WorldWideScience

Sample records for canada devrait-il autoriser

  1. CANADA

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Hakan Mustafa

    . AAAA. Numéro du fournisseur. Protégé B*. (une fois rempli). RENSEIGNEMENTS GÉNÉRAUX, FISCAUX ET BANCAIRES DU FOURNISSEUR – CANADA. Section 1 : RENSEIGNEMENTS GÉNÉRAUX. Nom du particulier (nom, prénom) ou ...

  2. S’autoriser à apprendre

    OpenAIRE

    Heraudet, Jeannine

    2008-01-01

    C’est par son corps que, bien souvent, l’enfant exprime à l’école le mal-être  qu’il ne peut exprimer autrement. La distraction ou l’attention labile ou bien une agitation incoercible ou encore le fait d’avoir toujours « la tête ailleurs », incapable de se fixer sur une tâche, peuvent être les signes d’une préoccupation, d’un conflit psychique qui l’empêchent de s’investir dans l’activité proposée par le maître. L’enseignant se sent alors démuni, impuissant pour l’aider. Il constate que son a...

  3. Eastern Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, R.G.; Roliff, W.A.; Sealey, R.; Palonen, P.A.

    1981-10-01

    Uncertainty of increased taxation of petroleum revenues proposed under the Canadian national energy program effected a minor slowdown of the rapid exploration in 1980. Total numbers of wells drilled in eastern Canada were: Ontario, 224; Quebec, 3; Nova Scotia, 1; and the Atlantic offshore, 13. Much of the Ontario drilling, 123 wells, was for development purposes. The success ratio on exploratory drilling in Ontario was 34.7, while all Quebec and Nova Scotia wells were dry. Production of oil and gas declined by 16.8% and 18.5% in New Brunswick. Oil production in Ontario increased by 1.2%. The increase in gas production of 14.3% to almost 443,535.5 x 10/sup 3/m/sup 3/ was due almost entirely to development of known fields underlying Lake Erie. The exploration of offshore eastern Canada continued at a stable rate, with 12 wells completed. Of these, 2 were in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, 3 on the Grand Banks, 6 on the Labrador Shelf, and 1 in Davis Strait. All wells were abandoned or suspended at year end, although discoveries of hydrocarbon were made in Davis Strait and the Grand Banks. The early exploration stage, combined with record water depths, prevented any of these wells from being put into production, although testing will be continued on the most promising shows. Seismic exploration increased to approximately 30,000 km in the Atlantic offshore areas. In addition, 1,420.94 km was shot in Lake Erie. Onshore seismic exploration accounted for 1,078.67 km in Ontario, 350 km in Nova Scotia and 242.76 km in Quebec. 3 figures, 8 tables.

  4. Study Canada: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Robert L.; And Others

    The document presents the first of five units on Canada developed for classroom use in American secondary schools. This unit, an overview of Canada, offers a sequence of information sheets for students and class activity suggestions for teachers which use a comparative approach stressing an understanding of Canada from the viewpoints of both…

  5. Canada Among Nations 2014. Crisis and Reform: Canada and the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    28 mai 2014 ... This 28th edition of the Canada Among Nations series examines the 2008 global financial crisis, its impact on Canada, and the country's historic and current role in the international financial system.

  6. Canada Among Nations 2014. Crisis and Reform: Canada and the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-05-28

    May 28, 2014 ... ​This 28th edition of the Canada Among Nations series examines the 2008 global financial crisis, its impact on Canada, and the country's historic and current role in the international financial system. Published by the Centre for International Governance Innovation, Crisis and Reform: Canada and the ...

  7. Indian Arts in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawow, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A recent publication, "Indian Arts in Canada", examines some of the forces, both past and present, which are not only affecting American Indian artists today, but which will also profoundly influence their future. The review presents a few of the illustrations used in the book, along with the Introduction and the Foreword. (KM)

  8. Suicide in Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leenaars, Antoon A

    1998-01-01

    ... provides long-awaited information that focuses specifically on Canada. It addresses suicide as a multidimensional problem with biological, psychological, cultural, sociological, personal, and philosophical aspects. The contributions integrate both critical analysis and personal experience. There are accounts from Inuit elders, fr...

  9. The butterflies of Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Layberry, Ross A; Hall, Peter W; Lafontaine, J. Donald

    1998-01-01

    ... for the close to three hundred butterfly species recorded in Canada, including descriptions of early stages, subspecies, and key features that help distinguish similar species. Each species of butterfly has an individual distribution map, generated from a database of more than 90,000 location records. More than just a field guide to identifying Canadian butterfli...

  10. Acid precipitation in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. W. Summers; D. M. Whelpdale

    1976-01-01

    The total annual emissions of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides in Canada are estimated to be 7.2 x 106 tons and 1.4 x 106 tons, respectively. These figures represent 5% and 2%, respectively, of the estimated worldwide anthropogenic emissions. Nearly two-thirds of the Canadian SO2 emissions come from...

  11. Midwifery education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michelle M; Hutton, Eileen K; McNiven, Patricia S

    2016-02-01

    This article is part of a special series on midwifery education and describes the approach to midwifery education in Canada We begin with an overview of the model of midwifery practice introduced in Canada in the 1990s. We describe the model of midwifery education developed and report how it is implemented, with particular attention to the two longest established programs. Midwifery education programs in Ontario and British Columbia. Midwifery education programs in Canada are offered at the undergraduate baccalaureate level at universities and are typically four years in length. Programs are competence-based and follow a spiral curriculum. The first semesters focus on on core sciences, social sciences and introduction to midwifery concepts. Students spend fifty percent of the program in clinical practices with community-based midwives. Innovative education models enable students to be placed in distant placements and help to align theoretical and practice components. Clinically active faculty adds to the credibility of teaching but bring its own challenges for midwifery educators. The Canadian model of midwifery education has been very effective with low attrition rates and high demand for the number of places available. Further program expansion is warranted but is contingent on the growth of clinical placements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Canada Among Nations 2013, Canada-Africa Relations: Looking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    19 août 2013 ... Depuis 1984, la collection Canada Among Nations invite d'éminents chercheurs et praticiens du Canada et de l'étranger à évaluer ensemble la politique étrangère du Canada. Préparé par la Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA) de l'Université Carleton, le numéro de 2013 est le premier ...

  13. Transnational surrogacy: Canada's contradictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozanski, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Transnational commercial surrogacy represents a form of medical tourism undertaken by intended parents who seek to hire women in other countries, increasingly often in the global South, as surrogates. While much of the scholarly literature focuses on the conditions of surrogacy within host countries, such as India, there has been limited analysis of transnational surrogacy focused upon origin countries. In this article, I build upon the scholarship that explores the impact of host country structures on transnational surrogacy, with special attention to the significance of Canadian citizenship policy through analysis of legislation and policy vis-à-vis transnational commercial surrogacy. The Canadian case demonstrates clear contradictions between the legislation and policy that is enacted domestically to prohibit commercial surrogacy within Canada and legislation and policy that implicitly sanctions commercial surrogacy through the straightforward provision of citizenship for children born of such arrangements abroad. The ethical underpinnings of Canada's domestic prohibition of commercial surrogacy, which is presumed to exploit women and children and to impede gender equality, are violated in Canada's bureaucratic willingness to accept children born of transnational commercial surrogacy as citizens. Thus, the ethical discourses apply only to Canadian citizens within Canadian geography. The failure of the Canadian government to hold Canadian citizens who participate in transnational commercial surrogacy to the normative imperatives that prohibit the practice within the country, or to undertake a more nuanced, and necessarily controversial, discussion of commercial surrogacy reinforces transnational disparities in terms of whose bodies may be commodified as a measure of gendered inequality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Canada's population is aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jennifer; Samis, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Canada's population is aging, and the authors of this issue's lead article, Neena Chappell and Marcus Hollander, present a policy prescription for how to design a healthcare system that better responds to needs of older Canadians. The timing of this issue of Healthcare Papers is important: the first of the baby boomers turned 65 in January 2011. There is a pressing need to develop policies and implement sustainable reforms that will allow older adults to stay healthier and maintain their independence longer in their place of choice, while also creating efficiencies and quality improvements in our overall healthcare system that will benefit Canadians of all ages.

  15. Radiation Protection in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, P. M.

    1964-01-01

    The current status of radiation protection in Canada is discussed in the last of a three-part series. Particular emphasis has been placed on the role of the Radiation Protection Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare. A radioactive fallout study program has been established involving the systematic collection of air and precipitation samples from 24 locations, soil samples from 23 locations, fresh-milk samples from 16 locations, wheat samples from nine areas and human-bone specimens from various hospitals throughout Canada. A whole-body-counting facility and a special study of fallout in Northern areas have also been initiated. For any age group, the highest average strontium-90 concentration in human bone so far reported has been less than four picocuries per gram of calcium compared with the maximum permissible level of 67 derived from the International Committee on Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommendations. By the end of 1963 a general downward trend of levels of radioactivity detected in other parts of the program has been observed. Programs to assess the contribution to the radiation exposure of members of the population from medical x-rays, nuclear reactor operations and natural background-radiation sources have also been described. The annual genetically significant dose from diagnostic x-ray examinations in Canadian public hospitals has been estimated to be 25.8 mrem. Results from the reactor-environment monitoring programs have not suggested the presence of radioactivity beyond that contributed from fallout. PMID:14143681

  16. OECD Economic Surveys: Canada 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Canada weathered the global economic crisis well, mainly reflecting sustained growth in domestic pending, and the economy is continuing to grow despite the persistence of international turbulence, most recently stemming from the euro zone sovereign debt crisis. In Canada's case, several factors are acting in its favour. Federal fiscal plans are…

  17. Canada-U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    61 Access to Medicines ...and Mexico . Canada claims the rule is a non-tariff barrier that has led to a steep drop in beef and hog shipments to U.S. processors...concern about trade in pirated and counterfeit goods in Canada, as well as weak enforcement and relatively lax penalties

  18. Canada-U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    stopped, in traversing the two countries’ 5,500- mile border. About 70% of U.S.-Canada merchandise trade crosses the border by truck; many of these...concern about trade in pirated and counterfeit goods in Canada, as well as weak enforcement and relatively lax penalties...pirated and counterfeit goods by customs agents without a court order. The government introduced a new Copyright Modernization Act (C-32) in June 2010

  19. Canada and the green economy

    OpenAIRE

    Kuszewski, Judy; Crowther, Yasmin

    2012-01-01

    Canada has a complex relationship with the global efforts to move to a green economy. Its policymakers and business leaders need to balance the country’s vast natural resources and the economic growth that they can foster, with the need to develop in a low-carbon, resource-efficient and socially inclusive manner. This report explores what the green economy means to Canada, with a particular focus on Canadian companies and the accountancy profession. Publisher PDF

  20. Canada Among Nations 2013, Canada-Africa Relations : Looking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    expansion la plus rapide dans le monde et un virage vers une bonne ... Le CRDI, l'Israel Science Foundation, la Fondation Azrieli et les Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada annoncent l'appel de propositions pour la ...

  1. Survey of recreational fishing in Canada, 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    The 2005 Survey of Recreational Fishing in Canada collected information about recreational fishing activities to assess the economic and social importance of recreational fisheries to Canada's provinces and territories...

  2. A National Palliative Care Strategy for Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, R. Sean

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify barrier to achieving universal access to high quality palliative care in Canada, review published national strategies and frameworks to promote palliative care, examine key aspects that have been linked to successful outcomes, and make recommendations for Canada.

  3. Building better health care leadership for Canada: implementing evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Denis, Jean-Louis; Sullivan, Terrence James

    2011-01-01

    ... of the Government of Canada through the Canada Book Fund for our publishing activities. Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Building better health care leadership for Canada: imple...

  4. canada's “thousand talent program”i: how canada research chair ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-10-24

    Oct 24, 2013 ... richer explanation of brain circulation, using the case study of Chinese holders of Canada Research Chairs. (CRC). Canada suffered brain drain in the 1990s, in particular to the United States. The Canada. Research Chair Program (CRCP), launched in 2000 by the Government of Canada, signalled the ...

  5. Comparing pyloromyotomy outcomes across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ednie, Alexander C; Amram, Ofer; Schuurman, Nadine; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2017-05-01

    Changing patterns of referral and management of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) in North America have recently been described. Comfort with perioperative management, anesthesia, and corrective surgery have been cited as reasons for these changes. Our primary objective was to assess pyloromyotomy outcomes between different hospital types across Canada. The secondary objective was to geospatially map all pyloromyotomies to identify regions of higher HPS incidence across Canada. Data of all pyloromyotomies done between 2011 and 2013 were acquired from Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). Complication rates and length of hospital stay (LOS) were analyzed. Postal codes for each patient were used to geospatially map regions of higher HPS incidence. A total of 1261 pyloromyotomies were assessed. There was no difference in LOS or complication rates between different hospital types or surgeon group. Open pyloromyotomies were done in 75% of the cases. Several regions of higher HPS incidence were identified across Canada. This study found no difference in complication rate or LOS stay between hospital type and surgeon type across Canada. This may reflect a previously identified referral trend in the United States towards pediatric centers. Several regions of higher HPS incidence were identified, and may aid in identifying genetic elements causing HPS. 2c. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Computerized Library Networking in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Roderick M.; Islam, Mazharul

    1979-01-01

    Reviews a study which examined computerized bibliographic centers in Canada identifying three types: (1) library processing facility; (2) library network user group; and (3) information retrieval facility. The study also reported on ways to promote a computerized library network with emphasis on national location service. (CWM)

  7. The Inuit (Eskimo) of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creery, Ian

    This report examines the history of the colonization of Arctic Canada and the efforts of its 25,000 Inuit residents to decolonize themselves. Initial sections outline the origins and early history of the Inuit; characteristics of Inuit culture, family life, and spirituality; the effects of whaling and the fur trade; and the movement of the Inuit…

  8. Compute Canada: Advancing Computational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Susan

    2012-02-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) is redefining the way that research is done. Compute Canada's HPC infrastructure provides a national platform that enables Canadian researchers to compete on an international scale, attracts top talent to Canadian universities and broadens the scope of research.

  9. Unique Measles Virus in Canada

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-08-24

    Dr. Shelley Deeks, chief of communicable diseases at Public Health Ontario, discusses a measles outbreak in Canada.  Created: 8/24/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/24/2017.

  10. Pharmacy information systems in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jeff; Jennings, Heather

    2009-01-01

    The goal of Canada Health Infoway is to provide at least 50% of all Canadians with an electronic health record (EHR) by 2010. The goal of the Infoway Drug Information Systems Program is to develop an interoperable drug information system that will keep each patient's medication history: prescribed and dispensed drugs, allergies, ongoing drug treatment, etc. Drug and drug-interaction checks will be performed automatically and added to the patients' drug profiles. Physicians and pharmacists will be supplied with data to support appropriate and accurate prescribing and dispensing, thereby avoiding adverse drug interactions and drug-related deaths [1]. This paper describes Canadian developments in pharmacy eHealth. It presents the results of the Pharmacy Informatics Pharmacy Special Networks (PSN) survey about computer systems used in hospital pharmacies across Canada including information concerning Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) systems deployed; which may reduce the number of errors in orders.

  11. Canada-U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    2008 budget seeks to ensure continuity through the Canada First Defence Strategy , which will provide for yearly increases of 2% beginning in 2011-12...Minister Harper of permitting Canada’s Afghanistan strategy “to be defined by Washington.” He stated that “once [Canada’s] military mission ends in...56 RBC Financial Group, Daily Forex Fundamentals, February 27, 2009. [ http

  12. Can Canada Avoid Arctic Militarization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-20

    global market and the evolution of new fracking technology for the extraction of shale hydrocarbons, the development of the Canadian Arctic might not...Powers and Prospects in Canada’s North, ed. Abele Frances (Montréal: Institute for Research on Public Policy, 2009), 378. 167Richard Spencer, “ Fracking ...Boom Frees the US from Old Oil Alliances,” The Telegraph, December 13, 2013, http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/energy/oil/10476647/ Fracking -boom-frees

  13. Canada: expanding nuclear fuel exports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paehlke, R.

    1978-01-01

    Uranium is soon to be a very big business in Canada and most of the expansion is bound for export markets. The expansions that are planned are both in uranium mining and in fuel processing. Almost all environmental problems associated with the nuclear fuel cycle thus far in Canada have been associated with these two phases of the cycle: mining and processing. The water in Elliot Lake has been found to have high concentrations of radium and the drinking water of Serpent River, Ontario--downwater from Elliot Lake--has been found to be contaminated by excess radioactivity. Buildings in both Port Hope, Ontario, and Uranium City, Saskatchewan (near Eldorado's Saskatchewan minesite), have excess radiation counts attributable to radon and radon daughter gases. Several aspects of the expansion are currently undergoing environmental impact assessment. Far and away the most careful and balanced inquiry is the Saskatchewan government-appointed inquiry under Mr. Justice E. D. Bayda of the Saskatchewan Appeals Court. This inquiry is, in the first instance, examining a proposal by Amok Ltee., a consortium of a French multinational and the French government, to develop a $135 million uranium mine and mill at Cluff Lake in the northern portion of Saskatchewan. But the inquiry is considering all aspects and implications of the full nuclear fuel cycle. The second stage of the uranium boom in Canada centers on processing. Here two major new plants are proposed by Eldorado Nuclear: one at Port Granby, Ontario; the second at Varman, Saskatchewan. Several massive nuclear power stations are planned east of Toronto, but nuclear opposition is growing in Canada. (MCW)

  14. Indigenous Educational Attainment in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E. Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the educational attainment of Indigenous peoples of working age (25 to 64 years in Canada is examined. This diverse population has typically had lower educational levels than the general population in Canada. Results indicate that, while on the positive side there are a greater number of highly educated Indigenous peoples, there is also a continuing gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples. Data also indicate that the proportion with less than high school education declined, which corresponds with a rise of those with a PSE; the reverse was true in 1996. Despite these gains, however, the large and increasing absolute numbers of those without a high school education is alarming. There are intra-Indigenous differences: First Nations with Indian Status and the Inuit are not doing as well as non-Status and Métis peoples. Comparisons between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations reveal that the documented gap in post-secondary educational attainment is at best stagnant. Out of the data analysis, and based on the history of educational policy, we comment on the current reform proposed by the Government of Canada, announced in February of 2014, and propose several policy recommendations to move educational attainment forward.

  15. Women in Physics in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Janis

    2012-10-01

    Here we are in the 21st century in Canada, where most of us would say that young girls and boys have equal access to education, opportunities, and careers of their own choice. In Canada, women currently outnumber men in full-time university enrollment, in Medical Schools and in Law Schools. 48% of the Canadian work force is female, yet women make up only 21% of working professionals in science, engineering and technology. Canada-wide in Physics, the situation is such that only 20% of our BSc graduates are women, and 19% of our PhD graduates are women. It is evident that the ``leaky pipeline'' in Physics leaks most at a young age, before BSc graduation. High school physics statistics in BC indicate that while most of the grade 12 science and math disciplines have roughly equal numbers of young men and women enrolled, this is not the case for high school physics, where province-wide, only 30% of Physics 12 students are women. (Biology is also skewed, but in the other direction: 62% of Biology 12 students are women) This poster will present current statistics and will hopefully be a wake-up call for us all to consider participating in more outreach in science, and especially physics, in our high schools.

  16. Canada-U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Canada CRS-8 20 “Spend More On Military, U.S. Envoy Urges Ottawa.” Toronto Star. Feb. 25, 2004. 21 “Canada’s Flying Coffins .” Peter Newman...introduction of alien species of aquatic life may disturb the ecological balance and endanger fishing in Lake Winnipeg, into which the Red River empties...have been under review. The two countries have continued the long-standing debate over the ecological impact of possible development in Alaska’s

  17. 78 FR 16493 - ExxonMobil Canada Energy, Flint Hills Resources Canada, LP, Imperial Oil, NOVA Chemical (Canada...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... State Canada, Inc., Phillips 66 Canada ULC, St. Paul Park Refining Co. LLC, Suncor Energy Marketing, Inc., United Refining Company v. Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on..., Suncor Energy Marketing, Inc., and United Refining Company (Complainants) filed a formal complaint...

  18. Global Affairs Canada | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    As a Government of Canada Crown Corporation, we are an important part of Canada's foreign affairs and development efforts. ... The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund is a CA$125 million initiative that aims to bring market-ready agriculture innovations to more people, improving lives and livelihoods.

  19. Canada's World : a Deliberative Dialogue | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Call for proposals for the Joint Canada-Israel Health Research Program 2018 competition. IDRC, the Israel Science Foundation, the Azrieli Foundation, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research announce the call for proposals for the fourth round of the Joint Canada-Israel Health... View moreCall for proposals for the ...

  20. Canada's Changing Geography of Jobs and Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, David

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the impact of globalization on the jobs and trade of Canada. Emphasizes new relationships with countries in Latin America and Africa. Notes the types of trade that Canada enjoys with these two areas and encourages expansion of business into them. (DSK)

  1. Mexico-Canada Knowledge Translation Partnership | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  2. The OECD Reports on Canada's Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, P.

