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  1. Systemic Design: Two Canadian Case Studies

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    Alex Ryan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces two novel applications of systemic design to facilitate a comparison of alternative methodologies that integrate systems thinking and design. In the first case study, systemic design helped the Procurement Department at the University of Toronto re-envision how public policy is implemented and how value is created in the broader university purchasing ecosystem. This resulted in an estimated $1.5 million in savings in the first year, and a rise in user retention rates from 40% to 99%. In the second case study, systemic design helped the clean energy and natural resources group within the Government of Alberta to design a more efficient and effective resource management system and shift the way that natural resource departments work together. This resulted in the formation of a standing systemic design team and contributed to the creation of an integrated resource management system. A comparative analysis of the two projects identifies a shared set of core principles for systemic design as well as areas of differentiation that reveal potential for learning across methodologies. Together, these case studies demonstrate the complementarity of systems thinking and design thinking, and show how they may be integrated to guide positive change within complex sociotechnical systems.

  2. Measuring Holocaust Knowledge and Its Impact: A Canadian Case Study

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    Jedwab, Jack

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the responses of some 1,500 Canadians to a public opinion survey on knowledge of the Holocaust, awareness of genocide, and attitudes towards discrimination and diversity. Based on one of the most detailed surveys conducted to date on Holocaust knowledge, the study found strong correlations between greater reported Holocaust…

  3. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

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    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  4. Transnational archives: the Canadian case

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    Julia Creet

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a brief overview of the concept of the transnational archive as a counterpoint to the idea that a national archive is necessarily a locus of a static idea of nation. The Canadian national archives is used as a case study of an archives that was transnational in its inception, and one that has continued to change in its mandate and materials as a response to patterns in migration and changing notions of multiculturalism as a Canadian federal policy. It introduces the most recent formation of the transnational archive and its denizens: the genealogical archive inhabited by family historians.

  5. Critical challenges in ERP implementation: A qualitative case study in the Canadian oil and gas industry

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    Menon, Sreekumar A.

    This exploratory qualitative single-case study examines critical challenges encountered during ERP implementation based on individual perspectives in four project roles: senior leaders, project managers, project team members, and business users, all specifically in Canadian oil and gas industry. Data was collected by interviewing participants belonging to these categories, and by analyzing project documentation about ERP implementation. The organization for the case study was a leading multinational oil and gas company having a substantial presence in the energy sector in Canada. The study results were aligned with the six management questions regarding critical challenges in ERP: (a) circumstances to implement ERP, (b) benefits and process improvements achieved, (c) best practices implemented, (d) critical challenges encountered, (e) strategies and mitigating actions used, and (f) recommendations to improve future ERP implementations. The study results highlight six key findings. First, the study provided valid circumstances for implementing ERP systems. Second, the study underscored the importance of benefits and process improvements in ERP implementation. Third, the study highlighted that adoption of best practices is crucial for ERP Implementation. Fourth, the study found that critical challenges are encountered in ERP Implementation and are significant during ERP implementation. Fifth, the study found that strategies and mitigating actions can overcome challenges in ERP implementation. Finally, the study provided ten major recommendations on how to improve future ERP implementations.

  6. Internationalization in Canadian Higher Education: A Case Study of the Gap between Official Discourses and On-the-Ground Realities

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    Larsen, Marianne A.

    2015-01-01

    This case study about one university's internationalization initiative, known as North Goes South, provides a nuanced and finely grained understanding of what internationalization looks like in practice. The study was guided by a desire to probe the perceived impact of a Canadian-East African internationalization initiative on students, faculty,…

  7. Achieving Flexible Learning through Recognition of Prior Learning Practice: A Case-Study Lament of the Canadian Academy

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    Conrad, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    Although the recognition of learners' experiential learning toward postsecondary credentials holds the promise of increased flexibility and opportunity for many, especially in the current climate of labour shortage, Canadian universities have been slow to adopt recognition of prior learning (RPL) systems. This case study of one Canadian…

  8. Towards a structured approach to Strategic Environmental Assessment: A case study of Canadian energy policy alternatives

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    Noble, Bram F.

    Considerable attention has been given to the role of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) in policy, plan and program (PPP) assessment; however, there is still very little consensus on appropriate methodologies for SEA. Despite calls for SEA to develop more independently of project-level assessment, existing SEA methodologies still tend to be based on project-level EIA principles, rather than also on a trickling down of objectives of broader environmental policy. This thesis argues that if SEA is to advance in application and effectiveness then a different, but structured methodological framework is required. While SEA can perhaps utilize many of the existing methods and techniques from project-level assessment, the types of questions being addressed in strategic assessment are inherently different from those in project-level assessment. Accordingly, a different methodological assessment framework is required for SEA. The emphasis of strategic assessment is on the development of an appropriate strategy for action, addressing alternative courses of action, rather than the assessment of the potential impacts of a pre-determined option. In order to accomplish this, SEA methodology must be more broad brush than project-level assessment in order to allow the assessment of both the more general policy issues and the more technical plan and program issues. Similar to project-level assessment, however, a structured framework is desired in order to facilitate a more systematic and replicable assessment process. This thesis develops a structured, generic seven-phase assessment framework to guide SEA application. The framework is demonstrated through a case study SEA of potential Canadian energy policy alternatives. Through the use of a modified policy-type Delphi and multi-criteria analytical methods, alternative options for Canadian energy policy are evaluated and the 'best practicable environmental option' is determined. While the geographic scale of the case study and

  9. Servant leadership: a case study of a Canadian health care innovator

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    Vanderpyl TH

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tim H VanderpylSchool of Global Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA, USAAbstract: Both servant leadership and innovation are easier to theorize than to actually implement in practice. This article presents a case study of a Canadian health care executive who led a remarkable turnaround of St Michael's Health Centre, a floundering and almost bankrupt nursing home. In less than 7 years, Kevin Cowan turned around the finances and changed numerous broken relationships into strategic alliances. Under his leadership, St Michael's Health Centre went from being one of the most underperforming health care organizations in Canada, to one of the most innovative. This article describes some of Cowan's strategies and argues that a servant leadership approach has a direct impact on an organization's ability to innovate. As far as the author is aware, this is the first published article on this specific change effort, which presents a unique perspective on the topics of servant leadership and innovation.Keywords: servant leadership, innovation, Canada, health care, case study

  10. Dental students' perceptions of and attitudes about poverty: a Canadian participatory case study.

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    Reis, Clarice M R; Rodriguez, Charo; Macaulay, Ann C; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    This qualitative case study was conducted in a Canadian dental school using a participatory approach and was based on Paulo Freire's theoretical concept of conscientização, a form of critical consciousness that involves awareness of social reality and fosters action towards social justice. The aim of the study was to understand dental students' perceptions of and attitudes about poverty and dental care provided to people living in poverty. It also examined how these perceptions shape students' plans for their professional careers, as well as their opinions on educational strategies to prepare them to work with poor patients. The sources of data generation were semistructured interviews, participant observations, and document analysis. A deductive-inductive thematic strategy was used to analyze the data. Out of a class of thirty-five senior dental students, the authors interviewed a convenience sample of twelve: five male and seven female. The findings suggest that the students had incipient conscientização about poverty-related themes. They perceived poverty as a distant issue and as the responsibility of the government or of the poor individuals themselves. The students did not have plans to work with patients living in poverty in the future and struggled to envision ways to address these patients' needs other than volunteer work. This research supports the need for academic dental institutions to adopt strategies to increase students' critical consciousness about oral health inequities. Reducing oral health inequities is a matter of social justice, and dental care providers are key actors in this endeavor.

  11. Comparison of Climate Preferences for Domestic and International Beach Holidays: A Case Study of Canadian Travelers

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    Michelle Rutty

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal tourism is the largest segment of global leisure tourism and it is firmly linked to the destination’s natural resources—with climatic resources chief among them. Through observations and survey responses of beach users, studies have evaluated climatic resources for coastal tourism by quantifying optimal and unacceptable conditions. However, these studies have not taken into consideration that different forms of holidays (e.g., daytrips, short trips, main annual holiday, “once-in-a-lifetime” trip may have varying degrees of resilience to climatic conditions. This is the first study to explore whether ideal and unacceptable climatic conditions vary between domestic and international tourists. Using an in situ survey, Canadian beach users traveling domestically (n = 359 and internationally (n = 120 were examined. Key findings include statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.05 between the two sample groups for every climate variable, with the international sample more resilient to a broader range of weather conditions, including a greater acceptance for warm temperatures, longer rainfall durations, higher wind speeds, and greater cloud cover. This study adds further insight into the complexities of evaluating climate for tourism, with implications for the demand response of tourists to climate change.

  12. Operational value of ensemble streamflow forecasts for hydropower production: A Canadian case study

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    Boucher, Marie-Amélie; Tremblay, Denis; Luc, Perreault; François, Anctil

    2010-05-01

    increased hydropower production. The ensemble precipitation forecasts extend from March 1st of 2002 to December 31st of 2003. They were obtained using two atmospheric models, SEF (8 members plus the control deterministic forecast) and GEM (8 members). The corresponding deterministic precipitation forecast issued by SEF model is also used within HYDROTEL in order to compare ensemble streamflow forecasts with their deterministic counterparts. Although this study does not incorporate all the sources of uncertainty, precipitation is certainly the most important input for hydrological modeling and conveys a great portion of the total uncertainty. References: Fortin, J.P., Moussa, R., Bocquillon, C. and Villeneuve, J.P. 1995: HYDROTEL, un modèle hydrologique distribué pouvant bénéficier des données fournies par la télédétection et les systèmes d'information géographique, Revue des Sciences de l'Eau, 8(1), 94-124. Jaun, S., Ahrens, B., Walser, A., Ewen, T. and Schaer, C. 2008: A probabilistic view on the August 2005 floods in the upper Rhine catchment, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 8 (2), 281-291. Krzysztofowicz, R. 2001: The case for probabilistic forecasting in hydrology, Journal of Hydrology, 249, 2-9. Murphy, A.H. 1994: Assessing the economic value of weather forecasts: An overview of methods, results and issues, Meteorological Applications, 1, 69-73. Mylne, K.R. 2002: Decision-Making from probability forecasts based on forecast value, Meteorological Applications, 9, 307-315. Laio, F. and Tamea, S. 2007: Verification tools for probabilistic forecasts of continuous hydrological variables, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 11, 1267-1277. Roulin, E. 2007: Skill and relative economic value of medium-range hydrological ensemble predictions, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 11, 725-737. Velazquez, J.-A., Petit, T., Lavoie, A., Boucher, M.-A., Turcotte, R., Fortin, V. and Anctil, F. 2009: An evaluation of the Canadian global meteorological ensemble

  13. Using Mobile Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Student Digital Information Literacy Skills: A Canadian Case Study

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    Alice Schmidt Hanbidge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning essential information literacy skills through the use of mobile phones is an innovative mlearning pilot project that was collaboratively undertaken in a Canadian university college over the course of two academic terms by faculty and the library staff. The research pilot project involved ninety one undergraduate students in five different classes majoring in psychology, social work, education or social development studies in an attempt to determine the effectiveness of using mobile technology to enhance students’ information literacy skills and learning experiences. Pre and post-test measures, and survey questionnaires generated quantitative and qualitative data that was analyzed to determine the degree of changes in frequency of mobile device information literacy access and fluency in digital literacy skills. The article highlights the Mobile Information Literacy innovation and includes the development and design of the mobile lessons, interactive exercises, and its applications. The study’s main results and conclusions are also discussed. Additionally, the successes and challenges of the pilot to support anytime, anywhere student mobile information literacy eLearning training that engages mobile learners and enhances their learning experience are identified and critically reflected upon to improve the innovation for stage two of the project.

  14. Comparative Canadian-American Studies.

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    Ezell, Macel D.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines topics for comparative study of Canada and the United States. Includes geography, politics, settlement patterns, economics, education, religion, and sports. Suggests materials to aid teachers in formulating comparative approaches to Canadian and U.S. studies. (DB)

  15. Using Mobile Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Student Digital Information Literacy Skills: A Canadian Case Study

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    Hanbidge, Alice Schmidt; Sanderson, Nicole; Tin, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Learning essential information literacy skills through the use of mobile phones is an innovative m-learning pilot project that was collaboratively undertaken in a Canadian university college over the course of two academic terms by faculty and the library staff. The research pilot project involved ninety one undergraduate students in five…

  16. Perceptions of ESL Program Management in Canadian Higher Education: A Qualitative Case Study

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    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2017-01-01

    ESL programs at post-secondary institutions must often generate revenue in addition to teaching students English. Institutions often impose explicit expectations on these programs to generate profit, creating unique challenges for those who administer them. This qualitative case study investigated challenges faced by ESL program directors at one…

  17. Are Military and Medical Ethics Necessarily Incompatible? A Canadian Case Study.

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    Rochon, Christiane; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2016-12-01

    Military physicians are often perceived to be in a position of 'dual loyalty' because they have responsibilities towards their patients but also towards their employer, the military institution. Further, they have to ascribe to and are bound by two distinct codes of ethics (i.e., medical and military), each with its own set of values and duties, that could at first glance be considered to be very different or even incompatible. How, then, can military physicians reconcile these two codes of ethics and their distinct professional/institutional values, and assume their responsibilities towards both their patients and the military institution? To clarify this situation, and to show how such a reconciliation might be possible, we compared the history and content of two national professional codes of ethics: the Defence Ethics of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Code of Ethics of the Canadian Medical Association. Interestingly, even if the medical code is more focused on duties and responsibility while the military code is more focused on core values and is supported by a comprehensive ethical training program, they also have many elements in common. Further, both are based on the same core values of loyalty and integrity, and they are broad in scope but are relatively flexible in application. While there are still important sources of tension between and limits within these two codes of ethics, there are fewer differences than may appear at first glance because the core values and principles of military and medical ethics are not so different.

  18. Using Transformative Learning as a Model for Human Rights Education: A Case Study of the Canadian Human Rights Foundation's International Human Rights Training Program

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    Nazzari, Vincenza; McAdams, Paul; Roy, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the essential practices and conditions for fostering transformative learning using the Canadian Human Rights Foundation's "International Human Rights Training Program" as a case study. It suggests that the program's participants challenge their own values and assumptions about human rights, their work and their society through…

  19. International research partnerships in occupational therapy: a Canadian-Zambian case study.

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    Njelesani, Janet; Stevens, Marianne; Cleaver, Shaun; Mwambwa, Lombe; Nixon, Stephanie

    2013-06-01

    The country of Zambia's Sixth National Development Plan includes many objectives related to participation and health that align with values underlying occupational therapy. Given this link, occupational therapy research has the potential to advance the Sixth National Development Plan and thereby enhance the participation and health of Zambians. However, there is neither a school of occupational therapy nor many occupational therapists working in Zambia. Using an example of a global research partnership between Canadian occupational therapy researchers and Zambian researchers, this paper examines the partnership using four criteria for global health research in order to derive lessons for future occupational therapy research partnerships. Implications for future occupational therapy research partnerships include the need for partners to combine their complementary skills and knowledge so that they may collaborate in mutually beneficial ways to address global health challenges and expand the reach of occupational therapy perspectives. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. A case study of a Canadian homelessness intervention programme for elderly people.

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    Ploeg, Jenny; Hayward, Lynda; Woodward, Christel; Johnston, Riley

    2008-12-01

    The aims of this study were to describe: (1) how the Homelessness Intervention Programme addressed the needs of elderly people who were homeless or at risk of homelessness; and (2) the factors that influenced the ability of the programme to address client needs. The programme was offered by a multi-service non-profit agency serving low-income families and individuals in an urban neighbourhood in Ontario, Canada. Using a case study approach, we conducted 10 individual interviews and three focus groups with programme clients, programme providers, other service providers and programme funders. Programme providers completed intake forms, monthly follow-up forms and exit/housing change forms for each of the 129 clients served by the programme over a 28-month period. Approximately equal proportions of clients were between 54 years old and 65 years old (47%) and over 65 years (53%). There were equal proportions of women and men. In addition to being homeless or marginally housed, clients lived with multiple and complex issues including chronic illness, mental illness and substance abuse. Through the facilitation of continuity of care, the programme was able to meet the needs of this vulnerable group of elderly people. Three types of continuity of care were facilitated: relational, informational and management continuity. The study confirmed the value of a continuous caring relationship with an identified provider and the delivery of a seamless service through coordination, integration and information sharing between different providers. Study findings also highlighted the broader systemic factors that acted as barriers to the programme and its ability to meet the needs of elderly people. These factors included limited housing options available; limited income supports; and lack of coordinated, accessible community health and support services. The central findings stress the importance of continuity of care as a guiding concept for intervention programmes for homeless and

  1. Adherence to Canadian C-Spine Rule in a regional hospital: a retrospective study of 406 cases.

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    Paxton, Mark; Heal, Clare F; Drobetz, Herwig

    2012-10-01

    Cervical spine radiography may be over-utilised in an emergency department setting. The Canadian C-Spine Rule has been developed to reduce unnecessary radiography. Our aim was to retrospectively determine the proportion of cervical spine radiographs requested through the emergency department for trauma patients that were clinically indicated, according to the Canadian C-Spine Rule. This was a cross-sectional survey conducted at a regional centre in Northern Queensland, Australia. All cervical spine radiographs for trauma, performed at the Mackay Base Hospital from 1 January 2009 to the 31 December 2009, were reviewed. The relevant patient charts were audited for evidence of indications for radiography. Of 406 patients in the study, 155 patients (38%) (95% confidence interval 33.3%, 42.7%) had cervical spine imaging performed that was not indicated according to the Canadian C-Spine Rule. None of these patients had a significant cervical spine injury on radiography. Applying the Canadian C-Spine Rule would have safely reduced the incidence of cervical spine radiography by 38%. This would also reduce costs, patient morbidity and radiation exposure. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  2. Sampling Ozone Exposure of Canadian Forests at Different Scales: Some Case Studies

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    R.M. Cox

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of passive samplers in extensive monitoring, such as that used in national forest health monitoring plots, indicates that these devices are able to determine both spatial and temporal differences in ozone exposure of the plots. This allows for categorisation of the plots and the potential for cause-effect analysis of certain forest health responses. Forest exposure along a gradient of air pollution deposition demonstrates large variation in accumulated exposures. The efficacy of using passive samplers for in situ monitoring of forest canopy exposure was also demonstrated. The sampler data produced weak relationships with ozone values from the nearest �continuous� monitor, even though data from colocated samplers showed strong relationships. This spatial variation and the apparent effect of elevation on ozone exposure demonstrate the importance of topography and tree canopy characteristics in plant exposure on a regional scale. In addition, passive sampling may identify the effects of local pollutant gases, such as NO, which may scavenge ozone locally only to increase the production of this secondary pollutant downwind, as atmospheric reactions redress the equilibrium between concentrations of this precursor and those of the generated ozone. The use of passive samplers at the stand level is able to resolve vertical profiles within the stand and edge effects that are important in exposure of understorey and ground flora. Recent case studies using passive samplers to determine forest exposure to ozone indicate a great potential for the development of spatial models on a regional, landscape, and stand level scale.

  3. "Things I did not know": Retrospectives on a Canadian rural male youth suicide using an instrumental photovoice case study.

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    Creighton, Genevieve M; Oliffe, John L; Lohan, Maria; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Palm, Emma

    2017-11-01

    In Canada, it is young, rural-based men who are at the greatest risk of suicide. While there is no consensus on the reasons for this, evidence points to contextual social factors including isolation, lack of confidential services, and pressure to uphold restrictive norms of rural masculinity. In this article, we share findings drawn from an instrumental photovoice case study to distil factors contributing to the suicide of a young, Canadian, rural-based man. Integrating photovoice methods and in-depth qualitative, we conducted interviews with seven family members and close friends of the deceased. The interviews and image data were analyzed using constant comparative methods to discern themes related to participants' reflections on and perceptions about rural male suicide. Three inductively derived themes, "Missing the signs," "Living up to his public image," and "Down in Rural Canada," reflect the challenges that survivors and young rural men can experience in attempting to be comply with restrictive dominant ideals of masculinity. We conclude that community-based suicide prevention efforts would benefit from gender-sensitive and place-specific approaches to advancing men's mental health by making tangibly available and affirming an array of masculinities to foster the well-being of young, rural-based men.

  4. Spatiotemporal air pollution exposure assessment for a Canadian population-based lung cancer case-control study

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    Hystad Perry

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few epidemiological studies of air pollution have used residential histories to develop long-term retrospective exposure estimates for multiple ambient air pollutants and vehicle and industrial emissions. We present such an exposure assessment for a Canadian population-based lung cancer case-control study of 8353 individuals using self-reported residential histories from 1975 to 1994. We also examine the implications of disregarding and/or improperly accounting for residential mobility in long-term exposure assessments. Methods National spatial surfaces of ambient air pollution were compiled from recent satellite-based estimates (for PM2.5 and NO2 and a chemical transport model (for O3. The surfaces were adjusted with historical annual air pollution monitoring data, using either spatiotemporal interpolation or linear regression. Model evaluation was conducted using an independent ten percent subset of monitoring data per year. Proximity to major roads, incorporating a temporal weighting factor based on Canadian mobile-source emission estimates, was used to estimate exposure to vehicle emissions. A comprehensive inventory of geocoded industries was used to estimate proximity to major and minor industrial emissions. Results Calibration of the national PM2.5 surface using annual spatiotemporal interpolation predicted historical PM2.5 measurement data best (R2 = 0.51, while linear regression incorporating the national surfaces, a time-trend and population density best predicted historical concentrations of NO2 (R2 = 0.38 and O3 (R2 = 0.56. Applying the models to study participants residential histories between 1975 and 1994 resulted in mean PM2.5, NO2 and O3 exposures of 11.3 μg/m3 (SD = 2.6, 17.7 ppb (4.1, and 26.4 ppb (3.4 respectively. On average, individuals lived within 300 m of a highway for 2.9 years (15% of exposure-years and within 3 km of a major industrial emitter for 6.4 years (32% of exposure-years. Approximately 50

  5. Transmission of hepatitis D virus between spouses: A longitudinal study of the first reported Canadian case

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    Carla Osiowy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic hepatitis B (CHB, hepatitis D virus (HDV superinfection can lead to acute liver failure. The incidence of HDV superinfection is unknown, but is often detected in immigrants from HDV endemic countries. In this report, we characterize long-term clinical and virological outcomes in a hepatitis B virus (HBV infected carrier before and after HDV superinfection, acquired from their spouse having HBV/HDV co-infection. A 38 year-old Mongolian male with CHB on anti-HBV therapy developed acute liver failure following HDV superinfection. Although he recovered, avoiding the need for liver transplant, HDV serological and molecular markers of infection persisted for the subsequent 16-month follow-up period, suggesting the development of CHB/HDV co-infection. The source of his HDV was from his wife of 10 years, a 34-year old Mongolian female known to have inactive CHB/HDV co-infection but who was not on anti-HBV therapy. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete HDV genome from the couple showed >99% similarity, with post-transmission longitudinal sequence revealing specific nucleotide substitutions between both spouse’s HDV genome sequences. This study highlights the ongoing risk of HDV superinfection due to long-term co-habitation or sexual transmission in CHB patients. The fact that transmission occurred after almost a decade of marriage may be due to host immune or environmental factors that created a more favorable condition for transmission.

  6. An epidemiological investigation of the early phase of the porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) outbreak in Canadian swine herds in 2014: A case-control study.

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    Perri, Amanda M; Poljak, Zvonimir; Dewey, Cate; Harding, John C S; O'Sullivan, Terri L

    2018-02-01

    The first case of porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) in Canada was diagnosed in January 2014 in Ontario, approximately 9 months after PED emerged in the United States. An early investigation of the Canadian outbreak suspected that the probable source of the virus was contaminated feed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of feed and other possible factors in the early phase of the PED outbreak in Canadian swine herds. The study period of interest for this case-control study was January 22nd to March 1st, 2014. A case herd was defined as a swine herd with a confirmed positive laboratory diagnostic test (RT-PCR) results for PED virus, along with pigs exhibiting typical clinical signs at the herd level during the study period. A questionnaire was administered to participating producers from the 22 Canadian swine herds enrolled (n = 9 case and n = 13 control herds). Case herd producers were asked to provide information from the initial day of onset of clinical signs and 30 days prior to that day. Control herds were matched to a case herd on the basis of province, herd type and approximate size. The period of interest for a control herd was matched to the initial day of clinical signs of PED for the case herd, along with the 30 days prior to this day. The questionnaire questions focused on herd demographics, biosecurity protocols, live animal movements onto and off sites, deadstock movements, feed and people movements for both the case and control herds. The questionnaire for control herds were based on their matched case's period of interest, and together with case herds formed a matched stratum. Multivariable exact conditional logistic regression and mixed multivariable logistic regression models, with the matched stratum as a random effect, were used to assess the association between various risk factors and the odds of PED introduction into a herd. After adjusting for biosecurity practices, the odds of a PED occurrence was 38.1 (95% CI: 2

  7. Canadian Council for Area Studies Learned Societies - 2007-2008 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CCASLS) provides a shared secretariat for four area studies associations: the Canadian Association of African Studies (CAAS); the Canadian Asian Studies Association (CASA): the Canadian Association of Latin American and Caribbean Studies ...

  8. Rethinking International Migration of Human Capital and Brain Circulation: The Case of Chinese-Canadian Academics

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    Blachford, Dongyan Ru; Zhang, Bailing

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the dynamics of brain circulation through a historical review of the debates over international migration of human capital and a case study on Chinese-Canadian academics. Interviews with 22 Chinese-Canadian professors who originally came from China provide rich data regarding the possibilities and problems of the contemporary…

  9. Reporting of financial conflicts of interest in clinical practice guidelines: a case study analysis of guidelines from the Canadian Medical Association Infobase.

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    Shnier, Adrienne; Lexchin, Joel; Romero, Mirna; Brown, Kevin

    2016-08-15

    Clinical practice guidelines are widely distributed by medical associations and relied upon by physicians for the best available clinical evidence. International findings report that financial conflicts of interest (FCOI) with drug companies may influence drug recommendations and are common among guideline authors. There is no comparable study on exclusively Canadian guidelines; therefore, we provide a case study of authors' FCOI declarations in guidelines from the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) Infobase. We also assess the financial relationships between guideline-affiliated organizations and drug companies. Using a population approach, we extracted first-line drug recommendations and authors' FCOI disclosures in guidelines from the CMA Infobase. We contacted the corresponding authors on guidelines when FCOI disclosures were missing for some or all authors. We also extracted guideline-affiliated organizations and searched each of their websites to determine if they had financial relationships with drug companies. We analyzed 350 authors from 28 guidelines. Authors were named on one, two, or three guidelines, yielding 400 FCOI statements. In 75.0 % of guidelines at least one author, and in 21.4 % of guidelines all authors, disclosed FCOI with drug companies. In 54.0 % of guidelines at least one author, and in 28.6 % of guidelines over half of the authors, disclosed FCOI with manufacturers of drugs that they recommended. Twenty of 48 authors on multiple guidelines reported different FCOI in their disclosures. Eight guidelines identified affiliated organizations with financial relationships with manufacturers of drugs recommended in those guidelines. This is the first study to systematically describe FCOI disclosures by authors of Canadian guidelines and financial relationships between guideline-affiliated organizations and pharmaceutical companies. These financial relationships are common. Because authoritative value is assigned to guidelines distributed by

  10. In vivo facial tissue depth for Canadian Mi'kmaq adults: a case study from Nova Scotia, Canada.

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    Peckmann, Tanya R; Harris, Mikkel; Huculak, Meaghan; Pringle, Ashleigh; Fournier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This study examines facial tissue depth in Canadian Mi'kmaq adults. Using ultrasound, measurements were taken at 19 landmarks on the faces of 152 individuals aged 18-75 years old. The relationships between tissue thickness, age, and sex were investigated. A positive linear trend exists between tissue thickness and age for Mi'kmaq males and females at multiple landmarks. Seven landmarks show significant differences in facial tissue depth between males and females aged 18-34 years old; no landmarks show significant differences in facial tissue depth between males and females aged 35-45 years old and 46-55 years old. Significant differences were shown in facial tissue depth between Mi'kmaq and White Americans and Mi'kmaq and African Americans. These data can assist in 3-D facial reconstructions and aid in establishing the identity of unknown Mi'kmaq individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  11. Religious Diversity in the Public Sphere: The Canadian Case

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    Lori G. Beaman

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the contours of religious and nonreligious diversity in the Canadian public sphere. The ever-changing (nonreligious landscape offers an opportunity to consider the flow of ideas from this new diversity to responses and choices at the individual, group, and state levels to inclusion and exclusion. The paper first begins with a descriptive approach to religious diversity, identifying the normatively-charged nature inherent to measures of religion. It then turns to the notion of choices, considering the somewhat uniquely Canadian contributions of multiculturalism, reasonable accommodation, and the recent complication of nonreligion as a category of religious identity. The paper then considers three case studies which reveal the tensions embedded in the new diversity and responses to it in Canada, including (1 the Saint-Sacrement Hospital crucifix incident; (2 Zunera Ishaq’s challenge to the citizenship ceremony niqab ban; and (3 school controversies in Ontario’s Peel Region.

  12. Comprehensive Evidence-Based Assessment and Prioritization of Potential Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants: A Case Study from Canadian Eastern James Bay Cree Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre S. Haddad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Canadian Aboriginals, like others globally, suffer from disproportionately high rates of diabetes. A comprehensive evidence-based approach was therefore developed to study potential antidiabetic medicinal plants stemming from Canadian Aboriginal Traditional Medicine to provide culturally adapted complementary and alternative treatment options. Key elements of pathophysiology of diabetes and of related contemporary drug therapy are presented to highlight relevant cellular and molecular targets for medicinal plants. Potential antidiabetic plants were identified using a novel ethnobotanical method based on a set of diabetes symptoms. The most promising species were screened for primary (glucose-lowering and secondary (toxicity, drug interactions, complications antidiabetic activity by using a comprehensive platform of in vitro cell-based and cell-free bioassays. The most active species were studied further for their mechanism of action and their active principles identified though bioassay-guided fractionation. Biological activity of key species was confirmed in animal models of diabetes. These in vitro and in vivo findings are the basis for evidence-based prioritization of antidiabetic plants. In parallel, plants were also prioritized by Cree Elders and healers according to their Traditional Medicine paradigm. This case study highlights the convergence of modern science and Traditional Medicine while providing a model that can be adapted to other Aboriginal realities worldwide.

  13. Assessment of the toxicity of a substance under Canadian environmental protection act, a case study. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadon, B.; Germain, A.; Coillie, R. van [Environment Canada, Montreal (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The Canadian Environmental Protection Act (CEPA) proclaimed in 1988 requires the Canadian Ministers of the Environment and of National Health and Welfare to assess the toxicity of different substances. A Priority Substances List containing 44 substances was developed and their assessments had to determine if they were `toxic`, according to the CEPA definition. This definition states that `a substance is toxic if it is entering or may enter the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions (a) having or that may have an immediate or long-term harmful effect on the environment, (b) constituting or that may constitute a danger to the environment on which human life depends; or (c) constituting or that may constitute a danger in Canada to human life of health.` This presentation use the assessment of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as an example of this procedure. (author)

  14. An Open-Source Strategy for Documenting Events: The Case Study of the 42nd Canadian Federal Election on Twitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Ruest

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the tools, approaches, collaboration, and findings of the Web Archives for Historical Research Group around the capture and analysis of about 4 million tweets during the 2015 Canadian Federal Election. We hope that national libraries and other heritage institutions will find our model useful as they consider how to capture, preserve, and analyze ongoing events using Twitter. While Twitter is not a representative sample of broader society - Pew research shows in their study of US users that it skews young, college-educated, and affluent (above $50,000 household income – Twitter still represents an exponential increase in the amount of information generated, retained, and preserved from 'everyday' people. Therefore, when historians study the 2015 federal election, Twitter will be a prime source.On August 3, 2015, the team initiated both a Search API and Stream API collection with twarc, a tool developed by Ed Summers, using the hashtag #elxn42. The hashtag referred to the election being Canada's 42nd general federal election (hence 'election 42' or elxn42. Data collection ceased on November 5, 2015, the day after Justin Trudeau was sworn in as the 42nd Prime Minister of Canada. We collected for a total of 102 days, 13 hours and 50 minutes. To analyze the data set, we took advantage of a number of command line tools, utilities that are available within twarc, twarc-report, and jq. In accordance with the Twitter Developer Agreement & Policy, and after ethical deliberations discussed below, we made the tweet IDs and other derivative data available in a data repository. This allows other people to use our dataset, cite our dataset, and enhance their own research projects by drawing on #elxn42 tweets. Our analytics included: breaking tweet text down by day to track change over time; client analysis, allowing us to see how the scale of mobile devices affected medium interactions; URL analysis, comparing both to Archive

  15. The contribution of zoos and aquaria to Aichi Biodiversity Target 12: A case study of Canadian zoos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Olive

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of Aichi Biodiversity Target 12 is to prevent extinction of known threaten species, and improve the decline of the world’s most imperiled species. Governments and NGOs around the world are actively working toward this goal. This article examines the role of zoos and aquaria in the conservation of species at risk through an in-depth examination of four accredited Canadian zoos and aquaria. Through site visits, interviews with staff, and research into the programs at each institution, this paper demonstrates that captive breeding, reintroductions, and headstarting projects are each a large component of conservation efforts. Interviews with zoo staff reveal strong consensus that zoo offer two critical components for species at risk conservation: space and expertise. Overall, this article calls for greater attention to the types of conservation actives occurring and the ways in which zoos are working together to protect and recover global biodiversity.

  16. From theory to practice: a Canadian case study of the utility of climate change adaptation frameworks to address health impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Kaila-Lea; Berry, Peter

    2012-02-01

    It is now recognized that climate change affects human health. The question is how to adapt. This article examines mainstreaming climate considerations into public health programs and the utility of climate change and health adaptation frameworks, using Ontario, Canada, as a case study. A literature review identified climate change and health adaptation frameworks for comparison with the Ontario Public Health Standards. Key informant interviews gauged the extent to which climate change risks are currently considered in policy and planning. Ontario's Public Health Standards already require many of the risk management activities identified in climate change and health adaptation frameworks. However, public health officials require additional information about linkages between climate change and health to manage risks. Risk management activities such as population health assessments, surveillance and public education and outreach can address many key risks related to climate hazards when information about the risks, vulnerable populations and time scales is made available to health officials. The development, analysis and transfer of this information should be considered a priority at all levels within the public health sector.

  17. “Things I did not know”: Retrospectives on a Canadian rural male youth suicide using an instrumental photovoice case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Genevieve M; Oliffe, John L; Lohan, Maria; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Palm, Emma

    2016-01-01

    In Canada, it is young, rural-based men who are at the greatest risk of suicide. While there is no consensus on the reasons for this, evidence points to contextual social factors including isolation, lack of confidential services, and pressure to uphold restrictive norms of rural masculinity. In this article, we share findings drawn from an instrumental photovoice case study to distil factors contributing to the suicide of a young, Canadian, rural-based man. Integrating photovoice methods and in-depth qualitative, we conducted interviews with seven family members and close friends of the deceased. The interviews and image data were analyzed using constant comparative methods to discern themes related to participants’ reflections on and perceptions about rural male suicide. Three inductively derived themes, “Missing the signs,” “Living up to his public image,” and “Down in Rural Canada,” reflect the challenges that survivors and young rural men can experience in attempting to be comply with restrictive dominant ideals of masculinity. We conclude that community-based suicide prevention efforts would benefit from gender-sensitive and place-specific approaches to advancing men’s mental health by making tangibly available and affirming an array of masculinities to foster the well-being of young, rural-based men. PMID:26979983

  18. Residential water demand with endogenous pricing: The Canadian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Arnaud; Renzetti, Steven; Villeneuve, Michel

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we show that the rate structure endogeneity may result in a misspecification of the residential water demand function. We propose to solve this endogeneity problem by estimating a probabilistic model describing how water rates are chosen by local communities. This model is estimated on a sample of Canadian local communities. We first show that the pricing structure choice reflects efficiency considerations, equity concerns, and, in some cases, a strategy of price discrimination across consumers by Canadian communities. Hence estimating the residential water demand without taking into account the pricing structures' endogeneity leads to a biased estimation of price and income elasticities. We also demonstrate that the pricing structure per se plays a significant role in influencing price responsiveness of Canadian residential consumers.

  19. A Bio-Economic Case Study of Canadian Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies: Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS) in Queen Breeding Affects Beekeeper Profits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixby, Miriam; Baylis, Kathy; Hoover, Shelley E; Currie, Rob W; Melathopoulos, Andony P; Pernal, Stephen F; Foster, Leonard J; Guarna, M Marta

    2017-06-01

    Over the past decade in North America and Europe, winter losses of honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies have increased dramatically. Scientific consensus attributes these losses to multifactorial causes including altered parasite and pathogen profiles, lack of proper nutrition due to agricultural monocultures, exposure to pesticides, management, and weather. One method to reduce colony loss and increase productivity is through selective breeding of queens to produce disease-, pathogen-, and mite-resistant stock. Historically, the only method for identifying desirable traits in honey bees to improve breeding was through observation of bee behavior. A team of Canadian scientists have recently identified markers in bee antennae that correspond to behavioral traits in bees and can be tested for in a laboratory. These scientists have demonstrated that this marker-assisted selection (MAS) can be used to produce hygienic, pathogen-resistant honey bee colonies. Based on this research, we present a beekeeping case study where a beekeeper's profit function is used to evaluate the economic impact of adopting colonies selected for hygienic behavior using MAS into an apiary. Our results show a net profit gain from an MAS colony of between 2% and 5% when Varroa mites are effectively treated. In the case of ineffective treatment, MAS generates a net profit benefit of between 9% and 96% depending on the Varroa load. When a Varroa mite population has developed some treatment resistance, we show that MAS colonies generate a net profit gain of between 8% and 112% depending on the Varroa load and degree of treatment resistance. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  20. Canadian retail petroleum markets study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervin, M.J.

    1998-02-01

    A retail petroleum market study was conducted to provide a comprehensive overview of the competitiveness of the downstream petroleum industry in Canada and to set a foundation for effective policy development. The downstream petroleum industry, which includes the petroleum refining and marketing sectors, faces a poor public image, competitive pressures from U.S. and offshore refiners, and a broad range of environmental challenges. In this study, 19 markets representing a wide range of conditions were chosen for a detailed review of outlet economics. A market-by-market and regional comparisons of key competitiveness indicators was made in order to identify market and regional competitive differences as potential issues or opportunities within the industry. The study also included a pump price/margin model and provided a general overview of the retail gasoline sub-sector in terms of infrastructure. A review of prices, margins and demand patterns over the past several years was also undertaken to show the relationship between consumer demand patterns and pump price fluctuations. The study presented 22 findings which led to several conclusions and recommendations regarding the competitiveness of Canada's petroleum marketing sector. Two of the key conclusions were that taxation is a significant factor in the price of retail gasoline (about 50 per cent) and that government intervention into petroleum marketing is likely to be a poor alternative to market-based regulation. 18 tabs., 37 figs

  1. Assessment of public perception and environmental compliance at a pulp and paper facility: a Canadian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Emma; Bernier, Meagan; Blotnicky, Brenden; Golden, Peter G; Janes, Jeffrey; Kader, Allison; Kovacs-Da Costa, Rachel; Pettipas, Shauna; Vermeulen, Sarah; Walker, Tony R

    2015-12-01

    Communities across Canada rely heavily on natural resources for their livelihoods. One such community in Pictou County, Nova Scotia, has both benefited and suffered, because of its proximity to a pulp and paper mill (currently owned by Northern Pulp). Since production began in 1967, there have been increasing impacts to the local environment and human health. Environmental reports funded by the mill were reviewed and compared against provincial and federal regulatory compliance standards. Reports contrasted starkly to societal perceptions of local impacts and independent studies. Most environmental monitoring reports funded by the mill indicate some levels of compliance in atmospheric and effluent emissions, but when compliance targets were not met, there was a lack of regulatory enforcement. After decades of local pollution impacts and lack of environmental compliance, corporate social responsibility initiatives need implementing for the mill to maintain its social licence to operate.

  2. Differential temperature preferences and thresholds among summer campers in Ontario's southern provincial parks: a Canadian case study in tourism climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewer, Micah J.; Scott, Daniel J.; Gough, William A.

    2017-08-01

    Weather and climate are important factors in relation to outdoor recreation and tourism. Camping and park visitation are weather sensitive activities very likely to be impacted by projected climate change. Temperature is the weather variable that has received the greatest attention within the tourism climatology literature and was the greatest predictor of park visitation within previous assessments. This study uses a stated climate preferences approach, relying on survey-based data, to explore differences for temperature preferences and thresholds among campers in Ontario parks. Statistically significant differences (at the 95% confidence level) in mean values for temperature preferences and thresholds were recorded based on various camper characteristics, such as the following: activity selection, age, gender, distance travelled, length of stay, life cycle stage, camping experience, and camping equipment. Swimmers preferred warmer day-time temperatures. Older campers preferred cooler temperatures and were more sensitive to heat stress, in the day and night time. Females preferred warmer temperatures and were less sensitive to heat stress during the night time. Campers who had travelled further distances to reach the park or planned to stay for longer periods were less sensitive to heat stress. Campers with children in their group preferred warmer temperatures and were less sensitive to heat stress, in the day and at night. Respondents with higher levels of camping experience preferred warmer temperatures at night. Tent campers were less sensitive to heat stress, in the day and at night. The results of this study have direct implications for previous and future climate change impact assessments on park visitation.

  3. Twenty years of therapeutic touch in a Canadian cancer agency: lessons learned from a case study of integrative oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Joanne E; Mackenzie, Gina; Sample, Sarah; Macdonald, Jennifer

    2007-08-01

    Therapeutic touch (TT) is a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment modeled on the ancient practice of "laying on of hands" that has been developed into a contemporary supportive care intervention. Evidence-based support for TT is emerging with increasingly more sophisticated studies; however, flaws in early research contributed to a perception that TT is poor science. Yet TT is a safe CAM treatment that is highly valued by patients and can be integrated into conventional settings. Having offered TT as a supportive care intervention within a provincial cancer agency for 20 years, we have grappled with the issues of evidence and of satisfying both patient demands and administrative needs. Our TT practice evolved in response to changing needs and our experience may be useful to those who are contemplating offering a CAM treatment within a conventional setting. The objectives are to describe TT practice within a conventional cancer agency and to identify the important issues and success factors of this program and, secondly, to discuss TT research and our approach to the issues. TT is a safe and beneficial intervention for cancer patients that can be integrated within a conventional setting, providing that the program evolves with changing patient and organizational needs. Lessons gleaned include (1) positioning TT within the context of research and evidence-based practice, (2) developing and adhering to standards of practice and professionalism, and (3) maintaining a nonpartisan attitude and communicating a plausible rationale.

  4. European and Canadian Studies of Loneliness among Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    This article provides a commentary on a set of five other articles reporting European and Canadian studies of loneliness among seniors. It places those works involving Canadian, Dutch, Finnish, and Welsh samples in the larger context of research on loneliness; offers reflections on the methods and findings reported in the articles; and addresses…

  5. CASID and Canadian Journal of Development Studies ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CASID was founded in 1989 by a group of individuals from the academic and practitioner community to provide a forum for Canadian scholars, policymakers, ... strengthen its capacity to deliver its programs, but also to do so more efficiently and effectively by improving itself as an organization in critical areas of performance.

  6. Canadian very large optical telescope technical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Scott C.; Morbey, Christopher L.; Crabtree, Dennis R.; Carlberg, Ray; Crampton, David; Davidge, Timothy J.; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff T.; Gedig, Michael H.; Halliday, David J.; Hesser, James E.; Herriot, Glen; Oke, J. Beverly; Pazder, John S.; Szeto, Kei; Veran, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    A design is proposed for a 20 m Canadian Very Large Optical Telescope (VLOT). This design meets the science, schedule, and availability requirements of the Canadian astronomical community. The telescope could be operational by early in the next decade to complement the science discoveries of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). This design is suitable for location on the Mauna Kea summit ridge, and could replace the current 3.6 m CFHT telescope. The telescope structure provides room for two vertically oriented Nasmyth instruments, implements a very stiff monocoque mirror cell, and offers a short and direct load path to the telescope mount. A Calotte style dome structure offers many advantages over current designs including lower and more even power requirements, and a circular aperture that will better protect the telescope structure from wind buffeting. The science requirements are presented, and the telescope optical design, primary mirror pupil segmentation options, including hexagonal segments and a radial segment design with a central 8 m mirror, are considered. Point spread function plots and encircled energy calculations show that there is no significant diffraction performance difference between the options except that hexagonal segments in the 1 m point-to-point range appear to deliver poorer PSF's as compared to 2 m and larger segments. Plans for implementation of a Matlab based integrated telescope model are discussed. A summary of adaptive optics system issues for large telescopes is presented along with plans for future research in AO.

  7. Canadian Association for the Study of International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-09-23

    The Canadian Association for the Study of International Development (CASID) is a membership-based organization devoted to the promotion of new knowledge in the broad field of international development. Since its inception in 1989, ... Project status. Closed. Start Date. September 23, 2010. End Date. October 31, 2012 ...

  8. The cost of a case of subclinical ketosis in Canadian dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohary, Khaled; Overton, Michael W; Von Massow, Michael; LeBlanc, Stephen J; Lissemore, Kerry D; Duffield, Todd F

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a model to estimate the cost of a case of subclinical ketosis (SCK) in Canadian dairy herds. Costs were derived from the default inputs, and included increased clinical disease incidence attributable to SCK, $76; longer time to pregnancy, $57; culling and death in early lactation attributable to SCK, $26; milk production loss, $44. Given these figures, the cost of 1 case of SCK was estimated to be $203. Sensitivity analysis showed that the estimated cost of a case of SCK was most sensitive to the herd-level incidence of SCK and the cost of 1 day open. In conclusion, SCK negatively impacts dairy herds and losses are dependent on the herd-level incidence and factors included in the calculation.

  9. The Canadian Association for the Study of International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Revue canadienne des études en développement) publishes research by the Canadian community and ... It stimulates Canadian graduate students to work in this field and enhances IDRC's visibility within the Canadian academic community.

  10. Comparison of automatic procedures in the selection of peaks over threshold in flood frequency analysis: A Canadian case study in the context of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durocher, M.; Mostofi Zadeh, S.; Burn, D. H.; Ashkar, F.

    2017-12-01

    Floods are one of the most costly hazards and frequency analysis of river discharges is an important part of the tools at our disposal to evaluate their inherent risks and to provide an adequate response. In comparison to the common examination of annual streamflow maximums, peaks over threshold (POT) is an interesting alternative that makes better use of the available information by including more than one flood event per year (on average). However, a major challenge is the selection of a satisfactory threshold above which peaks are assumed to respect certain conditions necessary for an adequate estimation of the risk. Additionally, studies have shown that POT is also a valuable approach to investigate the evolution of flood regimes in the context of climate change. Recently, automatic procedures for the selection of the threshold were suggested to guide that important choice, which otherwise rely on graphical tools and expert judgment. Furthermore, having an automatic procedure that is objective allows for quickly repeating the analysis on a large number of samples, which is useful in the context of large databases or for uncertainty analysis based on a resampling approach. This study investigates the impact of considering such procedures in a case study including many sites across Canada. A simulation study is conducted to evaluate the bias and predictive power of the automatic procedures in similar conditions as well as investigating the power of derived nonstationarity tests. The results obtained are also evaluated in the light of expert judgments established in a previous study. Ultimately, this study provides a thorough examination of the considerations that need to be addressed when conducting POT analysis using automatic threshold selection.

  11. Canadian study of cancer following multiple fluoroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Records of patients treated in Canadian Sanatoria during the period 1930-1952 have been linked with the National Death Index maintained by Statistics Canada to provide fact and cause of death information for the years 1950-1980. Of 31,710 women known to be under observation on January 1, 1950, 13,795 were exposed to fluoroscopy for control of collapse therapy, while the remaining 17,915 were unexposed. The unexposed had the similar mortality from breast cancer to that expected from general population rates. Those exposed to fluoroscopy had increasing mortality with increasing radiation dose to the breast, the best fit to the dose-response curve being a quadratic function. Estimates of risk at doses above 300 rads were largely derived from patients treated in Nova Scotia, where fluoroscopy was administered antero-posterior, as distinct from the more usual postero-antero practiced elsewhere. There is evidence of age-related susceptibility to radiation-induced breast cancer. The risk was maximal for those who first received fluoroscopy in their teens or twenties, but it was similar to expectation for those first exposed at age 30 or more. The latent period from onset of exposure to first increase in the death rate from breast cancer was 15 years for those first exposed at ages 10-24 and 10 years for those first exposed at ages 25 or more. However, these periods coincide with years when mortality from breast cancer normally rises and may therefore not be a true latent period effect. Estimates of predicted excess deaths from breast cancer per million women first exposed at ages 10-29 vary depending on the model used to represent the effect and whether or not data from the Nova Scotia Series are included in the computations

  12. Data mining: comparing the empiric CFS to the Canadian ME/CFS case definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A; Skendrovic, Beth; Furst, Jacob; Brown, Abigail; Weng, Angela; Bronikowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This article contrasts two case definitions for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). We compared the empiric CFS case definition (Reeves et al., 2005) and the Canadian ME/CFS clinical case definition (Carruthers et al., 2003) with a sample of individuals with CFS versus those without. Data mining with decision trees was used to identify the best items to identify patients with CFS. Data mining is a statistical technique that was used to help determine which of the survey questions were most effective for accurately classifying cases. The empiric criteria identified about 79% of patients with CFS and the Canadian criteria identified 87% of patients. Items identified by the Canadian criteria had more construct validity. The implications of these findings are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. School violence : a critical review of Canadian and American studies

    OpenAIRE

    Tait, Leigh Anne Deana

    2004-01-01

    School violence in Canada and the United States is a topic of public and media concern following several recent shocking incidents of student killings by their classmates in Canada and the United States. This thesis reviews and critically evaluates Canadian and American studies of school violence. Published reports and studies are used as the source of data. The main focus for evaluating the studies is an in-depth analysis of the conceptual frameworks and elements of the research. This includ...

  14. Interprofessional education in U.S. and Canadian dental schools: an ADEA Team Study Group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J; Andrieu, Sandra C; Buchanan, Judith A; Childs, Gail Schneider; Gibbs, Micaela; Inglehart, Marita R; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Pyle, Marsha A; D'Abreu, Kim; Evans, Lauren

    2012-09-01

    The state of interprofessional education (IPE) in U.S. and Canadian dental schools was studied by the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Team Study Group on Interprofessional Education. The study group reviewed the pertinent IPE literature, examined IPE competencies for dental students, surveyed U.S. and Canadian dental schools to determine the current and planned status of IPE activities, and identified best practices. Members of the study group prepared case studies of the exemplary IPE programs of six dental schools, based on information provided by those schools; representatives from each school then reviewed and approved its case study. Six reviewers critiqued a draft of the study group's report, and study group members and reviewers met together to prepare recommendations for schools. This report identifies four domains of competence for student achievement in IPE and summarizes responses to the survey (which had an 86 percent response rate). It also includes the case descriptions of six schools' IPE programs and the study group's recommendations for dental schools. The report concludes that there is general recognition of the goals of IPE across U.S. and Canadian dental schools, but a wide range of progress in IPE on the various campuses. Challenges to the further development of IPE are discussed.

  15. Canadian Consumer Food Safety Practices and Knowledge: Foodbook Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Regan; Glass-Kaastra, Shiona; Gardhouse, Christine; Marshall, Barbara; Ciampa, Nadia; Franklin, Kristyn; Hurst, Matt; Thomas, M Kate; Nesbitt, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Understanding consumers' food safety practices and knowledge supports food safety education for the prevention of foodborne illness. The objective of this study was to describe Canadian consumer food safety practices and knowledge. This study identifies demographic groups for targeted food safety education messaging and establishes a baseline measurement to assess the effectiveness of food safety interventions over time. Questions regarding consumer food safety practices and knowledge were included in a population-based telephone survey, Foodbook, conducted from November 2014 to March 2015. The results were analyzed nationally by age group and by gender. The results showed that approximately 90% of Canadians reported taking the recommended cleaning and separating precautions when handling raw meat to prevent foodborne illness. Only 29% of respondents reported using a food thermometer when cooking any meat, and even fewer (12%) reported using a food thermometer for small cuts of meat such as chicken pieces. The majority (>80%) of Canadians were aware of the foodborne illness risks related to chicken and hamburger, but fewer (food safety education in Canada should focus on increasing people's awareness of high-risk foods, specifically foods for which the awareness of risk found in this study was low; targeting messaging to demographic groups as appropriate; and promoting the use of food thermometers when cooking meat and poultry.

  16. Parents' Attitudes toward Heritage Language Maintenance for Their Children and Their Efforts to Help Their Children Maintain the Heritage Language: A Case Study of Korean-Canadian Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Man; Sarkar, Mela

    2007-01-01

    In this study we explore Korean immigrant parents' attitudes toward heritage language maintenance for their children and their efforts to help their children maintain Korean as their heritage language in Montreal. Some implications for mainstream school policies and classroom practices are touched on briefly. Data were collected from nine Korean…

  17. How reliable are Psychopathy Checklist-Revised scores in Canadian criminal trials? A case law review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, John F; Cox, Jennifer; Smith, Shannon Toney; DeMatteo, David; Sörman, Karolina

    2015-06-01

    The Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; Hare, 2003) is a professional rating scale that enjoys widespread use in forensic and correctional settings, primarily as a tool to inform risk assessments in a variety of types of cases (e.g., parole determinations, sexually violent predator [SVP] civil commitment). Although widely described as "reliable and valid" in research reports, several recent field studies have suggested that PCL-R scores provided by examiners in forensic cases are significantly less reliable than the interrater reliability values reported in research studies. Most of these field studies, however, have had small samples and only examined SVP civil commitment cases. This study builds on existing research by examining the reliability of PCL-R scores provided by forensic examiners in a much more extensive sample of Canadian criminal cases. Using the LexisNexis database, we identified 102 cases in which at least 2 scores were reported (of 257 total PCL-R scores). The single-rater intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC(A1)) was .59, indicating that a large percentage of the variance in individual scores was attributable to some form of error. ICC values were somewhat higher for sexual offending cases (.66) than they were for nonsexual offending cases (.46), indicating that poor interrater reliability was not restricted specifically to the assessment of sexual offenders. These and earlier findings concerning field reliability in legal cases suggest that the standard error of measurement for PCL-R scores that are provided to the courts is likely to be much larger than the value of 2.90 reported in the instrument's manual. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Circulating metals and persistent organic pollutant concentrations in Canadian and non-Canadian born primiparous women from five Canadian centres: Results of a pilot biomonitoring study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, Warren G., E-mail: fosterw@mcmaster.ca [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Cheung, Anthony P. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Davis, Karelyn [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada (Canada); Graves, Gillian [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Jarrell, John [University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Leblanc, Alain [Institut national de sante publique, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Liang, Chun Lei [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada (Canada); Leech, Tara [Chemicals Surveillance Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Walker, Mark [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Weber, Jean Philippe [Institut national de sante publique, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada); Van Oostdam, Jay [Chemicals Surveillance Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The developing foetus is thought to be at increased risk from exposure to environmental contaminants; however, developmental exposure data is notably lacking for many contaminants. Moreover, potential regional differences or effect of place of birth on residue levels measured in pregnant women is also unknown. Therefore, as part of a multinational biomonitoring study, 125 primiparous pregnant Canadian women were recruited from five Canadian centres (Vancouver, Calgary, Hamilton, Ottawa, and Halifax). Metals in whole blood and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in plasma were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS), respectively. Of the 125 women recruited to this study, complete data sets were available for 123 of which 103 were Canadian born. Data were analysed by analysis of covariance and linear mixed models using age and body mass index as covariates. The metals cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and total mercury (Hg) were detected in more than 93% of the samples tested. {beta}-Hexachlorohexane ({beta}-HCH), oxychlordane, trans-nonachlor, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p Prime -DDE), polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners (PBDE-153, PBDE-47), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (PCB-138, -153, and -180), and the dioxin-like PCB congener PCB-118 were quantified in greater than 70% of the samples tested. Significant differences in the concentrations of Cd, Ni, PCB-153, and p,p Prime -DDE were found between the centres studied. Furthermore, foreign-born pregnant women had significantly higher concentrations of Cd, {beta}-HCH, PBDE-47, PCB-138, -153, -180, and p,p Prime -DDE compared to Canadian born pregnant women. Taken together, the data suggest that there are potential regional differences in contaminant body burden and place of birth may also contribute to differences in maternal residue concentrations. -- Highlights: Black

  19. Hedgerows of different cultures: implications from a Canadian and English cross-cultural study

    OpenAIRE

    Oreszczyn, S.; Lane, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    This paper outlines the functions and character of hedgerows in two different cultures through the investigation of different perspectives. Data from a small Canadian study in the Delta region of British Columbia was used to inform a larger study in two English counties. Although many aspects of the Canadian perspective on hedgerows were similar to that of the English perspective, the Canadian data highlighted the importance of cultural differences in hedged landscapes. These differences had ...

