and micromachines; experimental validations; theory of mechatronic simulation; mechatronic systems; and control of mechatronic systems. The MUSME symposium on Multibody Systems and Mechatronics was held under the auspices of IFToMM, the International Federation for Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science, and FeIbIM, the Iberoamerican Federation of Mechanical Engineering. Since the first symposium in 2002, MUSME events have been characterised by the way they stimulate the integration between the various mechatronics and multibody systems dynamics disciplines, present a forum for facilitating contacts among researchers and students mainly in South American countries, and serve as a joint conference for the ...

  11. Expert consensus v. evidence-based approaches in the revision of the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Solomon, M

    2016-08-01

    The development of DSM-III through DSM-5 has relied heavily on expert consensus. In this essay, we provide an historical and critical perspective on this process. Over the last 40 years, medicine has struggled to find appropriate methods for summarizing research results and making clinical recommendations. When such recommendations are issued by authorized organizations, they can have widespread influence (i.e. DSM-III and its successors). In the 1970s, expert consensus conferences, led by the NIH, reviewed research about controversial medical issues and successfully disseminated results. However, these consensus conferences struggled with aggregating the complex available evidence. In the 1990s, the rise of evidence-based medicine cast doubt on the reliability of expert consensus. Since then, medicine has increasingly relied on systematic reviews, as developed by the evidence-based medicine movement, and advocated for their early incorporation in expert consensus efforts. With the partial exception of DSM-IV, such systematic evidence-based reviews have not been consistently integrated into the development of the DSMs, leaving their development out of step with the larger medical field. Like the recommendations made for the NIH consensus conferences, we argue that the DSM process should be modified to require systematic evidence-based reviews before Work Groups make their assessments. Our suggestions - which would require leadership and additional resources to set standards for appropriate evidence hierarchies, carry out systematic reviews, and upgrade the group process - should improve the objectivity of the DSM, increase the validity of its results, and improve the reception of any changes in nosology.

  12. Interdisciplinary consensus on diagnosis and treatment of testicular germ cell tumors. Results of an update conference based on evidence-based medicine (EBM); Interdisziplinaerer Konsensus zur Diagnostik und Therapie von Hodentumoren. Ergebnisse einer Update-Konferenz auf Grundlage evidenzbasierter Medizin (EBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, R. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) (Germany); Arbeitsgemeinschaft Radiologische Onkologie (ARO), Strahlenklinik AKH Hagen (Germany); Krege, S. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Urologie (DGU) (Germany); Essen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Urologie; Schmoll, H.J. [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (AIO), Zentrum fuer innere Medizin IV der Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Albers, P. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Beyer, J. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Innere Medizin; Bokemeyer, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Innere Medizin 2; Classen, J. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinisches Strahleninstitut und Roentgenabteilung; Dieckmann, K.P. [Albertinen-Krankenhaus, Hamburg (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Hartmann, M. [Bundeswehrkrankenhaus, Hamburg (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Heidenreich, A. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Hoeltl, W. [Kaiser-Franz-Josef-Spital Wien (Austria). Urologische Klinik; Kliesch, S. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Urologie; Koehrmann, K.U. [Urologische Klinik des Klinikums der Stadt Mannheim (Germany); Kuczyk, M. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Klinik fuer Urologie; Schmidberger, H. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Weinknecht, S. [Krankenhaus am Urban Berlin (Germany). Urologische Abt.; Winter, E. [Klinikum Schwerin (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Wittekind, C. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie

    2000-09-01

    An 'Interdisciplinary Update Consensus Statement' summarizes and defines the diagnostic and therapeutic standards according to the current scientific practices in testicular cancer. For 21 separate areas scientifically based decision criteria are suggested. For treatment areas where more than one option exist without a consensus being reached for a preferred strategy, such as in seminoma in clinical Stage I or in non-seminoma Stages CS I or CS IIA/B, all acceptable alternative strategies with their respecitve advantages and disadvantages are presented. This 'Interdisciplinary Update Consensus' was presented at the 24th National Congress of the German Cancer Society on March 21st and subsequently evaluated and approved by the various German scientific medical societies. (orig.) [German] Der zu 21 Themenkomplexen anhand wissenschaftlich begruendeter Entscheidungskriterien erarbeitete 'Interdisziplinaere Update-Konsensus' praezisiert und definiert diagnostische und therapeutische Standards entsprechend dem aktuellen Wissensstand ueber die Tumorentitaet. Fuer Therapiesituationen, bei denen mehrere Optionen bestehen und kein Konsens ueber die favorisierte Strategie erzielt wurde wie beim Seminom im klinischen Stadium I oder beim Nichtseminom in den Stadien CS I bzw. CS IIA/B, wurden jeweilige Alternativen mit deren Vor- und Nachteilen dargestellt. Der 'Interdisziplinaere Update-Konsensus' wurde beim 24. Deutschen Krebskongress am 21.3.2000 vorgestellt, nachfolgend von den daran beteiligten wissenschaftlichen Fachgesellschaften geprueft und gebilligt. (orig.)

  13. Consensus statement on genetic research in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikkert, M.G. Olde; der, V van; Burns, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the European Dementia Consensus Network developed a consensus on research ethics in dementia, taking into account the questions posed by the era of genetic research and its new research methods. The consensus process started with a Delphi procedure...... procedure fuelled the development of the consensus statement, which is presented in this paper. The consensus statement aims to stimulate ethically acceptable research in the field of dementia and the protection of vulnerable elderly patients with dementia from application of inadequate research methods...

  14. Responsible Canadian energy progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) represents oil and gas companies throughout Canada; its members produce over 90% of Canada's natural gas and crude oil output. The aim of the Association is to improve the economics of the Canadian upstream petroleum sector in an environmentally and socially responsible way. The aim of this Responsible Canadian Energy report is to present the performance data of CAPP's members for the year 2009. Data, trends, and performance analyses are provided throughout the document. This analysis makes it possible to determine where progress has been made and where performance improvement is necessary. It also presents success stories and best practices so that other companies can learn from them how to improve their own performance. This paper provides useful information on the performance of the upstream petroleum industry in Canada and highlights where the focus should be for further improvement in its performance.

  15. Eliciting Public Attitudes Regarding Bioremediation Cleanup Technologies: Lessons Learned from a Consensus Workshop in Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denise Lach, Principle Investigator; Stephanie Sanford, Co-P.I.

    2003-03-01

    During the summer of 2002, we developed and implemented a ''consensus workshop'' with Idaho citizens to elicit their concerns and issues regarding the use of bioremediation as a cleanup technology for radioactive nuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The consensus workshop is a derivation of a technology assessment method designed to ensure dialogue between experts and lay people. It has its origins in the United States in the form of ''consensus development conferences'' used by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to elicit professional knowledge and concerns about new medical treatments. Over the last 25 years, NIH has conducted over 100 consensus development conferences. (Jorgensen 1995). The consensus conference is grounded in the idea that technology assessment and policy needs to be socially negotiated among many different stakeholders and groups rather than narrowly defined by a group of experts. To successfully implement new technology, the public requires access to information that addresses a full complement of issues including understanding the organization proposing the technology. The consensus conference method creates an informed dialogue, making technology understandable to the general public and sets it within perspectives and priorities that may differ radically from those of the expert community. While specific outcomes differ depending on the overall context of a conference, one expected outcome is that citizen panel members develop greater knowledge of the technology during the conference process and, sometimes, the entire panel experiences a change in attitude toward the technology and/or the organization proposing its use (Kluver 1995). The purpose of this research project was to explore the efficacy of the consensus conference model as a way to elicit the input of the general public about bioremediation of radionuclides and heavy metals at Department of Energy sites

  16. Consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemieux-Charles Louise

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intensivists must provide enough analgesia and sedation to ensure dying patients receive good palliative care. However, if it is perceived that too much is given, they risk prosecution for committing euthanasia. The goal of this study is to develop consensus guidelines on analgesia and sedation in dying intensive care unit patients that help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Methods Using the Delphi technique, panelists rated levels of agreement with statements describing how analgesics and sedatives should be given to dying ICU patients and how palliative care should be distinguished from euthanasia. Participants were drawn from 3 panels: 1 Canadian Academic Adult Intensive Care Fellowship program directors and Intensive Care division chiefs (N = 9; 2 Deputy chief provincial coroners (N = 5; 3 Validation panel of Intensivists attending the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group meeting (N = 12. Results After three Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on 16 statements encompassing the role of palliative care in the intensive care unit, the management of pain and suffering, current areas of controversy, and ways of improving palliative care in the ICU. Conclusion Consensus guidelines were developed to guide the administration of analgesics and sedatives to dying ICU patients and to help distinguish palliative care from euthanasia.

  17. Transnational archives: the Canadian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Creet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the concept of the transnational archive as a counterpoint to the idea that a national archive is necessarily a locus of a static idea of nation. The Canadian national archives is used as a case study of an archives that was transnational in its inception, and one that has continued to change in its mandate and materials as a response to patterns in migration and changing notions of multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy. It introduces the most recent formation of the transnational archive and its denizens: the genealogical archive inhabited by family historians.

  18. Global Consensus Recommendations on Prevention and Management of Nutritional Rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Craig F.; Shaw, Nick; Kiely, Mairead; Specker, Bonny L.; Thacher, Tom D.; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi; Tiosano, Dov; Mughal, M. Zulf; Mäkitie, Outi; Ramos-Abad, Lorna; Ward, Leanne; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Atapattu, Navoda; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Braegger, Christian; Pettifor, John M.; Seth, Anju; Idris, Hafsatu Wasagu; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi; Fu, Junfen; Goldberg, Gail; Sävendahl, Lars; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Pludowski, Pawel; Maddock, Jane; Hyppönen, Elina; Oduwole, Abiola; Frew, Emma; Aguiar, Magda; Tulchinsky, Ted; Butler, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are common worldwide, causing nutritional rickets and osteomalacia, which have a major impact on health, growth, and development of infants, children, and adolescents; the consequences can be lethal or can last into adulthood. The goals of this evidence-based consensus document are to provide health care professionals with guidance for prevention, diagnosis, and management of nutritional rickets and to provide policy makers with a framework to work toward its eradication. Evidence: A systematic literature search examining the definition, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nutritional rickets in children was conducted. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system that describe the strength of the recommendation and the quality of supporting evidence. Process: Thirty-three nominated experts in pediatric endocrinology, pediatrics, nutrition, epidemiology, public health, and health economics evaluated the evidence on specific questions within five working groups. The consensus group, representing 11 international scientific organizations, participated in a multiday conference in May 2014 to reach a global evidence-based consensus. Results: This consensus document defines nutritional rickets and its diagnostic criteria and describes the clinical management of rickets and osteomalacia. Risk factors, particularly in mothers and infants, are ranked, and specific prevention recommendations including food fortification and supplementation are offered for both the clinical and public health contexts. Conclusion: Rickets, osteomalacia, and vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are preventable global public health problems in infants, children, and adolescents. Implementation of international rickets prevention programs, including supplementation and food fortification, is urgently required. PMID:26745253

  19. To Create a Consensus on Malnutrition Diagnostic Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederholm, Tommy; Jensen, Gordon L

    2017-03-01

    During the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) Congress in Copenhagen, Denmark (September 2016), representatives of the 4 largest global parenteral and enteral nutrition (PEN) societies from Europe (ESPEN), the United States (American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition [ASPEN]), Asia (Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Society of Asia [PENSA]), and Latin America (Latin American Federation of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition [FELANPE]) and from national PEN societies around the world met to continue the conversation on how to diagnose malnutrition that started during the Clinical Nutrition Week, Austin, Texas (February 2016). Current thinking on diagnostic approaches was shared; ESPEN suggested a grading approach that could encompass various types of signs, symptoms, and etiologies to support diagnosis. ASPEN emphasized where the parties agree; that is, that the 3 major published approaches (ESPEN, ASPEN-Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and Subjective Global Assessment [SGA]) all propose weight loss as a key indicator for malnutrition. FELANPE suggested that the anticipated consensus approach needs to prioritize a diagnostic method that is available for everybody since resources differ globally. PENSA highlighted that body mass index varies by ethnicity/race and that sarcopenia/muscle mass evaluation is important for the diagnosis of malnutrition. A Core Working Committee of the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition has been established (comprising 2 representatives each from the 4 largest PEN societies) that will lead consensus development in collaboration with a larger working group with broad global representation, using e-mail, telephone conferences, and face-to-face meetings during the upcoming ASPEN and ESPEN congresses. Transparency and external input will be sought. Objectives include (1) consensus development around evidence-based criteria for broad application, (2) promotion of global dissemination of the

  20. Canadian Children's Literature: An Alberta Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Joyce; Carbonaro, Mike; Green, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an online survey administered to Alberta elementary school teachers in 2000-2001. The survey explored the teachers' knowledge and use of Canadian children's literature and their thoughts about the role of Canadian literature in elementary school classrooms. Canadian children's trade books espouse particular…

  1. Man in the North Technical Paper. Education in the Canadian North, Report One: Community-Guided Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Doug; And Others

    The specific objective of this applied research project was to evaluate practical formulas for community-guided education in 5 native communities in the Canadian North. The projects, launched at the Man in the North Inuvik Conference (1970), involved the adults of these communities in the educational process as special education committees and…

  2. Conference summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seestrom, S.J.

    1993-10-06

    The conference began with an introductory lecture by Bunakov. It is very appropriate that this workshop be held in Dubna as Bunakov reminded us that the experiments that motivated the current interest in the study of symmetry violation with neutrons were started here at Dubna by Alfimenkov, Pikelner, and collaborators. Bunakov discussed the fact that is the complexity of the compound nucleus that leads to large enhancement of parity violation near P-resonances and to the possibility of using statistical models to relate the measured parity violation to more-fundamental quantities. He also pointed out that it is a rare case in which complexity aids us. Bunakov did not point out that this is an example of another rare phenomena -- where theory has predicted correctly in advance the parity violating effects seen near p-resonances. As long ago as 1969, Karmanov and Lobov first predicted an enhancement of {gamma}-ray circular polarization near p-resonances. Sushkov and Flambaum later predicted asymmetries P {approximately} 10{sup {minus}2} for p-resonances and suggested {sup 117}Sn, {sup 139}La, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 238}U for study. Bunakov and Gudkov developed a theory describing the energy dependence of parity-violating effects over a large energy range. This theory predicted random signs for the parity-violating asymmetries.

  3. Mannheim carotid intima-media thickness consensus (2004-2006). An update on behalf of the Advisory Board of the 3rd and 4th Watching the Risk Symposium, 13th and 15th European Stroke Conferences, Mannheim, Germany, 2004, and Brussels, Belgium, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touboul, P-J; Hennerici, M G; Meairs, S; Adams, H; Amarenco, P; Bornstein, N; Csiba, L; Desvarieux, M; Ebrahim, S; Fatar, M; Hernandez Hernandez, R; Jaff, M; Kownator, S; Prati, P; Rundek, T; Sitzer, M; Schminke, U; Tardif, J-C; Taylor, A; Vicaut, E; Woo, K S; Zannad, F; Zureik, M

    2007-01-01

    Intima-media thickness (IMT) is increasingly used as a surrogate end point of vascular outcomes in clinical trials aimed at determining the success of interventions that lower risk factors for atherosclerosis and associated diseases (stroke, myocardial infarction and peripheral artery diseases). The necessity to promote further criteria to distinguish early atherosclerotic plaque formation from thickening of IMT and to standardize IMT measurements is expressed through this updated consensus. Plaque is defined as a focal structure that encroaches into the arterial lumen of at least 0.5 mm or 50% of the surrounding IMT value or demonstrates a thickness >1.5 mm as measured from the media-adventitia interface to the intima-lumen interface. Standard use of IMT measurements is based on physics, technical and disease-related principles as well as agreements on how to perform, interpret and document study results. Harmonization of carotid image acquisition and analysis is needed for the comparison of the IMT results obtained from epidemiological and interventional studies around the world. The consensus concludes that there is no need to 'treat IMT values' nor to monitor IMT values in individual patients apart from exceptions named, which emphasize that inside randomized clinical trials should be performed. Although IMT has been suggested to represent an important risk marker, according to the current evidence it does not fulfill the characteristics of an accepted risk factor. Standardized methods recommended in this consensus statement will foster homogenous data collection and analysis. This will help to improve the power of randomized clinical trials incorporating IMT measurements and to facilitate the merging of large databases for meta-analyses. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Selective abortion: a new moral order? Consensus and debate in the medical community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, L; Renaud, M; Kremp, O; Dallaire, L

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss the results of a survey of the attitudes of Canadian and French (Picardie, Nord-Pas de Calais) physicians toward selective abortion of fetal anomalies detected by ultrasound, amniocentesis, or chorionic villus sampling. The study documents the threshold of acceptability of abortion of fetuses with selected anomalies, as well as the physicians' own perceptions of their role in the decision to abort. While there was no consensus among all Canadian physicians regarding the acceptability of abortion, more than 55 percent from France and Quebec would accept selective abortion of a fetus affected with trisomy 21, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, cystic fibrosis, Huntington's chorea, or spina bifida. In the province of Quebec, Anglophone physicians showed a greater acceptance of abortion than did their French-speaking colleagues. In reference to the physician's role in the decision to abort, French physicians are more directive than North American physicians. Cultural predispositions may explain these differences in attitudes.