    1976-01-01

    Extracts from a 1975 study undertaken by the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on the state of education in Canada is presented. The extracts focus on the vocational technical field and call for a vigorous and creative rethinking in the practical and technical education of Canada's youth. (Author/EC)

  3. Paint removal activities in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Terry

    1993-03-01

    Paint removal activities currently under way in Canada include: research and development of laser paint stripping; development and commercialization of a new blasting medium based on wheat starch; commercialization of a new blasting medium and process using crystalline ice blasting for paint removal and surface cleaning; and the development of automated and robotic systems for paint stripping applications. A specification for plastic media blasting (PMB) of aircraft and aircraft components is currently being drafted by NDHQ for use by the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and contractors involved in coating removal for the CAF. Defense Research Establishment Pacific (DREP) is studying the effects of various blast media on coating removal rates, and minimizing the possibility of damage to substrates other than aluminum such as graphite epoxy composite and Kevlar. The effects of plastic media blasting on liquid penetrant detection of fatigue cracks is also under investigation.

  4. Restorative justice innovations in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin J; Huculak, Bria; McWhinnie, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    As many jurisdictions move towards more retributive measures as a means to address public discontent with crime, a parallel movement has developed in regard to restorative justice. This article presents three restorative initiatives currently in use in Canada. Each initiative addresses offender behavior and community engagement at a different point in the justice continuum. The use of Sentencing Circles is an example of how restorative justice principles can be instituted at the front end, prior to an offender becoming lodged in the system. The Restorative Justice Options to Parole Suspension project demonstrates how community engagement can assist in preventing offenders from being returned to the system once they have achieved conditional release. The Circles of Support and Accountability project has enlisted the support of professionally supported volunteers in the community reintegration of high-risk sexual offenders. These initiatives are presented within a framework of effective correctional interventions and increased empowerment for a variety of stakeholders. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Forest insect pests in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The papers presented in this book cover the range of forest insect pest management activities in Canada. The first section contains papers on the current status of insect pests by region, including data on insect populations and extent of defoliation caused by the insect. The next section covers pest management technology, including the use of insecticides, insect viruses, fungal pathogens, growth regulators, antifeedants, pheromones, natural predators, and aerial spraying. The third section contains papers on the application of technology and equipment for forest pest control, and includes papers on the impacts of insecticides on the forest environment. The fourth section describes operational control programs by province. The final paper presents future strategies for the management of forest pests. An author index is included.

  6. Canada's population: growth and dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaujot, R P

    1978-04-01

    In Canada the current 1.3% population growth rate is causing some concern. Those concerned argue that such a rate of growth in combination with high levels of consumption could jeopardize the country's resource base and its comfortable style of living. Many Canadians are questioning high levels of immigration, for now that the fertility level is below replacement level, net immigration contributes substantially to population growth (over 1/3 in 1976). The growing proportion of non-Europeans among recent immigrants is causing resentment, and, in a tight job market, immigrants are regarded as threats to the World War 2 baby boom cohort who are now at working ages. The baby boom generation also puts stress on housing and health services, and it will increase the need for pension checks as it ages. Although French fertility is no longer high and immigration is no longer dominated by the British, the French group's 200-year struggle to preserve its identity continues on in the current effort of the Quebec government to enforce the use of French language by law within that province. Geography and climate dictate another demographic fact that divides the country and pervades its history. In addition to intense regionalism, uneven population distribution is responsible for 2 other concerns: the rapid growth of several already large cities and depopulation of many small communities. Focus in this discussion is on Canada's population growth in the past and as projected for the future, historical and current fertility, mortality and immigration trends, the search for a new immigration policy, the impact of the baby boom generation on the population's age structure and the problems this creates, and recent shifts in population distribution and in the country's ethnic and linguistic makeup. The population policy proposals evolved thus far involve to a great extent the use of immigration as a lever for achieving given population objectives.

  7. Operational expert system applications in Canada

    CERN Document Server

    Suen, Ching Y

    1992-01-01

    This book is part of a new series on operational expert systems worldwide. Expert systems are now widely used in different parts of the world for various applications. The past four years have witnessed a steady growth in the development and deployment of expert systems in Canada. Research in this field has also gained considerable momentum during the past few years. However, the field of expert systems is still young in Canada. This book contains 13 chapters contributed by 31 experts from both universities and industries across Canada covering a wide range of applications related to electric

  8. 19 CFR 123.41 - Truck shipments transiting Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Truck shipments transiting Canada. 123.41 Section... OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO United States and Canada In-Transit Truck... Manifest, Customs Form 7512-B Canada 81/2. The driver shall present the manifest in four copies to U.S...

  9. 9 CFR 93.317 - Horses from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Canada. 93.317 Section 93... CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Canada 16 § 93.317 Horses from Canada. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, horses from Canada shall be inspected as provided in § 93.306; shall be...

  10. Cost Effectiveness of Infant Vaccination for Rotavirus in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Coyle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus is the main cause of gastroenteritis in Canadian children younger than five years of age, resulting in significant morbidity and cost. The present study provides evidence on the cost effectiveness of two alternative rotavirus vaccinations (RotaTeq [Merck Frosst Canada Ltd, Canada] and Rotarix [GlaxoSmithKline, Canada] available in Canada.

  11. Opportunities for manufactured housing in Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bairstow, Dale

    1985-01-01

    In the fall of 1984, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation commissioned this study because it wanted to find out why manufactured housing appeared to be increasing in importance in certain foreign...

  12. 1982 Aleutian Canada goose nesting survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Investigation of the endangered Aleutian Canada goose (Branta canadensis leucopareia) was conducted from 1974 to 1976, again in 1977 and in 1979 on Buldir. During...

  13. The future of Canada's radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2017-11-01

    Through involvement in CHIME, ALMA, the Jansky VLA and the Murchison Widefield Array, Canada is well placed in current radio astronomy facilities and the future looks even brighter, with strategic interest in the SKA and the Next Generation VLA.

  14. Driver's Licences for the handicapped in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Marg; Clarke, Bryan R.

    1985-01-01

    The article reviews Canada's Guide for Physicians in Determining Fitness to Drive a Vehicle and then considers sections of provincial motor vehicle acts that regulate the issuance of licenses to the handicapped. (CL)

  15. Mineral Operations of Latin America and Canada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries...

  16. Comprehensive school health in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veugelers, Paul J; Schwartz, Margaret E

    2010-01-01

    The Canadian education system is among the best in the world academically. In contrast, students' (children and youth) eating and activity levels are so poor that they have led to prevalence rates of overweight that are among the highest in the world. Given the enormous public health burden associated with poor nutrition and physical inactivity, Canada needs to address this health risk. Comprehensive school health (CSH) is a promising approach to promoting healthy eating and active living (HEAL). This article provides a review of CSH and discusses its four essential elements: 1) teaching and learning; 2) social and physical environments; 3) healthy school policy; and 4) partnerships and services. It also provides a common understanding of the implementation and broader benefits of CSH, which, in addition to health, include student learning and self-esteem. The article further discusses some complexities of a rigorous evaluation of CSH, which comprises proof of implementation, impact and positive outcome. Though such an evaluation has yet to be conducted, some studies did confirm successful implementation, and another study observed positive outcomes. Rigorous evaluation is urgently needed to provide a stronger evidence base of the benefits of CSH for learning, self-esteem and disease prevention. This evidence is essential to justify devoting more school time to promote HEAL and more resources to implement and support CSH to the benefit of both learning and health.

  17. Export opportunities for Czech companies in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Otta, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of the theses is to analyze economic cooperation of Czech republic and Canada. There is a particular information about Canadian economical and political setting as well as local business environment. The theses places emphasis on how to help Czech exporters trading with Canada, and gives complete overview of opportunities for export, entrance to the market and helps to understand local business customs.

  18. The Beginning Farmers’ Problem In Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Pouliot, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    Concerns about beginning farmers in Canada derive from trends in data that show that the population of farmers and the number of young farmers are declining. This paper discusses and analyses issues regarding the constraints and opportunities beginning farmers in Canada face. The discussion covers whether issues peculiar to beginning farmers are, from an economic policy point of view, a source of concern and whether there are motives for government intervention. The main conclusions are 1) th...

  19. A Strategic Analysis of Canada Post's Parcel Ecommerce Growth Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Canada Post is a market leader in the business to consumer residential delivery of parcels in Canada. There is an increasing demand for residential delivery due to the worldwide growth in ecommerce sales. This paper presents a strategic analysis of the opportunity for Canada Post to increase its breadth and depth in the parcel delivery industry in Canada. The analysis will review the parcel industry, the ecommerce opportunity, an internal review of Canada Post, develop and evaluate four strat...

  20. Croatian Language Maintenance in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Petrović

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the topic of language maintenance has received considerable attention from linguists around the world, there are still many aspects of this language-contact phenomenon that could be examined further. This paper aims to contribute to the existing body of knowledge by exploring the state of Croatian as a heritage language in Canada. The aim of the paper is two-fold. The first is to describe the demographic characteristics of the Croatian community by investigating the number of people of Croatian descent and the number of Croatian speakers in Canada. The second, and more specific, aim of the paper is to provide an account of the state of Croatian as a minority language and examine the extent of language maintenance in the community. To accomplish the first objective, Canadian census data (1996, 2001, 2006, and 2011 was analyzed, with special focus on linguistic census data (number and age of Croatian speakers in Canada, mother tongue of people of Croatian descent, language most used at home, etc.. To accomplish the second objective, census data was supplemented with data from a questionnaire-based survey completed by members of the Croatian community in Toronto. The survey was completed by 220 participants; 110 first-generation Croatian Canadians and 110 second-generation Croatian Canadians. Two versions of the questionnaire were designed, one for first-generation participants and the other for second-generation participants. The great majority of items in the two versions were identical; each version contained questions about demographic characteristics, language use in everyday life, and self-perceived language proficiency in English and Croatian. The majority of questions were of a closed type (multiple-choice questions and rating scales, but there were also some open-ended questions, so as to give participants the opportunity to express their viewpoint or comment on certain issues. Questions were written in both Croatian and English

  1. Reimagining Haj Khalil v. Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Bahdi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper emphasizes the importance of cultural competence for tort law by analyzing the Federal Court’s decision in Haj Khalil v. Canada. Given that this symposium in honour of Rose Voyvodic’s life and work is entitled “Re-Imagining Access to Justice,” this paper asks “how do the principles of cultural competence allow us to think about the facts of the Haj Khalil differently. In particular, what would a cause in fact analysis look like if it were informed by the principles of cultural competence?” My analysis proceeds by “reading the silences” or focusing on the unstated assumptions and unexplored elements of Haj Khalil’s story to bring into focus factors relevant to factual causation which remain largely unexplored or undervalued by the Federal Court. An examination of the facts that framed Haj Khalil`s claim against immigration officials through a culturally competent lens would open the possibility of a different understanding of causation as it arises on the facts of the case. While Canadian courts have emphasized the importance of social context for fair judgment, they have not fully come to grips with the implications of social context for judicial decision-making. This is particularly the case within negligence law which remains vexed by the need to maintain an objective standard while simultaneously recognizing the importance of context and circumstance to particular claims. Cet article souligne l’importance de la compétence culturelle pour le droit de la responsabilité civile délictuelle en analysant le jugement Haj Khalil c. Canada de la Cour Fédérale. Vu que ce symposium en honneur de la vie et de l’oeuvre de Rose Voyvodic est intitulé « Re-Imagining Access to Justice», cet article pose la question «comment les principes de compétence culturelle nous permettent-ils de concevoir différemment les faits de Haj Khalil. En particulier, comment se présenterait la causalité si l’analyse des faits

  2. Only in Canada: A Study of National Market Potential for Christian Higher Education Canada (CHEC) Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Al

    2011-01-01

    In July 2007 Ipsos Reid delivered to Christian Higher Education Canada (CHEC) a report entitled "Christian Post-Secondary Education in Canada, Phase 3: Defining the Market". This article is a selective summary of the full 353-page report. It tabulates and analyzes findings from 1,000 phone interviews and 6,689 online surveys from six…

  3. Aging in a Multicultural Canada: A Graphic Overview = Le Vieillissement dans un Canada Multiculturel: Apercu Graphique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Secretary of State, Ottawa (Ontario). Multiculturalism Directorate.

    This document, in English and French, provides a graphic overview of statistical data on aging and ethnicity in Canada. Most of the information was drawn from 1981 and 1986 census figures and immigration statistics. Part 1, "Multicultural Canada," provides background information on the multicultural nature of the population. One map and…

  4. Canada Among Nations 2014 – le Canada et le système financier ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    28 mai 2014 ... Le 28e ouvrage de la collection Canada Among Nations revient sur la crise financière mondiale de 2008 et examine son impact au Canada ainsi que le rôle que le pays a joué et joue toujours au sein du système financier international.

  5. The Hybridisation of Higher Education in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Shale

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Canada's postsecondary institutions are becoming increasingly involved with technology enhanced learning, generally under the rubric of distance education. Growth and activity in distance education stems from rapid developments in communication and information technologies such as videoconferencing and the Internet. This case study focuses on the use of new technologies, primarily within the context of higher education institutions operating in Canada's English speaking provinces. Capitalising on the interactive capabilities of "new" learning technologies, some distance education providers are starting to behave more like conventional educational institutions in terms of forming study groups and student cohorts. Conversely, new telecommunications technologies are having a reverse impact on traditional classroom settings, and as a result conventional universities are beginning to establish administrative structures reflective of those used by distance education providers. When viewed in tandem, these trends reflect growing convergence between conventional and distance learning modes, leading to the hybridisation of higher education in Canada.

  6. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome associated with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masaharu; Muta, Hiromi; Somada, Shinichi; Maeda, Toyoki; Mutoh, Toshitaka; Shimizu, Kanako; Suehiro, Yoko; Hisano, Terumasa; Kurita, Ryo; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Mori, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Yasuji; Tsunetomi, Nobuto; Uchida, Akihiro; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2007-01-01

    Here, we report a case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome in a patient with schizophrenia. A 64-year-old man, who had been diagnosed as having a schizophrenic disorder at the age of 30, presented with alopecia, atrophic nail changes, hyperpigmentation of the skin, and inflammatory polyposis of the stomach and colon. Endoscopic ultrasonography of the stomach and colon revealed diffuse mucosal thickening with small hypoechoic areas, corresponding to edema of the lamina propria. After treatment with parenteral hyperalimentation and tranexamic acid, his physical findings and polyposis gradually improved. This is the first report of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome in a patient with schizophrenia.

  7. [Immigration and labor: Australia and Canada compared].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovetta, F; Quinlan, M

    1995-08-01

    "Australia and Canada share...a common colonial history and many similarities in geography, economy, demography, etc., as well as a substantial anti-non anglo-celtic immigrant tradition, in spite of their being immigration countries. Those similarities and differences are analyzed here, as far as labor migration and relationships between immigrant and local labor are concerned. The arrival of European labor first, Asian later, was perceived similarly by both Australia and Canada, combining racial prejudice and unions' hostility towards contract labor migration as well as towards assisted migration. The evolution of those difficult relations through the 19th and 20th centuries is analyzed here." (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  8. Canada goose kill statistics: Swan Lake Public Hunting Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document discusses how the flexible kill formula for Canada goose hunting at Swan Lake Public Hunting Area was reached. Methods used to collect Canada goose...

  9. All projects related to canada | Page 22 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-03-22

    , VULNERABLE GROUPS, Climate change. Region: Malawi, Canada. Program: Food, Environment, and Health. Total Funding: CA$ 566,860.00. Support for Communities affected by Mining in Canada and around the Globe. Project. Founded ...

  10. All projects related to Canada | Page 12 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... an international platform committed to making governments more open, accountable, and responsive to citizens. Topic: INFORMATION DISSEMINATION, CANADA, Civil society, GOVERNMENT, PRIVATE SECTOR, INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. Region: Brazil, Nepal, Nigeria, Canada, United States, Netherlands.

  11. Characters of age, sex and sexual maturity in Canada geese

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper discusses the characters of age, sex, and sexual maturity in Canada geese. Present findings are based on trap and/or bag samples of Canada geese. Methods...

  12. Industrial Relations in Canada: Contemporary Comparisons and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Paul; Goodman, John, Eds.

    1990-01-01

    Includes "Canadian Industrial Relations: An Introductory Overview" (Blyton, Goodman); "Overview of Canadian Labour Law" (Miller); "Industrial Conflict and Resolution in Canada and Britain" (Haiven); "Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector in Canada" (Calvert); "Canadian Automobile Industry: Work…

  13. Global Entrepreneurship Monitor - Canada Survey | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    They will also allow detailed comparisons with developing countries. This comparative analysis will support dialogue on the following issues: -ways to improve entrepreneurship; -the private sector's role in fostering entrepreneurship; and, -how greater entrepreneurship can contribute to economic development in Canada ...

  14. French Immersion in Canada: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safty, Adel

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the theoretical foundations of French immersion programs in Canada, which are based on early exposure, creation of a natural imitative environment, cross-language interference and support, contextualized learning, and a communicative approach. Describes the practical applications of the theories, immersion program teachers and their roles,…

  15. STEM Education in Canada: A Knowledge Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoito, Isha

    2016-01-01

    Across Canada many initiatives have been initiated to generate more interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education; however, no single or comprehensive overview has been conducted that takes into account the impact of these STEM initiatives on teaching/learning outcomes in K-12 education. This knowledge synthesis of…

  16. Information Literacy Training in Canada's Public Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Heidi; Hoffman, Cameron

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to explore the role of Canada's public libraries in developing the public's information literacy (IL) skills, to explore current IL training practices, and to explore the perspectives and IL experiences of individuals who visit public libraries to access the Internet. This article documents the second phase of a…

  17. Ethnic identity of older Chinese in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel W L

    2012-06-01

    In Canada's multicultural society, ethnic identity is important to the elderly and can influence areas such as access to services, health promotion and care. Often, the complex nature of ethnic identity is underestimated when looking at cultural groups. This study aims to: (a) validate the factor structure of a Chinese ethnic identity measure for older Chinese in Canada, (b) examine the level of ethnic identity of the participants, and (c) examine the correlates of ethnic identity in these older individuals. Using data from a large, national research project on the elderly Chinese in Canada, this study analyzed the results gathered from a total of 2,272 participants. Principal component analysis, maximum-likelihood confirmatory factor analysis, and multiple regression analysis were performed. The results indicated that ethnic identity of the older Chinese is a multi-dimensional construct made up of three factors: (a) culture related activities, (b) community ties, (c) linkage with country of origin, and (d) cultural identification. The findings have provided a better understanding of how ethnic identity can be measured among the aging Chinese population in Canada.

  18. Addiction Medicine in Canada: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Guebaly, Nady; Crockford, David; Cirone, Sharon; Kahan, Meldon

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, the qualification of physicians is the jurisdiction of the College of Family Physicians and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Colleges have promoted the training of "generalists" in family medicine and "sophisticated generalists" among the traditional specialties, and the development of subspecialties…

  19. Canada thistle phenology in broadbean canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Wesołowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Soine of the developmental stages of Canada thistle - Cirsium arvense (L. Scop. (I. emergence and early growth, II. shooting, II. budding, IV. flowering, V. fructification, VI. shedding of fruits on the background of development stages of broad-bean, weeded by herbicides and without that weed-killing substances, were presented in the paper. Phenological observations were carried out on the plants growing on alluvial soil developed from light loam in Zakrz6w near Tarnobrzeg. It was proved that phenological development of Canada thistle, during broad-bean vegetation, depended on course of weather conditions and method of crop care. Emergence of the weed occurred earlier than broad-bean plants during warm and rather dry seasons. In every vegetation period, emergence and early vegetation stage (to 4 leaves seedling of Canada thistle lasted about 3 months, until broad-bean got full pod setting. During wet and cold season (in 2001 the weed emerged also early under herbicide (Afalon 1,5 kg ha-1 condition. Until to broad-bean harvest, Canada thistle attained the finish developmental stages, that means fruiting and fruit shedding. Herbicide treatment delayed the last two stages and limited fruit shedding by plants of Cirsium arvense.

  20. Echinococcus multilocularis in Urban Coyotes, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Stefano; Lejeune, Manigandan; Liccioli, Stefano; Verocai, Guilherme G.; Gesy, Karen M.; Jenkins, Emily J.; Kutz, Susan J.; Fuentealba, Carmen; Duignan, Padraig J.

    2012-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis is a zoonotic parasite in wild canids. We determined its frequency in urban coyotes (Canis latrans) in Alberta, Canada. We detected E. multilocularis in 23 of 91 coyotes in this region. This parasite is a public health concern throughout the Northern Hemisphere, partly because of increased urbanization of wild canids. PMID:23017505

  1. Culture and Community in Canada's Isolated Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John; Anderson, Kirk; Jamal, Samina

    This paper presents highlights from surveys of some of Canada's most isolated schools, located in northern Labrador, Nunavut, northern Saskatchewan, and northern and interior British Columbia. Most served Inuit or other First Nations communities. Although all schools had contact by phone and most had e-mail, few were accessible by road. Five Inuit…

  2. extérieur du canada

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Hakan Mustafa

    RENSEIGNEMENTS GÉNÉRAUX, FISCAUX ET BANCAIRES DU FOURNISSEUR –. EXTÉRIEUR DU CANADA. Veuillez lire attentivement les instructions figurant aux pages 2 et 3 avant de remplir le présent formulaire. Nouveau. Modification. Section 1 : RENSEIGNEMENTS GÉNÉRAUX. Nom du particulier (nom, prénom) ...