  20. Initiation of opiate addiction in a Canadian prison: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Ronald

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In North America, the harms of illicit drug use have been responded to primarily through law enforcement interventions. This strategy has resulted in record populations of addicted individuals being incarcerated in both Canada and the United States. The incarceration of non-violent drug offenders has become increasingly controversial as studies demonstrate the harms, including elevated HIV risk behavior, of incarcerating injection drug users. Other harms, such as the initiation of illicit drug use by prison inmates who previously did not use drugs, have been less commonly described. Case Presentation We report on the case of an individual who initiated non-injection opiate use in a Canadian prison and developed an addiction to the drug. Upon release into the community, the individual continued using opiates and sought treatment at a clinic. The patient feared that he might initiate injection use of opiates if his cravings could not be controlled. The patient was placed on methadone maintenance therapy. Conclusion While anecdotal reports indicate that initiation in prison of the use of addictive illicit substances is frequent, documentation through clinical experience is rare, and the public health implications of this behavior have not been given sufficient attention in the literature. Strategies of incarcerating non-violent drug offenders and attempting to keep illicit drugs out of prisons have not reduced the harms and costs of illicit drug use. Effective, practical alternatives are urgently needed; expanded community diversion programs for non-violent drug offenders deserve particular attention.

  1. Surgical case volume in Canadian urology residency: a comparison of trends in open and minimally invasive surgical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamut, Adiel E; Afshar, Kourosh; Mickelson, Jennifer J; Macneily, Andrew E

    2011-06-01

    The application of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has become increasingly common in urology training programs and clinical practice. Our objective was to review surgical case data from all 12 Canadian residency programs to identify trends in resident exposure to MIS and open procedures. Every year, beginning in 2003, an average of 41 postgraduate year 3 to 5 residents reported surgical case data to a secure internet relational database. Data were anonymized and extracted for the period 2003 to 2009 by measuring a set of 11 predefined index cases that could be performed in both an open and MIS fashion. 16,687 index cases were recorded by a total of 198 residents. As a proportion, there was a significant increase in MIS from 12% in 2003 to 2004 to 32% in 2008 to 2009 (P=0.01). A significant decrease in the proportion of index cases performed with an open approach was also observed from 88% in 2003 to 2004 to 68% in 2008 to 2009 (P=0.01). The majority of these shifts were secondary to the increased application of MIS for nephrectomies of all type (29%-45%), nephroureterectomy (27%-76%), adrenalectomy (15%-71%), and pyeloplasty (17%-54%) (Pfashion during the study period. MIS constitutes an increasingly significant component of surgical volume in Canadian urology residencies with a reciprocal decrease in exposure to open surgery. These trends necessitate ongoing evaluation to maintain the integrity of postgraduate urologic training.

  2. Cognitive measures in the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuokko, Holly; Griffith, Lauren E; Simard, Martine; Taler, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    We describe the implementation of cognitive measures within the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA), a nationwide, epidemiological study of aging, and relate CLSA Tracking cohort data (n over 20,000) to previous studies using these measures. CLSA participants (aged 45-85, n over 50,000) provided demographic, social, physical/clinical, psychological, economic, and health service utilization information relevant to health and aging through telephone interviews (Tracking cohort, n over 20,000) or in-person (i.e. Comprehensive cohort, n over 30,000) in both official languages (i.e. English, French). Cognitive measures included: the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) - Trial 1 and five-minute delayed recall; Animal Fluency (AF), the Mental Alternation Test (MAT) (both cohorts); Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Stroop Test, Prospective Memory Test, and Choice reaction times (Comprehensive Cohort). Performance on the RAVLT Trial 1 and AF were very similar to comparable groups studied previously; CLSA sample sizes were far larger. Within the CLSA Tracking cohort, main effects of age and language were observed for all cognitive measures except RAVLT delayed recall. Interaction effects (language × age) were observed for AF. This preliminary examination of the CLSA Tracking cognitive measures lends support to their use in large studies of aging. The CLSA has the potential to provide the 'best' comparison data for adult Canadians generated to date and may also be applicable more broadly. Future studies examining relations among the psychological, biological, health, lifestyle, and social measures within the CLSA will make unique contributions to understanding aging.

  3. Injuries at a Canadian National Taekwondo Championships: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Willy

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the injury rates in male and female adult Canadian Taekwondo athletes relative to total number of injuries, type and body part injured. Methods Subjects (219 males, 99 females participated in the 1997 Canadian National Taekwondo Championships in Toronto, Canada. Injuries were recorded on an injury form to documents any injury seen and treatment provided by the health care team. These data were later used for this study. The injury form describes the athlete and nature, site, severity and mechanism of the injury. Results The overall rate of injuries was 62.9/1,000 athlete-exposures (A-E. The males (79.9/1,000 A-E sustained significantly more injuries than the females (25.3/1,000 A-E. The lower extremities were the most commonly injured body region in the men (32.0 /1,000 A-E, followed by the head and neck (18.3/1,000 A-E. Injuries to the spine (neck, upper back, low back and coccyx were the third most often injured body region in males (13.8/1,000 A-E. All injuries to the women were sustained to the lower extremities. The most common type of injury in women was the contusion (15.2/1,000 A-E. However, men's most common type of injury was the sprain (22.8/1,000 A-E followed by joint dysfunction (13.7/1,000A-E. Concussions were only reported in males (6.9/1,000 A-E. Compared to international counterparts, the Canadian men and women recorded lower total injury rates. However, the males incurred more cerebral concussions than their American colleagues (4.7/1,000 A-E. Conclusions Similar to what was found in previous studies, the current investigation seems to suggest that areas of particular concern for preventive measures involve the head and neck as well as the lower extremities. This is the first paper to identify spinal joint dysfunction.

  4. Canadian Author Study: Pre-service Teachers Engage in Assignments to Promote Awareness of Canadian Young Adult Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth McQuirter Scott

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an initiative designed to familiarize pre-service teachers with a wide range of Canadian authors of young adult literature. Teacher candidates work in small groups to study at least three novels by the same author. Each group presents its findings in a creative manner to the class. This background material is then used to prepare a language unit that focuses on one of the following: the author, common themes, or interdisciplinary connections.

  5. SPG7 mutations explain a significant proportion of French Canadian spastic ataxia cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Karine; Tétreault, Martine; Yang, Sharon; La Piana, Roberta; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Vanstone, Megan R; Mathieu, Jean; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Rioux, Marie-France; Rouleau, Guy A; Boycott, Kym M; Majewski, Jacek; Brais, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary cerebellar ataxias and hereditary spastic paraplegias are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and often overlapping neurological disorders. Mutations in SPG7 cause the autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7), but recent studies indicate that they are also one of the most common causes of recessive cerebellar ataxia. In Quebec, a significant number of patients affected with cerebellar ataxia and spasticity remain without a molecular diagnosis. We performed whole-exome sequencing in three French Canadian (FC) patients affected with spastic ataxia and uncovered compound heterozygous variants in SPG7 in all three. Sanger sequencing of SPG7 exons and exon/intron boundaries was used to screen additional patients. In total, we identified recessive variants in SPG7 in 22 FC patients belonging to 12 families (38.7% of the families screened), including two novel variants. The p.(Ala510Val) variant was the most common in our cohort. Cerebellar features, including ataxia, were more pronounced than spasticity in this cohort. These results strongly suggest that variants affecting the function of SPG7 are the fourth most common form of recessive ataxia in FC patients. Thus, we propose that SPG7 mutations explain a significant proportion of FC spastic ataxia cases and that this gene should be considered in unresolved patients.

  6. Technoeconomic analysis of biojet fuel production from camelina at commercial scale: Case of Canadian Prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Mupondwa, Edmund; Tabil, Lope

    2018-02-01

    This study undertakes technoeconomic analysis of commercial production of hydro-processed renewable jet (HRJ) fuel from camelina oil in the Canadian Prairies. An engineering economic model designed in SuperPro Designer® investigated capital investment, scale, and profitability of producing HRJ and co-products (biodiesel, naphtha, LPG, and propane) based on biorefinery plant sizes of 112.5-675 million L annum -1 . Under base case scenario, the minimum selling price (MSP) of HRJ was $1.06 L -1 for a biorefinery plant with size of 225 million L. However, it could range from $0.40 to $1.71 L -1 given variations in plant capacity, feedstock cost, and co-product credits. MSP is highly sensitive to camelina feedstock cost and co-product credits, with little sensitivity to capital cost, discount rate, plant capacity, and hydrogen cost. Marginal and average cost curves suggest the region could support an HRJ plant capacity of up to 675 million L annum -1 (capital investment of $167 million). Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Concentrations of Platinum Group Elements (Pt, Pd, Rh in Airborne Particulate Matter (PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 Collected at Selected Canadian Urban Sites: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celo V.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing environmental concentrations of platinum group elements (PGEs, in particular platinum (Pt, palladium (Pd and rhodium (Rh, from catalytic converters has been reported worldwide. Initially it was believed that the emitted PGEs remain in the roadside environment, but recent studies have shown that fine PGE-containing particles can be transported and distributed at regional and long-range levels. Therefore, the monitoring of PGEs in airborne particulate matter (PM is important for the estimation of potential risks to human health and to the ecosystem. The aim of this study is to present the first results from an analysis on the concentration and distribution of Pt, Pd and Rh in PM collected on Teflon filters at two selected urban sites (Toronto, Ontario; Edmonton, Alberta collected within the Canadian National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS network. In this work, a quadruple inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, combined with microwave assisted acid digestion using aqua regia was used. A cation exchange separation was used to alleviate the matrix-induced spectral and nonspectral interferences prior to ICP-MS analysis. To obtain sufficient material needed for PGEs analysis, fine PM (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 mm; PM2.5 and coarse PM (with aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 mm; PM10-2.5 samples were combined into composite samples on a seasonal basis. The obtained results will be discussed and compared with literature data.

  8. Child Maltreatment Among Children With Intellectual Disability in the Canadian Incidence Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Jacinthe; Paquette, Geneviève; Tremblay, Karine-N; Collin-Vézina, Delphine; Chabot, Martin

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to compare, among a representative sample of substantiated child maltreatment cases, the characteristics of those with intellectual disability (ID) from those without ID. Using the 2008 Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect, 5,797 cases of substantiated maltreatment that involved children aged between 0 and 14 years were analyzed. One in 10 children (11.3%) was identified with ID. Results revealed functional problems to be higher among children with ID and their parents. Moreover, children with ID experienced more severe maltreatment, and were more often referred to ongoing child protection services. These findings suggest that maltreated children with ID are facing additional challenges that must be accounted for in service planning and delivery.

  9. First Imported Case of Chikungunya Virus Infection in a Travelling Canadian Returning from the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Therrien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first Canadian case of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV infection reported in a traveller returning from the Caribbean. Following multiple mosquito bites in Martinique Island in January 2014, the patient presented with high fever, headaches, arthralgia on both hands and feet, and a rash on the trunk upon his return to Canada. Initial serological testing for dengue virus infection was negative. Support therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was administered. The symptoms gradually improved 4 weeks after onset with residual arthralgia and morning joint stiffness. This clinical feature prompted the clinician to request CHIKV virus serology which was found to be positive for the presence of IgM and neutralizing antibodies. In 2014, over four hundred confirmed CHIKV infection cases were diagnosed in Canadian travellers returning from the Caribbean and Central America. Clinical suspicion of CHIKV or dengue virus infections should be considered in febrile patients with arthralgia returning from the recently CHIKV endemic countries of the Americas.

  10. Persistent Albuminuria in Children with Type 2 Diabetes: A Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Elizabeth A C; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Amed, Shazhan; Dart, Allison B; Dyck, Roland F; Hamilton, Jill; Langlois, Valerie; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Dean, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and the clinical features associated with persistent albuminuria in Canadian children aged albuminuria in children with type 2 diabetes were reported during a 24-month period from 2010 to 2012. Persistent albuminuria was defined as an elevated albumin-to-creatinine ratio in a minimum of 2 out of 3 urine samples obtained at least 1 month apart over 3-6 months and confirmed with a first morning sample. Descriptive statistics were used to illustrate demographic and clinical features of the population. The prevalence of persistent albumuria was estimated using data from a previous national surveillence study of type 2 diabetes in children. Fifty cases were reported over the 24-month study period. The estimated prevalence of persistent albuminuria in children with type 2 diabetes in Canada was 5.1%. The median duration of diabetes at the time of diagnosis of albuminuria was 21 days (IQR, 0-241 days). Almost two-thirds (64%) were female, 80% were of Canadian First Nations heritage, and 76% were from Manitoba. Exposure to gestational or pregestational diabetes in utero occurred in 65%, and 48% had a family history of diabetes-related renal disease. Structural anomalies of the kidney were found in 37%. Persistent albuminuria occurs in youths with type 2 diabetes in the first year after diagnosis, demonstrates regional variation, and is associated with First Nations heritage and exposure to maternal diabetes during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Canadian Woman Studies = Les Cahiers de la Femme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This journal volume by and about Indian, Inuit, and Metis native Canadian women, contains articles, interviews, book reviews, fiction, poetry, journal entries and art. It is dedicated to the grandmothers who managed to hold on to old ways, teachings, and feelings, and to pass them on. Poems and stories create personal portraits and reminiscences…

  12. Casing study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, P.

    2000-12-01

    An unorthodox method of casing drilling used by Tesco Corporation at a gas well in Wyoming to drill deeper using casings as drillpipe is discussed. The process involves either rotating the casing as drill string or using a downhole mud motor to rotate the bit. In this instance, the surface hole and the production hole were casing-drilled to a record 8,312 feet by rotating the casing. The 8 1/2-inch surface hole was drilled with 7-inch casing to 1,200 feet using a Tesco underreamer and a polycrystalline pilot bit; drilling and cementing was completed in 12 1/2 hours. The 6 1/4-inch production hole was drilled with 4 1/2-inch casing and the bottomhole assembly was retrieved after 191 hours rotating. This case was the first in which the entire well was casing-drilled from surface to TD. Penetration rate compared favorably with conventional methods: 12 1/2 hours for casing-drilling to 18.9 hours for conventional drilling, despite the fact that the casing-drilling technology is still in its infancy. It is suggested that casing-drilling has the potential to eliminate the need for the drillpipe entirely. If these expectations were to be realised, casing-drilling could be one of the most radical drilling changes in the history of the oil and gas industry. 1 photo.

  13. Acoustic-phonetics of coronal stops: a cross-language study of Canadian English and Canadian French.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundara, Megha

    2005-08-01

    The study was conducted to provide an acoustic description of coronal stops in Canadian English (CE) and Canadian French (CF). CE and CF stops differ in VOT and place of articulation. CE has a two-way voicing distinction (in syllable initial position) between simultaneous and aspirated release; coronal stops are articulated at alveolar place. CF, on the other hand, has a two-way voicing distinction between prevoiced and simultaneous release; coronal stops are articulated at dental place. Acoustic analyses of stop consonants produced by monolingual speakers of CE and of CF, for both VOT and alveolar/dental place of articulation, are reported. Results from the analysis of VOT replicate and confirm differences in phonetic implementation of VOT across the two languages. Analysis of coronal stops with respect to place differences indicates systematic differences across the two languages in relative burst intensity and measures of burst spectral shape, specifically mean frequency, standard deviation, and kurtosis. The majority of CE and CF talkers reliably and consistently produced tokens differing in the SD of burst frequency, a measure of the diffuseness of the burst. Results from the study are interpreted in the context of acoustic and articulatory data on coronal stops from several other languages.

  14. Effect of immigration on multiple sclerosis sex ratio in Canada: the Canadian Collaborative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, S-M; Ramagopalan, S V; Brocklebank, D; Herrera, B M; Dyment, D A; Yee, I M; Sadovnick, A D; Ebers, G C

    2010-01-01

    The ratio of female to male (F:M) multiple sclerosis (MS) cases varies geographically, generally being greater in areas of high prevalence. In many regions, including Canada, rising MS incidence in women has been implied by the marked increase in F:M ratio. We examined the F:M ratio over time in MS patients in the Canadian Collaborative Study born outside Canada, with onset postmigration (n = 2531). We compared the trends to native-born Canadians, by region of origin and age at migration. Regression analysis showed that year of birth (YOB) was a significant predictor of sex ratio in immigrants (chi(2) = 21.4, pimmigrant F:M ratio was 2.17, but varied by country of origin. It was significantly lower in migrants from Southern Europe compared with Northern Europe or USA (1.89 vs 2.14 and 2.86, p = 0.023 and p = 0.0003, respectively). Increasing age at immigration was associated with decreasing sex ratio (p = 0.041). The sex ratio of individuals migrating or =21 (2.79 vs 1.96, p = 0.004). MS sex ratio in immigrants to Canada is increasing but variable by region of origin and influenced by age at migration. The findings highlight the importance of environmental effect(s) in MS risk, which are likely gender-specific.

  15. Characteristics of martial art injuries in a defined Canadian population: a descriptive epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Mark; Pickett, William

    2010-12-30

    The martial arts have emerged as common activities in the Canadian population, yet few studies have investigated the occurrence of associated injuries on a population basis. We performed such an investigation and suggest potential opportunities for prevention. The data source was 14 years (1993 to 2006) of records from the Kingston sites of the Canadian Hospital Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP). 920 cases were identified. Incidence rates were initially estimated using census data as denominators. We then imputed annual injury rates per 10000 using a range of published estimates of martial arts participation available from a national survey. Rates of injury in males and females were 2300 and 1033 per 10000 (0.3% participation) and 575 and 258 per 10000 (1.2% participation). Injuries were most frequently reported in karate (33%) and taekwondo (14%). The most common mechanisms of injury were falls, throws and jumps (33%). Fractures (20%) were the most frequently reported type of injury and the lower limb was the most common site of injury (41%). Results provide a foundation for potential interventions with a focus on falls, the use of weapons, participation in tournaments, as well as head and neck trauma.

  16. Characteristics of martial art injuries in a defined Canadian population: a descriptive epidemiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pickett William

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The martial arts have emerged as common activities in the Canadian population, yet few studies have investigated the occurrence of associated injuries on a population basis. Methods We performed such an investigation and suggest potential opportunities for prevention. The data source was 14 years (1993 to 2006 of records from the Kingston sites of the Canadian Hospital Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP. Results 920 cases were identified. Incidence rates were initially estimated using census data as denominators. We then imputed annual injury rates per 10000 using a range of published estimates of martial arts participation available from a national survey. Rates of injury in males and females were 2300 and 1033 per 10000 (0.3% participation and 575 and 258 per 10000 (1.2% participation. Injuries were most frequently reported in karate (33% and taekwondo (14%. The most common mechanisms of injury were falls, throws and jumps (33%. Fractures (20% were the most frequently reported type of injury and the lower limb was the most common site of injury (41%. Conclusions Results provide a foundation for potential interventions with a focus on falls, the use of weapons, participation in tournaments, as well as head and neck trauma.

  17. Canadian prediction equations of spirometric lung function for Caucasian adults 20 to 90 years of age: Results from the Canadian Obstructive Lung Disease (COLD) study and the Lung Health Canadian Environment (LHCE) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Wan C; Bourbeau, J; Hernandez, P

    2011-01-01

    -corrected FEV1, FVC and FEV1⁄FVC ratio were compared with other spirometry reference studies, mean values were similar, with the closest being derived from population-based studies. CONCLUSION: These spirometry reference equations, derived from randomly selected population-based cohorts with stringently......BACKGROUND: Currently, no reference or normative values for spirometry based on a randomly selected Canadian population exist. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present analysis was to construct spirometric reference values for Canadian adults 20 to 90 years of age by combining data collected from healthy...... with published regression equations showed that the best agreement was obtained from data derived from random populations. RESULTS: The best-fitting regression models for healthy, never-smoking, asymptomatic European-Canadian men and women 20 to 90 years of age were constructed. When age- and height...

  18. Canadian Pharmacy Practice Residents’ Projects: Publication Rates and Study Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Michelle; Duffett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research projects are a key component of pharmacy residents’ education. Projects represent both a large investment of effort for each resident (up to 10 weeks over the residency year) and a large body of research (given that there are currently over 150 residency positions in Canada annually). Publication of results is a vital part of the dissemination of information gleaned from these projects. Objectives: To determine the publication rate for research projects performed under the auspices of accredited English-language hospital pharmacy residency programs in Canada and to describe the study characteristics of residency projects performed in Ontario from 1999/2000 to 2008/2009. Methods: Lists of residents and project titles for the period of interest were obtained from residency coordinators. PubMed, CINAHL, the Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, and Google were searched for evidence of publication of each project identified, as an abstract or presentation at a meeting, a letter to the editor, or a full-text manuscript. The library holdings of the University of Toronto were reviewed to determine study characteristics of the Ontario residency projects. Results: For the objective of this study relating to publication rate, 518 projects were included. The overall publication rate was 32.2% (60 [35.9%] as abstracts and 107 [64.1%] as full-text manuscripts). Publication in pharmacy-specific journals (66 [61.7%] of 107 full-text manuscripts) was more frequent than publication in non-pharmacy-specific journals. The publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts remained stable over time. Of the 202 Ontario residency projects archived in the University of Toronto’s library, most were cohort studies (83 [41.1%]), and the most common topic was efficacy and/or safety of a medication (46 [22.8%]). Conclusions: Most hospital pharmacy residents’ projects were unpublished, and the publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts has not

  19. Canadian pharmacy practice residents' projects: publication rates and study characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Michelle; Duffett, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Research projects are a key component of pharmacy residents' education. Projects represent both a large investment of effort for each resident (up to 10 weeks over the residency year) and a large body of research (given that there are currently over 150 residency positions in Canada annually). Publication of results is a vital part of the dissemination of information gleaned from these projects. To determine the publication rate for research projects performed under the auspices of accredited English-language hospital pharmacy residency programs in Canada and to describe the study characteristics of residency projects performed in Ontario from 1999/2000 to 2008/2009. Lists of residents and project titles for the period of interest were obtained from residency coordinators. PubMed, CINAHL, the Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, and Google were searched for evidence of publication of each project identified, as an abstract or presentation at a meeting, a letter to the editor, or a full-text manuscript. The library holdings of the University of Toronto were reviewed to determine study characteristics of the Ontario residency projects. For the objective of this study relating to publication rate, 518 projects were included. The overall publication rate was 32.2% (60 [35.9%] as abstracts and 107 [64.1%] as full-text manuscripts). Publication in pharmacy-specific journals (66 [61.7%] of 107 full-text manuscripts) was more frequent than publication in non-pharmacy-specific journals. The publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts remained stable over time. Of the 202 Ontario residency projects archived in the University of Toronto's library, most were cohort studies (83 [41.1%]), and the most common topic was efficacy and/or safety of a medication (46 [22.8%]). Most hospital pharmacy residents' projects were unpublished, and the publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts has not increased over time. Most projects were observational studies

  20. CASE STUDY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV infection has several oral manifestations, including oral candidiasis and oral hairy leucoplakia. Occasionally unusual presentations requiring rigorous investigations are seen, and in these cases the diagnosis sometimes remains a dilemma owing to limited investigation facilities.1-3 We present the case of a patient who.

  1. The Canadian petroleum industry: An activity study. 1987 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report provides financial aspects of activity in the Canadian petroleum and natural gas industry. Data are given in graphic and tabular form on revenues, sources and destinations of funds (including financing, incentives, dividend payments, capital and operational expenditures); on comparisons with other industries; on how revenues are shared between the industry and various levels of government; and on principal trends observed. Data are broken down by various industry sectors where applicable. 10 figs., 15 tabs

  2. Pilot Validation Study: Canadian Global Rating Scale for Colonoscopy Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Carpentier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The United Kingdom Global Rating Scale (GRS-UK measures unit-level quality metrics processes in digestive endoscopy. We evaluated the psychometric properties of its Canadian version (GRS-C, endorsed by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG. Methods. Prospective data collection at three Canadian endoscopy units assessed GRS-C validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change according to responses provided by physicians, endoscopy nurses, and administrative personnel. These responses were compared to national CAG endoscopic quality guidelines and GRS-UK statements. Results. Most respondents identified the overarching theme each GRS-C item targeted, confirming face validity. Content validity was suggested as 18 out of 23 key CAG endoscopic quality indicators (78%, 95% CI: 56–93% were addressed in the GRS-C; statements not included pertained to educational programs and competency monitoring. Concordance ranged 75–100% comparing GRS-C and GRS-UK ratings. Test-retest reliability Kappa scores ranged 0.60–0.83, while responsiveness to change scores at 6 months after intervention implementations were greater (P<0.001 in two out of three units. Conclusion. The GRS-C exhibits satisfactory metrics, supporting its use in a national quality initiative aimed at improving processes in endoscopy units. Data collection from more units and linking to actual patient outcomes are required to ensure that GRS-C implementation facilitates improved patient care.

  3. MULTI-PLATFORM PRODUCTION: FULL SPEED AHEAD. THE CASE OF THE CANADIAN COMPANY QUÉBECOR, 1995–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Cam Florence

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the strategies of the Canadian corporation Quebecor, a conglomerate regarded as the prototypical media company and a veteran in the process of gradual media convergence. This case study is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted between 1999 and 2005, and on a review of the corporation’s activities five years later, in 2010. Synergistically integrating cross–promoting media, strategic partnerships with other media, and structural innovation, Quebecor is the most strongly committed actor in multiplatform production in Quebec – and beyond in English Canada. It has also become an increasingly avid proponent of the concept of the multitasking journalist. The analysis proposed here illustrates not only the transformation of the work of Quebecor employees but also the strategies deployed by a conglomerate to control financial and business opportunities anticipated through media convergence.

  4. CASE STUDY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vascular disease necessitating bilateral amputations at the knee. The patient had no ... patients on long-term treatment and those on protease inhibitor (PI) regimens.1,2 We present a rare case of atypical lipodystrophy, presenting as multiple subcutaneous lipomas, in a patient who had been on a non-PI. ARV regimen for 6 ...

  5. Case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Point mutations in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene are well documented in inherited skeletal anomalies, such as achondroplasia and thanatophoric dysplasia, that are associated in most cases of dwarfism.10 In addition, an oncogenic role has been proposed for mutant FGFR.11 Recently,.

  6. "We have been forced to move away from home": print news coverage of Canadians studying abroad at Caribbean offshore medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jeffrey; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy

    2017-11-23

    Canadian international medical graduates are Canadian-citizens who have graduated from a medical school outside of Canada or the United States. A growing number of Canadians enroll in medical school abroad, including at Caribbean offshore medical schools. Often, Canadians studying medicine abroad attempt to return to Canada for postgraduate residency training and ultimately to practice. The authors conducted a qualitative media analysis to discern the dominant themes and ideologies that frame discussion of offshore medical schools, and the Canadian medical students they graduate, in the Canadian print news. We carried out structured searches on Canadian Newsstand Database for print media related to offshore medical schools. Canadian news articles used two frames to characterize offshore medical schools and the Canadian international medical graduates they train: (1) increased opportunity for medical education for Canadians; and (2) frustration returning to Canada to practice despite domestic physician shortages. Frames deployed by the Canadian print media to discuss Caribbean offshore medical schools and Canadians studying abroad define two problems: (1) highly qualified Canadians are unable to access medical school in Canada; and (2) some Canadian international medical graduates are unable to return to Canada to practice medicine. Caribbean offshore medical schools are identified as a solution to the first problem while playing a central role in creating the second problem. These frames do not acknowledge that medical school admissions are a primary means to control the make-up of the Canadian physician workforce and they do not address the nature of Canadian physician shortages.

  7. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  8. Canadian retail petroleum markets study : a review of competitiveness in the Canadian refined petroleum marketing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ervin, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    A retail petroleum market study was conducted to provide a comprehensive overview of the competitiveness of the downstream petroleum industry in Canada, as well as to provide a foundation for effective policy development. A model which illustrates the interrelationships between the many stakeholders who receive revenue from the sale of gasoline was presented. It was shown that although there has been an upward trend in world crude prices since 1991, both refiners and marketers have experienced a decline in margins due to price competition at the rack and at the retail pump. Government intervention into petroleum marketing was considered to be of questionable value and a poor alternative to market-based regulation. In this study, 19 markets representing a broad range of conditions, were chosen for a detailed review of outlet economics. Market-by-market and regional comparisons of key competitiveness indicators were reviewed and discussed. Improving public understanding and awareness of competition in the petroleum marketing sector and developing cooperative industry research into marketing sector competitive issues were recommended. 7 refs., 15 tabs., 37 figs

  9. A Replication Study for Association of LBX1 Locus With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in French-Canadian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Dina; Julien, Cédric; Samuels, Mark E; Moreau, Alain

    2018-02-01

    A case-control association study. To investigate the relationship between LBX1 (lady bird homeobox1) polymorphisms and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in French-Canadian population. It is widely accepted that genetic factors contribute to AIS. Although the LBX1 locus is so far the most successfully replicated locus in different AIS cohorts, these associations were replicated mainly in Asian populations, with few studies in Caucasian populations of European descent. We recruited 1568 participants (667 AIS patients and 901 healthy controls) in the French-Canadian population. Genomic data were generated using the Illumina Human Omni 2.5M BeadChip. An additional 121 AIS cases and 51 controls were genotyped for specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by multiplex polymerase chain reaction using standard procedures. BEAGLE 3 was used to impute the following markers: rs7893223, rs11190878, and rs678741 against the 1000-genomes European cohort phased genotypes given that they were absent in our genome wide association studies (GWAS) panel. Resulting genotypes were combined then used for single marker and haplotyped-based association. Four markers showed association with AIS in our cohort at this locus; rs11190870 the most studied marker, rs7893223, rs594791, and rs11190878. When we restricted the analysis to severe cases only, four additional SNPs showed associations: rs11598177, rs1322331, rs670206, and rs678741. In addition, we analyzed the associations of the observed haplotypes and dihaplotypes formed by these SNPs. The haplotype TTAAGAAA and its homozygous dihaplotype showed the highest association with our severe group and was the highest risk haplotype. The haplotype CCGCAGGG was significantly more associated with the control group, and its homozygous or heterozygous dihaplotype was less frequent in the severe group compared with the control group, suggesting that CCGCAGGG may represent a protective haplotype. We have replicated the association of the

  10. Comparative Analysis of Institutional Policy Definitions of Plagiarism: A Pan-Canadian University Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2017-01-01

    This article shares the findings of a study investigating institutional policy definitions of plagiarism at twenty English-speaking Canadian universities. The types of primary sources consulted for this study included: (1) university academic calendars for 2016-2017, (2) institutional policies on academic misconduct, and (3) student academic codes…

  11. Examining the Heterotypic Continuity of Aggression Using Teacher Reports: Results from a National Canadian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessie L.; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Boyle, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the heterotypic continuity of aggression hypothesis (physical to indirect) using independent teacher reports of aggression drawn from a nationally representative sample of 749 Canadian girls and boys. Confirmatory factor analysis using an accelerated longitudinal design confirmed a two-factor model of physical and indirect…

  12. Who Is Most at Risk for Intimate Partner Violence? A Canadian Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romans, Sarah; Forte, Tonia; Cohen, Marsha M.; Du Mont, Janice; Hyman, Ilene

    2007-01-01

    Whole population studies on intimate partner violence (IPV) have given contradictory information about prevalence and risk factors, especially concerning gender. The authors examined the 1999 Canadian General Social Survey data for gender patterns of physical, sexual, emotional, or financial IPV from a current or ex-partner. More women (8.6%) than…

  13. Do Children Who Bully Their Peers Also Play Violent Video Games? A Canadian National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrick, Crystal J.; Beran, Tanya N.; Mishna, Faye; Hetherington, Ross; Shariff, Shaheen

    2013-01-01

    The study examined whether children who bully others are likely to prefer playing video games that are rated high in maturity and violence. A stratified random sample of Canadian children ages 10 to 17 years from the provinces of Canada was obtained. Parents (n = 397) and their children (n = 492) completed an online survey of children's bullying…

  14. Publicly-Reported Indicators of School System Success: A Comparative Study of Three Canadian Provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauseman, D. Cameron

    2015-01-01

    This comparative study paper seeks to investigate the nature of reported measures of school success currently reported in Ontario with two other Canadian jurisdictions with similar school systems and student populations (Alberta and British Columbia). As education in Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia is, for the most part, a government…

  15. Referential Argumentation and Its Ethical Considerations in Televised Political Advertising: The Case of the 1993 Canadian Federal Election Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Gilles

    1994-01-01

    Studies televised political advertising during the October 1993 Canadian federal election campaign to identify referential argumentation and provide a basis for ethical analysis. Identifies a number of "ad" arguments (ad hominem, ad verecumdiam, ad misericordiam, etc.) according to four types of reference. Discusses two criteria in the…

  16. Visual-Motor Skills Performance on the Beery-VMI: A Study of Canadian Kindergarten Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Coallier B.Sc.O.T.; M.Sc.; PhD student

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Beery VMI is one of the standardized assessment tools most widely used by occupational therapists to assess visual-motor integration. Currently, no specific norms exist for Canadian children. This study was developed to assess whether kindergarten children in Canada compared similarly to the norms established in the U.S. sample of the Beery VMI in order to validate its use with Canadian children. Possible gender differences were also examined. The Beery VMI was administered to 151 kindergarten children, aged 5 to 6 years, at the end of the school year. The data collection took place in seven schools, where the participants were individually assessed. T-tests were used to compare the mean standard scores of the Canadian sample to those provided in the Beery VMI, as well as gender differences. Overall, the study sample showed a similar score (p = .997 compared to the U.S. norms, as well as a significant gender difference; girls obtained higher mean scores than boys (p = .003. These findings support the use of the Beery VMI reference norms to interpret performance results obtained by Canadian kindergarten children. However, the significant gender difference observed should be addressed in future studies.

  17. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  18. Diabetes Nurse Case Management in a Canadian Tertiary Care Setting: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Danni; Elliott, Tom; Klein, Gerri; Ur, Ehud; Tang, Tricia S

    2017-06-01

    To examine the effects of a 6-month nurse case manager (NCM) intervention compared to standard care (SC) on glycemic control and diabetes distress in a Canadian tertiary-care setting. We recruited 140 adults with type 2 diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels >8% (64 mmol/mol) from 2 tertiary care facilities and randomized them to: 1) a 6-month NCM intervention in addition to SC or 2) SC by the primary endocrinologists. Assessments were conducted at baseline and at 6 months. Primary outcomes included A1C levels and diabetes distress scores (DDS). Secondary outcomes included body mass index, blood pressure, diabetes-related behaviour measures, depressive symptoms, self-motivation and perception of support. At the 6-month follow up, the NCM group experienced larger reductions in A1C levels of -0.73% compared to the SC group (p=0.027; n=134). The NCM group also showed an additional reduction of -0.40 (26% reduction) in DDS compared to those in the SC group (p=0.001; n=134). The NCM group had lower blood pressure, ate more fruit and vegetables, exercised more, checked their feet more frequently, were more motivated, were less depressed and perceived more support. There were no changes and no group differences in terms of body mass index, medication compliance or frequency of testing. Compared to SC, NCM intervention was more effective in improving glycemic control and reducing diabetes distress. It is, therefore, a viable adjunct to standard diabetes care in the tertiary care setting, particularly for patients at high risk and with poor control. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Impact of SOX Adoption on the Compensation of Non-US Companies’ Boards: The Case of Canadian Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda SERDIUC

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to study the relationship between the adoption of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX and the compensation of the board of directors of Canadian companies listed on US stock markets. The SOX act, promulgated on 30 July 2002 and the rules adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC require, among furthermore, a majority of independent directors on boards. The literature focuses on two main differences between US companies and Canadian companies: more concentrated ownership and the smaller market capitalization of Canadian companies. Therefore, a consistent application of SOX on all the companies that differ at the base, in their size and structure, may have a different impact on the costs of compliance. Using a sample of 17 Canadian companies listed on US stock exchanges from 2001 to 2004, our analysis show that there is a link between the adoption of SOX and the increased in the cash compensation of the board of directors. The results also show that the effect of SOX is different depending on the company’s size.

  20. Canada's power play : the case for a Canadian energy strategy for a carbon-constrained world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbins, R.; Roberts, K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper presented the results of a series of energy sector consultations conducted across western Canada to determine expert opinions related to the subject of energy policy in Canada. The consultations indicated that many sector experts and stakeholders feel that climate change must be addressed when designing an energy policy for Canada, and that a fair balance must be obtained between the need for economic and environmental sustainability. The economy should not be compromised by action on climate change, and regional differences should be considered. Results of the study suggested that a Canadian energy strategy should coordinate federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal energy policy initiatives. Energy production targets for a range of renewable and non-renewable energy sources should be established. The strategy should inform and be compatible with a national climate change strategy, and move beyond regulation and singular initiatives such as carbon capture and storage. The strategy should stress energy conservation, send appropriate price signals as financial incentives for change, and recognize the need for public investment in research and technology. The document stated that an effective energy strategy may take many years to establish.

  1. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in the gene TTC7A in French-Canadian cases with hereditary multiple intestinal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Mark E; Majewski, Jacek; Alirezaie, Najmeh; Fernandez, Isabel; Casals, Ferran; Patey, Natalie; Decaluwe, Hélène; Gosselin, Isabelle; Haddad, Elie; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Marchand, Valerie; Michaud, Jacques L; Rodrigue, Marc-André; Desjardins, Sylvie; Dubois, Stéphane; Le Deist, Francoise; Awadalla, Philip; Raymond, Vincent; Maranda, Bruno

    2013-05-01

    Congenital multiple intestinal atresia (MIA) is a severe, fatal neonatal disorder, involving the occurrence of obstructions in the small and large intestines ultimately leading to organ failure. Surgical interventions are palliative but do not provide long-term survival. Severe immunodeficiency may be associated with the phenotype. A genetic basis for MIA is likely. We had previously ascertained a cohort of patients of French-Canadian origin, most of whom were deceased as infants or in utero. The goal of the study was to identify the molecular basis for the disease in the patients of this cohort. We performed whole exome sequencing on samples from five patients of four families. Validation of mutations and familial segregation was performed using standard Sanger sequencing in these and three additional families with deceased cases. Exon skipping was assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Five patients from four different families were each homozygous for a four base intronic deletion in the gene TTC7A, immediately adjacent to a consensus GT splice donor site. The deletion was demonstrated to have deleterious effects on splicing causing the skipping of the attendant upstream coding exon, thereby leading to a predicted severe protein truncation. Parents were heterozygous carriers of the deletion in these families and in two additional families segregating affected cases. In a seventh family, an affected case was compound heterozygous for the same 4bp deletion and a second missense mutation p.L823P, also predicted as pathogenic. No other sequenced genes possessed deleterious variants explanatory for all patients in the cohort. Neither mutation was seen in a large set of control chromosomes. Based on our genetic results, TTC7A is the likely causal gene for MIA.

  2. Incidence and age-specific presentation of restrictive eating disorders in children: a Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhas, Leora; Morris, Anne; Crosby, Ross D; Katzman, Debra K

    2011-10-01

    To document and describe the incidence and age-specific presentation of early-onset restrictive eating disorders in children across Canada. Surveillance study. Cases were ascertained through the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program by surveying approximately 2453 Canadian pediatricians (a 95% participation rate) monthly during a 2-year period. Canadian pediatric practices. Pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists. A description of clinical presentations and characteristics of eating disorders in this population and the incidence of restrictive eating disorders in children. The incidence of early-onset restrictive eating disorders in children aged 5 to 12 years seen by pediatricians was 2.6 cases per 100 000 person-years. The ratio of girls to boys was 6:1, and 47.1% of girls and 54.5% of boys showed signs of growth delay. Forty-six percent of children were below the 10th percentile for body mass index, 34.2% were initially seen with unstable vital signs, and 47.2% required hospital admission. Only 62.1% of children met criteria for anorexia nervosa. Although children with anorexia nervosa were more likely to be medically compromised, some children who did not meet criteria for anorexia nervosa were equally medically unstable. Young children are seen with clinically significant restrictive eating disorders, with the incidence exceeding that of type 2 diabetes mellitus. These eating disturbances can result in serious medical consequences, ranging from growth delay to unstable vital signs, which can occur in the absence of weight loss or other restrictive eating disorder symptoms.

  3. A study of algal biomass potential in selected Canadian regions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passell, Howard David; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-11-01

    A dynamic assessment model has been developed for evaluating the potential algal biomass and extracted biocrude productivity and costs, using nutrient and water resources available from waste streams in four regions of Canada (western British Columbia, Alberta oil fields, southern Ontario, and Nova Scotia). The purpose of this model is to help identify optimal locations in Canada for algae cultivation and biofuel production. The model uses spatially referenced data across the four regions for nitrogen and phosphorous loads in municipal wastewaters, and CO{sub 2} in exhaust streams from a variety of large industrial sources. Other data inputs include land cover, and solar insolation. Model users can develop estimates of resource potential by manipulating model assumptions in a graphic user interface, and updated results are viewed in real time. Resource potential by location can be viewed in terms of biomass production potential, potential CO{sub 2} fixed, biocrude production potential, and area required. The cost of producing algal biomass can be estimated using an approximation of the distance to move CO{sub 2} and water to the desired land parcel and an estimation of capital and operating costs for a theoretical open pond facility. Preliminary results suggest that in most cases, the CO{sub 2} resource is plentiful compared to other necessary nutrients (especially nitrogen), and that siting and prospects for successful large-scale algae cultivation efforts in Canada will be driven by availability of those other nutrients and the efficiency with which they can be used and re-used. Cost curves based on optimal possible siting of an open pond system are shown. The cost of energy for maintaining optimal growth temperatures is not considered in this effort, and additional research in this area, which has not been well studied at these latitudes, will be important in refining the costs of algal biomass production. The model will be used by NRC-IMB Canada to identify

  4. An inventory of Canadian pregnancy and birth cohort studies: research in progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joly Marie-Pier

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A web-based inventory was developed as a voluntary registry of Canadian pregnancy and birth cohort studies, with the objective to foster collaboration and sharing of research tools among cohort study groups as a means to enrich research in maternal and child health across Canada. Description Information on existing birth cohort studies conducted in Canada exclusively or as part of broader international initiatives was accessed by searching the literature in PubMed and PsychInfo databases. Additional studies were identified by enquiring about the research activities of researchers at Canadian universities or working in affiliated hospitals or research centres or institutes. Of the fifty-eight birth cohort studies initially identified, forty-six were incorporated into the inventory if they were of a retrospective and/or prospective longitudinal design and with a minimum of two phases of data collection, with the first period having occurred before, during, or shortly after pregnancy and had an initial study sample size of a minimum of 200 participants. Information collected from each study was organized into four main categories: basic information, data source and period of collection, exposures, and outcome measures and was coded and entered into an Excel spreadsheet. The information incorporated into the Excel spreadsheet was double checked, completed when necessary, and verified for completeness and accuracy by contacting the principal investigator or research coordinator. All data collected were then uploaded onto the website of the Institute of Human Development Child and Youth Health of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Subsequently, the database was updated and developed as an online searchable inventory on the website of the Maternal, Infant, Child and Youth Research Network. Conclusions This inventory is unique, as it represents detailed information assembled for the first time on a large number of Canadian

  5. School Experiences Influence Personal Health and Interpersonal Relationships of Adolescents: The Canadian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin

    2007-01-01

    Canadian data from the 1998 Cross-National Survey on Health Behaviors in School-Aged Children were analyzed to examine the effects of school experiences on personal health (physical health, mental health, self-esteem, helplessness, and body image) and interpersonal relationships (number of close friends and making friends) among adolescents.…

  6. Why Workers Are Reluctant Learners: The Case of the Canadian Pulp and Paper Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratton, John A.

    2001-01-01

    In the Canadian pulp/paper industry, management is focused on worker flexibility for productivity. Unions view workplace learning as a threat to job control and security. Although learning new skills enhances individual workers' flexibility and employability, collectively it weakens the union through job losses. (Contains 56 references.) (SK)

  7. Rationale, design, and methods for Canadian alliance for healthy hearts and minds cohort study (CAHHM – a Pan Canadian cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia S. Anand

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Canadian Alliance for Healthy Hearts and Minds (CAHHM is a pan-Canadian, prospective, multi-ethnic cohort study being conducted in Canada. The overarching objective of the CAHHM is to understand the association of socio-environmental and contextual factors (such as societal structure, activity, nutrition, social and tobacco environments, and access to health services with cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical vascular disease, and cardiovascular and other chronic disease outcomes. Methods/Design Participants between 35 and 69 years of age are being recruited from existing cohorts and a new First Nations Cohort to undergo a detailed assessment of health behaviours (including diet and physical activity, cognitive function, assessment of their local home and workplace environments, and their health services access and utilization. Physical measures including weight, height, waist/hip circumference, body fat percentage, and blood pressure are collected. In addition, eligible participants undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain, heart, carotid artery and abdomen to detect early subclinical vascular disease and ectopic fat deposition. Discussion CAHHM is a prospective cohort study designed to investigate the impact of community level factors, individual health behaviours, and access to health services, on cognitive function, subclinical vascular disease, fat distribution, and the development of chronic diseases among adults living in Canada.

  8. “We have been forced to move away from home”: print news coverage of Canadians studying abroad at Caribbean offshore medical schools

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey Morgan; Valorie A. Crooks; Jeremy Snyder

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Canadian international medical graduates are Canadian-citizens who have graduated from a medical school outside of Canada or the United States. A growing number of Canadians enroll in medical school abroad, including at Caribbean offshore medical schools. Often, Canadians studying medicine abroad attempt to return to Canada for postgraduate residency training and ultimately to practice. Methods The authors conducted a qualitative media analysis to discern the dominant them...

  9. “We have been forced to move away from home”: print news coverage of Canadians studying abroad at Caribbean offshore medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Morgan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Canadian international medical graduates are Canadian-citizens who have graduated from a medical school outside of Canada or the United States. A growing number of Canadians enroll in medical school abroad, including at Caribbean offshore medical schools. Often, Canadians studying medicine abroad attempt to return to Canada for postgraduate residency training and ultimately to practice. Methods The authors conducted a qualitative media analysis to discern the dominant themes and ideologies that frame discussion of offshore medical schools, and the Canadian medical students they graduate, in the Canadian print news. We carried out structured searches on Canadian Newsstand Database for print media related to offshore medical schools. Results Canadian news articles used two frames to characterize offshore medical schools and the Canadian international medical graduates they train: (1 increased opportunity for medical education for Canadians; and (2 frustration returning to Canada to practice despite domestic physician shortages. Conclusion Frames deployed by the Canadian print media to discuss Caribbean offshore medical schools and Canadians studying abroad define two problems: (1 highly qualified Canadians are unable to access medical school in Canada; and (2 some Canadian international medical graduates are unable to return to Canada to practice medicine. Caribbean offshore medical schools are identified as a solution to the first problem while playing a central role in creating the second problem. These frames do not acknowledge that medical school admissions are a primary means to control the make-up of the Canadian physician workforce and they do not address the nature of Canadian physician shortages.

  10. Case Study Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  11. Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among French-Canadian breast cancer cases attending an outpatient clinic in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadirian, P; Robidoux, A; Nassif, E; Martin, G; Potvin, C; Patocskai, E; Younan, R; Larouche, N; Venne, A; Zhang, S; Royer, R; Narod, S A

    2014-01-01

    Study subjects were French-Canadian women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive breast cancer (incident or prevalent) who were treated and followed at a single breast cancer clinic affiliated with the Research Center of University of Montreal (CRCHUM), who were either aged less than 50 years at diagnosis or who were 50 years or older and with at least two affected first- or second-degree relatives. Subjects were tested for six founder mutations (three in BRCA1 and three in BRCA2); 1093 eligible cases were tested. Of these, 56 women (5.1%) were mutation carriers, including 43 BRCA2 carriers and 13 BRCA1 carriers. The prevalence of mutations was 5.3% for unselected women aged 50 and less and was 4.6% for familial cases over age 50. The prevalence of mutations was 3.3% for women with DCIS and was 5.3% for women with invasive cancer. It is rational to offer genetic testing to all French-Canadian women diagnosed recently or in the past with either DCIS or invasive breast cancer before age 50 or with familial breast cancer above age 50. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A replication study for association of 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms in ScoliScore test with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in French-Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi Lin; Julien, Cedric; Eveleigh, Robert; Bourque, Guillaume; Franco, Anita; Labelle, Hubert; Grimard, Guy; Parent, Stefan; Ouellet, Jean; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Gorman, Kristen F; Moreau, Alain

    2015-04-15

    A replication association study that used genomic data generated from French-Canadian case and control cohorts. To determine whether the 53 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were previously associated with spinal deformity progression in an American Caucasian cohort are similarly associated in French-Canadian population. It is widely accepted that genetic factors contribute to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The identification of genetic variants associated with the predisposition or progression of curvature could facilitate diagnostic/prognostic tool development. Although 53 SNPs have been associated with spinal curve progression in Caucasian cohorts in the United States, these associations were not replicated in a large Japanese population study, arguing that such a discrepancy could be explained by ethnicity, thus raising the importance of a replication study in an independent Caucasian population of European descent. Genomic data were collected from the French-Canadian population, using the Illumina HumanOmni 2.5M BeadChip. Fifty-two SNPs, tested in ScoliScore or in high linkage disequilibrium with SNPs in the test, were selected to assess their association with scoliosis generally, and with spinal curve progression. One SNP in ScoliScore, rs16909285, could not be evaluated in our Genome-Wide association study. None of the SNPs used in ScoliScore were associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis curve progression or curve occurrence in French-Canadian population. We evaluated 52 SNPs in severe patients by comparing risk allele frequencies with those in nonsevere patients and with those in control individuals. There was no significant difference between the severe group and the nonsevere group or between the severe group and the control group. Although the 52 SNPs studied here were previously associated with curve progression in an American population of European descent, we found no association in French-Canadian patients with adolescent

  13. 2009 reference case scenario : Canadian energy demand and supply to 2020 : an energy market assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The National Energy Board regulates the construction and operation of interprovincial and international oil and gas pipelines and power lines as well as the tolls and tariffs for the pipelines under its jurisdictions. The import and export of natural gas is also regulated by the NEB. The NEB examined the possible energy futures that might unfold for Canadians up to the year 2020. The factors that affect the supply of crude oil, natural gas, liquefied natural gas, electricity and coal in the short term were examined to determine the outlook for deliverability through 2020. The growing demand for energy was reviewed along with the adequacy of future energy supplies, and related issues of emerging technologies, energy infrastructure and energy exports. This assessment provided separate production outlooks for hydrocarbons, electricity and coal and outlined the key uncertainties to the supply outlook. The likely impact of recent economic, energy and policy trends on energy demand and supply were considered. It was concluded that energy markets in Canada will continue to function well. Energy prices will provide appropriate market signals for the development of energy resources to meet Canadian and export demand. A significant portion of Canadian demand for energy will be met by fossil fuels. However, the demand to move towards greener energy fuels should result in fewer greenhouse gas emissions. 1 tab., 27 figs.

  14. Project management case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kerzner, Harold R

    2013-01-01

    A new edition of the most popular book of project management case studies, expanded to include more than 100 cases plus a ""super case"" on the Iridium Project Case studies are an important part of project management education and training. This Fourth Edition of Harold Kerzner''s Project Management Case Studies features a number of new cases covering value measurement in project management. Also included is the well-received ""super case,"" which covers all aspects of project management and may be used as a capstone for a course. This new edition:Contains 100-plus case studies drawn from re

  15. Feasibibility study - cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Hvelplund, Frede Kloster; Sukkumnoed, Decharut

    2004-01-01

    The chapter presents two case studies to show the tools of feasibiliy studies within the context of technological innovation.......The chapter presents two case studies to show the tools of feasibiliy studies within the context of technological innovation....

  16. Biomedical and health studies with the new Canadian SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, R.E.; Hancock, R.G.V.; Isles, K.; Hill, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies on clinical patients who had malnutrition, cystic fibrosis and other related electrolyte disorders. A stable activable tracer technique has been developed to determine the extracellular fluid volume (ECV) of infants. A regulated dose of sodium bromide is injected into the patient and, following short-term equilibration and dilution of this sample, a small blood sample is taken, yielding 50 μl of plasma. The plasma bromide concentration is determined by 80 Br (T=18 m) activation. Some samples were cross-checked by a microdiffusion method. The technique has been applied to 230 patients and controls, and has proved to be simple, rapid, accurate and sensitive for determining ECV to +-6%. Patients with cystic fibrosis (C.F.) were studied with respect to their growth and their sodium and electrolyte balance. In related clinical studies, hair and nail clippings from 50 C.F. patients and control children of the same age groups were activated at SLOWPOKE and Cu, Ca, Br, Cl, K, Na and I determined for use in differentiating C.F., along with a number of other elements including Zn, Mn, Al, Ti and Ni which showed little difference. A fairly good correlation of hair and nail concentrations was found for a number of the elements determined, suggesting that either tissue may be used in future studies. (T.G.)

  17. An environmental radionuclide baseline study near three Canadian naval ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, E.J.; Cole, D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes an environmental radionuclide baseline study undertaken for the Department of National Defence in Canada. The purpose of the project was to establish levels of radionuclides present in the environment around areas where nuclear propelled vessels may be berthed. Specifically, this report describes environmental baselines near Halifax (Nova Scotia), Esquimalt (British Columbia), and Nanoose Bay (British Columbia). Valued ecosystem component samples were taken from dairy farms, beef producers, market gardens, vegetables, tree fruits and berries within the study areas, as well as marine bivalves (mussels and clams), salmon, seaweed, and food from native fisheries. Numerous naturally occurring isotopes were detected and quantified. The only non-naturally occurring isotope positively identified was in the form of trace quantities of 131 I, measured in the Halifax study zone (attributed to local hospital cancer therapy). 137 Cs is the only other anthropogenic radionuclide detected. Its origin may be the combination of fallout from the Chernobyl accident and fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. The results indicate that nuclear-powered vessels have not resulted in activity levels that would contribute a significant radiation exposure to the public, the biota, and the environment within the three study zones

  18. Study in Grey and White: Measuring the Impact of the 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resources Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Sivak

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To use the 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resources Study (the 8Rs Study as a test case to develop a model for assessing research impact in LIS. Methods – Three different methods of citation analysis which take into account the changing environment of scholarly communications. These include a ‚manual‛ method of locating citations to the 8Rs Study through a major LIS database, an enhanced-citation tool Google Scholar, and a general Google search to locate Study references in non-scholarly documents Results – The majority of references (82% were found using Google or Google Scholar; the remainder were located via LISA. Each method had strengths and limitations.Conclusion - In-depth citation analysis provides a promising method of understanding the reach of published research. This investigation’s findings suggest the need for improvements in LIS citation tools, as well as digital archiving practices to improve the accessibility of references for measuring research impact. The findings also suggest the merit of researchers and practitioners defining levels of research impact, which will assist researchers in the dissemination of their work.

  19. The duty to care in an influenza pandemic: a qualitative study of Canadian public perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensimon, Cécile M; Smith, Maxwell J; Pisartchik, Dmitri; Sahni, Sachin; Upshur, Ross E G

    2012-12-01

    Ever since the emergence of SARS, when we were reminded that the nature of health care practitioners' duty to care is greatly contested, it has remained a polarizing issue. Discussions on the nature and limits of health care practitioners' duty to care during disasters and public health emergencies abounds the literature, ripe with arguments seeking to ground its foundations. However, to date there has been little public engagement on this issue. This study involved three Townhall meetings held between February 2008 and May 2010 in three urban settings in Canada in order to probe lay citizens' views about ethical issues related to pandemic influenza, including issues surrounding the duty to care. Participants included Canadian residents aged 18 and over who were fluent in English. Data were collected through day-long facilitated group discussions using case scenarios and focus group guides. Participant's views were organized according to several themes, including the following main themes (and respective sub-themes): 1. Legitimate limits; a) competing obligations; and b) appeal to personal choice; and 2. Legitimate expectations; a) reciprocity; and b) enforcement and planning. Our findings show that participants moved away from categorical notions of the duty to care towards more equivocal and often normative views throughout deliberations. Our analysis contributes a better understanding of the constitutive nature of the duty to care, defined in part by taking account of public views. This broadened understanding can further inform the articulation of acceptable norms of duty to care and policy development efforts. What is more, it illustrates the urgent need for policy-makers and regulators to get clarity on obligations, responsibilities, and accountability in the execution of HCPs' duty to care during times of universal vulnerability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Canadian birth place study: examining maternity care provider attitudes and interprofessional conflict around planned home birth

    OpenAIRE

    Vedam, Saraswathi; Stoll, Kathrin; Schummers, Laura; Fairbrother, Nichole; Klein, Michael C; Thordarson, Dana; Kornelsen, Jude; Dharamsi, Shafik; Rogers, Judy; Liston, Robert; Kaczorowski, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Available birth settings have diversified in Canada since the integration of regulated midwifery. Midwives are required to offer eligible women choice of birth place; and 25-30% of midwifery clients plan home births. Canadian provincial health ministries have instituted reimbursement schema and regulatory guidelines to ensure access to midwives in all settings. Evidence from well-designed Canadian cohort studies demonstrate the safety and efficacy of midwife-attended home birth. H...