  5. Algorithm development for corticosteroid management in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis trial using consensus methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilowite Norman T

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of background corticosteroid therapy in rheumatology clinical trials poses a major challenge. We describe the consensus methodology used to design an algorithm to standardize changes in corticosteroid dosing during the Randomized Placebo Phase Study of Rilonacept in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Trial (RAPPORT. Methods The 20 RAPPORT site principal investigators (PIs and 4 topic specialists constituted an expert panel that participated in the consensus process. The panel used a modified Delphi Method consisting of an on-line questionnaire, followed by a one day face-to-face consensus conference. Consensus was defined as ≥ 75% agreement. For items deemed essential but when consensus on critical values was not achieved, simple majority vote drove the final decision. Results The panel identified criteria for initiating or increasing corticosteroids. These included the presence or development of anemia, myocarditis, pericarditis, pleuritis, peritonitis, and either complete or incomplete macrophage activation syndrome (MAS. The panel also identified criteria for tapering corticosteroids which included absence of fever for ≥ 3 days in the previous week, absence of poor physical functioning, and seven laboratory criteria. A tapering schedule was also defined. Conclusion The expert panel established consensus regarding corticosteroid management and an algorithm for steroid dosing that was well accepted and used by RAPPORT investigators. Developed specifically for the RAPPORT trial, further study of the algorithm is needed before recommendation for more general clinical use.

  6. Consensus on Control of Risky Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Taiwan with National Health Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Shyang Sheu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. To compose upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB consensus from a nationwide scale to improve the control of UGIB, especially for the high-risk comorbidity group. Methods. The steering committee defined the consensus scope to cover preendoscopy, endoscopy, postendoscopy, and overview from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD assessments for UGIB. The expert group comprised thirty-two Taiwan experts of UGIB to conduct the consensus conference by a modified Delphi process through two separate iterations to modify the draft statements and to vote anonymously to reach consensus with an agreement ≥80% for each statement and to set the recommendation grade. Results. The consensus included 17 statements to highlight that patients with comorbidities, including liver cirrhosis, end-stage renal disease, probable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes, are at high risk of peptic ulcer bleeding and rebleeding. Special considerations are recommended for such risky patients, including raising hematocrit to 30% in uremia or acute myocardial infarction, aggressive acid secretory control in high Rockall scores, monitoring delayed rebleeding in uremia or cirrhosis, considering cycloxygenase-2 inhibitors plus PPI for pain control, and early resumption of antiplatelets plus PPI in coronary artery disease or stroke. Conclusions. The consensus comprises recommendations to improve care of UGIB, especially for high-risk comorbidities.

  7. Phonological Variability in Canadian English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolf, Gaelan Dodds

    A study compared salient variables of Canadian English from two concurrent sociodialectal surveys, one for Ottawa, Ontario and one for Vancouver, British Columbia. Using the Labovian model of phonological variation in association with sociological parameters and other linguistic variables within each specific area, the analysis investigated four…

  8. Engendering migrant health: Canadian perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spitzer, Denise L

    2011-01-01

    .... Focusing on the context of Canadian policy and society, the contributors illuminate migrants' testimonies of struggle, resistance, and solidarity as they negotiate a place for themselves in a new country. Topics range from the difficulties of Francophone refugees and the changing roles of fathers, to the experiences of queer newcomers and the importance of social unity to communal and individual health."--pub. desc.

  9. Universal values of Canadian astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brcic, Jelena; Della-Rossa, Irina

    2012-11-01

    Values are desirable, trans-situational goals, varying in importance, that guide behavior. Research has demonstrated that universal values may alter in importance as a result of major life events. The present study examines the effect of spaceflight and the demands of astronauts' job position as life circumstances that affect value priorities. We employed thematic content analysis for references to Schwartz's well-established value markers in narratives (media interviews, journals, and pre-flight interviews) of seven Canadian astronauts and compared the results to the values of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Russian Space Agency (RKA) astronauts. Space flight did alter the level of importance of Canadian astronauts' values. We found a U-shaped pattern for the values of Achievement and Tradition before, during, and after flight, and a linear decrease in the value of Stimulation. The most frequently mentioned values were Achievement, Universalism, Security, and Self-Direction. Achievement and Self Direction are also within the top 4 values of all other astronauts; however, Universalism was significantly higher among the Canadian astronauts. Within the value hierarchy of Canadian astronauts, Security was the third most frequently mentioned value, while it is in seventh place for all other astronauts. Interestingly, the most often mentioned value marker (sub-category) in this category was Patriotism. The findings have important implications in understanding multi-national crew relations during training, flight, and reintegration into society.

  10. International Conference held at the University of Alberta

    CERN Document Server

    Strobeck, Curtis

    1983-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the International Conference in Population Biology held at The University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada from June 22 to June 30, 1982. The Conference was sponsored by The University of Alberta and The Canadian Applied Mathematics Society, and overlapped with the summer meeting of CAMS. The main objectives of this Conference were: to bring mathematicians and biologists together so that they may interact for their mutual benefit; to bring those researchers interested in modelling in ecology and those interested in modelling in genetics together; to bring in keynote speakers in the delineated areas; to have sessions of contributed papers; and to present the opportunity for researchers to conduct workshops. With the exception of the last one, the objec­ tives were carried out. In order to lend some focus to the Conference, the following themes were adopted: models of species growth, predator-prey, competition, mutualism, food webs, dispersion, age structure, stability, evol...

  11. PREFACE AND CONFERENCE INFORMATION: Eighth International Conference on Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Herman, Peter R.; Bäuerle, Dieter; Koinuma, Hideomi

    2007-04-01

    Laser ablation encompasses a wide range of delicate to extreme light interactions with matter that present considerably challenging problems for scientists to study and understand. At the same time, laser ablation also represents a basic process of significant commercial importance in laser material processing—defining a multi-billion dollar industry today. These topics were widely addressed at the 8th International Conference on Laser Ablation (COLA), held in Banff, Canada on 11-16 September 2005. The meeting took place amongst the majestic and natural beauty of the Canadian Rocky Mountains at The Banff Centre, where delegates enjoyed many inspiring presentations and discussions in a unique campus learning environment. The conference brought together world leading scientists, students and industry representatives to examine the basic science of laser ablation and improve our understanding of the many physical, chemical and/or biological processes driven by the laser. The multi-disciplinary research presented at the meeting underlies some of our most important trends at the forefront of science and technology today that are represented in the papers collected in this volume. Here you will find new processes that are producing novel types of nanostructures and nano-materials with unusual and promising properties. Laser processes are described for delicately manipulating living cells or modifying their internal structure with unprecedented degrees of control and precision. Learn about short-pulse lasers that are driving extreme physical processes on record-fast time scales and opening new directions from material processing applications. The conference papers further highlight forefront application areas in pulsed laser deposition, nanoscience, analytical methods, materials, and microprocessing applications. Laser ablation continues to grow and evolve, touching forefront areas in science and driving new technological trends in laser processing applications. Please

  12. Consensus in a Precambrian garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, William Ward

    At the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary, the course of life on Earth underwent a dramatic change that culminated in the rise of predators and other complex animals, a group of paleontologists agreed at a conferece last week.Just prior to 590 million years ago, the ecology of life in the oceans was very simple; soft-shelled multicellular animals called Ediacara lived in apparent harmony with vast mats o f bacteria and algae that covered the seafloor, dependent on the photosynthesis or chemosynthesis of their one-celled hosts for their existence. According to the consensus reached by the scientists, this symbiotic and apparently global “Garden of Ediacara” fell early in the Cambrian Period, as the mats declined and food chains multiplied with new animals that, for the first time in Earth's history, preyed on other living things.

  13. Subclinical hypothyroidism: Controversies to consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abbas Raza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnoses of subclinicaal hypothyroidism (SCH is biochemically made, when serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels is elevated while free thyroid hormone levels are within normal reference range. SCH is diagnosed after excluding all other causes of elevated TSH levels. Symptoms of SCH may vary from being asymptomatic to having mild nonspecific symptoms. The risk of progression to overt hypothyroidism is related to number of factors including initial serum TSH concentration, presence of auto antibodies, family history and presence goiter. Various screening recommendations for thyroid function assessment are in practice. There are still controversies surrounding SCH and associated risk of various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, pregnancy outcomes, neuropsychiatric issues, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemia. Consensus will require more large randomized clinical studies involving various age groups and medical condition, especially in developing countries. All these efforts will definitely improve our understanding of disease and ultimately patient outcomes.

  14. International Consensus on drug allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoly, P; Adkinson, N F; Brockow, K; Castells, M; Chiriac, A M; Greenberger, P A; Khan, D A; Lang, D M; Park, H-S; Pichler, W; Sanchez-Borges, M; Shiohara, T; Thong, B Y- H

    2014-04-01

    When drug reactions resembling allergy occur, they are called drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) before showing the evidence of either drug-specific antibodies or T cells. DHRs may be allergic or nonallergic in nature, with drug allergies being immunologically mediated DHRs. These reactions are typically unpredictable. They can be life-threatening, may require or prolong hospitalization, and may necessitate changes in subsequent therapy. Both underdiagnosis (due to under-reporting) and overdiagnosis (due to an overuse of the term ‘allergy’) are common. A definitive diagnosis of such reactions is required in order to institute adequate treatment options and proper preventive measures. Misclassification based solely on the DHR history without further testing may affect treatment options, result in adverse consequences, and lead to the use of more-expensive or less-effective drugs, in contrast to patients who had undergone a complete drug allergy workup. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents on general or specific drug class-induced DHRs are available to support the medical decision process. The use of standardized systematic approaches for the diagnosis and management of DHRs carries the potential to improve outcomes and should thus be disseminated and implemented. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), and the World Allergy Organization (WAO), has decided to issue an International CONsensus (ICON) on drug allergy. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences and deficiencies of evidence, thus providing a comprehensive reference document for the diagnosis and management of

  15. Canadian Political Science and Medicare: Six Decades of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Michael A.; McGuinty, Dylan; Teskey, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Based on an extensive sample of the literature, this critical review dissects the principal themes that have animated the Canadian political science profession on the topic of medicare. The review considers the coincidence of economic eras and how these are reflected in the methodological approaches to the study of medicare. As is to be expected, most of the scholarly activity coincides with the economic era marked by fiscal restraint and decreases in social investments (1993–2003). At the same time, the review notes the prevalence of institutionalism as an approach to the topic and the scholarly community's near-consensus on medicare as a defining characteristic of the country and its people. PMID:22548098

  16. Conference this! Lead Pipers compare conference experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As library travel budgets are increasingly slashed around the country, it’s a tough time for conference-going. In this group post, we compare notes about the conferences we’ve attended, which have been our favorites, and why. We hope this will generate creative ideas on good conferences (online or in-person to look forward to, and maybe offer [...

  17. Nonsurgical Strategies to Reduce Mortality in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: An Updated Consensus Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, Giovanni; Lomivorotov, Vladimir; Silvietti, Simona; Nigro Neto, Caetano; Pisano, Antonio; Alvaro, Gabriele; Hajjar, Ludmilla Abrahao; Paternoster, Gianluca; Riha, Hynek; Monaco, Fabrizio; Szekely, Andrea; Lembo, Rosalba; Aslan, Nesrin A; Affronti, Giovanni; Likhvantsev, Valery; Amarelli, Cristiano; Fominskiy, Evgeny; Baiardo Redaelli, Martina; Putzu, Alessandro; Baiocchi, Massimo; Ma, Jun; Bono, Giuseppe; Camarda, Valentina; Covello, Remo Daniel; Di Tomasso, Nora; Labonia, Miriam; Leggieri, Carlo; Lobreglio, Rosetta; Monti, Giacomo; Mura, Paolo; Scandroglio, Anna Mara; Pasero, Daniela; Turi, Stefano; Roasio, Agostino; Votta, Carmine D; Saporito, Emanuela; Riefolo, Claudio; Sartini, Chiara; Brazzi, Luca; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2017-06-07

    A careful choice of perioperative care strategies is pivotal to improve survival in cardiac surgery. However, there is no general agreement or particular attention to which nonsurgical interventions can reduce mortality in this setting. The authors sought to address this issue with a consensus-based approach. A systematic review of the literature followed by a consensus-based voting process. A web-based international consensus conference. More than 400 physicians from 52 countries participated in this web-based consensus conference. The authors identified all studies published in peer-reviewed journals that reported on interventions with a statistically significant effect on mortality in the setting of cardiac surgery through a systematic Medline/PubMed search and contacts with experts. These studies were discussed during a consensus meeting and those considered eligible for inclusion in this study were voted on by clinicians worldwide. Eleven interventions finally were selected: 10 were shown to reduce mortality (aspirin, glycemic control, high-volume surgeons, prophylactic intra-aortic balloon pump, levosimendan, leuko-depleted red blood cells transfusion, noninvasive ventilation, tranexamic acid, vacuum-assisted closure, and volatile agents), whereas 1 (aprotinin) increased mortality. A significant difference in the percentages of agreement among different countries and a variable gap between agreement and clinical practice were found for most of the interventions. This updated consensus process identified 11 nonsurgical interventions with possible survival implications for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This list of interventions may help cardiac anesthesiologists and intensivists worldwide in their daily clinical practice and can contribute to direct future research in the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Strategic consensus mapping : A new method for testing and visualizing strategic consensus within and between teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarakci, M.; Ates, N.Y.; Porck, J.P.; van Knippenberg, D.; Groenen, P.J.F.; de Haas, M.

    Research on strategic consensus focuses primarily on the extent of agreement among team members regarding organizational strategy. It does not include elements such as the content of the agreement, between-group consensus, or the significance of differences in consensus (e.g., for evaluating the

  19. Consensus document on European brain research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Jes; Baker, Mary G; Freund, Tamas; di Luca, Monica; Mendlewicz, Julien; Ragan, Ian; Westphal, Manfred

    2006-08-01

    research. The EBC envisages that the priority for brain research it proposes at the European level will translate into higher priority for brain research at the national level, and this document may also serve as a starting point for the development of national consensus programmes. It seems likely that consensus conferences on brain research in Europe may further develop the themes and ideas discussed here. An EBC task force may also be established to further the consensus process. In general, increasing funding in the brain sciences would bring enormous economic returns by lightening the burden on healthcare systems and increasing the productivity of affected individuals-and might easily pay for itself. The human and social returns of such an investment are inestimable. And the time to act is now.