  3. Reconsidering the Right to Privacy in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Leslie Regan

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that post-September 11 political debates and legislation around security necessitates a reconsideration of a right to privacy in Canada. It looks at the proposal for a Canadian Charter of Privacy Rights promoted by Senator Sheila Finestone in the late 1990s and the current challenges of emergent material technologies…

  4. Submarine landslides in Arctic sedimentation: Canada Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, David C.; Shimeld, John; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Lebedova-Ivanova, N; Chapman, C.

    2016-01-01

    Canada Basin of the Arctic Ocean is the least studied ocean basin in the World. Marine seismic field programs were conducted over the past 6 years using Canadian and American icebreakers. These expeditions acquired more than 14,000 line-km of multibeam bathymetric and multi-channel seismic reflection data over abyssal plain, continental rise and slope regions of Canada Basin; areas where little or no seismic reflection data existed previously. Canada Basin is a turbidite-filled basin with flat-lying reflections correlateable over 100s of km. For the upper half of the sedimentary succession, evidence of sedimentary processes other than turbidity current deposition is rare. The Canadian Archipelago and Beaufort Sea margins host stacked mass transport deposits from which many of these turbidites appear to derive. The stratigraphic succession of the MacKenzie River fan is dominated by mass transport deposits; one such complex is in excess of 132,000 km2 in area and underlies much of the southern abyssal plain. The modern seafloor is also scarred with escarpments and mass failure deposits; evidence that submarine landsliding is an ongoing process. In its latest phase of development, Canada Basin is geomorphologically confined with stable oceanographic structure, resulting in restricted depositional/reworking processes. The sedimentary record, therefore, underscores the significance of mass-transport processes in providing sediments to oceanic abyssal plains as few other basins are able to do.

  5. Alcohol use among immigrants in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agic, Branka; Mann, Robert E; Tuck, Andrew; Ialomiteanu, Anca; Bondy, Susan; Simich, Laura; Ilie, Gabriela

    2016-03-01

    This study examined prevalence of alcohol consumption among immigrants and the Canadian-born populations of Ontario by ethnic origin, and the association between ethnicity, country of birth, age at arrival, length of residence in Canada and drinking measures. Data were derived from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) Monitor, a cross-sectional survey of Ontario adults, conducted between January 2005 and December 2010 (n = 13,557). The prevalence of alcohol consumption and risk drinking was generally lower among foreign-born than Canadian-born respondents, but significant variations across ethnic groups were found. In general, foreign-born respondents of European descent reported higher rates of alcohol use and risk drinking than foreign-born respondents from other ethnic groups. We also observed that ethnicity effects varied by whether or not respondents were born in Canada, and by the age at which they arrived in Canada. While previous studies generally found an increase in immigrants' alcohol consumption with years in Canada, our data suggest that longer duration of residence may have either positive or negative effects on immigrants' alcohol use, depending on the country of origin/traditional drinking pattern. More research is needed to explore determinants of alcohol use and risk drinking among immigrants and to identify those groups at highest risk. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  6. Evolving Perspectives on Lyme Borreliosis in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, JLH; Middelveen, MJ; Klein, D; Sperling, FAH

    2012-01-01

    With cases now documented in every province, Lyme borreliosis (LB) is emerging as a serious public health risk in Canada. Controversy over the contribution of LB to the burden of chronic disease is maintained by difficulty in capturing accurate Canadian statistics, especially early clinical cases of LB. The use of dogs as sentinel species demon-strates that potential contact with Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes, as detected by C6 peptide, extends across the country. Dissemination of infected ticks by migratory birds and rapid establishment of significant levels of infection have been well described. Canadian public health response has focused on identification of established populations of the tick vectors, Ixodes scapularis and I. pacificus, on the assumption that these are the only important vectors of the disease across Canada. Strains of B. burgdorferi circulating in Canada and the full range of their reservoir species and coinfections remain to be explored. Ongoing surveys and historical records demonstrate that Borrelia-positive Ixodes species are regu-larly present in regions of Canada that have previously been considered to be outside of the ranges of these species in re-cent modeling efforts. We present data demonstrating that human cases of LB are found across the nation. Consequently, physician education and better early diagnoses are needed to prevent long term sequelae. An international perspective will be paramount for developing improved Canadian guidelines that recognize the complexity and diversity of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23091570

  7. Education of advanced practice nurses in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Carter, Nancy; Kilpatrick, Kelley; DiCenso, Alba

    2010-12-01

    In Canada, education programs for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) roles began 40 years ago. NP programs are offered in almost all provinces. Education for the CNS role has occurred through graduate nursing programs generically defined as providing preparation for advanced nursing practice. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe the following: (1) history of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (2) current status of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (3) curriculum issues, (4) interprofessional education, (5) resources for education and (6) continuing education. Although national frameworks defining advanced nursing practice and NP competencies provide some direction for education programs, Canada does not have countrywide standards of education for either the NP or CNS role. Inconsistency in the educational requirements for primary healthcare NPs continues to cause significant problems and interferes with inter-jurisdictional licensing portability. For both CNSs and NPs, there can be a mismatch between a generalized education and specialized practice. The value of interprofessional education in facilitating effective teamwork is emphasized. Recommendations for future directions for advanced practice nursing education are offered.

  8. Aging in Canada: State of the Art and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Debra J.; Gallagher, Elaine M.

    2013-01-01

    Canada shares many similarities with other industrialized countries around the world, including a rapidly aging population. What sets Canada uniquely apart is the collaborative approach that has been enacted in the health care system and the aging research initiatives. Canada has tremendous pride in its publicly funded health care system that…

  9. 77 FR 39624 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Turboprop Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... holidays. Fax: 202-493-2251. For service information identified in this AD, contact Pratt & Whitney Canada...-238-7176; fax: 781-238-7199. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion Transport Canada, which is the... information referenced above. We are issuing this AD because we evaluated all information provided by Canada...

  10. PubMed Central Canada: Beyond an Open Access Repository?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariani, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) represents a partnership between the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the National Research Council's Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (NRC-CISTI), and the National Library of Medicine of the US. The present study was done to gauge faculty awareness about the CIHR Policy on…

  11. Delusions of power : vanity, folly and the uncertain future of Canada`s hydro giants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skene, W.

    1997-12-31

    The current state of Canada`s power supply industry was reviewed. The author explained how Canada`s biggest electrical empires (Ontario Hydro, B.C. Hydro and Hydro-Quebec) were forged and how they have influenced not only Canada`s economic development but also how Canadians live their daily lives. He investigates how political and corporate decisions being made today will influence our future ability to have access to a reliable supply of low-cost electricity. The environmental and social costs of alternative power generation were also examined. He outlines the past behaviour of publicly owned utilities which was characterized by overspending and excessive generating capacity. These practices invited the current round of restructuring, deregulation, demonopolization and privatization. He feels that these forces are threatening to break up Canada`s publicly owned and regulated electric power system. Arguments for and against dismantling, selling off, or reorganizing the public utilities were dissected in an attempt to find answers as to how we got ourselves into the current mess. This unprecedented drive for restructuring may turn out to be an event more profound in terms of its implications for our future than the eighteenth century transition from agricultural society to an industrial society. The overall conclusion was that large public utilities, especially those relying on nuclear and fossil-fuel generation, will have to make way for renewable sources. It was predicted that new technologies will be developed that will inevitably lead to the dismantling of the large utilities over time. If we are wise enough to learn from our mistakes, publicly-owned and regulated utilities will continue to be allowed to co-exist with new entrants to provide the reliability and quality of service that competition and new competitive entrants into the field cannot provide. 112 refs.

  12. Effects of pesticides on Canada Geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blus, L.J.; Rusch, Donald H.; Samuel, Michael D.; Humburg, Dale D.; Sullivan, Brian D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes published and unpublished sources relating to exposure of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) to pesticides, emphasizing documented episodes of poisoning by organochlorine (OC), organophosphorus (OP), and carbamate compounds. Canada geese accumulate the lipid-soluble OC compounds, although they have a lower potential for biomagnification of these pesticides than animals at higher trophic levels in food webs. Low residues of p,p'-DDT and its metabolite p,p'-DDE were frequently found in tissues and eggs of Canada geese, but they had no apparent adverse effects on reproductive success or eggshell thickness. Likewise, in an orchard system in central Washington state, the OC rodenticide endrin accumulated in tissues and eggs of Canada geese without apparent adverse effect. In contrast, ingestion of seeds treated with the OC heptachlor caused mortality, lowered reproductive success, and caused a local population decline of geese in Oregon and Washington. In recent years, the most persistent OC's have been banned by law and replaced with less persistent carbamate and OP compounds that do not readily accumulate in animal tissues. However, many of these compounds are acutely toxic and have caused numerous die-offs of Canada geese. Among OP compounds, diazinon was responsible for most reported die-offs (41 incidents involving >535 geese), whereas parathion applied alone or jointly with methyl parathion accounted for most reported mortalities (8 incidents involving >3,000 geese). Three other OP's, a carbamate (carbofuran), zinc phosphide, and strychnine also caused goose die-offs. Mortality from anticholinesterase (antiChE) compounds occurs relatively soon after exposure and death can usually be diagnosed by evaluation of brain cholinesterase (thE) activity. Because geese are primarily grazers, the main route of exposure to antiChE's is apparently ingestion of contaminated grasses and forbs; dermal absorption and inhalation are other routes. Despite the

  13. GEOID '88: A gravimetric geoid for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Dezso

    1989-01-01

    Using Stokes' formula, a gravimetric geoid was calculated for Canada. The input data are as follows: 15 x 15' block averages were used for Canada and the USA and 1 x 1 deg block averages and satellite model (GEM-T1) provided values for the remaining part of the Earth. The geoid was calculated at 6398 points covering the area within the points rho(sub i)(phi sub i; lambda sub i) (lambda is + west): rho sub 1(40,125); rho sub 2(75,184); rho sub 3(75,10); and rho sub 4(40,60). The computed geoid refers to the GRS1980 and reaches a local minimum of -47.3 meters around the western part of Hudson Bay. A contour map of the geoid is shown.

  14. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-08-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children.

  15. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    fundamental limits to the use of acoustic methods and signal processing imposed by ice and ocean processes in the new Arctic. The hope is that these...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE...ocean structure. Changes in sea ice and the water column affect both acoustic propagation and ambient noise. This implies that what was learned

  16. Estimating the prevalence of infertility in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnik, Tracey; Cook, Jocelynn L.; Yuzpe, A. Albert; Tough, Suzanne; Collins, John

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant increase in the use of assisted reproductive technologies in Canada, however, little is known about the overall prevalence of infertility in the population. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of current infertility in Canada according to three definitions of the risk of conception. METHODS Data from the infertility component of the 2009–2010 Canadian Community Health Survey were analyzed for married and common-law couples with a female partner aged 18–44. The three definitions of the risk of conception were derived sequentially starting with birth control use in the previous 12 months, adding reported sexual intercourse in the previous 12 months, then pregnancy intent. Prevalence and odds ratios of current infertility were estimated by selected characteristics. RESULTS Estimates of the prevalence of current infertility ranged from 11.5% (95% CI 10.2, 12.9) to 15.7% (95% CI 14.2, 17.4). Each estimate represented an increase in current infertility prevalence in Canada when compared with previous national estimates. Couples with lower parity (0 or 1 child) had significantly higher odds of experiencing current infertility when the female partner was aged 35–44 years versus 18–34 years. Lower odds of experiencing current infertility were observed for multiparous couples regardless of age group of the female partner, when compared with nulliparous couples. CONCLUSIONS The present study suggests that the prevalence of current infertility has increased since the last time it was measured in Canada, and is associated with the age of the female partner and parity. PMID:22258658

  17. U.S. - UK - Canada Trilateral Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-02

    Lockheed Martin Canada · Mr. George S. (Sam) Sevier , Senior Advisor, MK Technology FUTURE OF TRANSATLANTIC COOPERATION: GOVERNMENT AND... Sevier , Senior Advisor, MK Technology 15:00 – 15:15 NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK 15:15 – 16:15 FUTURE OF TRANSATLANTIC ARMAMENTS COOPERATION: GOVERNMENT...GEORGE S. (SAM) SEVIER SENIOR ADVISOR, MK TECHNOLOGY George S. “Sam” Sevier , Senior Executive Service 4, Department of Defense (ret.), Colonel, USAF (ret

  18. Cronkhite-Canada syndrome: case description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Da Porto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an 80-year old woman affected by the Cronkhite-Canada syndrome. This rare disease was described for the first time in 1955. It is characterized by the growth of multiple polyps in the gastroenteric tract, leading to diarrhea, alopecia, dystrophy of nails and hyper-pigmented skin. In this article, we describe the patient’s clinical picture and report the results of laboratory tests and imaging assessments.

  19. Sources of child maltreatment information in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, D A; Hovdestad, W E; Tonmyr, L

    2013-02-01

    Interest in understanding the problem of child maltreatment is widely shared by governments, organizations of physicians, and others. Our objective was to describe and discuss sources of information in Canada that could be used to help understand the nature and scope of the problem, either within any province or territory, or across all of Canada. A series of web searches and a focused literature review were conducted to identify sources of child maltreatment information. Government departments responsible for child welfare were also contacted on an as-needed basis in order to identify additional sources. Identified sources included: child welfare administrative provincial/territorial data and reports based on those data, other child welfare information, surveys of child protection workers and shelter workers, mortality/morbidity data, police data, direct surveys of children and their parents, and the 2011 Canadian census. Each type of source had strengths and limitations in terms of how it could describe the nature and scope of the problem of child maltreatment. Increased use of morbidity and mortality data, data linking, expanding existing databases, and increasing the use of general population surveys could expand understanding of child maltreatment in Canada.

  20. Thallium contamination of water in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheam, V. [National Water Research Institute Branch, Burlington, ON (Canada). Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Branch

    2001-07-01

    A highly sensitive instrument, a Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometer, has been developed to study thallium contamination in some important Canadian ecosystems from the Arctic (containing very low thallium concentration) to coal-related industries across Canada and even to the study of thallium toxicity in an invertebrate, Hyalella azteca. Overall, the data indicate that the coal power plants and mines contain higher thallium concentrations than the other ecosystems studied, and the eastern region has the highest Tl concentrations compared to other regions. The range of thallium concentration in ng/L for the Arctic snow and ice was between not detected and 8.4, for the Great Lakes waters 0.9 to 48, for pore waters 0.1 to 213, for western coal power plants and mines 0.1 to 1326, for central coal power plants 1.2 to 175, for eastern coal power plants and mines 0.2 to 23605, and for miscellaneous sites across Canada not detected to 4390 ng/L. Some of these high concentrations and those high ones reported in industrial wastewaters exceeded the chronic toxicity endpoints for Hyalella azteca mortality, growth and reproduction, and thus can cause serious distress to the environment. All data were integrated into a map of thallium distribution, the first one in Canada. Natural background level of thallium for the Arctic was estimated to be 0.02 to 0.03 pg/g.

  1. Canada: variations on a common theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa B. Deber

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Canada faces health care challenges common to all industrialized countries – how to ensure timely access to high quality care, close to home, at an affordable cost. Addressing these challenges is complicated by interjurisdictional variation in both how health care is managed and delivered, and in health outcomes. Canada can be described as a non-system of 10 provincial and three territorial health insurance plans which mandate publicly-funded coverage for medically necessary hospital and physician services, based upon common principles and shaped by a federal governance structure that affords substantial power and autonomy to the provinces/territories over matters of health and health care. This article first examines the structural context of the health care system in Canada, including the range of services publicly funded, the public-private mix, and the complexities of current governance arrangements. It then discusses several issues affecting health policy reform: costs versus access; questions of sustainability, quality, and performance; human resources capacity; and the provision of public and population health services.

  2. Canada: psychosis in the immigrant Caribbean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2011-09-01

    Many reports from European countries suggest that acute episodes of psychosis are more frequent among immigrants from the Caribbean than among their non-immigrant peers. The aim of this selective review is to examine how the social correlates of migration to Canada interact with biological mechanisms to contribute to psychosis in the Caribbean population. PubMed and JSTOR social science databases (between 1966 and 2010) were searched using the following search terms: psychiatric genetics; dopamine pathways; Caribbean family structure and child rearing; cannabis and psychosis; obstetric complications and schizophrenia; social defeat; social capital; racial discrimination; urbanicity; immigration; assimilation; and immigration. This was followed by the cross-checking of references pertinent to Canada. There was no information about the prevalence of psychosis in Afro-Caribbean immigrant groups to Canada. There was a suggestion that the form the acute episode takes may differ, depending perhaps on the island of origin. Ethnicity and migration influence susceptibility and response to psychotic illness in a number of distinct and interacting ways depending both on the host country and the country of origin. Understanding the pathways can help to protect the health of immigrants.

  3. Clinical neuropsychology practice and training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A; Guger, Sharon

    2016-11-01

    This invited paper provides information about professional neuropsychology issues in Canada and is part of a special issue addressing international perspectives on education, training, and practice in clinical neuropsychology. Information was gathered from literature searches and personal communication with other neuropsychologists in Canada. Canada has a rich neuropsychological history. Neuropsychologists typically have doctoral-level education including relevant coursework and supervised practical experience. Licensure requirements vary across the 10 provinces and there are regional differences in salary. While training at the graduate and internship level mirrors that of our American colleagues, completion of a two-year postdoctoral fellowship in neuropsychology is not required to obtain employment in many settings and there are few postdoctoral training programs in this country. The majority of neuropsychologists are employed in institutional settings (e.g. hospitals, universities, rehabilitation facilities), with a growing number entering private practice or other settings. There are challenges in providing neuropsychological services to the diverse Canadian population and a need for assessment measures and normative data in multiple languages. Canadian neuropsychologists face important challenges in defining ourselves as distinct from other professions and other psychologists, in maintaining funding for high-quality training and research, in establishing neuropsychology-specific training and practice standards at the provincial or national level, and ensuring the clinical care that we provide is efficient and effective in meeting the needs of our patient populations and consumers, both within and outside of the publically funded health care system.

  4. Hunger among Inuit children in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Leanne C; Langlois, Kellie A; Kohen, Dafna E

    2013-01-01

    Inuit populations may be at increased risk for experiencing poor nutrition or hunger due to limited access and availability to food. The prevalence and correlates of parental perceptions of hunger among a nationally representative sample of Inuit children in Canada have not yet been reported. Data are from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). Sociodemographic information, dietary behaviours and hunger status were parent-reported via a household interview for Inuit children aged 2-5 years (n=1,234). Prevalence of hunger was calculated among Inuit children by sociodemographic factors and by dietary behaviours. In addition, a multivariate logistic regression model was conducted to determine factors associated with parental perception of ever experiencing hunger. The prevalence of Inuit children in Canada aged 2-5 years ever experiencing hunger was 24.4%. Children who were reported to have experienced hunger consumed milk and milk products (p0.05). The majority (81%) of Inuit parents/guardians of ever-hungry children sought help from family or friends. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing hunger include sociodemographic characteristics (such as income and household size), living in an Inuit region and living in a community with cultural activities. About 1 in 4 Inuit children were reported by their parents to have experienced hunger, and hunger was associated with region, sociodemographic and community factors. Future research could further examine the impact of ever experiencing hunger on the health status of Inuit children and their families in Canada.

  5. Fertility Adaptation of Child Migrants to Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsera, Alicia; Ferrer, Ana

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the fertility behavior of immigrant women arriving to Canada before age 19 using the 20 per cent sample of the Canadian Census from 1991 through 2006. Findings show that fertility increases with age at immigration, and is particularly high for those immigrating in their late teens. This pattern prevails regardless of the country of origin or whether the mother tongue of the migrant is an official language in Canada or not. We do not find a ‘critical age’ at which the behavior of migrants with and without official mother tongue start to diverge by more, even though the fertility of migrants without official mother tongue is always higher on average. Formal education matters as the fertility of immigrants who arrived to Canada before adulthood and graduated from college is similar to that of their native peers regardless of their age of arrival. However, the fertility of those with less than tertiary education increasingly diverges with age at migration from similarly educated Canadians. PMID:23800074

  6. Very Low Head Turbine Deployment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P.; Williams, C.; Sasseville, Remi; Anderson, N.