  1. Operative Landscape at Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Michael K; Dakson, Ayoub; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Sankar, Tejas; Christie, Sean D

    2017-07-01

    Background Currently, the literature lacks reliable data regarding operative case volumes at Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. Our objective was to provide a snapshot of the operative landscape in Canadian neurosurgical training using the trainee-led Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative. Anonymized administrative operative data were gathered from each neurosurgery residency program from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Procedures were broadly classified into cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures. A number of prespecified subspecialty procedures were recorded. We defined the resident case index as the ratio of the total number of operations to the total number of neurosurgery residents in that program. Resident number included both Canadian medical and international medical graduates, and included residents on the neurosurgery service, off-service, or on leave for research or other personal reasons. Overall, there was an average of 1845 operative cases per neurosurgery residency program. The mean numbers of cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures were 725, 466, 48, and 193, respectively. The nationwide mean resident case indices for cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and total procedures were 90, 58, 5, and 196, respectively. There was some variation in the resident case indices for specific subspecialty procedures, with some training programs not performing carotid endarterectomy or endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures. This study presents the breadth of neurosurgical training within Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. These results may help inform the implementation of neurosurgery training as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons residency training transitions to a competence-by-design curriculum.

  2. A qualitative study on Canadian youth's perspectives of peers who smoke: an opportunity for health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, Roberta L; Busolo, David S

    2015-12-28

    Peer influence, peer selection, and health risk awareness are factors in smoking among youth. Despite the numerous studies on the social context, social network, and how youth define themselves and their smoking status in relation to tobacco use, qualitative knowledge about the role of smoking within peer relationships from youth themselves is only emerging. In this paper, qualitative findings describing Canadian youth's perspectives and experiences of smoking within the context of peer relationships are presented. To examine youth's perceptions, a qualitative research study design was used. Seventy-five Canadian youth aged 11-19 years participated in open-ended interviews, focus groups, and photovoice methods. Data analysis involved several levels of analysis consistent with qualitative research. Youth who smoked were perceived by non-smoking peers as less popular and less socially accepted as represented by the theme: The coolness (not so cool) factor. Non-smoking youth felt that peers who smoked strained relationships and forced them to set boundaries and negotiate friendships as denoted by the theme: Negotiating friendships: Being influenced, but also influencing. Finally, in the theme of Making sense of peers who smoke, youth struggled to understand peers who continued to smoke and why they would start in the first place. As reinforced in this study, Canadian youth increasingly view smoking as unhealthy and uncool. Moreover, youth report resisting peer influence to smoke and in fact, are now influencing their friends who smoke to quit. The self-empowerment stories of non-smoker youth reinforces the idea that the social meaning of smoking with peers is continuing to change from one where youth accepted and participated in the smoking behaviors of their peers, to an environment where youth's perceptions of personal health is paramount. Findings from this study could be used to guide health promotion and smoking prevention programs and campaigns for youth.

  3. Opportunities for prevention and intervention with young children: lessons from the Canadian incidence study of reported child abuse and neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallon Barbara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most effective way to provide support to caregivers with infants in order to promote good health, social, emotional and developmental outcomes is the subject of numerous debates in the literature. In Canada, each province adopts a different approach which range from universal to targeted programs. Nonetheless, each year a group of vulnerable infants is identified to the child welfare system with concerns about their well-being and safety. This study examines maltreatment-related investigations in Canada involving children under the age of one year to identify which factors determine service provision at the conclusion of the investigation. Methods A secondary analysis of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect CIS-2008 (PHAC, 2010 dataset was conducted. Multivariate analyses were conducted to understand the profile of investigations involving infants (n=1,203 and which predictors were significant in the decision to transfer a case to ongoing services at the conclusion of the investigation. Logistic Regression and Classification and Regression Trees (CART were conducted to examine the relationship between the outcome and predictors. Results The results suggest that there are three main sources that refer infants to the Canadian child welfare system: hospital, police, and non-professionals. Infant maltreatment-related investigations involve young caregivers who struggle with poverty, single-parenthood, drug/solvent and alcohol abuse, mental health issues, lack of social supports, and intimate partner violence. Across the three referral sources, primary caregiver risk factors are the strongest predictor of the decision to transfer a case to ongoing services. Conclusions Multivariate analyses indicate that the presence of infant concerns does not predict ongoing service provision, except when the infant is identified with positive toxicology at birth. The opportunity for early intervention and the

  4. Shift Work and Obesity among Canadian Women: A Cross-Sectional Study Using a Novel Exposure Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Natalie; Kirsh, Victoria A; Cotterchio, Michelle; Harris, M Anne; Nadalin, Victoria; Kreiger, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the association between shift work and chronic disease is mediated by an increase in obesity. However, investigations of the relationship between shift work and obesity reveal mixed findings. Using a recently developed exposure assessment tool, this study examined the association between shift work and obesity among Canadian women from two studies: a cohort of university alumni, and a population-based study. Self-administered questionnaire data were used from healthy, currently employed females in a population-based study, the Ontario Women's Diet and Health case-control study (n = 1611 controls), and from a subset of a of university alumni from the Canadian Study of Diet, Lifestyle, and Health (n = 1097) cohort study. Overweight was defined as BMI≥25 to work value derived from Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics data. Regular evenings, nights, or rotating work comprised shift work. Polytomous logistic regression estimated the association between probability of shift work, categorized as near nil, low, medium, and high probability of shift work, on overweight and obesity, controlling for detected confounders. In the population-based sample, high probability of shift work was associated with obesity (reference = near nil probability of shift work, OR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.01-3.51, p = 0.047). In the alumni cohort, no significant association was detected between shift work and overweight or obesity. As these analyses found a positive association between high probability of shift work exposure and obesity in a population-based sample, but not in an alumni cohort, it is suggested that the relationship between shift work and obesity is complex, and may be particularly susceptible to occupational and education-related factors within a given population.

  5. Case study research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ruth; Thomas-Gregory, Annette

    2015-06-10

    This article describes case study research for nursing and healthcare practice. Case study research offers the researcher an approach by which a phenomenon can be investigated from multiple perspectives within a bounded context, allowing the researcher to provide a 'thick' description of the phenomenon. Although case study research is a flexible approach for the investigation of complex nursing and healthcare issues, it has methodological challenges, often associated with the multiple methods used in individual studies. These are explored through examples of case study research carried out in practice and education settings. An overview of what constitutes 'good' case study research is proposed.

  6. Leadership, a central ingredient for a successful quality agenda: a qualitative study of Canadian leaders' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Deborah E; Jackson, Karen; Norris, Jill M

    2013-01-01

    Quality and safety (QS) teams have emerged as one strategy to improve the quality of care and safety. This article aims to enhance understanding of, and identify implications for, leaders in implementing successful QS teams. Research findings from the authors' study that explored barriers and facilitators of Canadian QS teams highlight the need for delineated leadership and accountability, focused strategic plans, available data, dedicated resources and targeted messaging to engage staff and physicians. While top-down leadership strategies were predominantly reported, developing leaders at all organizational levels was acknowledged as key to sustaining a quality culture and advancing the quality agenda.

  7. Identity Profiles and Well-Being of Multicultural Immigrants: The Case of Canadian Immigrants Living in Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Joëlle; de la Sablonnière, Roxane

    2013-01-01

    Studies worldwide point toward increased risk of mental health issues among immigrants. Immigrants’ ability to integrate the cultural identity of their new country has been found to be a key factor in their psychological well-being. Even though researchers agree on the crucial role of identity integration in immigrants’ well-being, the current literature has two main limitations: (1) researchers do not agree on the importance that should be allocated to each of the cultural identities, and (2) research has focused on bicultural individuals as opposed to multicultural individuals. The present paper proposes to study Canadians immigrants living in the province of Quebec who, because of the political and linguistic situation of the province, face the challenge of integrating two new cultural identities (Quebecer and Canadian) to their original one. Specifically, cluster analysis was used to observe identity profiles that naturally emerge among 120 Canadian immigrants from the province of Quebec. Identity profiles were then compared on various indices of well-being to identify the optimal identity structure. In total, four identity profiles emerged, differing in their levels of identity coherence (i.e., similar levels of identification with each group) and identification to either the original group or the Quebecers. ANOVA results confirmed that identity profiles differed in their average level of well-being. First, immigrants with coherent profiles displayed higher levels of well-being. Second, among incoherent profiles, the profile where identification to the original group is the highest showed the greatest well-being. Implications suggest that in order to maximize immigrants’ well-being, psychologists should focus on the coherence between cultural groups as well as identification to the original group. PMID:23450648

  8. Identity profiles and well-being of multicultural immigrants: the case of canadian immigrants living in quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Joëlle; de la Sablonnière, Roxane

    2013-01-01

    Studies worldwide point toward increased risk of mental health issues among immigrants. Immigrants' ability to integrate the cultural identity of their new country has been found to be a key factor in their psychological well-being. Even though researchers agree on the crucial role of identity integration in immigrants' well-being, the current literature has two main limitations: (1) researchers do not agree on the importance that should be allocated to each of the cultural identities, and (2) research has focused on bicultural individuals as opposed to multicultural individuals. The present paper proposes to study Canadians immigrants living in the province of Quebec who, because of the political and linguistic situation of the province, face the challenge of integrating two new cultural identities (Quebecer and Canadian) to their original one. Specifically, cluster analysis was used to observe identity profiles that naturally emerge among 120 Canadian immigrants from the province of Quebec. Identity profiles were then compared on various indices of well-being to identify the optimal identity structure. In total, four identity profiles emerged, differing in their levels of identity coherence (i.e., similar levels of identification with each group) and identification to either the original group or the Quebecers. ANOVA results confirmed that identity profiles differed in their average level of well-being. First, immigrants with coherent profiles displayed higher levels of well-being. Second, among incoherent profiles, the profile where identification to the original group is the highest showed the greatest well-being. Implications suggest that in order to maximize immigrants' well-being, psychologists should focus on the coherence between cultural groups as well as identification to the original group.

  9. Identity profiles and well-being of multicultural immigrants: The case of Canadian immigrants living in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle eCarpentier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies worldwide point toward increased risk of mental health issues among immigrants. Immigrants’ ability to integrate the cultural identity of their new country has been found to be a key factor in their psychological well-being. Even though researchers agree on the crucial role of identity integration in immigrants’ well-being, the current literature has two main limitations: 1 researchers do not agree on the importance that should be allocated to each of the cultural identities, and 2 research has focused on bicultural individuals as opposed to multicultural individuals. The present paper proposes to study Canadians immigrants living in the province of Quebec who, because of the political and linguistic situation of the province, face the challenge of integrating two new cultural identities (Quebecer and Canadian to their original one. Specifically, cluster analysis was used to observe identity profiles that naturally emerge among 120 Canadian immigrants from the province of Quebec. Identity profiles were then compared on various indices of well-being to identify the optimal identity structure. In total, four identity profiles emerged, differing in their levels of identity coherence (i.e., similar levels of identification with each group and identification to either the original group or the Quebecers. ANOVA results confirmed that identity profiles differed in their average level of well-being. First, immigrants with coherent profiles displayed higher levels of well-being. Second, among incoherent profiles, the profile where identification to the original group is the highest showed the greatest well-being. Implications suggest that in order to maximize immigrants’ well-being, psychologists should focus on the coherence between cultural groups as well as identification to the original group.

  10. A national surveillance project on chronic kidney disease management in Canadian primary care: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Aminu K; Ronksley, Paul E; Tangri, Navdeep; Singer, Alexander; Grill, Allan; Nitsch, Dorothea; Queenan, John A; Lindeman, Cliff; Soos, Boglarka; Freiheit, Elizabeth; Tuot, Delphine; Mangin, Dee; Drummond, Neil

    2017-08-04

    Effective chronic disease care is dependent on well-organised quality improvement (QI) strategies that monitor processes of care and outcomes for optimal care delivery. Although healthcare is provincially/territorially structured in Canada, there are national networks such as the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN) as important facilitators for national QI-based studies to improve chronic disease care. The goal of our study is to improve the understanding of how patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are managed in primary care and the variation across practices and provinces and territories to drive improvements in care delivery. The CPCSSN database contains anonymised health information from the electronic medical records for patients of participating primary care practices (PCPs) across Canada (n=1200). The dataset includes information on patient sociodemographics, medications, laboratory results and comorbidities. Leveraging validated algorithms, case definitions and guidelines will help define CKD and the related processes of care, and these enable us to: (1) determine prevalent CKD burden; (2) ascertain the current practice pattern on risk identification and management of CKD and (3) study variation in care indicators (eg, achievement of blood pressure and proteinuria targets) and referral pattern for specialist kidney care. The process of care outcomes will be stratified across patients' demographics as well as provider and regional (provincial/territorial) characteristics. The prevalence of CKD stages 3-5 will be presented as age-sex standardised prevalence estimates stratified by province and as weighted averages for population rates with 95% CIs using census data. For each PCP, age-sex standardised prevalence will be calculated and compared with expected standardised prevalence estimates. The process-based outcomes will be defined using established methods. The CPCSSN is committed to high ethical standards when dealing with

  11. From smart city to smart destination. The case of three Canadian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Bédard

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Several cities around the world are self-proclaimed "smart" by integrating, in varying degrees, new technologies in the different spheres of the city. Nevertheless, despite this effervescence around the smart city, the concept requires more conceptualization from the researchers. This is even more important when it comes time to distinguishing between smart city and smart destination. The relationship between these two concepts is blurred and the transition from the smart city to the smart destination is not automatic. This situation is explained by the fact that the intrinsic characteristics of their respective target populations, being the citizens and the tourists, are different. This article compares three Canadian cities in the province of Quebec with the aim of demonstrating that the realization of a smart destination project requires the adaptation of governance structure and the involvement of all the stakeholders and more particularly in tourism.

  12. Homelessness in the Medical Curriculum: An Analysis of Case-Based Learning Content From One Canadian Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J; MacLeod, Anna; Hwang, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Homelessness is a major public health concern. Given that homeless individuals have high rates of mortality and morbidity, are more likely to be users of the healthcare system, and often report unmet health needs, it is important to examine how homelessness is addressed in medical education. We wanted to examine content and framing of issues related to homelessness in the case-based learning (CBL) curriculum and provide insights about whether medical students are being adequately trained to meet the health needs of homeless individuals through CBL. CBL content at a Canadian medical school that featured content related to homelessness was analyzed. Data were extracted from cases for the following variables: curriculum unit (e.g., professionalism/ethics curriculum or biomedical/clinical curriculum), patient characteristics (e.g., age, sex), and medical and social conditions. A thematic analysis was performed on cases related to homelessness. Discrepancies in analysis were resolved by consensus. Homelessness was mentioned in five (2.6%) of 191 CBL cases in the medical curriculum. Homelessness was significantly more likely to be featured in professionalism/ethics cases than in biomedical/clinical cases (p = .03). Homeless patients were portrayed as socially disadvantaged individuals, and medical learners were prompted to discuss ethical issues related to homeless patients in cases. However, homeless individuals were largely voiceless in cases. Homelessness was associated with serious physical and mental health concerns, but students were rarely prompted to address these concerns. Insights: The health and social needs of homeless individuals are often overlooked in CBL cases in the medical curriculum. Moreover, stereotypes of homelessness may be reinforced through medical training. There are opportunities for growth in addressing the needs of homeless individuals through medical education.

  13. Internet Exposure Associated With Canadian Parents’ Perception of Risk on Childhood Immunization: Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowcroft, Natasha Sarah; Gesink, Dionne; Johnson, Ian; Keelan, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Background There is a large presence of provaccination and antivaccination content on the Internet. The Internet has been identified as an important source for parents to seek and share vaccine information. There are concerns that parental fears or hesitancy on childhood immunizations are increasing due to the popularity of social media and exposure to online antivaccination sentiment. No other studies have investigated the association between seeking vaccine information online and Canadian parents’ perception of risk on childhood immunization. Objective We aimed to investigate the potential association between seeking vaccine information on the Internet and Canadian parents’ perception of risk on childhood immunization in order to quantify the perceived association and increase our understanding on the impact of the Internet to help guide public health interventions. Methods We analyzed this association in two population samples: a self-selecting Web-based sample of Canadian parents recruited through Facebook (n=966) and a population-based sample of parents recruited by random digit dialing (RDD; n=951). The outcome was parental perception of vaccine safety on a seven-point ordinal scale from “not safe” to “extremely safe.” An ordinal regression model was used to investigate if Internet information seeking on childhood vaccination predicted parental perception of vaccine safety. Results After adjusting for income level, Internet reliability, age of parent, and region, the odds of perceiving vaccines as less safe rather than more safe were 1.6 times higher (95% CI 1.3-2.1) for parents who used the Internet to search for vaccination information compared to parents who did not search the Internet in the Web-based sample, and 2.0 times higher (95% CI 1.6-2.5) in the population-based RDD sample. Conclusions The results suggest the Internet is significantly associated with Canadian parents’ negative perception of vaccine risk. Governmental and scientific

  14. Internet Exposure Associated With Canadian Parents' Perception of Risk on Childhood Immunization: Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustin, Jordan Lee; Crowcroft, Natasha Sarah; Gesink, Dionne; Johnson, Ian; Keelan, Jennifer

    2018-01-19

    There is a large presence of provaccination and antivaccination content on the Internet. The Internet has been identified as an important source for parents to seek and share vaccine information. There are concerns that parental fears or hesitancy on childhood immunizations are increasing due to the popularity of social media and exposure to online antivaccination sentiment. No other studies have investigated the association between seeking vaccine information online and Canadian parents' perception of risk on childhood immunization. We aimed to investigate the potential association between seeking vaccine information on the Internet and Canadian parents' perception of risk on childhood immunization in order to quantify the perceived association and increase our understanding on the impact of the Internet to help guide public health interventions. We analyzed this association in two population samples: a self-selecting Web-based sample of Canadian parents recruited through Facebook (n=966) and a population-based sample of parents recruited by random digit dialing (RDD; n=951). The outcome was parental perception of vaccine safety on a seven-point ordinal scale from "not safe" to "extremely safe." An ordinal regression model was used to investigate if Internet information seeking on childhood vaccination predicted parental perception of vaccine safety. After adjusting for income level, Internet reliability, age of parent, and region, the odds of perceiving vaccines as less safe rather than more safe were 1.6 times higher (95% CI 1.3-2.1) for parents who used the Internet to search for vaccination information compared to parents who did not search the Internet in the Web-based sample, and 2.0 times higher (95% CI 1.6-2.5) in the population-based RDD sample. The results suggest the Internet is significantly associated with Canadian parents' negative perception of vaccine risk. Governmental and scientific sectors should consider the development and implementation of

  15. Impact and determinants of nurse turnover: a pan-Canadian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Murphy, Gail Tomblin; Shamian, Judith; Li, Xiaoqiang; Hayes, Laureen J

    2010-11-01

    As part of a large study of nursing turnover in Canadian hospitals, the present study focuses on the impact and key determinants of nurse turnover and implications for management strategies in nursing units. Nursing turnover is an issue of ever-increasing priority as work-related stress and job dissatisfaction are influencing nurses' intention to leave their positions. Data sources included the nurse survey, unit managers, medical records and human resources databases. A broad sample of hospitals was represented with nine different types of nursing units included. Nurses turnover is a major problem in Canadian hospitals with a mean turnover rate of 19.9%. Higher levels of role ambiguity and role conflict were associated with higher turnover rates. Increased role conflict and higher turnover rates were associated with deteriorated mental health. Higher turnover rates were associated with lower job satisfaction. Higher turnover rate and higher level of role ambiguity were associated with an increased likelihood of medical error. Managing turnover within nursing units is critical to high-quality patient care. A supportive practice setting in which role responsibilities are understood by all members of the caregiver team would promote nurse retention. Stable nurse staffing and adequate managerial support are essential to promote job satisfaction and high-quality patient care. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Factors associated with the grief after stillbirth: a comparative study between Brazilian and Canadian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Ferreira Paris

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To verify the association between complicated grief and sociodemographic, reproductive, mental, marital satisfaction, and professional support characteristics in women after stillbirth. METHOD Cross-sectional study with 26 women who had stillbirth in 2013, living in the city of Maringá, Brazil, and eight women who attended the Centre d'Études et de Rechercheen Intervention Familiale at the University of Quebec en Outaouais, in Canada. The instrument was administered as an interview to a small number of mothers of infants up to three months (n=50, who did not participate in the validation study. RESULTS By applying the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale, the prevalence of complicated grief in Brazilian women was found to be higher (35% in relation to Canadian women (12%.Characteristics of the Brazilian women associated with the grief period included the presence of previous pregnancy with live birth, absence of previous perinatal loss, postpartum depression, and lack of marital satisfaction. For the Canadians it was observed that 80% of the women presenting no grief made use of the professional support group. In both populations the occurrence of complicated grief presented a higher prevalence in women with duration of pregnancy higher than 28 weeks. CONCLUSION The women that must be further investigated during the grief period are those living in Brazil, making no use of a professional support group, presenting little to no marital satisfaction, having no religion, and of a low educational level.

  17. Developing a Canadian Curriculum for Simulation-Based Education in Obstetrics and Gynaecology: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Catherine; Posner, Glenn D

    2017-09-01

    As obstetrics and gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) residency training programs move towards a competence-based approach to training and assessment, the development of a national standardized simulation curriculum is essential. The primary goal of this study was to define the fundamental content for the Canadian Obstetrics and Gynecology Simulation curriculum. A modified Delphi technique was used to achieve consensus in three rounds by surveying residency program directors or their local simulation educator delegates in 16 accredited Canadian Ob/Gyn residency programs. A consensus rate of 80% was agreed upon. Survey results were collected over 11 months in 2016. Response rates for the Delphi were 50% for the first round, 81% for the second round, and 94% for the third round. The first survey resulted in 84 suggested topics. These were organized into four categories: obstetrics high acuity low frequency events, obstetrics common events, gynaecology high acuity low frequency events, and gynaecology common events. Using the modified Delphi method, consensus was reached on 6 scenarios. This study identified the content for a national simulation-based curriculum for Ob/Gyn residency training programs and is the first step in the development of this curriculum. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An ultrasound study of Canadian French rhotic vowels with polar smoothing spline comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Jeff

    2015-05-01

    This is an acoustic and articulatory study of Canadian French rhotic vowels, i.e., mid front rounded vowels /ø œ̃ œ/ produced with a rhotic perceptual quality, much like English [ɚ] or [ɹ], leading heureux, commun, and docteur to sound like [ɚʁɚ], [kɔmɚ̃], and [dɔktaɹʁ]. Ultrasound, video, and acoustic data from 23 Canadian French speakers are analyzed using several measures of mid-sagittal tongue contours, showing that the low F3 of rhotic vowels is achieved using bunched and retroflex tongue postures and that the articulatory-acoustic mapping of F1 and F2 are rearranged in systems with rhotic vowels. A subset of speakers' French vowels are compared with their English [ɹ]/[ɚ], revealing that the French vowels are consistently less extreme in low F3 and its articulatory correlates, even for the most rhotic speakers. Polar coordinates are proposed as a replacement for Cartesian coordinates in calculating smoothing spline comparisons of mid-sagittal tongue shapes, because they enable comparisons to be roughly perpendicular to the tongue surface, which is critical for comparisons involving tongue root position but appropriate for all comparisons involving mid-sagittal tongue contours.

  19. Western University (No. 10 Canadian Stationary Hospital and No. 14 Canadian General Hospital): a study of medical volunteerism in the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istl, Alexandra C; McAlister, Vivian C

    2016-12-01

    The Canadian government depended on chaotic civilian volunteerism to staff a huge medical commitment during the First World War. Offers from Canadian universities to raise, staff and equip hospitals for deployment, initially rejected, were incrementally accepted as casualties mounted. When its offer was accepted in 1916, Western University Hospital quickly adopted military decorum and equipped itself using Canadian Red Cross Commission guidelines. Staff of the No. 10 Canadian Stationary Hospital and the No. 14 Canadian General Hospital retained excellent morale throughout the war despite heavy medical demand, poor conditions, aerial bombardment and external medical politics. The overwhelming majority of volunteers were Canadian-born and educated. The story of the hospital's commanding officer, Edwin Seaborn, is examined to understand the background upon which the urge to volunteer in the First World War was based. Although many Western volunteers came from British stock, they promoted Canadian independence. A classical education and a broad range of interests outside of medicine, including biology, history and native Canadian culture, were features that Seaborn shared with other leaders in Canadian medicine, such as William Osler, who also volunteered quickly in the First World War.

  20. The right to die in Canadian legislation, case law and legal doctrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, M

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses moral, social, medical and legal problems pertaining to the so-called 'right to die' from the perspective of Canadian criminal legislation (the Criminal Code), constitutional law (the Charter of Rights and Freedoms) and court rulings. Regarding the latter, the opinions delivered in Nancy B v Hôtel-Dieu de Quebec and Rodriguez v British Columbia (Attorney General) are especially significant. In Rodriguez, the Supreme Court of British Columbia unequivocally rejected the petitioner's submission that the Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the right to die. This judgment was upheld on appeal by both the British Columbia Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Canada. In addition, the article addresses the complex problem of legislating the right to die in Canada. Several options are examined, such as professional judgment and advance health care directives including living wills and powers of attorney for health care. In this context, the recommendations adopted by both the Law Reform Commission of Canada and provincial commissions are analysed. Finally, the article discusses the legislation proposed recently in Alberta, Manitoba, Newfoundland, Ontario and Saskatchewan. It seems doubtful, however, whether a nation-wide solution will be found in the near future.

  1. Study of the economic and environmental impacts of the research and development program of the Canadian Carbonization Research Association (CCRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    A partnership between the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology (CANMET) Energy Technology Centre (CETC) of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), and the Canadian coal and steel industries, the Canadian Carbonization Research Association (CCRA) which conducts research and development activities with its partners. This document summarizes the economic and environmental impacts of the research and development program administered by the CCRA. More than 25 research programs have been undertaken by the CCRA since it was established in 1964. The activities dealt with specific technical challenges which the Canadian coal industry faced with regard to the production and marketing of metallurgical coal, as well as the uses of coal and alternative fuels such as natural gas to make coke used in blast furnaces. The report detailed the scope of CETC's energy for high temperature processes, then addressed program resources and study methodology. Three categories of impacts were discussed: general-level impacts, economic and environmental impacts, and quantitative estimates of economic impacts. The attribution of impacts was examined and future directions were examined in the last section of the report. It was determined that CETC participation in the research program is still required, due to the fact that it is Canada's only technical support available to the Canadian coking coal industry. The survival of Canadian coal producers owes something to the economic impacts derived from the CCRA under the current decreasing metallurgical coal prices conditions. 2 tabs

  2. A compromise too far: a review of Canadian cases of direct-to-consumer advertising regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel; Mintzes, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Since the mid 1990's, Canada has introduced partial direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs through administrative policy shifts. Little documentation exists on how regulation occurs in practice. To evaluate Health Canada's response to complaints about DTCA. We use case studies about DTCA spanning from 2000 to 2011 to examine the stringency of regulation by Health Canada. The aim was to identify key themes in Health Canada's approach to regulation from a public health perspective. All of the material related to the cases was independently read by each of the authors and any disagreements in interpretation were resolved through discussion. We identified six weaknesses in how Health Canada deals with DTCA: failure to act on concerns about promotion for unapproved "off-label" uses, possible financial inducements to use a product, advertisements perceived to stimulate unwarranted fear about disease risks, and advertising of products with serious safety concerns identified in Health Canada safety advisories; ineffective enforcement actions undertaken by Health Canada; and lack of transparency in Health Canada's decision-making. There is an astonishing degree of discordance between public health priorities and regulation of DTCA in Canada. The current approach to enforcement is notable both for its lack of teeth and lack of accountability and transparency.

  3. a case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of (dis)ability in a prospec tive commercial diver with a hand injury – a case study. A case study in disability. W A J (JAck) MeintJes, MB ChB, DOM, FCPHM (SA) Occ Med, MMed (Occ Med). Specialist, Occupational Medicine, Division of Community Health, Department of Interdisciplinary Health Sciences, ...

  4. Chinese immigrant entrepreneurs’ involvement in internationalization and innovation: Three Canadian cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Vissak, Tiia

    2014-01-01

    In international entrepreneurship literature, entrepreneurs moving across borders have received less attention than other entrepreneurs. Also, only scant attention has been paid to immigrant entrepreneurs’ contributions to their organizations. This paper aims to contribute to the emerging...... international immigrant entrepreneurship literature by studying Chinese immigrant entrepreneurs’ roles in their firms’ international and innovative activities in Canada, China, and other countries. It is based on three cases of Chinese entrepreneurs who established businesses in Canada. We conclude...... and locals. Consequently, immigrant entrepreneurs should actively use their connections both in their new country of residence and also in their previous home country, but to become even more successful, they should also reach beyond their ethnic ties....

  5. The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study: examining developmental origins of allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, Padmaja; Anand, Sonia S; Becker, Allan B; Befus, A Dean; Brauer, Michael; Brook, Jeffrey R; Denburg, Judah A; HayGlass, Kent T; Kobor, Michael S; Kollmann, Tobias R; Kozyrskyj, Anita L; Lou, W Y Wendy; Mandhane, Piushkumar J; Miller, Gregory E; Moraes, Theo J; Pare, Peter D; Scott, James A; Takaro, Tim K; Turvey, Stuart E; Duncan, Joanne M; Lefebvre, Diana L; Sears, Malcolm R

    2015-10-01

    The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) birth cohort study recruited 3624 pregnant women, most partners and 3542 eligible offspring. We hypothesise that early life physical and psychosocial environments, immunological, physiological, nutritional, hormonal and metabolic influences interact with genetics influencing allergic diseases, including asthma. Environmental and biological sampling, innate and adaptive immune responses, gene expression, DNA methylation, gut microbiome and nutrition studies complement repeated environmental and clinical assessments to age 5. This rich data set, linking prenatal and postnatal environments, diverse biological samples and rigorous phenotyping, will inform early developmental pathways to allergy, asthma and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. A review of recent analyses of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Potter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this analysis is to identify, assess the quality and summarize the findings of peer-reviewed articles that used data from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS published since November 2011 and data from provincial oversamples of the CIS as well as to illustrate evolving uses of these datasets. Methods: Articles were identified from the Public Health Agency of Canada's data request records tracking access to CIS data and publications produced from that data. At least two raters independently reviewed and appraised the quality of each article. Results: A total of 32 articles were included. Common strengths of articles included clearly stated research aims, appropriate control variables and analyses, sufficient sample sizes, appropriate conclusions and relevance to practice or policy. Common problem areas of articles included unclear definitions for variables and inclusion criteria of cases. Articles frequently measured the associations between maltreatment, child, caregiver, household and agency/referral characteristics and investigative outcomes such as opening cases for ongoing services and placement. Conclusion: Articles using CIS data were rated positively on most quality indicators. Researchers have recently focussed on inadequately studied categories of maltreatment (exposure to intimate partner violence [IPV], neglect and emotional maltreatment and examined factors specific to First Nations children. Data from the CIS oversamples have been underutilized. The use of multivariate analysis techniques has increased.

  7. Examining Child Welfare Decisions and Services for Asian-Canadian Versus White-Canadian Children and Families in the Child Welfare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara; Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Fallon, Barbara; Black, Tara; Trocmé, Nico

    2017-05-01

    Using administrative child welfare data from the Ontario Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (OCANDS), this study compared the profiles of Asian-Canadian and White-Canadian children and families that experienced a case closure after an investigation instead of being transferred to ongoing child protection services (CPS). Child protection investigations involving Asian-Canadian and White-Canadian children and families that were transferred to ongoing CPS presented a different profile of case characteristics and caregiver and child clinical needs. Asian-Canadian children and families received ongoing CPS for over a month longer than White-Canadian children and families and were less likely (odds ratio [ OR] = 0.39) to be reinvestigated for any form of maltreatment-related concerns within 1 year after case closure. It appears that child protection investigations involving Asian-Canadian children and families are less likely to be closed prematurely than White-Canadian children and families, and the child protection system may be meeting the needs of Asian-Canadian communities. Alternatively, it is possible there is unaccounted biases that may be reflective of systemic problem of discriminative practices in the child protection system. Further research is needed to explore this phenomenon.

  8. Deriving low-risk gambling limits from longitudinal data collected in two independent Canadian studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Shawn R; Hodgins, David C; Casey, David M; El-Guebaly, Nady; Smith, Garry J; Williams, Robert J; Schopflocher, Don P

    2017-11-01

    To derive low-risk gambling limits using the method developed by Currie et al. (2006) applied to longitudinal data. Secondary analysis of data from the Quinte Longitudinal Study (n = 3054) and Leisure, Lifestyle and Lifecycle Project (n = 809), two independently conducted cohort studies of the natural progression of gambling in Canadian adults. Community-dwelling adults in Southeastern Ontario and Alberta, Canada. A total of 3863 adults (50% male; median age = 44) who reported gambling in the past year. Gambling behaviours (typical monthly frequency, total expenditure and percentage of income spent on gambling) and harm (experiencing two or more consequences of gambling in the past 12 months) were assessed with the Canadian Problem Gambling Index. The dose-response relationship was comparable in both studies for frequency of gambling (days per month), total expenditure and percentage of household income spent on gambling (area under the curve values ranged from 0.66 to 0.74). Based on the optimal sensitivity and specificity values, the low-risk gambling cut-offs were eight times per month, $75CAN total per month and 1.7% of income spent on gambling. Gamblers who exceeded any of these limits at time 1 were approximately four times more likely to report harm at time 2 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.9-6.6]. Longitudinal data in Canada suggest low-risk gambling thresholds of eight times per month, $75CAN total per month and 1.7% of income spent on gambling, all of which are higher than previously derived limits from cross-sectional data. Gamblers who exceed any of the three low-risk limits are four times more likely to experience future harm than those who do not. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Increase in Utilization of Afterhours Medical Imaging: A Study of Three Canadian Academic Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Shivani; Dhalla, Irfan; Lebovic, Gerald; Rogalla, Patrik; Dowdell, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of our study were to assess trends in afterhours medical imaging utilization for emergency department (ED) and inpatient (IP) patient populations from 2006-2013, including analysis by modality and specialty and with adjustment for patient volume. For this retrospective study, we reviewed the number of CT, MRI, and ultrasound studies performed for the ED and IP patients during the afterhours time period (5pm - 8am on weekdays and 24 hours on weekends and statutory holidays) from 2006-2013 at three different Canadian academic hospitals. We used the Jonckheere-Terpstra (JT) test to determine statistical significance of imaging and patient volume trends. A regression model was used to examine whether there was an increasing trend over time in the volume of imaging tests per 1000 patients. For all three sites from 2006-2013 during the afterhours time period: There was a statistically significant increasing trend in total medical imaging volume, which also held true when the volumes were assessed by modality and by specialty. There was a statistically significant increasing trend in ED and IP patient volume. When medical imaging volumes were adjusted for patient volumes, there was a statistically significant increasing trend in imaging being performed per patient. Afterhours medical imaging volumes demonstrated a statistically significant increasing trend at all three sites from 2006-2013 when assessed by total volume, modality, and specialty. During the same time period and at all three sites, the ED and IP patient volumes also demonstrated a statistically significant increasing trend with more medical imaging, however, being performed per patient. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A study of Canadian hospice palliative care volunteers' attitudes toward physician-assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Miller, Kathryn

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of hospice palliative care (HPC) volunteers who provide in-home support (n = 47) and members of the community (n = 58) toward the issue of physician-assisted suicide (PAS). On the first part of the survey, participants responded to 15 items designed to assess their attitudes toward PAS. An examination of individual items revealed differences in opinions among members of both the groups. Responses to additional questions revealed that the majority of volunteers and community members (1) support legalizing PAS; (2) would choose HPC over PAS for themselves if they were terminally ill; and (3) think Canadians should place more priority on developing HPC rather than on legalizing PAS. The implications of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Expression of pain among Mi'kmaq children in one Atlantic Canadian community: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Margot; Finley, G Allen; Rudderham, Sharon; Inglis, Stephanie; Francis, Julie; Young, Shelley; Hutt-MacLeod, Daphne

    2014-07-01

    First Nation children have the highest rates of pain-related conditions among Canadian children, yet there is little research on how this population expresses its pain or how and whether the pain is successfully treated. The aim of this study was to understand how Mi'kmaq children express pain and how others interpret it. We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study in a large Canadian Mi'kmaq community using interviews and conversation sessions. Participants included children and youth (n = 76), parents (n = 12) teachers (n = 7), elders (n = 6) and health care professionals (n = 13). Interpretive descriptive analysis was used and themes regarding pain expression, care seeking and pain management were identified. Pain expression included stoicism and hiding behaviour, and, when pain was discussed, it was via storytelling and descriptive language, such as similes. Participants reported feeling unheard, stereotyped and frustrated when they sought pain care. Frustration led to avoidance of seeking further care, perceptions of racism and repeat visits because of unsuccessful previous treatment. Participants voiced concerns about the utility of the numeric and faces pain scales to describe pain meaningfully. Positive encounters occurred when participants felt respected and heard. Mi'kmaq children are stoic and often hide their pain. Community members feel frustrated and discriminated against when their pain is not identified, and conventional pain assessment tools may not be useful. If clinicians consider cultural context, build trust and allow for additional time to assess pain via storytelling or word descriptions as well as a family-centred approach, better pain care may occur.

  12. Cross-sectional study of Hepatitis B Awareness among Chinese and Southeast Asian Canadians in the Vancouver-Richmond community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cheung

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B (HBV is endemic and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Asia. British Columbia has the highest proportion of Chinese and Southeast Asians among all Canadian provinces. The present study was designed to evaluate the degree of concern for and knowledge of HBV in this high-risk community.

  13. Ready or Not...: Perspectives on Literacy and Essential Skills in this Economic Downturn--A Canadian Baseline Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Janet; Yerichuk, Deanna; Murray-Smith, Nick

    2009-01-01

    In March 2009, Movement for Canadian Literacy (MCL) commissioned "Resources for Results", a private research and evaluation firm, to conduct a baseline study to explore the effects of the recent economic downturn on literacy and essential skills programs across Canada. The "Resources for Results" research team interviewed 35…

  14. Research and Evidence in Education Decision-Making: A Comparison of Results from Two Pan-Canadian Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galway, Gerald; Sheppard, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we compare the use of research and other evidence in the decision-making practices of two groups of education policy elites, situated in different contexts--provincial education ministries and school districts. Data are derived from two pan-Canadian studies: Galway (2006) and Sheppard, Galway, Brown and Wiens (2013). The findings…

  15. The gendered nature of filial piety--a study among Chinese Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Neena L; Kusch, Karen

    2007-03-01

    This paper examines the modern face of filial piety enactment among Chinese families living away from their homeland. It empirically assesses filial piety practices among a random sample of diasporic Chinese Canadians, by studying the role of sons, daughters and spouses in providing assistance with basic activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living and perceptions of support; the relative contribution of the traditional Chinese caring unit (son plus daughter-in-law) with assistance provided; whether source of assistance changes when amount of care is taken into account, when the gendered nature of tasks is taken into account and when controlling for other factors in multivariate analyses. N = 2,272 Chinese seniors (age 55+) living in seven cities across Canada. The findings reveal that, among these diasporic Chinese, patterns found in other Chinese societies are evident in their tendency to live with children, even when the spouse is still living, and the involvement of sons and the son/daughter-in-law unit in providing care. However, similar to recent findings for China, daughters and spouses are involved in all 3 areas of support examined and importantly, their involvement increases as more assistance is provided while that from sons decreases, notably in terms of IADL. The participation of daughters-in-law tends to be lower than that of either sons or daughters. The involvement of spouses increases for perceived or emotional support. The findings suggest a blending of Chinese and Canadian patterns of care and are discussed in terms of the changing but still gendered nature of care.

  16. Six Heliport Case Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peisen, Deborah

    1997-01-01

    .... This report evaluates the dynamics of heliport development and operation in order to achieve greater success rate in the future through the case study investigation of six heliports that have both succeeded and failed...

  17. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. Objectivist case study research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Fachner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    be achieved through the use of objectivist case study research. The strength of the case study design is that it allows for uncovering or suggesting causal relationships in real-life settings through an intensive and rich collection of data. According to Hilliard (1993), the opposite applies for extensive...... designs, in which a small amount of data is gathered on a large number of subjects. With the richness of data, the intensive design is ―the primary pragmatic reason for engaging in single-case or small N research‖ (p. 374) and for working from an idiographic rather than a nomothetic perspective....

  19. Realization of entry-to-practice milestones by Canadians who studied medicine abroad and other international medical graduates: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Maria; Kandar, Rima; Slade, Steve; Yi, Yanqing; Beardall, Sue; Bourgeault, Ivy

    2017-06-19

    International medical graduates must realize a series of milestones to obtain full licensure. We examined the realization of milestones by Canadian and non-Canadian graduates of Western or Caribbean medical schools, and Canadian and non-Canadian graduates from other medical schools. Using the National IMG Database (data available for 2005-2011), we created 2 cohorts: 1) international medical graduates who had passed the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I between 2005 and 2010 and 2) those who had first entered a family medicine postgraduate program between 2005 and 2009, or had first entered a specialty postgraduate program in 2005 or 2006. We examined 3 entry-to-practice milestones; obtaining a postgraduate position, passing the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part II and obtaining a specialty designation. Of the 6925 eligible graduates in cohort 1, 2144 (31.0%) had obtained a postgraduate position. Of the 1214 eligible graduates in cohort 2, 1126 (92.8%) had passed the Qualifying Examination Part II, and 889 (73.2%) had obtained a specialty designation. In multivariate analyses, Canadian graduates of Western or Caribbean medical schools (odds ratio [OR] 4.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.82-5.71) and Canadian graduates of other medical schools (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.31-1.70) were more likely to obtain a postgraduate position than non-Canadian graduates of other (not Western or Caribbean) medical schools. There was no difference among the groups in passing the Qualifying Examination Part II or obtaining a specialty designation. Canadians who studied abroad were more likely than other international medical graduates to obtain a postgraduate position; there were no differences among the groups in realizing milestones once in a postgraduate program. These findings support policies that do not distinguish postgraduate applicants by citizenship or permanent residency status before medical school. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its

  20. A study of supply-chain capabilities in the Canadian wind power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittholz, H.; Pan, D.

    2004-11-01

    In recent years, Canadian wind energy has developed to a total installed capacity of 439 MW. It is possible that by 2012, the cumulative installed wind power capacity may reach 5,600 MW, representing an investment of $8.4 billion. This analysis of the supply-chain structure in the life cycle of a wind farm identified many potential areas where Canadian companies can offer services. Opportunities for both manufacturers and service providers were presented. It was emphasized that although wind energy is a growth industry, Canada has not participated in the development and commercialization of large wind turbine technology. The technical barriers facing Canadian suppliers regarding wind turbine generator (WTG) assembly and component manufacturing were presented. Currently, Canada imports all large WTGs and components. In order to maximize benefits to the Canadian economy, it was recommended that Canadian companies acquire European technology through licences, joint ventures or foreign investment. Technology transfer funding, training and technical assistance funding, tax incentives for capital equipment and support to universities and colleges were also recommended. It was suggested that Canadian companies should focus on manufacturing rotor blades, towers, base frames, nacelle covers and spinners, flexible drive shafts, disk brakes, vibration mounts, inverters, control cabinets, and generators. tabs., figs

  1. Why are young Canadians afraid of birth? A survey study of childbirth fear and birth preferences among Canadian University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Kathrin; Hall, Wendy; Janssen, Patricia; Carty, Elaine

    2014-02-01

    to examine attitudes towards birth that may be common among young adults who have been socialised into a medicalised birth culture. Specifically, we were interested in examining factors that might be associated with fear of birth and preferences for elective obstetric interventions among the next generation of maternity care consumers. secondary analysis of an online survey of university students. British Columbia, Canada. students from the University of British Columbia (n=3680). A quarter of the sample comprised Asian students, which allowed for analysis of cultural differences in attitudes towards birth. Both male and female students participated in the study; results are reported for the full sample, and by gender. a six item fear of childbirth scale was developed, as well as a 4 item index that measures students' concerns over physical changes following pregnancy and birth and a 2 item scale that assesses students' attitudes towards obstetric technology. as we hypothesised, students who were more fearful of birth preferred epidural anaesthesia and birth by CS. Worries over physical changes following pregnancy and birth, favourable attitudes towards obstetric technology, and exposure to pregnancy and birth information via the media were also significantly associated with a preference for CS. Fear of birth scores were highest among students who reported that the media had shaped their attitudes towards pregnancy and birth. Asian students had significantly higher fear of birth scores and were more likely to prefer CS, compared to Caucasian students. young adults are contemplating pregnancy and birth in an increasingly technology-dependent society. Educational programmes aimed at reducing fear of childbirth and concerns over physical changes following pregnancy and childbirth might contribute to vaginal birth intentions among young adults. Midwives may use the findings to identify and counsel nulliparas who exhibit fear of birth and other childbirth attitudes that

  2. Canadian Physicians' Use of Antiobesity Drugs and Their Referral Patterns to Weight Management Programs or Providers: The SOCCER Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Padwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiobesity pharmacotherapy and programs/providers that possess weight management expertise are not commonly used by physicians. The underlying reasons for this are not known. We performed a cross-sectional study in 33 Canadian medical practices (36 physicians examining 1788 overweight/obese adult patients. The frequency of pharmacotherapy use and referral for further diet, exercise, behavioral management and/or bariatric surgery was documented. If drug treatment or referral was not made, reasons were documented by choosing amongst preselected categories. Logistic regression models were used to identify predictors of antiobesity drug use. No single antiobesity management strategy was recommended by physicians in more than 50% of patients. Referral was most common for exercise (49% of cases followed by dietary advice (46%, and only 5% of eligible patients were referred for bariatric surgery. Significant predictors of initiating/continuing pharmacotherapy were male sex (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.52–0.94, increasing BMI (1.02; 95% CI 1.01–1.03, and private drug coverage (1.78; 95% CI 1.39–2.29. “Not considered” and “patient refusal” were the main reasons for not initiating further weight management. We conclude that both physician and patient factors act as barriers to the use of weight management strategies and both need to be addressed to increase uptake of these interventions.

  3. A study of Iranian immigrants’ experiences of accessing Canadian health care services: a grounded theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastjerdi Mahdieh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immigration is not a new phenomenon but, rather, has deep roots in human history. Documents from every era detail individuals who left their homelands and struggled to reestablish their lives in other countries. The aim of this study was to explore and understand the experience of Iranian immigrants who accessed Canadian health care services. Research with immigrants is useful for learning about strategies that newcomers develop to access health care services. Methods The research question guiding this study was, “What are the processes by which Iranian immigrants learn to access health care services in Canada?” To answer the question, a constructivist grounded theory approach was applied. Initially, unstructured interviews were conducted with 17 participants (11 women and six men who were adults (at least 18 years old and had immigrated to Canada within the past 15 years. Eight participants took part in a second interview, and four participants took part in a third interview. Results Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, “tackling the stumbling blocks of access” emerged as the core category. The basic social process (BSP, becoming self-sufficient, was a transitional process and had five stages: becoming a stranger; feeling helpless; navigating/seeking information; employing strategies; and becoming integrated and self-sufficient. We found that “tackling the stumbling blocks of access” was the main struggle throughout this journey. Some of the immigrants were able to overcome these challenges and became proficient in accessing health care services, but others were unable to make the necessary changes and thus stayed in earlier stages/phases of transition, and sometimes returned to their country of origin. Conclusion During the course of this journey a substantive grounded theory was developed that revealed the challenges and issues confronted by this particular group of immigrants. This process explains

  4. A study of Iranian immigrants' experiences of accessing Canadian health care services: a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Mahdieh; Olson, Karin; Ogilvie, Linda

    2012-09-29

    Immigration is not a new phenomenon but, rather, has deep roots in human history. Documents from every era detail individuals who left their homelands and struggled to reestablish their lives in other countries. The aim of this study was to explore and understand the experience of Iranian immigrants who accessed Canadian health care services. Research with immigrants is useful for learning about strategies that newcomers develop to access health care services. The research question guiding this study was, "What are the processes by which Iranian immigrants learn to access health care services in Canada?" To answer the question, a constructivist grounded theory approach was applied. Initially, unstructured interviews were conducted with 17 participants (11 women and six men) who were adults (at least 18 years old) and had immigrated to Canada within the past 15 years. Eight participants took part in a second interview, and four participants took part in a third interview. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, "tackling the stumbling blocks of access" emerged as the core category. The basic social process (BSP), becoming self-sufficient, was a transitional process and had five stages: becoming a stranger; feeling helpless; navigating/seeking information; employing strategies; and becoming integrated and self-sufficient. We found that "tackling the stumbling blocks of access" was the main struggle throughout this journey. Some of the immigrants were able to overcome these challenges and became proficient in accessing health care services, but others were unable to make the necessary changes and thus stayed in earlier stages/phases of transition, and sometimes returned to their country of origin. During the course of this journey a substantive grounded theory was developed that revealed the challenges and issues confronted by this particular group of immigrants. This process explains why some Iranian immigrants are able to access Canadian health care

  5. A study of Iranian immigrants’ experiences of accessing Canadian health care services: a grounded theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Immigration is not a new phenomenon but, rather, has deep roots in human history. Documents from every era detail individuals who left their homelands and struggled to reestablish their lives in other countries. The aim of this study was to explore and understand the experience of Iranian immigrants who accessed Canadian health care services. Research with immigrants is useful for learning about strategies that newcomers develop to access health care services. Methods The research question guiding this study was, “What are the processes by which Iranian immigrants learn to access health care services in Canada?” To answer the question, a constructivist grounded theory approach was applied. Initially, unstructured interviews were conducted with 17 participants (11 women and six men) who were adults (at least 18 years old) and had immigrated to Canada within the past 15 years. Eight participants took part in a second interview, and four participants took part in a third interview. Results Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, “tackling the stumbling blocks of access” emerged as the core category. The basic social process (BSP), becoming self-sufficient, was a transitional process and had five stages: becoming a stranger; feeling helpless; navigating/seeking information; employing strategies; and becoming integrated and self-sufficient. We found that “tackling the stumbling blocks of access” was the main struggle throughout this journey. Some of the immigrants were able to overcome these challenges and became proficient in accessing health care services, but others were unable to make the necessary changes and thus stayed in earlier stages/phases of transition, and sometimes returned to their country of origin. Conclusion During the course of this journey a substantive grounded theory was developed that revealed the challenges and issues confronted by this particular group of immigrants. This process explains why some Iranian

  6. The Canadian approach to microbial studies in nuclear waste management and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Sargent, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    Many countries considering radioactive waste disposal have, or are considering programs to study and quantify microbial effects in terms of their particular disposal concept. Although there is an abundance of qualitative information, there is a need for quantitative data. Quantitative research should cover topics such as the kinetics of microbial activity in geological media, microbial effects on radionuclide migration in host rock (including effects of biofilms), tolerance to extreme conditions of radiation, heat and desiccation, microbially-influenced corrosion of waste containers and microbial gas production. The research should be performed in relevant disposal environments with the ultimate objective to quantify those effects that need to be included in models for predictive and safety assessment purposes. The Canadian approach to dealing with microbial effects involves a combination of pertinent, quantitative measurements from carefully designed laboratory studies and from large scale engineering experiments in AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The validity of these quantitative data is measured against observations from natural environments and analogues. An example is the viability of microbes in clay-based scaling materials. Laboratory studies have shown that the clay content of these barriers strongly affects microbial activity and movement. This is supported by natural environment and analogue observations that show clay deposits to contain very old tree segments and dense clay lenses in sediments to contain much smaller, less diverse and less active microbial populations than more porous sediments. This approach has allowed for focused, quantitative research on microbial effects in Canada. (author)

  7. Determinants of internal medicine residents' choice in the canadian R4 Fellowship Match: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam Narmin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a discrepancy between Internal Medicine residents' decisions in the Canadian subspecialty fellowship match (known as the R4 match and societal need. Some studies have been published examining factors that influence career choices. However, these were either demographic factors or factors pre-determined by the authors' opinion as possibly being important to incorporate into a survey. Methods A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that determine the residents choice in the subspecialty (R4 fellowship match using focus group discussions involving third and fourth year internal medicine residents Results Based on content analysis of the discussion data, we identified five themes: 1 Practice environment including acuity of practice, ability to do procedures, lifestyle, job prospects and income 2 Exposure in rotations and to role models 3 Interest in subspecialty's patient population and common diseases 4 Prestige and respect of subspecialty 5 Fellowship training environment including fellowship program resources and length of training Conclusions There are a variety of factors that contribute to Internal Medicine residents' fellowship choice in Canada, many of which have been identified in previous survey studies. However, we found additional factors such as the resources available in a fellowship program, the prestige and respect of a subspecialty/career, and the recent trend towards a two-year General Internal Medicine fellowship in our country.

  8. Epidemiology of electrical and lightning-related injuries among Canadian children and youth, 1997-2010: A Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhrer, Madeleine; Stewart, Samuel A; Hurley, Katrina F

    2017-06-27

    Introduction Although death due to electrical injury and lightning are rare in children, these injuries are often preventable. Twenty years ago, most injuries occurred at home, precipitated by oral contact with electrical cords, contact with wall sockets and faulty electrical equipment. We sought to assess the epidemiology of electrical injuries in children presenting to Emergency Departments (EDs) that participate in the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP). This study is a retrospective review of electrical and lightning injury data from CHIRPP. The study population included children and youth aged 0-19 presenting to participating CHIRPP EDs from 1997-2010. Age, sex, year, setting, circumstance and disposition were extracted. Variables were tested using Fisher's exact test and simple linear regression. The dataset included 1183 electrical injuries, with 84 (7%) resulting in hospitalization. Most events occurred at home in the 2-5 year age group and affected the hands. Since 1997 there has been a gradual decrease in the number of electrical injuries per year (plightning were rare (n=19). No deaths were recorded in the database. Despite the decrease in the number of electrical injuries per year, a large portion of injuries still appear to be preventable. Further research should focus on effective injury prevention strategies.

  9. Canadian adolescent mothers' perceptions of influences on breastfeeding decisions: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Sherry A; Campbell, Karen A; Jack, Susan M; Robinson, Heather; Piehl, Kathleen; Bogdan, Janice C

    2012-12-12

    There is increased recognition of the importance of breastfeeding at a national level as evidenced by the increased number of Canadian mothers initiating breastfeeding. However, adolescent mothers (impact of breastfeeding on social and intimate relationships; 2) the availability of social support; 3) the physical demands of breastfeeding; 4) mothers' knowledge of breastfeeding practices and benefits; and 5) mothers' perceived sense of comfort in breastfeeding. The results of this study provide health care providers new conceptual insight and understanding of the factors that influence adolescents' decisions to "try" breastfeeding and to continue providing breastmilk to their infants. Professional implications drawn from this study include active engagement of adolescents in the pre and postnatal periods, including early assessment of potential barriers surrounding breastfeeding decisions. This early professional interaction highlights the professional as a form of support, and allows for sharing of evidence-informed breastfeeding information and practical breastfeeding skills. Inclusion of adolescents' positive social support networks should be emphasized in professional breastfeeding support. Motivational interviewing is a promising prenatal strategy to influence behavior change and reduce ambivalence in decision-making about breastfeeding, creating opportunities for health care providers to tailor interventions.

  10. Economic burden of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a Canadian study of out-of-pocket expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladman, Matthew; Dharamshi, Celina; Zinman, Lorne

    2014-09-01

    This study quantifies the 'out-of-pocket' expenses incurred by individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and their families, explores cost-driving factors and describes the current state of financial support in a Canadian cohort. We performed structured cost-of-illness interviews with 50 consecutive ALS patients and family members detailing disease-specific factors, direct and indirect costs. Direct costs were divided into 'out-of-pocket' and 'government/non-profit organization (NPO) supported'. Results showed that the average annual direct cost per patient was $32,337, of which $19,574 (61%) was paid for out-of-pocket. The most significant direct cost was disease-related home renovations, which garnered minimal government or NPO support. The costs of mobility aids, medical expenses, and private personal support workers were also substantial. Higher out-of-pocket costs were associated with an ALS Functional Rating Scale gross motor subscore of ≤ 6 (p = 0.03), limb-predominant symptoms (p = 0.04) and > 4 h/week of personal support care (p = 0.005). Annual indirect costs (lost wages) for patients with ALS and family members providing care were $56,821. In conclusion, this study quantified the substantial personal economic impact of ALS as measured by non-reimbursed, out-of-pocket expenses. Mobilization of additional resources for ALS patients and families is required to soften the economic burden of this disabling disease.

  11. SCA12 case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 1. Utilizing linkage disequilibrium information from Indian Genome Variation Database for mapping mutations: SCA12 case study. Samira Bahl Ikhlak Ahmed The Indian Genome Variation Consortium Mitali Mukerji. Research Article Volume 88 Issue 1 April 2009 pp 55- ...

  12. Retrospective Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Phillip M.

    1977-09-01

    This project, Retrospective Case Studies (RCS) operates directly under DGE's Resource Exploration and Assessment program. The overall objectives of this project are: (1) to improve the general and specific level of understanding of geothermal systems, and (2) to improve tools and technology for geothermal exploration and assessment.

  13. Chaitanya case study

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    lremy

    sustainability, that began at our inception 12 years ago. This case study ... women. Over the years, we moved towards building a model of sustainable institutions .... poverty alleviation. However, over the last decade, a number of organizations had gained expertise in organizing and managing SHGs and as a result, very few.