  20. World Endometriosis Society consensus on the classification of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil P; Hummelshoj, Lone; Adamson, G David; Keckstein, Jörg; Taylor, Hugh S; Abrao, Mauricio S; Bush, Deborah; Kiesel, Ludwig; Tamimi, Rulla; Sharpe-Timms, Kathy L; Rombauts, Luk; Giudice, Linda C

    2017-02-01

    What is the global consensus on the classification of endometriosis that considers the views of women with endometriosis? We have produced an international consensus statement on the classification of endometriosis through systematic appraisal of evidence and a consensus process that included representatives of national and international, medical and non-medical societies, patient organizations, and companies with an interest in endometriosis. Classification systems of endometriosis, developed by several professional organizations, traditionally have been based on lesion appearance, pelvic adhesions, and anatomic location of disease. One system predicts fertility outcome and none predicts pelvic pain, response to medications, disease recurrence, risks for associated disorders, quality of life measures, and other endpoints important to women and health care providers for guiding appropriate therapeutic options and prognosis. A consensus meeting, in conjunction with pre- and post-meeting processes, was undertaken. A consensus meeting was held on 30 April 2014 in conjunction with the World Endometriosis Society's 12th World Congress on Endometriosis. Rigorous pre- and post-meeting processes, involving 55 representatives of 29 national and international, medical and non-medical organizations from a range of disciplines, led to this consensus statement. A total of 28 consensus statements were made. Of all, 10 statements had unanimous consensus, however none of the statements was made without expression of a caveat about the strength of the statement or the statement itself. Two statements did not achieve majority consensus. The statements covered women's priorities, aspects of classification, impact of low resources, as well as all the major classification systems for endometriosis. Until better classification systems are developed, we propose a classification toolbox (that includes the revised American Society for Reproductive Medicine and, where appropriate, the

  1. Recommendations from a consensus development workshop on the diagnosis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are underdiagnosed in Australia, and health professionals have endorsed the need for national guidelines for diagnosis. The aim of this study was to develop consensus recommendations for the diagnosis of FASD in Australia. Methods A panel of 13 health professionals, researchers, and consumer and community representatives with relevant expertise attended a 2-day consensus development workshop to review evidence on the screening and diagnosis of FASD obtained from a systematic literature review, a national survey of health professionals and community group discussions. The nominal group technique and facilitated discussion were used to review the evidence on screening and diagnosis, and to develop consensus recommendations for the diagnosis of FASD in Australia. Results The use of population-based screening for FASD was not recommended. However, there was consensus support for the development of standard criteria for referral for specialist diagnostic assessment. Participants developed consensus recommendations for diagnostic categories, criteria and assessment methods, based on the adaption of elements from both the University of Washington 4-Digit Diagnostic Code and the Canadian guidelines for FASD diagnosis. Panel members also recommended the development of resources to: facilitate consistency in referral and diagnostic practices, including comprehensive clinical guidelines and assessment instruments; and to support individuals undergoing assessment and their parents or carers. Conclusions These consensus recommendations provide a foundation for the development of guidelines and other resources to promote consistency in the diagnosis of FASD in Australia. Guidelines for diagnosis will require review and evaluation in the Australian context prior to national implementation as well as periodic review to incorporate new knowledge. PMID:24083778

  2. The Canadian safeguards support program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeffe, R. [Atomic Energy Control Board, Canadian Safeguards Support Program, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Canada supports international safeguards as a means by which the proliferation of nuclear weapons can be discouraged. Canada recognizes that,to meet that the IAEA must have effective safeguards techniques and the active cooperation of Member States. Therefore the Canadian Government decided in 1976 to initiate a program in support of IAEA safeguards, known as the Canadian Safeguards Support Program (CSSP). The CSSP is funded and administered by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The CSSP is a co-ordinated program for the development and the application of safeguards instruments and techniques for nuclear facilities and materials on behalf of the IAEA and also in support of Canada's own national nuclear material safeguards system, implemented by the AECB. (author)

  3. Canadian safeguards - an historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ironside, A.M. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Smith, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper summarizes safeguards activities and programs undertaken in Canada. In 1970, Canada, in collaboration with the IAEA, began a study of procedures and equipment required for the application of safeguards to on-line-fueled reactors. In 1977, this assistance was substantially increased and formalized into the Canadian Safeguards Support Program (CSSP). To date, Canada has spent in excess of $35 million Canadian on this program. The CSSP provides support to the IAEA safeguards effort for areas in which Canada has expertise and has been primarily engaged in developing safeguards procedures and equipment for the CANDU power reactors in Canada and throughout the world. Work, projects, and equipment development undertaken by CANDU CSSP are highlighted.

  4. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  5. Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.; Hu, N.; Spanos, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    We propose Veto-Consensus Multiple Kernel Learning (VCMKL), a novel way of combining multiple kernels such that one class of samples is described by the logical intersection (consensus) of base kernelized decision rules, whereas the other classes by the union (veto) of their complements. The

  6. Construction of barley consensus map showing chromosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the past, it has been difficult to accurately determine the location of many types of barley molecular markers due to the lack of commonality between international barley linkage maps. In this study, a consensus map of barley was constructed from five different maps (OWB, VxHs, KxM, barley consensus 2 and barley ...

  7. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Ahlberg, J.; Glaros, A.G.; Kato, T.; Koyano, K.; Lavigne, G.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Manfredini, D.; Svensson, P.; Winocur, E.

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined

  8. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November 29... addressing risks to reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences. The...

  9. Reframing the Canadian Oil Sands

    OpenAIRE

    Patchett, Merle M; Lozowy, A

    2012-01-01

    Reframing the Canadian Oil Sands” is a collaborative exchange between photographer Andriko Lozowy and cultural geographer Merle Patchett that engages photography and photographic theory to evoke a more critical and politically meaningful visual engagement with the world’s largest capital oil project. Since the appearance of Edward Burtynsky’s aerial and abstracted photographic-mappings of the region, capturing the scale of the Oil Sands from ‘on high’ has become the dominant visual imaginary....

  10. Nutritional risk among older Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage-Morin, Pamela L; Garriguet, Didier

    2013-03-01

    Nutritional risk screening is typically done in clinical settings to identify individuals at risk of malnourishment. This article presents the first population-level assessment of nutritional risk based on a large national sample representative of Canadian householders aged 65 or older. Data from the 2008/2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging were used to estimate the prevalence of nutritional risk by selected characteristics. Factors associated with nutritional risk were examined with restricted and full logistic models. The distribution of responses on the SCREEN II-AB nutritional risk instrument is reported. Based on the results of the 2008/2009 survey, 34% of Canadians aged 65 or older were at nutritional risk. Women were more likely than men to be at risk. Among people with depression, 62% were at nutritional risk, compared with 33% of people without depression. Level of disability, poor oral health, and medication use were associated with nutritional risk, as were living alone, low social support, infrequent social participation, and not driving on a regular basis. Lower income and education were also associated with nutritional risk. Nutritional risk is common among seniors living in private households in Canada. The characteristics of people most likely to be at nutritional risk provide evidence for targeted screening and assessment.

  11. Benchmarks for cystic fibrosis carrier screening: a European consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Carlo; Macek, Milan; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Duff, Alistair; Massie, John; ten Kate, Leo P; Barton, David; Cutting, Garry; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Dequeker, Elisabeth; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Grody, Wayne; Highsmith, Edward W; Kääriäinen, Helenal; Kruip, Stephan; Morris, Michael; Pignatti, Pier Franco; Pypops, Ulrike; Schwarz, Martin; Soller, Maria; Stuhrman, Manfred; Cuppens, Harry

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the conclusions from an international conference convened to address current issues related to the provision of Cystic Fibrosis carrier screening within Europe. Consensus was not aimed at stating whether such a programme should be implemented. Instead the focus was to provide a framework for countries and agencies who are considering or planning its establishment. The general principles and target population of Cystic Fibrosis carrier screening, advantages and disadvantages, health economics, monitoring and future evaluative and research directions were covered. A range of screening strategies have been assessed and compared: pre-conceptional and prenatal screening; individual and couple screening; sequential and simultaneous sampling or testing. Furthermore, technical issues were examined with respect to the choice of the panel of mutations, its detection rate, sensitivity, management of intermediate 'at-risk' couples, screening approach to different populations and ethnic minorities, and assurance of laboratory quality control. The consensus statement also aims to establish the benchmarks for communicating with health care providers, the general public and potential and actual participants before and after the genetic test.

  12. Standard operating procedures for ESPEN guidelines and consensus papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Stephan C; Singer, Pierre; Koller, Michael; Barazzoni, Rocco; Cederholm, Tommy; van Gossum, André

    2015-12-01

    The ESPEN Guideline standard operating procedures (SOP) is based on the methodology provided by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies of Germany (AWMF), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), and the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine at the University of Oxford. The SOP is valid and obligatory for all future ESPEN-sponsored guideline projects aiming to generate high-quality guidelines on a regular basis. The SOP aims to facilitate the preparation of guideline projects, to streamline the consensus process, to ensure quality and transparency, and to facilitate the dissemination and publication of ESPEN guidelines. To achieve this goal, the ESPEN Guidelines Editorial board (GEB) has been established headed by two chairmen. The GEB will support and supervise the guideline processes and is responsible for the strategic planning of ESPEN guideline activities. Key elements of the SOP are the generation of well-built clinical questions according to the PICO system, a systemic literature search, a classification of the selected literature according to the SIGN evidence levels providing an evidence table, and a clear and straight-forward consensus procedure consisting of online voting's and a consensus conference. Only experts who meet the obligation to disclosure any potential conflict of interests and who are not employed by the Industry can participate in the guideline process. All recommendations will be graded according to the SIGN grading and novel outcome models besides biomedical endpoints. This approach will further extent the leadership of ESPEN in creating up-to-date and suitable for implementation guidelines and in sharing knowledge on malnutrition and clinical nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiologist Peer Review by Group Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H Benjamin; Alkasab, Tarik K; Prabhakar, Anand M; Halpern, Elkan F; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Pandharipande, Pari V; Gazelle, G Scott

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the consensus-oriented group review (COGR) method of radiologist peer review within a large subspecialty imaging department. This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. Radiologist interpretations of CT, MRI, and ultrasound examinations at a large academic radiology department were subject to peer review using the COGR method from October 2011 through September 2013. Discordance rates and sources of discordance were evaluated on the basis of modality and division, with group differences compared using a χ(2) test. Potential associations between peer review outcomes and the time after the initiation of peer review or the number of radiologists participating in peer review were tested by linear regression analysis and the t test, respectively. A total of 11,222 studies reported by 83 radiologists were peer reviewed using COGR during the two-year study period. The average radiologist participated in 112 peer review conferences and had 3.3% of his or her available CT, MRI and ultrasound studies peer reviewed. The rate of discordance was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4%-3.0%), with significant differences in discordance rates on the basis of division and modality. Discordance rates were highest for MR (3.4%; 95% CI, 2.8%-4.1%), followed by ultrasound (2.7%; 95% CI, 2.0%-3.4%) and CT (2.4%; 95% CI, 2.0%-2.8%). Missed findings were the most common overall cause for discordance (43.8%; 95% CI, 38.2%-49.4%), followed by interpretive errors (23.5%; 95% CI, 18.8%-28.3%), dictation errors (19.0%; 95% CI, 14.6%-23.4%), and recommendation (10.8%; 95% CI, 7.3%-14.3%). Discordant cases, compared with concordant cases, were associated with a significantly greater number of radiologists participating in the peer review process (5.9 vs 4.7 participating radiologists, P peer review data to better elucidate sources of error in diagnostic imaging reports, while reviewing a sufficient case

  14. Climate Science Conference

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The North Pacific LCC is helping sponsor the Second Annual Pacific Northwest Climate Science Conference. This two day, regional conference included a panel...

  15. [Spanish consensus on infantile haemangioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselga Torres, Eulalia; Bernabéu Wittel, José; van Esso Arbolave, Diego L; Febrer Bosch, María Isabel; Carrasco Sanz, Ángel; de Lucas Laguna, Raúl; Del Pozo Losada, Jesús; Hernández Martín, Ángela; Jiménez Montañés, Lorenzo; López Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos; Martín-Santiago, Ana; Redondo Bellón, Pedro; Ruíz-Canela Cáceres, Juan; Torrelo Fernández, Antonio; Vera Casaño, Ángel; Vicente Villa, María Asunción

    2016-11-01

    Infantile haemangiomas are benign tumours produced by the proliferation of endothelial cells of blood vessels, with a high incidence in children under the age of one year (4-10%). It is estimated that 12% of them require treatment. This treatment must be administered according to clinical practice guidelines, expert experience, patient characteristics and parent preferences. The consensus process was performed by using scientific evidence on the diagnosis and treatment of infantile haemangiomas, culled from a systematic review of the literature, together with specialist expert opinions. The recommendations issued were validated by the specialists, who also provided their level of agreement. This document contains recommendations on the classification, associations, complications, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with infantile haemangioma. It also includes action algorithms, and addresses multidisciplinary management and referral criteria between the different specialities involved in the clinical management of this type of patient. The recommendations and the diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms of infantile haemangiomas contained in this document are a useful tool for the proper management of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Consensus Paper: Cerebellum and Emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamaszek, M; D'Agata, F; Ferrucci, R; Habas, C; Keulen, S; Kirkby, K C; Leggio, M; Mariën, P; Molinari, M; Moulton, E; Orsi, L; Van Overwalle, F; Papadelis, C; Priori, A; Sacchetti, B; Schutter, D J; Styliadis, C; Verhoeven, J

    2017-04-01

    Over the past three decades, insights into the role of the cerebellum in emotional processing have substantially increased. Indeed, methodological refinements in cerebellar lesion studies and major technological advancements in the field of neuroscience are in particular responsible to an exponential growth of knowledge on the topic. It is timely to review the available data and to critically evaluate the current status of the role of the cerebellum in emotion and related domains. The main aim of this article is to present an overview of current facts and ongoing debates relating to clinical, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological findings on the role of the cerebellum in key aspects of emotion. Experts in the field of cerebellar research discuss the range of cerebellar contributions to emotion in nine topics. Topics include the role of the cerebellum in perception and recognition, forwarding and encoding of emotional information, and the experience and regulation of emotional states in relation to motor, cognitive, and social behaviors. In addition, perspectives including cerebellar involvement in emotional learning, pain, emotional aspects of speech, and neuropsychiatric aspects of the cerebellum in mood disorders are briefly discussed. Results of this consensus paper illustrate how theory and empirical research have converged to produce a composite picture of brain topography, physiology, and function that establishes the role of the cerebellum in many aspects of emotional processing.

  17. Fake/Bogus Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asadi, Amin; Rahbar, Nader; Rezvani, Mohammad Javad

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of the present paper is to introduce some features of fake/bogus conferences and some viable approaches to differentiate them from the real ones. These fake/bogus conferences introduce themselves as international conferences, which are multidisciplinary and indexed in major sci...... scientific digital libraries. Furthermore, most of the fake/bogus conference holders offer publishing the accepted papers in ISI journals and use other techniques in their advertisement e-mails....

  18. Canadian Thoracic Society 2012 Guideline Update: Diagnosis and Management of Asthma in Preschoolers, Children and Adults: Executive Summary

    OpenAIRE

    M. Diane Lougheed; Catherine Lemiere; Ducharme, Francine M.; Chris Licskai; Dell, Sharon D; Rowe, Brian H.; Mark FitzGerald; Richard Leigh; Wade Watson; Louis-Philippe Boulet; Canadian Thoracic Society Asthma Clinical Assembly

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) published a Consensus Summary for the diagnosis and management of asthma in children six years of age and older, and adults, including an updated Asthma Management Continuum. The CTS Asthma Clinical Assembly subsequently began a formal clinical practice guideline update process, focusing, in this first iteration, on topics of controversy and/or gaps in the previous guidelines.METHODS: Four clinical questions were identified as a focus f...

  19. Moral and Ethical Dilemmas in Canadian Forces Military Operation: Qualitative and Descriptive Analyses of Commanders’ Operational Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    1998 as issued jointly by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Social ...canadiennes qui avaient tous été confrontés à un dilemme moral (c.-à-d. des situations ou circonstances où au moins deux valeurs fondamentales sont en...intensity dimensions were Concentration of Effect (the number of people affected by the event) and Social Consensus. The most often invoked moral

  20. Developing a Canadian Curriculum for Simulation-Based Education in Obstetrics and Gynaecology: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Catherine; Posner, Glenn D

    2017-09-01

    As obstetrics and gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) residency training programs move towards a competence-based approach to training and assessment, the development of a national standardized simulation curriculum is essential. The primary goal of this study was to define the fundamental content for the Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology Simulation curriculum. A modified Delphi technique was used to achieve consensus in three rounds by surveying residency program directors or their local simulation educator delegates in 16 accredited Canadian Ob/Gyn residency programs. A consensus rate of 80% was agreed upon. Survey results were collected over 11 months in 2016. Response rates for the Delphi were 50% for the first round, 81% for the second round, and 94% for the third round. The first survey resulted in 84 suggested topics. These were organized into four categories: obstetrics high acuity low frequency events, obstetrics common events, gynaecology high acuity low frequency events, and gynaecology common events. Using the modified Delphi method, consensus was reached on 6 scenarios. This study identified the content for a national simulation-based curriculum for Ob/Gyn residency training programs and is the first step in the development of this curriculum. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. COAL Conference Poster

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Taylor Alexander; McGibbney, Lewis John

    2017-01-01

    COAL Conference Poster This archive contains the COAL conference poster for the AGU Fall Meeting 2017 by Taylor Alexander Brown. The Inkscape SVG source is available at https://github.com/capstone-coal/coal-conference-poster/ under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license.