    2014-03-01

    The Very Low Head (VLH) turbine is a recent turbine technology developed in Europe for low head sites in the 1.4 - 4.2 m range. The VLH turbine is primarily targeted for installation at existing hydraulic structures to provide a low impact, low cost, yet highly efficient solution. Over 35 VLH turbines have been successfully installed in Europe and the first VLH deployment for North America is underway at Wasdell Falls in Ontario, Canada. Deployment opportunities abound in Canada with an estimated 80,000 existing structures within North America for possible low-head hydro development. There are several new considerations and challenges for the deployment of the VLH turbine technology in Canada in adapting to the hydraulic, environmental, electrical and social requirements. Several studies were completed to determine suitable approaches and design modifications to mitigate risk and confirm turbine performance. Diverse types of existing weirs and spillways pose certain hydraulic design challenges. Physical and numerical modelling of the VLH deployment alternatives provided for performance optimization. For this application, studies characterizing the influence of upstream obstacles using water tunnel model testing as well as full-scale prototype flow dynamics testing were completed. A Cold Climate Adaptation Package (CCA) was developed to allow year-round turbine operation in ice covered rivers. The CCA package facilitates turbine extraction and accommodates ice forces, frazil ice, ad-freezing and cold temperatures that are not present at the European sites. The Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG) presents some unique challenges in meeting Canadian utility interconnection requirements. Specific attention to the frequency driver control and protection requirements resulted in a driver design with greater over-voltage capability for the PMG as well as other key attributes. Environmental studies in Europe included fish friendliness testing comprised of multiple in

  7. Canada's e-health journey and HIMSS Analytics' Canada Information and Communications Technology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    In spring 2007, HIMSS Analytics began developing its first Canada Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Study. Less than one year later, 38 RHAs, DHAs and HAs are already on board, with some 20 more scheduled to participate by year's end. Why are so many Canadian provincial healthcare delivery organizations now participating in HIMSS Analytics' Canada ICT Study? The answer is tied to the character of the HIMSS study, the value offered to all participants and specific Canadian healthcare issues that are addressed by the study.

  8. Real wages in Australia and Canada, 1870-1913

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greasley, David; Madsen, Jakob Brøchner; Oxley, Les

    2000-01-01

    Australia's and Canada's real wage experiences between 1870 and 1913 were distinctive. Faster productivity growth underpinned Canada's overtaking of Australia's wage levels. The globalization forces of migration and trade also shaped their comparative wages, principally by reducing wage growth...... in Canada. Immigration increased slightly Australia's real wages, but reduced wage levels in Canada, and tempered there the beneficial effects of rising productivity and improving terms of trade. In contrast, wage earners' share of national income rose after 1890 in Australia, with the productivity slowdown...... hitting chiefly rents and profits. Distributional shifts favouring wage earners in Australia, and the depressing effects of mass immigration on wages in Canada, limited Canada's wage lead before 1914, despite her faster productivity growth...

  9. Changes in Distribution of Canada Geese Nesting in Arkansas

    OpenAIRE

    Ronke, M. Eliese; Krementz, David G.

    2015-01-01

    The reintroduced Canada goose (Branta canadensis) population in Arkansas has grown in range and abundance in recent decades. We determined the geographic range of Arkansas resident Canada geese from 2004 to 2012 using volume contour maps from citizen science observations using eBird, a citizen science website, and hunter recovery locations from the U.S. Geological Survey Bird Banding Laboratory. Resulting maps indicate an increase in Canada goose encounters toward northwestern and southwester...

  10. Climate Impacts on Northern Canada: Regional Background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prowse, Terry D.; Peters, Daniel L. (Water and Climate Impacts Research Centre, Environment Canada, Dept. of Geography, Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada)). e-mail: terry.prowse@ec.gc.caa; Furgal, Chris (Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent Univ., Peterborough, ON (Canada)); Bonsal, Barrie R. (National Water Research Inst., National Hydrology Research Centre, Environment Canada, Saskatoon, SK (Canada))

    2009-07-15

    Understanding the implications of climate change on northern Canada requires a background about the size and diversity of its human and biogeophysical systems. Occupying an area of almost 40% of Canada, with one-third of this contained in Arctic islands, Canada's northern territories consist of a diversity of physical environments unrivaled around the circumpolar north. Major ecozones composed of a range of landforms, climate, vegetation, and wildlife include: Arctic, boreal and taiga cordillera; boreal and taiga plains; taiga shield; and northern and southern Arctic. Although generally characterized by a cold climate, there is an enormous range in air temperature with mean annual values being as high as -5 deg C in the south to as low as -20 deg C in the high Arctic islands. A similar contrast characterizes precipitation, which can be >700 mm y-1 in some southern alpine regions to as low as 50 mm y-1 over islands of the high Arctic. Major freshwater resources are found within most northern ecozones, varying from large glaciers or ice caps and lakes to extensive wetlands and peat lands. Most of the North's renewable water, however, is found within its major river networks and originates in more southerly headwaters. Ice covers characterize the freshwater systems for multiple months of the year while permafrost prevails in various forms, dominating the terrestrial landscape. The marine environment, which envelops the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, is dominated by seasonal to multiyear sea ice often several meters thick that plays a key role in the regional climate. Almost two-thirds of northern Canadian communities are located along coastlines with the entire population being just over 100 000. Most recent population growth has been dominated by an expansion of nonaboriginals, primarily the result of resource development and the growth of public administration. The economies of northern communities, however, remain quite mixed with traditional land

  11. Hunger among Inuit children in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne C. Findlay

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives. Inuit populations may be at increased risk for experiencing poor nutrition or hunger due to limited access and availability to food. The prevalence and correlates of parental perceptions of hunger among a nationally representative sample of Inuit children in Canada have not yet been reported. Design. Data are from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS. Sociodemographic information, dietary behaviours and hunger status were parent-reported via a household interview for Inuit children aged 2–5 years (n=1,234. Prevalence of hunger was calculated among Inuit children by sociodemographic factors and by dietary behaviours. In addition, a multivariate logistic regression model was conducted to determine factors associated with parental perception of ever experiencing hunger. Results. The prevalence of Inuit children in Canada aged 2–5 years ever experiencing hunger was 24.4%. Children who were reported to have experienced hunger consumed milk and milk products (p<0.001; fish, eggs and meat (p<0.05; fruits (p<0.001; and vegetables (p<0.001 significantly less often than never-hungry children. Fast food and processed foods, soft drinks and juice, and salty snacks, sweets and desserts were consumed as often as never-hungry children (all p>0.05. The majority (81% of Inuit parents/guardians of ever-hungry children sought help from family or friends. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing hunger include sociodemographic characteristics (such as income and household size, living in an Inuit region and living in a community with cultural activities. Conclusion. About 1 in 4 Inuit children were reported by their parents to have experienced hunger, and hunger was associated with region, sociodemographic and community factors. Future research could further examine the impact of ever experiencing hunger on the health status of Inuit children and their families in Canada.

  12. Canada : oil, gas, and the new Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebert, R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Political Science; Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Centre for Military and Strategic Studies

    2010-07-01

    This presentation provided a broad overview of the geopolitical issues affecting the massive transformation of the Arctic resulting from resource development, globalization, and climate change. Two Arctics are emerging, notably one European and one North American. Oil and gas companies are investing heavily in the North, and there is continued debate over pipelines and projects, but the viability of projects can shift abruptly from technological and political change. Recent examples include the emergence of shale gas, the possibility of the United States becoming a gas exporter, and the Deepwater Horizon disaster. In terms of Maritime jurisdictions and boundaries, a comparison was presented regarding the Canadian and Russian claims to the continental shelf. International cooperation and a commitment to peaceful means can be seen in the Ilulissat Declaration, the acceptance of the United Nations Convention of the Law of the Sea as rules, the scientific cooperation of Canada, the United States, and Denmark, and the recent boundary agreement between Russia and Norway. The positions of the main players in the new geopolitics of the North were outlined, particularly with respect to Russia, the United States, Norway, Denmark, and Canada. Their recent policy statements and developing arctic force capabilities were summarized. Canada's more assertive Arctic policy was outlined in more detail along with the country's base locations and recent security actions in the North. The main issues facing nations with interests in the North will be maritime and aerospace; understanding the new players on the scene; and new technological developments. 10 figs., 5 refs.

  13. Hunger among Inuit children in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Leanne C.; Langlois, Kellie A.; Kohen, Dafna E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Inuit populations may be at increased risk for experiencing poor nutrition or hunger due to limited access and availability to food. The prevalence and correlates of parental perceptions of hunger among a nationally representative sample of Inuit children in Canada have not yet been reported. Design Data are from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). Sociodemographic information, dietary behaviours and hunger status were parent-reported via a household interview for Inuit children aged 2–5 years (n=1,234). Prevalence of hunger was calculated among Inuit children by sociodemographic factors and by dietary behaviours. In addition, a multivariate logistic regression model was conducted to determine factors associated with parental perception of ever experiencing hunger. Results The prevalence of Inuit children in Canada aged 2–5 years ever experiencing hunger was 24.4%. Children who were reported to have experienced hunger consumed milk and milk products (psweets and desserts were consumed as often as never-hungry children (all p>0.05). The majority (81%) of Inuit parents/guardians of ever-hungry children sought help from family or friends. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing hunger include sociodemographic characteristics (such as income and household size), living in an Inuit region and living in a community with cultural activities. Conclusion About 1 in 4 Inuit children were reported by their parents to have experienced hunger, and hunger was associated with region, sociodemographic and community factors. Future research could further examine the impact of ever experiencing hunger on the health status of Inuit children and their families in Canada. PMID:23620871

  14. Modeling the cardiac surgery workforce in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderby, Sonia A; Carter, Michael W; Latham, Timothy; Ouzounian, Maral; Hassan, Ansar; Tang, Gilbert H; Teng, Carolyn J; Kingsbury, Kori; Feindel, Christopher M

    2010-08-01

    Limited employment opportunities for recently trained cardiac surgeons are deterring medical students from entering cardiac surgery residency programs. Given the lengthy training period and the aging of both the general population and currently practicing cardiac surgeons, this reduced enrollment raises concerns about the adequacy of the future cardiac surgery workforce. A workforce model was developed to explore the future need for cardiac surgeons in Canada. A novel system dynamics model was developed to simulate the supply and demand for cardiac surgery in Canada between 2008 and 2030 to identify whether an excess or shortage of surgeons would exist. Several different scenarios were examined, including varying surgeon productivity, revascularization rates, and residency enrollment rates. The simulation results of various scenarios are presented. In the base case, a surgeon shortage is expected to develop by 2025, although this depends on surgeons' response to demand-supply gap changes. An alternative scenario in which residency enrollment directly relates to the presence of unemployed surgeons also projects substantial shortages after 2021. The model results indicate that if residency enrollment rates remain at the 2009 level an alarming shortage may develop soon, possibly reaching almost 50% of the Canadian cardiac surgical workforce. These workforce model results project an eventual cardiac surgeon shortage in Canada. This study highlights the possibility of a crisis in cardiac surgery and emphasizes the urgency with which enrollment into cardiac surgery training programs and the employability of recently trained cardiac surgery graduates need to be addressed. Copyright 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Progress against major depression in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Scott B

    2002-10-01

    Generally, public health strategies for major depression have focused on case-finding, public and professional education, and disease-management strategies. In principle, increased rates of treatment utilization and improved treatment outcomes should lead to improved mental health at the population level. Progress of this sort, however, has been difficult to confirm. The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) is a large-scale longitudinal study of a representative sample drawn from the Canadian population. To date, Statistics Canada has released data from 3 NPHS cycles: 1994-1995, 1996-1997, and 1998-1999. Treatment utilization and major depression measures were employed in the NPHS survey, providing a unique source of longitudinal Canadian data. In this study, major depression point prevalence (defined using a predictive instrument for annual major depressive episode [MDE] prevalence and responses from a distress scale) and associated treatment utilization were evaluated over time. Between 1994-1995 and 1995-1996, the proportion of persons with depression receiving antidepressant treatment increased dramatically, from 18.2% (12.3% to 22.1%) in 1994-1995 to 32.6% (23.0% to 42.2%) in 1998-1999. Point prevalence of major depression was 2.4%, 1.8%, and 1.9% in the 3 NPHS iterations. Data from the NPHS suggest public health progress against major depression in Canada. More people with major depression in Canada are receiving treatment, and these changes may have been associated with improved population health status. However, both random variation and extraneous societal factors could account for the observed trends in prevalence. It is impossible to relate changes in utilization directly to population health status using the NPHS data.

  16. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) RADIOSONDE GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Radiosonde GCPEx dataset provides measurements of pressure, temperature, humidity, and winds collected by Vaisala...

  17. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) RADIOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Radiometer GCPEx dataset contains retrievals of temperature, water vapor, relative humidity, liquid water profiles...

  18. GPM GROUND VALIDATION METEOROLOGICAL TOWER ENVIRONMENT CANADA GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Meteorological Tower Environment Canada GCPEx dataset provides temperature, relative humidity, 10 m winds, pressure and solar radiation...

  19. Social policy and practice in Canada: a history

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Finkel, Alvin

    2006-01-01

    ..., - Social policy and practice in Canada : a history / Alvin Finkel. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN : ---. ISBN : ---- . Canada- Social policy. . Public welfare- Canada- History. . Welfare state- Canada- History. I. Title. HV.F  .' C-- Cover and text design by Sa...

  20. THE POLICING OF MAJOR EVENTS IN CANADA: LESSONS FROM TORONTO’S G20 AND VANCOUVER’S OLYMPICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wes Pue

    2015-10-01

    tenue de grands événements, comme les événements sportifs ou les grandes conférences internationales, mène au chaos, au déploiement d’escouades anti-émeute et à des arrestations massives. Un retour sur les événements entourant la tenue d’un sommet du G20 à Toronto et des Jeux olympiques d’hiver de Vancouver nous donne un aperçu des choses qui peuvent bien fonctionner et des dérapages possibles à ces occasions. Dans le présent article, nous passons en revue ces événements afin d’explorer les lacunes que comporte le droit canadien, y compris les écarts entre le droit théorique et le droit pratique.      Les paramètres juridiques qui régissent les événements de grande envergure influent sur l’efficacité des mesures liées à la sécurité publique, à la restriction des risques de chaos et à la protection des libertés fondamentales. Fait étonnant, les grands événements se déroulent souvent sans qu’un cadre juridique ait été mis au point, ce qui mène à la confusion entre les autorités policières fédérales et locales et les autorités civiles. Nous nous penchons tour à tour sur l’application passée des règles de common law, d’un règlement de la ville de Vancouver, de la Loi sur la protection des ouvrages publics de l’Ontario et des dispositions relatives à la surveillance policière et à la sécurité de la Loi sur les missions étrangères et les organisations internationales (loi fédérale afin de déterminer les types de mesures juridiques les plus susceptibles d’assurer une gestion réussie des événements. Étant donné que les grands événements tenus au Canada sont planifiés le plus souvent dans la pénombre du droit, en l’absence d’une autorisation juridique ou de directives législatives claires régissant les mesures qui sont nécessaires, tant la gestion efficace que les libertés ordinaires sont compromises. Lorsque la situation dégénère et que le pire survient, les relations entre la

  1. ACCC's Response to Industry Canada's Consultation on Improving Canada's Digital Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Canadian Community Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As the national and international voice representing over 150 publicly-funded colleges, institutes, polytechnics, cegeps, university colleges and universities with a college mandate, the Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC) welcomes the opportunity to provide input to Industry Canada's consultation on a Digital Economy Strategy for…

  2. Response to Industry Canada's Consultation Paper "Seizing Canada's Moment: Moving Forward in Science, Technology and Innovation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Wayne D.; Turk, James L.

    2014-01-01

    According to these authors, Canada is in need of a new science policy and strategy. The current direction of the federal government is threatening to impede scientific progress and compromise the integrity and independence of public science. This is reflected in the government's waning commitment to funding basic research; its attempts to steer…

  3. Active Canada 20/20: A physical activity plan for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C; Faulkner, Guy; Costas Bradstreet, Christa; Duggan, Mary; Tremblay, Mark S

    2016-03-16

    Physical inactivity is a pressing public health concern. In this commentary we argue that Canada's approach to increasing physical activity (PA) has been fragmented and has lacked coordination, funding and a strategic approach. We then describe a potential solution in Active Canada 20/20 (AC 20/20), which provides both a national plan and a commitment to action from non-government and public sectors with a view to engaging corporate Canada and the general public. It outlines a road map for initiating, coordinating and implementing proactive initiatives to address this prominent health risk factor. The identified actions are based on the best available evidence and have been endorsed by the majority of representatives in the relevant sectors. The next crucial steps are to engage all those involved in public health promotion, service provision and advocacy at the municipal, provincial and national levels in order to incorporate AC 20/20 principles into practice and planning and thus increase the PA level of every person in Canada. Further, governments, as well as the private, not-for-profit and philanthropic sectors, should demonstrate leadership and continue their efforts toward providing the substantial and sustained resources needed to recalibrate Canadians' habitual PA patterns; this will ultimately improve the overall health of our citizens.

  4. Social Science Research in Canada and Government Information Policy: The Statistics Canada Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Kirsti

    1998-01-01

    Identified the effects of government information policy on accessibility, use, and users by investigating policy effects on a government agency, Statistics Canada. Presents a case study and discusses bibliometric research on the use of statistics sources, examining Canadian social science journal articles in economics, education, geography,…

  5. Recovery in Canada: toward social equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piat, Myra; Sabetti, Judith

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews evolution of the recovery paradigm in Canadian mental health. We first trace the origins and development of the recovery concept through the literature, followed by an examination of how the recovery concept has been implemented in national and provincial mental health policy since publication of the 2006 Kirby Commission Report. Based on consultations with Canadian policymakers, and an examination of available policy documents, we explore how the dual theme of 'recovery' and 'well-being', adopted by the Mental Health Commission of Canada in its 2009 strategy: Toward Recovery and Well-being - A Framework For a Mental Health Strategy has subsequently played out in mental health policymaking at the provincial level. Findings reveal mixed support for recovery as a guiding principle for mental health reform in Canada. While policies in some provinces reflect widespread support for recovery, and strong identification with the aspirations of the consumer movement; other provinces have shifted to population-based, wellness paradigms that privilege evidence-based services and professional expertise. The recognition of social equality for people who experience mental illness emerges as an important value in Canadian mental health policy, cutting across the conceptual divide between recovery and well-being.

  6. Mineral Facilities of Latin America and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Rachel; Eros, Mike; Quintana-Velazquez, Meliany

    2006-01-01

    This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries of aluminum, cement, coal, copper, diamond, gold, iron and steel, nickel, platinum-group metals, salt, and silver, among others. Records include attributes such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity if applicable, and generalized coordinates. The data were compiled from multiple sources, including the 2003 and 2004 USGS Minerals Yearbooks (Latin America and Candada volume), data to be published in the 2005 Minerals Yearbook Latin America and Canada Volume, minerals statistics and information from the USGS minerals information Web site (minerals.usgs.gov/minerals), and data collected by USGS minerals information country specialists. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies,and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information and explanation is available from the country specialists.

  7. Canada Committee on Natural Resources Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-26

    The Canada Committee for Natural Resources (CCNR) met on 2 occasions during the reporting period. The first was to discuss recommendations regarding Canada's National Strategy for Agri-Food Research and Technology Transfer 1997-2002. This involved the development and application of a database on existing programs covering the sustainable use of natural resources. Another growing concern for Canadians, the impact of agricultural inputs on water quality, was also discussed. The second meeting focused on the issue of greenhouse gases and carbon sequestration and the progress in the Climate Change Funding Initiative in Agriculture program. This report includes a status report on soil resources, water resources and air quality. It includes sections on the activities of the CCNR and issues of national interest regarding agriculture research. Priorities for agriculture research include greenhouse gas mitigation, sinks and sources. The report referred to: (1) the impact of mitigation on nutrient cycle, (2) full-life cycle consideration in food and fiber production, (3) the use of classical and eco-technologies, (4) applications for whole farm systems and associated watersheds, and (5) the importance for landscape ecology. Research into processes and fluxes include studies of key soil processes and components, the effects of global change on processes and fluxes of greenhouse gases, and plant pests. Research into assessment methods include national accounting and verification, ecological models, measurement techniques, and monitoring carbon sources and sinks. The socio-economic considerations and adoptions examine impacts and adaptation, and economic analysis. 1 tab.

  8. The osteoporosis care gap in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulos P

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of a fragility fracture is a major risk factor for osteoporosis, and should be an indicator for osteoporosis diagnosis and therapy. However, the extent to which patients who fracture are assessed and treated for osteoporosis is not clear. Methods We performed a review of the literature to identify the practice patterns in the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in adults over the age of 40 who experience a fragility fracture in Canada. Searches were performed in MEDLINE (1966 to January 2, 2003 and CINAHL (1982 to February 1, 2003 databases. Results There is evidence of a care gap between the occurrence of a fragility fracture and the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in Canada. The proportion of individuals with a fragility fracture who received an osteoporosis diagnostic test or physician diagnosis ranged from 1.7% to 50%. Therapies such as hormone replacement therapy, bisphosphonates or calcitonin were being prescribed to 5.2% to 37.5% of patients. Calcium and vitamin D supplement intake was variable, and ranged between 2.8% to 61.6% of patients. Conclusion Many Canadians who experience fragility fracture are not receiving osteoporosis management for the prevention of future fractures.