  14. MRI case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggett, S.; Barber, J.

    1989-01-01

    Three case studies are presented to show the value of magnetic resonance imaging used in conjunction with other imaging techniques. In each case MRI proved a vital diagnostic tool and superior to CT in showing firstly the haematoma in a patient with aphasia and right-sided weakness, secondly the size of the disc herniation in a patient with severe leg and ankle pains and thirdly the existence of a metastatic lesion in a patient with a previous history of breast cancer. 11 figs

  15. Studying illicit drug trafficking on Darknet markets: Structure and organisation from a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broséus, J; Rhumorbarbe, D; Mireault, C; Ouellette, V; Crispino, F; Décary-Hétu, D

    2016-07-01

    Cryptomarkets are online marketplaces that are part of the Dark Web and mainly devoted to the sale of illicit drugs. They combine tools to ensure anonymity of participants with the delivery of products by mail to enable the development of illicit drug trafficking. Using data collected on eight cryptomarkets, this study provides an overview of the Canadian illicit drug market. It seeks to inform about the most prevalent illicit drugs vendors offer for sale and preferred destination countries. Moreover, the research gives an insight into the structure and organisation of distribution networks existing online. In particular, we provide information about how vendors are diversifying and replicating across marketplaces. We inform on the number of listings each vendor manages, the number of cryptomarkets they are active on and the products they offer. This research demonstrates the importance of online marketplaces in the context of illicit drug trafficking. It shows how the analysis of data available online may elicit knowledge on criminal activities. Such knowledge is mandatory to design efficient policy for monitoring or repressive purposes against anonymous marketplaces. Nevertheless, trafficking on Dark Net markets is difficult to analyse based only on digital data. A more holistic approach for investigating this crime problem should be developed. This should rely on a combined use and interpretation of digital and physical data within a single collaborative intelligence model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Retention Patterns of Canadians Who Studied Medicine Abroad and Other International Medical Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Maria; Kandar, Rima; Slade, Steve; Yi, Yanqing; Beardall, Sue; Bourgeault, Ivy

    2017-05-01

    Are Canadians who study abroad (CSAs) more likely to stay in Canada than other international medical graduates (IMGs)? We looked at retention patterns of CSAs and immigrant IMGs who completed post-graduate medical education (PGME) training in Canada to describe the proportion and predictors of those working in Canada and in rural communities in Canada in 2015. We linked the National IMG Database to Scott's Medical Database to track the work locations of CSAs and immigrant IMGs in 2015. Of the 1,214 IMGs who entered PGME training in Canada between 2005 and 2011, most were working in Canada in 2015 (88.0%). Relatively few IMGs worked in rural communities (9.1%). There were no differences in work location patterns of CSAs and immigrant IMGs. Contrary to what CSA advocates suggest, CSAs have the same retention patterns as immigrant IMGs. PGME admission policies should treat all IMGs in the same manner, regardless of their citizenship or residency before medical school. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  17. Cost study on waste management at three model Canadian uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    A waste management cost study was initiated to determine the capital and operating costs of three different uranium waste management systems which incorporate current technologies being used in Canadian uranium mining operations. Cost estimates were to be done to a thirty percent level of accuracy and were to include all waste management related costs of a uranium ore processing facility. Each model is based on an annual uranium production of 1,923,000 kg U (5,000,000 lbs U 3 O 8 ) with a total operating life of 20 years for the facility. The three models, A, B, and C, are based on three different uranium ore grades, 0.10 percent U 3 O 8 , 0.475 percent U 3 O 8 and 1.5 percent U 3 O 8 respectively. Yellowcake production is assumed to start in January 1984. Model A is based on a conceptual 7,180 tonne per day uranium ore processing facility and waste management system typical of uranium operations in the Elliot Lake area of northern Ontario with an established infrastructure. Model B is a 1.512 tonne per day operation based on a remote uranium operation typical of the Athabasca Basin properties in northern Saskatchewan. Model C is a 466 tonne per day operation processing a high-grade uranium ore containing arsenic and heavy metal concentrations typical of some northern Saskatchewan deposits

  18. The effects of outdoor air pollution on the respiratory health of Canadian children: A systematic review of epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Villamizar, Laura Andrea; Magico, Adam; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Rowe, Brian H

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution is a global problem with serious effects on human health, and children are considered to be highly susceptible to the effects of air pollution. To conduct a comprehensive and updated systematic review of the literature reporting the effects of outdoor air pollution on the respiratory health of children in Canada. Searches of four electronic databases between January 2004 and November 2014 were conducted to identify epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of exposure to outdoor air pollutants on respiratory symptoms, lung function measurements and the use of health services due to respiratory conditions in Canadian children. The selection process and quality assessment, using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, were conducted independently by two reviewers. Twenty-seven studies that were heterogeneous with regard to study design, population, respiratory outcome and air pollution exposure were identified. Overall, the included studies reported adverse effects of outdoor air pollution at concentrations that were below Canadian and United States standards. Heterogeneous effects of air pollutants were reported according to city, sex, socioeconomic status and seasonality. The present review also describes trends in research related to the effect of air pollution on Canadian children over the past 25 years. The present study reconfirms the adverse effects of outdoor air pollution on the respiratory health of children in Canada. It will help researchers, clinicians and environmental health authorities identify the available evidence of the adverse effect of outdoor air pollution, research gaps and the limitations for further research.

  19. Dominant Cultural Narratives, Racism, and Resistance in the Workplace: A Study of the Experiences of Young Black Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasford, Julian

    2016-03-01

    Although many studies have examined lived experiences of racism and resistance in various contexts, relatively little research has examined such experiences among Black youth within the workplace-particularly in the Canadian context. In this study I use qualitative analyses of narrative interviews with 24 Black Canadian youth and young adults (aged 16-35) to examine the impact of dominant cultural narratives on lived experiences of workplace racism and resistance. Findings are presented using theatrical games as a central conceptual metaphor, suggesting that: (a) dominant cultural narratives have a major impact on relational dynamics of oppression in the workplace; (b) identity performance is a critical strategy for negotiating dominant cultural narratives in the workplace; and (c) panopticism (the internalized gaze) is a significant aspect of internalized oppression. Implications for future research and action are discussed. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  20. Understanding Parent Advocacy during the Transition to School of Children with Developmental Disabilities: Three Canadian Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nancy L.; Pyle, Angela; Villeneuve, Michelle; Dods, Jennifer; Dalton, C. J.; Minnes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown the benefits of parent involvement for student participation in education. Parent advocacy is a critical form of involvement by parents for children who are young, have disabilities, and are making transitions. Studies have classified forms of parent advocacy but have not illuminated the components necessary for effective parent…

  1. Evolution Of Late Holocene Sea-Surface Parameters In The Beaufort Sea Area (Mackenzie Slope, Canadian Arctic): Insights From CASES 2004-804-803 Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, A.; Bringué, M.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims at reconstructing late Holocene sea-surface parameters in the Beaufort Sea area (Western Canadian Arctic) on the basis of sedimentary cores collected over the Mackenzie Slope. Piston, trigger and box cores were sampled at station 803 in 2004 aboard the CCGS Amundsen (CASES) at 218 m water depth. Sedimentation at this particular location is influenced by both the Beaufort gyre and the Mackenzie River, whose sedimentary discharge is by far the largest among all other Arctic rivers. The chronology of the piston core is constrained by 4 AMS-14C dates, as the sedimentation rate in the box core is assessed from 210Pb data. We obtain a continuous composite sequence covering the last 4600 years, with a sedimentation rate of ˜140 cm/kyr. Palynological data reveal that dinocyst assemblages are dominated by Operculodinium centrocarpum (mean of 43.3%), with the accompanying taxa Brigantedinium spp. (19.6%), Islandinium minutum (15.6%) and cysts of Pentapharsodinium dalei (13.7%). Four zones have been established on the basis of dinocyst relative abundances, with the following key taxa. Zone I (4600-4000 cal BP): high relative abundances of cysts of P. dalei (mean of 14.9%) and I. minutum var. cezare (up to 8.9%); zone II (4000-2600 cal BP): high abundances of Spiniferites frigidus/elongatus (up to 7.3%); zone III (2600-1600 cal BP): well- represented heterotrophic taxa Brigantedinium spp. (30.8%) and cysts of Polykrikos sp. arctic/quadratus (up to 4.2%); zone IV (1600 cal BP - present): high relative abundances of I. minutum (mean of 19.8%) and cysts of P. dalei (17.3%). Quantitative reconstructions of sea-surface parameters indicate relatively stable conditions from 4600 to 1600 cal BP. Conversely, a trend of increasing summer (August) sea-surface temperature (from ˜5° C to ˜6° C; actual value = 6° C), increasing salinity (from ˜20 to ˜26 psu; modern value = 19 psu) and decreasing sea-ice cover (from ˜9 to 8 month/yr; actual value = 10) is observed

  2. Barriers and supports to implementation of MDI/spacer use in nine Canadian pediatric emergency departments: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ian D

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite recent research supporting the use of metered dose inhalers with spacer devices (MDI/spacers in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs for acute exacerbations of asthma, uptake of this practice has been slow. The objectives of this study were to determine the barriers and supports to implementing MDI/spacer research and to identify factors associated with early and late adoption of MDI/spacers in Canadian PEDs. Methods Using a comparative case study design, we classified nine tertiary care pediatric hospital PEDs based on their stage of implementation. Data were collected using focus group interviews with physicians, registered nurses (RNs, and respiratory therapists (RTs, and individual interviews with both patient care and medical directors at each site. Initial coding was based on the Ottawa Model of Research Use (OMRU categories of elements known to influence the uptake of innovations. Results One hundred and fifty healthcare professionals from nine different healthcare institutions participated in this study. Lack of leadership in the form of a research champion, a lack of consensus about the benefits of MDI/spacers among staff, perceived resistance from patients/parents, and perceived increased cost and workload associated with MDI/spacer use were the most prevalent barriers to the adoption of the MDI/spacer. Common strategies used by early-adopting sites included the active participation of all professional groups in the adoption process in addition to a well-planned and executed educational component for staff, patients, and families. Early adopter sites were also more likely to have the MDI/spacer included in a clinical protocol/pathway. Conclusion Potential barriers and supports to implementation have been identified that will help EDs adopt MDI/spacer use. Future interventions intended to increase MDI/spacer use in PEDs will need to be sensitive to the barriers identified in this study.

  3. Assessing availability of scientific journals, databases, and health library services in Canadian health ministries: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léon, Grégory; Ouimet, Mathieu; Lavis, John N; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre

    2013-03-21

    Evidence-informed health policymaking logically depends on timely access to research evidence. To our knowledge, despite the substantial political and societal pressure to enhance the use of the best available research evidence in public health policy and program decision making, there is no study addressing availability of peer-reviewed research in Canadian health ministries. To assess availability of (1) a purposive sample of high-ranking scientific journals, (2) bibliographic databases, and (3) health library services in the fourteen Canadian health ministries. From May to October 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional survey among librarians employed by Canadian health ministries to collect information relative to availability of scientific journals, bibliographic databases, and health library services. Availability of scientific journals in each ministry was determined using a sample of 48 journals selected from the 2009 Journal Citation Reports (Sciences and Social Sciences Editions). Selection criteria were: relevance for health policy based on scope note information about subject categories and journal popularity based on impact factors. We found that the majority of Canadian health ministries did not have subscription access to key journals and relied heavily on interlibrary loans. Overall, based on a sample of high-ranking scientific journals, availability of journals through interlibrary loans, online and print-only subscriptions was estimated at 63%, 28% and 3%, respectively. Health Canada had a 2.3-fold higher number of journal subscriptions than that of the provincial ministries' average. Most of the organisations provided access to numerous discipline-specific and multidisciplinary databases. Many organisations provided access to the library resources described through library partnerships or consortia. No professionally led health library environment was found in four out of fourteen Canadian health ministries (i.e. Manitoba Health, Northwest

  4. Case study - Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the lecture Case Study - Czechoslovakia with the sub-title 'Unified System of Personnel Preparation for Nuclear Programme in Czechoslovakia' the actual status and the current experience of NPP personnel training and preparation in Czechoslovakia are introduced. The above mentioned training system is presented and demonstrated by the story of a proxy person who is going to become shift engineer in a nuclear power plant in Czechoslovakia. (orig./HP)

  5. Case Studies - Cervical Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about several case studies for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2010 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  6. Canadian adolescent mothers’ perceptions of influences on breastfeeding decisions: a qualitative descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesbitt Sherry A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increased recognition of the importance of breastfeeding at a national level as evidenced by the increased number of Canadian mothers initiating breastfeeding. However, adolescent mothers ( Methods The principles of interpretive description guided this qualitative study. A purposeful, homogenous sample of 16 adolescent mothers (15–19 years were recruited to complete individual, semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Conventional content analysis was used to code data, identify concepts and synthesize them into overall themes. Results Adolescent mothers in this study expressed that the decision to breastfeed was made prenatally and while partner and family member opinions about breastfeeding initiation were influential, the decision was made independently. Mothers were primarily motivated to initiate breastfeeding due to the health benefits for the infant. Lower breastfeeding duration rates were found among mothers who decided to only “try” breastfeeding when compared to the mothers who committed to breastfeeding. Influences on continued breastfeeding included: 1 the impact of breastfeeding on social and intimate relationships; 2 the availability of social support; 3 the physical demands of breastfeeding; 4 mothers’ knowledge of breastfeeding practices and benefits; and 5 mothers’ perceived sense of comfort in breastfeeding. Conclusions The results of this study provide health care providers new conceptual insight and understanding of the factors that influence adolescents’ decisions to “try” breastfeeding and to continue providing breastmilk to their infants. Professional implications drawn from this study include active engagement of adolescents in the pre and postnatal periods, including early assessment of potential barriers surrounding breastfeeding decisions. This early professional interaction highlights the professional as a form of support, and allows for sharing of evidence

  7. Multicenter study of environmental contamination with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate in 66 Canadian hospitals: A 2016 follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, C; Caron, N; Bussières, J F

    2017-08-01

    Oncology workers are occupationally exposed to antineoplastic drugs. This exposure can induce adverse health effects. To reduce their exposure, contamination on surfaces should be kept as low as possible. The main objective of this study was to monitor environmental contamination with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate in oncology pharmacy and patient care areas in Canadian centers. The secondary objective was to describe the impact of some factors that may limit contamination. This is a descriptive study. Twelve standardized sites were sampled in each participating center (six in the pharmacy and six in patient care areas). Samples were analyzed for the presence of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technology. Descriptive statistical analyses were done and results were compared with a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for independent samples. In 2016, 66 centers participated in this study (66/202, 32.7%). Overall, 43.4% (326/752) of the samples were positive for cyclophosphamide, 13.2% (99/752) for ifosfamide and 6.9% (52/752) for methotrexate. The 75th percentile value of cyclophosphamide surface concentration was 6.8 pg/cm 2 and lower than the limit of detection for ifosfamide and methotrexate. Centers who prepared more antineoplastic drugs per year (p contamination to cyclophosphamide. Environmental surveillance is one part of a comprehensive approach for minimizing hazardous exposures in healthcare. This study highlights a low level of contamination of three hazardous drugs amongst 66 Canadian centers. Regular environmental monitoring is a good practice to maintain contamination as low as reasonably achievable.

  8. Qualitative Insights from a Canadian Multiinstitutional Research Study: In Search of Meaningful E-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine M. Carter

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the qualitative findings of a mixed methods research study conducted at three Canadian post-secondary institutions. Called the Meaningful E-learning or MEL project, the study was an exploration of the teaching and learning experiences of faculty and students as well as their perceptions of the benefits and challenges of e-learning. Importantly, e-learning was conceptualized as the integration of pedagogy, instructional technology, and the Internet into teaching and learning environments. Based on this definition, participants reflected on e-learning in relation to one or more of the following contexts: face-to-face (f2f classrooms in which instructional technologies (e.g. learning management systems, video and webconferencing, mobile devices, etc. are used; blended or web-enhanced learning environments; and fully online learning environments. Data collected for the study included survey data (n=1377 for students, n=187 for faculty; narrative comments (n=269 for students, n=74 for faculty; and focus groups (n=16 for students, n=33 for faculty. The latter two sets of data comprise the basis of this paper. Four major themes emerged based on the responses of students and faculty. Represented by the acronym HIDI, the themes include human connection (H, IT support (I, design (D, and institutional infrastructure (I. These themes and sub-themes are presented in the paper as well as recommendations for educators and administrators who aspire to make e-learning a pedagogically meaningful experience for both learners and their teachers.

  9. Multicenter study of environmental contamination with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate in 48 Canadian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poupeau, Céline; Tanguay, Cynthia; Caron, Nicolas J; Bussières, Jean-François

    2018-01-01

    Context Oncology workers are occupationally exposed to antineoplastic drugs. This exposure can induce adverse health effects. In order to reduce their exposure, contamination on surfaces should be kept as low as possible. Objectives To monitor environmental contamination with cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate in oncology pharmacy and patient care areas in Canadian hospitals. To describe the impact of some factors that may limit contamination. Methods This is a descriptive study. Twelve standardized sites were sampled in each participating center (six in the pharmacy and six in patient care areas). Samples were analyzed for the presence of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and methotrexate by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry technology. Descriptive statistical analyses were done and results were compared with a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for independent samples. Results In 2015, 48 hospitals participated in this study (48/202, 24%). Overall, 34% (181/525) of the samples were positive for cyclophosphamide, 8% (41/525) for ifosfamide, and 6% (31/525) for methotrexate. The 75th percentile value of cyclophosphamide surface concentration was 6.9 pg/cm 2 . For ifosfamide and methotrexate, they were lower than the limit of detection. Centers who prepared more antineoplastic drugs per year and centers who used more cyclophosphamide per year showed significantly higher surface contamination ( p contamination. Conclusion In comparison with other multicenter studies that were conducted in Canada, the concentration of antineoplastic drugs measured on surfaces is decreasing. Regular environmental monitoring is a good practice in order to maintain contamination as low as reasonably achievable.

  10. The Right to Live and Die. Canadian Critical Issues Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, John; Bourne, Paula

    One of a series adapted from the Canadian Public Issues Project, this book is designed to stimulate discussion and reflection about controversial issues through case studies. The book is based on high school units originally drawn from cases in newspapers, journals, books, legal documents, and government reports. Conflicts from issues arising over…

  11. Prevalence, risk factors and awareness of albuminuria on a Canadian First Nation: A community-based screening study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharias James

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both diabetic and non-diabetic end stage renal disease (ESRD are more common among Canadian First Nations people than among the general Canadian population. The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for albuminuria in a Canadian First Nation population at high risk for ESRD and dialysis. Methods Data from a community-based screening study of 483 residents of a Plains Ojibway First Nation in Manitoba was used. Participants provided random urine samples. Proteinuria was defined as any dipstick positive for protein (≥1 g/L or those with ACR in the macroalbuminuric range (≥30 mg/mmol on at least one sample. Microalbuminuria was defined as ACR ≥2 mg/mmol for males and ≥2.8 mg/mmol for females. Other measures included fasting glucose, haemoglobin A1c, triglycerides, cholesterol, blood pressure, height, weight and waist and hip circumferences. Results Twenty percent of study participants had albuminuria, (5% proteinuria and 15% microalbuminuria. Of participants with diabetes, 42% (56/132 had albuminuria compared to 26% (7/27 among those with impaired fasting glucose and 10% (30/303 among those with normal glucose tolerance. Only 5.3% of those with albuminuria were aware of any degree of renal disease. In a multivariate logistic regression, independent associations with albuminuria were male gender [p = 0.002], increasing fasting glucose [p Conclusions The independent association between BMI and albuminuria has not been previously reported among indigenous populations. There is a high prevalence of albuminuria in this Canadian First Nation population; the high proportion of patients with diabetes and undiagnosed kidney disease demonstrates the need for screening, education and intervention to halt the progression and development of albuminuria and ultimately ESRD and CVD.

  12. Quality in Family Child Care: A Focus Group Study with Canadian Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of American, Canadian and English preschoolers regularly participate in family child care making its quality of vital importance for the children concerned, their parents, the school system and the society in which they live. This article discusses the seven key caregiver behaviors and physical space characteristics…

  13. Talent Management Programmes at British, American and Canadian Universities: Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichenko, Maryna

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the peculiarities of talent management programmes implementation at the top British, American and Canadian universities. The essence of the main concepts of research--talent and talent management--has been revealed. Talent management is referred to as the systematic attraction, identification, development, engagement,…

  14. Predictors of homelessness among vulnerably housed adults in 3 Canadian cities: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J; Palepu, Anita; Aubry, Tim; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Gogosis, Evie; Gadermann, Anne; Cherner, Rebecca; Farrell, Susan; Misir, Vachan; Hwang, Stephen W

    2016-10-03

    Homelessness is a major concern in many urban communities across North America. Since vulnerably housed individuals are at risk of experiencing homelessness, it is important to identify predictive factors linked to subsequent homelessness in this population. The objectives of this study were to determine the probability of experiencing homelessness among vulnerably housed adults over three years and factors associated with higher risk of homelessness. Vulnerably housed adults were recruited in three Canadian cities. Data on demographic characteristics, chronic health conditions, and drug use problems were collected through structured interviews. Housing history was obtained at baseline and annual follow-up interviews. Generalized estimating equations were used to characterize associations between candidate predictors and subsequent experiences of homelessness during each follow-up year. Among 561 participants, the prevalence of homelessness was 29.2 % over three years. Male gender (AOR = 1.59, 95 % CI: 1.14-2.21) and severe drug use problems (AOR = 1.98, 95 % CI: 1.22-3.20) were independently associated with experiencing homelessness during the follow-up period. Having ≥3 chronic conditions (AOR = 0.55, 95 % CI: 0.33-0.94) and reporting higher housing quality (AOR = 0.99, 95 % CI: 0.97-1.00) were protective against homelessness. Vulnerably housed individuals are at high risk for experiencing homelessness. The study has public health implications, highlighting the need for enhanced access to addiction treatment and improved housing quality for this population.

  15. Predictors of homelessness among vulnerably housed adults in 3 Canadian cities: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. To

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homelessness is a major concern in many urban communities across North America. Since vulnerably housed individuals are at risk of experiencing homelessness, it is important to identify predictive factors linked to subsequent homelessness in this population. The objectives of this study were to determine the probability of experiencing homelessness among vulnerably housed adults over three years and factors associated with higher risk of homelessness. Methods Vulnerably housed adults were recruited in three Canadian cities. Data on demographic characteristics, chronic health conditions, and drug use problems were collected through structured interviews. Housing history was obtained at baseline and annual follow-up interviews. Generalized estimating equations were used to characterize associations between candidate predictors and subsequent experiences of homelessness during each follow-up year. Results Among 561 participants, the prevalence of homelessness was 29.2 % over three years. Male gender (AOR = 1.59, 95 % CI: 1.14–2.21 and severe drug use problems (AOR = 1.98, 95 % CI: 1.22–3.20 were independently associated with experiencing homelessness during the follow-up period. Having ≥3 chronic conditions (AOR = 0.55, 95 % CI: 0.33–0.94 and reporting higher housing quality (AOR = 0.99, 95 % CI: 0.97–1.00 were protective against homelessness. Conclusions Vulnerably housed individuals are at high risk for experiencing homelessness. The study has public health implications, highlighting the need for enhanced access to addiction treatment and improved housing quality for this population.

  16. Facebook Recruitment of Vaccine-Hesitant Canadian Parents: Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background There is concern over the increase in the number of “vaccine-hesitant” parents, which contributes to under-vaccinated populations and reduced herd immunity. Traditional studies investigating parental immunization beliefs and practices have relied on random digit dialing (RDD); however, this method presents increasing limitations. Facebook is the most used social media platform in Canada and presents an opportunity to recruit vaccine-hesitant parents in a novel manner. Objective The study aimed to explore the use of Facebook as a tool to reach vaccine-hesitant parents, as compared with RDD methods. Methods We recruited Canadian parents over 4 weeks in 2013-14 via targeted Facebook advertisements linked to a Web-based survey. We compared methodological parameters, key parental demographics, and three vaccine hesitancy indicators to an RDD sample of Canadian parents. Two raters categorized respondent reasons for difficulties in deciding to vaccinate, according to the model of determinants of vaccine hesitancy developed by the World Health Organization’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization. Results The Facebook campaign received a total of 4792 clicks from unique users, of whom 1696 started the Web-based survey. The total response rate of fully completed unique Web-based surveys was 22.89% (1097/4792) and the survey completion rate was 64.68% (1097/1696). The total cost including incentives was reasonable (Can $4861.19). The Web-based sample yielded younger parents, with 85.69% (940/1097) under the age of 40 years as compared with 23.38% (408/1745) in the RDD sample; 91.43% (1003/1097) of the Facebook respondents were female as compared with 59.26% (1034/1745) in the RDD sample. Facebook respondents had a lower median age of their youngest child (1 year vs 8 years for RDD). When compared with the RDD sample, the Web-based sample yielded a significantly higher proportion of respondents reporting vaccines as moderately safe to not safe

  17. Facebook Recruitment of Vaccine-Hesitant Canadian Parents: Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustin, Jordan Lee; Crowcroft, Natasha Sarah; Gesink, Dionne; Johnson, Ian; Keelan, Jennifer; Lachapelle, Barbara

    2017-07-24

    There is concern over the increase in the number of "vaccine-hesitant" parents, which contributes to under-vaccinated populations and reduced herd immunity. Traditional studies investigating parental immunization beliefs and practices have relied on random digit dialing (RDD); however, this method presents increasing limitations. Facebook is the most used social media platform in Canada and presents an opportunity to recruit vaccine-hesitant parents in a novel manner. The study aimed to explore the use of Facebook as a tool to reach vaccine-hesitant parents, as compared with RDD methods. We recruited Canadian parents over 4 weeks in 2013-14 via targeted Facebook advertisements linked to a Web-based survey. We compared methodological parameters, key parental demographics, and three vaccine hesitancy indicators to an RDD sample of Canadian parents. Two raters categorized respondent reasons for difficulties in deciding to vaccinate, according to the model of determinants of vaccine hesitancy developed by the World Health Organization's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization. The Facebook campaign received a total of 4792 clicks from unique users, of whom 1696 started the Web-based survey. The total response rate of fully completed unique Web-based surveys was 22.89% (1097/4792) and the survey completion rate was 64.68% (1097/1696). The total cost including incentives was reasonable (Can $4861.19). The Web-based sample yielded younger parents, with 85.69% (940/1097) under the age of 40 years as compared with 23.38% (408/1745) in the RDD sample; 91.43% (1003/1097) of the Facebook respondents were female as compared with 59.26% (1034/1745) in the RDD sample. Facebook respondents had a lower median age of their youngest child (1 year vs 8 years for RDD). When compared with the RDD sample, the Web-based sample yielded a significantly higher proportion of respondents reporting vaccines as moderately safe to not safe (26.62% [292/1097] vs 18.57% [324

  18. Factors associated with the grief after stillbirth: a comparative study between Brazilian and Canadian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Gisele Ferreira; Montigny, Francine de; Pelloso, Sandra Marisa

    2016-01-01

    To verify the association between complicated grief and sociodemographic, reproductive, mental, marital satisfaction, and professional support characteristics in women after stillbirth. Cross-sectional study with 26 women who had stillbirth in 2013, living in the city of Maringá, Brazil, and eight women who attended the Centre d'Études et de Rechercheen Intervention Familiale at the University of Quebec en Outaouais, in Canada. The instrument was administered as an interview to a small number of mothers of infants up to three months (n=50), who did not participate in the validation study. By applying the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale, the prevalence of complicated grief in Brazilian women was found to be higher (35%) in relation to Canadian women (12%).Characteristics of the Brazilian women associated with the grief period included the presence of previous pregnancy with live birth, absence of previous perinatal loss, postpartum depression, and lack of marital satisfaction. For the Canadians it was observed that 80% of the women presenting no grief made use of the professional support group. In both populations the occurrence of complicated grief presented a higher prevalence in women with duration of pregnancy higher than 28 weeks. The women that must be further investigated during the grief period are those living in Brazil, making no use of a professional support group, presenting little to no marital satisfaction, having no religion, and of a low educational level. Verificar aassociação entre o luto complicado e as características sociodemográficas, reprodutivas, mentais, de satisfação conjugal e apoio profissional em mulheres após óbito fetal. Estudo transversal com 26 mulheres que tiveram óbito fetal no ano de 2013 residentes no município de Maringá, Brasil, e 18 mulheres participantes do Centre d'Études et de Rechercheen Intervention Familiale, na Universidade do Quebec em Outaouais, no Canadá. Por meio da aplicação da vers

  19. Characteristics of problem gambling in a Canadian context: a preliminary study using a DSM-IV-based questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, C M; Cox, B J

    1999-06-01

    To develop a self-report instrument to assess diagnostic criteria and associated features of pathological gambling in order to learn more about the characteristics of individuals who seek treatment for gambling problems in a Canadian setting. Fifty-seven adults seeking treatment for gambling problems at the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba were assessed. There was substantial variation in the endorsement of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) symptoms. Lying to family members or friends and "chasing" previous gambling losses were frequently reported, while more serious consequences (for example, relationship breakup, job losses) were less frequent. DSM-IV ratings were correlated (r = 0.59) with the South Oaks Gambling Screen. Many individuals reported gambling as a way to alleviate dysphoric mood, and 30% reported receiving mental health services in the past. Approximately 50% reported suicidal ideation, although recent suicide attempts were not common. These preliminary results of Canadian adults seeking treatment for gambling problems suggest a somewhat different profile from many United States studies, which often rely on older male pathological gamblers. More systematic investigation of the presence of major depression and other psychiatric disorders is warranted. Consistent with demographic data collected at the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba, it appears that video lottery terminals play a major role in the type of problem gambling experience seen in Canadian settings.

  20. Case Study - Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Leybourne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study was developed from an actual scenario by Dr. Steve Leybourne of Boston University.  The case documents the historical evolution of an organization, and has been used successfully in courses dealing with organizational and cultural change, and the utilization of ‘soft skills’ in project-based management. This is a short case, ideal for classroom use and discussion.  The issues are easily accessible to students, and there is a single wide ranging question that allows for the inclusion of many issues surrounding strategic decision-making, and behavioural and cultural change. Alpha was one of the earlier companies in the USA to invest in large, edge-of-town superstores, with plentiful free vehicle parking, selling food and related household products. Alpha was created in the 1950s as a subsidiary of a major publicly quoted retail group.  It started business by opening a string of very large discount stores in converted industrial and warehouse premises in the south of the United States. In the early days shoppers were offered a limited range of very competitively priced products. When Alpha went public in 1981 it was the fourth largest food retailer in the US, selling an ever-widening range of food and non-food products.  Its success continued to be based on high volume, low margins and good value for money, under the slogan of ‘Alpha Price.’

  1. Basic Laparoscopic Skills Assessment Study: Validation and Standard Setting among Canadian Urology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason Y; Andonian, Sero; Pace, Kenneth T; Grober, Ethan

    2017-06-01

    As urology training programs move to a competency based medical education model, iterative assessments with objective standards will be required. To develop a valid set of technical skills standards we initiated a national skills assessment study focusing initially on laparoscopic skills. Between February 2014 and March 2016 the basic laparoscopic skill of Canadian urology trainees and attending urologists was assessed using 4 standardized tasks from the AUA (American Urological Association) BLUS (Basic Laparoscopic Urological Surgery) curriculum, including peg transfer, pattern cutting, suturing and knot tying, and vascular clip applying. All performances were video recorded and assessed using 3 methods, including time and error based scoring, expert global rating scores and C-SATS (Crowd-Sourced Assessments of Technical Skill Global Rating Scale), a novel, crowd sourced assessment platform. Different methods of standard setting were used to develop pass-fail cut points. Six attending urologists and 99 trainees completed testing. Reported laparoscopic experience and training level correlated with performance (p standard setting methods to define pass-fail cut points for all 4 AUA BLUS tasks. The 4 AUA BLUS tasks demonstrated good construct validity evidence for use in assessing basic laparoscopic skill. Performance scores using the novel C-SATS platform correlated well with traditional time-consuming methods of assessment. Various standard setting methods were used to develop pass-fail cut points for educators to use when making formative and summative assessments of basic laparoscopic skill. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Postpartum Diabetes Testing Rates after Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Canadian Women: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butalia, Sonia; Donovan, Lois; Savu, Anamaria; Johnson, Jeffrey; Edwards, Alun; Kaul, Padma

    2017-12-01

    We assessed the rate and type of postpartum glycemic testing in women with impaired glucose tolerance of pregnancy (IGTp) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We examined whether the likelihood of testing was modulated by patients' characteristics and pregnancy outcomes. Our population-level cohort study included data from 132,905 pregnancies between October 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, in Alberta, Canada. Laboratory data within 270 days before and 1 year after delivery were used to identify pregnancies involving IGTp/GDM and postpartum glycemic testing, respectively. Logistic regression was used to identify maternal and pregnancy factors associated with postpartum testing. A total of 8,703 pregnancies were affected by IGTp (n=3669) or GDM (n=5034) as defined by the prevailing Canadian Diabetes Association 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada. By 1 year postpartum, 55.1% had undergone glycemic assessments. Of those, 59.7% had had 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests, 17.4% had had glycated hemoglobin tests without oral glucose tolerance tests and 22.9% had had only fasting or random glucose tests. Women with IGTp or GDM, respectively, who were younger, smokers and residing in rural areas and whose labours were not induced were less likely to be tested postpartum. Having large for gestational age infants was also associated with a lower likelihood of postpartum testing in women with GDM. Despite a universal health-care system in Canada, many women with IGTp or GDM do not undergo postpartum glucose testing. Maternal and pregnancy characteristics influence postpartum testing and provide valuable information for creating targeted strategies to improve postpartum testing in this group of high-risk women. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Active transportation and bullying in Canadian schoolchildren: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozma, Ioana; Kukaswadia, Atif; Janssen, Ian; Craig, Wendy; Pickett, William

    2015-02-07

    Bullying is a recognized social problem within child populations. Engagement in childhood bullying often occurs in settings that are away from adult supervision, such as en route to and from school. Bullying episodes may also have a negative impact on school childrens' decisions to engage in active transportation. Using a cross-sectional design, we analyzed reports from the 2009/10 cycle of the Canadian Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study. Records from this general health survey were obtained for 3,997 urban students in grades 6-10 who lived in close proximity of their school and were hence ineligible for school bussing. Students who indicated walking or bicycling to school were classified as engaged in active transportation. Victims and perpetrators of bullying were defined using standard measures and a frequency cut-off of at least 2-3 times per month. Analyses focused on relations between bullying and active transportation, as well as barriers to active transportation as perceived by young people. 27% of young people indicated being victimized, and 12% indicated that they engaged in bullying. Girls were more likely to be victimized than boys, and younger students were more likely to be victimized than older students. Engagement in active transportation was reported by 63% of respondents, of these, 68% indicated that worrying about bullying on the way to school was an impediment to such transportation methods. Victimization by bullying (adjusted OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.00 - 1.59) was reported more frequently by children who used active transportation. Health promotion efforts to promote engagement in active transportation of students to school have obvious value. The potential for modest increases in exposure to bullying should be considered in the planning of such initiatives.

  4. NOx trade. Case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Some of the questions with respect to the trade of nitrogen oxides that businesses in the Netherlands have to deal with are dealt with: should a business buy or sell rights for NOx emission; which measures must be taken to reduce NOx emission; how much must be invested; and how to deal with uncertainties with regard to prices. Simulations were carried out with the MOSES model to find the answers to those questions. Results of some case studies are presented, focusing on the chemical sector in the Netherlands. Finally, the financial (dis)advantages of NOx trade and the related uncertainties for a single enterprise are discussed [nl

  5. Canadian beef quality audit.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Donkersgoed, J; Jewison, G; Mann, M; Cherry, B; Altwasser, B; Lower, R; Wiggins, K; Dejonge, R; Thorlakson, B; Moss, E; Mills, C; Grogan, H

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted in 4 Canadian processing plants in 1995-96 to determine the prevalence of quality defects in Canadian cattle. One percent of the annual number of cattle processed in Canada were evaluated on the processing floor and 0.1% were graded in the cooler. Brands were observed on 37% and multiple brands on 6% of the cattle. Forty percent of the cattle had horns, 20% of which were scurs, 33% were stubs, 10% were tipped, and 37% were full length. Tag (mud and manure on the hide) wa...

  6. Pan-Canadian assessment of pandemic immunization data collection: study methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikora Christopher A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collection of individual-level pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza immunization data was considered important to facilitate optimal vaccine delivery and accurate assessment of vaccine coverage. These data are also critical for research aimed at evaluating the new vaccine's safety and effectiveness. Systems used to collect immunization data include manual approaches in which data are collected and retained on paper, electronic systems in which data are captured on computer at the point of vaccination and hybrid systems which are comprised of both computerized and manual data collection components. This study's objective was to compare the efficiencies and perceptions of data collection methods employed during Canada's pandemic (H1N1 2009 influenza vaccination campaign. Methods/Design A pan-Canadian observational study was conducted in a convenience sample of public health clinics and healthcare institutions during the H1N1 vaccination campaign in the fall of 2009. The study design consisted of three stages: Stage 1 involved passive observation of the site's layout, processes and client flow; Stage 2 entailed timing site staff on 20 clients through five core immunization tasks: i client registration, ii medical history collection, iii medical history review, iv vaccine administration record keeping and v preparation of proof of vaccine administration for the client; in Stage 3, site staff completed a questionnaire regarding perceived usability of the site's data collection approach. Before the national study began, a pilot study was conducted in three seasonal influenza vaccination sites in Ontario, to both test that the proposed methodology was logistically feasible and to determine inter-rater reliability in the measurements of the research staff. Comparative analyses will be conducted across the range of data collection methods with respect to time required to collect immunization data, number and type of individual-level data

  7. A 20-Year Comparison of Football-Related Injuries in American and Canadian Youth Aged 6 to 17 Years: A Replication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keays, Glenn; Friedman, Debbie; Gagnon, Isabelle

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Little is known about Canadian youth football injuries. The objectives of this study were (a) to contrast the injuries in Canadian and American football players aged 6 to 17 years and (b) compare the injuries sustained during organized football with those in nonorganized football. Methods Using a retrospective cohort design based on data from the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program and the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System a comparison of injuries was made. Results Trends in injuries were comparable. Proportions and odds of injuries were similar, except for a few exceptions. In Canada, more girls were injured and fractures were more prevalent. Compared with nonorganized football, organized football players were older, involved more males, and suffered more traumatic brain injuries and injuries to their lower extremities. Conclusion Canadian and American youth football injuries were similar. The type of football, be it organized or nonorganized, has an impact on injuries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Enhancing Contextualized Curriculum: Integrated Identity in Young Shi'i Muslim Arabic-Canadian Students' Social Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fartousi, May

    2016-01-01

    This research explored 10 young female Shi'i Muslim Arabic-Canadian students' experiences associated with wearing the Hijab (headscarf) within their home, community, and predominantly White Canadian public elementary school environments. The in-depth case study sought to address the dearth of information about Shi'is' experiences in schools…

  9. Japanese and Canadian Children’s Beliefs about Child and Adult Knowledge: A Case for Developmental Equifinality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitneva, Stanka A.; Pile Ho, Elizabeth; Hatayama, Misako

    2016-01-01

    Children do not know everything that adults know, nor do adults know everything that children know. The present research examined the universality of beliefs about child and adult knowledge and their development with 4- and 7-year-old Canadian and Japanese children (N = 96). In both countries, all children were able to identify adult-specific knowledge and only older children displayed beliefs about child-specific knowledge. However, Japanese and Canadian children differed in whether they used their own knowledge in deciding whether a person who knew an item was a child or an adult. In addition, parental and child beliefs were related in Japan but not in Canada. These findings indicate that children growing up in different cultures may take different paths in developing beliefs about age-related knowledge. Implications for theories of socio-cognitive development and learning are discussed. PMID:27632387

  10. An overview of the statistical methods reported by studies using the Canadian community health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yergens, Dean W; Dutton, Daniel J; Patten, Scott B

    2014-01-25

    The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) is a cross-sectional survey that has collected information on health determinants, health status and the utilization of the health system in Canada since 2001. Several hundred articles have been written utilizing the CCHS dataset. Previous analyses of statistical methods utilized in the literature have focused on a particular journal or set of journals to understand the statistical literacy required for understanding the published research. In this study, we describe the statistical methods referenced in the published literature utilizing the CCHS dataset(s). A descriptive study was undertaken of references published in Medline, Embase, Web of Knowledge and Scopus associated with the CCHS. These references were imported into a Java application utilizing the searchable Apache Lucene text database and screened based upon pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Full-text PDF articles that met the inclusion criteria were then used for the identification of descriptive, elementary and regression statistical methods referenced in these articles. The identification of statistical methods occurred through an automated search of key words on the full-text articles utilizing the Java application. We identified 4811 references from the 4 bibliographical databases for possible inclusion. After exclusions, 663 references were used for the analysis. Descriptive statistics such as means or proportions were presented in a majority of the articles (97.7%). Elementary-level statistics such as t-tests were less frequently referenced (29.7%) than descriptive statistics. Regression methods were frequently referenced in the articles: 79.8% of articles contained reference to regression in general with logistic regression appearing most frequently in 67.1% of the articles. Our study shows a diverse set of analysis methods being referenced in the CCHS literature, however, the literature heavily relies on only a subset of all possible

  11. Case Studies of School Community and Climate: Success Narratives of Schools in Challenging Circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Darlene Ciuffetelli; Grenville, Heather; Flessa, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a Canadian qualitative case study project funded by the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario. The paper describes success stories of students and communities affected by poverty from a diverse sample of eleven elementary schools throughout the province of Ontario. Over the period of one school year (2007-2008) and…

  12. International cross-cultural validation study of the Canadian haemophilia outcomes: kids' life assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, P J; Fischer, K; Holzhauer, S; Meunier, S; Altisent, C; Grainger, J D; Blanchette, V S; Burke, T A; Wakefield, C; Young, N L

    2015-05-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) assessment is recognized as an important outcome in the evaluation of different therapeutic regimens for persons with haemophilia. The Canadian Haemophilia Outcomes-Kids' Life Assessment Tool (CHO-KLAT) is a disease-specific measure of HRQoL for 4 to 18-year-old boys with haemophilia. The purpose of this study was to extend this disease-specific, child-centric, outcome measure for use in international clinical trials. We adapted the North American English CHO-KLAT version for use in five countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom (UK). The process included four stages: (i) translation; (ii) cognitive debriefing; (iii) validity assessment relative to the PedsQL (generic) and the Haemo-QoL (disease-specific) and (iv) assessment of inter and intra-rater reliability. Cognitive debriefing was performed in 57 boys (mean age 11.4 years), validation was performed in 144 boys (mean age 11.0 years) and reliability was assessed for a subgroup of 64 boys (mean age 12.0 years). Parents also participated. The mean scores reported by the boys were high: CHO-KLAT 77.0 (SD = 11.2); PedsQL 83.8 (SD = 11.9) and Haemo-QoL 79.6 (SD = 11.5). Correlations between the CHO-KLAT and PedsQL ranged from 0.63 in Germany to 0.39 in the Netherlands and Spain. Test-retest reliability (concordance) for child self-report was 0.67. Child-parent concordance was slightly lower at 0.57. The CHO-KLAT has been fully culturally adapted and validated for use in five different languages and cultures (in England, the Netherlands, France, Germany and Spain) where treatment is readily available either on demand or as prophylaxis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Canadian attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.E.O.

    1977-01-01

    In the past ten years, public interest in nuclear power and its relationship to the environment has grown. Although most Canadians have accepted nuclear power as a means of generating electricity, there is significant opposition to its use. This opposition has effectively forced the Canadian nuclear industry to modify its behaviour to the public in the face of growing concern over the safety of nuclear power and related matters. The paper reviews Canadian experience concerning public acceptance of nuclear power, with special reference to the public information activities of the Canadian nuclear industry. Experience has shown the need for scientific social data that will permit the nuclear industry to involve the public in a rational examination of its concern about nuclear power. The Canadian Nuclear Association sponsored such studies in 1976 and the findings are discussed. They consisted of a national assessment of public attitudes, two regional studies and a study of Canadian policy-makers' views on nuclear energy. The social data obtained were of a base-line nature describing Canadian perceptions of and attitudes to nuclear power at that time. This research established that Canadian levels of knowledge about nuclear power are very low and that there are marked regional differences. Only 56% of the population have the minimum knowledge required to indicate that they know that nuclear power can be used to generate electricity. Nevertheless, 21% of informed Canadians oppose nuclear power primarily on the grounds that it is not safe. Radiation and waste management are seen to be major disadvantages. In perspective, Canadians are more concerned with inflation than with the energy supply. About half of all Canadians see the question of energy supplies as a future problem (within five years), not a present one. A more important aspect of energy is seen by the majority of Canadians to be some form of energy independence. The use of data from these studies is no easy

  14. I Am Canadian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joe

    2011-01-01

    "I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness......."I Am Canadian: Immigration and Multiculturalism in the True North" looks at Canadian immigration history from a contemporary point of view. The article scrutinizes recent discussions on dual nationality and what this may mean for Canadianness....

  15. Canadian gas resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Canadian exports of gas to the United States are a critical component of EMF-9 (North American Gas Supplies). However, it has been noted that there are differences between US expectations for imports and Canadian forecasts of export supply capacity. Recent studies by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) indicate that 1.8 to 2.4 Tcf of imports may be required in the mid to late 1990's; A recent study by Canada's National Energy Board (NEB) indicates that the conventional resource base may not be able to provide continued gas exports to the US after the mid 1990's and that frontier sources would need to be developed to meet US expectations. The discrepancies between US expectations and Canadian estimates of capacity are of great concern to US policymakers because they call into question the availability of secure supplies of natural gas and suggest that the cost of imports (if available) will be high. By implication, if shortages are to be averted, massive investment may be required to bring these higher cost sources to market. Since the long-term supply picture will be determined by the underlying resource base, EMF-9 participants have been asked to provide estimates of critical components of the Canadian resource base. This paper provides a summary of ICF-Lewin's recent investigation of both the Conventional and Tight Gas resource in Canada's Western Sedimentary Basin, which includes both quantitative estimates and a brief sketch of the analysis methodology

  16. Mental Health Services Use Trends in Canadian Veterans: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Alyson L; Aiken, Alice B; Cramm, Heidi; Whitehead, Marlo; Groome, Patti; Kurdyak, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A substantial evidence base in the peer-reviewed literature exists investigating mental illness in the military, but relatively less is documented about mental illness in veterans. This study uses provincial, administrative data to study the use of mental health services by Canadian veterans in Ontario. This was a retrospective cohort study of Canadian Armed Forces and Royal Canadian Mounted Police veterans who were released between 1990 and 2013 and resided in Ontario. Mental health-related primary care physician, psychiatrist, emergency department (ED) visits, and psychiatric hospitalisations were counted. Repeated measures were presented in 5-year intervals, stratified by age at release. The cohort included 23,818 veterans. In the first 5 years following entry into the health care system, 28.9% of veterans had ≥1 mental health-related primary care physician visit, 5.8% visited a psychiatrist at least once, and 2.4% received acute mental health services at an ED. The use of mental health services was consistent over time. Almost 8% of veterans aged 30 to 39 years saw a psychiatrist in the first 5 years after release, compared to 3.5% of veterans aged ≥50 years at release. The youngest veterans at release (<30 years) were the most frequent users of ED services for a mental health-related reason (5.1% had at least 1 ED visit). Understanding how veterans use the health care system for mental health problems is an important step to ensuring needs are met during the transition to civilian life.

  17. Goiania incident case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petterson, J.S.

    1988-06-01

    The reasons for wanting to document this case study and present the findings are simple. According to USDOE technical risk assessments (and our own initial work on the Hanford socioeconomic study), the likelihood of a major accident involving exposure to radioactive materials in the process of site characterization, construction, operation, and closure of a high-level waste repository is extremely remote. Most would agree, however, that there is a relatively high probability that a minor accident involving radiological contamination will occur sometime during the lifetime of the repository -- for example, during transport, at an MRS site or at the permanent site itself during repacking and deposition. Thus, one of the major concerns of the Yucca Mountain Socioeconomic Study is the potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential accident scenarios have been under consideration (such as a transportation or other surface accident which results in a significant decline in tourism, the number of conventions, or the selection of Nevada as a retirement residence). The results of the work in Goiania make it clear, however, that such a significant shift in established social patterns and trends is not likely to occur as a direct outcome of a single nuclear-related accident (even, perhaps, a relatively major one), but rather, are likely to occur as a result of the enduring social interpretations of such an accident -- that is, as a result of the process of understanding, communicating, and socially sustaining a particular set of associations with respect to the initial incident

  18. Depressive symptoms among immigrant and Canadian born mothers of preterm infants at neonatal intensive care discharge: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballantyne Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mothers of preterm infants are considered at higher risk for depressive symptoms, higher than for mothers of healthy term infants. Predictors of depressive symptoms in mothers of preterm infants are not yet well established. Immigrant mothers of term infants have higher prevalence of depressive symptoms than Canadian born mothers but the relative prevalence for immigrant mothers of preterm infants is unknown. This study had two aims: (i to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in immigrant as compared to Canadian born mothers of preterm infants, and (ii to determine what factors are associated with depressive symptoms in mothers of preterm infants. Methods This is a multi-site, cross sectional study of mothers whose preterm infants required hospitalization in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Consecutive eligible mothers (N = 291 were recruited during the week prior to their infant’s NICU discharge. Mothers completed a self-administered questionnaire booklet of validated psychosocial/cultural measures including the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, Parental Stressor Scale:NICU, General Functioning Subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device, Social Support Index, and Vancouver Index of Acculturation; and demographic characteristics questions. Infant characteristics included gestational age, birth weight, sex, singleton/multiple birth, and Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-II. Results Immigrant mothers (N = 107, when compared to Canadian born mothers (N = 184, reported more depressive symptoms, poorer family functioning, less social support, and less mainstream acculturation. Hierarchical regression for a subsample of 271 mothers indicated that single parent status, high stress, poorer family functioning, and less social support were associated with increased depressive symptoms and accounted for 39% of the variance on the CES-D. Immigrant status did not contribute

  19. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  20. Genotype and Phenotype Studies in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP) of the French Canadian Founder Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coussa, Razek Georges; Chakarova, Christina; Ajlan, Radwan; Taha, Mohammed; Kavalec, Conrad; Gomolin, Julius; Khan, Ayesha; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Waseem, Naushin; Kamenarova, Kunka; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Koenekoop, Robert K

    2015-12-01

    The French Canadian population of Quebec is a unique, well-known founder population with religious, linguistic, and geographic isolation. The genetics of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in Quebec is not well studied thus far. The purpose of our study was to establish the genetic architecture of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) and to characterize the phenotypes associated with new adRP mutations in Quebec. Sanger sequencing of the commonly mutated currently known adRP genes was performed in a clinically well-characterized cohort of 60 adRP French Canadian families. Phenotypes were analyzed by projected visual acuity (best corrected), Goldmann visual fields, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and ERG. The potential effect of the novel mutations was assessed using in silico bioinformatic tools. The pathogenicity of all variants was then confirmed by segregation analysis within the families, when available. We identified the causal mutation/gene in 24 of our adRP families, as 24 (40%) of 60 patients had adRP mutations in six known adRP genes. Eleven (46%) of these mutations were in RHO, four mutations (17%) were found in SNRNP200, three mutations (12.5%) in PRPH2/RDS, three mutations (12.5%) in TOPORS, two mutations (8%) in PRPF31, and one mutation (4%) in IMPDH1. Four mutations were novel. We identified new mutations in RHO (p.S270I), PRPF31 (p.R288W), IMPDH1 (p.Q318H), and TOPORS (p.H889R); the rest were previously reported. We present the genotype-phenotype characteristics of the four novel missense mutations. This is the first large screening of adRP genes in the founder population of Quebec. Our prevalence of known adRP genes is 40% in the French Canadian population, which is lower than in other adRP populations around the world, illustrating the uniqueness of the French Canadian population. Our findings are crucial in expanding the current understanding of the genotypic-phenotypic spectrum of RP and documenting the genetic architecture of

  1. Canadian Mock Juror Attitudes and Decisions in Domestic Violence Cases Involving Asian and White Interracial and Intraracial Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Evelyn M.; Mossiere, Annik; Cheung, Liann

    2013-01-01

    This study manipulated the race of the defendant and the victim (White/White, White/Asian, Asian/Asian, and Asian/White) in a domestic violence case to examine the potential prejudicial impact of race on juror decision making. A total of 181undergraduate students read a trial transcript involving an allegation of spousal abuse in which defendant…

  2. Physical and Leisure Activity in Older Community-Dwelling Canadians Who Use Wheelchairs: A Population Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista L. Best

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical and leisure activities are proven health promotion modalities and have not been examined in older wheelchair users. Main Objectives. Examine physical and leisure activity in older wheelchair users and explore associations between wheelchair use and participation in physical and leisure activity, and wheelchair use, physical and leisure activity, and perceived health. Methods. 8301 Canadians ≥60 years of age were selected from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Sociodemographic, health-related, mobility-related, and physical and leisure activity variables were analysed using logistic regression to determine, the likelihood of participation in physical and leisure activity, and whether participation in physical and leisure activities mediates the relationship between wheelchair use and perceived health. Results. 8.3% and 41.3% older wheelchair users were physically and leisurely active. Wheelchair use was a risk factor for reduced participation in physical (OR=44.71 and leisure activity (OR=10.83. Wheelchair use was a risk factor for poor perceived health (OR=10.56 and physical and leisure activity negatively mediated the relationship between wheelchair user and perceived health. Conclusion. There is a need for the development of suitable physical and leisure activity interventions for older wheelchair users. Participation in such interventions may have associations with health benefits.

  3. A survey study of evidence-based medicine training in US and Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Maria A; Capello, Carol F; Dorsch, Josephine L; Perry, Gerald; Zanetti, Mary L

    2014-07-01

    The authors conducted a survey examining (1) the current state of evidence-based medicine (EBM) curricula in US and Canadian medical schools and corresponding learning objectives, (2) medical educators' and librarians' participation in EBM training, and (3) barriers to EBM training. A survey instrument with thirty-four closed and open-ended questions was sent to curricular deans at US and Canadian medical schools. The survey sought information on enrollment and class size; EBM learning objectives, curricular activities, and assessment approaches by year of training; EBM faculty; EBM tools; barriers to implementing EBM curricula and possible ways to overcome them; and innovative approaches to EBM education. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used for data analysis. Measurable learning objectives were categorized using Bloom's taxonomy. One hundred fifteen medical schools (77.2%) responded. Over half (53%) of the 900 reported learning objectives were measurable. Knowledge application was the predominant category from Bloom's categories. Most schools integrated EBM into other curricular activities; activities and formal assessment decreased significantly with advanced training. EBM faculty consisted primarily of clinicians, followed by basic scientists and librarians. Various EBM tools were used, with PubMed and the Cochrane database most frequently cited. Lack of time in curricula was rated the most significant barrier. National agreement on required EBM competencies was an extremely helpful factor. Few schools shared innovative approaches. Schools need help in overcoming barriers related to EBM curriculum development, implementation, and assessment. Findings can provide a starting point for discussion to develop a standardized competency framework.

  4. Capturing how age-friendly communities foster positive health, social participation and health equity: a study protocol of key components and processes that promote population health in aging Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Mélanie; Dubois, Marie-France; Généreux, Mélissa; Menec, Verena; Raina, Parminder; Roy, Mathieu; Gabaude, Catherine; Couturier, Yves; St-Pierre, Catherine

    2017-05-25

    case study will be conducted in five Canadian communities performing best on positive health, social participation and health equity. Building on new and existing collaborations and generating evidence from real-world interventions, the results of this project will help communities to promote age-friendly policies, services and structures which foster positive health, social participation and health equity at a population level.

  5. Government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    Several facets of government intervention in the Canadian nuclear industry are examined by reviewing the general historical evolution of intervention since the Second World War and by a more detailed analysis of three case studies. The case studies are the public sector - private sector content of the initial CANDU reactor program in the 1950's, the regulation of the health and safety of uranium miners in the late 1960's and early 1970's, and the Ontario Hydro decision in 1978 to enter into longer-term (40 year) contracts for uranium for its power reactors. (auth)

  6. Exploring Canadian Echinoderm Diversity through DNA Barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Kara K S; Corstorphine, Erin A; Hebert, Paul D N

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding has proven an effective tool for species identification in varied groups of marine invertebrates including crustaceans, molluscs, polychaetes and echinoderms. In this study, we further validate its utility by analyzing almost half of the 300 species of Echinodermata known from Canadian waters. COI sequences from 999 specimens were assigned to 145 BINs. In most cases, species discrimination was straightforward due to the large difference (25-fold) between mean intra- (0.48%) and inter- (12.0%) specific divergence. Six species were flagged for further taxonomic investigation because specimens assigned to them fell into two or three discrete sequence clusters. The potential influence of larval dispersal capacity and glacial events on patterns of genetic diversity is discussed for 19 trans-oceanic species. Although additional research is needed to clarify biogeographic patterns and resolve taxonomic questions, this study represents an important step in the assembly of a DNA barcode library for all Canadian echinoderms, a valuable resource for future biosurveillance programs.