  2. Professional Legitimation for Education in Canadian Universities: "The Canadian Journal of Education", 1976-1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Donald

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, Donald Fisher reports on the history of the "The Canadian Journal of Education" as part of this 40th anniversary issue. Fisher states that the history of the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) has been profoundly influenced by changes in the role of the Canadian State. The 1960s and 1970s were a time…

  3. Mannheim carotid intima-media thickness and plaque consensus (2004-2006-2011). An update on behalf of the advisory board of the 3rd, 4th and 5th watching the risk symposia, at the 13th, 15th and 20th European Stroke Conferences, Mannheim, Germany, 2004, Brussels, Belgium, 2006, and Hamburg, Germany, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touboul, P-J; Hennerici, M G; Meairs, S; Adams, H; Amarenco, P; Bornstein, N; Csiba, L; Desvarieux, M; Ebrahim, S; Hernandez Hernandez, R; Jaff, M; Kownator, S; Naqvi, T; Prati, P; Rundek, T; Sitzer, M; Schminke, U; Tardif, J-C; Taylor, A; Vicaut, E; Woo, K S

    2012-01-01

    Intima-media thickness (IMT) provides a surrogate end point of cardiovascular outcomes in clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of cardiovascular risk factor modification. Carotid artery plaque further adds to the cardiovascular risk assessment. It is defined as a focal structure that encroaches into the arterial lumen of at least 0.5 mm or 50% of the surrounding IMT value or demonstrates a thickness >1.5 mm as measured from the media-adventitia interface to the intima-lumen interface. The scientific basis for use of IMT in clinical trials and practice includes ultrasound physics, technical and disease-related principles as well as best practice on the performance, interpretation and documentation of study results. Comparison of IMT results obtained from epidemiological and interventional studies around the world relies on harmonization on approaches to carotid image acquisition and analysis. This updated consensus document delineates further criteria to distinguish early atherosclerotic plaque formation from thickening of IMT. Standardized methods will foster homogenous data collection and analysis, improve the power of randomized clinical trials incorporating IMT and plaque measurements and facilitate the merging of large databases for meta-analyses. IMT results are applied to individual patients as an integrated assessment of cardiovascular risk factors. However, this document recommends against serial monitoring in individual patients. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    and facilitate a variety of simple learning techniques at thirty one- and two-day conferences of up to 300 participants each. We present ten of these techniques and data evaluating them. We conclude that if conference organizers allocate a fraction of the total conference time to facilitated processes......The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an al-ternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum...

  5. International Conference on Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    OMICS International, (conference series) the World Class Open Access Publisher and Scientific Event Organizer is hosting “International Conference on physics” which is going to be the biggest conference dedicated to Physics. The theme “Highlighting innovations and challenges in the field of Physics” and it features a three day conference addressing the major breakthroughs, challenges and the solutions adopted. The conference will be held during June 27-29, 2016 at New Orleans, USA. Will be published in: http://physics.conferenceseries.com/

  6. Canadian Council for Area Studies Learned Societies - 2007-2008 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CCASLS) provides a shared secretariat for four area studies associations: the Canadian Association of African Studies (CAAS); the Canadian Asian Studies Association (CASA): the Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies ...

  7. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates. To introduce an alternative, the ?learning conference,? that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes. Design....../methodology/approach: A typical full-day conference is analyzed. It has six hours of podium talk and twenty-five minutes for delegates to become involved. What model of learning can possibly lie behind this? The transfer model, which assumes learners to be empty vessels. An alternative view is that conference delegates...... are active professionals in search of inspiration, and they also want to share knowledge with their peers at the conference. A theory of the conference as a forum for mutual inspiration and human co-flourishing is proposed, as are four design principles for a learning conference: 1. Presentations must...

  8. National Fall Prevention Workshop: stepping up pan-Canadian coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    About one in three Canadian seniors will experience a fall at least once each year. Such falls are the leading cause of injury-related hospitalizations among older people. Apart from causing injury, falls can result in chronic pain, reduced quality of life and, in severe cases, death. Psychological effects of a fall may cause a post-fall syndrome that includes dependence on others for daily activities, loss of autonomy, confusion, immobilization and depression. Falls and the resulting injuries often occur due to a combination of factors, including health conditions associated with aging such as vision problems, osteoporosis, dementia and symptoms of a chronic disease. They can be due to the side effects of medications, environmental hazards and risk-taking behaviours. Fall prevention initiatives and strategies are taking place in all provinces and territories and at the national level. To enhance the collaborative understanding of these initiatives, a National Fall Prevention Workshop was held at the Canadian Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, on 17 November 2011. The Workshop was co-hosted by the British Columbia Injury Research and Prevention Unit (BCIRPU) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). Fall prevention leads from each province and territory were invited to present their most recent activities and their plans.

  9. CIHR canadian HIV trials network HIV workshop: ethical research through community participation and strengthening scientific validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Slogrove, Amy; Sas, Jacqueline; Kunda, John; Morfaw, Frederick; Mukonzo, Jackson; Thabane, Lehana

    2014-01-01

    The CIHR canadian HIV trials network mandate includes strengthening capacity to conduct and apply clinical research through training and mentoring initiatives of HIV researchers by building strong networks and partnerships on the African continent. At the17th International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa (ICASA), the CTN facilitated a two-day workshop to address ethical issues in the conduct of HIV research, and career enhancing strategies for young African HIV researchers. Conference attendees were allowed to attend whichever session was of interest to them. We report on the topics covered, readings shared and participants' evaluation of the workshop. The scientific aspects of ethical research in HIV and career enhancement strategies are relevant issues to conference attendees.

  10. Identifying key performance indicators for nursing and midwifery care using a consensus approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCance, Tanya; Telford, Lorna; Wilson, Julie; Macleod, Olive; Dowd, Audrey

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to gain consensus on key performance indicators that are appropriate and relevant for nursing and midwifery practice in the current policy context. There is continuing demand to demonstrate effectiveness and efficiency in health and social care and to communicate this at boardroom level. Whilst there is substantial literature on the use of clinical indicators and nursing metrics, there is less evidence relating to indicators that reflect the patient experience. A consensus approach was used to identify relevant key performance indicators. A nominal group technique was used comprising two stages: a workshop involving all grades of nursing and midwifery staff in two HSC trusts in Northern Ireland (n = 50); followed by a regional Consensus Conference (n = 80). During the workshop, potential key performance indicators were identified. This was used as the basis for the Consensus Conference, which involved two rounds of consensus. Analysis was based on aggregated scores that were then ranked. Stage one identified 38 potential indicators and stage two prioritised the eight top-ranked indicators as a core set for nursing and midwifery. The relevance and appropriateness of these indicators were confirmed with nurses and midwives working in a range of settings and from the perspective of service users. The eight indicators identified do not conform to the majority of other nursing metrics generally reported in the literature. Furthermore, they are strategically aligned to work on the patient experience and are reflective of the fundamentals of nursing and midwifery practice, with the focus on person-centred care. Nurses and midwives have a significant contribution to make in determining the extent to which these indicators are achieved in practice. Furthermore, measurement of such indicators provides an opportunity to evidence of the unique impact of nursing/midwifery care on the patient experience. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. The Canadian mobile satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertenyi, Elemer

    1992-07-01

    Plans to upgrade Canadian mobile data services by introducing a full, two way mobile voice and data service, using a large geostationary satellite which is scheduled to be launched in 1994, are reported. This Mobile Satellite (MSAT) will offer customers the ability to communicate, using mobile or transportable terminals, from the most remote parts of the continent, to any other point within North America, and indeed the whole world. Currently planned MSAT services are reviewed, the main features of the overall system are outlined, and the configuration and key performance parameters of the MSAT satellite are presented. The communications subsystem is detailed, and a summary of the spacecraft service module is given.

  12. Canadian Cardiovascular Society and Canadian Thoracic Society Position Statement on Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Langleben

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society requested a position statement on pulmonary arterial hypertension from leading Canadian experts. The present document is intended to act as an update for the clinician, to provide a template for the initial evaluation of patients, to enable the understanding of current therapeutic paradigms based on approved indications for Canada, to highlight new therapies on the horizon, and to state the positions of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Thoracic Society on resource management for pulmonary arterial hypertension in Canada.

  13. The 2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part II - therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadia A; McAlister, Finlay A; Lewanczuk, Richard Z; Touyz, Rhian M; Padwal, Raj; Rabkin, Simon W; Leiter, Lawrence A; Lebel, Marcel; Herbert, Carol; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Herman, Robert J; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Carruthers, George; Culleton, Bruce; DeChamplain, Jacques; Pylypchuk, George; Logan, Alexander G; Gledhill, Norm; Petrella, Robert; Campbell, Norman R C; Arnold, Malcolm; Moe, Gordon; Hill, Micharl D; Jones, Charlotte; Larochelle, Pierre; Ogilvie, Richard I; Tobe, Sheldon; Houlden, Robyn; Burgess, Ellen; Feldman, Ross D

    2005-06-01

    To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults. For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. While changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field, and for certain comorbid conditions, other relevant outcomes, such as development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function, were considered. MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2003 to October 2004 to update the 2004 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content and methodology experts. As per previous years, only studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature were included; evidence from abstracts, conference presentations and unpublished personal communications was not included. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise on four to seven days of the week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; follow a reduced fat, low cholesterol diet with an adequate intake of potassium, magnesium and calcium; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management (in selected individuals). Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ

  14. Current Results and Future Research Priorities in Late Effects after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with Sickle Cell Disease and Thalassemia: A Consensus Statement from the Second Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium International Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Shalini; Angelucci, Emanuele; Arnold, Staci D; Baker, K Scott; Bhatia, Monica; Bresters, Dorine; Dietz, Andrew C; De La Fuente, Josu; Duncan, Christine; Gaziev, Javid; King, Allison A; Pulsipher, Michael A; Smith, Angela R; Walters, Mark C

    2017-04-01

    Sustained donor engraftment after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) converts to healthy donor hemoglobin synthesis and halts disease symptoms in patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia major. A disease-free survival probability that exceeds 90% has been reported when HCT using an HLA-matched sibling donor is performed in young patients with low-risk disease or treatment-related risk factors. Alternate donor HCT and HCT in adults is performed infrequently because of a higher risk profile. Transplant-specific risks include conditioning regimen-related toxicity, graft-versus-host disease, graft rejection with marrow aplasia or disease recurrence, and infections associated with immunosuppression and delayed immune reconstitution. The magnitude of risk depends on patient age, clinical status of the underlying disease (eg, organ injury from vasculopathy and iron overload), donor source, and intensity of the conditioning regimen. These risks are commonly monitored and reported in the short term. Documenting very late outcomes is important, but these data are rarely reported because of challenges imposed by patient drop-out and insufficient resources. This report summarizes long-term follow-up results after HCT for hemoglobin disorders, identifies gaps in knowledge, and discusses opportunities for future investigations. This consensus summary will be followed by a second article detailing comprehensive long-term follow-up recommendations to aid in maintaining health in these individuals and identifying late complication risks that could facilitate interventions to improve outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. OGC Consensus: How Successful Standards Are Made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Reed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the history, background, and current status of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC standards development consensus process. The roots of the formation of the OGC lie in the early 1990s when a very strong market requirement for exchanging GIS data content was clearly stated. At that time, each GIS vendor had their own formats for publishing and/or exchanging their GIS data. There was no mechanism or organization that provided a forum for the GIS vendors and GIS data users to collaborate and agree on how to share GIS data. That requirement, along with the vision of a few individuals, led to the formation of the OGC. This paper describes the early development of the consensus process in the OGC, how this process has evolved over time, why consensus is so important for defining open standards that are implemented in the marketplace, and the future of the OGC consensus process.

  16. Judicial Deference Allows European Consensus to Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dothan, Shai

    2018-01-01

    conceived as competing doctrines: the more there is of one, the less there is of another. This paper suggests a novel rationale for the emerging consensus doctrine: the doctrine can allow the ECHR to make good policies by drawing on the independent decision-making of many similar countries. In light of that......, the paper demonstrates that a correct application of the margin of appreciation doctrine actually helps emerging consensus reach optimal results, by giving countries an incentive to make their policies independently....

  17. International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatti, Sofie F M; De Risio, Luisa; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    with the initial drug is unsatisfactory, and 4) when treatment changes should be considered. In this consensus proposal, an overview is given on the aim of AED treatment, when to start long-term treatment in canine epilepsy and which veterinary AEDs are currently in use for dogs. The consensus proposal for drug...... for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy. Furthermore, for the management of structural epilepsy AEDs are inevitable in addition to treating the underlying cause, if possible....

  18. Strategic consensus predicting outputs of team performance

    OpenAIRE

    Puente-Palacios,Katia; Moreira, Tatiana; Puente, Tamara; Lira, Naianne

    2014-01-01

    Strategic consensus in work teams is a group process related to the shared comprehension among team members of the strategies defined to attain work goals. This study aimedto verify the predictive power of strategic consensus in relation to team performance. The prediction model was constructed based on data collected from teachers and coordi-nators of 70 educational institutions in Ecuador. The individual data were aggregated per institution to obtain group level scores. The results indicate...

  19. Blockchain Consensus Protocols in the Wild

    OpenAIRE

    Cachin, Christian; Vukolić, Marko

    2017-01-01

    A blockchain is a distributed ledger for recording transactions, maintained by many nodes without central authority through a distributed cryptographic protocol. All nodes validate the information to be appended to the blockchain, and a consensus protocol ensures that the nodes agree on a unique order in which entries are appended. Consensus protocols for tolerating Byzantine faults have received renewed attention because they also address blockchain systems. This work discusses the process o...

  20. CASID and Canadian Journal of Development Studies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CASID and Canadian Journal of Development Studies : Organizational Strengthening 2007-2010. The Canadian Association for the Study of International Development (CASID) is a national, bilingual, multidisciplinary and pluralistic association devoted to the study of international development in all parts of the world.

  1. Guide to Canadian Aerospace Related Industries,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    fabrication, PWC assembly & test, automatic backplane wiring, computerized wire History : AEI, an established Canadian company for over 55...production of Automatic Number Identification (ANI) systems and 911 Emergency History : Aeo Machining Ltd is a small machining company Reporting Systems for...Aircraft, DeHavilland, Grumman Aircraft, and Canadian Digital Radar Data Processing - Contract with Fundacao Vickers Ltd. Educacional de Bauru, Brazil

  2. 47 CFR 90.121 - Canadian registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Canadian registration. 90.121 Section 90.121 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations § 90.121 Canadian registration. Form 410 shall be...

  3. Rural Canadian Youth Exposed to Physical Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laye, Adele M.; Mykota, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to physical violence is an unfortunate reality for many Canadian youth as it is associated with numerous negative psychosocial effects. The study aims to assist in understanding resilience in rural Canadian youth exposed to physical violence. This is accomplished by identifying the importance of protective factors, as measured by the…

  4. Pragmatism and Political Pluralism - Consensus and Pluralism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marsonet

    2015-07-01

    In our day the German philosopher Jürgen Habermas has in a way revived these Peircean insights, putting forward an influential theory to the effect that consensus indeed plays a key role in human praxis, so that the primary task of philosophy is to foster it by eliminating the disagreement which we constantly have to face in the course of our daily life. In his “communicative theory of consensus,” furthermore, he claims that human communication rests on an implicit commitment to a sort of “ideal speech situation” which is the normative foundation of agreement in linguistic matters. Consequently, the quest for consensus is a constitutive feature of our nature of (rational human beings: rationality and consensus are tied together. A very strong consequence derives from Habermas’ premises: were we to abandon the search for consensus we would lose rationality, too, and this makes us understand that he views the pursuit of consensus as a regulative principle (rather than as a merely practical objective. Rescher opposes both Peirce’s eschatological view and Habermas’ regulative and idealized one.

  5. Proceedings of CanWEA's 23. annual conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This conference was attended by wind turbine manufacturers, component suppliers, wind energy project developers, utilities and a broad range of service providers to the wind power industry. It provided a forum to identify key issues facing the wind power industry and the measures that must be taken if Canada is to meet the targets and objectives established for wind energy by federal and provincial governments. It is anticipated that the rapid growth in the wind power industry will help create jobs and training opportunities as well as provide economic benefits to local communities. The conference was divided into 3 streams, namely policy; business and development; and technical. Alberta policy and Quebec policy issues were discussed on the first day of the conference along with project financing issues and operations/maintenance of wind farms. Wind in cold climates was also discussed along with wind and grid reliability issues. Policy developments in western Canada, Atlantic Canada and Ontario were discussed on the second day of the conference along with wind farm siting issues, small wind projects under 10 MW, wind resource assessment, performance measurement, and advances in wind forecasting. Municipal involvement in wind projects was discussed on the final day of the conference along with wind integration with conventional grids and the need for trained service technicians in the Canadian wind industry. Forty presentations from the conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Exit, cohesion, and consensus: social psychological moderators of consensus among adolescent peer groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jacob C

    2017-02-01

    Virtually all social diffusion work relies on a common formal basis, which predicts that consensus will develop among a connected population as the result of diffusion. In spite of the popularity of social diffusion models that predict consensus, few empirical studies examine consensus, or a clustering of attitudes, directly. Those that do either focus on the coordinating role of strict hierarchies, or on the results of online experiments, and do not consider how consensus occurs among groups in situ. This study uses longitudinal data on adolescent social networks to show how meso-level social structures, such as informal peer groups, moderate the process of consensus formation. Using a novel method for controlling for selection into a group, I find that centralized peer groups, meaning groups with clear leaders, have very low levels of consensus, while cohesive peer groups, meaning groups where more ties hold the members of the group together, have very high levels of consensus. This finding is robust to two different measures of cohesion and consensus. This suggests that consensus occurs either through central leaders' enforcement or through diffusion of attitudes, but that central leaders have limited ability to enforce when people can leave the group easily.