  9. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera records for Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre de Tonnancour

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The following species of Curculionoidea are newly recorded from the Canadian province of Quebec: Coelocephalapion emaciipes (Fall, 1898; Ischnopterapion virens (Herbst, 1797; Omphalapion hookerorum (Kirby, 1808; Perapion punctinasum (J.B. Smith, 1884 (all Brentidae; Anthonomus robustulus LeConte, 1876; Pseudanthonomus helvolus (Boheman, 1843; Bagous magister LeConte, 1876; Bagous tanneri O’Brien, 1979; Buchananius striatus (LeConte, 1876; Ceutorhynchus bolteri Dietz, 1896; Ceutorhynchus pallidactylus (Marsham, 1802; Ceutorhynchus pauxillus Dietz, 1896; Conotrachelus buchanani Schoof, 1942; Conotrachelus pusillus LeConte, 1878; Conotrachelus recessus (Casey, 1910; Curculio rubidus (Gyllenhal, 1835; Cylindrocopturus longulus (LeConte, 1876; Hadroplontus litura (Fabricius, 1775; Hypera rumicis (Linnaeus, 1758; Lixus terminalis LeConte, 1876; Myosides seriehispidus Roelofs, 1873; Phloeotribus dentifrons (Blackman, 1921; Plocamus echidna (LeConte, 1876; Scolytus muticus Say, 1824; Sirocalodes sericans (LeConte, 1876; Smicronyx sculpticollis Casey, 1892 (all Curculionidae. Among these, Buchananius striatus, Conotrachelus buchanani, Conotrachelus pusillus, and Curculio rubidus (all Curculionidae are also recorded from Canada for the first time. The latter is also newly reported from Ontario. Collecting data are provided for Lixus punctinasus LeConte, 1876, previously reported to occur in Canada without any further information, and for Choragus sayi LeConte, 1876 (Anthribidae and Rhyssomatus aequalis Horn, 1873 (Curculionidae, both previously recorded from Quebec, also without further details.

  10. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera) records for Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tonnancour, Pierre; Anderson, Robert S; Bouchard, Patrice; Chantal, Claude; Dumont, Stéphane; Vigneault, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The following species of Curculionoidea are newly recorded from the Canadian province of Quebec: Coelocephalapion emaciipes (Fall, 1898); Ischnopterapion virens (Herbst, 1797); Omphalapion hookerorum (Kirby, 1808); Perapion punctinasum (J.B. Smith, 1884) (all Brentidae); Anthonomus robustulus LeConte, 1876; Pseudanthonomus helvolus (Boheman, 1843); Bagous magister LeConte, 1876; Bagous tanneri O'Brien, 1979; Buchananius striatus (LeConte, 1876); Ceutorhynchus bolteri Dietz, 1896; Ceutorhynchus pallidactylus (Marsham, 1802); Ceutorhynchus pauxillus Dietz, 1896; Conotrachelus buchanani Schoof, 1942; Conotrachelus pusillus LeConte, 1878; Conotrachelus recessus (Casey, 1910); Curculio rubidus (Gyllenhal, 1835); Cylindrocopturus longulus (LeConte, 1876); Hadroplontus litura (Fabricius, 1775); Hypera rumicis (Linnaeus, 1758); Lixus terminalis LeConte, 1876; Myosides seriehispidus Roelofs, 1873; Phloeotribus dentifrons (Blackman, 1921); Plocamus echidna (LeConte, 1876); Scolytus muticus Say, 1824; Sirocalodes sericans (LeConte, 1876); Smicronyx sculpticollis Casey, 1892 (all Curculionidae). Among these, Buchananius striatus, Conotrachelus buchanani, Conotrachelus pusillus, and Curculio rubidus (all Curculionidae) are also recorded from Canada for the first time. The latter is also newly reported from Ontario. Collecting data are provided for Lixus punctinasus LeConte, 1876, previously reported to occur in Canada without any further information, and for Choragus sayi LeConte, 1876 (Anthribidae) and Rhyssomatus aequalis Horn, 1873 (Curculionidae), both previously recorded from Quebec, also without further details.

  11. Improving Canada's Marine Navigation System through e-Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Breton

    2016-06-01

    The conclusion proposed is that on-going work with key partners and stakeholders can be used as the primary mechanism to identify e-Navigation related innovation and needs, and to prioritize next steps. Moving forward in Canada, implementation of new e-navigation services will continue to be stakeholder driven, and used to drive improvements to Canada's marine navigation system.

  12. The Analysis of Adult Immigrants' Learning System in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukan, Nataliya; Barabash, Olena; Busko, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In the article the problem of adult immigrants' learning in Canada has been studied. The main objectives of the article are defined as: analysis of scientific and pedagogical literature which highlights different aspects of the research problem; analysis of the adult immigrants' learning system in Canada; and the perspectives for creative…

  13. Supporting Democracy: The South Africa-Canada Program on ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The South Africa-Canada Program on Governance (PoG) was born in anticipation of this historic transition. It was conceived during Nelson Mandela's 1992 visit to Canada, when he asked the Canadian government to assist the people of South Africa in their preparations for democracy. In 1993, the Canadian International ...

  14. Enige aspecten van de hedendaagse migratie van Nederlanders naar Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinman, A.S.

    1952-01-01

    After the Second World War most of the restrictions against entry to Canada as an immigrant were abolished, although the admission of farmers and farm workers has never been restricted. The ideas about Canada's immigrational capacity fluctuated with the economic situation; after 1950 the doors were

  15. Canada improving child nutrition in Vietnam | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    14 déc. 2015 ... IDRC and Global Affairs Canada, through the Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF), are contributing $1.16 million to support researchers from Vietnam's National Institute of Nutrition and Canada's Ryerson University to implement proven methods to improve children's health.

  16. Canada-Latin America and the Caribbean Research Exchange ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  17. Inaugural recipients of the Hopper-Bhatia Canada Fund | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-31

    Jan 31, 2018 ... Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and ...

  18. Canada-Latin America and the Caribbean Research Exchange ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Like the three earlier phases (002624, 004097 and 101783), this project will allow the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) to offer academics (graduate students, professors, researchers) from Canada and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) opportunities for face-to-face dialogue on ...

  19. All projects related to Canada | Page 3 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In the developing world, millions of children do not have access to basic quality education. Region: Kenya, Canada. Program: ... Region: Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Viet Nam, South Asia, Far East Asia, United States, Canada. Program: Employment and ...

  20. Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Campylobacter spp. in Retail Chicken, Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, David; Avery, Brent P.; Parmley, E. Jane; Deckert, Anne; Carson, Carolee A.; Dutil, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    During 2005–2010, the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance identified increased prevalence of ciprofloxacin (a fluororquinolone) resistance among Campylobacter isolates from retail chicken in British Columbia (4%–17%) and Saskatchewan (6%–11%), Canada. Fluoroquinolones are critically important to human medicine and are not labeled for use in poultry in Canada. PMID:23764141

  1. All projects related to Canada | Page 10 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... Nigeria, Senegal, Canada, Burkina Faso. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 2,600,000.00. Scaling up development, production of CBPP vaccine for cattle in Kenya. Project. This project will allow researchers from Canada and Kenya to field trial a vaccine for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.

  2. Canada-India Institutional Cooperation Project: International Partnerships in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Alix

    The Canada-India Institutional Cooperation Project (CIICP) is a joint venture by the Association of Canadian Community Colleges and the governments of India and Canada designed to contribute to human resource development in India's polytechnic system. Specifically, the project seeks to develop replicable models of institutional development in 13…

  3. New South Africa–Canada Research Chairs Initiative | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-12-08

    Dec 8, 2016 ... They build on NRF's existing South African Research Chairs Initiative (SARChI), as well as on the Industrial Research Chairs program, funded in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the Canada Research Chairs Program (CRCP). Funded jointly by ...

  4. Apprenticeship Programme Requirements and Apprenticeship Completion Rates in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    The past two decades have seen considerable growth in new apprenticeship registrations in Canada. However, this has not been matched by a corresponding increase in completions. Across provinces, trades and time, there is considerable variation in apprenticeship completion rates. In Canada, apprenticeship programmes are provincially regulated and…

  5. The Analysis Of Adult Immigrants’ Learning System In Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukan Nataliya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the problem of adult immigrants’ learning in Canada has been studied. The main objectives of the article are defined as: analysis of scientific and pedagogical literature which highlights different aspects of the research problem; analysis of the adult immigrants’ learning system in Canada; and the perspectives for creative implementation of Canadian experience in Ukraine.

  6. Publication Canada Among Nations, de 2012 à 2014 | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Université Carleton à Ottawa, à faire paraître trois volumes de Canada Among Nations (CAN), ouvrage dont on a dit qu'il s'agissait des meilleures annales publiées au pays sur les relations internationales du Canada. Chaque année, CAN ...

  7. CAUT Response to Industry Canada's 2014 S&T Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Association of University Teachers, 2015

    2015-01-01

    At the beginning of December 2014, Canada's Prime Minister and Minister of State (Science and Technology) released their science, technology and innovation strategy and launched the Canada First Excellence Research Fund (CFERF). This brief looks at the implications of the proposed policy on academic research and on research and development…

  8. Changes in distribution of Canada geese nesting in Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krementz, David G.; Ronke, M. Eliese

    2015-01-01

    The reintroduced Canada goose (Branta canadensis) population in Arkansas has grown in range and abundance in recent decades. We determined the geographic range of Arkansas resident Canada geese from 2004 to 2012 using volume contour maps from citizen science observations using eBird, a citizen science website, and hunter recovery locations from the U.S. Geological Survey Bird Banding Laboratory. Resulting maps indicate an increase in Canada goose encounters toward northwestern and southwestern Arkansas from the original relocations in the Arkansas River valley. We examined movement of Canada geese banded and recovered in Arkansas by determining the distance and angle of movement between initial and final encounter locations; 25% moved east, and 17% went west. The average distance moved from banding to recovery was 50 km (SE = 1 km). Recoveries of Canada geese banded in Arkansas were greatest in the Mississippi Flyway (58% of all geese) followed by the Central Flyway (37%) with some representation in both the Atlantic (4%) and Pacific flyways (0.9%). Movement from Arkansas to other states and Canada was influenced by goose age and sex. Older individuals traveled longer distances than younger ones, and females traveled longer distances than males. Our findings suggest that recently established Canada geese in Arkansas have slowly expanded within the state to the northwest and southwest with the expansion to the east being important now. Movement of Arkansas resident Canada geese on molt-migration can contribute to management issues in other states and provinces.

  9. Ecology of Canada lynx in southern boreal forests [Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith B. Aubry; Gary M. Koehler; John R. Squires

    2000-01-01

    Canada lynx occur throughout boreal forests of North America, but ecological conditions in southern regions differ in many respects from those in Canada and Alaska. To evaluate the extent to which lynx ecology and population biology may differ between these regions, we review existing information from southern boreal forests and compare our findings to...

  10. Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada Partnership ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    For almost 30 years, IDRC has enabled the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada to provide Canadian universities with liaison and information services on ... International Development Week, observed February 4-10 this year, is an opportunity to focus on Canada's contributions to global development.

  11. Leaving Sweden behind: Gains in life expectancy in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Nathalie; Le Serbon, Emilie; Rostila, Mikael

    2015-06-01

    Sweden and Canada are known for quality of living and exceedingly high life expectancy, but recent data on how these countries compare are lacking. We measured life expectancy in Canada and Sweden during the past decade, and identified factors responsible for changes over time. We calculated life expectancy at birth for Canada and Sweden annually from 2000 to 2010, and determined the ages and causes of death responsible for the gap between the two countries using Arriaga's method. We determined how population growth, ageing, and mortality influenced the number of deaths over time. During 2000-2010, life expectancy in Canada caught up with Sweden for men, and surpassed Sweden by 0.4 years for women. Sweden lost ground owing to a slower reduction in circulatory and tumour mortality after age 65 years compared with Canada. Nonetheless, population ageing increased the number of deaths in Canada, especially for mental and nervous system disorders. In Sweden, the number of deaths decreased. In only one decade, life expectancy in Canada caught up and surpassed Sweden due to rapid improvements in circulatory and tumour mortality. Population ageing increased the number of deaths in Canada, potentially stressing the health care system more than in Sweden. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  12. Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network : Building African Capacity ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network : Building African Capacity for HIV/AIDS Prevention Trials. The Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network (CAPT Network) was formed through a capacity building grant from the Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI). The Network comprises eight African centres (four in Uganda, ...

  13. All projects related to Canada | Page 2 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-12-01

    Malignant brain tumours are the most common cause of death among children with cancer, but there is no known cure. This project will advance research in this important field. Start Date: December 1, 2015. Topic: BRAIN, MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH, CANCER, THERAPY, CANADA. Region: India, Canada, Israel.

  14. Health inequities in Canada: intersectional frameworks and practices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hankivsky, Olena; De Leeuw, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    ... recycled) that is processed chlorineand acid-free. Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Health inequities in Canada : intersectional frameworks and practices / edited by Olena Hankivsky. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-7748-1975-6 (bound); ISBN 978-0-7748-1972-5 (pbk) 1. Health services accessibi...

  15. Open Source in Canada's Public Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Leibovitch

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The story of the growth of open source use in Canada has been far more a matter of evolution than revolution, so quiet in its pace that its progress has been difficult to measure. This has posed many challenges to Canadian open source advocates in their efforts to ensure that their country does not lag behind the rest of the world in understanding the social and business benefits open source provides. Perhaps some of the leading soldiers in the trenches might be our civil servants who protect the public purse. In addition to managing and minimizing the costs of delivering necessary services, public sector projects should also advance the social good through the delicate balance of transparency and efficiency.

  16. Teaching Inquiry in Nigeria and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strubbe, Linda

    2015-08-01

    Inquiry is a teaching strategy in which student work mirrors authentic scientific research: students have ownership over their learning path, and learning scientific concepts (e.g., properties of light, motion in a gravitational field) is intertwined with learning scientific practices (e.g., asking questions, planning an investigation, constructing explanations). I will describe inquiry and education research showing its effectiveness; and I will present inquiry-based astronomy curricula and assessment strategies we have designed for undergraduate and graduate courses in Nigeria and Canada: an activity on the cosmic distance ladder (part of a short course in Abuja); a course on order-of-magnitude astronomy problem solving (Toronto); and new education research from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative at the University of British Columbia (where I am a new postdoc).

  17. Western Canada SAGD drilling and completions performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchin, S.; Tucker, R. [Ziff Energy Group (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is a thermal recovery method used to enhance oil recovery. In 2009, Ziff Energy carried out a study on SAGD drilling and completions performance in Western Canada. This paper presents the methodology used to assess drilling performances and the results obtained. This study was conducted on 159 SAGD well pairs and 1,833 delineation wells in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin from late 2004 to fall 2008. The drilling performance assessment was calculated from several aspects including well quality, drilling and completions cost performance and drilling time analysis. This study provided a detailed analysis of drilling and completions costs of SAGD which can help companies to improve their performance.

  18. ATLAS Canada lightpath data transfer trial

    CERN Document Server

    Kost, C J; Caron, B; Hong, W

    2003-01-01

    Emerging grids play a significant role in the computational, data, storage, and network requirements of high energy physics experiments coming online in the next few years. One such requirement, the bulk transfer of data over advanced high speed optical networks is necessary as such experiments are highly distributed with resources and participants from research laboratories and institutions spanning the globe. This trial at the iGrid 2002 conference attempts to stress the feasibility of high speed bulk data transfer over an end-to-end lightpath, a dedicated point-to-point optical link. Specifically, the objective was to transfer 1 TB of Monte Carlo data from TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada, to CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. A rate equivalent to transferring a full CD of data every 8 s was achieved. (15 refs).

  19. Non-residential fatherhood in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Strohschein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to shed light on non-residential fatherhood in Canada. Data come from the 2012 LISA. Analysis was restricted to fathers who had children under the age of 19 (N=3,592. Approximately 17.4% were non-residential fathers. Logistic regression models indicated that being outside a marital union, low educational attainment and low income were associated with increased odds of being a non-residential father. Teen parenthood was not a statistically significant predictor. I discuss the implications of these findings as well as the need for measures that better capture variability in the living arrangements of fathers and their children. Le but de cette étude est d’éclairer le phénomène de paternité non résidentielle au Canada. Les données proviennent du sondage LISA 2012. L'analyse est limitée aux pères ayant des enfants de moins de 19 ans (N = 3 592. Environ 17,4% sont des pères non-résidentiels. Les modèles de régression logistique indiquent qu'étant hors d'une union maritale, d'avoir un faible niveau de scolarité, et de faible revenu est associé à une probabilité élevée d'être un père non-résidentiel. Être un parent adolescent n’est pas un prédicteur statistiquement significatif. Je discute des implications de ces résultats ainsi que de la nécessité de mesures qui permettent de mieux saisir la variabilité des modes de vie des pères et de leurs enfants.

  20. A National Palliative Care Strategy for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R Sean

    2018-01-01

    To identify barrier to achieving universal access to high quality palliative care in Canada, review published national strategies and frameworks to promote palliative care, examine key aspects that have been linked to successful outcomes, and make recommendations for Canada. In 2014, the World Health Organization called on members to develop and implement policies to ensure palliative care is integrated into national health services. Rapid review supplemented by the author's personal files, outreach to colleagues within the international palliative care community, review of European Association for Palliative Care publications, and a subsequent search of the table of contents of the major palliative care journals. Frameworks were found for 10 countries ranging from detailed and comprehensive multi-year strategies to more general approaches including laws guaranteeing access to palliative care services for "dying" patients or recommendations for the development of clinical infrastructure. Few formal evaluations were found minimal comparative data exist regarding the quality of care, access to palliative care services, timing of access in the disease trajectory, and patient and family satisfaction with care. Factors that appear to be associated with success include: 1) input and early involvement of senior policy makers; 2) comprehensive strategies that address major barriers to universal access and that involve the key constituents; 3) a focus on enhancing the evidence base and developing a national system of quality reporting; and 4) substantial and sustained government investment. Comprehensive national strategies appear to improve access to high quality palliative care for persons with serious illness and their families. Such strategies require sustained government funding and address barriers related to infrastructure, professional and public education, workforce shortages, and an inadequate evidence base.

  1. Canada 2050 : four long-term scenarios for Canada's energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The Energy Sector of Natural Resources Canada initiated the Energy Technology Futures project in 1998 to develop a set of viable scenarios of what Canada's energy system could potentially look like in 30 to 50 years. The objective was to see what the effect of new technologies might have on our ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Three independent drivers were used for developing the scenarios. These included: environmental etiquette, markets and the pace of innovation. The first scenario looked at a world in which greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions increased in all areas of the economy along with Canada's population and economic activity. The second scenario looked at a world where GHG emissions initially exhibited a downward trend to 2020. The third scenario looked at a world where GHG emissions decreased as new efficient technologies replaced GHG intensive processes. And finally, the last scenario looked at a world where GHG emissions were substantially reduced in all areas of the economy. The study clearly demonstrated that more work is needed to develop longer-term perspectives on the issue of climate change. In addition, there will be a need for long-term policy, program development and investment into science and technology. figs.

  2. Pain medicine--a new credential in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley-Forster, Patricia; Karpinski, Jolanta

    2015-06-01

    In 2010, Pain Medicine was formally recognized as a subspecialty in Canada by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, a national organization with oversight of the medical education of specialists in Canada. The first trainees began their training at the Western University, London, Canada in July, 2014. This article traces the process of Pain Medicine's development as a discipline in Canada and outlines its multiple entry routes, 2-year curriculum, and assessment procedures. The application for specialty status was initiated in 2007 with the understanding that while Anesthesiology would be the parent specialty, the curriculum would train clinicians in a multidisciplinary setting. To receive recognition as a Royal College subspecialty, Pain Medicine had to successfully pass through three phases, each stage requiring formal approval by the Committee on Specialties. The multiple entry routes to this 2-year subspecialty program are described in this article as are the objectives of training, the curriculum, assessment of competency and the practice-eligibility route to certification. The process of accreditation of new training programs across Canada is also discussed. The new Pain Medicine training program in Canada will train experts in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of the spectrum of acute pain, cancer pain and non-cancer pain problems. These physicians will become leaders in education, research, advocacy and administration of this emerging field. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cronobacter spp. (Enterobacter sakazakii): advice, policy and research in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Franco J; Farber, Jeffrey M

    2009-12-31

    Although the number of reported cases of Cronobacter infection in Canada is low, Health Canada has been actively studying this organism since 1991. After reviewing the situation at the national level and due to health concerns with powdered formulae and its international trade, in 2003, Health Canada raised this issue at the international level by proposing to revise the Code of Practice for Powdered Formulae for Infants and Young Children at the Codex Alimentarius Committee of Food Hygiene. Canada volunteered to chair the Working Group that would be developing the Code, and the Code was completed in four years. The Code contributed to an improvement in the hygienic conditions in plants manufacturing Powdered Infant Formula (PIF), resulting in a lower level of product contamination with Cronobacter species. Canada has produced a document detailing Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) for Infant Formula in Canada. Health Canada uses the GMPs as a basis for assessing the manufacturing information received in pre-market notifications for new or changed infant formulas. Health Canada does not have microbiological criteria for Cronobacter spp. in PIF; however, we are currently working on developing these criteria. At present, there are no active or passive surveillance systems for Cronobacter spp. in Canada, although this has been discussed. Health Canada has recently adapted and condensed FAO/WHO guidelines to develop a draft guidance document for the hygienic preparation and handling of PIF in home and hospitals/care settings, which outline requirements for parents, caregivers, and staff in hospitals and day-care centres. Health Canada's Bureau of Microbial Hazards conducts research on the ecology, biology and pathogenesis of Cronobacter spp. Some of the research projects include specific aspects of molecular typing, virulence studies involving animal models, as well as in vitro tissue culture work to examine adhesion and invasion. Collaborative research is also being

  4. Canada's Supreme Court abolishes 'promise of the patent'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, John; Gloor, Alex

    2018-01-01

    The Supreme Court of Canada has done away with the 'promise of the patent' doctrine. This doctrine invalidated patents to numerous otherwise useful inventions from 2005 to 2016. The Supreme Court of Canada has clarified that the statutory utility requirement requires only a scintilla of utility related to the subject matter of the invention. This utility must have been demonstrated or soundly predicted as of the Canadian filing date. The decision brings increased certainty to Canada's patent system and more closely aligns it with international norms.