  7. Youth De-Radicalization: A Canadian Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafal (Haval Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Youth radicalization leading to violence has become a growing fear among Canadians, as terrorist attacks are carried out in Western states. Although Canada has suffered relatively fewer acts of violence, this fear has intensified and a de-radicalization strategy is needed in the Canadian context. In a qualitative case study methodology, interviews were conducted with school counsellors, religious leaders, and academics to explore solutions to youth radicalization. Youth de-radicalization approaches from the United Kingdom were analyzed and found that community-based initiatives were missing from programming. Social identity theory is used to explain that youth join radicalized groups to feel a sense of belonging and have to be provided an alternative and moderate group identity to de-radicalize. This study found youth de-radicalization in Canada is best served through a community collaboration approach.

  8. Prescribing of psychotropic medications to the elderly population of a Canadian province: a retrospective study using administrative databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Alessi-Severini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psychotropic medications, in particular second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs and benzodiazepines, have been associated with harm in elderly populations. Health agencies around the world have issued warnings about the risks of prescribing such medications to frail individuals affected by dementia and current guidelines recommend their use only in cases where the benefits clearly outweigh the risks. This study documents the use of psychotropic medications in the entire elderly population of a Canadian province in the context of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of behavioural disturbances. Methods. Prevalent and incident utilization of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines and related medications (zopiclone and zaleplon were determined in the population of Manitobans over age 65 in the time period 1997/98 to 2008/09 fiscal years. Comparisons between patients living in the community and those living in personal care (nursing homes (PCH were conducted. Influence of sociodemographic characteristics on prescribing was assessed by generalized estimating equations. Non-optimal use was defined as the prescribing of high dose of antipsychotic medications and the use of combination therapy of a benzodiazepine (or zopiclone/zaleplon with an antipsychotic. A decrease in intensity of use over time and lower proportions of patients treated with antipsychotics at high dose or in combination with benzodiazepines (or zopiclone/zaleplon was considered a trend toward better prescribing. Multiple regression analysis determined predictors of non-optimal use in the elderly population. Results. A 20-fold greater prevalent utilization of SGAs was observed in PCH-dwelling elderly persons compared to those living in the community. In 2008/09, 27% of PCH-dwelling individuals received a prescription for an SGA. Patient characteristics, such as younger age, male gender, diagnoses of dementia (or use of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor or psychosis in the

  9. 427 Case studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marinda

    2009-05-22

    May 22, 2009 ... No other complications except hypersensitivity to hypnotic agents were observed. Case 2: The patient was a 10-year-old boy with Cornelia de Lange syndrome who underwent dental treatment under general anaesthesia. He had a history and symptoms of obstructive airway disorders in addition to showing ...

  10. Migraine and Despair: Factors Associated with Depression and Suicidal Ideation among Canadian Migraineurs in a Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esme Fuller-Thomson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to (1 investigate the association between migraine and both depression and suicidal ideation and (2 to identify the factors independently associated with each of these mental health problems among Canadian men and women with migraine. Data were analyzed from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS. Presence of migraine was assessed by self-report of a health professional diagnosis. Current depression was measured using the CIDI-SF, and suicidal ideation was based on a question about serious consideration of suicide at any point during the respondent's lifetime. Migraineurs were found to have elevated odds of depression (men: OR = 2.02; 95% CI = 1.70, 2.41; women: OR = 1.89; 95% CI = 1.71, 2.10 and suicidal ideation (men: OR = 1.70; 95% CI = 1.55, 1.96; women: OR = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.59, 1.86 even when adjusting for sociodemographic variables and disability status. The odds of depression and suicidal ideation were higher among both genders of migraineurs who were younger, unmarried and had more activity limitations; associations with poverty and race depended on gender and whether the focus was on depression or suicidal ideation. While screening for depression is already recommended for those with migraine, this research helps identify which migraineurs may require more immediate attention, including those who are younger, unmarried, and experiencing limitations in their activities.

  11. Varicella zoster virus infections in Canadian children in the prevaccine era: A hospital-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Susan; Davies, H Dele; Jadavji, Taj

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical course of children admitted for varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections to a pediatric hospital before the release of VZV vaccine in Canada.DESIGN: Retrospective case series.SETTING: Tertiary pediatric hospital. Population studied was children aged 18 years or younger admitted to hospital between 1983 and 1992 who were discharged with a diagnosis of varicella or zoster. Of the 201 children who were identified, 36 were excluded, leaving 165 for analysis.RESU...

  12. Progress in welding studies for Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maak, P.Y.Y.

    1985-11-01

    This report describes the progress in the development of closure-welding technology for Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. Titanium, copper and Inconel 625 are being investigated as candidate materials for fabrication of these containers. Gas-tungsten-arc welding, gas metal-arc-welding, resistance-heated diffusion bonding and electron beam welding have been evaluated as candidate closure welding processes. Characteristic weldment properties, relative merits of welding techniques, suitable weld joint configurations and fit-up tolerances, and welding parameter control ranges have been identified for various container designs. Furthermore, the automation requirements for candidate welding processes have been assessed. Progress in the development of a computer-controlled remote gas-shielded arc welding system is described

  13. Studies of cesium and strontium migration in unconsolidated Canadian geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillham, R.W.; Lindsay, L.E.; Reynolds, W.D.; Kewen, T.J.; Cherry, J.A.; Reddy, M.R.

    1981-06-01

    Distribution coefficients (Ksub(d)) were measured for cesium and strontium in 16 samples of Canadian unconsolidated geological materials. The samples were collected to cover a wide range of grain size, clay-mineral composition, cation exchange capacity and carbonate mineral content. Distribution coefficients ranged between 10 2 and 2.0 x 10 4 ml/g for cesium and between 2.5 and 10 2 ml/g for strontium, indicating that most unconsolidated geological materials have a substantial ability to retard the migration of cesium, while strontium could generally be expected to be somewhat more mobile. The measured K values were not significantly correlated with the measured soil properties, but appeared to be significantly affected by the background concentration of stable isotopes of the respective radionuclides

  14. Stigma in Male Depression and Suicide: A Canadian Sex Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Gordon, Susan J; Creighton, Genevieve; Kelly, Mary T; Black, Nick; Mackenzie, Corey

    2016-04-01

    Stigma in men's depression and suicide can restrict help-seeking, reduce treatment compliance and deter individuals from confiding in friends and family. In this article we report sex comparison findings from a national survey of English-speaking adult Canadians about stigmatized beliefs concerning male depression and suicide. Among respondents without direct experience of depression or suicide (n = 541) more than a third endorsed the view that men with depression are unpredictable. Overall, a greater proportion of males endorsed stigmatizing views about male depression compared to female respondents. A greater proportion of female respondents endorsed items indicating that men who suicide are disconnected, lost and lonely. Male and female respondents with direct personal experience of depression or suicide (n = 360) strongly endorsed stigmatizing attitudes toward themselves and a greater proportion of male respondents indicated that they would be embarrassed about seeking help for depression.

  15. Key indicators of overcrowding in Canadian emergency departments: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, Maria B; Bond, Kenneth; Schull, Michael; Innes, Grant; Blitz, Sandra; Rowe, Brian H

    2007-09-01

    To identify the level of consensus among a group of Canadian emergency department (ED) experts on the importance of a set of indicators to document ED overcrowding. A 2-round Delphi survey was conducted from February 2005 to April 2005, with a multidisciplinary group of 38 Canadian experts in various aspects of ED operations who rated the relevance of 36 measures and ranked their relative importance as indicators of ED overcrowding. The response rates for the first and second rounds were 84% and 87%, respectively. The most important indicator identified by the experts was the percentage of the ED occupied by inpatients (mean on a 7-point Likert-type scale 6.53, standard deviation [SD] 0.80). The other 9 indicators, in order of the importance attributed, were the total number of ED patients (mean 6.35, SD 0.75), the total time in the ED (mean 6.16, SD 1.04), the percentage of time that the ED was at or above capacity (mean 6.16, SD 1.08), the overall bed occupancy (mean 6.19, SD 0.93), the time from bed request to bed assignment (mean 6.06, SD 1.08), the time from triage to care (mean 5.84, SD 1.08) the physician satisfaction (mean 5.84, SD 1.22), the time from bed availability to ward transfer (mean 5.53, SD 1.72) and the number of staffed acute care beds (mean 5.53, SD 1.57). Ten clinically important measures were prioritized by the participants as relevant indicators of ED overcrowding. Indicators derived from consensus techniques have face validity, but their metric properties must be tested to ensure their effectiveness for identifying ED overcrowding in different settings.

  16. Methods used for immunization coverage assessment in Canada, a Canadian Immunization Research Network (CIRN) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah E; Quach, Susan; MacDonald, Shannon E; Naus, Monika; Deeks, Shelley L; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Mahmud, Salaheddin M; Tran, Dat; Kwong, Jeff; Tu, Karen; Gilbert, Nicolas L; Johnson, Caitlin; Desai, Shalini

    2017-08-03

    Accurate and complete immunization data are necessary to assess vaccine coverage, safety and effectiveness. Across Canada, different methods and data sources are used to assess vaccine coverage, but these have not been systematically described. Our primary objective was to examine and describe the methods used to determine immunization coverage in Canada. The secondary objective was to compare routine infant and childhood coverage estimates derived from the Canadian 2013 Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey (cNICS) with estimates collected from provinces and territories (P/Ts). We collected information from key informants regarding their provincial, territorial or federal methods for assessing immunization coverage. We also collected P/T coverage estimates for select antigens and birth cohorts to determine absolute differences between these and estimates from cNICS. Twenty-six individuals across 16 public health organizations participated between April and August 2015. Coverage surveys are conducted regularly for toddlers in Quebec and in one health authority in British Columbia. Across P/Ts, different methodologies for measuring coverage are used (e.g., valid doses, grace periods). Most P/Ts, except Ontario, measure up-to-date (UTD) coverage and 4 P/Ts also assess on-time coverage. The degree of concordance between P/T and cNICS coverage estimates varied by jurisdiction, antigen and age group. In addition to differences in the data sources and processes used for coverage assessment, there are also differences between Canadian P/Ts in the methods used for calculating immunization coverage. Comparisons between P/T and cNICS estimates leave remaining questions about the proportion of children fully vaccinated in Canada.

  17. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RADON EXPOSURE IN CANADIAN HOMES AND URANIUM MINES-A DISCUSSION ON THE IMPORTANCE OF NATIONAL RADON PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing

    2017-11-01

    The history of lung cancer in uranium miners is well known for over hundreds of years when the disease was referred to as 'miner's disease' or 'mountain sickness'. Radon levels in uranium mines have decreased significantly over the past 30 years as a result of effective radiation protection measures at workplaces. For the most recent 10-year period, the average radon concentrations to underground and surface workers in Canadian uranium mines were 111 and 11 Bq m-3, respectively. Based on the recent radon survey carried out in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada and the more recent radon and thoron survey in 33 Canadian cities and 4000 homes, the average radon concentration in Canadian homes is 77 Bq m-3. This study demonstrates that, nowadays, workers are exposed to radon in underground mines at a comparable radon level to what Canadians are exposed to at home. Since exposure to indoor radon is the main source of natural radiation exposure to the population, it is important for the National Radon Program to further increase radon awareness, and to encourage more Canadians to take appropriate actions to reduce radon exposure. © Crown copyright 2017.

  18. Syncope: Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleyman, Inna; Weimer, Louis H

    2016-08-01

    Syncope, or the sudden loss of consciousness, is a common presenting symptom for evaluation by neurologists. It is not a unique diagnosis but rather a common manifestation of disorders with diverse mechanisms. Loss of consciousness is typically preceded by a prodrome of symptoms and sometimes there is a clear trigger. This article discusses several cases that illustrate the various causes of syncope. Reflex syncope is the most common type and includes neurally mediated, vasovagal, situational, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, and atypical forms. Acute and chronic autonomic neuropathies and neurodegenerative disorders can also present with syncope. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers; The Canadian fluoroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, G.R. (Toront Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics)

    1992-01-01

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author).

  20. Accounting for variation in wind deployment between Canadian provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson-Martin, Christopher J.; Hill, Stephen D.

    2011-01-01

    Wind energy deployment varies widely across regions and this variation cannot be explained by differences in natural wind resources alone. Evidence suggests that institutional factors beyond physical wind resources can influence the deployment of wind energy systems. Building on the work of , this study takes a historical institutionalist approach to examine the main factors influencing wind energy deployment across four Canadian provinces Canada: Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario and Nova Scotia. Our case studies suggest that wind energy deployment depends upon a combination of indirect causal factors-landscape values, political and social movements, government electricity policy, provincial electricity market structure and incumbent generation technologies and direct causal factors-grid architecture, ownership patterns, renewable incentive programs, planning and approvals processes and stakeholder support and opposition. - Research highlights: → Examines the reasons for variations in wind deployment between Canadian provinces. → Employs a historical institutional approach to the analysis. → Discusses social factors that affect wind deployment across Canadian jurisdictions.

  1. Building theories from case study research: the progressive case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Meredith (1998) argues for more case and field research studies in the field of operations management. Based on a literature review, we discuss several existing approaches to case studies and their characteristics. These approaches include; the Grounded Theory approach which proposes no prior

  2. Theory Testing Using Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ann-Kristina Løkke; Dissing Sørensen, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The appropriateness of case studies as a tool for theory testing is still a controversial issue, and discussions about the weaknesses of such research designs have previously taken precedence over those about its strengths. The purpose of the paper is to examine and revive the approach of theory...... testing using case studies, including the associated research goal, analysis, and generalisability. We argue that research designs for theory testing using case studies differ from theorybuilding case study research designs because different research projects serve different purposes and follow different...

  3. A queer day in Canada: examining Canadian high school students' experiences with school-based homophobia in two large-scale studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Tracey; Taylor, Catherine; Chamberland, Line

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the study is to examine how location (nationally, compared to Canadian regions) is related to indicators of a hostile school environment for sexual minority youth, particularly when physical abuse is used as the outcome variable. Data representing 5,766 Canadian students were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate techniques. Results from the multivariate analyses showed that non-physical abuse was the most significant predictor of homophobically based physical abuse, for both LGBQ and non-LGBQ students. Findings reiterate the importance of considering the progression of harmful events as an escalation of violence as well as the need to view homophobic bullying as having a significant impact on all students. Finally, while the presence of homophobia is prevalent across all Canadian regions, there are, nevertheless, many regional differences, which could be used to inform region-specific action plans.

  4. Management and adherence to VTE treatment guidelines in a national prospective cohort study in the Canadian outpatient setting. The Recovery Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Susan R; Springmann, Vicky; Schulman, Sam; Martineau, Josée; Stewart, John A; Komari, Nelly; McLeod, Anne; Strulovitch, Carla; Blostein, Mark; Faucher, Jacques-Philippe; Gamble, Greg; Gordon, Wendy; Kagoma, Peter K; Miron, Marie-José; Laverdière, David; Game, Melaku; Mills, Allan

    2012-09-01

    Documenting patterns and outcomes of venous thromboembolism (VTE) management and degree of adherence by clinicians to treatment guidelines could help identify remediable gaps in patient care. Prospective, clinical practice-based data from Canadian outpatient settings on management of VTE, degree of adherence with treatment guidelines and frequency of recurrent VTE and bleeding during follow-up was obtained in a multicentre, prospective observational study. From 12 Canadian centres, we assessed 868 outpatients with acute symptomatic VTE who received the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) enoxaparin alone or with vitamin K antagonists (VKA), at baseline and at six months (or at the end of treatment, whichever came first). Index VTE was limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in 583 (67.2%) patients, pulmonary embolism (PE) with or without DVT in 262 (30.2%) patients, and unusual site DVT in 23 (2.6%) patients. VTE was unprovoked in 399 (46.0%) patients, associated with cancer in 74 (8.5%) patients, transient risk factors in 327 (37.7%) patients and hormonal factors in 68 (7.8%) patients.With regard to guideline adherence, 58 (7.3%) patients received 3 months. Only 38.1% of patients with transient VTE risk factors had received thromboprophylaxis. Our study provides useful information on clinical presentation, management and related outcomes in Canadian outpatients with VTE. Our results suggest there may be important gaps in use of thromboprophylaxis to prevent VTE and use of LMWH monotherapy to treat cancer-related VTE.

  5. Development of a Canadian socioeconomic status index for the study of health outcomes related to environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Emily; Serrano, Jesus; Chen, Li; Stieb, David M; Jerrett, Michael; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro

    2015-07-28

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is an important determinant of health and potential modifier of the effects of environmental contaminants. There has been a lack of comprehensive indices for measuring overall SES in Canada. Here, a more comprehensive SES index is developed aiming to support future studies exploring health outcomes related to environmental pollution in Canada. SES variables (n = 22, Census Canada 2006) were selected based on: cultural identities, housing characteristics, variables identified in Canadian environmental injustice studies and a previous deprivation index (Pampalon index). Principal component analysis with a single varimax rotation (factor loadings ≥ │60│) was performed on SES variables for 52974 census dissemination areas (DA). The final index was created by averaging the factor scores per DA according to the three components retained. The index was validated by examining its association with preterm birth (gestational age environmental pollution and health in Canada.

  6. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1993 Annual Meeting (York, Ontario, Canada, May 28-June 1, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Martyn, Ed.

    These proceedings contain papers presented at the 1993 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are presented in four sections: (1) invited lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic groups; and (4) ad hoc groups. Papers include: (1) "What is a Square Root? A Study of Geometrical Representation in Different…

  7. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1994 Annual Meeting (Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, June 3-7, 1994).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Martyn, Ed.

    These proceedings contain papers from the 1994 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are divided into the following sections: (1) invited lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic groups; (4) ad hoc groups; and (5) reports on ICMI (International Committee on Mathematical Instruction) studies. Papers include: (1)…

  8. Canadian valuation of EQ-5D health states: preliminary value set and considerations for future valuation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansback, Nick; Tsuchiya, Aki; Brazier, John; Anis, Aslam

    2012-01-01

    The EQ-5D is a preference based instrument which provides a description of a respondent's health status, and an empirically derived value for that health state often from a representative sample of the general population. It is commonly used to derive Quality Adjusted Life Year calculations (QALY) in economic evaluations. However, values for health states have been found to differ between countries. The objective of this study was to develop a set of values for the EQ-5D health states for use in Canada. Values for 48 different EQ-5D health states were elicited using the Time Trade Off (TTO) via a web survey in English. A random effect model was fitted to the data to estimate values for all 243 health states of the EQ-5D. Various model specifications were explored. Comparisons with EQ-5D values from the UK and US were made. Sensitivity analysis explored different transformations of values worse than dead, and exclusion criteria of subjects. The final model was estimated from the values of 1145 subjects with socio-demographics broadly representative of Canadian general population with the exception of Quebec. This yielded a good fit with observed TTO values, with an overall R2 of 0.403 and a mean absolute error of 0.044. A preference-weight algorithm for Canadian studies that include the EQ-5D is developed. The primary limitations regarded the representativeness of the final sample, given the language used (English only), the method of recruitment, and the difficulty in the task. Insights into potential issues for conducting valuation studies in countries as large and diverse as Canada are gained.

  9. Potential Increased Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease Mortality With Significant Dose Fractionation in the Canadian Fluoroscopy Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotska, Lydia B.; Little, Mark P.; Cornett, R. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Risks of noncancer causes of death, particularly cardiovascular disease, associated with exposures to high-dose ionizing radiation, are well known. Recent studies have reported excess risk in workers who are occupationally exposed to low doses at a low dose rate, but the risks of moderately fractionated exposures, such as occur during diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. The Canadian Fluoroscopy Cohort Study includes 63,707 tuberculosis patients exposed to multiple fluoroscopic procedures in 1930–1952 and followed-up for death from noncancer causes in 1950–1987. We used a Poisson regression to estimate excess relative risk (ERR) per Gy of cumulative radiation dose to the lung (mean dose = 0.79 Gy; range, 0–11.60). The risk of death from noncancer causes was significantly lower in these subjects compared with the Canadian general population (P < 0.001). We estimated small, nonsignificant increases in the risk of death from noncancer causes with dose. We estimated an ERR/Gy of 0.176 (95% confidence interval: 0.011, 0.393) (n = 5,818 deaths) for ischemic heart disease (IHD) after adjustment for dose fractionation. A significant (P = 0.022) inverse dose fractionation effect in dose trends of IHD was observed, with the highest estimate of ERR/Gy for those with the fewest fluoroscopic procedures per year. Radiation-related risks of IHD decreased significantly with increasing time since first exposure and age at first exposure (both P < 0.05). This is the largest study of patients exposed to moderately fractionated low-to-moderate doses of radiation, and it provides additional evidence of increased radiation-associated risks of death from IHD, in particular, significantly increased radiation risks from doses similar to those from diagnostic radiation procedures. The novel finding of a significant inverse dose-fractionation association in IHD mortality requires further investigation. PMID:24145888

  10. Fuzzy-Set Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Kim Sass

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary case studies rely on verbal arguments and set theory to build or evaluate theoretical claims. While existing procedures excel in the use of qualitative information (information about kind), they ignore quantitative information (information about degree) at central points of the analysis. Effectively, contemporary case studies rely on…

  11. Kickstarter - A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Willumsen, Ea Christina; Byg-Fabritius, Edith Ursula Tvede

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an investigation of the online crowdfunding platform Kickstarter, and discusses what makes a Kickstarter campaign successful. Two previous Kickstarter campaigns have been debated in focus groups interviews, as the basis of the study is a reception analysis of two focus group interviews. Ee apply theories from Schrøder (2000) and Batey (2008) to our analysis to study how the campaigns appeal to their backers. By drawing on ideas from Rogers (2003) and Pine & Gilmore (1998), w...

  12. A Questionnaire-Based Study on the Perceptions of Canadian Seniors About Cognitive, Social, and Psychological Benefits of Digital Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplàa, Emmanuel; Kaufman, David; Sauvé, Louise; Renaud, Lise

    2017-06-01

    This study explored the perceptions of seniors who play digital games on the potential benefits of these games and on the factors associated with these perceptions. We developed and administered a questionnaire to a sample of 590 Canadian seniors in British Columbia and Quebec that addressed demographics, digital game practices, and perceived benefits. Results of administering the questionnaire showed that cognitive benefits were reported more frequently than social or psychological benefits. First language and gender were associated with the benefits reported, with fewer Francophones and women reporting benefits. The most important factor found was whether or not they played online, as playing online was associated with greater perceptions of social, as well as cognitive, benefits. Social and cognitive benefits are reported by seniors from playing digital games and should be investigated through future experimental and quasi-experimental research.

  13. School and community predictors of smoking: a longitudinal study of Canadian high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Chris; Watts, Allison; Brown, K Stephen; Lee, Derrick; Sabiston, Catherine; Nykiforuk, Candace; Eyles, John; Manske, Steve; Campbell, H Sharon; Thompson, Mary

    2013-02-01

    We identified the most effective mix of school-based policies, programs, and regional environments associated with low school smoking rates in a cohort of Canadian high schools over time. We collected a comprehensive set of student, school, and community data from a national cohort of 51 high schools in 2004 and 2007. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to predict school and community characteristics associated with school smoking prevalence. Between 2004 and 2007, smoking prevalence decreased from 13.3% to 10.7% in cohort schools. Predictors of lower school smoking prevalence included both school characteristics related to prevention programming and community characteristics, including higher cigarette prices, a greater proportion of immigrants, higher education levels, and lower median household income. Effective approaches to reduce adolescent smoking will require interventions that focus on multiple factors. In particular, prevention programming and high pricing for cigarettes sold near schools may contribute to lower school smoking rates, and these factors are amenable to change. A sustained focus on smoking prevention is needed to maintain low levels of adolescent smoking.

  14. Cyberbullying victimization and its association with health across the life course: A Canadian population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soyeon; Boyle, Michael H; Georgiades, Katholiki

    2018-01-22

    To examine the prevalence of cyberbullying victimization (CV), its associations with self-reported health and substance use and the extent to which age moderates these associations. We used the 2014 Canadian General Social Survey on Victimization (N = 31 907, mean age = 45.83, SD = 18.67) and binary logistic regression models to estimate the strength of association between CV and health-related outcomes. The five-year prevalence of CV was 5.1%. Adolescents reported the highest prevalence of CV (12.2%), compared to all other adult age groups (1.7%-10.4%). After controlling for socio-demographic covariates, individuals exposed to CV had increased odds of reporting poor mental health (OR = 4.259, 95% CI = 2.853-6.356), everyday limitations due to mental health problems (OR = 3.263, 95% CI = 2.271-4.688), binge drinking (OR = 2.897, 95% CI = 1.765-4.754), and drug use (OR = 3.348, 95% CI = 2.333-4.804), compared to those not exposed to CV. The associations between CV and self-reported mental health and substance use were strongest for adolescents and attenuated across the adult age groups. Adolescence may represent a developmental period of heightened susceptibility to CV. Developing and evaluating targeted preventive interventions for this age group is warranted.

  15. Case study - Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, E.

    1986-01-01

    Antecedents and experience of nuclear activities in Argentina; the Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). First development and research activities. Research reactors and radioisotopes plants. Health physics and safety regulations. - Feasibility studies for the first nuclear power plant. Awarding the first plant CNA I (Atucha I). Relevant data related to the different project stages. Plant performance. - Feasibility study for the second nuclear power plant. Awarding the second plant CNE (Central Nuclear Embalse). Relevant data related to established targets. Differences compared with the first station targets. Local participation. Plant performance. (orig./GL)

  16. A Case Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Lacks of investment make it difficult for women to earn a living from agriculture. Financially independence of ... 2 Associate Professor; St. Mary's University College; School of Graduate. Studies;Eylachewz@yahoo.com .... lies within 0.5 degree north latitude and 39 degree longitude along the Addis. Ababa Gojjam road.

  17. A Psychobiographical Case Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    but, due to the impact of this, the social world. The study ..... This academic dissertation, by Ndoro (2014), was undertaken in partial fulfilment of the requirements for a Master of Business. Administration (MBA) at a South African university business school ..... era) may thus have precipitated Jobs's marijuana use. (Schlender ...

  18. The professional role of massage therapists in patient care in Canadian urban hospitals--a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania-Richmond, Ania; Reece, Barb Findlay; Suter, Esther; Verhoef, Marja J

    2015-02-07

    Massage therapy (MT) is becoming established as a recognized health care profession in Canada. It has been integrated as a core service in settings such as health spas, private integrative health centers, and there is indication that MT is starting to be integrated into hospitals. Research in the area of hospital-based MT has primarily focused on the efficacy, effectiveness, and increasingly, the safety of MT. However, little is known about the professional role of massage therapists in the hospital setting. The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-depth exploration and description of massage therapists' professional role in patient care in the context of Canadian urban hospitals. A sequential mixed methods study design was used. For the quantitative phase, a survey was sent to urban hospitals where MT services were organized by hospitals and provided by licensed massage therapists to patients to a) provide a contextual description of the hospitals and b) identify a sampling frame for the qualitative phase. The subsequent qualitative phase entailed semi structured interviews with a purposively diverse sample of participants massage therapists from the surveyed sites to explore their role perceptions. The quantitative and qualitative approaches were integrated during data collection and analysis. Of the hospitals that responded, sixteen urban hospitals across Canada (5%) provided MT to patients by licensed therapists. The majority of hospitals were located in Ontario and ranged from specialized small community hospitals to large multi-site hospitals. Based on interviews with 25 participants, six components of the massage therapists' professional role emerged: health care provider, team member, program support, educator, promoter of the profession, and researcher. While hospital-based MT in Canada is not a new phenomenon, MT is not yet an established health care profession in such settings. However, there is significant potential for the inclusion of the

  19. Exploring Canadian women's knowledge of and interest in mifepristone: results from a national qualitative study with abortion patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kristina I; LaRoche, Kathryn J; El-Haddad, Julie; Chaumont, Andréanne; Foster, Angel M

    2016-08-01

    Although Canada decriminalized abortion in 1988, significant disparities in access to services and an uneven geographic distribution of providers persists. Health Canada registered mifepristone, the gold standard of medication abortion, in July 2015. Our study explored Canadian women's knowledge of, interest in, and perspectives on mifepristone prior to registration. From November 2012 through July 2015 we conducted in-depth interviews with 174 Anglophone and Francophone women from Alberta, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Ontario, and Quebec about their abortion experiences and their opinions about medication abortion. We purposively recruited participants from different age cohorts and different regions within each study province to explore a range of perspectives. We analyzed these interviews for content and themes related to mifepristone using both deductive and inductive analytic techniques. The overwhelming majority of participants had no knowledge of mifepristone at the time of the interview. However, after providing a brief description of an evidence-based mifepristone/misoprostol regimen, more than half of the participants reported that they would have considered this method had it been available at the time of their abortion and most would have been comfortable receiving medication abortion care from a family physician or nurse practitioner. Most women supported the approval of mifepristone and felt Canadian women would benefit from having more options for early pregnancy termination. Although knowledge of mifepristone among recent abortion patients was low, considerable interest in medication abortion exists. Expanding awareness-raising efforts and supporting the approval of evidence-based regimens and provision of mifepristone appears warranted. The approval and introduction of mifepristone for early abortion in Canada promises to increase options and access. Creating tailored and culturally and contextually resonant messages about mifepristone is of high

  20. Management practices associated with pain in cattle on western Canadian cow-calf operations: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggy, M A; Pajor, E A; Thurston, W E; Parker, S; Greter, A M; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S; Campbell, J R; Windeyer, M C

    2017-02-01

    The implementation of on-farm pain mitigation strategies is dependent on feasibility and importance to producers. Currently, there is a lack of information regarding adoption of management practices associated with pain in cattle within the Canadian beef industry. The objective of this mixed methods study was to describe pain-associated practices implemented on farm and producer perceptions toward pain mitigation strategies. A questionnaire about calving management and calf processing was delivered to 109 cow-calf producers in western Canada. In addition, 15 respondents were purposively selected based on questionnaire responses to participate in individual semistructured, on-farm interviews. The prevalence of pain mitigation strategies used for dystocia and cesarean section by respondents were 46 and 100%, respectively. The majority of operations reported castrating and dehorning calves before 3 mo of age (95 and 89%, respectively). The majority of operations did not use pain mitigation strategies for castration and dehorning (90 and 85%, respectively). Branding was practiced by 57% of respondents, 4% of which used pain mitigation. Thematic content analysis revealed that producers' perception of pain were influenced by what they referred to as "common sense," relatability to cattle, visual evidence of pain, and age of the animal. Factors that influenced participant rationale for the implementation of pain mitigation practices included access to information and resources, age of the animal, benefit to the operation, cost and logistics, market demands, and personal conscience. Overall, management practices were generally in compliance with published Canadian guidelines. Results of this study may provide direction for future policy making, research, and extension efforts to encourage the adoption of pain mitigation strategies.

  1. Case Study: Shiraz Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Khajehnoori

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between lifestyle which seems as a scale of globalization process with body image. Required data was collected by systematic random sampling among 508 women in Shiraz. Based on existing theories and studies theoretical framework has constituted based on Giddens theory. Six hypotheses have been established. For collecting information, survey method and self reported questionnaire were used. In data analysis and explanation, multiple regression and unilateral dispersion analyses were used. The result showed that among effective factors on body image, modern musical lifestyle, religious' lifestyle, leisure lifestyle and participative lifestyle explained 23 percent of variations of body image. Among these variables, only religious lifestyle had negative relationship with body image and other variables had positive relationship with dependant variable.

  2. Case study: Tourism marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Kennell, James

    2014-01-01

    Tourism can be a challenging subject for students because it is both dynamic and susceptible to economic turbulence and shifts in trends. Tourism: A Modern Synthesis is an essential textbook for tourism students looking for a clear and comprehensive introduction to their studies which helps overcome these challenges. The authors apply a strong business approach to the subject reflecting developments in the teaching and content of modern courses and the text covers both key principles and cont...

  3. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the 1995 Annual Meeting (Ontario, Canada, May 26-30, 1995).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothier, Yvonne M., Ed.

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at the 1995 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group. Papers are organized into four sections: (1) plenary lectures; (2) working groups; (3) topic sessions; and (4) ad hoc sessions. Papers include: (1) "The Role of Epistemology in the Analysis of Teaching/Learning…

  4. Untangling Risk of Maltreatment from Events of Maltreatment: An Analysis of the 2008 Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Barbara; Trocme, Nico; MacLaurin, Bruce; Sinha, Vandna; Black, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the methodological changes that occurred across cycles of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS), specifically outlining the rationale for tracking investigations of families with children at risk of maltreatment in the CIS-2008 cycle. This paper also presents analysis of data from the CIS-2008…

  5. There Are Doorways in These Huts: An Empirical Study of Educational Programs, Native Canadian Student Needs, and Institutional Effectiveness in British Columbia and Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A study examined characteristics of Native Canadian educational programming that might influence Native student success at 27 colleges and universities in British Columbia and Ontario. Presence or absence of an advisory board composed of Native community members, numbers of Native faculty members, and how well institutional systems fit with Native…

  6. Technology assessment and resource allocation for predictive genetic testing: A study of the perspectives of Canadian genetic health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einsiedel Edna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a growing number of genetic tests becoming available to the health and consumer markets, genetic health care providers in Canada are faced with the challenge of developing robust decision rules or guidelines to allocate a finite number of public resources. The objective of this study was to gain Canadian genetic health providers' perspectives on factors and criteria that influence and shape resource allocation decisions for publically funded predictive genetic testing in Canada. Methods The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 senior lab directors and clinicians at publically funded Canadian predictive genetic testing facilities. Participants were drawn from British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. Given the community sampled was identified as being relatively small and challenging to access, purposive sampling coupled with snowball sampling methodologies were utilized. Results Surveyed lab directors and clinicians indicated that predictive genetic tests were funded provincially by one of two predominant funding models, but they themselves played a significant role in how these funds were allocated for specific tests and services. They also rated and identified several factors that influenced allocation decisions and patients' decisions regarding testing. Lastly, participants provided recommendations regarding changes to existing allocation models and showed support for a national evaluation process for predictive testing. Conclusion Our findings suggest that largely local and relatively ad hoc decision making processes are being made in relation to resource allocations for predictive genetic tests and that a more coordinated and, potentially, national approach to allocation decisions in this context may be appropriate.

  7. Does Mental Health Status Influence Susceptibility to the Physiologic Effects of Air Pollution? A Population Based Study of Canadian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dales, Robert E; Cakmak, Sabit

    2016-01-01

    Both air pollution exposure and the presence of mental illness are associated with an increased risk of physical illness. To determine whether or not children with less favourable mental health are more susceptible to pulmonary and cardiovascular effects of ambient air pollution, compared to those who are mentally healthy. We carried out a cross-sectional study of 1,883 children between the ages of 6 and 17 years of age who participated in the Canadian Health Measures population survey between 2007 and 2009. Subjects were assigned the air pollution values obtained from the National Air Pollution monitor closest to their neighborhood. Lung function, heart rate and blood pressure were stratified by indicators of mental health. The latter were ascertained by questions about feelings of happiness, a diagnosed mood disorder, and the emotional symptom subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Among those who reported a mood disorder, an interquartile increase in ozone was associated with increases in systolic and diastolic pressures of 3.8 mmHg (95% CI 1.6, 5.9) and 3.0mmHg (95%CI 0.9, 5.2) respectively, and a decreases in FVC of 7.6% (95% CI 2.9, 12.3). No significant changes in these variables were observed in those who did not report a mood disorder. Among those with unfavourable emotional symptoms, ozone was associated with a 6.4% (95% CI 1.7, 11.3) increase in heart rate, a 4.1% (95%CI 1.2, 7.1) increase in systolic blood pressure, and a 6.0% (95% CI 1.4, 10.6) decrease in FEVl. No significant effect was seen in these variables among those with no emotional symptoms. In the Canadian population, children who report mood disorders or unfavourable emotional symptoms appear to be more vulnerable to the adverse physiologic effects of air pollution.

  8. Case Study: Derechos Digitales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Neylon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Derechos Digitales is a Latin American advocacy and research network focussed on freedom on the internet, privacy and copyright reform. For the pilot project a specific IDRC funded project was the notional focus of study. However in practice the effort for considering data sharing was aimed at being organisation wide. The organisation already shares reports and other resources (particularly images and infographics by default. While open data was described as being “in the DNA of the organisation” there was little practice across the network of sharing preliminary and in-process materials. Some aspects of data collection on research projects, particularly to do with copyright and legal issues, have significant privacy issues and as the organisation focuses on privacy as one of its advocacy areas this is taken very seriously. Many materials from research projects are not placed online at all. Derechos Digitales run distributed projects and this creates challenges for consistent management. Alongside this the main contact at DD changed during the course of the pilot. This exchange exemplified the challenges of maintaining organisational systems and awareness through a personnel change.

  9. Case study: Khoramdareh County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Riahi Riahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental sustainability of rural settlements based on a systematic viewpoint may be defined as a realization of sustainable development in different social, economic and environmental aspects of rural areas. Achieving this goal requires that we pay more attention to effective elements and factors through a set of sustainability indices. This research was meant to analyze sustainable factors of rural settlement in three dimensions: environmental, social and economic context using multi-criteria decision analysis and explanation of the relationships between its active and effective factors in the rural area of the Khorramdarreh County in the province of Zanjan. The research method used is the descriptive analytic approach. Data from 287 households were sampled randomly from a total of 1143 households in the four villages including: Rahmat Abad, Alvand, Baghdareh and, Sukhariz (out of 15 villages in the Khorramdarreh County. In the process of doing this research and after calculating the weights, the difference in the sustainability of environmental, social, economic and physical aspects in rural areas of this county have been determined. Data was collected using library and field research through questionnaires. Data analysis was performed by the One-Sample t Test and the Vikur and path analysis techniques, using statistical software SPSS. The findings show that environmental sustainability in the study area is half desirable. Among the different aspects of environmental sustainability, the most effective factors are physical, economic, social and environmental aspects, respectively. Little attention of policy-making –system to socio-cultural and environmental aspects, especially in practice, and rapid and unplanned utilization of production resources are the most important factors affecting this situation in two given dimensions. Although, in programmed documents the planning system agents emphasize on the socio-cultural sustainability

  10. Final report on case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungberg, Daniel; McKelvey, Maureen; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2012-01-01

    Case study as a research design means investigating a single or multiple instance(s) or setting(s) (i.e. a case) and its entire context to explain a phenomenon and its processes. This is achieved through detailed understanding, usually comprised of multiple sources of information. In this way, ca...

  11. Supporting the Transition into Employment: A Study of Canadian Young Adults Living with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetha, Arif; Bowring, Julie; Furrie, Adele; Smith, Frank; Breslin, Curtis

    2018-04-25

    Objective To examine the job accommodation and benefit needs of young adults with disabilities as they transition into employment, and their perceived barriers to meeting support needs. Methods An online survey was conducted of 155 Canadian young adults with disabilities (mean age = 25.8 years). Respondents were either employed or seeking employment, and were asked about their need for health benefits, and soft (e.g., flexible scheduling) and hard accommodations (e.g., ergonomic interventions), and perceived accommodation barriers. Disability characteristics (e.g., disability type), demographic details and work context information were collected. Multivariable logistic analyses were conducted to examine the factors associated with a greater need for health benefits and hard and soft accommodations. Result Participants reported having a physical (79%), psychological (79%) or cognitive/learning disability (77%); 68% had > 1 disability. Over half (55%) were employed. Health benefits and soft accommodations were most needed by participants. Also, an average of six perceived accommodation barriers were indicated; difficulty with disability disclosure was most frequently reported. More perceived accommodation barriers were associated with a greater need for health benefits (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04-1.31) and soft accommodations (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.01-1.27). A psychological disability was a associated with a greater need for health benefits (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.09-7.43) and soft accommodations (OR 3.83, 95% CI 1.41-10.42). Discussion Employers can support the employment of young adults with disabilities through provision of extended health benefits and soft accommodations. Addressing accommodation barriers could minimize unmet workplace need, and improve employment outcomes for young adults with disabilities as they begin their career and across the life course.

  12. Predicting the atopic march: Results from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Maxwell M; Lefebvre, Diana L; Dharma, Christoffer; Dai, David; Lou, Wendy Y W; Subbarao, Padmaja; Becker, Allan B; Mandhane, Piush J; Turvey, Stuart E; Sears, Malcolm R

    2018-02-01

    The atopic march describes the progression from atopic dermatitis during infancy to asthma and allergic rhinitis in later childhood. In a Canadian birth cohort we investigated whether concomitant allergic sensitization enhances subsequent development of these allergic diseases at age 3 years. Children completed skin prick testing at age 1 year. Children were considered sensitized if they produced a wheal 2 mm or larger than that elicited by the negative control to any of 10 inhalant or food allergens. Children were also assessed for atopic dermatitis by using the diagnostic criteria of the UK Working Party. At age 3 years, children were assessed for asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Data from 2311 children were available. Atopic dermatitis without allergic sensitization was not associated with an increased risk of asthma at age 3 years after adjusting for common confounders (relative risk [RR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.11-1.93). Conversely, atopic dermatitis with allergic sensitization increased the risk of asthma more than 7-fold (RR, 7.04; 95% CI, 4.13-11.99). Atopic dermatitis and allergic sensitization had significant interactions on both the additive (relative excess risk due to interaction, 5.06; 95% CI, 1.33-11.04) and multiplicative (ratio of RRs, 5.80; 95% CI, 1.20-27.83) scales in association with asthma risk. There was also a positive additive interaction between atopic dermatitis and allergic sensitization in their effects on food allergy risk (relative excess risk due to interaction, 15.11; 95% CI, 4.19-35.36). Atopic dermatitis without concomitant allergic sensitization was not associated with an increased risk of asthma. In combination, atopic dermatitis and allergic sensitization had strong interactive effects on both asthma and food allergy risk at age 3 years. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Addressing issues raised by stakeholders: impacts on process, content and behaviour in the case of the Canadian nuclear waste management organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight how stakeholder input has shaped the work of the Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in both process and content. In 2002, NWMO was mandated by the Government of Canada to undertake a study of different approaches for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel, and to recommend an approach to the Government by November 15, 2005. Public consultations are an important part of this legislated mandate. In inviting broad dialogue and feedback from the public at large, experts, and other communities of interest, NWMO intends that its processes, the study and its recommendations will reflect the values and perspectives of Canadian society. The organization has adopted a reflective study approach, through which it deliberately seeks public input at each stage of study. A continuum of engagement activities provides for dynamic interaction between the engagement processes and the research and analysis. The insights gained from engagement are integrated into the NWMO's study, to continuously enrich the iterative learning process. NWMO has received a wide range of comments, insights and questions from face-to-face discussions, workshops, round-tables, written submissions and public opinion research. The sections that follow illustrate how this stakeholder input has helped to shape the organisation's public engagement plans, work-plan and the focus of the assessment that is now in progress. Going forward, issues and comments provided by different communities of interest will assist the assessment of the management approaches and help design NWMO's recommendation to the Government of Canada. (author)

  14. Validation of the Canadian norms for the Alberta In fant Motor Scale for infants in a South African region aged four to twelve months; a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Manuel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS is a norm referenced,performance based, observational tool that assesses motor developmentin infants from birth up to the age of eighteen months. The AIMS has beenwidely used by researchers and clinicians around the world, but only afew attempts were made to validate the Canadian norms for infants residingoutside Canada.The purpose of the study was to validate the Canadian norms of the AIMSfor infants within the Cape Metropolitan region, South Africa.A longitudinal study was conducted using the AIMS to assess the gross motordevelopment of 67 healthy full term infants at 4, 8 and 12 months respectively.At 4 months the mean percentile ranking was significantly higher than the Canadian norm (p=0.01, while no statisticalsignificant differences were found at 8 and 12 months of age.The AIMS is a valid assessment tool for healthy infants aged 8 and 12 months within the Cape Metropole, SouthAfrica. The infants at four months of age scored higher than the Canadian norm. Further validation which incorporatelarger, random samples are required to enable generalisation of the findings for the South African infant population.

  15. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  16. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  17. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. Case Study: Bangladesh Bank Heist

    OpenAIRE

    Md Ahsan Habib

    2017-01-01

    Cyber crime is a threat to our E- commerce . A hacker group named "Lazarus" hacked $951 million from Bangladesh Bank's account. This is the short case study of this incident with professional ethical view.

  19. Exploring the use of lesson study with six Canadian middle-school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Terry James

    This qualitative case study explores the use of lesson study over a ten-week period with six Ontario middle school science teachers. The research questions guiding this study were: (1) How does participation in science-based lesson study influence these teachers': (a) science subject matter knowledge (science SMK), (b) science pedagogical content knowledge (science PCK), and (c) confidence in teaching science?, and (2) What benefits and challenges do they associate with lesson study? Data sources for this study were: teacher questionnaires, surveys, reflections, pre- and post- interviews, and follow-up emails; researcher field notes and reflections; pre- and post- administration of the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument; and audio recordings of group meetings. The teachers demonstrated limited gains in science SMK. There was evidence for an overall improvement in teacher knowledge of forces and simple machines, and two teachers demonstrated improvement in over half of the five scenarios assessing teacher science SMK. Modest gains in teacher science PCK were found. One teacher expressed more accurate understanding of students' knowledge of forces and a better knowledge of effective science teaching strategies. The majority of teachers reported that they would be using three-part lessons and hands-on activities more in their science teaching. Gains in teacher pedagogical knowledge (PK) were found in four areas: greater emphasis on anticipation of student thinking and responses, recognition of the importance of observing students, more intentional teaching, and anticipated future use of student video data. Most teachers reported feeling more confident in teaching structures and mechanisms, and attributed this increase in confidence to collaboration and seeing evidence of student learning and engagement during the lesson teachings. Teacher benefits included: learning how to increase student engagement and collaboration, observing students, including video data

  20. Outcome of secondary high-grade glioma in children previously treated for a malignant condition: A study of the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carret, Anne-Sophie; Tabori, Uri; Crooks, Bruce; Hukin, Juliette; Odame, Isaac; Johnston, Donna L.; Keene, Daniel L.; Freeman, Carolyn; Bouffet, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reports of secondary high-grade glioma (HGG) in survivors of childhood cancer are scarce. The aim of this study was to review the pattern of diagnosis, the treatment, and outcome of secondary pediatric HGG. Patients and methods: We performed a multi-center retrospective study among the 17 paediatric institutions participating in the Canadian Pediatric Brain Tumour Consortium (CPBTC). Results: We report on 18 patients (14 males, 4 females) treated in childhood for a primary cancer, who subsequently developed a HGG as a second malignancy. All patients had previously received radiation therapy +/- chemotherapy for either acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (n = 9) or solid tumour (n = 9). All HGG occurred within the previous radiation fields. At the last follow-up, 17 patients have died and the median survival time is 9.75 months. Conclusion: Although aggressive treatment seems to provide sustained remissions in some patients, the optimal management is still to be defined. Further documentation of such cases is necessary in order to better understand the pathogenesis, the natural history and the prevention of these tumours

  1. Dietary patterns and colorectal cancer: results from a Canadian population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Woodrow, Jennifer; Zhu, Yun; Roebothan, Barbara; Mclaughlin, John R; Parfrey, Patrick S

    2015-01-15

    The relationship between major dietary patterns and colorectal cancer (CRC) in other populations largely remains consistent across studies. The objective of the present study is to assess if dietary patterns are associated with the risk of CRC in the population of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). Data from a population based case-control study in the province of NL were analyzed, including 506 CRC patients (306 men and 200 women) and 673 controls (400 men and 273 women), aged 20-74 years. Dietary habits were assessed by a 169-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the association between dietary patterns and the CRC risk. Three major dietary patterns were derived using factor analysis, namely a Meat-diet pattern, a Plant-based diet pattern and a Sugary-diet pattern. In combination the three dietary patterns explained 74% of the total variance in food intake. Results suggest that the Meat-diet and the Sugary-diet increased the risk of CRC with corresponding odds ratios (ORs) of 1.84 (95% CI: 1.19-2.86) and 2.26 (95% CI: 1.39-3.66) for people in the highest intake quintile compared to those in the lowest. Whereas plant-based diet pattern decreases the risk of CRC with a corresponding OR of 0.55 (95% CI: 0.35-0.87). Even though odds ratios (ORs) were not always statistically significant, largely similar associations across three cancer sites were found: the proximal colon, the distal colon, and the rectum. The finding that Meat-diet/Sugary-diet patterns increased and Plant-based diet pattern decreased the risk of CRC would guide the promotion of healthy eating for primary prevention of CRC in this population.

  2. The Canadian Legal System, the Robert Latimer Case, and the Rhetorical Construction of (Dis)ability: "Bodies that Matter?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers Judge Ted Noble's 1997 ruling of the Latimer case in terms of how it rhetorically constructs and privileges the normal, able-bodied status quo, while, at the same time, deconstructs and positions as inferior the "abnormal," dis-abled minority. In this case, Noble not only took the unprecedented step of granting…

  3. An analysis of the effectiveness of a joint commodity and foreign exchange rate futures hedge: The case of a Canadian crude oil trader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klusa, L.J.

    1993-04-01

    This study focused on reducing risk for Canadian crude oil traders exposed to crude oil price and exchange rate uncertainty. Joint static and flow period hedges were developed and compared to unhedged positions and to naive and simple hedges. Optimal hedge ratio size and hedging effectiveness were identified for a variety of hedge lifting periods and durations. The in-sample results indicated that joint hedge models were more effective than other models in terms of minimizing the variance of returns. Out-of-sample results indicated that joint and simple commodity hedges were equally effective. Other findings included: shorter duration, close to expiry hedges were the most effective; the difference between the variability of spot and future price differences and their correlations were related to hedge ratio size; and a flow period hedge was the most effective hedge when spot prices were monthly average prices. 53 refs., 3 figs., 49 tabs

  4. The Canadian HIV and aging cohort study - determinants of increased risk of cardio-vascular diseases in HIV-infected individuals: rationale and study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Madeleine; Chartrand-Lefebvre, Carl; Baril, Jean-Guy; Trottier, Sylvie; Trottier, Benoit; Harris, Marianne; Walmsley, Sharon; Conway, Brian; Wong, Alexander; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Kovacs, Colin; MacPherson, Paul A; Monteith, Kenneth Marc; Mansour, Samer; Thanassoulis, George; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Zhu, Zhitong; Tsoukas, Christos; Ancuta, Petronela; Bernard, Nicole; Tremblay, Cécile L

    2017-09-11

    With potent antiretroviral drugs, HIV infection is becoming a chronic disease. Emergence of comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become a leading concern for patients living with the infection. We hypothesized that the chronic and persistent inflammation and immune activation associated with HIV disease leads to accelerated aging, characterized by CVD. This will translate into higher incidence rates of CVD in HIV infected participants, when compared to HIV negative participants, after adjustment for traditional CVD risk factors. When characterized further using cardiovascular imaging, biomarkers, immunological and genetic profiles, CVD associated with HIV will show different characteristics compared to CVD in HIV-negative individuals. The Canadian HIV and Aging cohort is a prospective, controlled cohort study funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. It will recruit patients living with HIV who are aged 40 years or older or have lived with HIV for 15 years or more. A control population, frequency matched for age, sex, and smoking status, will be recruited from the general population. Patients will attend study visits at baseline, year 1, 2, 5 and 8. At each study visit, data on complete medical and pharmaceutical history will be captured, along with anthropometric measures, a complete physical examination, routine blood tests and electrocardiogram. Consenting participants will also contribute blood samples to a research biobank. The primary outcome is incidence of a composite of: myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, stroke, hospitalization for angina or congestive heart failure, revascularization or amputation for peripheral artery disease, or cardiovascular death. Preplanned secondary outcomes are all-cause mortality, incidence of the metabolic syndrome, incidence of type 2 diabetes, incidence of renal failure, incidence of abnormal bone mineral density and body fat distribution. Patients participating to the

  5. Substantiated Reports of Child Maltreatment From the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect 2008: Examining Child and Household Characteristics and Child Functional Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Tracie O; Taillieu, Tamara; Cheung, Kristene; Katz, Laurence Y; Tonmyr, Lil; Sareen, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Identifying child and household characteristics that are associated with specific child maltreatment types and child functional impairment are important for informing prevention and intervention efforts. Our objectives were to examine the distribution of several child and household characteristics among substantiated child maltreatment types in Canada; to determine if a specific child maltreatment type relative to all other types was associated with increased odds of child functional impairment; and to determine which child and household characteristics were associated with child functional impairment. Method: Data were from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (collection 2008) from 112 child welfare sites across Canada (n = 6163 children). Results: Physical abuse, sexual abuse, and emotional maltreatment were highly prevalent among children aged 10 to 15 years. For single types of child maltreatment, the highest prevalence of single-parent homes (50.6%), social assistance (43.0%), running out of money regularly (30.7%), and unsafe housing (30.9%) were reported for substantiated cases of neglect. Being male, older age, living in a single-parent home, household running out of money, moving 2 or more times in the past year, and household overcrowding were associated with increased odds of child functional impairment. Conclusions: More work is warranted to determine if providing particular resources for single-parent families, financial counselling, and facilitating adequate and stable housing for families with child maltreatment histories or at risk for child maltreatment could be effective for improving child functional outcomes. PMID:26175390

  6. Varicella zoster virus infections in Canadian children in the prevaccine era: A hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, S; Davies, H D; Jadavji, T

    1997-11-01

    To describe the clinical course of children admitted for varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections to a pediatric hospital before the release of VZV vaccine in Canada. Retrospective case series. Tertiary pediatric hospital. Population studied was children aged 18 years or younger admitted to hospital between 1983 and 1992 who were discharged with a diagnosis of varicella or zoster. Of the 201 children who were identified, 36 were excluded, leaving 165 for analysis. There was a male:female ratio of 1.5:1 and a median age of 5.3 years (range two weeks to 18 years). The group included those who were previously healthy (70, 42.4%), immunocompromised (60, 36.4%), and those with nonimmunocompromising conditions (35, 21.2%). Comparison of immunocompetent and immunocompromised children revealed that complication of VZV infection was a more common reason for admission among the former (86 of 105, 81.9%, Pcomplications in immunocompetent children (36 of 98) and those younger than five years (26 of 53), whereas pulmonary complications predominated among immunocompromised patients (eight of 98) and neurological complications in five- to 10-year-olds (16 of 36). Only one death (0.6%) occurred in an immunocompetent patient. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus caused equal numbers of secondary infections (92% of all isolates). Complications of VZV infections and secondary prophylactic antiviral treatment of immunocompromised children explain the majority of hospitalizations in this institution, and can be monitored after VZV vaccine introduction. Complications vary significantly with underlying healthy status and age.

  7. Contribution of the PALB2 c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] founder mutation in well-defined breast and/or ovarian cancer families and unselected ovarian cancer cases of French Canadian descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischkowitz, Marc; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Hamel, Nancy; Pouchet, Carly; Foulkes, William D; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane M; Tonin, Patricia N

    2013-01-09

    The PALB2 c.2323C>T [p.Q775X] mutation has been reported in at least three breast cancer families and breast cancer cases of French Canadian descent and this has been attributed to common ancestors. The number of mutation-positive cases reported varied based on criteria of ascertainment of index cases tested. Although inherited PALB2 mutations are associated with increased risks of developing breast cancer, risk to ovarian cancer has not been fully explored in this demographically unique population. We screened the PALB2 p.Q775X variant in 71 families with at least three cases of breast cancer (n=48) or breast and ovarian cancers (n=23) that have previously been found negative for at least the most common BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations reported in the French Canadian population and in 491 women of French Canadian descent who had invasive ovarian cancer and/or low malignant potential tumors of the major histopathological subtypes. We identified a PALB2 p.Q775X carrier in a breast cancer family, who had invasive ductal breast carcinomas at 39 and 42 years of age. We also identified a PALB2 p.Q775X carrier who had papillary serous ovarian cystadenocarcinoma at age 58 among the 238 serous subtype ovarian cancer cases investigated, who also had breast cancer at age 52. Our findings, taken together with previous reports, support adding PALB2 c.2323C>T p.Q775X to the list of cancer susceptibility genes for which founder mutations have been identified in the French Canadian population.