  7. Consensus modeling to develop the farmers' market readiness assessment and decision instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunlye; Dalton, Jarrod; Ngendahimana, David; Bebo, Pat; Davis, Ashley; Remley, Daniel; Smathers, Carol; Freedman, Darcy A

    2017-09-01

    Nutrition-related policy, system, and environmental (PSE) interventions such as farmers' markets have been recommended as effective strategies for promoting healthy diet for chronic disease prevention. Tools are needed to assess community readiness and capacity factors influencing successful farmers' market implementation among diverse practitioners in different community contexts. We describe a multiphase consensus modeling approach used to develop a diagnostic tool for assessing readiness and capacity to implement farmers' market interventions among public health and community nutrition practitioners working with low-income populations in diverse contexts. Modeling methods included the following: phase 1, qualitative study with community stakeholders to explore facilitators and barriers influencing successful implementation of farmers' market interventions in low-income communities; phase 2, development of indicators based on operationalization of qualitative findings; phase 3, assessment of relevance and importance of indicators and themes through consensus conference with expert panel; phase 4, refinement of indicators based on consensus conference; and phase 5, pilot test of the assessment tool. Findings illuminate a range of implementation factors influencing farmers' market PSE interventions and offer guidance for tailoring intervention delivery based on levels of community, practitioner, and organizational readiness and capacity.

  8. International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Cryocoolers 13

    2005-01-01

    This is the 13th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature super-capacitor applications.

  9. Conference proceedings ISES 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Peerstrup Ahrendt, Line; Malmkvist, Jens

    The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers.......The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers....

  10. Canadian EdGEO National Workshop Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, L. A.; Haidl, F. M.; Hymers, L. A.; van der Flier-Keller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Established in the early 1970s, EdGEO supports locally driven geosciences workshops for Canadian teachers. Workshops are organized by geoscientists and teachers, and typically have field, laboratory and classroom components. Grants of up to $3000 per workshop are available from the National EdGEO Program. By providing educational opportunities for today's teachers and, through them, their students, EdGEO seeks to cultivate a heightened awareness of our planet. EdGEO workshops provide teachers with potential fieldtrip sites for their students and the knowledge, enthusiasm and materials to inspire their students to engage in geoscience. Networking opportunities with local experts promote the importance of the geoscience profession. The expected result is an improved capacity on the part of Canadians to understand the Earth and to make informed decisions, especially with regard to the use of mineral and energy resources, the maintenance and remediation of the environment, and response to geological hazards. There exists a critical need to provide teachers with training and resources to tackle their Earth science curricula. In 2008, EdGEO supported fourteen workshops, with an unprecedented 521 teachers attending. These teachers then used our resources to reach an estimated 14,000 students during that single academic year. EdGEO workshops are locally driven and are therefore very diverse. Workshops are strongly tied to the provincial curriculum, focus on a specific geoscience topic, or may be largely field-based to demonstrate and practice how field activities could be incorporated into Earth science teaching. Many strive to include all of these important components. Geoscientists and teachers work collaboratively to develop and deliver EdGEO workshops to ensure that the activities can be effectively used in the classroom. The length of these professional development opportunities range from two-hour sessions to several days, and can generally accommodate up to twenty

  11. Scheduling EURO-k Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Thomas Jacob Riis; Pisinger, David; Vigo, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    EURO-k conferences are among the largest Operations Research conferences in the world, typically including more than 2000 presentations. As opposed to many other conferences, EURO-k conferences are hierarchically organized, and the conference schedule should reflect this structure to make...

  12. Factors affecting food selection in Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, M; Riediger, N; Moghadasian, M H

    2008-11-01

    To establish health-related reasons behind Canadian food choices, and how variables such as education, income, gender, ethnicity and age may affect food selection. Approximately 98 733 Canadians responded to the 12 questions regarding food choices in the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) cycle 2.1, conducted by the Canadian Government in 2003. These included 13 727 adolescents (12-19 years), 19 089 young adults (20-34 years), 31 039 middle-aged adults (35-54 years), 25 338 older adults (55-74 years) and 9580 elderly (75+ years). Approximately 70% of Canadian adolescents in the sample indicated that their food choices were independent of health concerns. Body weight management was a major concern for food selection by adolescents and adults, while the elderly stated heart disease as their main concern. Among all participants, females, and individuals with high levels of education and income reported the highest response to choosing or avoiding foods due to health concerns and food content. Our data indicate that several factors significantly affect food choices for health-related reasons in the Canadian population. Among them, age- and gender-related gaps, particularly between adolescents and adults, are profound. This observation may urge authorities to implement effective strategies to educate Canadians, especially adolescents, that selection of appropriate foods may prevent chronic diseases.

  13. Consensus formation times in anisotropic societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neirotti, Juan

    2017-06-01

    We developed a statistical mechanics model to study the emergence of a consensus in societies of adapting, interacting agents constrained by a social rule B . In the mean-field approximation, we find that if the agents' interaction H0 is weak, all agents adapt to the social rule B , with which they form a consensus; however, if the interaction is sufficiently strong, a consensus is built against the established status quo. We observed that, after a transient time αt, agents asymptotically approach complete consensus by following a path whereby they neglect their neighbors' opinions on socially neutral issues (i.e., issues for which the society as a whole has no opinion). αt is found to be finite for most values of the interagent interaction H0 and temperature T , with the exception of the values H0=1 , T →∞ , and the region determined by the inequalities β <2 and 2 β H0<1 +β -√{1 +2 β -β2 } , for which consensus, with respect to B , is never reached.

  14. Nuclear communications : A Canadian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macpherson, John A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ottawa (Canada)

    1994-04-15

    Times have changed since the early days of nuclear energy when it was a symbol of a brave new world, Public information strategies have evolved to meet increasing public concerns, and have shifted from being a largely unfocused attempt at publicity to being more concerned with managing issues and solving problems. This paper describes some of the salient features of the Canadian experience in nuclear communications and examines four key aspects: opinion and attitude research; media relations; coeducation; and advertising. It also addresses the challenge of responding to the allegations and tactics of those who are actively hostile to nuclear energy, and recommends that the principles of Total Quality Management and of organizational effectiveness be applied more thorough and more consistently to the public affairs function.

  15. Tritium technology. A Canadian overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmings, R.L. [Canatom NPM (Canada)

    2002-10-01

    An overview of the various tritium research and operational activities in Canada is presented. These activities encompass tritium processing and recovery, tritium interactions with materials, and tritium health and safety. Many of these on-going activities form a sound basis for the tritium use and handling aspects of the ITER project. Tritium management within the CANDU heavy water reactor, associated detritiation facilities, research and development facilities, and commercial industry and improving the understanding of tritium behaviour in humans and the environment remain the focus of a long-standing Canadian interest in tritium. While there have been changes in the application of this knowledge and experience over time, the operating experience and the supporting research and development continue to provide for improved plant and facility operations, an improved understanding of tritium safety issues, and improved products and tools that facilitate tritium management. (author)

  16. Canadian orthodontist Internet user profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Neal G; Yacyshyn, James R; Northcott, Herbert C; Nebbe, Brian; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Major, Paul W

    2006-01-01

    An anonymous, self-administered, mail-out survey of Canadian Orthodontists was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of orthodontic Internet use. The response rate was 45.6% (304 of 667). A total of 76.6% of orthodontists reported having Internet access at work, and an additional 12.4% reported having Internet access from a different location. Statistically significant associations between Internet usage and office staff size (P < .001) and years of practice (P = .046) were observed. Offices with larger staffs had greater Internet access. Number of staffs and number of case starts were positively correlated (P < .001, r = 0.498). The odds ratio for having Internet access on the basis of increased case starts from the less than 100 to 300-399 categories was 5.67. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend for greater Internet access by younger practitioners.

  17. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  18. Conference scene: 2nd cancer epigenetics conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cassandra L

    2013-04-01

    The GTC Cancer Summit: Novel Approaches to Drug Discovery was divided into two parallel tracks: the 2nd Cancer Epigenetics Conference, and the Protein Kinases and Drug Design Conference. The 2nd Cancer Epigenetics Conference focused on exciting changes in drug discovery that include an unprecedented private and public collaboration on drug discovery in epigenetics through the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), which has led to several major breakthroughs including: the development of small-molecule inhibitors that interfere with protein interactions, especially bromodomain-containing protein acetylation readers; the indirect but successful targeting of the elusive MYC oncogene; and the identification of epigenetic drugs that are disease-specific. Also reported were the development of clinically useful DNA methylation assays; cell, peptide and protein arrays for testing antibody- and protein-binding specificity; and tools for chromatin capture and DNA modification analysis. Several groups reported on the lack of specificity of some commercial, but unnamed, antibodies used for epigenetic studies.

  19. Canadian Civil Society Organizations and Human Rights and Global ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project aims to strengthen the capacity of Canadian civil society organizations (CSOs) to inform Canadian policy on human rights and global justice. The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) receives core funding from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). This grant will provide ...

  20. Delphi process yielded consensus on terminology and research agenda for therapeutic footwear for neuropathic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Rutger; van der Wilden, Gelske J; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J; Boers, Maarten

    2008-08-01

    To investigate areas of consensus and disagreement among Dutch physiatrists concerning prescription of therapeutic footwear for the neuropathic foot and to develop a research agenda. Forty participants were physiatrists and experts in the field of orthopedic shoe techniques. Four postal Delphi rounds were followed by a final plenary session. Forty of the 44 invited experts participated in all postal Delphi rounds, with an overall response of 100%. They achieved consensus on the following. 1. (Dutch) Terminology for two sets of domains and dimensions for the various features of the neuropathic foot and for the shoe characteristics. 2. Application of specific shoe components: insole, shaft, outsole, tongue, and heel. In most features of the neuropathic foot, shaft and outsole domains were linked in the flexibility dimension. 3. Shoe prescriptions for various features of the neuropathic foot in at least four technical domains. Experts disagreed on application of rocker bar and shaft height. In a final conference, 31 experts agreed on a prioritized research agenda. An intensive Delphi process yielded consensus on terminology, and determined areas of consensus and disagreement for future research for the various features of the neuropathic foot and the shoe characteristics.

  1. Dynamic Average Consensus and Consensusability of General Linear Multiagent Systems with Random Packet Dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Min Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the consensus problem of general linear discrete-time multiagent systems (MASs with random packet dropout that happens during information exchange between agents. The packet dropout phenomenon is characterized as being a Bernoulli random process. A distributed consensus protocol with weighted graph is proposed to address the packet dropout phenomenon. Through introducing a new disagreement vector, a new framework is established to solve the consensus problem. Based on the control theory, the perturbation argument, and the matrix theory, the necessary and sufficient condition for MASs to reach mean-square consensus is derived in terms of stability of an array of low-dimensional matrices. Moreover, mean-square consensusable conditions with regard to network topology and agent dynamic structure are also provided. Finally, the effectiveness of the theoretical results is demonstrated through an illustrative example.

  2. A perspective on Canadian shale gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mike; Davidson, Jim; Mortensen, Paul

    2010-09-15

    In a relatively new development over just the past few years, shale formations are being targeted for natural gas production. Based on initial results, there may be significant potential for shale gas in various regions of Canada, not only in traditional areas of conventional production but also non-traditional areas. However, there is much uncertainty because most Canadian shale gas production is currently in experimental or early developmental stages. Thus, its full potential will not be known for some time. If exploitation proves to be successful, Canadian shale gas may partially offset projected long-term declines in Canadian conventional natural gas production.

  3. Proceedings of the 2010 Canadian Dam Association's public safety around dams workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Nearly 30 people have drowned in dam-related incidents over the last 10 years in Canada. The Canadian public is now calling for improved safety guidelines. Public interaction with dams is increasing as a result of interest in extreme sports and perceived rights of access. However, many members of the public are not aware of the dangers posed by dams. This workshop provided a forum to discuss proposals for a draft publication of the Canadian Dam Association (CDA) guidelines for public safety and security around dams. Issues related to current legislation and liability were discussed. Methods of increasing public awareness of the hazards posed by dams included increased signage in dam locations, the use of audible and visual alert systems, and the use of booms and buoys. The responsibilities of dam owners in ensuring the safety of dams were also discussed. The conference featured 5 presentations, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  4. Radiation`96. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia.

  5. The Vision Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2002-01-01

    The concept of the design, planning and mangement of a creative conference is presented. A case study illustrates the theoretical concepts.......The concept of the design, planning and mangement of a creative conference is presented. A case study illustrates the theoretical concepts....

  6. Vehicular Networking Conference (VNC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altintas, O.; Chen, W.; Heijenk, Geert; Dressler, F.; Ekici, E.; Kargl, Frank; Shigeno, H.; Dietzel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the Organizing Committee, we would like to welcome you to the third edition of the IEEE Vehicular Networking Conference (IEEE VNC 2011) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. IEEE VNC is a unique conference sponsored by both the IEEE Communications Society and the IEEE Intelligent

  7. Consensus-oriented group peer review: a new process to review radiologist work output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkasab, Tarik K; Harvey, H Benjamin; Gowda, Vrushab; Thrall, James H; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Gazelle, G Scott

    2014-02-01

    The Joint Commission and other regulatory bodies have mandated that health care organizations implement processes for ongoing physician performance review. Software solutions, such as RADPEER™, have been created to meet this need efficiently. However, the authors believe that available systems are not optimally designed to produce changes in practice and overlook many important aspects of quality by excessive focus on diagnosis. The authors present a new model of peer review known as consensus-oriented group review, which is based on group discussion of cases in a conference setting and places greater emphasis on feedback than traditional systems of radiology peer review. By focusing on the process of peer review, consensus-oriented group review is intended to optimize performance improvement and foster group standards of practice. The authors also describe the software tool developed to implement this process of enriched peer review. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Global health and emergency care: a postgraduate medical education consensus-based research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ian B K; Jacquet, Gabrielle A; Levine, Adam C; Douglass, Kate; Pousson, Amelia; Dunlop, Stephen; Khanna, Kajal; Bentley, Suzanne; Tupesis, Janis P

    2013-12-01

    Global emergency medicine (EM) is a rapidly growing field within EM, as evidenced by the increasing number of trainees and clinicians pursuing additional experiences in global health and emergency care. In particular, many trainees now desire opportunities at the postgraduate level by way of global EM fellowship programs. Despite this growing popularity, little is known of the effects of postgraduate training in global health and emergency care on learners and patients in the United States and abroad. During the 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on global health and emergency care, a group of leading educators at the postgraduate medical education level convened to generate a research agenda of pressing questions to be answered in this area. The consensus-based research agenda is presented in this article. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  9. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. ICCK Conference Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, William H. [MIT

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase

  11. 3rd Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Louie, Berverly; McCarthy, Sandy

    1985-01-01

    Cryocoolers 3 documents the output of the Third Cryocooler Conference, held at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado, on September 17-18, 1984. About 140 people from 10 countries attended the conference representing industry, government, and academia. A total of 26 papers were presented orally at the conference and all appear in written form in the proceedings. The focus of this conference was on small cryocoolers in the temperature range of 4 - 80 K. Mechanical and nonmechanical types are discussed in the various papers. Applications of these small cryocoolers include the cooling of infrared detectors, cryopumps, small superconducting devices and magnets, and electronic devices. The conference proceedings reproduced here was published by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado as NBS Special Publication #698.

  12. Skin-Color Preferences and Body Satisfaction among South Asian-Canadian and European-Canadian Female University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Sarita; Piran, Niva

    1997-01-01

    Examines skin-color preferences and body satisfaction among South Asian-Canadian and European-Canadian female university students. Hypothesizes that South Asian-Canadians would display a greater wish to be lighter in skin color than would European-Canadians and that the discrepancy would be greater the darker their skin color. Reports that the…

  13. Age and the false-consensus effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinon, Y; Mayraz, A; Fox, S

    1994-12-01

    Israeli participants in four age groups (older adolescents, adults, residents of an old-age home, and older participants in a university program) answered a 12-item false-consensus questionnaire and Davis's (1980) Interpersonal Reactivity Index measuring empathy-egocentrism. The false-consensus effect (FCE) was found in all four age groups. The effect was significantly weaker among the older students, which was also the group lowest on egocentrism. Older adolescents were more egocentric than adults, who were less egocentric than residents of the old-age home, who were the highest on egocentrism. No correlation was found between the strength of the FCE and the egocentrism score.