  5. Harnessing the potential - Atlantic Canada`s oil and gas industry : Newfoundland Ocean Industries special releases or publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    A comprehensive overview of Atlantic Canada`s oil and gas industry is presented, demonstrating the importance of oil and gas resources and their related industries to Atlantic Canada. The objective of the report is to provide a basis for a strategy to optimize opportunities within the region from the oil and gas sector. The report reviews the current status of the industry, including the region`s resource potential and the oil and gas developments currently underway. The evolution of the oil and gas industry is discussed in terms of value chain components. A broad assessment of the region`s supply, labour force, infrastructure, training, and research and development capabilities is presented, followed by a description of the industry`s potential, its regulatory framework and the barriers and constraints affecting industry development. Appendices contain a chronological history of major events in Atlantic Canada`s oil and gas industry (Appendix A); and overview of the Atlantic Accord and the Canada-Nova Scotia Accord`s equalization offset provisions (Appendix B); a value chain matrix, detailing some 60 categories of industry requirements and a capsule assessment of the region`s ability to meet them (Appendix C); and a listing of research and development institutions in Atlantic Canada, including their areas of specialization (Appendix D).

  6. 19 CFR 123.27 - Feeding and watering animals in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Feeding and watering animals in Canada. 123.27...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Shipments in Transit Through Canada or... cannot be fed and watered in Canada without breaking customs seals, the seals shall be broken and the...

  7. All projects related to canada | Page 18 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: FOREIGN INVESTMENT, DIRECT INVESTMENT, INVESTMENT POLICY, INVESTMENT PROMOTION, INVESTMENT RETURNS, Poverty alleviation, Economic and social development, ECONOMIC EQUITY, SOCIAL EQUITY. Region: Canada, North and Central America, Far East Asia, Viet Nam, South Africa, North ...

  8. Snowfall and Snow Depth for Canada 1943-1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data include monthly snowfall and end-of-month snow depth for 140 stations across Canada. Stations that maintained at least 20 years of data were chosen. The...

  9. All projects related to Canada | Page 5 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    , Economics. Region: Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand, Canada, Japan. Program: Employment and Growth. Total Funding: CA$ 382,600.00. Livestock Vaccine Innovation Fund: Strengthening of Research Capacity. Project. This project creates ...

  10. Permafrost Map for Northwestern Canada (Mackenzie Region), Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Permafrost Map for Northwestern Canada (Mackenzie Region) is a digital version of the 1:1,000,000 map produced by Heginbottom and Radburn [Heginbottom, J.A. and...

  11. The state of genetically modified crop regulation in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Stuart J

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops were first commercialized in Canada in 1995 and the 2014 crop represents the 20th year of successful production. Prior to the first commercialization of GM crops, Canada reviewed its existing science-based regulatory framework and adapted the existing framework to allow for risk assessments on the new technology to be undertaken in a timely and efficient manner. The result has been the rapid and widespread adoption of GM varieties of canola, corn and soybeans. The first decade of GM crop production precipitated 2 landmark legal cases relating to patent infringement and economic liability, while the second decade witnessed increased political efforts to have GM crops labeled in Canada as well as significant challenges from the low level comingling of GM crops with non-GM commodities. This article reviews the 20 y of GM crop production in Canada from a social science perspective that includes intellectual property, consumer acceptance and low level presence. PMID:25437238

  12. British Columbia, Canada Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The British Columbia, Canada Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  13. The state of genetically modified crop regulation in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Stuart J

    2014-07-03

    Genetically modified (GM) crops were first commercialized in Canada in 1995 and the 2014 crop represents the 20th year of successful production. Prior to the first commercialization of GM crops, Canada reviewed its existing science-based regulatory framework and adapted the existing framework to allow for risk assessments on the new technology to be undertaken in a timely and efficient manner. The result has been the rapid and widespread adoption of GM varieties of canola, corn and soybeans. The first decade of GM crop production precipitated 2 landmark legal cases relating to patent infringement and economic liability, while the second decade witnessed increased political efforts to have GM crops labeled in Canada as well as significant challenges from the low level comingling of GM crops with non-GM commodities. This article reviews the 20 y of GM crop production in Canada from a social science perspective that includes intellectual property, consumer acceptance and low level presence.

  14. The level of pension awareness in Canada: a report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the level of the public's awareness regarding the pension system in Canada, retirement planning and in particular, provisions and benefits available under the CPP...

  15. Canada's constitutional separation of (wind) power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, Scott Victor [Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-04-15

    This paper investigates the impact that a federal government structure has on strategic selection of renewable energy policy instruments. The context for this study centers on wind power development in Canada. Canada is a nation that is blessed by all the attributes necessary to catalyze global leadership in installed wind power capacity. Unfortunately, the constitutional separation of powers that underpins Canada's federal system impedes the creation of a national wind power development strategy because Canada's provinces have constitutional authority over electricity governance. The insights gleaned from the case study are used to develop a conceptual framework for understanding the impact that federal structure has on policy instrument selection and efficacy under areas of federal, regional and concurrent policy jurisdiction. Finally, this framework is re-applied to identify specific approaches the Canadian federal government could take to resolve what currently amounts to be a fragmented, ineffective approach to wind power development planning. (author)

  16. All projects related to canada | Page 12 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    , North and Central America, South America. Program: Foundations for ... Region: Far East Asia, Viet Nam, Central Asia, South Asia, Malaysia, Canada, Singapore. Program: Employment and Growth. Total Funding: CA$ 100,000.00. Canadian ...

  17. Canada : tous les projets | Page 17 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: LABOUR MIGRATION, BRAIN DRAIN, RETURN MIGRATION, TOURISM, FOREIGN INVESTMENT, Economic and social development. Région: Canada, North and Central America, Europe, United Kingdom, United States, South America, West Indies, Jamaica, Barbados. Programme: Emploi et croissance.

  18. All projects related to Canada | Page 13 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    , South of Sahara, Canada. Program: Climate Change. Total Funding: CA$ 4,745,530.00. Facilitating Alcohol Control Law Development in Vietnam. Project. Alcohol abuse is a growing problem in Vietnam. Topic: ALCOHOL, RESEARCH, LAW, ...

  19. All projects related to Canada | Page 25 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: REFUGEES, DISPLACED PERSONS, IMMIGRATION, RESETTLEMENT, SOCIAL INTEGRATION, HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE. Region: North and Central America, South America, Colombia, Ecuador, Canada. Program: Governance and Justice. Total Funding: CA$ 218,745.00. Effective and Sustainable Health ...

  20. Canada Enacts Significant Changes to its Foreign Investment Laws

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine Pawluch; Kevin Wright; Jonathan Gilhen

    2010-01-01

    A foreigner considering an investment in Canada might understandably be overwhelmed (and potentially deterred) by the complex regulatory framework governing the potential investment. Catherine A. Pawluch, Kevin Wright, & Jonathan Gilhen (Davis LLP)

  1. Ecology of Aleutian Canada geese at Buldir Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The only known breeding population of the endangered Aleutian Canada goose (Branta canadensis leucopareia) was studied from 1974 to 1977 at Buldir Island, Alaska....

  2. All projects related to Canada | Page 11 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-01-09

    Start Date: January 9, 2013. Topic: INFORMATION DISSEMINATION, VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ABUSE, WOMEN, GIRLS, METHODOLOGY, MEDIA, POLICY MAKING. Region: South Africa, Canada. Program: Foundations for Innovation. Total Funding: CA$ 2,400,000.00. Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia Partnership.

  3. Pacific Flyway management plan for the dusky Canada goose

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan for the dusky Canada goose (Branta canadensis occidentalis) is a revision of earlier plans adopted by the Pacific Flyway Council (1973, 1985,...

  4. All projects related to canada | Page 5 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: MEDICAL RESEARCH, VACCINES, SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, TRAINING, STUDENTS, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA. Region: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Canada. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 743,000.00. Scaling Research Results: Design and Evaluation. Project.

  5. Matters of life and death: public health issues in Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Picard, André

    2017-01-01

    .... Matters of Life and Death collects Picard's most compelling columns, covering a broad range of topics including Canada's right-to-die law, the true risks of the Zika virus, the financial challenges...

  6. Canada : tous les projets | Page 12 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    End Date: 31 mars 2011. Sujet: International cooperation, VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS, VOLUNTARY SERVICES, VOLUNTEERS, RESEARCH NETWORKS, Economic and social development. Région: North and Central America, South America, Canada. Programme: Fondements pour l'innovation. Financement total ...

  7. Healthcare in Canada's North: Are We Getting Value for Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, T Kue; Chatwood, Susan; Marchildon, Gregory P

    2016-08-01

    To determine if Canadians are getting value for money in providing health services to our northern residents. Secondary analyses of data from Statistics Canada, the Canadian Institute of Health Information and territorial government agencies on health status, health expenditures and health system performance indicators. Per capita health expenditures in Canada's northern territories are double that of Canada as a whole and are among the highest in the world. The North lags behind the rest of the country in preventable mortality, hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and other performance indicators. The higher health expenditure in the North is to be expected from its unique geography and demography. If the North is not performing as well as Canada, it is not due to lack of money, and policy makers should be concerned about whether healthcare can be as good as it could be. Copyright © 2016 Longwoods Publishing.

  8. Canada-BC data warehouse: information architecture strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the final needs assessment and results analysis components of the Canada/BC Data Warehouse - Phase 2 Business Requirements Project along with the recommended options and deployment strategy...

  9. PROGRAM EVALUATION IN THE GOVERNMENT OF CANADA: PLUS CA CHANGE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    RV Segsworth

    2005-01-01

      This article describes the evolution of evaluation policy and practice from 1977, when the first policy on program evaluation was issued by Treasury Board, to the current state of evaluation in the Government of Canada...

  10. Decolonizing employment: Aboriginal inclusion in Canada's labour market

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacKinnon, Shauna

    2015-01-01

    ... is a critical source of future labour. Shauna MacKinnon's Decolonizing Employment: Aboriginal Inclusion in Canada's Labour Market is a case study with lessons applicable to communities throughout North America...

  11. All projects related to Canada | Page 6 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    effective, double-fortified salt formulation has been successfully tested for efficacy and use in the field. Topic: DIET, FOOD TECHNOLOGY, CANADA, MODELS, SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, PRIVATE SECTOR, PUBLIC SECTOR, INDIA.

  12. canada : tous les projets | Page 12 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING, RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS, RESEARCH NETWORKS, RESEARCH REPORTS, INFORMATION DISSEMINATION, FUTURE STUDIES, POLICY MAKING. Région: Myanmar, Central Asia, Far East Asia, South Asia, Canada. Programme: Agriculture ...

  13. All projects related to Canada | Page 19 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    End Date: October 1, 2013. Topic: Evaluation, ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE, VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS. Region: Canada, North and Central America, South America. Program: Foundations for Innovation. Total Funding: CA$ 183,000.00. Research and Capacity Building for Communities affected by Mining (Global).

  14. Canada-United States Transboundary Particulate Matter Science Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This 2004 document summarizes the findings of the Canada-U.S. subcommittee on Scientific Cooperation concerning the transboundary transport of particulate matter (PM) and PM precursors between the two countries.

  15. Canada-United States Transboundary Particulate Matter Science Assessment 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    This 2013 document summarizes the findings of the Canada-U.S. subcommittee on Scientific Cooperation concerning the transboundary transport of particulate matter (PM) and PM precursors between the two countries.

  16. All projects related to canada | Page 15 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: INFORMATION SYSTEMS, DATA COLLECTING, HEALTH STATISTICS, HEALTH PLANNING, PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION. Region: Nigeria, South of Sahara, United States, Canada, Sweden, South Africa. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 17,397,789.00.

  17. Canada : tous les projets | Page 13 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: INFORMAL SECTOR, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, MIGRANTS, DISCRIMINATION, UNEMPLOYMENT, ELDERLY, EMPLOYMENT POLICY. Région: South of Sahara, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Canada, South Africa. Programme: Emploi et croissance. Financement total : CA$ 861,500.00. Penser mondialement, agir ...

  18. Access to internet in rural and remote Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Leanne M; Ronquillo, Charlene; Dick, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Canada is the second largest landmass country in the world, but has one of the lowest population densities. As of 2011, approximately 19% of the Canadian population lives in rural, or remote communities. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in rural and urban access to the Internet and device use in Canada, and to explore differences in access to broadband between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in Canada. In general rural-dwellers had lower levels of Internet access and despite efforts to increase access to high speed Internet, Aboriginal communities in some regions have limited access. Future research should explore computer and health literacy in the context of rural and remote communities in Canada.

  19. canada : tous les projets | Page 17 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: LABOUR MIGRATION, BRAIN DRAIN, RETURN MIGRATION, TOURISM, FOREIGN INVESTMENT, Economic and social development. Région: Canada, North and Central America, Europe, United Kingdom, United States, South America, West Indies, Jamaica, Barbados. Programme: Emploi et croissance.

  20. All projects related to Canada | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Promoting the economic inclusion of youth and women through entrepreneurship in Madagascar. Project. The project aims to promote women and youth entrepreneurship in Madagascar by supporting local research capacities and relevant, useful analysis. Region: Madagascar, Canada. Program: Employment and Growth.

  1. Relationship between particle matter and meteorological data in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Azad; Memarian Fard, Mahsa; Bahrami, Ala

    2017-04-01

    The fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has a strong influence on the hydrological cycle, cloud formation, visibility, global climate, and human health. The meteorological conditions have important effects on PM2.5 mass concentration. Canada's National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) network measures air pollutants at urban, suburban and rural locations in Canada. In this study, the point monthly relationships between meteorological data provided by Environment of Canada and PM2.5 mass concentration from January 1st, 2010 to December 31st, 2015 of fifteen speciation stations in Canada were analyzed. The correlation analysis results between PM2.5 concentrations and precipitation as well as surface pressure demonstrated a negative correlation. It should be noted that the correlation between temperature and special humidity with PM2.5 in cold seasons and warm seasons were negative and positive respectively. Moreover, the weak correlation between wind speed and PM2.5 were obtained.

  2. NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada, 1969-1973, R1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains two files (.txt format) for study sites in the Mississagi River area of Ontario, Canada (46.35 N -83.38 W elevation 860 m). One file...

  3. NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973, R1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains two files (.txt format) for study sites in the Mississagi River area of Ontario, Canada (46.35 N -83.38 W elevation 860 m). One file...

  4. Canada's northern food subsidy Nutrition North Canada: a comprehensive program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Tracey

    2017-01-01

    Nutrition North Canada (NNC) is a retail subsidy program implemented in 2012 and designed to reduce the cost of nutritious food for residents living in Canada's remote, northern communities. The present study evaluates the extent to which NNC provides access to perishable, nutritious food for residents of remote northern communities. Program documents, including fiscal and food cost reports for the period 2011-2015, retailer compliance reports, audits of the program, and the program's performance measurement strategy are examined for evidence that the subsidy is meeting its objectives in a manner both comprehensive and equitable across regions and communities. NNC lacks price caps or other means of ensuring food is affordable and equitably priced in communities. Gaps in food cost reporting constrain the program's accountability. From 2011-15, no adjustments were made to community eligibility, subsidy rates, or the list of eligible foods in response to information provided by community members, critics, the Auditor General of Canada, and the program's own Advisory Board. Measures to increase program accountability, such as increasing subsidy information on point-of-sale receipts, make NNC more visible but do nothing to address underlying accountability issues Conclusions: The current structure and regulatory framework of NNC are insufficient to ensure the program meets its goal. Both the volume and cost of nutritious food delivered to communities is highly variable and dependent on factors such as retailers' pricing practices, over which the program has no control. It may be necessary to consider alternative forms of policy in order to produce sustainable improvements to food security in remote, northern communities.

  5. Writing requirements across nursing programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Jo-Anne D; Graves, Roger

    2013-02-01

    The emphasis on scholarship in nursing, demands for evidence-based practice, and attention to writing have raised the profile of academic writing within nursing curricula. This article provides a comprehensive review of English and writing course requirements across 81 English-language baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada. The data were gathered from a review of nursing programs and curriculum information from university and college Web sites. Of the 81 programs, 39 (48.1%) require neither an English literature course nor a writing course, 15 (18.5%) require an English literature course, and 32 (39.5%) require a writing course, including five programs that require a discipline-specific writing course. Discipline-specific writing courses appear to be useful adjuncts to writing-across-the-curriculum initiatives in nursing and will help students to develop the research and writing skills needed to succeed both academically and in a career in which nursing scholarship and evidence-informed practice are increasingly valued and expected. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Streamflow input to Lake Athabasca, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, K.; Hernández-Henríquez, M. A.; Déry, S. J.

    2013-05-01

    The Lake Athabasca drainage area in northern Canada encompasses ecologically rich and sensitive ecosystems, vast forests, glacier-clad mountains, and abundant oil reserves in the form of oil sands. The basin includes the Peace-Athabasca Delta, recognized internationally by UNESCO and the Ramsar Convention as a biologically rich inland delta and wetland that are now under increasing pressure from multiple stressors. In this study, streamflow variability and trends for rivers feeding Lake Athabasca are investigated over the last half century. Hydrological regimes and trends are established using a robust regime shift detection method and the Mann-Kendall (MK) test, respectively. Results show that the Athabasca River, which is the main contributor to the total lake inflow, experienced marked declines in recent decades impacting lake levels and its ecosystem. From 1960 to 2010 there was a significant reduction in lake inflow and a significant recession in the Lake Athabasca level. Our trend analysis corroborates a previous study using proxy data obtained from nearby sediment cores suggesting that the lake level may drop 2 to 3 m by 2100. The lake recession may threaten the flora and fauna of the Athabasca Lake basin and negatively impact the ecological cycle of an inland freshwater delta and wetland of global importance.

  7. Developmental milestones among Aboriginal children in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Leanne; Kohen, Dafna; Miller, Anton

    2014-05-01

    Windows of achievement provide age ranges for the attainment of early developmental skills. Group-specific research is warranted given that development may be influenced by social or cultural factors. To examine developmental milestones for Inuit, Métis and off-reserve First Nation children in Canada, based on developmental domains collected from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey. Sociodemographic and health predictors of risk for developmental delay were also examined. The ranges in which children achieve certain developmental milestones are presented. Gross motor and self-help skills were found to be achieved earlier (across the three Aboriginal groups), whereas language skills were achieved slightly later than in Canadian children in general. Furthermore, health factors (eg, low birth weight, chronic health conditions) were associated with late achievement of developmental outcomes even when sociodemographic characteristics were considered. Findings suggest that the timing of milestone achievement may differ for Aboriginal children, highlighting the importance of establishing culturally specific norms and standards rather than relying on those derived from general populations. This information may be useful for practitioners and parents interested in identifying the age ranges for development, as well as age ranges indicating potential for developmental risk and opportunities for early intervention among Aboriginal children.

  8. Asbestos and drinking water in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toft, P.; Wigle, D.; Meranger, J.C.; Mao, Y.

    1981-04-01

    Samples of raw, treated and distributed tap water were collected from 71 municipalities across Canada and analyzed for asbestos content by transmission electron microscopy. Chrysotile asbestos was identified as the major asbestos type present in drinking water with some 5% of public water supplies containing asbestos at concentrations greater than 10 million fibres per litre. Improvement factors of up to 300 were observed for the removal of chrysotile fibres from drinking water during treatment, indicating that coagulation/filtration treatment is efficient for this purpose. In certain cases there is evidence to suggest that erosion of asbestos from pipe material is taking place. Age-standardized mortality rates for gastro-intestinal cancers were calculated for each city for the period of 1966 to 1976. Rates for the 2 localities with the highest (congruent to 10(8)/L) concentrations of asbestos fibres in treated drinking water were compared with the weighted average of the rates for the 52 localities with asbestos concentrations not significantly greater than zero. Eleven localities had intermediate concentrations of asbestos and six were too small for meaningful statistical analysis. Relatively high mortality rates were apparent amongst males in city 1 for cancer of the large intestine except rectum, and in both sexes in city 1 and males in city 2 for stomach cancer. It is felt that these findings are probably related to occupational exposure to asbestos. Further statistical analyses are required, however, before the significance of these observations can be fully assessed.