  8. The Canadian birth place study: examining maternity care provider attitudes and interprofessional conflict around planned home birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, Saraswathi; Stoll, Kathrin; Schummers, Laura; Fairbrother, Nichole; Klein, Michael C; Thordarson, Dana; Kornelsen, Jude; Dharamsi, Shafik; Rogers, Judy; Liston, Robert; Kaczorowski, Janusz

    2014-10-28

    Available birth settings have diversified in Canada since the integration of regulated midwifery. Midwives are required to offer eligible women choice of birth place; and 25-30% of midwifery clients plan home births. Canadian provincial health ministries have instituted reimbursement schema and regulatory guidelines to ensure access to midwives in all settings. Evidence from well-designed Canadian cohort studies demonstrate the safety and efficacy of midwife-attended home birth. However, national rates of planned home birth remain low, and many maternity providers do not support choice of birth place. In this national, mixed-methods study, our team administered a cross-sectional survey, and developed a 17 item Provider Attitudes to Planned Home Birth Scale (PAPHB-m) to assess attitudes towards home birth among maternity providers. We entered care provider type into a linear regression model, with the PAPHB-m score as the outcome variable. Using Students' t tests and ANOVA for categorical variables and correlational analysis (Pearson's r) for continuous variables, we conducted provider-specific bivariate analyses of all socio-demographic, education, and practice variables (n=90) that were in both the midwife and physician surveys. Median favourability scores on the PAPHB-m scale were very low among obstetricians (33.0), moderately low for family physicians (38.0) and very high for midwives (80.0), and 84% of the variance in attitudes could be accounted for by care provider type. Amount of exposure to planned home birth during midwifery or medical education and practice was significantly associated with favourability scores. Concerns about perinatal loss and lawsuits, discomfort with inter-professional consultations, and preference for the familiarity of the hospital correlated with less favourable attitudes to home birth. Among all providers, favourability scores were linked to beliefs about the evidence on safety of home birth, and confidence in their own ability

  9. Theory Testing Using Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Pernille Dissing; Løkke, Ann-Kristina

    2006-01-01

    design. Finally, we discuss the epistemological logic, i.e., the value to larger research programmes, of such studies and, following Lakatos, conclude that the value of theory-testing case studies lies beyond naïve falsification and in their contribution to developing research programmes in a progressive...

  10. Canadian attitudes to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.E.O.; Dobson, J.K.; Baril, R.G.

    1977-05-01

    A national assessment was made of public attitudes towards nuclear power, along with regional studies of the Maritimes and mid-western Canada and a study of Canadian policy-makers' views on nuclear energy. Public levels of knowledge about nuclear power are very low and there are marked regional differences. Opposition centers on questions of safety and is hard to mollify due to irrational fear and low institutional credibility. Canadians rate inflation as a higher priority problem than energy and see energy shortages as a future problem (within 5 years) and energy independence as a high priority policy. (E.C.B.)

  11. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  12. Case Study of 'moral injury' : Format Dutch Case Studies Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, Sjaak; Walton, Martin N.; van Loenen, Guus

    2017-01-01

    The case study ‘Moral Injury’ traces care provided by a chaplain in a mental health institution to a former military marksman named Hans. Hans was in care at a specialized unit for military veterans with traumas. He sought contact with a chaplain “to set things right with God” and wanted the

  13. Early Neurodevelopment and Self-Reported Adolescent Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety in a National Canadian Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, C. Rebecca; Wild, T. Cam; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Colman, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the mental health outcomes of young children who experience developmental delay. The objective of this study was to assess whether delay in attaining developmental milestones was related to depressive and anxious symptoms in adolescence. Method The sample included 3508 Canadian children who participated in a nationally representative prospective cohort study. The person most knowledgeable about the child reported on attainment of developmental milestones spanning several developmental domains at ages 2–3. The children were followed into adolescence and self-reported depressive and anxious symptoms were used from adolescents ages 12–13. An overall assessment of developmental milestones as well as a supplementary analysis of specific categories of developmental milestones was conducted. Results Cohort members who displayed delayed developmental milestones in early childhood were more likely to experience higher levels of depressive and anxious symptoms as adolescents. However, there was no interaction between delayed developmental milestones and stressful life events. In the supplementary analysis, two developmental domains (self-care and speech/communication) were associated with higher levels of depressive and anxious symptoms in adolescence. Conclusion Delay in attainment of early developmental milestones is significantly associated with adolescent depressive and anxious symptoms. PMID:23437245

  14. Early neurodevelopment and self-reported adolescent symptoms of depression and anxiety in a National Canadian Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Rebecca North

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the mental health outcomes of young children who experience developmental delay. The objective of this study was to assess whether delay in attaining developmental milestones was related to depressive and anxious symptoms in adolescence. METHOD: The sample included 3508 Canadian children who participated in a nationally representative prospective cohort study. The person most knowledgeable about the child reported on attainment of developmental milestones spanning several developmental domains at ages 2-3. The children were followed into adolescence and self-reported depressive and anxious symptoms were used from adolescents ages 12-13. An overall assessment of developmental milestones as well as a supplementary analysis of specific categories of developmental milestones was conducted. RESULTS: Cohort members who displayed delayed developmental milestones in early childhood were more likely to experience higher levels of depressive and anxious symptoms as adolescents. However, there was no interaction between delayed developmental milestones and stressful life events. In the supplementary analysis, two developmental domains (self-care and speech/communication were associated with higher levels of depressive and anxious symptoms in adolescence. CONCLUSION: Delay in attainment of early developmental milestones is significantly associated with adolescent depressive and anxious symptoms.

  15. Pilot study investigating ambient air toxics emissions near a Canadian kraft pulp and paper facility in Pictou County, Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Emma; Guernsey, Judith R; Walker, Tony R; Kim, Jong Sung; Sherren, Kate; Andreou, Pantelis

    2017-09-01

    Air toxics are airborne pollutants known or suspected to cause cancer or other serious health effects, including certain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), prioritized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While several EPA-designated air toxics are monitored at a subset of Canadian National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) sites, Canada has no specific "air toxics" control priorities. Although pulp and paper (P&P) mills are major industrial emitters of air pollutants, few studies quantified the spectrum of air quality exposures. Moreover, most NAPS monitoring sites are in urban centers; in contrast, rural NAPS sites are sparse with few exposure risk records. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate prioritized air toxic ambient VOC concentrations using NAPS hourly emissions data from a rural Pictou, Nova Scotia Kraft P&P town to document concentration levels, and to determine whether these concentrations correlated with wind direction at the NAPS site (located southwest of the mill). Publicly accessible Environment and Climate Change Canada data (VOC concentrations [Granton NAPS ID: 31201] and local meteorological conditions [Caribou Point]) were examined using temporal (2006-2013) and spatial analytic methods. Results revealed several VOCs (1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride) routinely exceeded EPA air toxics-associated cancer risk thresholds. 1,3-Butadiene and tetrachloroethylene were significantly higher (p towns and contribute to poor health in nearby communities.

  16. School differences in adolescent health and wellbeing: findings from the Canadian Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Hana; Klinger, Don

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between student- and school-level factors and student health and wellbeing outcomes, and to estimate the variability present at each of the student and school levels for each of three selected health-related outcomes. The data are from the 2006 Canadian Health Behaviour in School-aged children (HBSC) study in which Grades 6-10 students (N=9670) and administrators (N=187) were surveyed. The three outcome measures are Self-Rated Health (SRH), Emotional Wellbeing (EWB), and Subjective Health Complaints (SHC). Individual and school-level effects on the three outcomes were estimated using multi-level modeling. Both individual and school-level factors were associated with students' health. Gender, family wealth, family structure, academic achievement and neighbourhood were significant student-level predictors. We identified random associations between the student-level variables and reported health outcomes. These random effects indicate that the relationships between these student variables and health are not consistent across schools. Student Problem Behaviours at the school were significant predictors of SRH and SHC, while Student Aggression and the school's average socioeconomic standing were significant school-level predictors of EWB. Findings suggest that the environment and disciplinary climate in schools can predict student health and wellbeing outcomes, and may have important implications for school initiatives aimed at students who are struggling both emotionally and academically. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Canadian heavy water production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlinger, A.; Lockerby, W.E.; Rae, H.K.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews Canadian experience in the production of heavy water, presents a long-term supply projection, relates this projection to the anticipated long-term electrical energy demand, and highlights principal areas for further improvement that form the bulk of the Canadian R and D programme on heavy water processes. Six Canadian heavy water plants with a total design capacity of 4000Mg/a are in operation or under construction. All use the Girdler-Sulphide (GS) process, which is based on deuterium exchange between water and hydrogen sulphide. Early operating problems have been overcome and the plants have demonstrated annual capacity factors in excess of 70%, with short-term production rates equal to design rates. Areas for further improvement are: to increase production rates by optimizing the control of foaming to give both higher sieve tray efficiency and higher flow rates, to reduce the incapacity due to deposition of pyrite (FeS 2 ) and sulphur (between 5% and 10%), and to improve process control and optimization of operating conditions by the application of mathematical simulations of the detailed deuterium profile throughout each plant. Other processes being studied, which look potentially attractive are the hydrogen-water exchange and the hydrogen-amine exchange. Even if they become successful competitors to the GS process, the latter is likely to remain the dominant production method for the next 10-20 years. This programme, when related to the long-term electricity demand, indicates that heavy water supply and demand are in reasonable balance and that the Candu programme will not be inhibited because of shortages of this commodity. (author)

  18. Case Study on Logistics Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Sorooshian

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research carried out at a medium‐size manufacturing organization in east Asia. The study tries to highlight the importance of supply chain management; specifically, our aim for this study is to understand logistics and performance measurement in the logistics and supply chain, and we include a theoretical discussion of online data collected and a case study of the logistic performance of a real organization. The study also examines the performance of the selected company, identifies the problems and provides recommendations for improvements. This study can be a guide for business advisers and those interested in analysing company performance, especially from a logistics viewpoint. We also suggest the methodology of this case study for those who want to have a better understanding of a business environment before starting their own business, or for benchmarking practice during strategic planning.

  19. BioFleet case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    These six case studies examined the use of different biodiesel blends as fuel supply sources for businesses in British Columbia (BC). In the first case study, 6 municipalities participated in a pilot program designed to compare the performance of biodiesel and diesel fuels. Each municipality operated 2 base vehicles running on conventional diesel along with 2 similar vehicles which used biodiesel. Real time emissions tests and analyses of the vehicles using biodiesel were also conducted by 2 of the participating municipalities. All municipalities participating in the study agreed to purchase significant volumes of biodiesel. The second case study described a pilot study conducted by the City of Vancouver's equipment services branch in 2004. As a result of the study, the city now has over 530 types of equipment that use biodiesel. The third case study described a program designed by TSI Terminals in Vancouver to assess the emission reduction impact of using biodiesel at its port facility. Six different pieces of equipment were used to confirm that biodiesel could be used throughout the terminal. Test results confirmed that biodiesel blends could be used to reduce emissions. Overall emissions were reduced by 30 per cent. The fourth case study described a waste renderer that used a fleet of 36 trucks to deliver raw products to its plants. The company made the decision to use only biodiesel for its entire fleet of trucks. Since July 2005, the company has logged over 1.7 million km using biodiesel blends. The fifth case study described a salmon hatchery that switched from diesel to biodiesel in order to reduce emissions. The biodiesel blends are used to fuel the hatchery's 2 diesel generators. The hatchery has reduced emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) by an estimated 1800 tonnes annually. The sixth case study described how the Township of Langley has started using biodiesel for its entire fleet of of approximately 250 pieces of equipment. The township has not

  20. Mutation analysis and characterization of ATR sequence variants in breast cancer cases from high-risk French Canadian breast/ovarian cancer families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durocher, Francine; Lespérance, Bernard; Ouellette, Geneviève; Pichette, Roxane; Plante, Marie; Tavtigian, Sean V; Simard, Jacques; Labrie, Yvan; Soucy, Penny; Sinilnikova, Olga; Labuda, Damian; Bessette, Paul; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Laframboise, Rachel; Lépine, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) is a member of the PIK-related family which plays, along with ATM, a central role in cell-cycle regulation. ATR has been shown to phosphorylate several tumor suppressors like BRCA1, CHEK1 and TP53. ATR appears as a good candidate breast cancer susceptibility gene and the current study was designed to screen for ATR germline mutations potentially involved in breast cancer predisposition. ATR direct sequencing was performed using a fluorescent method while widely available programs were used for linkage disequilibrium (LD), haplotype analyses, and tagging SNP (tSNP) identification. Expression analyses were carried out using real-time PCR. The complete sequence of all exons and flanking intronic sequences were analyzed in DNA samples from 54 individuals affected with breast cancer from non-BRCA1/2 high-risk French Canadian breast/ovarian families. Although no germline mutation has been identified in the coding region, we identified 41 sequence variants, including 16 coding variants, 3 of which are not reported in public databases. SNP haplotypes were established and tSNPs were identified in 73 healthy unrelated French Canadians, providing a valuable tool for further association studies involving the ATR gene, using large cohorts. Our analyses led to the identification of two novel alternative splice transcripts. In contrast to the transcript generated by an alternative splicing site in the intron 41, the one resulting from a deletion of 121 nucleotides in exon 33 is widely expressed, at significant but relatively low levels, in both normal and tumoral cells including normal breast and ovarian tissue. Although no deleterious mutations were identified in the ATR gene, the current study provides an haplotype analysis of the ATR gene polymorphisms, which allowed the identification of a set of SNPs that could be used as tSNPs for large-scale association studies. In addition, our study led to the characterization of a

  1. Next-generation models for Canadian collaboration in international ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through this project, the Canadian Council for International Cooperation (CCIC), in partnership with the Canadian Association for the Study of International Development, will identify and promote new ways for Canadian practitioners, academics, and public policymakers to work together in international development.

  2. Priority setting of ICU resources in an influenza pandemic: a qualitative study of the Canadian public's perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Diego S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pandemic influenza may exacerbate existing scarcity of life-saving medical resources. As a result, decision-makers may be faced with making tough choices about who will receive care and who will have to wait or go without. Although previous studies have explored ethical issues in priority setting from the perspective of clinicians and policymakers, there has been little investigation into how the public views priority setting during a pandemic influenza, in particular related to intensive care resources. Methods To bridge this gap, we conducted three public town hall meetings across Canada to explore Canadian's perspectives on this ethical challenge. Town hall discussions group discussions were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Six interrelated themes emerged from the town hall discussions related to: ethical and empirical starting points for deliberation; criteria for setting priorities; pre-crisis planning; in-crisis decision-making; the need for public deliberation and input; and participants' deliberative struggle with the ethical issues. Conclusions Our findings underscore the importance of public consultation in pandemic planning for sustaining public trust in a public health emergency. Participants appreciated the empirical and ethical uncertainty of decision-making in an influenza pandemic and demonstrated nuanced ethical reasoning about priority setting of intensive care resources in an influenza pandemic. Policymakers may benefit from a better understanding the public's empirical and ethical 'starting points' in developing effective pandemic plans.

  3. Does executive function explain the IQ-mortality association? Evidence from the Canadian study on health and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Peter A; Dubin, Joel A; Crossley, Margaret; Holmqvist, Maxine E; D'Arcy, Carl

    2009-02-01

    To assess the robustness of the association between intelligence quotient (IQ) and mortality in older adults and to examine whether or not the association can be explained by more specific cognitive processes, including individual differences in executive functioning. We examined the associations among Full Scale IQ, individual IQ subtest scores, and 10-year mortality among older community-dwelling, adult participants in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, who were verified as disease and cognitive-impairment free at baseline via comprehensive medical and neurological evaluation (n = 516). Survival analysis including Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to examine mortality risk as a function of Full Scale IQ and its specific subcomponents. An inverse association was found between IQ and mortality, but this did not survive adjustment for demographics and education. The association between IQ and mortality seemed to be predominantly accounted for by performance on one specific IQ subtest that taps executive processes (i.e., Digit Symbol (DS)). Performance on this subtest uniquely and robustly predicted mortality in both unadjusted and adjusted models, such that a 1-standard deviation difference in performance was associated with a 28% change in risk of mortality over the 10-year follow-up interval in adjusted models. The association between IQ and mortality in older adults may be predominantly attributable to individual differences in DS performance.

  4. Recognizing and avoiding intercultural miscommunication in distance education a study of the experiences of Canadian faculty and aboriginal nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Cynthia K; Gregory, David M; Care, W Dean; Hultin, David

    2007-01-01

    Language differences and diverse cultural norms influence the transmission and receipt of information. The online environment provides yet another potential source of miscommunication. Although distance learning has the potential to reach students in cultural groups that have been disenfranchised from traditional higher education settings in the past, intercultural miscommunication is also much more likely to occur through it. There is limited research examining intercultural miscommunication within distance education environments. This article presents the results of a qualitative study that explored the communication experiences of Canadian faculty and Aboriginal students while participating in an online baccalaureate nursing degree program that used various delivery modalities. The microlevel data analysis revealed participants' beliefs and interactions that fostered intercultural miscommunication as well as their recommendations for ensuring respectful and ethically supportive discourses in online courses. The unique and collective influences of intercultural miscommunication on the experiences of faculty and students within the courses are also identified. Instances of ethnocentrism and othering are illustrated, noting the effects that occurred from holding dualistic perspectives of us and them. Lastly, strategies for preventing intercultural miscommunication in online courses are described.

  5. The influence of impulsiveness on binge eating and problem gambling: A prospective study of gender differences in Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farstad, Sarah M; von Ranson, Kristin M; Hodgins, David C; El-Guebaly, Nady; Casey, David M; Schopflocher, Don P

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the degree to which facets of impulsiveness predicted future binge eating and problem gambling, 2 theorized forms of behavioral addiction. Participants were 596 women and 406 men from 4 age cohorts randomly recruited from a Canadian province. Participants completed self-report measures of 3 facets of impulsiveness (negative urgency, sensation seeking, lack of persistence), binge-eating frequency, and problem-gambling symptoms. Impulsiveness was assessed at baseline, and assessments of binge eating and problem gambling were followed up after 3 years. Weighted data were analyzed using zero-inflated negative binomial and Poisson regression models. We found evidence of transdiagnostic and disorder-specific predictors of binge eating and problem gambling. Negative urgency emerged as a common predictor of binge eating and problem gambling among women and men. There were disorder-specific personality traits identified among men only: High lack-of-persistence scores predicted binge eating and high sensation-seeking scores predicted problem gambling. Among women, younger age predicted binge eating and older age predicted problem gambling. Thus, there are gender differences in facets of impulsiveness that longitudinally predict binge eating and problem gambling, suggesting that treatments for these behaviors should consider gender-specific personality and demographic traits in addition to the common personality trait of negative urgency. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Widespread scrofuloderma: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kuzmina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case study of scrofuloderma in a female patient aged 55; the patient’s condition was of interest due to the prevalence of the pathology and long-term (25 years undiagnosed skin tuberculosis as a result of problems with the diagnostics of this localization of tuberculosis.

  7. Case Studies in Sports Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nancy

    1988-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two athletes who wanted to affect a change in their body weight in order to enhance athletic performance. Each athlete's problem and the nutrition approach used to solve it are discussed. Caloric values of fast foods are listed. (JL)

  8. eCompetence Case Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Bækkelund

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present some details of the processes undertaken in the European eCompetence Initiative. We present two illustrative and representative case studies. The research aims to identify and understand patterns of individual and organisational eCompetence approaches....

  9. The reflexive case study method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the international business research on small to medium-sized enterprises (SME) at the nexus of globalization. Based on a conceptual synthesis across disciplines and theoretical perspectives, it offers management research a reflexive method for case study research of postnational...

  10. Familial polyposis: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Meir, Zehava; Garber, Anna; Rassin, Michal; Silner, Dina

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a patient who was treated for 5 years from the time of diagnosis until his death. The patient was diagnosed with familial polyposis at the age of 35 due to a family history of the same. He suffered from low body image and showed a poor response to treatment, especially regarding nutrition. The period of time related to the presentation of symptoms and the patient's subsequent deterioration was characterized by attempts on the part of nursing staff to improve the patient's quality of life. Treatment of multiple fistulae was employed, while keeping the skin intact, along with the creative development of a unique bandaging method. This article describes the course of the patient's disease and specifies his problems and their solutions. It is hoped that presentation of this case will benefit caregiving staff in dealing with similar cases.

  11. Review of “Arts-based Contemplative Practices in Education”: 2017 Canadian Society for Studies in Education ARTS Pre-conference

    OpenAIRE

    Pamela Richardson; Kathryn Ricketts

    2017-01-01

    This review is a poetic and photographic response to a pre-conference session convened in May 2017 by the Arts Researchers and Teachers Society (ARTS) of the Canadian Society for Studies in Education, and organized by Susan Walsh, Barbara Bickel, Carl Leggo, and Diane Conrad. The gathering took place in Toronto, Canada on the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee, and of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation. The theme of the pre-conference was arts-based contemplative practice...

  12. Prevalence, continuation, and identification of postpartum depressive symptomatology among refugee, asylum-seeking, non-refugee immigrant, and Canadian-born women: results from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Merry, Lisa; Stewart, Donna; Gagnon, Anita J

    2016-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence, continuation, and identification of maternal depressive symptomatology over the first 16 weeks postpartum among refugee, asylum-seeking, non-refugee immigrant, and Canadian-born women. A sample of 1125 women (143 refugees, 369 asylum-seekers, 303 non-refugee immigrant, and 310 Canadian-born) completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 1 and 16 weeks postpartum. The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power of the 1-week EPDS to identify women with elevated EPDS scores at 16 weeks were determined. The total number of women with EPDS scores >9 for each group at 1 and 16 weeks, respectively, was 26.6 and 18.2 % for refugees; 25.2 and 24.1 % for asylum-seekers; 22.4 and 14.2 % for non-refugee immigrants, and 14.8 and 7.4 % for Canadian-born. Using the cut-off score of 9/10, the 1-week EPDS accurately classified 77.6 % refugee, 73.4 % asylum-seeking, 76.6 % non-refugee immigrant, and 85.5 % Canadian-born women at 16 weeks with or without postpartum depressive symptomatology. The 1-week EPDS was significantly correlated to the 16-week EPDS (r = 0.46, p depressive symptomatology at 16 weeks if they had EPDS scores >9 at 1 week postpartum: refugees (OR = 6.9, 95 % CI = 2.8-17.3), asylum-seekers (OR = 4.0, 95 % CI = 2.4-6.7), non-refugee immigrants (OR = 3.8, 95 % CI = 2.0-7.6), and Canadian-born women (OR = 8.0, 95 % CI = 3.3-19.8). Our findings suggest that refugee, asylum-seeking, non-refugee immigrant, and Canadian-born women at risk of postpartum depression may be identified early in the postpartum period such that secondary preventive interventions may be implemented.

  13. Impacts of Bicycle Infrastructure in Mid-Sized Cities (IBIMS): protocol for a natural experiment study in three Canadian cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Meghan; Branion-Calles, Michael; Therrien, Suzanne; Fuller, Daniel; Gauvin, Lise; Whitehurst, David G T; Nelson, Trisalyn

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Bicycling is promoted as a transportation and population health strategy globally. Yet bicycling has low uptake in North America (1%–2% of trips) compared with European bicycling cities (15%–40% of trips) and shows marked sex and age trends. Safety concerns due to collisions with motor vehicles are primary barriers. To attract the broader population to bicycling, many cities are making investments in bicycle infrastructure. These interventions hold promise for improving population health given the potential for increased physical activity and improved safety, but such outcomes have been largely unstudied. In 2016, the City of Victoria, Canada, committed to build a connected network of infrastructure that separates bicycles from motor vehicles, designed to attract people of ‘all ages and abilities’ to bicycling. This natural experiment study examines the impacts of the City of Victoria’s investment in a bicycle network on active travel and safety outcomes. The specific objectives are to (1) estimate changes in active travel, perceived safety and bicycle safety incidents; (2) analyse spatial inequities in access to bicycle infrastructure and safety incidents; and (3) assess health-related economic benefits. Methods and analysis The study is in three Canadian cities (intervention: Victoria; comparison: Kelowna, Halifax). We will administer population-based surveys in 2016, 2018 and 2021 (1000 people/city). The primary outcome is the proportion of people reporting bicycling. Secondary outcomes are perceived safety and bicycle safety incidents. Spatial analyses will compare the distribution of bicycle infrastructure and bicycle safety incidents across neighbourhoods and across time. We will also calculate the economic benefits of bicycling using WHO’s Health Economic Assessment Tool. Ethics and dissemination This study received approval from the Simon Fraser University Office of Research Ethics (study no. 2016s0401). Findings will be

  14. Cross-language measurement equivalence of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale in systemic sclerosis: a comparison of Canadian and Dutch patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakkenbos, Linda; Arthurs, Erin; van den Hoogen, Frank H J; Hudson, Marie; van Lankveld, Wim G J M; Baron, Murray; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Thombs, Brett D

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, medical research involves patients who complete outcomes in different languages. This occurs in countries with more than one common language, such as Canada (French/English) or the United States (Spanish/English), as well as in international multi-centre collaborations, which are utilized frequently in rare diseases such as systemic sclerosis (SSc). In order to pool or compare outcomes, instruments should be measurement equivalent (invariant) across cultural or linguistic groups. This study provides an example of how to assess cross-language measurement equivalence by comparing the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale between English-speaking Canadian and Dutch SSc patients. The CES-D was completed by 922 English-speaking Canadian and 213 Dutch SSc patients. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to assess the factor structure in both samples. The Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Cause (MIMIC) model was utilized to assess the amount of differential item functioning (DIF). A two-factor model (positive and negative affect) showed excellent fit in both samples. Statistically significant, but small-magnitude, DIF was found for 3 of 20 items on the CES-D. The English-speaking Canadian sample endorsed more feeling-related symptoms, whereas the Dutch sample endorsed more somatic/retarded activity symptoms. The overall estimate in depression scores between English and Dutch was not influenced substantively by DIF. CES-D scores from English-speaking Canadian and Dutch SSc patients can be compared and pooled without concern that measurement differences may substantively influence results. The importance of assessing cross-language measurement equivalence in rheumatology studies prior to pooling outcomes obtained in different languages should be emphasized.

  15. Cross-language measurement equivalence of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D scale in systemic sclerosis: a comparison of Canadian and Dutch patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kwakkenbos

    Full Text Available Increasingly, medical research involves patients who complete outcomes in different languages. This occurs in countries with more than one common language, such as Canada (French/English or the United States (Spanish/English, as well as in international multi-centre collaborations, which are utilized frequently in rare diseases such as systemic sclerosis (SSc. In order to pool or compare outcomes, instruments should be measurement equivalent (invariant across cultural or linguistic groups. This study provides an example of how to assess cross-language measurement equivalence by comparing the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D scale between English-speaking Canadian and Dutch SSc patients.The CES-D was completed by 922 English-speaking Canadian and 213 Dutch SSc patients. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was used to assess the factor structure in both samples. The Multiple-Indicator Multiple-Cause (MIMIC model was utilized to assess the amount of differential item functioning (DIF.A two-factor model (positive and negative affect showed excellent fit in both samples. Statistically significant, but small-magnitude, DIF was found for 3 of 20 items on the CES-D. The English-speaking Canadian sample endorsed more feeling-related symptoms, whereas the Dutch sample endorsed more somatic/retarded activity symptoms. The overall estimate in depression scores between English and Dutch was not influenced substantively by DIF.CES-D scores from English-speaking Canadian and Dutch SSc patients can be compared and pooled without concern that measurement differences may substantively influence results. The importance of assessing cross-language measurement equivalence in rheumatology studies prior to pooling outcomes obtained in different languages should be emphasized.

  16. Probabilistic Multiple-Bias Modeling Applied to the Canadian Data From the Interphone Study of Mobile Phone Use and Risk of Glioma, Meningioma, Acoustic Neuroma, and Parotid Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoli, F; Siemiatycki, J; McBride, M L; Parent, M-É; Richardson, L; Bedard, D; Platt, R; Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Krewski, D

    2017-10-01

    We undertook a re-analysis of the Canadian data from the 13-country case-control Interphone Study (2001-2004), in which researchers evaluated the associations of mobile phone use with the risks of brain, acoustic neuroma, and parotid gland tumors. In the main publication of the multinational Interphone Study, investigators concluded that biases and errors prevented a causal interpretation. We applied a probabilistic multiple-bias model to address possible biases simultaneously, using validation data from billing records and nonparticipant questionnaires as information on recall error and selective participation. In our modeling, we sought to adjust for these sources of uncertainty and to facilitate interpretation. For glioma, when comparing those in the highest quartile of use (>558 lifetime hours) to those who were not regular users, the odds ratio was 2.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.2, 3.4). After adjustment for selection and recall biases, the odds ratio was 2.2 (95% limits: 1.3, 4.1). There was little evidence of an increase in the risk of meningioma, acoustic neuroma, or parotid gland tumors in relation to mobile phone use. Adjustments for selection and recall biases did not materially affect interpretation in our results from Canadian data. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Feasibility and utility of mapping disease risk at the neighbourhood level within a Canadian public health unit: an ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanigaratne Susitha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted spatial analyses to determine the geographic variation of cancer at the neighbourhood level (dissemination areas or DAs within the area of a single Ontario public health unit, Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph, covering a population of 238,326 inhabitants. Cancer incidence data between 1999 and 2003 were obtained from the Ontario Cancer Registry and were geocoded down to the level of DA using the enhanced Postal Code Conversion File. The 2001 Census of Canada provided information on the size and age-sex structure of the population at the DA level, in addition to information about selected census covariates, such as average neighbourhood income. Results Age standardized incidence ratios for cancer and the prevalence of census covariates were calculated for each of 331 dissemination areas in Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph. The standardized incidence ratios (SIR for cancer varied dramatically across the dissemination areas. However, application of the Moran's I statistic, a popular index of spatial autocorrelation, suggested significant spatial patterns for only two cancers, lung and prostate, both in males (p Conclusion This paper demonstrates the feasibility and utility of a systematic approach to identifying neighbourhoods, within the area served by a public health unit, that have significantly higher risks of cancer. This exploratory, ecologic study suggests several hypotheses for these spatial patterns that warrant further investigations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Canadian study published in the peer-reviewed literature estimating the risk of relatively rare public health outcomes at a very small areal level, namely dissemination areas.

  18. Movement disorders in elderly users of risperidone and first generation antipsychotic agents: a Canadian population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vasilyeva

    Full Text Available Despite concerns over the potential for severe adverse events, antipsychotic medications remain the mainstay of treatment of behaviour disorders and psychosis in elderly patients. Second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs; e.g., risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine have generally shown a better safety profile compared to the first-generation agents (FGAs; e.g., haloperidol and phenothiazines, particularly in terms of a lower potential for involuntary movement disorders. Risperidone, the only SGA with an official indication for the management of inappropriate behaviour in dementia, has emerged as the antipsychotic most commonly prescribed to older patients. Most clinical trials evaluating the risk of movement disorders in elderly patients receiving antipsychotic therapy have been of limited sample size and/or of relatively short duration. A few observational studies have produced inconsistent results.A population-based retrospective cohort study of all residents of the Canadian province of Manitoba aged 65 and over, who were dispensed antipsychotic medications for the first time during the time period from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2007, was conducted using Manitoba's Department of Health's administrative databases. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS in new users of risperidone compared to new users of FGAs.After controlling for potential confounders (demographics, comorbidity and medication use, risperidone use was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs at 30, 60, 90 and 180 days (adjusted hazard ratios [HR] 0.38, 95% CI: 0.22-0.67; 0.45, 95% CI: 0.28-0.73; 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33-0.77; 0.65, 95% CI: 0.45-0.94, respectively. At 360 days, the strength of the association weakened with an adjusted HR of 0.75, 95% CI: 0.54-1.05.In a large population of elderly patients the use of risperidone was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs.

  19. Movement disorders in elderly users of risperidone and first generation antipsychotic agents: a Canadian population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, Irina; Biscontri, Robert G; Enns, Murray W; Metge, Colleen J; Alessi-Severini, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Despite concerns over the potential for severe adverse events, antipsychotic medications remain the mainstay of treatment of behaviour disorders and psychosis in elderly patients. Second-generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs; e.g., risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine) have generally shown a better safety profile compared to the first-generation agents (FGAs; e.g., haloperidol and phenothiazines), particularly in terms of a lower potential for involuntary movement disorders. Risperidone, the only SGA with an official indication for the management of inappropriate behaviour in dementia, has emerged as the antipsychotic most commonly prescribed to older patients. Most clinical trials evaluating the risk of movement disorders in elderly patients receiving antipsychotic therapy have been of limited sample size and/or of relatively short duration. A few observational studies have produced inconsistent results. A population-based retrospective cohort study of all residents of the Canadian province of Manitoba aged 65 and over, who were dispensed antipsychotic medications for the first time during the time period from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2007, was conducted using Manitoba's Department of Health's administrative databases. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in new users of risperidone compared to new users of FGAs. After controlling for potential confounders (demographics, comorbidity and medication use), risperidone use was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs at 30, 60, 90 and 180 days (adjusted hazard ratios [HR] 0.38, 95% CI: 0.22-0.67; 0.45, 95% CI: 0.28-0.73; 0.50, 95% CI: 0.33-0.77; 0.65, 95% CI: 0.45-0.94, respectively). At 360 days, the strength of the association weakened with an adjusted HR of 0.75, 95% CI: 0.54-1.05. In a large population of elderly patients the use of risperidone was associated with a lower risk of EPS compared to FGAs.

  20. International Relations as a Field of Study in the Canadian System of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomina, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    The research presents an attempt to investigate the current state of international relations as a field of study in the context of higher education system in Canada. It contains a general overview of the field of study, focusing predominantly on the role and function of the given academic discipline. The scientific investigation covers the issue…

  1. African Studies in a Canadian Academy: A Tool for Liberation or Marginalization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredua-Kwarteng, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This research uses critical race theory (CRT) as a conceptual perspective to study and analyze the experiences of ten students of African descent who enrolled in several African studies courses or related courses in an Ontarian university. The students, two females and eight males were interviewed between June and August 2005, using…

  2. Stochastic efficiency: five case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proesmans, Karel; Broeck, Christian Van den

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic efficiency is evaluated in five case studies: driven Brownian motion, effusion with a thermo-chemical and thermo-velocity gradient, a quantum dot and a model for information to work conversion. The salient features of stochastic efficiency, including the maximum of the large deviation function at the reversible efficiency, are reproduced. The approach to and extrapolation into the asymptotic time regime are documented. (paper)

  3. Medical cannabis - the Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gordon D; Bober, Sara L; Mindra, Sean; Moreau, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis has been widely used as a medicinal agent in Eastern medicine with earliest evidence in ancient Chinese practice dating back to 2700 BC. Over time, the use of medical cannabis has been increasingly adopted by Western medicine and is thus a rapidly emerging field that all pain physicians need to be aware of. Several randomized controlled trials have shown a significant and dose-dependent relationship between neuropathic pain relief and tetrahydrocannabinol - the principal psychoactive component of cannabis. Despite this, barriers exist to use from both the patient perspective (cost, addiction, social stigma, lack of understanding regarding safe administration) and the physician perspective (credibility, criminality, clinical evidence, patient addiction, and policy from the governing medical colleges). This review addresses these barriers and draws attention to key concerns in the Canadian medical system, providing updated treatment approaches to help clinicians work with their patients in achieving adequate pain control, reduced narcotic medication use, and enhanced quality of life. This review also includes case studies demonstrating the use of medical marijuana by patients with neuropathic low-back pain, neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia, and neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. While significant preclinical data have demonstrated the potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating pain in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, and cancer, further studies are needed with randomized controlled trials and larger study populations to identify the specific strains and concentrations that will work best with selected cohorts.

  4. A Canadian multicenter, double-blind study of paroxetine and fluoxetine in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chouinard, G; Saxena, B; Belanger, MC; Ravindran, A; Bakish, D; Beauclair, L; Morris, P; Nair, NPV; Manchanda, R; Reesal, R; Remick, R; O'Neill, MC

    Background: Recent studies have suggested clinical differences among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. In a 12-week randomized, multicenter, double-blind trial, the antidepressant and anxiolytic efficacy of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors paroxetine and fluoxetine was compared in

  5. Comparative study on pre-competition mood in Canadian and Spanish university students

    OpenAIRE

    Portela-Pino, Iago; Gutierrez-Sánchez, Águeda; Alonso-Fernández, Diego; Abadía-García de Vicuña, Olaia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to examine athletes’ mood at Universidad de Vigo (Spain), and at Prince Edward Island University (Canada), with regards with sports performance before competition. 104 students from both universities took part in the study. To measure athletes’ mood, the Profile of Mood States (POMS) scale was used. The results show that pre-competition mood distribution in athletes from both universities conform to an iceberg-type profile, as it is usually found in this kind of st...

  6. Radiation processing technology for cosmetics: a report on a Canadian study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, B.D.; Wilson, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    For several years some cosmetic raw materials and finished products have been successfully treated with irradiation to control microbial growth. Basic studies have been initiated to test the successful application of irradiation to a raw material or finished product in the cosmetics industry. Acceptance of this technology by industry and by regulatory agencies, is dependent upon the correct application of the technology and documenting the results of carefully controlled studies. A short list of raw materials was selected on which the immediate test work was undertaken. It includes talc, starch, gelatin and bentonite. This will increase confidence and expertise in this technology. (author)

  7. Management of return-to-work programs for workers with musculoskeletal disorders: a qualitative study in three Canadian provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, R; Clarke, J; Friesen, M; Stock, S; Cole, D

    2003-12-01

    In this qualitative research project, researchers in three Canadian provinces explored the perceptions of many different actors involved in return-to-work (RTW) programs for injured workers, studying their views on successful RTW strategies and barriers to/facilitators of the RTW process, then analyzing the underlying dynamics driving their different experiences. Each research team recruited actors in a variety of different workplaces and key informants in the RTW system, and used a combination of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and focus groups to collect data, which were coded using an open coding system. Analysis took a social constructionist perspective. The roles and mandates of the different groups of actors (injured workers; other workplace actors; actors outside the workplace), while sometimes complementary, could also differ, leading to tension and conflict. Characteristics of injured workers described as influencing RTW success included personal and sociodemographic factors, beliefs and attitudes, and motivation. Human resources managers and health care professionals tended to attribute workers' motivation to their individual characteristics, whereas injured workers, worker representatives and health and safety managers described workplace culture and the degree to which workers' well-being was considered as having a strong influence on workers' motivation. Some supervisors experienced role conflict when responsible for both production quotas and RTW programs, but difficulties were alleviated by innovations such as consideration of RTW program responsibilities in the determination of production quotas and in performance evaluations. RTW program success seemed related to labor-management relations and top management commitment to Health and Safety. Non-workplace issues included confusion stemming from the compensation system itself, communication difficulties with some treating physicians, and role conflict on the part of physicians wishing to

  8. Relationship between disease characteristics and orofacial manifestations in systemic sclerosis: Canadian Systemic Sclerosis Oral Health Study III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Tatibouet, Solène; Steele, Russell; Lo, Ernest; Gravel, Sabrina; Gyger, Geneviève; El Sayegh, Tarek; Pope, Janet; Fontaine, Audrey; Masetto, Ariel; Matthews, Debora; Sutton, Evelyn; Thie, Norman; Jones, Niall; Copete, Maria; Kolbinson, Dean; Markland, Janet; Nogueira, Getulio; Robinson, David; Fritzler, Marvin; Gornitsky, Mervyn

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) is associated with decreased saliva production and interincisal distance, more missing teeth, and periodontal disease. We undertook this study to determine the clinical correlates of SSc with these oral abnormalities. Subjects were recruited from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group cohort. Detailed dental and clinical examinations were performed according to standardized protocols. Associations between dental abnormalities and selected clinical and serologic manifestations of SSc were examined. One hundred sixty-three SSc subjects were included: 90% women, mean ± SD age 56 ± 11 years, mean ± SD disease duration 14 ± 8 years, 72% with limited cutaneous disease, and 28% with diffuse cutaneous disease. Decreased saliva production was associated with Sjögren's syndrome-related autoantibodies (β = -43.32; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] -80.89, -5.75), but not with disease severity (β = -2.51; 95% CI -8.75, 3.73). Decreased interincisal distance was related to disease severity (β = -1.02; 95% CI -1.63, -0.42) and the modified Rodnan skin thickness score (β = -0.38; 95% CI -0.53, -0.23). The number of missing teeth was associated with decreased saliva production (relative risk [RR] 0.97; 95% CI 0.94, 0.99), worse hand function (RR 1.52; 95% CI 1.13, 2.02), and the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; RR 1.68 [95% CI 1.14, 2.46]). No clinical or serologic variables were correlated with periodontal disease. In SSc, diminished interincisal distance is related to overall disease severity. Decreased saliva production is related to concomitant Sjögren's syndrome antibodies. Tooth loss is associated with poor upper extremity function, GERD, and decreased saliva. The etiology of excess periodontal disease is likely multifactorial and remains unclear. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Relationship Between Disease Characteristics and Oral Radiologic Findings in Systemic Sclerosis: Results From a Canadian Oral Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Dagenais, Marie; Macdonald, David; Gyger, Geneviève; El Sayegh, Tarek; Pope, Janet; Fontaine, Audrey; Masetto, Ariel; Matthews, Debora; Sutton, Evelyn; Thie, Norman; Jones, Niall; Copete, Maria; Kolbinson, Dean; Markland, Janet; Nogueira-Filho, Getulio; Robinson, David; Fritzler, Marvin; Wang, Mianbo; Gornitsky, Mervyn

    2016-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma) is associated with a wide periodontal ligament (PDL) and mandibular erosions. We investigated the clinical correlates of SSc with these radiologic abnormalities. Subjects from the Canadian Scleroderma Research Group cohort underwent detailed radiologic examinations. Associations between radiologic abnormalities and clinical manifestations of SSc were examined with univariate and multivariate analyses. The study included 159 subjects; 90.6% were women, the mean ± SD age was 56 ± 10 years, diffuse disease was present in 28.3%, and mean ± SD disease duration was 13.7 ± 8.4 years. Widening of the PDL involving at least 1 tooth was present in 38% of subjects, and 14.5% had at least 1 site in the mandible with an erosion. In analyses adjusting for age, disease duration, sex, smoking, and education, we found significant associations between the number of teeth with widening of the PDL and disease severity assessed by the physician global assessment (PGA) (relative risk [RR] 1.19, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.02-1.39, P = 0.028). Analyses replacing the PGA with the skin score, disease subset, or anti-topoisomerase I antibodies confirmed the relationship with indices of disease severity. There was no relationship between either the number of teeth with periodontal disease or the number of missing teeth, and the number of teeth with wide PDL. A smaller interdental distance (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.97, P = 0.006), but not disease severity, facial skin score, or ischemia was associated with a larger number of erosions. In SSc, a wide PDL may reflect generalized overproduction of collagen, and mandibular erosions are related to local factors in the oral cavity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. The experience of patients with cancer during diagnosis and treatment planning: a descriptive study of Canadian survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, A C; Tran, K; Chadder, J; Niu, J; Fung, S; Louzado, C; Rahal, R

    2017-10-01

    Communication with health care providers during diagnosis and treatment planning is of special importance because it can influence a patient's emotional state, attitude, and decisions about their care. Qualitative evidence suggests that some patients experience poor communication with health care providers and have negative experiences when receiving their cancer diagnosis. Here, we use survey data from 8 provinces to present findings about the experiences of Canadian patients, specifically with respect to patient-provider communication, during the diagnosis and treatment planning phases of their cancer care. Data from the Ambulatory Oncology Patient Satisfaction Survey, representing 17,809 survey respondents, were obtained for the study. Most respondents (92%) felt that their care provider told them of their cancer diagnosis in a sensitive manner. Most respondents (95%) also felt that they were provided with enough information about their planned cancer treatment. In contrast, more than half the respondents who had emotional concerns upon diagnosis (56%) were not referred to services that could help with their anxieties and fears. Also, 18% of respondents reported that they were not given the opportunity to discuss treatment options with a care provider, and 17% reported that their care providers did not consider their travel concerns while planning for treatment. Measuring the patient experience allows for an understanding of how well the cancer control system is addressing the physical, emotional, and practical needs of patients during diagnosis and treatment planning. Although results suggest high levels of patient satisfaction with some aspects of care, quality improvement efforts are still needed to provide person-centred care.

  11. Patient-reported dietetic care post hospital for free-living patients: a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H; Payette, H; Laporte, M; Bernier, P; Allard, J; Duerksen, D; Gramlich, L; Jeejeebhoy, K

    2018-02-01

    Transitions out of hospital can influence recovery. Ideally, malnourished patients should be followed by someone with nutrition expertise, specifically a dietitian, post discharge from hospital. Predictors of dietetic care post discharge are currently unknown. The present study aimed to determine the patient factors independently associated with 30-days post hospital discharge dietetic care for free-living patients who transitioned to the community. Nine hundred and twenty-two medical or surgical adult patients were recruited in 16 acute care hospitals in eight Canadian provinces on admission. Eligible patients could speak English or French, provide their written consent, were anticipated to have a hospital stay of ≥2 days and were not considered palliative. Telephone interviews were completed with 747 (81%) participants using a standardised questionnaire to determine whether dietetic care occurred post discharge; 544 patients discharged to the community were included in the multivariate analyses, excluding those who were admitted to nursing homes or rehabilitation facilities. Covariates during and post hospitalisation were collected prospectively and used in logistic regression analyses to determine independent patient-level predictors. Dietetic care post discharge was reported by 61/544 (11%) of participants and was associated with severe malnutrition [Subjective Global Assessment category C: odd's ratio (OR) 2.43 (1.23-4.83)], weight loss post discharge [(OR 2.86 (1.45-5.62)], comorbidity [(OR 1.09 (1.02-1.17)] and a dietitian consultation on admission [(OR 3.41 (1.95-5.97)]. Dietetic care post discharge occurs in few patients, despite the known high prevalence of malnutrition on admission and discharge. Dietetic care in hospital was the most influential predictor of post-hospital care. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  12. Supervisory Neglect and Risk of Harm. Evidence from the Canadian Child Welfare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Casares, Monica; Trocme, Nico; Fallon, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study explores prevalence and characteristics associated with supervisory neglect and physical harm in children in the child welfare system in Canada. Methods: The sample included all substantiated primary maltreatment investigations in the 2008 Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect excluding cases where…

  13. The Prerequisites to Ukrainian Students Participation in Study Abroad Programs at the Canadian Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovskyi, Vasyl; Simak, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    The problem of outbound mobility of Ukrainian students has been presented in the paper. The data regarding the number of Ukrainian students studying in Canada has been pointed out. This paper examines "push-pull" factors which motivate Ukrainian students to seek higher education overseas and factors which attract Ukrainian students to…

  14. Motivation to Study Core French: Comparing Recent Immigrants and Canadian-Born Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Callie J.

    2010-01-01

    As the number of Allophone students attending public schools in Canada continues to increase (Statistics Canada, 2008), it is clear that a need exists in English-dominant areas to purposefully address the integration of these students into core French. I report the findings of a mixed-method study that was conducted to assess and compare the…

  15. Children's Activity Levels in Different Playground Environments: An Observational Study in Four Canadian Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Engaging in moderate to vigorous amounts of physical activity is needed for young children to grow and develop to their full potential and the playground environment can help play a role. The purpose of this study was to determine the physical activity levels of children in preschool settings during outdoor playground activity time. Four…

  16. The Role of Attachment in Facebook Usage: A Study of Canadian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Doleck, Tenzin; Bazelais, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Considering the increasingly ubiquitous and frequent use of Facebook among college students, this study sought to explicate and unravel the salient determinants of Facebook use. Specifically, the main goal was to ascertain the factors influencing "Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel" (CEGEP) students' Facebook use, for which…

  17. A case study of Impetigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansouri P

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a report of a case study on 234 patients with impetigo who referred to Razi Dermatology Hospital from April to November, 1989. Treatment was started immediately after obtaining direct smear and performing culture and antibiotic sensitivity test. The most common organism responsible for impetigo was the coagulase-positive staphylococcus (71%. In 13.7% of the cases, the coagulase-negative staphylococcus was grown on culture media, but none of the cultures showed streptococcus as the main organism. Treatment was started with oral penicillin V, oral erythromycin, benzathine penicillin G injection, oral cephalexin, and topical fuccidin. Clinical and bacteriological evaluation after 3-7 days showed that it is preferable to use oral cephalexin instead of other protocols such as oral erythromycin, which has previously been the drug of choice for impetigo. In addition, topical fuccidin with a 75% curative rate was the first drug for treatment, with the same effect as the oral cephalexin

  18. Framing Canadian federalism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saywell, John; Anastakis, Dimitry; Bryden, Penny E

    2009-01-01

    ... the pervasive effects that federalism has on Canadian politics, economics, culture, and history, and provide a detailed framework in which to understand contemporary federalism. Written in honour of John T. Saywell's half-century of accomplished and influential scholarly work and teaching, Framing Canadian Federalism is a timely and fitting t...

  19. Facebook Recruitment of Vaccine-Hesitant Canadian Parents: Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tustin, Jordan Lee; Crowcroft, Natasha Sarah; Gesink, Dionne; Johnson, Ian; Keelan, Jennifer; Lachapelle, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background There is concern over the increase in the number of ?vaccine-hesitant? parents, which contributes to under-vaccinated populations and reduced herd immunity. Traditional studies investigating parental immunization beliefs and practices have relied on random digit dialing (RDD); however, this method presents increasing limitations. Facebook is the most used social media platform in Canada and presents an opportunity to recruit vaccine-hesitant parents in a novel manner. Objective The...

  20. Predictors of homelessness among vulnerably housed adults in 3 Canadian cities: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    To, Matthew J.; Palepu, Anita; Aubry, Tim; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Gogosis, Evie; Gadermann, Anne; Cherner, Rebecca; Farrell, Susan; Misir, Vachan; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Homelessness is a major concern in many urban communities across North America. Since vulnerably housed individuals are at risk of experiencing homelessness, it is important to identify predictive factors linked to subsequent homelessness in this population. The objectives of this study were to determine the probability of experiencing homelessness among vulnerably housed adults over three years and factors associated with higher risk of homelessness. Methods Vulnerably ho...

  1. The Search for Meaningful E-Learning at Canadian Universities: A Multi-Institutional Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyers, Vincent; Carter, Lorraine; Carter, Alanna; Myers, Sue; Barrett, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    While e-learning is now characterized by a past and trends within that past, there continues to be uncertainty about how e-learning is defined and conceptualized, whether or not we like e-learning, and whether or not it is as meaningful to us as face to face learning. The purpose of this study was to document the e-learning perceptions of students…

  2. Immunization and the chiropractor-patient interaction: a Western canadian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stacey A; Russell, Margaret L; Verhoef, Marja J; Injeyan, H Stephen

    2006-02-01

    To explore how the topic of vaccination arises during interactions between chiropractors and their patients, the advice that is given to patients, and the factors that influence the opinions of the chiropractors. Data were collected in semistructured interviews with a purposeful sample of chiropractors in Calgary, Canada. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis and constant comparison. Participants were chiropractors who had participated in a postal survey of immunization-related beliefs and behaviors and who consented to contact for further study. Data redundancy was attained after 14 interviews were complete. Immunization arose in clinical encounters by both indirect (provision of reference materials and/or posting of media stories in clinic waiting rooms) and direct communication. Direct communications were most commonly patient initiated and were prompted by media reports, clinic waiting room material, or patient perceived adverse reactions; however, they were also initiated by the chiropractors, particularly if they were seeing young children with their parents. For some chiropractors, the emphasis was on providing information of a negative, antivaccination nature; others referred clients to physicians and nurses. Factors that influenced their opinions included their chiropractic training, philosophy of health and illness, and self or important others having experienced negative reactions that were perceived to result from immunization. Both patients and chiropractors initiate discussions on immunization in practice, with many chiropractors using indirect stimuli to open the topic. Doctors of chiropractic in this particular sample were heterogeneous with respect to the information provided to patients. However, study findings may not be generalizable outside Canada.

  3. Tea and other beverage consumption and prostate cancer risk: a Canadian retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, L F

    2000-04-01

    Using participants in the 1970-1972 Nutrition Canada Survey (NCS), a retrospective cohort study was conducted to assess the relationship between tea, as well as coffee, cola and alcohol, and the risk of developing prostate cancer. The mortality and cancer experience of male NCS participants aged 50-84 years was determined up to 31 December 1993. Among the 3400 survey participants included in the study, 145 developed prostate cancer. No association was observed between tea (predominantly black tea) intake and prostate cancer. Subjects who drank more than 500 ml of tea per day experienced virtually the same risk as those who reported no tea consumption (rate ratio (RR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62-1.65). Compared to those who reported no coffee drinking, men who averaged more than 250-ml per day experienced a 40% increase in risk (95% CI 0.84-2.32). Cola consumption was not associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Total alcohol consumption was not related to subsequent development of prostate cancer, although very moderate consumption of wine (cancer risk.

  4. A Canadian Study toward Changing Local Practice in the Diagnosis of Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Rajani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition endorses serological diagnosis (SD for pediatric celiac disease (CD. The objective of this study was to pilot SD and to prospectively evaluate gastrointestinal permeability and mucosal inflammation at diagnosis and after one year on the gluten-free diet (GFD. We hypothesized that SD would be associated with similar short term outcomes as ED. Method. Children, 3–17 years of age, referred for possible CD were eligible for SD given aTTG level ≥200 U/mL, confirmed by repeat aTTG and HLA haplotypes. Gastrointestinal permeability, assessed using sugar probes, and inflammation, assessed using fecal calprotectin (FC, at baseline and after one year on a GFD were compared to patients who had ED. Results. Enrolled SD (n=40 and ED (n=48 patients had similar demographics. ED and SD groups were not different in baseline lactulose: mannitol ratio (L : M (0.049 versus 0.034; p=0.07, fractional excretion of sucrose (%FES; 0.086 versus 0.092; p=0.44, or fecal calprotectin (FC; 89.6 versus 51.4; p=0.05. At follow-up, urine permeability improved and was similar between groups, L : M (0.022 versus 0.025; p=0.55 and %FES (0.040 versus 0.047; p=0.87 (p>0.05. FC improved but remained higher in the SD group (37.1 versus 15.9; p=0.04. Conclusion. Patients on the GFD showed improved intestinal permeability and mucosal inflammation regardless of diagnostic strategy. This prospective study supports that children diagnosed by SD have resolving mucosal disease early after commencing a GFD.

  5. Canadian tourist and Dominican Republic sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, E S

    1992-01-01

    The Dominican Republic is a popular tourist destination for Canadians. The country's sex industry for tourists developed markedly in the 1980s. The Puerto Plata/Sosua area is currently one of the most popular tourist sites and claimed the highest incidence of AIDS in 1989 at 23.2 cases/100,000 people. Two pilot phases of the Dominican Sex Workers and Canadian Tourists Study have been conducted to obtain methodological and empirical data to use in developing a major study of sex and tourism. First phase interviews were held only with beachboys who make money by having relations with female tourists, while phase two interviews were held with beachboys, female sex workers, and female and male tourists. Results indicate that female tourists consider their relations with male sex workers to be primarily social, while male tourists see their relations with female sex workers as more casual, sexual, and monetarily based. Further, women are more likely than men to continue their relationships with sex workers after returning to Canada; many help their men to immigrate and some get married. To learn more about the dynamics of tourism, sex, and AIDS prevention, the author proposes individual studies exploring the characteristics of each of the following four populations: male and female sex workers and male and female tourists.

  6. Understanding Vaccine Hesitancy in Canada: Results of a Consultation Study by the Canadian Immunization Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Eve; Gagnon, Dominique; Ouakki, Manale; Bettinger, Julie A.; Guay, Maryse; Halperin, Scott; Wilson, Kumanan; Graham, Janice; Witteman, Holly O.; MacDonald, Shannon; Fisher, William; Monnais, Laurence; Tran, Dat; Gagneur, Arnaud; Guichon, Juliet; Saini, Vineet; Heffernan, Jane M.; Meyer, Samantha; Driedger, S. Michelle; Greenberg, Joshua; MacDougall, Heather

    2016-01-01

    “Vaccine hesitancy” is a concept now frequently used in vaccination discourse. The increased popularity of this concept in both academic and public health circles is challenging previously held perspectives that individual vaccination attitudes and behaviours are a simple dichotomy of accept or reject. A consultation study was designed to assess the opinions of experts and health professionals concerning the definition, scope, and causes of vaccine hesitancy in Canada. We sent online surveys to two panels (1- vaccination experts and 2- front-line vaccine providers). Two questionnaires were completed by each panel, with data from the first questionnaire informing the development of questions for the second. Our participants defined vaccine hesitancy as an attitude (doubts, concerns) as well as a behaviour (refusing some / many vaccines, delaying vaccination). Our findings also indicate that both vaccine experts and front-line vaccine providers have the perception that vaccine rates have been declining and consider vaccine hesitancy an important issue to address in Canada. Diffusion of negative information online and lack of knowledge about vaccines were identified as the key causes of vaccine hesitancy by the participants. A common understanding of vaccine hesitancy among researchers, public health experts, policymakers and health care providers will better guide interventions that can more effectively address vaccine hesitancy within Canada. PMID:27257809

  7. A study of institutional origins and change in a Canadian urban commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Robson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kenora is a small city located in northwestern Ontario, Canada. The study presented here focuses on Tunnel Island, 300 acres of forested land adjacent to Kenora’s downtown. The island is used and valued by both city residents and members of three nearby Ojibway nations. As a multiple-use, common-pool resource accessed by different groups for a range of non-extractive activities, the site has become an experiment in multicultural commons governance, and presents an excellent opportunity to examine the origins and development of institutions for managing collective environmental resources in an urban setting. Using participant observation, internet- and field-based user surveys, and semi-structured interviews, our research finds that grassroots ‘governance’ of the site is emerging through subtle processes of individual and social construction, with the strategies and norms (codes of conduct employed by users providing relative harmony on the trails, which suggests functioning commons institutions. Nevertheless, values-based and epistemic tensions exist among users, pointing to governance challenges for planned joint management of the site, and specifically the need to develop formal, legitimate, and yet flexible and inclusive arrangements that can operate in conjunction with the social practice of existing users.