  14. Vatican challenges growing consensus on population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Religious and ethical considerations have been at the center of the deliberations for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), with many religious communities around the world having come together to develop strategies on the critical issues of the conference such as the empowerment of women, the delivery of quality health services, environmental protection, and a more equitable distribution of resources. The most prominent religious institution at the conference, the Roman Catholic Church, vehemently opposes major portions of the conference's agenda. Indeed, the ICPD has become a focal point for the Vatican's concern about sexuality and reproduction. The hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church opposes abortion even to save the life of the woman. At the same time, the hierarchy also argues that any form of artificial contraception is immoral. A majority of Catholics worldwide disagree with and disregard these teachings.

  15. [Breast-conserving therapy in breast carcinoma--the indications and sequelae. The results of a multidisciplinary consensus meeting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellriegel, K P

    1991-02-01

    A multidisciplinary consensus development conference on the management of breast-preserving treatment in early breast cancer was organized in November 1989 in Berlin. Following a two-day discussion of data presented, conclusions and recommendations were achieved on the indication and limitation of breast conservation, the optimal technique as well as the diagnostic requirements and therapeutic strategies in context with breast conservation including follow-up.

  16. Reflections on the consensus process: a leadership role for emergency medicine in educational scholarship and practice across health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James A

    2012-12-01

    In just a few decades, emergency medicine (EM) has assumed a leadership role in medical education across many academic medical centers. This rapid evolution suggests medical education as a natural priority area for EM scholarship. This year's Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference provides an ideal forum to focus on educational research as a core element of the specialty's academic portfolio. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C.J. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference.

  18. To conference or not to conference

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy (ISSHP), the International Urogynaecology ... subject, of treatments or techniques they would never use, and why, or of treatments, interventions or tests which they ... colleagues recounted advice given over conference coffee – the one of obligatory consent for laparoscopy ...

  19. Exit competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine for graduating medical students: the Canadian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason; Pambrun, Chantale

    2015-05-01

    Physicians in every medical and surgical field must be able to use pathology concepts and skills in their practice: for example, they must order and interpret the correct laboratory tests, they must use their understanding of pathogenesis to diagnose and treat, and they must work with the laboratory to care for their patients. These important concepts and skills may be ignored by medical schools and even national/international organizations setting graduation expectations for medical students. There is an evolving international consensus about the importance of exit competencies for medical school graduates, which define the measurable or observable behaviors each graduate must be able to demonstrate. The Canadian Association of Pathologists (CAP) Education Group set out to establish the basic competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine which should be expected of every medical graduate: not competencies for pathologists, but for medical graduates who intend to enter any residency program. We defined 4 targets for pathology and laboratory medicine exit competencies: that they represent only measurable behaviors, that they be clinically focused, that they be generalizable to every medical graduate, and that the final competency document be user-friendly. A set of competencies was developed iteratively and underwent final revision at the 2012 CAP annual meeting. These competencies were subsequently endorsed by the CAP executive and the Canadian Leadership Council on Laboratory Medicine. This clinically focused consensus document provides the first comprehensive list of exit competencies in pathology and laboratory medicine for undergraduate medical education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dysplastic Nevus: Management by Canadian Dermatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Priya; Rosen, Cheryl; Siddha, Sanjay; Lynde, Charles W

    2015-01-01

    The management of dysplastic nevi is controversial. No studies have collected data regarding management of the lesion amongst Canadian dermatologists. To provide a comprehensive review of what the prevailing opinions are, regarding treatment and terminology of dysplastic nevi, amongst Canadian dermatologists. An online survey of 25 questions was e-mailed to 613 members of the Canadian Dermatology Association, in French and English. A total of 179 responses were received. Varying numbers of participants completed each question. The majority of participants think that the term dysplastic nevus should not be abandoned, and they indicated that they never reexcise lesions with mild to moderate atypia even when the margins are positive. The majority of Canadian dermatologists retain the use of the term dysplastic nevus and do not reexcise lesions with mild to moderate atypia even when the margins are positive. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Freezing at sea: a Canadian opportunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bollivar, D.R; Cadegan, E; Demone, E.H; Matthew, P; Nicholson, P.J; Shannon, C.P; Stirling, R.C

    This report was prepared for the Nova Scotia Fish Packers Association in an effort to set out as clearly as possible the issues relating to introduction of freezing at sea technology to the Canadian...

  2. The Canadian Forces Recruitment/Attrition Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wait, Tracey

    1998-01-01

    ...), as part of its mandate to provide analysis of potential impacts of trends and change on defense and defense related issues, has designed a prototype model of recruitment and attrition of the Canadian Forces (C F...

  3. Canadian shellfish sanitation program: manual of operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1992-01-01

    This manual outlines the authorities (acts and regulations), policies and procedures which apply to the Canadian program and which will be used to evaluate regional activities associated with the shellfish Sanitation Program...

  4. Canadian Business Schools: Going out of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobni, Dawn; Dobni, Brooke

    1996-01-01

    Using Porter's five-forces model (potential entrants, suppliers, buyers, rivalry, substitutes) to analyze competition in Canadian university business schools, the authors conclude that schools are becoming increasingly vulnerable to competitive pressures and that strategic reorientation is necessary. (SK)

  5. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Ketovuori, Mikko Mr.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about a multidisciplinary R&D project in which a Canadian Learning Through The Arts (LTTA) program was imported to Finland in 2003–2004. Cultural differences in arts education in Finland and Canada are discussed. While Finland has a national school curriculum with all the arts included. Canada relies more on partnerships to ensure arts education for children in the schools. Despite the fact that Canadian learning methods appeared to be quite similar to the ones Finnish teacher...

  6. Canadian Multiculturalism, Same as it ever Was?

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen Hoyos

    2014-01-01

    After the Second World War ended, Canada was no longer mainly composed of its two dominant ethnocultural groups, French and English, but rather constituted by polyethnicity; meaning, Canadian culture was made up of many different ethnic groups. Since then, Canada has actively embraced multiculturalism and on 12 July 1988, the House of Commons passed Bill C-93, ‘An Act for the preservation and enhancement of multiculturalism in Canada’. The Canadian multicultural experience has been much portr...

  7. Proceedings of the WIN-Global 2008 conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    WiN-France hosted the 16. WIN-Global conference May 26-30, 2008, in Marseille, France. The conference was attended by over 150 delegates, representing 30 countries. Canadian participants, from many diverse backgrounds, attended the annual conference from AECL, Bruce Power, CNSC, NB Power and OPG. The theme: Maintaining Key Competencies, Arising Key Competencies for Nuclear Energy: A Challenge and Opportunity for Diversity Development, emphasized the challenges ahead in providing a skilled workforce for the nuclear renaissance, as new build projects and a vast number of retirements are expected around the world within the next 5 years. The conference addressed such questions as 'How will nuclear, attract, develop and retain staff?' A technical tour of Marcoule invited conference attendees to visit one of: Atalante, a high level nuclear chemistry laboratory; Phenix, a fast breeding research reactor; or AVM, a vitrification plant. A subsequent technical tour visited Cadarache providing the opportunity to view ITER, the international fusion research project.

  8. Phenylketonuria Scientific Review Conference : State of the science and future research needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, Kathryn M.; Parisi, Melissa A.; Acosta, Phyllis B.; Berry, Gerard. T.; Bilder, Deborah A.; Blau, Nenad; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Brosco, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Christine S.; Burlina, Alberto B.; Burton, Barbara K.; Chang, Christine S.; Coates, Paul M.; Cunningham, Amy C.; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Ferguson, John H.; Franklin, Thomas D.; Frazier, Dianne M.; Grange, Dorothy K.; Greene, Carol L.; Groft, Stephen C.; Harding, Cary O.; Howell, R. Rodney; Huntington, Kathleen L.; Hyatt-Knorr, Henrietta D.; Jevaji, Indira P.; Levy, Harvey L.; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A.; Matalon, Kimberlee; MacDonald, Anita; McPheeters, Melissa L.; Mitchell, John J.; Mofidi, Shideh; Moseley, Kathryn D.; Mueller, Christine M.; Mulberg, Andrew E.; Nerurkar, Lata S.; Ogata, Beth N.; Pariser, Anne R.; Prasad, Suyash; Pridjian, Gabriella; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Reddy, Uma M.; Rohr, Frances J.; Singh, Rani H.; Sirrs, Sandra M.; Stremer, Stephanie E.; Tagle, Danilo A.; Thompson, Susan M.; Urv, Tiina K.; Utz, Jeanine R.; van Spronsen, Francjan; Vockley, Jerry; Waisbren, Susan E.; Weglicki, Linda S.; White, Desiree A.; Whitley, Chester B.; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Yannicelli, Steven; Young, Justin M.

    New developments in the treatment and management of phenylketonuria (PKU) as well as advances in molecular testing have emerged since the National Institutes of Health 2000 PKU Consensus Statement was released. An NIH State-of-the-Science Conference was convened in 2012 to address new findings,

  9. Management of young femoral neck fractures: is there a consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobogean, G P; Sprague, S A; Scott, T; McKee, M; Bhandari, M

    2015-03-01

    Femoral neck fractures in young adults (ages fracture healing complications such as avascular necrosis, nonunion, and significant shortening. Historically, evidence from small trials has suggested multiple cannulated screws were the optimal implant; however, newer studies and implant designs warrant reevaluation of screws as the gold standard among surgeons. In addition, controversies surrounding reduction technique and urgency of surgical fixation have been previously identified. We aimed to survey surgeon treatment preferences for these challenging fractures. A 17-item survey was developed and tested for validity and reliability prior to administration. The questionnaire characterised surgeon demographics, treatment preferences for displaced and undisplaced fractures, and controversies for future clinical trials. The target population consisted of surgeons from the Canadian Orthopaedic Association, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, and attendees at an international fracture course. 540 surgeons completed the survey, exceeding our sample size requirement. There was a similar proportion of respondents from academic and community hospitals. Most surgeons (61%) treat 1-5 young adult femoral neck fractures per year. For undisplaced fractures, 78% of respondents prefer to use multiple cannulated screws. For displaced fractures, equal preference for multiple screws (46%) and the sliding hip screw (SHS, 49%) was reported. The majority of surgeons perform an open reduction in less than 25% of cases, and the time to fixation was typically between 8 and 24h. Multiple cannulated screws remain the preferred treatment for most surgeons treating undisplaced fractures; however, there is an equal divide in preference between multiple screws and the SHS for displaced fractures. This increased preference for the SHS contradicts previous survey and small trial data recommending multiple screws for all fracture patterns. The lack of surgeon consensus and the high rates of fracture

  10. Beyond the Consensus View: Whole Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allchin, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The "consensus view" on the nature of science (NOS) is now outmoded. To help frame an enduring alternative, one should attend first to the "why" of NOS education. Functional, or civic, scientific literacy is foundational. Acknowledging a need for consumers and citizens to assess the reliability of scientific claims in personal…

  11. Self-Directed Learning: Consensus & Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Huey B.; And Others

    The following papers are presented in this book: "Self-Directed Learning: Consensus and Conflict" (Long); "Challenges in the Study and Practice of Self-Directed Learning" (Long); "A Conceptual Model of Autodidactism" (Tremblay, Theil); "Functional and Dysfunctional Uses of Self-Directedness in Adult…

  12. Vehicular Platooning: Multi-Layer Consensus Seeking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusco, M.; Semsar Kazerooni, E.; Ploeg, J.; Wouw, N. van de

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel Multi-Layer Consensus Seeking (MLCS) framework is proposed, focusing on the vehicular platooning problem. The vehicles are described by linear heterogeneous dynamics. For example, we consider thirdorder systems, however the algorithms discussed are suitable for any

  13. Consumer and professional standards: working towards consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, C.

    2000-01-01

    Standards of treatment and care should be acceptable to healthcare consumers as well as to healthcare professionals. A simple categorisation of standards according to their acceptability to consumers is outlined. Professional/consumer groups which review and set standards are discussed, with emphasis on the principles of partnership. Working together towards consensus can be difficult but is now an important way forward.

  14. Overlapping community detection using weighted consensus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Most of them are unstable and behave non-deterministically. In this paper, we use weighted consensus clustering for combining multiple base covers obtained by classic non-deterministic algorithms to improve the quality of the results. We first evaluate a reliability measure for each community in all base covers and assign ...

  15. Teacher Effectiveness in Physical Education--Consensus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This article synthesizes the series of manuscripts on teacher effectiveness in physical education recently published by the "Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport" and highlights both the consensus and points of disagreement. Although there is much agreement as to the mission to develop a physically active lifestyle, there is a great…

  16. Consensus over peri-implantaire infecties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Winkelhoff, A J

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, in a workshop of the European Federation on Periodontology, a consensus was reached concerning oral peri-implant infections on the basis of the state of the art in the relevant sciences. Important conclusions were that peri-implant mucositis occurs in 80% of subjects with oral implants, and

  17. neonatal academic hospitals' consensus guidelines for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this document is to address the current lack of consensus regarding the management of hyperbilirubinaemia in neonates in South Africa. If left untreated, severe neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia may cause kernicterus and ultimately death and the severity of neonatal jaundice is often underestimated clinically.

  18. Consensus and Cognitivism in Habermas's Discourse | Moellendorf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Habermas asserts that his discourse ethics rests on two main commitments: 1) Moral judgements have cognitive content analogous to truth value; and 2) moral justification requires real- life discourse. Habermas elaborates on the second claim by making actual consensus a necessary condition of normative validity. I argue ...

  19. Surface mold brachytherapy for nonmelanoma skin cancer: Canadian patterns of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jim N; McLaughlin, Pierre-Yves; Hanna, Timothy P; D'Souza, David; Sur, Ranjan; Falkson, Conrad B

    2014-01-01

    We sought to describe the use of surface mold brachytherapy (SMBT) for nonmelanoma skin cancer in Canada. A list of Canadian Association of Radiation Oncologists membership and provincial registries were used for a preliminary survey to identify radiation oncologists and physicists involved in the practice of SMBT. A detailed survey was sent electronically to individuals involved in treating with SMBT. Of 41 centers in Canada, 39 responded, with 7 centers indicating use of SMBT. Seven radiation oncologists and 5 physicists from 6 of 7 treating centers responded to the detailed survey, with an overall 75% individual response rate (12/16). General agreement was found regarding indications for SMBT which included irregular or curved surfaces, avoidance of deep structures, and requirement for small fields. There was consensus regarding some contraindications for SMBT such as tumor depth and size. Hypofractionated schedules were used in 5 of 6 centers and doses ranged from 50 Gy in 5 fractions once per week to 30 Gy in 10 fractions twice a day over 5 days. The most common dosimetric parameters for plan evaluation included D90, D95, D100, and maximum skin dose. A minority of Canadian centers practice SMBT. In centers practicing SMBT, general agreement exists on general indications for its use. Given the wide variation in dose and fractionation used and the rarity of the indication a phase 2 Canadian protocol would be invaluable.

  20. Proceeding of the public safety around dams conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The Canadian Dam Association hosted the Public Safety Around Dams workshop in which presentations were given in the morning to describe the different measures and methods implemented by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Ontario Power Generation and others to improve safety around dams. In the afternoon, the participants toured the Auburn and Lakefield dams and facilities to view the infrastructures and equipment. A roundtable discussion concluded the day. Following this workshop, a Public Safety Around Dams group was created on the social network site, LinkedIn. This conference featured 6 presentations, 3 of which have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database.

  1. Management of chronic urticaria in Asia: 2010 AADV consensus guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This guideline is a result of a consensus reached during the 19th Asian-Australasian Regional Conference of Dermatology by the Asian Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Study Group in collaboration with the League of Asian Dermatological Societies in 2010. Urticaria has a profound impact on the quality of life in Asia and the need for effective treatment is required. In line with the EAACI/GA2LEN/EDF/WAO guideline for the management of urticaria the recommended first-line treatment is new generation, non-sedating H1-antihistamines. If standard dosing is ineffective, increasing the dosage up to four-fold is recommended. For patients who do not respond to a four-fold increase in dosage of non-sedating H1-antihistamines, it is recommended that therapies such as H2-antihistamine, leukotriene antagonist, and cyclosporine A should be added to the antihistamine treatment. In the choice of second-line treatment, both their costs and risk/benefit profiles are the most important considerations. PMID:22701866

  2. Violence on canadian television networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Guy

    2004-02-01

    Over the past twenty years, the question of the effects of violence on television has figured prominently in public opinion and hundreds of studies have been devoted to this subject. Many researchers have determined that violence has a negative impact on behavior. The public, broadcasters and political figures all support the idea of reducing the total amount of violence on television - in particular in shows for children. A thousand programs aired between 1993 and 2001 on major non-specialty television networks in Canada were analyzed: TVA, TQS, as well as CTV and Global, private French and English networks, as well as the English CBC Radio and French Radio-Canada for the public networks. The methodology consists of a classic analysis of content where an act of violence constitutes a unit of analysis. The data collected revealed that the amount of violence has increased regularly since 1993 despite the stated willingness on the part of broadcasters to produce programs with less violence. The total number of violent acts, as well as the number of violent acts per hour, is increasing. Private networks deliver three times more violence than public networks. Researchers have also noted that a high proportion of violence occurs in programs airing before 21:00 hours, thereby exposing a large number of children to this violence. Psychological violence is taking on a more significant role in Canadian Television.