  9. Ellesmere Island (Canada) and Northern Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In late July, our planet.s northernmost land masses appear to finally be responding to the warmth of Northern Hemisphere summer. Ellesmere Island, Canada, (top left) and northern Greenland (right) have decided kick off their snowy winter garments in this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from July 3, 200. Bare brown soils are exposed along the coasts of the still frozen (but thawing!) Arctic waters. Several large, permanent ice caps and glaciers will remain on Ellesmere Island year-round, and Greenland does little more than remove her mittens, but thinning, blue ice is showing up in the many fjords and inlets in the rocky coastlines, showing that temperatures are on the rise. The Nares Strait, which separates the two land masses, still has a way to go before a passage opens up between Baffin Bay to the south and the Artic Ocean to the north. Although Ellesmere Island appears to be 'higher' or farther north than Greenland, that is simply a result of the way the high-latitude scene was projected into an image. To better picture the terrain, imagine that you took a printed copy of the rectangular image and rolled it into a cylinder along its northeast-southwest axis. If you held that cylinder straight up in front of you, you would find that Peary Land, Greenland (right of center), is actually the more northern terrain. In fact Peary Land is the northernmost point on land on the Earth.

  10. Streamflow input to Lake Athabasca, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rasouli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Lake Athabasca drainage area in northern Canada encompasses ecologically rich and sensitive ecosystems, vast forests, glacier-clad mountains, and abundant oil reserves in the form of oil sands. The basin includes the Peace–Athabasca Delta, recognized internationally by UNESCO and the Ramsar Convention as a biologically rich inland delta and wetland that are now under increasing pressure from multiple stressors. In this study, streamflow variability and trends for rivers feeding Lake Athabasca are investigated over the last half century. Hydrological regimes and trends are established using a robust regime shift detection method and the Mann–Kendall (MK test, respectively. Results show that the Athabasca River, which is the main contributor to the total lake inflow, experienced marked declines in recent decades impacting lake levels and its ecosystem. From 1960 to 2010 there was a significant reduction in lake inflow and a significant recession in the Lake Athabasca level. Our trend analysis corroborates a previous study using proxy data obtained from nearby sediment cores suggesting that the lake level may drop 2 to 3 m by 2100. The lake recession may threaten the flora and fauna of the Athabasca Lake basin and negatively impact the ecological cycle of an inland freshwater delta and wetland of global importance.

  11. Kidney transplant tourism: cases from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, L; Zaltzman, J S; Gill, J; Prasad, G V R

    2013-11-01

    Canada has a marked shortfall between the supply and demand for kidneys for transplantation. Median wait times for deceased donor kidney transplantation vary from 5.8 years in British Columbia, 5.2 years in Manitoba and 4.5 years in Ontario to a little over 2 years in Quebec and Nova Scotia. Living donation provides a viable option for some, but not all people. Consequently, a small number of people travel abroad to undergo kidney transplantation by commercial means. The extent to which they are aware of the potential risks to their health and the health of the kidney vendors is unclear. Travel abroad to obtain a kidney commercially i.e. transplant tourism (TT), raises ethical issues which include the exploitation of the poor, uncertainty of donor informed consent to nephrectomy, poor clinical care and lack of follow up for the donor, commodification of the body and inequity of access to medical care for donors. Also, TT widens socioeconomic disparities in access to transplantation, differing from the Canadian system of universal coverage for healthcare. The Canadian transplant community has discussed how to respond to patients who plan to travel abroad for TT or return with a purchased kidney. Unease rests in the tension between the duty to care for legitimate Canadian residents and the unwillingness to enable TT. This paper discusses three anonymized cases and the Canadian responses to TT as recorded in academic literature and a formal statement by relevant professional bodies.

  12. The Framework for US-Canada Defense and Security Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-15

    security trump card is played only sparingly. Finally, how US and Canada cooperation manifests itself affects US overall military strategy and force...solidified through a series of international and bilateral trade agreements culminating in the North American Free Trade Agreement ( NAFTA ) of 1994. NAFTA ...The 1989 Canada-US Free Trade Agreement and NAFTA were hotly-debated issues, a trend which continues today with initiatives towards further integration

  13. Energy Policies of IEA Countries - Canada -- 2009 Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-12

    Canada, with its diverse and balanced portfolio of energy resources, is one of the largest producers and exporters of energy among IEA member countries. The energy sector plays an increasingly important role for the Canadian economy and for global energy security, as its abundant resource base has the potential to deliver even greater volumes of energy. The federal, provincial and territorial governments of Canada are all strongly committed to the sustainable development of the country's natural resources and have a long-standing and informed awareness of the need for each to contribute to the development of the energy sector. Furthermore, the government of Canada seeks to achieve a balance between the environmentally responsible production and use of energy, the growth and competitiveness of the economy, and secure and competitively priced energy and infrastructure. Nonetheless, the long-term sustainability of the sector remains a challenge. Due to climatic, geographic and other factors, Canada is one of the highest per-capita CO2 emitters in the OECD and has higher energy intensity than any IEA member country. A comprehensive national energy efficiency strategy, coupled with a coordinated climate change policy targeted at the key emitting sectors, is needed. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a priority for the federal government and presents Canada with an opportunity to develop a new technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a large scale. The IEA recommends that Canada provide international leadership in the development of CCS technology. This review analyses the energy challenges facing Canada and provides sectoral critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide Canada towards a more sustainable energy future.

  14. Insights into the physician assistant profession in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréchette, Danielle; Shrichand, Arun

    2016-07-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) have been used for decades in the Canadian military. Now, PAs are being introduced in various clinical settings to provide patient care for the general population. This article reviews major developments in the PA profession across Canada over the last decade. Nearly 541 PAs are employed in Canada or work for a Canadian agency. Growing evidence demonstrates the positive effect of PAs; however, key issues challenge the extent to which the PA movement will continue to build momentum.

  15. The provision of mobile satellite services in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, N. G.; Roscoe, O. S.

    1990-05-01

    Telesat Mobile Inc. (TMI) is a private company authorized to provide mobile satellite services in Canada. TMI will operate a dedicated MSAT satellite to provide mobile telephone, mobile radio and mobile data services to customers on the move in any part of Canada. The baseline TMI system is described in this paper. The network architecture and the signaling system under development to support the mobile services are discussed. The time-scale for procurement of the system is discussed.

  16. L'entrepreneuriat au Canada dans le contexte mondial | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    24 nov. 2014 ... Également selon le rapport, au Canada, les immigrants de première génération se lancent en affaires dans une proportion plus élevée que le reste de la population, et les femmes participent davantage à l'activité entrepreneuriale que dans les autres pays du G7. En outre, au Canada, contrairement à ce ...

  17. The Apprenticeship System in Canada: Trends and Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Sharpe; James Gibson

    2005-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the trends and issues related to the apprenticeship system in Canada. It first discusses theoretical perspectives on apprenticeship, then reviews the institutional features of apprenticeship systems in Canada and in other countries. The report concludes that the market for apprenticeship is principally constrained by employer demand rather than by the supply of potential apprentices. Consequently, it proposes reforms based on three main principles: apprenti...

  18. Health Consequences to Immigrant Family Caregivers in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhee Vajracharya Suwal

    2010-12-01

    Immigrant family caregivers were three times more likely than non-immigrants to report a health consequence. Reciprocity played a big role in this outcome. Given the fact that an increasing number of culturally diverse immigrants enter Canada every year and that the immigrant population is aging, more caregivers will be in demand. Policy makers need to find ways to keep immigrant caregivers healthy so that quality care can be given to immigrant older adults and also for maintaining an overall healthy Canada.

  19. Productivity Trends in Natural Resources Industries in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Centre for the Study of Living Standards

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an overview of the evolution of productivity in the natural resources industries in Canada over the last 40 years. This report presents data and discusses trends in labour and total factor productivity for natural resources industries in Canada over the 1961-2000 period. It also examines the major determinants of these trends. Industries covered by the report are: the energy industries, including crude petroleum and natural gas extraction, refined pe...

  20. Partenariat en recherche ANASE-Canada | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le Partenariat en recherche ANASE-Canada contribuera à renforcer les relations entre le Canada et l'Association des nations de l'Asie du Sud-Est (ANASE) grâce à la recherche et au dialogue sur les politiques portant sur des questions d'intérêt commun dans la région. L'organisme bénéficiaire, le Centre for ...

  1. Racial gradients of ambient air pollution exposure in Hamilton, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Buzzelli; Michael Jerrett

    2004-01-01

    Environmental justice research in the United States has coalesced around the notion that visible-minority status, along with socioeconomic position (SEP), conditions exposure to environmental health hazards. In the context of long-standing debates over Canada - USA urban differences, we address the question of whether racial gradients exist in air pollution across Hamilton, Canada. Monitored air quality data are spatially interpolated with a kriging algorithm. These interpolated exposures are...

  2. A review of renewable energy in Canada, 1990-2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyboer, J.; Rivers, N.; Muncaster, K.; Bennett, M.; Bennett, S. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Canadian Industrial Energy End-Use Data and Analysis Centre

    2004-10-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive database of renewable energy facilities in Canada by province and by resource type. It considers technologies used for power generation or cogeneration, renewable energy heating systems, hydrogen generation and transportation fuels. Renewable energy technologies convert naturally regenerating resources into useful energy such as electricity, thermal energy, hydrogen or bio-fuels. The database contains information on renewable power operations in Canada over a scale of 100 kilowatts of rated capacity. Smaller applications have been included for run-of-river, hydro, earth, wind and solar power. There are 753 records for renewable energy facilities in Canada, including wind, hydroelectricity, wood residue biomass, landfill/sewage gas, solar photovoltaic, municipal solid waste, and tidal energy. The data in this report was acquired from Statistics Canada and other public information sources. For each of the 753 renewable energy power plants, this report states its type of renewable energy, the province, the name of the project, its location, its operator, electrical generating capacity, number of generating units, average annual electricity production, and the year it began operation. Canada currently has an installed electrical capacity of 115 GW, of which renewable energy sources constitute 76 per cent with the dominant source being hydroelectricity. Manitoba has the highest portion of renewable energy in its installed electrical capacity. Approximately 40 per cent Canada's renewable power capacity is in Quebec, followed by 15 per cent in British Columbia. Nova Scotia has Canada's only tidal power plant. Most of the installed renewable energy power capacity in Canada is owned by integrated electric utilities and a small percentage is owned by renewable electricity generating companies, aluminium companies, pulp and paper companies or diversified electricity generators. It is expected that interest in renewable energy will

  3. L'entrepreneuriat au Canada dans le contexte mondial | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Également selon le rapport, au Canada, les immigrants de première génération se lancent en affaires dans une proportion plus élevée que le reste de la population, et les femmes participent davantage à l'activité entrepreneuriale que dans les autres pays du G7. En outre, au Canada, contrairement à ce que l'on observe ...

  4. Canada's space program, 1958 1989: A program without an agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainor, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Canada's space program began in 1958 with the work that led to the launch of Canada's first satellite, Alouette 1, in 1962. In 1967, two major reports on Canadian space research efforts called for a Canadian Space Agency (CSA). The Canadian government declined to set up an agency but chose instead in 1969 to establish an interdepartmental committee to coordinate Canada's space efforts. The CSA finally began operations on March 1, 1989. This paper will look at government documents, reports and statements about Canadian space efforts during this time to trace the efforts to establish a CSA. This paper will also examine the creation of the Interdepartmental Committee on Space in 1969. In the 1960s and 1970s, the Canadian government focused on satellites as a communications tool and as a means of encouraging high technology industry in Canada. After joining the US space shuttle program in the 1970s, Canada was invited in the 1980s to send astronauts into space and take part in the US space station program. Although the committee structure was awkward and inconvenient, Canada's space efforts during that time saw a high degree of political and economic success.

  5. Multicultural Policies and Interethnic Relations: Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ružica Čičak-Chand

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian policy of multiculturalism recognised the positive and permanent influence of immigration on Canadian society and accepted “nation”-formation based on a model of cultural pluralism. Thus it assumed a radical “modification” of Canadian cultural definitions, instead of a formal adoption of certain “major” national cultural traditions. Canadian society, at the same time, experienced a growing divergence between the official policy of inclusion, and the increasing social exclusion of new immigrants – primarily “visible” minority groups – from economic spheres and from public life in general. In fact, the existing deep tensions in the society between two value systems – on the one hand, the reality of wide-spread racism, and on the other hand, the commitment to an ideology of liberal democracy, as well as poor results in integration policies, as indicated by marked unemployment, low incomes and poverty, especially in immigrant communities – have led to more and more frequent references to a prevailing “democratic racism” in Canada. With regard to the mentioned context, this paper first of all aims to indicate certain specificities in the development of ethnic relations and of multicultural policy, which are engrained and at the same time limited by their particular historical origin. Next, the paper intends to say something about the power of influence of the government’s multicultural policy, and the role of political correctness, as a concrete form of social action, in interethnic relations and in the opinions of the majority society in regard to ethnic minorities, and especially in regard to “visible” groups.

  6. Cost of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder diagnosis in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Popova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD is underdiagnosed in Canada. The diagnosis of FASD is not simple and currently, the recommendation is that a comprehensive, multidisciplinary assessment of the individual be done. The purpose of this study was to estimate the annual cost of FASD diagnosis on Canadian society. METHODS: The diagnostic process breakdown was based on recommendations from the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Canadian Guidelines for Diagnosis. The per person cost of diagnosis was calculated based on the number of hours (estimated based on expert opinion required by each specialist involved in the diagnostic process. The average rate per hour for each respective specialist was estimated based on hourly costs across Canada. Based on the existing clinical capacity of all FASD multidisciplinary clinics in Canada, obtained from the 2005 and 2011 surveys conducted by the Canada Northwest FASD Research Network, the number of FASD cases diagnosed per year in Canada was estimated. The per person cost of FASD diagnosis was then applied to the number of cases diagnosed per year in Canada in order to calculated the overall annual cost. RESULTS: Using the most conservative approach, it was estimated that an FASD evaluation requires 32 to 47 hours for one individual to be screened, referred, admitted, and diagnosed with an FASD diagnosis, which results in a total cost of $3,110 to $4,570 per person. The total cost of FASD diagnostic services in Canada ranges from $3.6 to $5.2 million (lower estimate, up to $5.0 to $7.3 million (upper estimate per year. DISCUSSION: As a result of using the most conservative approach, the cost of FASD diagnostic services presented in the current study is most likely underestimated. The reasons for this likelihood and the limitations of the study are discussed.

  7. Caribbean immigrants in Britain and Canada: socio-economic adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, A H

    1988-12-01

    This paper compares the socioeconomic experiences of Caribbean immigration in Britain and Canada and shows how differing immigration trends together with changing economic circumstances influenced the process of integration. Caribbean immigrants in Canada are more recent arrivals than those in Britain and, in 1981, were still experiencing initial adjustment problems aggravated by an economy in which unemployment is still high. Unlike Britain, which has a large population born in that country of West Indian parentage, the "2nd generation" in Canada is small and mostly still in school. Despite higher levels of education and qualifications than their counterparts in Britain, Caribbean immigrants in Canada faced similar problems. Males were relatively more concentrated in manufacturing industries in Canada and in transportation in Britain, sectors which were undergoing significant structural change and experiencing high levels of unemployment. Earned income was below average in both countries but there were interesting gender differences. Caribbean women experienced the same "earnings gap", relative to men, that characterized most women in the labor force. However, Caribbean women were relatively more successful than men, as measured by unemployment rates and earned incomes. This appears to be due to their qualifications in nursing and other service occupations that continued to expand, and to be in demand in the 1970s and 1980s, when other occupations were declining in response to technological change and "post-industrial" developments. In both countries there were residual disadvantages, faced by Caribbean men and women, which cannot be statistically explained by factors such as age, education, period of immigration, or structural changes in the economy. These can be attributed, at least in part, to the institutionalized prejudice and discrimination against racial minorities which is prevalent in both societies. In absolute terms Caribbean immigrants in Canada are

  8. The Future of Postgraduate Medical Education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busing, Nick; Harris, Ken; MacLellan, Anne-Marie; Moineau, Geneviève; Oandasan, Ivy; Rourke, James; Saxena, Anurag

    2015-09-01

    The Future of Medical Education in Canada Postgraduate (FMEC PG) Project was launched in 2010 by a consortium of four organizations: the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, the Collège des Médecins du Québec, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. The FMEC PG study set out to review the state of the Canadian postgraduate medical education (PGME) system and make recommendations for improvements and changes. The extensive process included literature reviews, commissioned papers, stakeholder interviews, international consultations, and dialogue with the public and learners. The resulting key findings and 10 recommendations, published in a report in 2012, represent the collective vision of the consortium partner organizations for PGME in Canada. Implementation of the recommendations began in 2013 and will continue beyond 2016.In this article, the authors describe the complex process of developing the recommendations, highlight several recommendations, consider implementation processes and issues, and share lessons learned to date. They reflect on the ways in which the transformation of a very complex and complicated PGME system has required many stakeholders to work together on multiple interventions simultaneously. Notwithstanding the challenges for the participating organizations, changes have been introduced and sustainability is being forged. Throughout this process, the consortium partners and other stakeholders have continued to address the social accountability role of all physicians with respect to the public they serve.

  9. Canada's National Forest Inventory (responding to current information needs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, M D

    2001-01-01

    Canada's current National Forest Inventory is a periodic compilation of existing inventory material from across the country. While the current approach has many advantages, it lacks information on the nature and rate of changes to the resource, and does not permit projections or forecasts. Being a compilation of inventories of different dates, the current national forest inventory cannot reflect the current state of the forests and therefore cannot be used as a satisfactory baseline for monitoring change. The current format of Canada's National Forest Inventory has served its purpose by providing national statistical compilations and reporting. However, its useful life is coming to a conclusion. To meet new demands, Canada is considering a new National Forest Inventory design consisting of a plot-based system of permanent observational units located on a national grid. The objective of the new inventory design is to assess and monitor the extent, state and sustainability of Canada's forests in a timely and accurate manner. Details of the new inventory design are described. A strategy to respond to Canada's national and international forest reporting commitments through a National Forest Information System is also discussed.

  10. Bioethanol from lignocellulosics: Status and perspectives in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabee, W E; Saddler, J N

    2010-07-01

    Canada has invested significantly in the development of a domestic bioethanol industry, and it is expected that bioethanol from lignocellulosics will become more desirable to the industry as it expands. Development of the Canadian industry to date is described in this paper, as are examples of domestic research programs focused on both bioconversion and thermochemical conversion to generate biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. The availability of lignocellulosic residues from agricultural and forestry operations, and the potential biofuel production associated with these residues, is described. The policy tools used to develop the domestic bioethanol industry are explored. A residue-based process could greatly extend the potential of the bioethanol industry in Canada. It is estimated that bioethanol production from residual lignocellulosic feedstocks could provide up to 50% of Canada's 2006 transportation fuel demand, given ideal conversion and full access to these feedstocks. Utilizing lignocellulosic biomass will extend the geographic range of the bioethanol industry, and increase the stability and security of this sector by reducing the impact of localized disruptions in supply. Use of disturbance crops could add 9% to this figure, but not in a sustainable fashion. If pursued aggressively, energy crops ultimately could contribute bioethanol at a volume double that of Canada's gasoline consumption in 2006. This would move Canada towards greater transportation fuel independence and a larger role in the export of bioethanol to the global market. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary health care in Canada: systems in motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Brian; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Strumpf, Erin; Coyle, Natalie

    2011-06-01

    During the 1980s and 1990s, innovations in the organization, funding, and delivery of primary health care in Canada were at the periphery of the system rather than at its core. In the early 2000s, a new policy environment emerged. This policy analysis examines primary health care reform efforts in Canada during the last decade, drawing on descriptive information from published and gray literature and from a series of semistructured interviews with informed observers of primary health care in Canada. Primary health care in Canada has entered a period of potentially transformative change. Key initiatives include support for interprofessional primary health care teams, group practices and networks, patient enrollment with a primary care provider, financial incentives and blended-payment schemes, development of primary health care governance mechanisms, expansion of the primary health care provider pool, implementation of electronic medical records, and quality improvement training and support. Canada's experience suggests that primary health care transformation can be achieved voluntarily in a pluralistic system of private health care delivery, given strong government and professional leadership working in concert. © 2011 Milbank Memorial Fund. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  12. Hot air : meeting Canada's climate change challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.; Jaccard, M.; Rivers, N.

    2007-07-01

    As a large northern country, Canada will change significantly as a result of climate change. Global warming is expected to cause diminutions of snow and ice changes in the Arctic, as well as changes to glaciers, and the mountain snowpacks that feed rivers, and provide sources of fresh water. This book argued that the effects of global warming have been apparent in Canada for many years. Water levels in lakes and rivers have been falling, and a thawing permafrost has led to difficulties in building and maintaining winter roads in the far north. Disturbances such as the mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation in British Columbia have also been attributed to global warming, the beetles are only killed by cold weather. The book also considered Canada's current climate change policies, and discussed attempts to arrive at meaningful and effective strategies. 30 refs.

  13. Endoscopy in Canada: Proceedings of the National Roundtable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Noah; Dixon, Elijah; Tinmouth, Jill; Bradley, Nori; Vassiliou, Melina; Schwaitzberg, Steve; Gomes, Tony; Ellsmere, James; de Gara, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This 2014 roundtable discussion, hosted by the Canadian Association of General Surgeons, brought together general surgeons and gastroenterologists with expertise in endoscopy from across Canada to discuss the state of endoscopy in Canada. The focus of the roundtable was the evaluation of the competence of general surgeons at endoscopy, reviewing quality assurance parameters for high-quality endoscopy, measuring and assessing surgical resident preparedness for endoscopy practice, evaluating credentialing programs for the endosuite and predicting the future of endoscopic services in Canada. The roundtable noted several important observations. There exist inadequacies in both resident training and the assessment of competency in endoscopy. From these observations, several collaborative recommendations were then stated. These included the need for a formal and standardized system of both accreditation and training endoscopists.