  8. PTSD following childbirth: a prospective study of incidence and risk factors in Canadian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, Nancy; Da Costa, Deborah; Marchand, André; Ireland, Kierla; Banack, Hailey; Dritsa, Maria; Khalifé, Samir

    2012-10-01

    The goals of the present study were to estimate the incidence and course of full and partial Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) following childbirth and to prospectively identify factors associated with the development of PTSD symptoms at 1month following childbirth. The sample comprised 308 women, with assessments at four time points: 25-40weeks gestation, 4-6weeks postpartum, 3 and 6months postpartum. Current and prior PTSD were assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) and the Modified PTSD Symptom Scale Self-Report (MPSS-SR). Incidence rates of PTSD varied according to time of measurement and instrument used, with higher rates of full and partial PTSD using the MPSS-SR at 1month postpartum (7.6% and 16.6%, respectively). Multivariate logistic regression showed that higher anxiety sensitivity (OR=1.75; 95% CI=1.19‒2.57, p=.005), history of sexual trauma (OR=2.81; 95% CI=1.07‒7.37, p=.036), a more negative childbirth experience than expected (OR=0.96; 95% CI=0.94‒0.98, p=.001), and less available social support at 1month postpartum (OR=0.40; 95% CI=0.17‒0.96, p=.041) independently predicted full or partial PTSD at 1month following childbirth. Our results indicate that a history of sexual trauma and anxiety sensitivity can increase the probability of developing PTSD after childbirth. The findings highlight the importance of screening and providing more tailored services for women at high risk. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcomes of Kidney Transplantation Abroad: A Single-Center Canadian Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Kevin; Sultan, Heebah; Li, Yanhong; Famure, Olusegun; Kim, S Joseph

    2016-03-01

    An increasing demand for kidney transplantation has enticed some patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) to venture outside their country of residence, but their posttransplant outcomes may be suboptimal. We compared the risks and clinical outcomes among tourists, or patients who pursue a kidney transplant abroad, versus patients who received a transplant at the Toronto General Hospital (TGH). A single-center, 1:3 matched (based on age at transplant, time on dialysis, and year of transplant) cohort study was conducted. Forty-five tourists were matched with 135 domestic transplant recipients between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2011. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to assess graft and patient outcomes. Among the 45 tourists, the majority (38 of 45) traveled to the Middle East or Far East Asia, and most received living donor kidney transplants (35 of 45). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models showed that tourists had a higher risk for the composite outcome of acute rejection, death-censored graft failure, or death with graft function (DWGF; hazard ratio [HR] 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-4.07). Tourists also showed a higher risk for the individual end points of acute rejection, DWGF, and posttransplant hospitalizations. Patients going abroad for kidney transplantation may have inferior outcomes compared to domestic patients receiving kidney transplants. Patients who are contemplating an overseas transplant need to be aware of the increased risk of adverse posttransplant outcomes and should be appropriately counseled by transplant professionals during the pretransplant evaluation process. © 2016, NATCO.

  10. MULTIPLE PERSONALITY: CASE REPORT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Židanik

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple personality disorder is characterised by splited individual ego-states and splited professional community arguing whether this disorder actually exists or not.Methods. In this case report study a supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy of a patient with multiple personality disorder is presented, that lasted for 4.5 years and resulted in ego-reintegration.Conclusions. The spliting between different ego-states is powered by unneutralised aggression with the possibility of hetero- and autoaggressive behaviour. Therefore the patient in the analytically oriented psychotherapeutic process is at high risk and a safe therapeutic (e. g. in-patient setting has to be provided.

  11. INTERIORITY - a prefab case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvejsel, Marie Frier

    and furnishing articulation hereof. In the second volume of the thesis; ‘INTERIORITY: a prefab case study’ this theory of interiority has been endeavored applied in a specific prefab project concerning the development of a novel prefab building system and housing series in collaboration with the Danish prefab......, tectonically. Hence, it has been a particular idea of the study to explore the relation between furniture, the spatial envelope itself, and its construct by using furniture as an architectural concept. Consequently, the thesis has specifically investigated whether this notion of interiority, describing...

  12. A Canadian naturalistic study of a community-based cohort treated for bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandresena Ranjith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar illness is associated with significant psychosocial morbidity and health resource utilization. Second generation antipsychotics, used alone or in combination with mood stabilizers are effective in treating acute mania in community settings. This study was designed to compare the change in clinical parameters and resource utilization at one month in a group of patients who required treatment intervention for exacerbation of mania. The clinical response at one year was also evaluated. Methods 496 patients were enrolled at 75 psychiatric practices across Canada. The Olanzapine cohort (n = 287 included patients who had olanzapine added to their medication regimen or the dose of olanzapine increased. The Other cohort (n = 209 had a medication other than olanzapine added or the dose adjusted. Changes from baseline in the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS, Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory and SF-12 Health Survey were compared at one month using ANCOVA. Categorical variables at one month for health resource utilization, employment status, abuse/dependency, and the number of suicide attempts were compared using Fisher's Exact test. Patients were followed for one year and a subgroup was evaluated. Results At one month, patients in the Olanzapine cohort recorded a mean reduction in the YMRS of 11.5, significantly greater than the mean reduction in the Other cohort of 9.7 (ANCOVA P = 0.002. The Olanzapine cohort was significantly improved compared to the Other cohort on the scales for depression and anxiety and did not experience the deterioration in physical functioning seen in the Other cohort. No significant differences were detected in health-related quality-of-life measures, employment status, drug abuse/dependency, number of suicide attempts, mental functioning, emergency room visits or inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations. In a subgroup treated for 12 months with a single second generation

  13. Occurrence of 13 volatile organic compounds in foods from the Canadian total diet study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu-Liang; Sparling, Melissa; Dabeka, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are ubiquitous in the environment due to evaporation and incomplete combustion of fuels, use of consumer and personal care products, etc. and they can accumulate in foods. Some VOCs in foods can also be formed during food processing and preparation and migrate from food packaging. In this pilot study, a GC-MS method based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was validated and used to analyse selected individual foods which can be consumed directly and 153 different total diet composite food samples for 13 VOCs. Vinyl chloride was not detected in any of the 153 composite food samples, while the other 12 VOCs were detected at various frequencies, with m-xylene being the most frequently detected (in 151 of the 153 samples), followed by toluene (145), 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (140), ethylbenzene (139), styrene (133), 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (122), benzene (96), p-dichlorobenzene (95), n-butylbenzene (55), chloroform (45), naphthalene (45) and trichloroethylene (31). Concentrations of the 12 VOCs in most of the food composite samples were low, with the 90th percentiles from 1.6 ng g(-1) for n-butylbenzene to 20 ng g(-1) for toluene. However, some VOCs were detected at higher levels with maxima, for example, of 948 ng g(-1) for m-xylene and 320 ng g(-1) for ethylbenzene in chewing gum, 207 ng g(-1) for styrene and 157 ng g(-1) for toluene in herbs and spices. VOCs were detected at higher levels in most of the individual food items than their corresponding composite samples, for example, the average chloroform concentration in the individual canned soft drinks was 20 ng g(-1) compared with 3.0 ng g(-1) in their composite, and the average toluene concentration in the individual canned citrus juice was 96 ng g(-1) compared with 0.68 ng g(-1) in their composite. Thus, for determination of VOCs in foods which can be consumed directly, their individual food items should be analysed whenever possible for accurate

  14. Qualitative Case Study Research as Empirical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinger, Andrea D.; McWhorter, Rochell

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of qualitative case study research as empirical inquiry. It defines and distinguishes what a case study is, the purposes, intentions, and types of case studies. It then describes how to determine if a qualitative case study is the preferred approach for conducting research. It overviews the essential steps in…

  15. Impacts of Bicycle Infrastructure in Mid-Sized Cities (IBIMS): protocol for a natural experiment study in three Canadian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Meghan; Branion-Calles, Michael; Therrien, Suzanne; Fuller, Daniel; Gauvin, Lise; Whitehurst, David G T; Nelson, Trisalyn

    2018-01-21

    Bicycling is promoted as a transportation and population health strategy globally. Yet bicycling has low uptake in North America (1%-2% of trips) compared with European bicycling cities (15%-40% of trips) and shows marked sex and age trends. Safety concerns due to collisions with motor vehicles are primary barriers.To attract the broader population to bicycling, many cities are making investments in bicycle infrastructure. These interventions hold promise for improving population health given the potential for increased physical activity and improved safety, but such outcomes have been largely unstudied. In 2016, the City of Victoria, Canada, committed to build a connected network of infrastructure that separates bicycles from motor vehicles, designed to attract people of 'all ages and abilities' to bicycling.This natural experiment study examines the impacts of the City of Victoria's investment in a bicycle network on active travel and safety outcomes. The specific objectives are to (1) estimate changes in active travel, perceived safety and bicycle safety incidents; (2) analyse spatial inequities in access to bicycle infrastructure and safety incidents; and (3) assess health-related economic benefits. The study is in three Canadian cities (intervention: Victoria; comparison: Kelowna, Halifax). We will administer population-based surveys in 2016, 2018 and 2021 (1000 people/city). The primary outcome is the proportion of people reporting bicycling. Secondary outcomes are perceived safety and bicycle safety incidents. Spatial analyses will compare the distribution of bicycle infrastructure and bicycle safety incidents across neighbourhoods and across time. We will also calculate the economic benefits of bicycling using WHO's Health Economic Assessment Tool. This study received approval from the Simon Fraser University Office of Research Ethics (study no. 2016s0401). Findings will be disseminated via a website, presentations to stakeholders, at academic conferences

  16. Psychological type profile of religiously committed male and female Canadian Baptist youth: a study among participants at tidal impact

    OpenAIRE

    Fawcett, Bruce G.; Francis, Leslie J.; Robbins, Mandy

    2009-01-01

    A sample of 479 female and 274 male religiously committed Canadian youth over the age of 11 years completed the Adolescent Form of the Francis Psychological Type Scales (FPTSA) within the context of a weeklong mission and service event sponsored by the Convention of Atlantic Baptist Churches. The data demonstrated strong preferences for intuition among both males (75%) and females (66%), and strong preferences for feeling among both males (86%) and females (92%). Females demonstrated stronger...

  17. An exploratory study on the consequences and contextual factors of intimate partner violence among immigrant and Canadian-born women

    OpenAIRE

    Du Mont, Janice; Forte, Tonia

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare immigrant and Canadian-born women on the physical and psychological consequences of intimate partner violence (IPV), as well as examine important sociodemographic, health and social support and network factors that may shape their experiences of abuse. Method National, population-based, cross-sectional survey conducted in 2009. Participants 6859 women reported contact with a current or former partner in the previous 5?years, of whom 1480 reported having experienced emotio...

  18. Leading Lean: a Canadian healthcare leader's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Benjamin A; Golden, Brian; Hannam, Rosemary; Morra, Dante

    2009-01-01

    Canadian healthcare organizations are increasingly asked to do more with less, and too often this has resulted in demands on staff to simply work harder and longer. Lean methodologies, originating from Japanese industrial organizations and most notably Toyota, offer an alternative - tried and tested approaches to working smarter. Lean, with its systematic approaches to reducing waste, has found its way to Canadian healthcare organizations with promising results. This article reports on a study of five Canadian healthcare providers that have recently implemented Lean. We offer stories of success but also identify potential obstacles and ways by which they may be surmounted to provide better value for our healthcare investments.

  19. The Role of Faculty in Connecting Canadian Undergraduate Arts and Humanities Students to Scholarly Inquiries into Teaching: A Case for Purposeful Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratsoy, Ginny R.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, various sectors of Canadian universities are advocating an assortment of beyond-the-classroom learning models--from research assistantships through service learning and cooperative education placements. At the same time, faculty who engage in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and related inquiries into teaching and…

  20. Canadian Civil-Military Relations, 1939-1941: A Case Study in Strategic Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2011 © Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le ministre de la...civils élaborent la politique et les forces militaires l’appliquent. Lorsque le Gén Crerar a assumé les fonctions de chef d’état-major général, le...Les décideurs politiques et militaires de la Seconde Guerre mondiale ont fait face à des questions complexes; or, la réussite et l’ampleur de l’effort

  1. Curriculum Integration and At-Risk Students: A Canadian Case Study Examining Student Learning and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMath, Sheryl; Roberts, Jillian; Wallace, John; Chi, Xiaohong

    2010-01-01

    The combining of subject areas or disciplines, referred to in this article as curriculum integration, has been recognised as being linked to high levels of student motivation and learning. Sheryl MacMath of the University of Toronto, Jillian Roberts of the University of Victoria, and John Wallace and Xiaohong Chi of the University of Toronto…

  2. When Children Seek Asylum from Their Parents: A Canadian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossin, Michael; Demirdache, Laila

    2012-01-01

    When children seek asylum from alleged abuse by a custodial parent, the notion that family reunification is always in the best interests of independent child migrants is undermined. In this chapter, the authors discuss the legal tensions between the Refugee Convention, the Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (the…

  3. Motives and Measures of Higher Education Internationalisation: A Case Study of a Canadian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesufu, Lawal O.

    2018-01-01

    Internationalisation is the inclusion of international, intercultural and global dimensions into the objectives, policies and practices in the delivery of postsecondary education. The objective of the research was to investigate the types of partnerships and internationalisation approaches that exist in higher education, the motives of…

  4. Citizen Science and Community Engagement in Tick Surveillance—A Canadian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lewis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in North America and Europe, and on-going surveillance is required to monitor the spread of the tick vectors as their populations expand under the influence of climate change. Active surveillance involves teams of researchers collecting ticks from field locations with the potential to be sites of establishing tick populations. This process is labor- and time-intensive, limiting the number of sites monitored and the frequency of monitoring. Citizen science initiatives are ideally suited to address this logistical problem and generate high-density and complex data from sites of community importance. In 2014, the same region was monitored by academic researchers, public health workers, and citizen scientists, allowing a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of each type of surveillance effort. Four community members persisted with tick collections over several years, collectively recovering several hundred ticks. Although deviations from standard surveillance protocols and the choice of tick surveillance sites makes the incorporation of community-generated data into conventional surveillance analyses more complex, this citizen science data remains useful in providing high-density longitudinal tick surveillance of a small area in which detailed ecological observations can be made. Most importantly, partnership between community members and researchers has proven a powerful tool in educating communities about of the risk of tick-vectored diseases and in encouraging tick bite prevention.

  5. Exploring Canadian Echinoderm Diversity through DNA Barcodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara K S Layton

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding has proven an effective tool for species identification in varied groups of marine invertebrates including crustaceans, molluscs, polychaetes and echinoderms. In this study, we further validate its utility by analyzing almost half of the 300 species of Echinodermata known from Canadian waters. COI sequences from 999 specimens were assigned to 145 BINs. In most cases, species discrimination was straightforward due to the large difference (25-fold between mean intra- (0.48% and inter- (12.0% specific divergence. Six species were flagged for further taxonomic investigation because specimens assigned to them fell into two or three discrete sequence clusters. The potential influence of larval dispersal capacity and glacial events on patterns of genetic diversity is discussed for 19 trans-oceanic species. Although additional research is needed to clarify biogeographic patterns and resolve taxonomic questions, this study represents an important step in the assembly of a DNA barcode library for all Canadian echinoderms, a valuable resource for future biosurveillance programs.

  6. Supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian oil sands: A comparative study of the costs and CO2 emissions of mining and in-situ recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

    2013-01-01

    High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil. The sensitivity analysis shows that before 2035, the most influential parameters are the learning parameter in the case of in-situ bitumen and the depletion parameter in the case of mined bitumen. After 2035, depletion dominates in both cases. The results show that the social cost of CO 2 has a large impact on the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon intensity of the recovery techniques: taking into account the social cost of CO 2 adds more than half to the cost of producing synthetic crude oil from mined bitumen in 2050 (mean value), while the cost of producing synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen more than doubles. - Highlights: • We model the cost of Canadian synthetic crude oil (SCO) using Monte-Carlo techniques. • We reveal the uncertainty associated with each input parameter. • We quantify the effect of learning, depletion and CO 2 using sensitivity analyses. • Accounting for the social cost of CO 2 doubles the cost of SCO from in-situ bitumen. • CO 2 pricing could have a large effect on the economics of the oil sands

  7. Toward a Canadian agenda for ecological fiscal reform : first steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Ecological fiscal reform (EFR) program of the National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) was designed to provide insight into the main challenges and opportunities regarding EFR and to examine potential for EFR in Canada. Phase 1 of the program reviewed international experience with EFR from June 2000 to October 2001. Three case studies were initiated in Phase 1, each dealing with the possible applications of EFR in the Canadian context. The 3 case studies illustrated the specific challenges for application of EFR for agricultural landscapes, cleaner transportation and substances of concern. 25 refs., 2 tabs., 2 appendices

  8. Associations between methadone maintenance treatment and crime: a 17-year longitudinal cohort study of Canadian provincial offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russolillo, Angela; Moniruzzaman, Akm; McCandless, Lawrence C; Patterson, Michelle; Somers, Julian M

    2018-04-01

    To estimate and test the difference in rates of violent and non-violent crime during medicated and non-medicated methadone treatment episodes. The study involved linkage of population level administrative data (health and justice) for all individuals (n = 14 530) in British Columbia, Canada with a history of conviction and who filled a methadone prescription between 1 January 1998 and 31 March 2015. Methadone maintenance treatment was the primary independent variable and was treated as a time-varying exposure. Each participant's follow-up (mean: 8 years) was divided into medicated (methadone was dispensed) and non-medicated (methadone was not dispensed) periods with mean durations of 3.3 and 4.6 years, respectively. Socio-demographics of participants were examined along with the main outcomes of violent and non-violent offences. During the first 2 years of treatment (≤ 2.0 years), periods in which methadone was dispensed were associated with a 33% lower rate of violent crime [0.67 adjusted hazard ratio (AHR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.59, 0.76] and a 35% lower rate of non-violent crime (0.65 AHR, 95% CI = 0.62, 0.69) compared with non-medicated periods. This equates to a risk difference of 3.6 (95% CI = 2.6, 4.4) and 37.2 (95% CI = 33.0, 40.4) fewer violent and non-violent offences per 100 person-years, respectively. Significant but smaller protective effects of dispensed methadone were observed across longer treatment intervals (2.0 to ≤ 5.0 years, 5.0 to ≤ 10.0 years). Among a cohort of Canadian offenders, rates of violent and non-violent offending were lower during periods when individuals were dispensed methadone compared with periods in which they were not dispensed methadone. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Waste management in Canadian nuclear programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyne, P.J.

    The objectives of the Canadian radioactive waste management program are described. Recycling actinides through reactors is being studied. Low and medium level waste treatments such as reverse osmosis concentration, immobilization in bitumen and plastics, and incineration are under study. Spent fuel can be stored dry in concrete canisters above ground and ultimate storage of wastes in salt deposits or hard rock is appropriate to Canadian conditions. (E.C.B.)

  10. South Asian Canadian experiences of depression

    OpenAIRE

    Grewal, Amarjit

    2010-01-01

    This narrative research study explored the socio-cultural context surrounding depression through semi-structured interviews with six South Asian Canadian participants, who self identified as having experienced depression. The study sought to expand on the knowledge of depression and South Asian Canadians by considering the roles of the family, the community, and the culture in the experiences of depression. Thematic analysis of the participant interviews resulted in five major themes: the exp...

  11. Using Correspondence Analysis in Multiple Case Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienstra, Natascha; van der Heijden, Peter G.M.

    2015-01-01

    In qualitative research of multiple case studies, Miles and Huberman proposed to summarize the separate cases in a so-called meta-matrix that consists of cases by variables. Yin discusses cross-case synthesis to study this matrix. We propose correspondence analysis (CA) as a useful tool to study

  12. The Radioisotope Industry - Canadian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D. J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer, while the Canadian share of total cyclotron isotope production is very much smaller. This is a direct reflection of the country's nuclear history. The NRC reactor, which went critical in 1947, was at that time the world's highest flux nuclear reactor. NRC, which followed in 1956, gave access to even higher fluxes and irradiation volumes. Isotope production in Canada began almost coincidentally with the start-up of NRC and I-131 was exported to the United Stated in 1948, followed by C-14 before 1950. The above specific isotope applications, together with the earlier commentary on the overall Canadian historical experience clearly indicates the value of an indigenous isotope industry in Canada's case. It should be noted, of course, that the Canadian domestic applications base also involves all the other technological areas covered by other speakers at this Conference. While Canada is unique in that domestic self-sufficiency has led to an even more important export industry, there is no doubt that the development of domestic self-reliance in the isotope applications area is in its own right a valuable off-shoot of any country's nuclear R and D and power programs

  13. The Fractious Academy: A Canadian Approach to Dispute Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Narrates some characteristic reactions of Canadian academics to the tenure concept; discusses representative criteria considered for promotion at Canadian universities, and sets out a model dispute resolving procedure which could be used when the appropriateness of such awards is questioned in individual cases. (Author/JF)

  14. Metals exposure and risk of small-for-gestational age birth in a Canadian birth cohort: The MIREC study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Shari [Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Arbuckle, Tye E., E-mail: Tye.Arbuckle@hc-sc.gc.ca [Population Studies Division, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Fisher, Mandy [Population Studies Division, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Fraser, William D. [Sainte Justine University Hospital Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Ettinger, Adrienne [Center for Perinatal, Pediatric & Environmental Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); King, Will [Department of Public Health Sciences, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Background: Lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic are some of the most common toxic metals to which Canadians are exposed. The effect of exposure to current low levels of toxic metals on fetal growth restriction is unknown. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine relationships between exposure to lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic during pregnancy, and risk of small for gestational age (SGA) birth. Methods: Lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic levels were measured in blood samples from the first and third trimesters in 1835 pregnant women from across Canada. Arsenic species in first trimester urine were also assessed. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using log binomial multivariate regression. Important covariates including maternal age, parity, pre-pregnancy BMI, and smoking, were considered in the analysis. An exploratory analysis was performed to examine potential effect modification of these relationships by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GSTP1 and GSTO1 genes. Results: No association was found between blood lead, cadmium or arsenic and risk for SGA. We observed an increased risk for SGA for the highest compared to the lowest tertile of exposure for mercury (>1.6 µg/L, RR=1.56.; 95% CI=1.04–2.58) and arsenobetaine (>2.25 µg/L, RR=1.65; 95% CI=1.10–2.47) after adjustment for the effects of parity and smoking. A statistically significant interaction was observed in the relationship between dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) levels in urinary arsenic and SGA between strata of GSTO1 A104A (p for interaction=0.02). A marginally significant interaction was observed in the relationship between blood lead and SGA between strata of GSTP1 A114V (p for interaction=0.06). Conclusions: These results suggest a small increase in risk for SGA in infants born to women exposed to mercury and arsenic. Given the conflicting evidence in the literature this warrants further investigation in other pregnant populations. - Highlights: • Metals

  15. Metals exposure and risk of small-for-gestational age birth in a Canadian birth cohort: The MIREC study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Shari; Arbuckle, Tye E.; Fisher, Mandy; Fraser, William D.; Ettinger, Adrienne; King, Will

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic are some of the most common toxic metals to which Canadians are exposed. The effect of exposure to current low levels of toxic metals on fetal growth restriction is unknown. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine relationships between exposure to lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic during pregnancy, and risk of small for gestational age (SGA) birth. Methods: Lead, mercury, cadmium and arsenic levels were measured in blood samples from the first and third trimesters in 1835 pregnant women from across Canada. Arsenic species in first trimester urine were also assessed. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using log binomial multivariate regression. Important covariates including maternal age, parity, pre-pregnancy BMI, and smoking, were considered in the analysis. An exploratory analysis was performed to examine potential effect modification of these relationships by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GSTP1 and GSTO1 genes. Results: No association was found between blood lead, cadmium or arsenic and risk for SGA. We observed an increased risk for SGA for the highest compared to the lowest tertile of exposure for mercury (>1.6 µg/L, RR=1.56.; 95% CI=1.04–2.58) and arsenobetaine (>2.25 µg/L, RR=1.65; 95% CI=1.10–2.47) after adjustment for the effects of parity and smoking. A statistically significant interaction was observed in the relationship between dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) levels in urinary arsenic and SGA between strata of GSTO1 A104A (p for interaction=0.02). A marginally significant interaction was observed in the relationship between blood lead and SGA between strata of GSTP1 A114V (p for interaction=0.06). Conclusions: These results suggest a small increase in risk for SGA in infants born to women exposed to mercury and arsenic. Given the conflicting evidence in the literature this warrants further investigation in other pregnant populations. - Highlights: • Metals

  16. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  17. Allographic agraphia: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Menichelli, Alina; Rapp, Brenda; Semenza, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of patient MN, diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia, who exhibited a severe impairment in writing letters and words in upper-case print in the face of accurate production of the same stimuli in lower-case cursive. In contrast to her written production difficulties, MN was unimpaired in recognizing visually presented letters and words in upper-case print. We find a modest benefit of visual form cueing in the written production of upper-case letters, despite an inability to...

  18. STS Case Study Development Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa de Jesus, Dan A.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    The Shuttle Case Study Collection (SCSC) has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. The SCSC provides educators with a new tool to teach real-world engineering processes with the goal of providing unique educational materials that enhance critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills. During this third phase of the project, responsibilities included: the revision of the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) source code to ensure all pages follow World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards, and the addition and edition of website content, including text, documents, and images. Basic HTML knowledge was required, as was basic knowledge of photo editing software, and training to learn how to use NASA's Content Management System for website design. The outcome of this project was its release to the public.

  19. Case studies in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, V.; Satheesh, C.; Varde, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing is widely used Non Destructive Testing (NDT) method and forms the essential part of In-service inspection programme of nuclear reactors. Main application of ultrasonic testing is for volumetric scanning of weld joints followed by thickness gauging of pipelines and pressure vessels. Research reactor Dhruva has completed the first In Service Inspection programme in which about 325 weld joints have been volumetrically scanned, in addition to thickness gauging of 300 meters of pipe lines of various sizes and about 24 nos of pressure vessels. Ultrasonic testing is also used for level measurements, distance measurements and cleaning and decontamination of tools. Two case studies are brought out in this paper in which ultrasonic testing is used successfully for identification of butterfly valve opening status and extent of choking in pipe lines in Dhruva reactor systems

  20. Canadian natural gas liquids : market outlook 2000 - 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, L.; Mortensen, P.

    2001-01-01

    This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the availability of Canadian natural gas liquids. The analysis was developed from production profiles and gas compositions for individual gas pools and takes into account the effects of market factors. On the demand side, the effects of new infrastructure and changes in corporate structures have been evaluated. The study was initiated at a time when energy prices were stable and the major concern was to see how the addition of the Alliance pipeline, the Aux Sable gas processing plant, the Empress V straddle plant and the Nova/UCC E3 ethylene plant would affect the Canadian liquids business. The study was complicated by the advent of unexpected factors affecting the supply and demand of natural gas liquids (NGLs). These included extremely high prices for natural gas, an apparent inability of the supply basin to respond to the high gas prices with increased supply, and the very high electricity costs in Alberta. The weak supply of NGLs coincides with the increase in ethane demand from the start-up of Alberta's fourth ethylene facility and the addition of the high vapour pressure Alliance pipeline. This weak supply suggests there will be an ethane shortage for at least the next few years. The longer term outlook, however, is less certain and will require an analysis of the outlook for gas production, gas composition and NGL extraction capacity. This study developed two forecasts for natural gas prices. Both presume rising gas demand across North America driven by increased gas use for power generation. The Low Case assumes modest growth in domestic Canadian gas demand and the High case predicts strong growth in domestic demand as higher levels of exports to the United States, resulting in a doubling in growth for Canadian gas production from 2000-2015 compared to the Low Case. Both High and Low Case scenarios suggest that prices will decline from current levels so that Alberta plant gate prices fall by 2005 and will then

  1. The Changing Landscape of Literacy Curriculum in a Sino-Canada Transnational Education Programme: An Actor-Network Theory Informed Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Heydon, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns an exploratory and interpretive case study of the literacy curricula in a Canadian transnational education programme (Pseudonym: SCS) delivered in China where Ontario secondary school curricula were used at the same time as the Chinese national high school curricula. Using ethnographic tools and actor-network theory, the study…

  2. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  3. The New Indices of Religious Orientation Revised (NIROR: A Study among Canadian Adolescents Attending a Baptist Youth Mission and Service Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie J. Francis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the properties of the New Indices of Religious Orientation Revised (NIROR among a sample of 521 Canadian adolescents attending a Baptist youth mission and service event, ranging in age from 12 to 19 years. This revision simplified the language of the original instrument to increase its accessibility among young people. The data support the internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the three revised nine-item scales designed to operationalise extrinsic religious orientation, intrinsic religious orientation, and quest religious orientation.

  4. Canadian nuclear risk experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    1982-05-01

    Risk assessment in the Canadian nuclear fuel cycle is a very important and complex subject. Many levels of government are involved in deciding the acceptable limits for the risks, taking into account the benefits for society [fr

  5. The impact of the Vancouver Winter Olympics on population level physical activity and sport participation among Canadian children and adolescents: population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cora L; Bauman, Adrian E

    2014-09-03

    There has been much debate about the potential impact of the Olympics. The purpose of this study was to determine if hosting the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Games (OG) encouraged Canadian children to be physically active. Children 5-19 years (n = 19862) were assessed as part of the representative Canadian Physical Activity Levels Among Youth surveillance study between August 2007 and July 2011. Parents were asked if the child participated in organized physical activity or sport. In addition, children wore pedometers for 7 days to objectively provide an estimate of overall physical activity. Mean steps/day and percent participating in organized physical activity or sport were calculated by time period within year for Canada and British Columbia. The odds of participation by time period were estimated by logistic regression, controlling for age and sex. Mean steps were lower during the Olympic period compared with Pre- (607 fewer steps/day 95% CI 263-950 steps/day) and Post-Olympic (1246 fewer steps 95% CI 858-1634 steps) periods for Canada. There was no difference by time period in British Columbia. A similar pattern in mean steps by time period was observed across years, but there were no significant differences in activity within each of these periods between years. The likelihood of participating in organized physical activity or sport by time period within or across years did not differ from baseline (August-November 2007). The 2010 Olympic Games had no measurable impact on objectively measured physical activity or the prevalence of overall sports participation among Canadian children. Much greater cross-Government and long-term efforts are needed to create the conditions for an Olympic legacy effect on physical activity.

  6. Making the Case for Case Studies in Empirical Legal Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Argyrou, A.

    2017-01-01

    This is a contribution to the scholarly discussion concerning the limited use of the case study qualitative method in support of legal research. It demonstrates the use of the case study qualitative method in the context of an empirical legal research project, which examines stakeholder

  7. Association between neighbourhood fast-food and full-service restaurant density and body mass index: a cross-sectional study of Canadian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Simon; Campbell, M Karen; Gilliland, Jason; Sarma, Sisira

    2014-05-07

    Frequent fast-food consumption is a well-known risk factor for obesity. This study sought to determine whether the availability of fast-food restaurants has an influence on body mass index (BMI). BMI and individual-level confounding variables were obtained from the 2007-08 Canadian Community Health Survey. Neighbourhood socio-demographic variables were acquired from the 2006 Canadian Census. The geographic locations of all restaurants in Canada were assembled from a validated business registry database. The density of fast-food, full-service and non-chain restaurants per 10,000 individuals was calculated for respondents' forward sortation area. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between restaurant density and BMI. Fast-food, full-service and non-chain restaurant density variables were statistically significantly associated with BMI. Fast-food density had a positive association whereas full-service and non-chain restaurant density had a negative association with BMI (additional 10 fast-food restaurants per capita corresponded to a weight increase of 1 kilogram; p<0.001). These associations were primarily found in Canada's major urban jurisdictions. This research was the first to investigate the influence of fast-food and full-service restaurant density on BMI using individual-level data from a nationally representative Canadian survey. The finding of a positive association between fast-food restaurant density and BMI suggests that interventions aiming to restrict the availability of fast-food restaurants in local neighbourhoods may be a useful obesity prevention strategy.

  8. Allographic agraphia: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichelli, Alina; Rapp, Brenda; Semenza, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of patient MN, diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia, who exhibited a severe impairment in writing letters and words in upper-case print in the face of accurate production of the same stimuli in lower-case cursive. In contrast to her written production difficulties, MN was unimpaired in recognizing visually presented letters and words in upper-case print. We find a modest benefit of visual form cueing in the written production of upper-case letters, despite an inability to describe or report visual features of letters in any case or font. This case increases our understanding of the allographic level of letter-shape representation in written language production. It provides strong support for previous reports indicating the neural independence of different types of case and font-specific letter-shape information; it provides evidence that letter-shape production does not require explicit access to information about the visual attributes of letter shapes and, finally, it reveals the possibility of interaction between processes involved in letter-shape production and perception. PMID:18489965

  9. Allographic agraphia: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichelli, Alina; Rapp, Brenda; Semenza, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of patient MN, diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia, who exhibited a severe impairment in writing letters and words in upper-case print in the face of accurate production of the same stimuli in lower-case cursive. In contrast to her written production difficulties, MN was unimpaired in recognizing visually presented letters and words in upper-case print. We find a modest benefit of visual form cueing in the written production of upper-case letters, despite an inability to describe or report visual features of letters in any case or font. This case increases our understanding of the allographic level of letter-shape representation in written language production. It provides strong support for previous reports indicating the neural independence of different types of case and font-specific letter-shape information; it provides evidence that letter-shape production does not require explicit access to information about the visual attributes of letter shapes and, finally, it reveals the possibility of interaction between processes involved in letter-shape production and perception.

  10. Catalog of NASA-Related Case Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The OCKO has developed over 50 case studies to enhance learning at workshops, training, retreats and conferences. Case studies make mission knowledge attractive and...

  11. Concentrated photovoltaics, a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonini Piergiorgio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated Photovoltaics (CPV, once a niche technology, has now reached the maturity and reliability for large scale power generation. Especially in regions where temperatures are very high, the use of high efficiency triple junction solar cells with concentrating optics allows stable energy yield. Thus CPV can be seen as complementary and not in concurrence with silicon photovoltaics. The state of the art, the advantages and limitations of this technology will be shown. Among the main advantages of CPV is the possibility of a much higher energy supply, when compared to silicon photovoltaics, both comparing CPV and silicon with same area or the same installed power. The use of recycled and recyclable materials allows a more environmentally friendly production. The possibility to couple CPV with desalination facilities, energy storage will be analysed. As an example a case study of a CPV installation in Northern Italy is discussed. Here the use of mature technologies, derived from automotive and lighting sectors resulted in a simple and efficient module.

  12. Neighbourhood social and built environment factors and falls in community-dwelling canadian older adults: A validation study and exploration of structural confounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Vafaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Older persons are vulnerable to the ill effects of their social and built environment due to age-related limitations in mobility and bio-psychological vulnerability. Falls are common in older adults and result from complex interactions between individual, social, and contextual determinants. We addressed two methodological issues of neighbourhood-health and social epidemiological studies in this analysis: (1 validity of measures of neighbourhood contexts, and (2 structural confounding resulting from social sorting mechanisms. Baseline data from International Mobility in Aging Study were used. Samples included community-dwelling Canadians older than 65 living in Kingston (Ontario and St-Hyacinthe (Quebec. We performed factor analysis and ecometric analysis to assess the validity of measures of neighbourhood social capital, socioeconomic status, and the built environment and stratified tabular analyses to explore structural confounding. The scales all demonstrated good psychometric and ecometric properties. There was an evidence of the existence of structural confounding in this sample of Canadian older adults as some combinations of strata for the three neighbourhood measures had no population. This limits causal inference in studying relationships between neighbourhood factors and falls and should be taken into account in aetiological aging research. Keywords: Ecometric analysis, Falls, Social and built environment, Neighbourhoods, Older adults, Social Capital, Structural confounding, Validity

  13. Cultural differences in self- and other-evaluations and well-being: a study of European and Asian Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunji; Schimmack, Ulrich; Oishi, Shigehiro

    2012-04-01

    Anusic, Schimmack, Pinkus, and Lockwood (2009) developed the halo-alpha-beta (HAB) model to separate halo variance from variance due to valid personality traits and other sources of measurement error in self-ratings of personality. The authors used a twin-HAB model of self-ratings and ratings of a partner (friend or dating partner) to test several hypotheses about culture, evaluative biases in self- and other-perceptions, and well-being. Participants were friends or dating partners who reported on their own and their partner's personality and well-being (N = 906 students). European Canadians had higher general evaluative biases (GEB) than Asian Canadians. There were no cultural differences in self-enhancement or other-enhancement. GEB significantly predicted self-ratings of life satisfaction, but not informant ratings of well-being. GEB fully mediated the effect of culture on self-ratings of life satisfaction. The results suggest that North American culture encourages positive biases in self- and other-perceptions. These biases also influence self-ratings of life satisfaction but have a much weaker effect on informant ratings of life satisfaction. The implications of these findings for cultural differences in well-being are discussed. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Costs and Quality of Life in Diabetic Macular Edema: Canadian Burden of Diabetic Macular Edema Observational Study (C-REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Gonder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To characterize the economic and quality of life burden of diabetic macular edema (DME in Canadian patients. Patients and Methods. 145 patients with DME were followed for 6 months with monthly telephone interviews and medical chart reviews at months 0, 3, and 6. Visual acuity in the worst-seeing eye was assessed at months 0 and 6. DME-related healthcare costs were determined over 6 months, and vision-related (National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire and generic (EQ-5D quality of life was assessed at months 0, 3, and 6. Results. Mean age of patients was 63.7 years: 52% were male and 72% had bilateral DME. At baseline, visual acuity was categorized as normal/mild loss for 63.4% of patients, moderate loss for 10.4%, and severe loss/nearly blind for 26.2%. Mean 6-month DME-related costs/patient were as follows: all patients (n=135, $2,092; normal/mild loss (n=88, $1,776; moderate loss (n=13, $1,845; and severe loss/nearly blind (n=34, $3,007. Composite scores for vision-related quality of life declined with increasing visual acuity loss; generic quality of life scores were highest for moderate loss and lowest for severe loss/nearly blind. Conclusions. DME-related costs in the Canadian healthcare system are substantial. Costs increased and vision-related quality of life declined with increasing visual acuity severity.

  15. Cognitive aspects of sexual functioning: differences between East Asian-Canadian and Euro-Canadian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Heather; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sexual beliefs of female undergraduates, as well as the thoughts they experience during sexual experiences. The study aimed to determine potential differences in these variables between East Asian-Canadians and Euro-Canadians, as well as the influence of acculturation on these variables. In addition, the relationships between sexual beliefs, automatic thoughts, and specific aspects of sexual functioning were examined. Euro-Canadian (n = 77) and East Asian-Canadian (n = 123) undergraduate women completed the Sexual Dysfunctional Beliefs Questionnaire, the Sexual Modes Questionnaire, the Female Sexual Function Index, and the Vancouver Index of Acculturation. East Asian women endorsed almost all sexual beliefs assessed in this study more than did Euro-Canadian women, and endorsement of these beliefs was associated with acculturation. In addition, East Asian-Canadian and Euro-Canadian women differed in the frequency of experiencing negative automatic thoughts. Results also revealed associations between difficulties in sexual functioning, and both sexual beliefs and automatic thoughts. Together, these results provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that differences in cognitive aspects of sexuality may underlie the differences in sexual functioning previously observed between these two groups.

  16. Summary of case studies for cooperation mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longa, Francesco Dalla; Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik; Hansen, Lise-Lotte Pade

    2012-01-01

    This document is a summary report highlighting the main aspect analyzed in the RES4LESS case studies. The document starts with an introductory chapter where the background that led to the selection of the case studies is outlined. In the following three chapters the case studies are presented, hi...

  17. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  18. Writing case studies in information systems research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Blonk, H.C.

    Case study research can be reported in different ways. This paper explores the various ways in which researchers may choose to write down their case studies and then introduces a subsequent typology of writing case studies. The typology is based on a 2 x 2 matrix, resulting in four forms of writing

  19. A methodology for evaluating environmental planning systems: a case study of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Meghan; Gunton, Thomas; Rutherford, Murray

    2010-06-01

    Sustainable environmental management is contingent on having an effective environmental planning system. A new methodology for designing and evaluating environmental planning systems is described and applied to a case study evaluation of the Canadian environmental planning process. The methodology is based on eight international best practice principles for environmental planning and 45 indicators. The research illustrates the benefits of the evaluation methodology in identifying how to improve environmental planning systems to achieve desired results. The methodology is applicable to a wide variety of jurisdictions. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A hard choice (case study)

    OpenAIRE

    KRAVCHENKO NATALIYA A.; KUZNETSOVA SVETLANA A.

    2014-01-01

    The case describes the problems of strategic choice: a small company successfully working in the engineering market (automation of technological processes) in the electric power industry has to make a decision on its further development in a changing external environment and increased competition. The case was carried out to be used in training programs of different levels within the courses “Strategic Management”, “Innovation Management”, “Strategic Analysis Methods”, “Change Management” whe...

  1. Stability of normative data for the SF-36: results of a three-year prospective study in middle-aged Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, Wilma M; Berger, Claudie; Joseph, Lawrence; Towheed, Tanveer; vandenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Anastassiades, Tassos; Cranney, Ann; Adachi, Jonathan D; Loannidis, George; Poliquin, Suzette; Brown, Jacques P; Murray, Timothy M; Hanley, David A; Papadimitropoulos, Emmanuel A; Tenenhouse, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The SF-36 is widely used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL), but with few longitudinal studies in healthy populations, it is difficult to quantify its natural history. This is important because any measure of change following an intervention may be confounded by natural changes in HRQOL. This paper assesses mean changes in SF-36 scores over a 3-year period in men and women between the ages of 40 and 59 years at baseline. Subjects were randomly selected from nine Canadian cities. Mean SF-36 changes over a 3-year period (1996/1997-1999/2000) were calculated for each gender within 5-year age categories. Multiple imputation was used to correct for potential bias due to missing data. The baseline cohort included 1,974 women and 975 men between 40 and 59 years. Mean changes in HRQOL tended to be small. Women demonstrated small average declines in 22 of the 32 age and domain groupings (4 age groups, 8 SF-36 domains) while men showed declines in 14/32. Most participants stayed within 10 points of their original baseline score. Mean SF-36 scores change only slightly over three years in middle-aged Canadians, although there is much individual variation. It may be necessary to adjust for the natural evolution of SF-36 scores when interpreting results from longitudinal studies.

  2. Mercury in Canadian crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebone, B.P.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates for average mercury concentrations in crude oil range widely from 10 ng/g of oil to 3,500 ng/g of oil. With such a broad range of estimates, it is difficult to determine the contributions of the petroleum sector to the total budget of mercury emissions. In response to concerns that the combustion of petroleum products may be a major source of air-borne mercury pollution, Environment Canada and the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute has undertaken a survey of the average total mercury concentration in crude oil processed in Canadian refineries. In order to calculate the potential upper limit of total mercury in all refined products, samples of more than 30 different types of crude oil collected from refineries were measured for their concentration of mercury as it enters into a refinery before processing. High temperature combustion, cold vapour atomic absorption and cold vapour atomic fluorescence were the techniques used to quantify mercury in the samples. The results of the study provide information on the total mass of mercury present in crude oil processed in Canada each year. Results can be used to determine the impact of vehicle exhaust emissions to the overall Canadian mercury emission budget. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  3. Changes in body mass index in Canadians over a five-year period: Results of a prospective, population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliquin Suzette

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The initiation of the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study in 1996, and subsequent follow-up of the cohort 5 years later, provided longitudinal body mass index (BMI data for a random sample of Canadians. Methods Height and weight were measured at baseline and 5 years and used to calculate BMI and assign one of six weight categories. Multiple imputation was used to adjust for missing weight at year 5. Data were stratified by age and gender. The proportion of participants moving between categories was generated, and multivariable linear regression was used to identify factors associated with weight change. Results Baseline data were available for 8548 participants, year 5 data for 6721, and year 5 weight was imputed for 1827 (17.6%. Mean BMI for every age and gender group exceeded healthy weight guidelines. Most remained within their BMI classification over 5 years, but when change occurred, BMI category was more likely to increase than decrease. Several sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical characteristics were associated with change. Conclusion Mean baseline BMI tended to be higher than recommended. Moreover, on average, men under age 45 and women under age 55 were gaining approximately 0.45 kilograms (one pound per year, which leveled off with increased age and reversed in the oldest age groups. These findings underscore the need for public health efforts aimed at combating obesity.

  4. Changes in body mass index in Canadians over a five-year period: results of a prospective, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, Wilma M; Leroux, Cristine; Berger, Claudie; Joseph, Lawrence; Barr, Susan I; Prior, Jerilynn C; Harrison, Mark; Poliquin, Suzette; Towheed, Tanveer; Anastassiades, Tassos; Goltzman, David

    2007-07-09

    The initiation of the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study in 1996, and subsequent follow-up of the cohort 5 years later, provided longitudinal body mass index (BMI) data for a random sample of Canadians. Height and weight were measured at baseline and 5 years and used to calculate BMI and assign one of six weight categories. Multiple imputation was used to adjust for missing weight at year 5. Data were stratified by age and gender. The proportion of participants moving between categories was generated, and multivariable linear regression was used to identify factors associated with weight change. Baseline data were available for 8548 participants, year 5 data for 6721, and year 5 weight was imputed for 1827 (17.6%). Mean BMI for every age and gender group exceeded healthy weight guidelines. Most remained within their BMI classification over 5 years, but when change occurred, BMI category was more likely to increase than decrease. Several sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical characteristics were associated with change. Mean baseline BMI tended to be higher than recommended. Moreover, on average, men under age 45 and women under age 55 were gaining approximately 0.45 kilograms (one pound) per year, which leveled off with increased age and reversed in the oldest age groups. These findings underscore the need for public health efforts aimed at combating obesity.

  5. Estimation of lung tissue doses following exposure to low-LET radiation in the Canadian study of cancer following multiple fluoroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.; Yaffe, M.

    1992-02-01

    Lung tissue doses from exposure to external low-LET radiation have been estimated for each year between 1930 and 1960 for 92,707 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canadian institutions between 1930 and 1952. Many of these patients received multiple chest fluoroscopies together with treatment by artificial pneumothorax, and thus accumulated doses up to 15.7 grays. The estimated doses have been used in a statistical analysis of lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 occurring among 64,698 patients known to be alive at the start of 1950, and followed by linkage to the Canadian national mortality data base. There were substantial variations in the total cumulative lung tissue dose received by the cohort, with 2,490 individuals having doses in excess of 1.7 grays. A total of 1,156 lung cancer deaths was observed in the cohort, and these have been used to estimate relative risks. The most appropriate risk model appears to be a simple linear relative risk function, with an excess relative risk coefficient of 0.089 for an absorbed dose of 1 gray. This contrasts with estimates of relative risk based on the atomic bomb survivors study, for which the excess relative risk coefficient for males 20 years after the first exposure is estimated to be 0.64. The difference is statistically significant. It is postulated that fractionation and dose rate effectiveness factors may account for some of the discrepancy. (Modified author abstract) (14 refs., 20 tabs.)

  6. 470 Case studies.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as vitiligo, psoriasis and lichen planus following trauma; these new lesions are identical to those in the diseased skin. The Koebner phenomenon may occur in recent scar or pressure points.9 This has also been reported in pemphigus vulgaris.10 Neuraxial opioids have been used in cases of pemphigus and are associated ...

  7. Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kozlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma of the skin is a fast progressing tumor with high risk of development of lymphogenous and hematogenous metastasis, low survival rates and complex diagnostics. this clinical case describes the application of typing tumor cells on the basis of immunohistochemistry to establish the nature of the tumor clone neoplasms.

  8. Transanal rectopexy - twelve case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Henrique Oleques Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study analyzed the results of transanal rectopexy and showed the benefits of this surgical technique. METHOD: Twelve patients were submitted to rectopexy between 1997 and 2011. The surgical technique used was transanal rectopexy, where the mesorectum was fixed to the sacrum with nonabsorbable suture. Three patients had been submitted to previous surgery, two by the Delorme technique and one by the Thiersch technique. RESULTS: Postoperative hospital stay ranged from 1 to 4 days. One patient (8.3% had intraoperative hematoma, which was treated with local compression and antibiotics. One patient (8.3% had residual mucosal prolapse, which was resected. Prolapse recurrence was seen in one case (8.3%. Improved incontinence occurred in 75% of patients and one patient reported obstructed evacuation in the first month after surgery. No death occurred. CONCLUSION: Transanal rectopexy is a simple, low cost technique, which has shown good efficacy in rectal prolapse control.OBJETIVO: O presente estudo analisou os resultados da retopexia pela via transanal e expôs os benefícios desta técnica cirúrgica. MÉTODO: Doze pacientes com prolapso foram operados no período de 1997 a 2011. A técnica cirúrgica usada foi a retopexia transanal, onde o mesorreto foi fixado ao sacro com fio inabsorvível. Três pacientes tinham cirurgia prévia, dois pela técnica de Delorme e um pela técnica de Thiersch. RESULTADOS: A permanência hospitalar pós-operatória variou de 1- 4 dias. Uma paciente (8,3% apresentou hematoma transoperatório que foi tratado com compressão local e antibioticoterapia. Um paciente apresentou prolapso mucoso residual (8,3%, que foi ressecado. Houve recidiva da procidência em um caso (8,3%. A melhora da incontinência ocorreu em 75% dos pacientes e uma paciente apresentou bloqueio evacuatório no primeiro mês após a cirurgia. Não houve mortalidade entre os pacientes operados. CONCLUSÃO: A retopexia transanal é uma t

  9. Case Study Methodology and Homelessness Research

    OpenAIRE

    Jill Pable

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the potential suitability of case study methodology for inquiry with the homeless population. It references a research study that uses case study research method to build theory. This study's topic is the lived experience of destitute individuals who reside in homeless shelters, and explores the homeless shelter built environment's potential influence on resident satisfaction and recovery. Case study methodology may be appropriate because it explores real-life contextual ...

  10. Five misunderstandings about case study research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    2004-01-01

    This article examines five common misunderstandings about case-study research: (1) Theoretical knowledge is more valuable than practical knowledge; (2) One cannot generalize from a single case, therefore the single case study cannot contribute to scientific development; (3) The case study is most...... useful for generating hypotheses, while other methods aremore suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building; (4) The case study contains a bias toward verification; and (5) It is often difficult to summarize specific case studies. The article explains and corrects these misunderstandings one by one...... and concludes with the Kuhnian insight that a scientific discipline without a large number of thoroughly executed case studies is a discipline without systematic production of exemplars, and that a discipline without exemplars is an ineffective one. Social science may be strengthened by the execution of more...

  11. Canadian competitive advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of the Canadian petrochemical industry was outlined, emphasizing the proximity to feedstocks as the principal advantage enjoyed by the industry over its international competitors. Annual sales statistics for 1995 were provided. Key players in the Canadian petrochemical industry (Nova, Dow, DuPont, Methanex, Esso, Union Carbide, Shell and Celanese), their share of the market and key products were noted. Manufacturing facilities are located primarily in Alberta, southern Ontario and Quebec. The feedstock supply infrastructure, historical and alternative ethane pricing in Canada and the US, the North American market for petrochemicals, the competitiveness of the industry, tax competitiveness among Canadian provinces and the US, the Canada - US unit labour cost ratio, ethylene facility construction costs in Canada relative to the US Gulf Coast, and projected 1997 financial requirements were reviewed. 19 figs

  12. Drive Electric Vermont Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Fred [Energetics Incorporated, Columbia, MD (United States); Roberts, Dave [Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), Burlington, VT (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); White, Sera [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Currently in the United States, the heavy majority of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) sales have been in highly conducive, selected, metropolitan areas; opposed to more broad distribution across the country. The U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge is looking carefully at the barriers and opportunities that exist to enable small and midsize communities to partake in the PEV market and benefit from the economic and environmental advantages of PEVs. In order to gain insight into these challenges and barriers, DOE selected a success story (i.e., Drive Electric Vermont) as the subject of this case study, as the state of Vermont is tied with Detroit, Michigan in having the highest percentage of 2014 (most recent complete data) PEV registrations for cold weather U.S. cities and has seen more than a sixfold increase in charging stations over the last three years. The overall objective of this case study was to use the lessons learned from Drive Electric Vermont to determine what activities are most effective at encouraging acquisitions of PEVs and deployment of charging infrastructure in small to midsize communities, prioritizing and sequencing their implementation, identifying robust means for extrapolation, and applying this understanding to other small to midsize communities across the nation. The Drive Electric Vermont Program was formed in 2012 with a goal of increasing the use of electrified transportation in Vermont through policy development, education and outreach, and infrastructure development. The Drive Electric Vermont Program can be broadly broken into four components: (1) strategic planning/leadership, (2) stakeholder/partnership development, (3) education and outreach, and (4) incentives. The early phases of the program focused heavily on strategic planning, and stakeholder and partnership development, followed by a transition to education and outreach activities, charging infrastructure development, and grant and incentive programs

  13. Bioremediation case studies: Abstracts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, K.

    1992-03-01

    The report contains abstracts of 132 case studies of bioremediation technology applied to hazardous waste clean-up. It was prepared to compile bioremediation studies in a variety of locations and treating diverse contaminants, most of which were previously undocumented. All data are based on vendor-supplied information and there was no opportunity to independently confirm its accuracy. These 132 case studies, from 10 different biotechnology companies, provide users with reference information about on-going and/or completed field applications and studies. About two-thirds of the cases were at full-scale clean-up level with the remainder at pilot or laboratory scale. In 74 percent of the cases, soil was at least one of the media treated. Soil alone accounts for 46 percent of the cases. Petroleum-related wastes account for the largest contaminant with 82 cases. Thirty-one states are represented in the case studies

  14. Roadmaster Roading Contractors Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazel Taylor

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Systems analysis students seldom experience the practical difficulties of the initial investigation into a client’s requirements. They get little chance to practice the skills they need to investigate complex and confused problem situations, or to appreciate the wider organizational issues that can impact on a situation. This teaching case is designed to give students the opportunity to practice and apply investigation skills and to challenge them to consider the wider work environment when considering possible solutions to a problem situation. The case is conducted as a role-play, with students acting as systems analysts and teaching staff role-playing the clients. The students develop a report analyzing the client’s situation based on the issues that arise during the interviews. Feed-back sessions focus on discussing how well the students applied various interviewing strategies previously covered in lectures, and on the wider organizational problems that could impact proposed information system solutions.

  15. The case of Iranian immigrants in the greater Toronto area: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastjerdi Mahdieh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Iranians comprise an immigrant group that has a very different cultural background from that of the mainstream Canadian population and speaks a language other than English or French; in this case mainly Farsi (Persian. Although Iranian immigrants in Toronto receive a high proportion of care from Farsi-speaking family physicians and health care providers than physicians who cannot speak Farsi, they are still not satisfied with the provided services. The purpose of this study was to identify the obstacles and issues Iranian immigrants faced in accessing health care services as seen through the eyes of Iranian health care professionals/providers and social workers working in Greater Toronto Area, Canada. Methods Narrative inquiry was used to capture and understand the obstacles this immigrant population faces when accessing health care services, through the lens of fifty Iranian health care professionals/providers and social workers. Thirty three health care professionals and five social workers were interviewed. To capture the essence of issues, individual interviews were followed by three focus groups consisting of three health care professionals and one social worker in each group. Results Three major themes emerged from the study: language barrier and the lack of knowledge of Canadian health care services/systems; lack of trust in Canadian health care services due to financial limitations and fear of disclosure; and somatization and needs for psychological supports. Conclusion Iranians may not be satisfied with the Canadian health care services due to a lack of knowledge of the system, as well as cultural differences when seeking care, such as fear of disclosure, discrimination, and mistrust of primary care. To attain equitable, adequate, and effective access to health care services, immigrants need to be educated and informed about the Canadian health care system and services it provides. It would be of great benefit to

  16. Establishing the Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CHIWOS): Operationalizing Community-based Research in a Large National Quantitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutfy, Mona; Greene, Saara; Kennedy, V Logan; Lewis, Johanna; Thomas-Pavanel, Jamie; Conway, Tracey; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; O'Brien, Nadia; Carter, Allison; Tharao, Wangari; Nicholson, Valerie; Beaver, Kerrigan; Dubuc, Danièle; Gahagan, Jacqueline; Proulx-Boucher, Karène; Hogg, Robert S; Kaida, Angela

    2016-08-19

    Community-based research has gained increasing recognition in health research over the last two decades. Such participatory research approaches are lauded for their ability to anchor research in lived experiences, ensuring cultural appropriateness, accessing local knowledge, reaching marginalized communities, building capacity, and facilitating research-to-action. While having these positive attributes, the community-based health research literature is predominantly composed of small projects, using qualitative methods, and set within geographically limited communities. Its use in larger health studies, including clinical trials and cohorts, is limited. We present the Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CHIWOS), a large-scale, multi-site, national, longitudinal quantitative study that has operationalized community-based research in all steps of the research process. Successes, challenges and further considerations are offered. Through the integration of community-based research principles, we have been successful in: facilitating a two-year long formative phase for this study; developing a novel survey instrument with national involvement; training 39 Peer Research Associates (PRAs); offering ongoing comprehensive support to PRAs; and engaging in an ongoing iterative community-based research process. Our community-based research approach within CHIWOS demanded that we be cognizant of challenges managing a large national team, inherent power imbalances and challenges with communication, compensation and volunteering considerations, and extensive delays in institutional processes. It is important to consider the iterative nature of community-based research and to work through tensions that emerge given the diverse perspectives of numerous team members. Community-based research, as an approach to large-scale quantitative health research projects, is an increasingly viable methodological option. Community-based research has several

  17. Establishing the Canadian HIV Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CHIWOS: Operationalizing Community-based Research in a Large National Quantitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Loutfy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based research has gained increasing recognition in health research over the last two decades. Such participatory research approaches are lauded for their ability to anchor research in lived experiences, ensuring cultural appropriateness, accessing local knowledge, reaching marginalized communities, building capacity, and facilitating research-to-action. While having these positive attributes, the community-based health research literature is predominantly composed of small projects, using qualitative methods, and set within geographically limited communities. Its use in larger health studies, including clinical trials and cohorts, is limited. We present the Canadian HIV Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CHIWOS, a large-scale, multi-site, national, longitudinal quantitative study that has operationalized community-based research in all steps of the research process. Successes, challenges and further considerations are offered. Discussion Through the integration of community-based research principles, we have been successful in: facilitating a two-year long formative phase for this study; developing a novel survey instrument with national involvement; training 39 Peer Research Associates (PRAs; offering ongoing comprehensive support to PRAs; and engaging in an ongoing iterative community-based research process. Our community-based research approach within CHIWOS demanded that we be cognizant of challenges managing a large national team, inherent power imbalances and challenges with communication, compensation and volunteering considerations, and extensive delays in institutional processes. It is important to consider the iterative nature of community-based research and to work through tensions that emerge given the diverse perspectives of numerous team members. Conclusions Community-based research, as an approach to large-scale quantitative health research projects, is an increasingly viable

  18. Case studies of skin melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kozlova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin melanoma is a malignant tumor originating in the cells of the melanocytic system, which is characterized by an aggressive clinical course, significant metastatic potential and unfavorable prognosis. These features of the tumor stipulate the need to improve measures to optimize early diagnosis of tumors. The article presents cases of pigmented skin melanoma to demonstrate the variability of clinical manifestations of this tumor requiring dermatologist skills in the differential diagnostics of neoplasms.