  3. The Canadian mobile satellite program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, P. M.; Breithaupt, R. W.; McNally, J. L.

    The progressions and selection of design features for the Canadian segment of a mobile satellite (MSAT) communications system are traced. The feasibility study for a satellite-based public and government mobile communications service to underserved areas was carried out between 1980-82. The results covered the market demand, commercial viability, user cost-benefit, and spacecraft concepts. A subsequent 2 yr study was initiated to proceed with project definition. A market of 1.1 million users was identified in all of Canada, with MSAT replacing other systems for 50 percent of the market. Operations would be in the 806-890 MHz range. Traffic will be routed through gateway links functioning in the 8/7 GHz SHF band while the mobile units will be connected through an 821-825 MHz up link and an 866-870 MH downlink. New technologies will be needed for a central control station, the gateway stations, and the base stations for the mobile radio service, the mobile user terminals, and data collection platforms.

  4. Medical cannabis - the Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gordon D; Bober, Sara L; Mindra, Sean; Moreau, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been widely used as a medicinal agent in Eastern medicine with earliest evidence in ancient Chinese practice dating back to 2700 BC. Over time, the use of medical cannabis has been increasingly adopted by Western medicine and is thus a rapidly emerging field that all pain physicians need to be aware of. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a significant and dose-dependent relationship between neuropathic pain relief and tetrahydrocannabinol - the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. Despite this, barriers exist to use from both the patient perspective (cost, addiction, social stigma, lack of understanding regarding safe administration) and the physician perspective (credibility, criminality, clinical evidence, patient addiction, and policy from the governing medical colleges). This review addresses these barriers and draws attention to key concerns in the Canadian medical system, providing updated treatment approaches to help clinicians work with their patients in achieving adequate pain control, reduced narcotic medication use, and enhanced quality of life. This review also includes case studies demonstrating the use of medical marijuana by patients with neuropathic low-back pain, neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. While significant preclinical data have demonstrated the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating pain in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, and cancer, further studies are needed with randomized controlled trials and larger study populations to identify the specific strains and concentrations that will work best with selected cohorts.

  5. Position paper by Canadian dental sleep medicine professionals regarding the role of different health care professionals in managing obstructive sleep apnea and snoring with oral appliances

    OpenAIRE

    Gauthier, Luc; Almeida, Fernanda; Arcache, Patrick; Ashton-McGregor, Catherine; Côté, David; Driver, Helen; Ferguson, Kathleen; Lavigne, Gilles; Martin, Philippe; Masse, Jean-François; Morisson, Florence; Pancer, Jeffrey; Samuels, Charles; Schachter, Maurice; Sériès, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The present Canadian position paper contains recommendations for the management by dentists of sleep-disordered breathing in adults with the use of oral appliances (OAs) as a treatment option for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The recommendations are based on literature reviews and expert panel consensus. OAs offer an effective, first-line treatment option for patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer an OA to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, or for severe O...

  6. Consensus Communication on Early Peanut Introduction and Prevention of Peanut Allergy in High-Risk Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, David M; Sicherer, Scott; Greenhawt, Matthew; Campbell, Dianne; Chan, Edmond; Muraro, Antonella; Halken, Susanne; Katz, Yitzhak; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Eichenfield, Lawrence; Sampson, Hugh; Lack, Gideon; Du Toit, George; Roberts, Graham; Bahnson, Henry; Feeney, Mary; Hourihane, Jonathan; Spergel, Jonathan; Young, Michael; As'aad, Amal; Allen, Katrina; Prescott, Susan; Kapur, Sandeep; Saito, Hirohisa; Agache, Ioana; Akdis, Cezmi A; Arshad, Hasan; Beyer, Kirsten; Dubois, Anthony; Eigenmann, Philippe; Fernandez-Rivas, Monserrat; Grimshaw, Kate; Hoffman-Sommergruber, Karin; Host, Arne; Lau, Susanne; O'Mahony, Liam; Mills, Clare; Papadopoulos, Nikolaus; Venter, Carina; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Kessel, Aaron; Antaya, Richard; Drolet, Beth; Rosenwasser, Lanny

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this brief communication is to highlight emerging evidence regarding potential benefits of supporting early rather than delayed peanut introduction during the period of complementary food introduction in infants. This document should be considered as interim guidance based on consensus among the following organizations: American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Israel Association of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Japanese Society for Allergology, Society for Pediatric Dermatology, and World Allergy Organization. More formal guidelines regarding early-life, complementary feeding practices and the risk of allergy development will follow in the next year from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-sponsored Working Group and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. © 2015 the Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Women in HIV conference research: trends and content analysis of abstracts presented at 17 HIV/AIDS conferences from 2003 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunny, Carole; Shearer, Brenna D; Cruikshank, James; Thomas, Kim; Smith, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS conferences provide an opportunity to review current research from around the world. Conferences are a good gauge of the amount of research conducted on HIV/AIDS and women because papers are disseminated widely and publicly, and can represent published or unpublished material. The objective of this study was to conduct content analysis and data coding to quantify trends in women-specific research in HIV/AIDS abstracts at the International AIDS Conferences (AIDS), the Canadian Association for HIV Research (CAHR) Conferences, and the Conferences on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) over a 7-year time period. Abstracts titles and text containing female keywords were retrieved from the AIDS, CAHR, and CROI conferences between 2003 and 2009 and coded according to research category using content analysis. Over 34,000 abstracts were searched. A total of 5,221 abstracts related to women (13.7%) were found over 7 years. Women-specific abstracts represented 16.2% (n = 4,245/26,175) at AIDS, 13.7% (n = 257/1,876) at CAHR, and 11.1% (n = 719/6,370) at CROI. The AIDS and CAHR conferences demonstrated a slightly increasing trend in women-specific abstracts over 7 years. In categorical coding, the most prevalent research category was reproductive health, and the most infrequent was policy and program evaluation. The AIDS conferences showed an increase in women-specific abstracts over time, probably owing to a gender policy implemented in 2008 and a women's research award. The CAHR conference instituted a gender policy in 2011, and the CROI conference should follow suit. Conference abstracts should include breakdown and analysis by gender. Copyright © 2011 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Theorizing Gender in Contemporary Canadian Citizenship: Lessons Learned from the CBC's "Greatest Canadian" Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubas, Kaela

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I have used the 2004 Greatest Canadian contest as an example of media's educational function. Contrary to mainstream discourse of gender-neutral citizenship, this contest reiterates a notion of Canadian citizenship as masculinized, classed, and raced. Gramsci's concepts of "hegemony," "ideology", and…

  9. Quality metrics in neonatal and pediatric critical care transport: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Michael T; Schwartz, Hamilton P

    2013-06-01

    The transport of neonatal and pediatric patients to tertiary care medical centers for specialized care demands monitoring the quality of care delivered during transport and its impact on patient outcomes. Accurate assessment of quality indicators and patient outcomes requires the use of a standard language permitting comparisons among transport programs. No consensus exists on a set of quality metrics for benchmarking transport teams. The aim of this project was to achieve consensus on appropriate neonatal and pediatric transport quality metrics. Candidate quality metrics were identified through literature review and those metrics currently tracked by each program. Consensus was governed by nominal group technique. Metrics were categorized in two dimensions: Institute of Medicine quality domains and Donabedian's structure/process/outcome framework. Two-day Ohio statewide quality metrics conference. Nineteen transport leaders and staff representing six statewide neonatal/pediatric specialty programs convened to achieve consensus. Two hundred fifty-seven performance metrics relevant to neonatal/pediatric transport were identified. Eliminating duplicate and overlapping metrics resulted in 70 candidate metrics. Nominal group methodology yielded 23 final quality metrics, the largest portion representing Donabedian's outcome category (n = 12, 52%) and the Institute of Medicine quality domains of effectiveness (n = 7, 30%) and safety (n = 9, 39%). Sample final metrics include measurement of family presence, pain management, intubation success, neonatal temperature control, use of lights and sirens, and medication errors. Lastly, a definition for each metric was established and agreed upon for consistency among institutions. This project demonstrates that quality metrics can be achieved through consensus building and provides the foundation for benchmarking among neonatal and pediatric transport programs and quality improvement projects.

  10. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  11. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  12. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    little support amongst serious students of learning. The professional conference as a forum for knowledge sharing is in dire need of a new learning theory and a more enlightened practice. The notion of human flourishing is offered as basis for theory, and four simple design principles for the so-called......The typical one-day conference attended by managers or professionals in search of inspiration is packed with PowerPoint presentations and offers little opportunity for involvement or knowledge sharing. Behind the conventional conference format lurks the transfer model of learning, which finds...... “learning conference” are proposed: People go to conferences to 1. get concise input, 2. interpret it in the light of their ongoing concerns, 3. talk about their current projects and 4. meet the other attendees and be inspired by them. Six practical techniques that induce attendees to do these things...

  13. Photos of the conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Åhman

    1984-05-01

    Full Text Available Birgitta  Åhman is the photographer of the series of pictures from the conference, also for the cover photo of the full paper edition showing Kongsvold Mountain Hut and Biological Station.

  14. Ranking Operations Management conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences

  15. 2nd SUMO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the conference proceedings of the Simulation of Urban Mobility (SUMO) conference 2014, Berlin. The included research papers cover a wide range of topics in traffic planning and simulation, including open data, vehicular communication, e-mobility, urban mobility, multimodal traffic as well as usage approaches. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.  

  16. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  17. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  18. Defensive medicine in neurosurgery: the Canadian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy R; Hulou, M Maher; Yan, Sandra C; Cote, David J; Nahed, Brian V; Babu, Maya A; Das, Sunit; Gormley, William B; Rutka, James T; Laws, Edward R; Heary, Robert F

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Recent studies have examined the impact of perceived medicolegal risk and compared how this perception impacts defensive practices within the US. To date, there have been no published data on the practice of defensive medicine among neurosurgeons in Canada. METHODS An online survey containing 44 questions was sent to 170 Canadian neurosurgeons and used to measure Canadian neurosurgeons' perception of liability risk and their practice of defensive medicine. The survey included questions on the following domains: surgeon demographics, patient characteristics, type of physician practice, surgeon liability profile, policy coverage, defensive behaviors, and perception of the liability environment. Survey responses were analyzed and summarized using counts and percentages. RESULTS A total of 75 neurosurgeons completed the survey, achieving an overall response rate of 44.1%. Over one-third (36.5%) of Canadian neurosurgeons paid less than $5000 for insurance annually. The majority (87%) of Canadian neurosurgeons felt confident with their insurance coverage, and 60% reported that they rarely felt the need to practice defensive medicine. The majority of the respondents reported that the perceived medicolegal risk environment has no bearing on their preferred practice location. Only 1 in 5 respondent Canadian neurosurgeons (21.8%) reported viewing patients as a potential lawsuit. Only 4.9% of respondents would have selected a different career based on current medicolegal risk factors, and only 4.1% view the cost of annual malpractice insurance as a major burden. CONCLUSIONS Canadian neurosurgeons perceive their medicolegal risk environment as more favorable and their patients as less likely to sue than their counterparts in the US do. Overall, Canadian neurosurgeons engage in fewer defensive medical behaviors than previously reported in the US.

  19. Distributed Parametric Consensus Optimization With an Application to Model Predictive Consensus Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinli; Cao, Jinde; Huang, Wei

    2017-07-25

    In this paper, we study a special class of distributed convex optimization problems--distributed parametric consensus optimization problem (DPCOP), for which a two-stage optimization method including primal decomposition and distributed consensus is provided. Different from traditional distributed optimization problems driving all the local states to a common value, DPCOP aims to solve a system-wide problem with partial common parameters shared amongst local agents in a distributed way. To relax the restriction on the topology, a distributed projected subgradient method is applied in distributed consensus stage to achieve the consensus of local estimated parameters, while the subgradients can be obtained by solving a multiparametric problem locally. For a special class of DPCOPs, a discrete-time distributed algorithm with exponential rate of convergence is provided. Furthermore, the proposed two-stage optimization method is applied to a distributed model predictive consensus problem in order to reach an optimal output consensus at equilibrium points for all agents. The stability analysis for the proposed algorithm is further given. Two case studies on a heterogenous multiagent system with high-order integrator dynamics are provided to verify the effectiveness of proposed methods.

  20. Building a framework for global health learning: an analysis of global health concentrations in Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Rita; Matthews, David; Bach, Paxton; Kherani, Irfan; Halpine, Mary; Meili, Ryan

    2015-04-01

    This study set out to explore the current state of global health concentrations in Canadian medical schools and to solicit feedback on the barriers and challenges to implementing rigorous global health concentration programs. A set of consensus guidelines for global health concentrations was drafted through consultation with student and faculty leaders across Canada between May 2011 and May 2012. Drawing on these guidelines, a formal survey was sent to prominent faculty at each of the 14 English-speaking Canadian medical schools. A thematic analysis of the results was then conducted. Overall, the guidelines were strongly endorsed. A majority of Canadian medical schools have programs in place to offer global health course work, extracurricular learning opportunities, local community service-learning, low-resource-setting clinical electives, predeparture training, and postreturn debriefing. Although student evaluation, global health mentorship, and knowledge translation projects were endorsed as important components, few schools had been successful in implementing them. Language training for global health remains contested. Other common critiques included a lack of time and resources, and difficulties in setting standards for student evaluation. The results suggest that these guidelines are appropriate and, at least for the major criteria, achievable. Although many Canadian schools offer individual components, the majority of schools have yet to develop formally structured concentration programs. By better articulating guidelines, a standardized framework can aid in the establishment and refinement of future programs.

  1. International Multispecialty Consensus on How to Evaluate Ultrasound Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G.; Todsen, Tobias; Sorensen, Jette L.

    2013-01-01

    To achieve international consensus across multiple specialties on a generic ultrasound rating scale using a Delphi technique.......To achieve international consensus across multiple specialties on a generic ultrasound rating scale using a Delphi technique....

  2. Consensus Through Conversation How to Achieve High-Commitment Decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Dressler, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Facilitation expert Larry Dressler's Consensus Through Conversation is a guide for the effective facilitation and practice of one of business's most popular - but most widely misunderstood - decision-making models: consensus.

  3. A survey of medical ethics education at U.S. and Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Kasoff, Willard S; Koch, Phoebe; Federman, Daniel D

    2004-07-01

    To assess the format, content, method, and placement of medical ethics education in medical schools; the faculty and curricular resources and institutional structure and support of medical ethics; and the perceptions of ethics education among deans of medical education and medical ethics course directors at U.S. and Canadian medical schools. Two questionnaires were mailed to 125 U.S. medical schools and 16 Canadian schools: one to be completed by the deans of medical education and one to be completed by the medical ethics course director. Descriptive statistics were used to compare responses. In all, 123 (87%) deans and 91 (64%) course directors responded, providing information about 91 schools (six Canadian). All responding institutions offered some formal instruction in medical ethics, and among these, 71 (78%) incorporated ethics into required preclinical courses. The primary pedagogic course structure was small-group discussion and the primary pedagogic method was case discussions. One-fifth of schools provided no funding for ethics teaching, and 47 (52%) did not fund curricular development in ethics. Institutions with a dedicated ethics faculty member were twice as likely to have a mandatory introductory ethics course (64% versus 32%, p ethics education were thought to be a lack of time in the curriculum, a lack of qualified teachers, and a lack of time in faculty schedules. Within a few decades the number of U.S. and Canadian medical schools requiring medical ethics has increased. Nevertheless, significant variation in the content, method, and timing of ethics education suggests consensus about curricular content and pedagogic methods remains lacking. Further progress in ethics education may depend on institutions' willingness to devote more curricular time and funding to medical ethics.

  4. Ethics Guide Recommendations for Organ-Donation-Focused Physicians: Endorsed by the Canadian Medical Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemie, Sam D; Simpson, Christy; Blackmer, Jeff; MacDonald, Shavaun; Dhanani, Sonny; Torrance, Sylvia; Byrne, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Donation physicians are specialists with expertise in organ and tissue donation and have been recognized internationally as a key contributor to improving organ and tissue donation services. Subsequent to a 2011 Canadian Critical Care Society-Canadian Blood Services consultation, the donation physician role has been gradually implemented in Canada. These professionals are generally intensive care unit physicians with an enhanced focus and expertise in organ/tissue donation. They must manage the dual obligation of caring for dying patients and their families while providing and/or improving organ donation services. In anticipation of actual, potential or perceived ethical challenges with the role, Canadian Blood Services in partnership with the Canadian Medical Association organized the development of an evidence-informed consensus process of donation experts and bioethicists to produce an ethics guide. This guide includes overarching principles and benefits of the DP role, and recommendations in regard to communication with families, role disclosure, consent discussions, interprofessional conflicts, conscientious objection, death determination, donation specific clinical practices in neurological determination of death and donation after circulatory death, end-of-life care, performance metrics, resources and remuneration. Although this report is intended to inform donation physician practices, it is recognized that the recommendations may have applicability to other professionals (eg, physicians in intensive care, emergency medicine, neurology, neurosurgery, pulmonology) who may also participate in the end-of-life care of potential donors in various clinical settings. It is hoped that this guidance will assist practitioners and their sponsoring organizations in preserving their duty of care, protecting the interests of dying patients, and fulfilling best practices for organ and tissue donation.