  19. Correlates of joint child protection and police child sexual abuse investigations: results from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tonmyr

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our study examines the frequency of joint investigations by child protection workers and the police in sexual abuse investigations compared to other maltreatment types and the association of child-, caregiver-, maltreatment- and investigation-related characteristics in joint investigations, focussing specifically on investigations involving sexual abuse. Methods: We analyzed data from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2008 using logistic regression. Results: The data suggest that sexual abuse (55%, and then physical abuse, neglect and emotional maltreatment, are most often co-investigated. Substantiation of maltreatment, severity of maltreatment, placement in out-of-home care, child welfare court involvement and referral of a family member to specialized services was more likely when the police were involved in an investigation. Conclusion: This study adds to the limited information on correlates of joint child protection agency and police investigations. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these joint investigations.

  20. Correlates of joint child protection and police child sexual abuse investigations: results from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonmyr, L; Gonzalez, A

    2015-01-01

    Our study examines the frequency of joint investigations by child protection workers and the police in sexual abuse investigations compared to other maltreatment types and the association of child-, caregiver-, maltreatment- and investigation-related characteristics in joint investigations, focussing specifically on investigations involving sexual abuse. We analyzed data from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2008 using logistic regression. The data suggest that sexual abuse (55%), and then physical abuse, neglect and emotional maltreatment, are most often co-investigated. Substantiation of maltreatment, severity of maltreatment, placement in out-of-home care, child welfare court involvement and referral of a family member to specialized services was more likely when the police were involved in an investigation. This study adds to the limited information on correlates of joint child protection agency and police investigations. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these joint investigations.

  1. Canadian Irradiation Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Canadian Irradiation Centre is a non-profit cooperative project between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Radiochemical Company and Universite du Quebec, Institut Armand-Frappier, Centre for Applied Research in Food Science. The Centre's objectives are to develop, demonstrate and promote Canada's radiation processing technology and its applications by conducting applied research; training technical, professional and scientific personnel; educating industry and government; demonstrating operational and scientific procedures; developing processing procedures and standards, and performing product and market acceptance trials. This pamphlet outlines the history of radoation technology and the services offered by the Canadian Irradiation Centre

  2. Radioactive waste disposal - ethical and environmental considerations - A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roots, F.

    1994-01-01

    This work deals with ethical and environmental considerations of radioactive waste disposal in Canada. It begins with the canadian attitudes toward nature and environment. Then are given the canadian institutions which reflect an environmental ethic, the development of a canadian radioactive waste management policy, the establishment of formal assessment and review process for a nuclear fuel waste disposal facility, some studies of the ethical and risk dimensions of nuclear waste decisions, the canadian societal response to issues of radioactive wastes, the analysis of risks associated with fuel waste disposal, the influence of other energy related environmental assessments and some common ground and possible accommodation between the different views. (O.L.). 50 refs

  3. Making a case for case studies in psychotherapy training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackrill, Thomas Edward; Iwakabe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The evidence debate in psychotherapy pays little attention to developing an evidence base for training practices. Understanding effective training requires an examination of what makes training work. This article examines the role of case studies in psychotherapy training. This has not been...... articulated explicitly or researched systematically in spite of its cardinal importance. An analysis of the role of case studies in psychotherapy training is presented. Reading, watching, or hearing about cases can offer novice psychotherapists access to a closed world; access to psychological theory...... or presenting cases offer students the opportunity of: learning to integrate information into a relevant whole; being in the ‘hot seat’; learning to give appropriate feedback; assessing the validity of interpretations, inferences, and interventions; adapting methods to suit the client; and learning...

  4. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  5. Liverpool Telecare Pilot: case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Barnes

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Telecare services use information and communications technology (ICT to support the provision of care to people in their own homes. This paper describes a pilot telecare service employed by Liverpool (UK City Council to support a sample of their frail and elderly social services users. The pilot has been running for over two years and has been deployed for 21 individuals in Liverpool. In this paper we present the pilot system and provide real example cases which help to illustrate the benefits of such a system.

  6. Mortality study of Canadian military personnel exposed to radiation: atomic test blasts and Chalk River nuclear reactor clean-ups, 1950's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Dulberg, C.S.; Spasoff, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    This report describes a historical cohort study of the group of Canadian military personnel exposed to radiation in the 1950s at atomic bomb test blasts in the U.S. and Australia, and at clean-up operations at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Overall and cause-specific mortality in the exposed group was compared to that of the control cohort of unexposed military personnel, matched on age, service, rank and trade. Analyses indicated no elevation in the exposed cohort, in overall or cause-specific mortality due to diseases associated with radiation. Since this study was restricted to an investigation of mortality, we must stress that we cannot generalize these results or conclusions to current morbidity experienced by the exposed cohort

  7. The Role of Faculty in Connecting Canadian Undergraduate Arts and Humanities Students to Scholarly Inquiries into Teaching: A Case for Purposeful Experiential Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny R. Ratsoy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, various sectors of Canadian universities are advocating an assortment of beyond-the-classroom learning models – from research assistantships through service learning and cooperative education placements. At the same time, faculty who engage in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL and related inquiries into teaching and learning are striving to shift attention on their activities from the periphery to a more central position within campus culture – a particular challenge for Arts and Humanities professors, who may find themselves marginalized within SoTL. This article focuses attention on the intersections of experiential learning and SoTL and SoTL-related activity. Students have much to benefit from, and offer to, these activities – beyond their usual role as subjects of studies. I present a framework based on examples from research and my own experiences – with a focus on undergraduate Arts students, who, arguably, have the fewest opportunities for Experiential Learning in general – that illustrates varying degrees of involvement. As Arts faculty attempt to enhance and highlight inquiries into teaching and learning, they would be wise to conjoin them with experiential learning by including students in the process and product. Divers secteurs des universités canadiennes conseillent de plus en plus un assortiment de modèles d’apprentissage hors de la salle de classe – que ce soit par le biais de postes d’assistants à la recherche, de l’apprentissage par le service ou de stages dans le cadre de l’enseignement coopératif. En même temps, les professeurs qui sont actifs dans l’Avancement des connaissances en enseignement et en apprentissage (ACEA et dans des domaines connexes liés à l’enseignement et à l’apprentissage s’efforcent d’attirer l’attention sur leurs activités pour les faire passer de la périphérie à une position plus centrale sur les campus – ce qui s’avère être un

  8. Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2009 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (33rd, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 5-June 9, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.; Oesterle, Susan, Ed.; Abu-Bakare, Veda, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2009 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at York University in Toronto, Ontario. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the Study Group…

  9. Case Study of the NENE Code Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kendall, Richard; Post, Douglass; Mark, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    ...) Program is sponsoring a series of case studies to identify the life cycles, workflows, and technical challenges of computational science and engineering code development that are representative...

  10. Canadian Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, John

    1992-01-01

    It is the view of the Canadian Nuclear Association that continuing creation of economic wealth is vital to sustainable development. A plentiful supply of cheap energy is essential. Nuclear energy provides the cleanest source of bulk energy generation essential to any path of sustainable development

  11. Research Award: Canadian Partnerships

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... universies and civil society organizaons (CSOs) — that is acvely engaged in creang, sharing, and using knowledge to advance our understanding of internaonal ... but programs are also being offered by other facules, including public health and engineering. Some inial research on Canadian study‐abroad ...

  12. Canadian oil sands : supply and potential for market growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, G.

    2004-01-01

    Canadian oil sands recoverable reserves rank second only to Saudi Arabia and present enormous potential, particularly through technological gains. This paper discussed the market potential for oil sands both globally and in North America. It was estimated that oil sands production would eventually surpass declining conventional production, increasing from 42 per cent of Western supply in 2002 to 78 per cent in 2015. Recoverable reserves were an estimated 174 billion barrels, with cumulative production at 4 billion barrels between 1967 to 2003. Statistics of U.S. and Canadian markets for crude oil were presented to the year 2020. A flow chart of oil sands products and market outlets was presented, as well as details of existing and potential markets for Canadian crude oil. Oil sands product dispositions were outlined, with the prediction that Asia may emerge as an incremental market. World crude oil production statistics were presented by type. World residual supply and demand estimates were presented, including details of conversion capacity and requirements for residual processing capacity in refineries and field upgraders. American refinery feedstocks were presented by type, with the identification of an increase in heavy crude runs. It was noted that recent pricing provided a strong incentive to add refining conversion capacity to process heavy oil. An outline of a study completed for the Alberta government and industry was presented, in which upgrading to light synthetic crude was determined as a base case. The value added to process bitumen beyond upgrading was discussed in relation to the upgrading of American refineries to process bitumen blends and synthetic crude. Potential cases for upgrading bitumen were presented, along with a comparison of capital costs. An overall economic comparison of projects was provided. Various measures to maximize markets for oil sands products in Alberta were presented. It was suggested that U.S. markets should absorb more new

  13. The Scholarship of Canadian Research University Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fox

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a national survey of Canadian research university librarians conducted by the author in 2006. The study deals with the motivation of librarians to engage in scholarly activities, the requirement for scholarship by librarians at Canadian research universities, the perceived importance of scholarship as a criterion for promotion and tenure, levels and forms of participation in scholarship, and librarians’ assessment of various types of support for scholarship. The study concluded that 13% of the sample population could be considered active scholars, and suggests that there may be a correlation between level of scholarly intensity and gender. The paper concludes with questions for further study.

  14. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify what is most important to the quality of life (QoL) of those who experience homelessness by directly soliciting the views of homeless and hard-to-house Canadians themselves. These individuals live within a unique social context that differs considerably from that of the general population. To understand the life areas that are most important to them, it is critical to have direct input from target populations of homeless and hard-to-house persons. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 140 individuals aged 15 to 73 years who were homeless or hard-to-house to explore the circumstances in which they were living and to capture what they find to be important and relevant domains of QoL. Participants were recruited in Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and Vancouver. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Six major content themes emerged: Health/health care; Living conditions; Financial situation; Employment situation; Relationships; and Recreational and leisure activities. These themes were linked to broader concepts that included having choices, stability, respect, and the same rights as other members of society. Conclusions These findings not only aid our understanding of QoL in this group, but may be used to develop measures that capture QoL in this population and help programs and policies become more effective in improving the life situation for persons who are homeless and hard-to-house. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study. PMID:22894551

  15. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: a multi-site focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palepu, Anita; Hubley, Anita M; Russell, Lara B; Gadermann, Anne M; Chinni, Mary

    2012-08-15

    The aim of this study was to identify what is most important to the quality of life (QoL) of those who experience homelessness by directly soliciting the views of homeless and hard-to-house Canadians themselves. These individuals live within a unique social context that differs considerably from that of the general population. To understand the life areas that are most important to them, it is critical to have direct input from target populations of homeless and hard-to-house persons. Focus groups were conducted with 140 individuals aged 15 to 73 years who were homeless or hard-to-house to explore the circumstances in which they were living and to capture what they find to be important and relevant domains of QoL. Participants were recruited in Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and Vancouver. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Six major content themes emerged: Health/health care; Living conditions; Financial situation; Employment situation; Relationships; and Recreational and leisure activities. These themes were linked to broader concepts that included having choices, stability, respect, and the same rights as other members of society. These findings not only aid our understanding of QoL in this group, but may be used to develop measures that capture QoL in this population and help programs and policies become more effective in improving the life situation for persons who are homeless and hard-to-house. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study.

  16. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palepu Anita

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to identify what is most important to the quality of life (QoL of those who experience homelessness by directly soliciting the views of homeless and hard-to-house Canadians themselves. These individuals live within a unique social context that differs considerably from that of the general population. To understand the life areas that are most important to them, it is critical to have direct input from target populations of homeless and hard-to-house persons. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 140 individuals aged 15 to 73 years who were homeless or hard-to-house to explore the circumstances in which they were living and to capture what they find to be important and relevant domains of QoL. Participants were recruited in Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and Vancouver. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Six major content themes emerged: Health/health care; Living conditions; Financial situation; Employment situation; Relationships; and Recreational and leisure activities. These themes were linked to broader concepts that included having choices, stability, respect, and the same rights as other members of society. Conclusions These findings not only aid our understanding of QoL in this group, but may be used to develop measures that capture QoL in this population and help programs and policies become more effective in improving the life situation for persons who are homeless and hard-to-house. Quality of life themes in Canadian adults and street youth who are homeless or hard-to-house: A multi-site focus group study.

  17. Interpretations of Resilience and Change and The Catalytic Roles of Media: A Case of Canadian Daily Newspaper Discourse on Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Mahed-Ul-Islam; Emdad Haque, C.

    2018-02-01

    The varied interpretations of the concept of resilience in natural hazards research literature has attracted numerous criticisms. A common criticism centers around a poor understanding of the changes caused by natural disasters by the research stream. Considering resilience as a metaphor of change, and newspaper as a catalyst that often highlights post-disaster opportunities for "forward looking" (rather than bouncing back) changes, we examined some specific aspects of change in Canadian communities by analyzing coverage of natural disasters in daily newspapers. We posit that post-disaster newspaper discourse on resilience and change can not only assist enhancing academic inquiries on resilience but also contribute to improving practices for transformative changes in post-disaster contexts. We adopted a social constructivist approach to analyzing newspaper discourse, using the ProQuest database to find articles from the 1996-2017 period. The findings exhibited a trend of the increased use of narratives on resilience in Canadian newspapers since the 1990s that substantiates the hypothesis that transformative change in the personal and practical spheres requires alteration of peoples' attitude, behavior, and thinking toward environmental risks. The discourse emphasized incremental changes at the policy level: (i) to improve response and recovery, and (ii) to address the needs of vulnerable and disaster-affected population. Our findings overall underscore the importance of documentation and efforts towards streamlining learning; application of learning at multiple interconnected levels for progressive changes to enhance community resilience, and the need for building consensus among academicians, practitioners and policy makers regarding the meaning and use of the concept of resilience.

  18. Leishmaniasis in dogs: Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a case of leishmaniasis in a 2.5-month-old dog imported from France. The clinical examination established a generally poor state of health, expressed cachexia, atrophy of the temporal musculature, weakness of movement, as well as abnormally long and brittle nails. There was also hyperkeratosis of the nose tip and paws. A histological examination of biopsy sections of the altered skin parts showed inflammatory changes in the area of the dermis, together with infiltration of macrophages and a smaller number of lymphocytes, plasmocytes and neutrophil granulocytes in the area around the sebaceous glands and hair follicles. The determined changes correspond to superficial dermatitis. Edema followed by partial degeneration of connective-tissue fibers is observed in connective tissue. A smaller number of intracellular parasitic forms was established in mononuclear cells. A smaller number of oval amastigotes with round dark red nucleis were observed in sections stained using the Gimza method in the cytoplasm of macrophages located in the dermis, but also extracellularly. It was concluded that the dog was diseased with leishmaniasis on the grounds of the clinical picture and the microscopic findings.

  19. Regional case studies--Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Andrew M

    2009-01-01

    Africa is the final continent to be affected by the nutrition transition and, as elsewhere, is characterized by the paradoxical coexistence of malnutrition and obesity. Several features of the obesity epidemic in Africa mirror those in other emerging nations: it penetrates the richer nations and urban areas first with a strong urban- rural gradient; initially it affects the wealthy, but later there is a demographic switch as obesity becomes a condition more associated with poverty, and it shares many of the same drivers related to the increasing affordability of highly refined oils and carbohydrates, and a move away from subsistence farm work and towards sedentary lifestyles. Africa also has some characteristics of the obesity epidemic that stand out from other regions such as: (1) excepting some areas of the Pacific, Africa is probably the only region in which obesity (especially among women) is viewed culturally as a positive and desirable trait, leading to major gender differences in obesity rates in many countries; (2) most of Africa has very low rates of obesity in children, and to date African obesity is mostly an adult syndrome; (3) Africans seem genetically prone to higher rates of diabetes and hypertension in association with obesity than Caucasians, but seem to be relatively protected from dislipidemias; (4) the case-specific deaths and disabilities from diabetes and hypertension in Africa are very high due to the paucity of health services and the strain that the 'double burden' of disease places on health systems. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Canadian pesticide air sampling campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Y.; Harner, T.; Blanchard, P.; Li, Y.F.; Aulagnier, F. [Environment Canada, Gatineau, PQ (Canada). Meteorological Service of Canada; Tuduri, L. [Laboratoire de Physico Toxicochimie des Systemes Naturels, Talence (France). Equipe Perigourdine de Chimie Appliquee; Waite, D.; Belzer, W. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Environmental Conservation Branch; Murphy, C. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Environmental Protection Service

    2005-07-01

    Although pesticides are widely used in Canada, little is known about the presence, distribution, and fate of currently used pesticides (CUPs) in the Canadian atmosphere. This paper provided details of a campaign conducted in 2003 to provide information on air and precipitation levels of CUPs. The objective of the campaign was to create pesticide emission inventories and to identify important pesticide issues related to environmental fate, exposure, and risk assessment in order to develop effective pesticide policies. A Canadian atmospheric network for currently used pesticides was established, which was then followed by an intensive field study in the Canadian prairies. Air samples were collected weekly using high volume PS-1 samplers with polyurethane foam (PUF) XAD sandwiches and glass fibre filters. Precipitation samples were collected each month using MIC samplers equipped with XAD columns. Passive air samplers were deployed at many of the sites for periods of 1 to 3 months. Results of the study showed relatively high concentrations of endosulfan at all sites. High levels of chloropyrifos, malathion, and carbofurans were also detected from air samples. High concentrations of lindane were also observed. Alachlor, metochlor, and trifluralin concentrations were detected in most Ontario and Quebec air and rainfall samples. Eleven target pesticides were detected from air samples during the prairie study. High concentrations of triallate were observed, and good correlations between air concentration trends and dry deposition trends were seen for triallate, 2,4-D, MCPA, dicamba, and bromoxynil. Results of the campaign are now being modelled using a simplified gridded pesticide emission and residue model. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Does accreditation stimulate change? A study of the impact of the accreditation process on Canadian healthcare organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabah Abdo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One way to improve quality and safety in healthcare organizations (HCOs is through accreditation. Accreditation is a rigorous external evaluation process that comprises self-assessment against a given set of standards, an on-site survey followed by a report with or without recommendations, and the award or refusal of accreditation status. This study evaluates how the accreditation process helps introduce organizational changes that enhance the quality and safety of care. Methods We used an embedded multiple case study design to explore organizational characteristics and identify changes linked to the accreditation process. We employed a theoretical framework to analyze various elements and for each case, we interviewed top managers, conducted focus groups with staff directly involved in the accreditation process, and analyzed self-assessment reports, accreditation reports and other case-related documents. Results The context in which accreditation took place, including the organizational context, influenced the type of change dynamics that occurred in HCOs. Furthermore, while accreditation itself was not necessarily the element that initiated change, the accreditation process was a highly effective tool for (i accelerating integration and stimulating a spirit of cooperation in newly merged HCOs; (ii helping to introduce continuous quality improvement programs to newly accredited or not-yet-accredited organizations; (iii creating new leadership for quality improvement initiatives; (iv increasing social capital by giving staff the opportunity to develop relationships; and (v fostering links between HCOs and other stakeholders. The study also found that HCOs' motivation to introduce accreditation-related changes dwindled over time. Conclusions We conclude that the accreditation process is an effective leitmotiv for the introduction of change but is nonetheless subject to a learning cycle and a learning curve. Institutions invest

  2. A Case Study of "Empathetic Teaching Artistry"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This case study is one of twenty cases derived from Anderson and Risner's international study of teaching artists in dance, and theatre, which investigated participants' (n=172) artistic and academic preparation in dance, and theatre, initial entry into the teaching artist field, rewards, challenges, and obstacles in participants' work, artists'…

  3. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  4. Innovative Interpretive Qualitative Case Study Research Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lc2o

    SUMMARY. The aim of this paper is to review the methodology for interpretive qualitative case study research method using ... encourages a quantitative approach to research (Darling and. 40. AJPARS ... Interpretive Qualitative Case Study Aligned with Systems Theory for Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Research. Scott ...

  5. Five Misunderstandings About Case-Study Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    2006-01-01

    useful for generating hypotheses, whereas other methods are more suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building; (d) the case study contains a bias toward verification; and (e) it is often difficult to summarize specific case studies. This article explains and corrects these misunderstandings one...

  6. Five misunderstandings about Case-study Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent

    useful for generating hypotheses, while other methods aremore suitable for hypotheses testing and theory building; (4) The case study contains a bias toward verification; and (5) It is often difficult to summarize specific case studies. The article explains and corrects these misunderstandings one by one...

  7. Portfolio Manager Selection – A Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Within a delegated portfolio management setting, this paper presents a case study of how the manager selection process can be operationalized in practice. Investors have to pursue a thorough screening of potential portfolio managers in order to discover their quality, and this paper discusses how...... such a screening process can be performed—represented by a case study....

  8. The Danish National Case Study Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Søsser; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    Three case studies from Danish science shops within the environmental field are analysed with respect to societal background, interaction between the involved actors and the societal impact of the co-operation. The report is one of the seven national case study reports from the EU...

  9. Using Case Studies to Teach Courtesy Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Explains some courtesy techniques that technical professionals can use to deal with interpersonal problems that arise in writing situations. Presents three case studies with sample responses to show how case studies can teach these courtesy strategies to technical writing students. (MM)

  10. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (25th, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, May 25-29, 2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the 2001 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG) held at the University of Alberta, May 25-39, 2000. The proceedings consist of two plenary lectures, four working groups, five topic sessions, new Ph.D. reports, an AD Hoc Session, and panel discussions. Papers include: (1)…

  11. Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2005 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (29th, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, May 27-31, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the University of Ottawa in Ottawa, Ontario. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the…

  12. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (24th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 26-30, 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.; McLoughlin, John Grant, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG) held at the University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada, May 26-30, 2000. The proceedings consist of two plenary lectures, five working groups, four topic sessions, new Ph.D. reports, and panel discussions. Papers include: (1)…

  13. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Groupe Canadien d'etude en didactique des mathematiques. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting (23rd, St. Catherine's, ON, June 4-8, 1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, John Grant, Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of 1999 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG). Papers include: (1) "Mathematics Lecture I: The Impact of Technology on the Doing of Mathematics" (Jonathan Borwein); (2) "Mathematics Lecture II: The Decline and Rise of Geometry in 20th Century North America" (Walter…

  14. Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2002 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (26th, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, May 24-28, 2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmt, Elaine, Ed.; Davis, Brent, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2002 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the Study…

  15. Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2006 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (30th, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Jun 3-7, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of the…

  16. Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group = Actes de la Rencontre Annuelle 2008 du Groupe Canadien d'Etude en Didactique des Mathematiques (32nd, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada, May 23-27, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Peter, Ed.; Oesterle, Susan, Ed.; Berneche, Christian, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This submission contains the Proceedings of the 2008 Annual Meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (CMESG), held at the Universite de Sherbrooke in Sherbrooke, Quebec. The CMESG is a group of mathematicians and mathematics educators who meet annually to discuss mathematics education issues at all levels of learning. The aims of…

  17. Exploring Alternate Specifications to Explain Agency-Level Effects in Placement Decisions regarding Aboriginal Children: Further Analysis of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect Part B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Martin; Fallon, Barbara; Tonmyr, Lil; MacLaurin, Bruce; Fluke, John; Blackstock, Cindy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This paper builds upon the analyses presented in two companion papers (Fluke et al., 2010 and Fallon et al., 2013) using data from the 1998 and 2003 cycles of the "Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-1998 and CIS-2003)" to examine the influence of clinical and organizational characteristics on the decision…

  18. Placement Decisions and Disparities among Aboriginal Children: Further Analysis of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect Part A: Comparisons of the 1998 and 2003 Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Barbara; Chabot, Martin; Fluke, John; Blackstock, Cindy; MacLaurin, Bruce; Tonmyr, Lil

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Fluke et al. (2010) analyzed Canadian Incidence Study on Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS) data collected in 1998 to explore the influence of clinical and organizational characteristics on the decision to place Aboriginal children in an out-of-home placement at the conclusion of a child maltreatment investigation. This study…

  19. Home Economics/Family Studies Education in Canadian Schools: A Position Paper = L'enseignement de l'economie familiale/etudes familiales dans les ecoles canadiennes: Expose de principes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Home Economics Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    English and French versions of the Canadian Home Economics Association's position paper describe the place of home economics/family studies (HEFS) in education and worldwide trends indicating the need for HEFS. Suggests it is the only subject with the primary focus on preparing students for everyday life in an increasingly complex global society.…

  20. Rebranding: a Case Study Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Size, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to explore how and why companies implement rebranding campaigns. The study stemmed from a realisation by the author that the area of rebranding is very much under-researched academically although anecdotal evidence indicates and increase in the occurrence of the phenomenon in recent years. Therefore the purpose of this research is to add to the insufficient body of literature on rebranding through exploring it from a corporate perspective. The two chapte...

  1. International Disputes and Cultural Ideas in the Canadian Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Danita Catherine

    of the Canadian-Arctic relationship. Using Canada as the focus for the analysis, the purpose of this project is to contribute to the existing Arctic studies and international relations literature by examining how interests and disputes in the Canadian Arctic region have been affected by domestic cultural...

  2. Denials of Racism in Canadian English Language Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Trevor; Thurrell, Kristy

    2016-01-01

    This critical discourse analysis examines denials of racism in descriptions of Canada and Canadians from English language textbooks. Denials of racism often accompany racist and nationalist discourse, preempting observations of racism. The study finds that in representations of Canada or Canadians, English language texts minimize and downplay…

  3. Writing history: case study of the university of Victoria School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaia, Margaret R; Young, Lynne

    2013-04-23

    A historical examination of a nursing curriculum is a bridge between past and present from which insights to guide curriculum development can be gleaned. In this paper, we use the case study method to examine how the University of Victoria School of Nursing (UVic SON), which was heavily influenced by the ideology of second wave feminism, contributed to a change in the direction of nursing education from task-orientation to a content and process orientation. This case study, informed by a feminist lens, enabled us to critically examine the introduction of a "revolutionary" caring curriculum at the UVic SON. Our research demonstrates the fault lines and current debates within which a feminist informed curriculum continues to struggle for legitimacy and cohesion. More work is needed to illuminate the historical basis of these debates and to understand more fully the complex landscape that has constructed the social and historical position of women and nursing in Canadian society today.

  4. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp. (United States); MacDonald, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  5. Outage management: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T.; Roberts, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study

  6. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochem eWillemsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or ‘Classical psychoanalysis’ dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals.

  7. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M.; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M. B. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or “Classical psychoanalysis” dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals. PMID:26483725

  8. A case study of Douala

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, demand of energy (heating/cooling) in the buildings is discussed in Douala, Cameroon. Daily data of the last 40 years coming from five weather stations of Cameroon have been studied. Some forecasts have been carried out with 14 GCM models, associated to three future climate scenarios B1, A2, and A1B.

  9. Costs of services for homeless people with mental illness in 5 Canadian cities: a large prospective follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Eric A; Rabouin, Daniel; Cao, Zhirong; Ly, Angela; Powell, Guido; Aubry, Tim; Distasio, Jino; Hwang, Stephen W; Somers, Julian M; Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Veldhuizen, Scott; Moodie, Erica E M; Lesage, Alain; Goering, Paula N

    2017-07-18

    Limited evidence on the costs of homelessness in Canada is available. We estimated the average annual costs, in total and by cost category, that homeless people with mental illness engender from the perspective of society. We also identified individual characteristics associated with higher costs. As part of the At Home/Chez Soi trial of Housing First for homeless people with mental illness, 990 participants were assigned to the usual-treatment (control) group in 5 Canadian cities (Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montréal and Moncton) between October 2009 and June 2011. They were followed for up to 2 years. Questionnaires ascertained service use and income, and city-specific unit costs were estimated. We adjusted costs for site differences in sample characteristics. We used generalized linear models to identify individual-level characteristics associated with higher costs. Usable data were available for 937 participants (94.6%). Average annual costs (excluding medications) per person in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montréal and Moncton were $53 144 (95% confidence interval [CI] $46 297-$60 095), $45 565 (95% CI $41 039-$50 412), $58 972 (95% CI $52 237-$66 085), $56 406 (95% CI $50 654-$62 456) and $29 610 (95% CI $24 995-$34 480), respectively. Net costs ranged from $15 530 to $341 535. Distributions of costs across categories varied significantly across cities. Lower functioning and a history of psychiatric hospital stays were the most important predictors of higher costs. Homeless people with mental illness generate very high costs for society. Programs are needed to reorient this spending toward more effectively preventing homelessness and toward meeting the health, housing and social service needs of homeless people. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  10. Neighborhood disorder and screen time among 10-16 year old Canadian youth: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Valerie; Janssen, Ian

    2012-05-31

    Screen time activities (e.g., television, computers, video games) have been linked to several negative health outcomes among young people. In order to develop evidence-based interventions to reduce screen time, the factors that influence the behavior need to be better understood. High neighborhood disorder, which may encourage young people to stay indoors where screen time activities are readily available, is one potential factor to consider. Results are based on 15,917 youth in grades 6-10 (aged 10-16 years old) who participated in the Canadian 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey (HBSC). Total hours per week of television, video games, and computer use were reported by the participating students in the HBSC student questionnaire. Ten items of neighborhood disorder including safety, neighbors taking advantage, drugs/drinking in public, ethnic tensions, gangs, crime, conditions of buildings/grounds, abandoned buildings, litter, and graffiti were measured using the HBSC student questionnaire, the HBSC administrator questionnaire, and Geographic Information Systems. Based upon these 10 items, social and physical neighborhood disorder variables were derived using principal component analysis. Multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between social and physical neighborhood disorder and individual screen time variables. High (top quartile) social neighborhood disorder was associated with approximately 35-45% increased risk of high (top quartile) television, computer, and video game use. Physical neighborhood disorder was not associated with screen time activities after adjusting for social neighborhood disorder. However, high social and physical neighborhood disorder combined was associated with approximately 40-60% increased likelihood of high television, computer, and video game use. High neighborhood disorder is one environmental factor that may be important to consider for future public health

  11. Neighborhood disorder and screen time among 10-16 year old Canadian youth: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson Valerie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screen time activities (e.g., television, computers, video games have been linked to several negative health outcomes among young people. In order to develop evidence-based interventions to reduce screen time, the factors that influence the behavior need to be better understood. High neighborhood disorder, which may encourage young people to stay indoors where screen time activities are readily available, is one potential factor to consider. Methods Results are based on 15,917 youth in grades 6-10 (aged 10-16 years old who participated in the Canadian 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey (HBSC. Total hours per week of television, video games, and computer use were reported by the participating students in the HBSC student questionnaire. Ten items of neighborhood disorder including safety, neighbors taking advantage, drugs/drinking in public, ethnic tensions, gangs, crime, conditions of buildings/grounds, abandoned buildings, litter, and graffiti were measured using the HBSC student questionnaire, the HBSC administrator questionnaire, and Geographic Information Systems. Based upon these 10 items, social and physical neighborhood disorder variables were derived using principal component analysis. Multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between social and physical neighborhood disorder and individual screen time variables. Results High (top quartile social neighborhood disorder was associated with approximately 35-45% increased risk of high (top quartile television, computer, and video game use. Physical neighborhood disorder was not associated with screen time activities after adjusting for social neighborhood disorder. However, high social and physical neighborhood disorder combined was associated with approximately 40-60% increased likelihood of high television, computer, and video game use. Conclusion High neighborhood disorder is one environmental

  12. The Canadian Preterm Birth Network: a study protocol for improving outcomes for preterm infants and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Prakesh S; McDonald, Sarah D; Barrett, Jon; Synnes, Anne; Robson, Kate; Foster, Jonathan; Pasquier, Jean-Charles; Joseph, K S; Piedboeuf, Bruno; Lacaze-Masmonteil, Thierry; O'Brien, Karel; Shivananda, Sandesh; Chaillet, Nils; Pechlivanoglou, Petros

    2018-01-18

    Preterm birth (birth before 37 wk of gestation) occurs in about 8% of pregnancies in Canada and is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates that substantially affect infants, their families and the health care system. Our overall goal is to create a transdisciplinary platform, the Canadian Preterm Birth Network (CPTBN), where investigators, stakeholders and families will work together to improve childhood outcomes of preterm neonates. Our national cohort will include 24 maternal-fetal/obstetrical units, 31 neonatal intensive care units and 26 neonatal follow-up programs across Canada with planned linkages to provincial health information systems. Three broad clusters of projects will be undertaken. Cluster 1 will focus on quality-improvement efforts that use the Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality method to evaluate information from the CPTBN database and review the current literature, then identify potentially better health care practices and implement identified strategies. Cluster 2 will assess the impact of current practices and practice changes in maternal, perinatal and neonatal care on maternal, neonatal and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Cluster 3 will evaluate the effect of preterm birth on babies, their families and the health care system by integrating CPTBN data, parent feedback, and national and provincial database information in order to identify areas where more parental support is needed, and also generate robust estimates of resource use, cost and cost-effectiveness around preterm neonatal care. These collaborative efforts will create a flexible, transdisciplinary, evaluable and informative research and quality-improvement platform that supports programs, projects and partnerships focused on improving outcomes of preterm neonates. Copyright 2018, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  13. Neighborhood disorder and screen time among 10-16 year old Canadian youth: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Screen time activities (e.g., television, computers, video games) have been linked to several negative health outcomes among young people. In order to develop evidence-based interventions to reduce screen time, the factors that influence the behavior need to be better understood. High neighborhood disorder, which may encourage young people to stay indoors where screen time activities are readily available, is one potential factor to consider. Methods Results are based on 15,917 youth in grades 6-10 (aged 10-16 years old) who participated in the Canadian 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey (HBSC). Total hours per week of television, video games, and computer use were reported by the participating students in the HBSC student questionnaire. Ten items of neighborhood disorder including safety, neighbors taking advantage, drugs/drinking in public, ethnic tensions, gangs, crime, conditions of buildings/grounds, abandoned buildings, litter, and graffiti were measured using the HBSC student questionnaire, the HBSC administrator questionnaire, and Geographic Information Systems. Based upon these 10 items, social and physical neighborhood disorder variables were derived using principal component analysis. Multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between social and physical neighborhood disorder and individual screen time variables. Results High (top quartile) social neighborhood disorder was associated with approximately 35-45% increased risk of high (top quartile) television, computer, and video game use. Physical neighborhood disorder was not associated with screen time activities after adjusting for social neighborhood disorder. However, high social and physical neighborhood disorder combined was associated with approximately 40-60% increased likelihood of high television, computer, and video game use. Conclusion High neighborhood disorder is one environmental factor that may be important

  14. Patterns of DNA barcode variation in Canadian marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Kara K S; Martel, André L; Hebert, Paul D N

    2014-01-01

    Molluscs are the most diverse marine phylum and this high diversity has resulted in considerable taxonomic problems. Because the number of species in Canadian oceans remains uncertain, there is a need to incorporate molecular methods into species identifications. A 648 base pair segment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene has proven useful for the identification and discovery of species in many animal lineages. While the utility of DNA barcoding in molluscs has been demonstrated in other studies, this is the first effort to construct a DNA barcode registry for marine molluscs across such a large geographic area. This study examines patterns of DNA barcode variation in 227 species of Canadian marine molluscs. Intraspecific sequence divergences ranged from 0-26.4% and a barcode gap existed for most taxa. Eleven cases of relatively deep (>2%) intraspecific divergence were detected, suggesting the possible presence of overlooked species. Structural variation was detected in COI with indels found in 37 species, mostly bivalves. Some indels were present in divergent lineages, primarily in the region of the first external loop, suggesting certain areas are hotspots for change. Lastly, mean GC content varied substantially among orders (24.5%-46.5%), and showed a significant positive correlation with nearest neighbour distances. DNA barcoding is an effective tool for the identification of Canadian marine molluscs and for revealing possible cases of overlooked species. Some species with deep intraspecific divergence showed a biogeographic partition between lineages on the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific coasts, suggesting the role of Pleistocene glaciations in the subdivision of their populations. Indels were prevalent in the barcode region of the COI gene in bivalves and gastropods. This study highlights the efficacy of DNA barcoding for providing insights into sequence variation across a broad taxonomic group on a large geographic scale.

  15. The Use of Voice Onset Time by Early Bilinguals to Distinguish Homorganic Stops in Canadian English and Canadian French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Andrea A. N.; Stoel-Gammon, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the extent to which bilingual speakers maintain language-specific phonological contrasts for homorganic stops when a cue is shared across both languages. To this end, voice onset time (VOT) was investigated in three groups of participants: early bilinguals speakers of Canadian French and Canadian English (n =…

  16. Case Study Methodology and Homelessness Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Pable

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the potential suitability of case study methodology for inquiry with the homeless population. It references a research study that uses case study research method to build theory. This study's topic is the lived experience of destitute individuals who reside in homeless shelters, and explores the homeless shelter built environment's potential influence on resident satisfaction and recovery. Case study methodology may be appropriate because it explores real-life contextual issues that characterize homelessness and can also accommodate the wide range of homeless person demographics that make this group difficult to study in a generalized fashion. Further, case study method accommodates the need within research in this area to understand individualized treatments as a potential solution for homelessness.

  17. Committing Canadian sociology: developing a Canadian sociology and a sociology of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ralph

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a slightly revised version of the author's "Outstanding Career Award Lecture" presented at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Sociological Association in Victoria, British Columbia on June 6, 2013. The paper distinguishes between Canadian Sociology and the Sociology of Canada. The former involves the explanatory stance that one takes to understanding Canada. The latter addresses the significant social dimensions that underlie Canadian social organization, culture, and behavior. I make a case for a Canadian Sociology that focuses on the unique features of Canadian society rather than adopting a comparative perspective. I also argue that there is a continuing need within the Sociology of Canada to address the issues of staples development. However, I argue that "new" staples analysis must have a directional change from that of the past, in that social processes now largely determine the pattern of staples development. Moreover, new staples analysis must include issues that were never part of earlier staples analysis, such as issues of environmental impacts and of staples depletion under conditions, such as climate change. The paper concludes by analyzing four factors that provide the dominant social contexts for analyzing modern staples development: (1) the rise of neoliberal government, (2) the implementation of globalization and its social consequences, (3) the assumption of aboriginal rights and entitlement, and (4) the rise of environmentalism. These factors were generally not considered in earlier staples approaches. They are critical to understanding the role of staples development and its impact on Canada in the present time.

  18. Canadian fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.S.

    1982-06-01

    The National Research Council of Canada is establishing a coordinated national program of fusion research and development that is planned to grow to a total annual operating level of about $20 million in 1985. The long-term objective of the program is to put Canadian industry in a position to manufacture sub-systems and components of fusion power reactors. In the near term the program is designed to establish a minimum base of scientific and technical expertise sufficient to make recognized contributions and thereby gain access to the international effort. The Canadian program must be narrowly focussed on a few specializations where Canada has special indigenous skills or technologies. The programs being funded are the Tokamak de Varennes, the Fusion Fuels Technology Project centered on tritium management, and high-power gas laser technology and associated diagnostic instrumentation

  19. Financing Canadian international operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle, G.

    1996-01-01

    A primer on financing international operations by Canadian corporations was provided. Factors affecting the availability to project finance (location, political risk), the various forms of financing (debt, equity, and combinations), the main sources of government backed financing to corporations (the International Finance Corporation) (IFC), the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Overseas Property Insurance Corporation (OPIC), government or agency guarantees, political risk coverage, the use of offshore financial centres, and the where, when and how these various organizations operate, were reviewed. Examples of all of the above, taken from the experiences of Canadian Occidental Petroleum of Calgary in the U.S., in South America, in the Middle and Far East, and in Kazakhstan, were used as illustrations. figs

  20. Canadian Mathematical Congress

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    For two weeks in August, 1975 more than 140 mathematicians and other scientists gathered at the Universite de Sherbrooke. The occasion was the 15th Biennial Seminar of the Canadian Mathematical Congress, entitled Mathematics and the Life Sciences. Participants in this inter­ disciplinary gathering included researchers and graduate students in mathematics, seven different areas of biological science, physics, chemistry and medical science. Geographically, those present came from the United States and the United Kingdom as well as from academic departments and government agencies scattered across Canada. In choosing this particular interdisciplinary topic the programme committee had two chief objectives. These were to promote Canadian research in mathematical problems of the life sciences, and to encourage co-operation and exchanges between mathematical scientists" biologists and medical re­ searchers. To accomplish these objective the committee assembled a stim­ ulating programme of lectures and talks. Six ...

  1. Case study in psychobiographical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G

    2013-10-01

    This article addresses ethical issues relative to the conduct and reporting of psychobiographical research. The author's recent psychobiographical study of World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer (1943-2008) is used to illustrate particular ethical challenges and responses in six areas: (1) institutional review board (IRB) evaluation and informed consent; (2) balancing objective research with respect for psychobiographical subject; (3) inviting subject or next-of-kin to read and comment on working drafts of psychobiography; (4) reporting never-before-revealed sensitive information on a subject; (5) role of interdisciplinary consultation in conducting psychobiography; and (6) the value and cautions of including psychological diagnoses as part of the psychological profile. A "bill of rights and responsibilities" for the psychobiographer is introduced as a stimulus for ongoing discussion and empirical research on ethical practice in psychobiography.

  2. Canadian petroleum history bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cass, D.

    2003-09-27

    The Petroleum History Bibliography includes a list of more than 2,000 publications that record the history of the Canadian petroleum industry. The list includes books, theses, films, audio tapes, published articles, company histories, biographies, autobiographies, fiction, poetry, humour, and an author index. It was created over a period of several years to help with projects at the Petroleum History Society. It is an ongoing piece of work, and as such, invites comments and additions.

  3. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1983-05-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is now well established. This report outlines the generic research and technological development underway in this program to assess the concept of immobilization and subsequent disposal of nuclear fuel waste deep in a stable plutonic rock in the Canadian Shield. The program participants, funding, schedule and associated external review processes are briefly outlined. The major scientific and engineering components of the program, namely, immobilization studies, geoscience research and environmental and safety assessment, are described in more detail

  4. Canadian Perspectives on East Indian Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Josephine C.

    In this paper, various studies and surveys on the status of East Indians in Canada and attitudes towards them are summarized. The history of the East Indian immigration into Canada is sketched. A 1976 survey of attitudes of Canadians toward multiculturalism (Berry, Kalin, and Taylor, 1976) is outlined. A study of the intercultural perceptions of…

  5. Antiphospholipid syndrome: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A forty-two-year-old male presented to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with symptoms of increasing shortness of breath, swelling in both ankles, petechial rash and blood in his sputum. Initial investigations showed cardiomegaly, right ventricular hypertrophy, patchy lung infiltrates, a platelet count of 1500 and a clotting time of 60 seconds. A V/Q scan indicated a high probability of pulmonary embolism. Further investigations showed that the patient was positive for lupus anticoagulant and cardiolipin antibodies. A diagnosis of primary antiphospholipid syndrome was made. The patient''s high risk of strokes and hemorrhaging prompted investigation by a 99 mTc-HMPAO brain scan. Further V/Q scans were performed to follow up the initial finding of multiple pulmonary embolism and a R-L shunt study was performed to investigate a left subclavian murmur. The patient was admitted for four weeks and began treatment which included cyclaphosphamide, corticosteroids and plasmaphoresis and was discharged when stable. Over the next six months he was re admitted three times for relapse of antiphospholipid syndrome. On his fourth admission he collapsed and died five hours after admission. Cause of death was due to cardiac arrhythmia secondary to severe right ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. The effects of antiphospholipid syndrome was believed to be responsible for this outcome

  6. Antiphospholipid syndrome: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, T. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: A forty-two-year-old male presented to the Royal Adelaide Hospital with symptoms of increasing shortness of breath, swelling in both ankles, petechial rash and blood in his sputum. Initial investigations showed cardiomegaly, right ventricular hypertrophy, patchy lung infiltrates, a platelet count of 1500 and a clotting time of 60 seconds. A V/Q scan indicated a high probability of pulmonary embolism. Further investigations showed that the patient was positive for lupus anticoagulant and cardiolipin antibodies. A diagnosis of primary antiphospholipid syndrome was made. The patient``s high risk of strokes and hemorrhaging prompted investigation by a {sup 99}mTc-HMPAO brain scan. Further V/Q scans were performed to follow up the initial finding of multiple pulmonary embolism and a R-L shunt study was performed to investigate a left subclavian murmur. The patient was admitted for four weeks and began treatment which included cyclaphosphamide, corticosteroids and plasmaphoresis and was discharged when stable. Over the next six months he was re admitted three times for relapse of antiphospholipid syndrome. On his fourth admission he collapsed and died five hours after admission. Cause of death was due to cardiac arrhythmia secondary to severe right ventricular hypertrophy and dilation. The effects of antiphospholipid syndrome was believed to be responsible for this outcome.

  7. Risk factor modifications and depression incidence: a 4-year longitudinal Canadian cohort of the Montreal Catchment Area Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangfei; Brunet, Alain; Turecki, Gustavo; Liu, Aihua; D'Arcy, Carl; Caron, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Objective Few studies have examined the effect of risk factor modifications on depression incidence. This study was to explore psychosocial risk factors for depression and quantify the effect of risk factor modifications on depression incidence in a large-scale, longitudinal population-based study. Methods Data were from the Montreal Longitudinal Catchment Area study (N=2433). Multivariate modified Poisson regression was used to estimate relative risk (RR). Population attributable fractions were also used to estimate the potential impact of risk factor modifications on depression incidence. Results The cumulative incidence rate of major depressive disorder at the 2-year follow-up was 4.8%, and 6.6% at the 4-year follow-up. Being a younger adult, female, widowed, separated or divorced, Caucasian, poor, occasional drinker, having a family history of mental health problems, having less education and living in areas with higher unemployment rates and higher proportions of visible minorities, more cultural community centres and community organisations, were consistently associated with the increased risk of incident major depressive disorder. Although only 5.1% of the disease incidence was potentially attributable to occasional drinking (vs abstainers) at the 2-year follow-up, the attribution of occasional drinking doubled at the 4-year follow-up. A 10% reduction in the prevalence of occasional drinking in this population could potentially prevent half of incident cases. Conclusions Modifiable risk factors, both individual and societal, could be the targets for public depression prevention programmes. These programmes should also be gender-specific, as different risk factors have been identified for men and women. Public health preventions at individual levels could focus on the better management of occasional drinking, as it explained around 5%~10% of incident major depressive disorders. Neighbourhood characteristics could also be the target for public prevention

  8. Tuberculosis in Aboriginal Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon H Hoeppner

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic tuberculosis (TB was almost certainly present in Canadian aboriginal people (aboriginal Canadians denotes status Indians, Inuit, nonstatus Indians and metis as reported by Statistics Canada before the Old World traders arrived. However, the social changes that resulted from contact with these traders created the conditions that converted endemic TB into epidemic TB. The incidence of TB varied inversely with the time interval from this cultural collision, which began on the east coast in the 16th century and ended in the Northern Territories in the 20th century. This relatively recent epidemic explains why the disease is more frequent in aboriginal children than in Canadian-born nonaboriginal people. Treatment plans must account for the socioeconomic conditions and cultural characteristics of the aboriginal people, especially healing models and language. Prevention includes bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination and chemoprophylaxis, and must account for community conditions, such as rates of suicide, which have exceeded the rate of TB. The control of TB requires a centralized program with specifically directed funding. It must include a program that works in partnership with aboriginal communities.

  9. Abbreviated Case Studies in Organizational Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanguri, Deloris McGee

    2005-01-01

    The cases contained within organizational communication texts are generally two to three pages, often followed by questions. These case studies are certainly useful. They generally describe events in the present, provide some type of organizational context, include first-hand data, include a record of what people say and think, develop a…

  10. Music in context : Four case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Randwijck, R.J.C. van

    2008-01-01

    In his thesis entitled “Music in Context. Four Case Studies”, R.J.C. van Randwijck investigates the context in which music has been created. It is a search in Four Case Studies, approaching four pieces of music from the context in which they were written in order to understand their meaning. The

  11. Case Study: A Separation of Powers Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Steve

    1986-01-01

    Presents a case study involving students in the issue of separation of powers as applied to the 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act. Students examine the case of Jagdish Rai Chadha, an immigrant threatened with deportation whose problems resulted in 1983 U.S. Supreme Court decision declaring legislative veto provision of Immigration and…

  12. Case Study Report about Gender Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Stine Thidemann; Agustin, Lise Rolandsen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this national case study report is to take a closer look at the use of Gender Impact Assessments in Denmark in order to describe the Danish implementation of this specific Gender Mainstreaming method. By way of analyzing two selected cases (two law proposals put forward by The Danish...

  13. Case studies of steel structure failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bernasovský

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with some case studies of steel structure failures, which happened in Slovakia a few years ago. Features of cracking are illustrated on real cases of breakdowns in the transmission gas pipelines, at the cement works and in the petrochemical indus-try. All failures were caused by an incorrect technical approach. Possible remedial measures are proposed.

  14. a case study of Turkish students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the present study is to identify preschoolers' conceptual perceptions of states of matter, this issue that they often come across in their daily and social life. The study was designed as a qualitative case study. The population of the study was comprised of 25 preschoolers studying at two primary schools located ...

  15. Case Study: Mini-Case Studies: Small Infusions of Active Learning for Large-Lecture Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carloye, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces the usage of case studies to be an excellent method for engaging students through stories. The author notes she developed a series of mini-case studies that can be implemented, with a little advance preparation, within a 10- to 15-minute window during lecture. What makes them "mini" case studies?…

  16. Design and Methods of the Pan-Canadian Applying Biomarkers to Minimize Long-Term Effects of Childhood/Adolescent Cancer Treatment (ABLE Nephrotoxicity Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R. McMahon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood cancer survivors experience adverse drug events leading to lifelong health issues. The Applying Biomarkers to Minimize Long-Term Effects of Childhood/Adolescent Cancer Treatment (ABLE team was established to validate and apply biomarkers of cancer treatment effects, with a goal of identifying children at high risk of developing cancer treatment complications associated with thrombosis, graft-versus-host disease, hearing loss, and kidney damage. Cisplatin is a chemotherapy well known to cause acute and chronic nephrotoxicity. Data on biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI and late renal outcomes in children treated with cisplatin are limited. Objective: To describe the design and methods of the pan-Canadian ABLE Nephrotoxicity study, which aims to evaluate urine biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin [NGAL] and kidney injury molecule-1 [KIM-1] for AKI diagnosis, and determine whether they predict risk of long-term renal outcomes (chronic kidney disease [CKD], hypertension. Design: This is a 3-year observational prospective cohort study. Setting: The study includes 12 Canadian pediatric oncology centers. Patients: The target recruitment goal is 150 patients aged less than 18 years receiving cisplatin. Exclusion criteria : Patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m 2 or a pre-existing renal transplantation at baseline. Measurements: Serum creatinine (SCr, urine NGAL, and KIM-1 are measured during cisplatin infusion episodes (pre-infusion, immediate post-infusion, discharge sampling. At follow-up visits, eGFR, microalbuminuria, and blood pressure are measured and outcomes are collected. Methods: Outcomes: AKI is defined as per SCr criteria of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO guidelines. CKD is defined as eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73m2 or albumin-to-creatinine ratio≥3mg/mmol. Hypertension is defined as per guidelines. Procedure: Patients are recruited before

  17. Implementing Product Platforms: A Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Fiil; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes a case study dealing with the process of creating and implementing a product platform. The paper espessially deals with the fact that to obtain the benefits of platforms a permanent change in behaviour in product development must be ensured. This change in behaviour requires...... acceptance and approval from the organisation in general and the commitment from management to enforce agreed-upon decisions. The case study itself was performed in the Danish company LEGO Group. The case study had two objectives: To create a technical architecture and align this architecture...

  18. Case study in professionally-oriented training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valitov Shamil M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern educational technologies are based on competence approach and focus on the future professional activity. Case study is one of the most significant technologies in modern higher education. The basic concepts used in the case study method are a “situation” and an “analysis”, as well as their derivative - “analysis of the situation”. The case study method of is one of the best tools for gaining experience, as it investigates practical situations that occur in managerial job. It combines theoretical knowledge with the analysis of the actual practical experience in accordance with a major. Doing case studies students read the description of the situation and offer divergent projects of managerial decisions that could be used by real managers dealing with the problem posed by the case study author. Answers to the questions posed in the case description are not given, as a rule, since the main purpose in the case analysis is to organize a discussion in the classroom or provoke speculations of those who do the self-study.

  19. Case-control studies in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvick, Cody L; Thompson, Clinton J; Boop, Frederick A; Klimo, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Observational studies, such as cohort and case-control studies, are valuable instruments in evidence-based medicine. Case-control studies, in particular, are becoming increasingly popular in the neurosurgical literature due to their low cost and relative ease of execution; however, no one has yet systematically assessed these types of studies for quality in methodology and reporting. The authors performed a literature search using PubMed/MEDLINE to identify all studies that explicitly identified themselves as "case-control" and were published in the JNS Publishing Group journals (Journal of Neurosurgery, Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, and Neurosurgical Focus) or Neurosurgery. Each paper was evaluated for 22 descriptive variables and then categorized as having either met or missed the basic definition of a case-control study. All studies that evaluated risk factors for a well-defined outcome were considered true case-control studies. The authors sought to identify key features or phrases that were or were not predictive of a true case-control study. Those papers that satisfied the definition were further evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. The search detected 67 papers that met the inclusion criteria, of which 32 (48%) represented true case-control studies. The frequency of true case-control studies has not changed with time. Use of odds ratios (ORs) and logistic regression (LR) analysis were strong positive predictors of true case-control studies (for odds ratios, OR 15.33 and 95% CI 4.52-51.97; for logistic regression analysis, OR 8.77 and 95% CI 2.69-28.56). Conversely, negative predictors included focus on a procedure/intervention (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.998) and use of the word "outcome" in the Results section (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.082-0.65). After exclusion of nested case-control studies, the negative correlation between focus on a procedure

  20. The Liberalization of Canadian Immigration Policy (1945-1976

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariia Burtseva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Immigration policy has played a key role in Canadian history since the second half of 19th century. Certainly, immigration legislation was a major element of it. Some of the most important reforms in Canadian immigration policy took place in the first decades after the Second World War. This was a time of multiple legislative reforms conducted by the Canadian government, but in general, the immigration regulations introduced during that period started the process of liberalization in this area. The Immigration Act of 1976 played a key role in building up the new liberal strategy of Canadian immigration. The pre-reform period is also important because it helps to understand the evolution process from discrimi¬native legislation to liberal policy. Therefore, the focus of this study is on the development of Canadian immigration policy from 1945 to 1976. The present research examines the main preconditions for the adoption of the 1976 Immigration Act. It analyses legislation regulations, which paved the ground for post-war Canadian immigration policy, with a particular emphasis on regula-tions enacted from 1945 to 1976. This article provides an overview of Canadian immigration policy in post-war period. It also identifies successive documents that proved particularly influential for Canadian immigration policy at the time. The findings of this research point to a variety of causes for the legislation changes, from foreign and domestic policy to economy policy.