  5. Portrayal of youth suicide in canadian news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easson, Amanda; Agarwal, Arnav; Duda, Stephanie; Bennett, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Responsible media reporting of youth suicide may reduce the risk of contagion and increase help-seeking behaviour. Accordingly, we conducted a content analysis of Canadian youth suicide newspaper articles to assess quality and summarize content (themes, age groups, populations and use of scientific evidence). The Canadian Periodical Index Quarterly (CPI.Q) was searched (2008-2012) for full-text Canadian newspaper articles using the keywords "youth" and "suicide." The top five most relevant articles as judged by CPI.Q were selected sequentially for each year (n=25). Quality was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for responsible media reporting. Content analysis was completed in duplicate by two reviewers. All articles addressed youth suicide generally rather than reporting exclusively on a specific death by suicide. Alignment of articles with individual WHO guideline items ranged from 16 to 60%. The most common content theme was prevention (80%). No article was judged to glamorize suicide. Help seeking was addressed in 52% of articles, but only 20% provided information on where to obtain help. Statistics were referenced more frequently than scientific research (76% vs. 28%). Our review suggests that Canadian media presents youth suicide as an issue for which hope and help exist. While the majority of reports aim to educate the public about suicide, increased use of scientific evidence about risk factors and prevention is recommended to facilitate the translation of rigorous scientific knowledge into improved mental health and reduced suicide risk among Canadian youth.

  6. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more...... for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based...

  7. [Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease, 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Gontijo, Eliane Dias; Luquetti, Alejandro; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Coura, José Rodrigues; Torres, Rosália Morais; Melo, José Renan da Cunha; Almeida, Eros Antonio de; Oliveira, Wilson de; Silveira, Antônio Carlos; Rezende, Joffre Marcondes de; Pinto, Fabiane Scalabrini; Ferreira, Antonio Walter; Rassi, Anis; Fragata, Abílio Augusto; Sousa, Andréa Silvestre de; Correia, Dalmo; Jansen, Ana Maria; Andrade, Glaucia Manzan Queiroz; Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli de Carvalho; Pinto, Ana Yecê das Neves; Rassi, Anis; Campos, Dayse Elisabeth; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Santos, Silvana Eloi; Chiari, Egler; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Moreira, Eliane Furtado; Marques, Divina Seila de Oliveira; Silva, Eliane Lages; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Valente, Sebastião Aldo da Silva; Carvalho, Noêmia Barbosa; Cardoso, Alessandra Viana; Silva, Rafaella Albuquerque E; Costa, Veruska Maia da; Vivaldini, Simone Monzani; Oliveira, Suelene Mamede; Valente, Vera da Costa; Lima, Mayara Maia; Alves, Renato Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected chronic condition that presents high morbidity and mortality burden, with considerable psychological, social, and economic impact. The disease represents a significant public health issue in Brazil, with different regional patterns. This document presents the evidence that resulted in the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease. The objective was to review and standardize strategies for diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control of Chagas disease in the country, based on the available scientific evidence. The consensus is based on collaboration and contribution of renowned Brazilian experts with vast knowledge and experience on various aspects of the disease. It is the result of close collaboration between the Brazilian Society of Tropical Medicine and the Ministry of Health. This document shall strengthen the development of integrated control measures against Chagas disease in the country, focusing on epidemiology, management, comprehensive care (including families and communities), communication, information, education, and research.

  8. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, F; Ahlberg, J; Glaros, A G; Kato, T; Koyano, K; Lavigne, G J; de Leeuw, R; Manfredini, D; Svensson, P; Winocur, E

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined bruxism as a repetitive jaw-muscle activity characterised by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible. Bruxism has two distinct circadian manifestations: it can occur during sleep (indicated as sleep bruxism) or during wakefulness (indicated as awake bruxism). For the operationalisation of this definition, the expert group proposes a diagnostic grading system of 'possible', 'probable' and 'definite' sleep or awake bruxism. The proposed definition and grading system are suggested for clinical and research purposes in all relevant dental and medical domains. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. The Mexican consensus on irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Sánchez, R; Icaza-Chávez, M E; Bielsa-Fernández, M V; Gómez-Escudero, O; Bosques-Padilla, F; Coss-Adame, E; Esquivel-Ayanegui, F; Flores-Rendón, Á R; González-Martínez, M A; Huerta-Iga, F; López-Colombo, A; Méndez-Gutiérrez, T H; Noble-Lugo, A; Nogueira-de Rojas, J R; Raña-Garibay, R H; Remes-Troche, J M; Roesch-Dietlen, F; Schmulson, M J; Soto-Pérez, J C; Tamayo, J L; Uscanga, L F; Valdovinos, M Á; Valerio-Ureña, J; Zavala-Solares, M R

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication in 2009 of the Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome of the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología (2009 Guidelines), there have been significant advances in our knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this disease. To present a consensus review of the most current knowledge of IBS, updating the 2009 Guidelines by incorporating new internationally published scientific evidence, with a special interest in Mexican studies. The PubMed literature from January 2009 to March 2015 was reviewed and complemented through a manual search. Articles in English and Spanish were included and preference was given to consensuses, guidelines, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Statements referring to the different aspects of the disease were formulated and voted upon by 24 gastroenterologists employing the Delphi method. Once a consensus on each statement was reached, the quality of evidence and strength of recommendation were determined through the GRADE system. Forty-eight statements were formulated, updating the information on IBS and adding the complementary data that did not appear in the 2009 Guidelines regarding the importance of exercise and diet, diagnostic strategies, and current therapy alternatives that were analyzed with more stringent scientific vigor or that emerged within the last 5 years. We present herein a consensus review of the most relevant advances in the study of IBS, updating and complementing the 2009 Guidelines. Several studies conducted in Mexico were included. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. 2014 St. Gallen Consensus on destination management

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhold, Stephan; Laesser, Christian; Beritelli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main insights of the second Biennial Forum on Advances in Destination Management (ADM), held in St. Gallen (Switzerland). Issues in five domains preoccupied the discourse of scholars and practitioners alike: (1) the definition of ‘destination', (2) the purpose and legitimacy of destination management organizations (DMO), (3) governance and leadership in destination networks, (4) destination branding, and (5) sustainability. For each domain, this consensus offers a pu...

  11. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  12. International Consensus Statement on the Clinical and Therapeutic Management of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Valerio; Carbonelli, Michele; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Kawasaki, Aki; Klopstock, Thomas; Lagrèze, Wolf A; La Morgia, Chiara; Newman, Nancy J; Orssaud, Christophe; Pott, Jan Willem R; Sadun, Alfredo A; van Everdingen, Judith; Vignal-Clermont, Catherine; Votruba, Marcela; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Barboni, Piero

    2017-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is currently estimated as the most frequent mitochondrial disease (1 in 27,000-45,000). Its molecular pathogenesis and natural history is now fairly well understood. LHON also is the first mitochondrial disease for which a treatment has been approved (idebenone-Raxone, Santhera Pharmaceuticals) by the European Medicine Agency, under exceptional circumstances because of the rarity and severity of the disease. However, what remains unclear includes the optimal target population, timing, dose, and frequency of administration of idebenone in LHON due to lack of accepted definitions, criteria, and general guidelines for the clinical management of LHON. To address these issues, a consensus conference with a panel of experts from Europe and North America was held in Milan, Italy, in 2016. The intent was to provide expert consensus statements for the clinical and therapeutic management of LHON based on the currently available evidence. We report the conclusions of this conference, providing the guidelines for clinical and therapeutic management of LHON.

  13. [National consensus on the modified Atkins diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarezza, María; Agustinho, Ariela; Alberti, M Julia; Argumedo, Laura; Armeno, Marisa; Blanco, Virginia; Bouquet, Cecilia; Cabrera, Analía; Caraballo, Roberto; Caramuta, Luciana; Cresta, Araceli; de Grandis, Elizabeth S; DeMartini, Martha G; Diez, Cecilia; Diz, Mariana; Dlugoszewski, Corina; Escobal, Nidia; Ferrero, Hilario; Galicchio, Santiago; Gambarini, Victoria; Gamboni, Beatriz; Gonzalez, Lara; Guisande, Silvina; Hassan, Amal; Matarrese, Pablo; Mestre, Graciela; Pesce, Laura; Rios, Viviana; Semprino, Marcos; Sosa, Patricia; Toma, Marisol; Viollaz, Rocío; Panico, Luis

    2016-04-16

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease that affects 0.5-1% of the population. One third of the patients become refractory to antiepileptic drugs. Among the non-pharmacological treatments available, the modified Atkins diet is an effective treatment used since 2003 as another alternative for children and adults with refractory epilepsy. The Ketogenic Diet National Committee, which depends on the Argentine Society of Pediatric Neurology, elaborated this consensus on the modified Atkins diet, basing itself on a review of the literature and on their clinical experience. This consensus in Spanish explains the different aspects to be taken into account regarding the modified Atkins diet, patient selection, implementation, different controls and adverse effects. Unlike the classic ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet is initiated without fasting or hospital stay, nor does it require protein, calorie or fluid restriction, thus improving patient palatability and consequently patient tolerability. The modified Atkins diet is a useful treatment for patients with intractable epilepsy. The publication of this consensus offers the possibility for new centers to get oriented regarding this diet implementation.

  14. Healthy eating at school: consensus among experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Guimarães Moraes CAMARGO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To identify attributes that promote healthy eating in order to support a study for the Quality Index for School Meal Menus content validity. Methods: This study used the Delphi technique to consult school nutrition experts in Brazil. These experts were selected among the authors of articles published between 2010 and 2015 that were identified by searching the Web of Science database, using the keywords 'school feeding', 'school nutrition program', and 'school food program', as well as the authors of official documents on this topic. The Likert method was used to record respondent perceptions in two analytical dimensions: foods that are part of a healthy menu for school feeding, and composition of an indicator of nutritional quality for school feeding menus. Results: Most respondents (n=27 were affiliated with public institutions (92.59% and had over six years of experience in the area (70.36%. Assertions resulted in consensus according to the analysis criteria. A consensus was established for fresh food, fruits and vegetables, dairy products, beans, meat and eggs, and a schedule compatible with the meal as promoters of healthy eating, and processed foods, sweets, and fat excess as risk attributes. Conclusion: Since a consensus was not reached in the first round, there is a need to broaden the debate on issues related to foods rich in sugar, replacement of meals by sweets, and foods rich in fat.

  15. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  16. Cognitive aspects of sexual functioning: differences between East Asian-Canadian and Euro-Canadian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Heather; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sexual beliefs of female undergraduates, as well as the thoughts they experience during sexual experiences. The study aimed to determine potential differences in these variables between East Asian-Canadians and Euro-Canadians, as well as the influence of acculturation on these variables. In addition, the relationships between sexual beliefs, automatic thoughts, and specific aspects of sexual functioning were examined. Euro-Canadian (n = 77) and East Asian-Canadian (n = 123) undergraduate women completed the Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire, the Sexual Modes Questionnaire, the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Vancouver Index of Acculturation. East Asian women endorsed almost all sexual beliefs assessed in this study more than did Euro-Canadian women, and endorsement of these beliefs was associated with acculturation. In addition, East Asian-Canadian and Euro-Canadian women differed in the frequency of experiencing negative automatic thoughts. Results also revealed associations between difficulties in sexual functioning, and both sexual beliefs and automatic thoughts. Together, these results provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that differences in cognitive aspects of sexuality may underlie the differences in sexual functioning previously observed between these two groups.

  17. The importance of nature to Canadians: survey highlights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DuWors, E

    1999-01-01

    .... The 1996 Survey on the Importance of Nature to Canadians (the Nature Survey) also tells us that Canadians commit large amounts of their leisure time to activities that depend on natural areas and wildlife...

  18. Primary outcomes for resuscitation science studies: a consensus statement from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lance B; Aufderheide, Tom P; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Callaway, Clifton W; Lazar, Ronald M; Donnino, Michael W; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Abella, Benjamin S; Adrie, Christophe; Berg, Robert A; Merchant, Raina M; O'Connor, Robert E; Meltzer, David O; Holm, Margo B; Longstreth, William T; Halperin, Henry R

    2011-11-08

    The guidelines presented in this consensus statement are intended to serve researchers, clinicians, reviewers, and regulators in the selection of the most appropriate primary outcome for a clinical trial of cardiac arrest therapies. The American Heart Association guidelines for the treatment of cardiac arrest depend on high-quality clinical trials, which depend on the selection of a meaningful primary outcome. Because this selection process has been the subject of much controversy, a consensus conference was convened with national and international experts, the National Institutes of Health, and the US Food and Drug Administration. The Research Working Group of the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee nominated subject leaders, conference attendees, and writing group members on the basis of their expertise in clinical trials and a diverse perspective of cardiovascular and neurological outcomes (see the online-only Data Supplement). Approval was obtained from the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the American Heart Association Manuscript Oversight Committee. Preconference position papers were circulated for review; the conference was held; and postconference consensus documents were circulated for review and comments were invited from experts, conference attendees, and writing group members. Discussions focused on (1) when after cardiac arrest the measurement time point should occur; (2) what cardiovascular, neurological, and other physiology should be assessed; and (3) the costs associated with various end points. The final document underwent extensive revision and peer review by the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee, the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee, and oversight committees. There was consensus that no single primary outcome is appropriate for all studies of cardiac arrest. The best outcome measure is the pairing of a time point and physiological condition that will best

  19. Developing interdisciplinary maternity services policy in Canada. Evaluation of a consensus workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carmel M; Kasperski, Jan

    2010-02-01

    Four maternity/obstetrical care organizations, representing women, midwives, obstetricians and family doctors conducted interdisciplinary policy research under auspices of four key stakeholder groups. These projects teams and key stakeholders subsequently collaborated to develop consensus on strategies for improved maternity services in Ontario. The objective of this study is to evaluate a 2-day research synthesis and consensus building conference to answer policy questions in relation to new models of interdisciplinary maternity care organizations in different settings in Ontario. The evaluation consisted of a scan of individual project activities and findings as were presented to an invited audience of key stakeholders at the consensus conference. This involved: participant observation with key informant consultation; a survey of attendees; pattern processing and sense making of project materials, consensus statements derived at the conference in the light of participant observation and survey material as pertaining to a complex system. The development of a systems framework for maternity care policy in Ontario was based on secondary analysis of the material. Conference participants were united on the importance of investment in maternity care for Ontario and the impending workforce crisis if adaptation of the workforce did not take place. The conference participants proposed reforming the current system that was seen as too rigid and inflexible in relation to the constraints of legislation, provider scope of practice and remuneration issues. However, not one model of interdisciplinary maternity/obstetrical care was endorsed. Consistency and coherence of models (rather than central standardization) through self-organization based on local needs was strongly endorsed. An understanding of primary maternity care models as subsystems of networked providers in complex health organizations and a wider social system emerged. The patterns identified were incorporated

  20. Operationalising emergency care delivery in sub-Saharan Africa: consensus-based recommendations for healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvello, Emilie J B; Tenner, Andrea G; Broccoli, Morgan C; Skog, Alexander P; Muck, Andrew E; Tupesis, Janis P; Brysiewicz, Petra; Teklu, Sisay; Wallis, Lee; Reynolds, Teri

    2016-08-01

    A major barrier to successful integration of acute care into health systems is the lack of consensus on the essential components of emergency care within resource-limited environments. The 2013 African Federation of Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference was convened to address the growing need for practical solutions to further implementation of emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa. Over 40 participants from 15 countries participated in the working group that focused on emergency care delivery at health facilities. Using the well-established approach developed in the WHO's Monitoring Emergency Obstetric Care, the workgroup identified the essential services delivered-signal functions-associated with each emergency care sentinel condition. Levels of emergency care were assigned based on the expected capacity of the facility to perform signal functions, and the necessary human, equipment and infrastructure resources identified. These consensus-based recommendations provide the foundation for objective facility capacity assessment in developing emergency health systems that can bolster strategic planning as well as facilitate monitoring and evaluation of service delivery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/