  14. Genotyping of measles virus in Canada: 1979-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipples, Graham A; Gray, Michael; Garbutt, Michael; Rota, Paul A

    2004-05-01

    Genotyping is an important component of measles surveillance. In this study, we report the genotypes of 30 measles viruses from cases in Canada; 6 of these were collected between 1979 and 1996 and 24 were collected from 1997 through 2002. Many measles virus genotypes were found (C1, C2, D3, D4, D5, D6, D7, D8, E, and H1). These data indicate that the predominant measles virus genotypes detected from 1979 to 1997 in Canada are no longer commonly found. Since the implementation of a routine second dose of measles vaccine and catch-up campaigns in 1996-1997, the wide variety of measles virus genotypes found supports epidemiological data showing that importation of measles is the source of current measles cases in Canada.

  15. Global change: The geological survey of Canada perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckman, B.H. (University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)); Harry, D.G. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    Geological processes are fundamental to understanding global change, or the study of the way mankind modifies the earth environment, and many activities of the Geological Survey of Canada are directly relevant to global change issues. From the Survey's perspective, several aspects of these issues are critical: prediction of present and future climate-process systems from past and present environments, the present rate and magnitude of environmental change in Canada, and the areas of Canada which are at risk due to global change impacts. Global change studies are of particular importance in the Arctic for such reasons as the probability of early detection of global warming in the Arctic, the critical role of the Canadian Arctic in determining global climate, and the strength of Canadian expertise in Arctic research. Research being conducted on contemporary environments, the paleoenvironmental record, the carbon cycle and greenhouse effect, changes in sea level, and environmental geochemistry is outlined.

  16. Petroleum prospectivity of the Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantz, A.; Hart, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Reconnaissance seismic reflection data indicate that Canada Basin is a remnant of the Amerasia Basin of the Arctic Ocean that lies south of the Alpha-Mendeleev Large Igneous Province, which was constructed on the northern part of the Amerasia Basin between about 127 and 89-75 Ma. Canada Basin is filled with Early Jurassic to Holocene detritus from the Mackenzie River system, which drains the northern third of interior North America, with sizable contributions from Alaska and Northwest Canada. Except for the absence of a salt- and shale-bearing mobile substrate Canada Basin is analogous to the Mississippi Delta and the western Gulf of Mexico. Canada Basin contains about 7 to >14 km of sediment beneath the Mackenzie Prodelta on the southeast, 6 to 7 km of sediment beneath the abyssal plain on the west, and roughly 5 or 6 million cubic km of sediment. About three fourths of the basin fill generates low amplitude seismic reflections, interpreted to represent hemiplegic deposits, and a fourth of the fill generates interbedded lenses to extensive layers of moderate to high amplitude reflections interpreted to represent unconfined turbidite and amalgamated channel deposits. Extrapolation from Arctic Alaska and Northwest Canada suggests that three fourths of the section in Canada Basin may contain intervals of hydrocarbon source rocks and the apparent age of the basin suggests that it contains three of the six stratigraphic intervals that together provided >90?? of the World's discovered reserves of oil and gas.. Worldwide heat flow averages suggest that about two thirds of Canada Basin lies in the oil or gas window. At least five types of structural or stratigraphic features of local to regional occurrence offer exploration targets in Canada Basin. These consist of 1) a belt of late Eocene to Miocene shale-cored detachment folds containing with at least two anticlines that are capped by beds with bright spots, 2) numerous moderate to high amplitude reflection packets

  17. Endoscopy in Canada: Proceedings of the National Roundtable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Switzer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This 2014 roundtable discussion, hosted by the Canadian Association of General Surgeons, brought together general surgeons and gastroenterologists with expertise in endoscopy from across Canada to discuss the state of endoscopy in Canada. The focus of the roundtable was the evaluation of the competence of general surgeons at endoscopy, reviewing quality assurance parameters for high-quality endoscopy, measuring and assessing surgical resident preparedness for endoscopy practice, evaluating credentialing programs for the endosuite and predicting the future of endoscopic services in Canada. The roundtable noted several important observations. There exist inadequacies in both resident training and the assessment of competency in endoscopy. From these observations, several collaborative recommendations were then stated. These included the need for a formal and standardized system of both accreditation and training endoscopists.

  18. Endoscopy in Canada: Proceedings of the National Roundtable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Noah; Dixon, Elijah; Tinmouth, Jill; Bradley, Nori; Vassiliou, Melina; Schwaitzberg, Steve; Gomes, Anthony; Ellsmere, James; de Gara, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This 2014 roundtable discussion, hosted by the Canadian Association of General Surgeons, brought together general surgeons and gastroenterologists with expertise in endoscopy from across Canada to discuss the state of endoscopy in Canada. The focus of the roundtable was the evaluation of the competence of general surgeons at endoscopy, reviewing quality assurance parameters for high-quality endoscopy, measuring and assessing surgical resident preparedness for endoscopy practice, evaluating credentialing programs for the endosuite and predicting the future of endoscopic services in Canada. The roundtable noted several important observations. There exist inadequacies in both resident training and the assessment of competency in endoscopy. From these observations, several collaborative recommendations were then stated. These included the need for a formal and standardized system of both accreditation and training endoscopists. PMID:25886520

  19. Placebo Trends across the Border: US versus Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Cory S; Campbell, Natasha K J; Raz, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Physicians around the world report to using placebos in a variety of situations and with varying degrees of frequency. Inconsistent methodologies, however, complicate interpretation and prevent direct comparisons across studies. While US- and Canada-based physicians share similar professional standards, Canada harbours a less-litigious universal healthcare model with no formal placebo-related policy-factors that may impact how physicians view and use placebos. To compare American and Canadian data, we circulated an online survey to academic physicians practicing in Canada, collected anonymous responses, and extracted those of internists and rheumatologists for comparison to US data obtained through parallel methodologies. Whereas our data show overall concordance across the border-from definitions to ethical limitations and therapeutic potential-differences between American- and Canadian-based placebo practices merit acknowledgement. For example, compared to 45%-80% among US-based respondents, only 23±7% of Canada-based respondents reported using placebos in clinical practice. However, 79±7% of Canada-respondents-a figure comparable to US data-professed to prescribing at least one form of treatment without proven or expected efficacy. Placebo interventions including unwarranted vitamins and herbal supplements (impure placebos) as well as sugar pills and saline injections (pure placebos) appear more common in Canada, where more doctors described placebos as "placebos" (rather than "medications") and used them as a "diagnostic" tool (rather than a means of placating patient demands for treatment). Cross-border variation in the use of clinical placebos appears minor despite substantial differences in health care delivery system, malpractice climate, and placebo-related policy. The prevalence of impure placebos in both Canadian and US clinics raises ethical and practical questions currently unaddressed by policy and warranting investigation.

  20. A review of existing renewable energy facilities in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyboer, J.; Pape-Salmon, A.

    2003-05-01

    This first annual report on renewable energy in the Canadian electricity sector includes records from 629 power plants across Canada. Renewable energy sources include wind, hydroelectricity, wood residue biomass, landfill/sewage gas, solar photovoltaic, municipal solid waste, and tidal energy. The data in this report was acquired from Statistics Canada and other public information sources. For each of the 629 renewable energy power plants, this report states its type of renewable energy, the province, the name of the project, its location, its operator, electrical generating capacity, number of generating units, average annual electricity production, and the year it began operation. The majority (64 per cent) of Canada's total installed power capacity comes from renewable energy sources, with the dominant source being hydroelectricity. Manitoba has the highest portion of renewable energy at almost 98 per cent of its installed electrical capacity. Nearly half of Canada's renewable power capacity is in Quebec, followed by 18 per cent in British Columbia. Nova Scotia has Canada's only tidal power plant. Approximately 80 per cent of the total installed renewable energy power capacity in Canada is owned by integrated electric utilities. Eleven per cent is owned by renewable electricity generating companies, 5 per cent is owned by aluminium companies, and 3 per cent is owned by pulp and paper companies. The rest is owned by diversified electricity generators. It is expected that with the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol interest in renewable energy will grow. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs., 1 appendix.

  1. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-06

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America . This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Canada, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in Canada.

  2. Reformulating lead-based paint as a problem in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Kelly; Perron, Amélie

    2011-12-01

    Leaded gasoline was officially removed from the Canadian market in December 1990. The removal of a major lead source and the subsequent decline in children's blood lead levels marked an important transition point and sparked the emergence of new discourse on lead in Canada. Today, childhood lead poisoning is viewed as a problem of the past or a problem of the United States. Sparse Canadian surveillance data supported this view. Moreover, tensions among federal agencies evolved into a power struggle, with Health Canada ultimately becoming the dominant authority, thereby relegating important research initiatives to obscurity and also shaping a vastly weaker regulatory response to lead than occurred in the United States.

  3. Impacts of sulphur and nitrogen deposition in western Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. SHAW

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of transportation sectors (road vehicles and marine vessels, industry (e.g., oil and gas and urban centres in western Canada has triggered a growth in research, monitoring and modelling activities investigating the impacts of sulphur and nitrogen deposition on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. This special issue presents an overview of related research in British Columbia (Georgia Basin, Alberta (Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The research provides a valuable benchmark for future studies across the region and points the way forward for 'acid rain' policies in western Canada.

  4. Reformulating Lead-Based Paint as a Problem in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Amélie

    2011-01-01

    Leaded gasoline was officially removed from the Canadian market in December 1990. The removal of a major lead source and the subsequent decline in children's blood lead levels marked an important transition point and sparked the emergence of new discourse on lead in Canada. Today, childhood lead poisoning is viewed as a problem of the past or a problem of the United States. Sparse Canadian surveillance data supported this view. Moreover, tensions among federal agencies evolved into a power struggle, with Health Canada ultimately becoming the dominant authority, thereby relegating important research initiatives to obscurity and also shaping a vastly weaker regulatory response to lead than occurred in the United States. PMID:21836119

  5. Space Radar Image of Altona, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band seasonal image of the Altona test site in Manitoba, Canada, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) south of Winnipeg. The image is centered at approximately 49 degrees north latitude and 97.5 degrees west longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 11, 1994, during the first flight of the radar system, and on October 2, 1994, during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The image channels have the following color assignments: red represents data acquired on April 11, 1994; green represents data acquired on October 2, 1994; blue represents the ratio of the two data sets. The test site is located in the Red River Basin and is characterized by rich farmland where a variety of crops are grown, including wheat, barley, canola, corn, sunflowers and sugar beets. This SIR-C/X-SAR research site is applying radar remote sensing to study the characteristics of vegetation and soil moisture. The seasonal comparison between the April and October 1994 data show the dramatic differences between surface conditions on the two dates. At the time of the April acquisition, almost all agricultural fields were bare and soil moisture levels were high. In October, however, soils were drier and while most crops had been harvested, some standing vegetation was still present. The areas which are cyan in color are dark in April and bright in October. These represent fields of standing biomass (amount of vegetation in a specified area) and the differences in brightness within these cyan fields represent differences in vegetation type. The very bright fields in October represent standing broadleaf crops such as corn, which had not yet been harvested. Other standing vegetation which has less biomass, such as hay and grain fields, are less bright. The magenta indicates bare soil surfaces which were wetter (brighter) in April than in October. The variations in brightness of

  6. New Curculionoidea (Coleoptera) records for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Hume; Bouchard, Patrice; Anderson, Robert S; de Tonnancour, Pierre; Vigneault, Robert; Webster, Reginald P

    2013-01-01

    The following species of Curculionoidea are recorded from Canada for the first time, in ten cases also representing new records at the generic level: Ischnopterapion (Ischnopterapion) loti (Kirby, 1808); Stenopterapion meliloti (Kirby, 1808) (both Brentidae); Atrichonotus taeniatulus (Berg, 1881); Barinus cribricollis (LeConte, 1876); Caulophilus dubius (Horn, 1873); Cionus scrophulariae (Linnaeus, 1758); Cryptorhynchus tristis LeConte, 1876; Cylindrocopturus furnissi Buchanan, 1940; Cylindrocopturus quercus (Say, 1832); Desmoglyptus crenatus (LeConte, 1876); Pnigodes setosus LeConte, 1876; Pseudopentarthrum parvicollis (Casey, 1892); Sibariops confinis (LeConte, 1876); Sibariops confusus (Boheman, 1836); Smicronyx griseus LeConte, 1876; Smicronyx lineolatus Casey, 1892; Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff, 1875); Hylocurus rudis (LeConte, 1876); Lymantor alaskanus Wood, 1978; Phloeotribus scabricollis (Hopkins, 1916); Scolytus oregoni Blackman, 1934; Xyleborus celsus Eichhoff, 1868; Xyleborus ferrugineus (Fabricius, 1801); Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky, 1866) (all Curculionidae). In addition the following species were recorded for the first time from these provinces and territories: Yukon - Dendroctonus simplex LeConte, 1868; Phloetribus piceae Swaine, 1911 (both Curculionidae); Northwest Territories - Loborhynchapion cyanitinctum (Fall, 1927) (Brentidae); Nunavut - Dendroctonus simplex LeConte, 1868 (Curculionidae); Alberta - Anthonomus tectus LeConte, 1876; Promecotarsus densus Casey, 1892; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, 1902; Hylastes macer LeConte, 1868; Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher, 1940); Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902 (all Curculionidae); Saskatchewan - Phloeotribus liminaris (Harris, 1852); Rhyncolus knowltoni (Thatcher, 1940); Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov Tjan-Shansky, 1902 (all Curculionidae); Manitoba - Cosmobaris scolopacea Germar, 1819; Listronotus maculicollis (Kirby, 1837); Listronotus punctiger LeConte, 1876; Scolytus schevyrewi

  7. Canada as an Immigrant Nation: Implications for Educators Excerpts from an Interview with John Ralston Saul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Canada, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with John Ralston Saul, one of Canada's pre-eminent thinkers. In the interview, Mr. Saul shares his provocative and compelling thoughts on the state of Canada's public education systems.

  8. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) VAISALA CEILOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environment Canada (EC) collected ceilometer data during the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) in Huronia, Canada from January 15, 2012 through March...

  9. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) MICRO RAIN RADAR (MRR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Environment Canada (EC) collected data from the Micro Rain Radar (MRR) during the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) in Ontario, Canada during the...

  10. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) WEB CAMERA IMAGES GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Web Camera Images GCPEx were taken at 5 site locations in Ontario, Canada during the GPM Cold-season Precipitation...

  11. Canada. Forestry Canada. Science and sustainable development directorate: ARNEWS: Annual report 1991. Information report No. ST-X-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J.P.; Pendrel, B.A.; Van Sickle, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    Forestry Canada's Acid Rain National Early Warning System (ARNEWS) has been in place since 1984 to detect early signs of damage to Canadian forests. ARNEWS is a long-term biomonitoring program designed to detect changes in forest vegetation and soils. ARNEWS consists of 103 permanent sample plots located in all 10 provinces. The health of 18 conifer and 9 hardwood species is described. This document presents methods used, the health of Canada's forests, further discussion and conclusions.

  12. Allan C. Gotlib, DC, CM: A worthy Member of the Order of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Douglas M

    2016-03-01

    On June 29, 2012, His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, announced 70 new appointments to the Order of Canada. Among them was Dr. Allan Gotlib, who was subsequently installed as a Member of the Order of Canada, in recognition of his contributions to advancing research in the chiropractic profession and its inter-professional integration. This paper attempts an objective view of his career, to substantiate the accomplishments that led to Dr. Gotlib receiving Canada's highest civilian honour.

  13. Learning to Be. A Perspective from British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Judy; Kaser, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how "learning to be", with a specific focus on social-emotional competencies, has become part of the educational mindset--and educational policy--in British Columbia, Canada. The development of a set of learning progressions for social responsibility, an emphasis on social emotional learning in the new curriculum…

  14. All projects related to canada | Page 4 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Malawi has the highest preterm delivery rate in the world. Topic: MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH, HEALTH FACILITIES, DECISION MAKING, MALAWI, TRAINING, SOUTHEAST ASIA. Region: Malawi, Canada. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 981,153.00. Community-Based Cause of Death Study ...

  15. All projects related to Canada | Page 5 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This innovative project will address the problem of rising obesity and overweight rates in Ecuador through a civil society-led marketing campaign on responsible food consumption. Topic: LATIN AMERICA, Health, FOOD CONSUMPTION, MARKETING, DIET, Civil society. Region: Ecuador, Canada. Program: Food ...

  16. Insights from the French Immersion Experience in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safty, Adel

    Canada's French immersion program began in 1965 in response to anglophone parent demand for bilingual French/English instruction. Instruction entirely in French begins in kindergarten, and formal English instruction begins in third grade. The program's popularity has caused rapid expansion, with success attributed to changing attitudes toward…

  17. canada : tous les projets | Page 21 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: SRI LANKA, REMITTANCES, PEACE, TERRORISM, CONFLICT RESOLUTION, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. Région: Canada, North and Central America, Sri Lanka, South America, Central Asia, Far East Asia, South Asia. Programme: Gouvernance et justice. Financement total : CA$ 366,700.00. Recherche ...

  18. All projects related to Canada | Page 11 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: SOUTHEAST ASIA, INFECTIOUS DISEASES, EPIDEMICS, TERRORISM, DISASTER PREVENTION. Region: South Asia, Far East Asia, Canada, Thailand. Program: Food, Environment, and Health. Total Funding: CA$ 335,000.00. Building Human Resource Capacity in Uruguay's Extractive Industry. Project. Properly ...

  19. Mutual Intercultural Relations among University Students in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Yongxia; Safdar, Saba; Berry, John

    2016-01-01

    The current study examies the views of both international and domestic students in Canada using the conceptual and empirical framework from the MIRIPS (Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies) project (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/research/mirips). Two hypotheses were examined. First is the "multiculturalism hypothesis"…

  20. All projects related to canada | Page 14 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-03-31

    Opportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic Tourism, and Investment. Project. Between 1965 and 2000, about 12% of the Caribbean labour force moved to Canada and other developed countries, making the Caribbean the largest per capita source of emigrants in the world. Start Date: March 31, 2009.

  1. All projects related to canada | Page 21 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-03-31

    Opportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic Tourism, and Investment. Project. Between 1965 and 2000, about 12% of the Caribbean labour force moved to Canada and other developed countries, making the Caribbean the largest per capita source of emigrants in the world. Start Date: March 31, 2009.

  2. Feeding nine billion by 2050? Canada can help | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Oct 15, 2014 ... That's why they are at the heart of this year's World Food Day theme: family farming—feeding the world, caring for the earth. Smallholder farming families in developing countries are also central to Canada's efforts to achieve global food security, efforts that are delivering promising results. But ensuring food ...

  3. Canada's Minister of International Trade meets IDRC-supported ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-07-17

    Jul 17, 2017 ... Photo credit: Canadian Embassy in Colombia Fostering entrepreneurship, discussing how trade can benefit women and their families, and creating job opportunities for the most vulnerable was at the heart of the roundtable discussion with Canada's Minister of International Trade, the Honourable ...

  4. Canada-Africa grants spur novel ideas, networks | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-22

    Jun 22, 2016 ... Eric Smith. Short-term collaborations between Canadian and African researchers has generated compelling results on such pressing issues as maternal and child health, climate change impacts, and alternative energy sources. The Canada Africa Research Exchange Grants (CAREG) program fostered ...

  5. The Online Promotion of Entrepreneurship Education: A View from Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro Milian, Roger; Gurrisi, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine how entrepreneurship education is being marketed to students within the Canadian university sector. Design/methodology/approach: A content analysis of the webpages representing 66 entrepreneurship education programs in Canada is performed. Findings: Entrepreneurship education is found to…

  6. Recognition of Langue des Signes Quebecoise in Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisot, Anne-Marie; Rinfret, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a portrait of two community-level and legal efforts in Canada to obtain official recognition of ASL and LSQ (Langue des signes quebecoise), both of which are recognized as official languages by the Canadian Association of the Deaf (CAD). In order to situate this issue in the Canadian linguistic context, the authors first…

  7. Food advertising during children's television in Canada and the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Hennessy-Priest, K; Ingimarsdóttir, S; Sheeshka, J; Ostbye, T; White, M

    2009-09-01

    Television advertisements for less healthy foods are thought to contribute to overweight and obesity in children. In the UK, new regulations on television food advertising to children came into effect in April 2007. These prohibit advertisements for "less healthy" foods during or around programmes "of particular appeal to" (OPAT) children. In Canada, self-regulated codes of practice on television food advertising to children were recently strengthened. To document the nutritional content of food advertised and number of advertisements OPAT children broadcast in the UK and central Canada before the introduction of the new UK regulations. All food advertisements broadcast on four popular channels in Canada and the three terrestrial commercial channels in the UK during 1 week in 2006 were identified and linked to relevant nutritional data. Food advertisements OPAT children and for "less healthy" products were identified using the criteria in the UK regulations. 2315 food related advertisements broadcast in Canada and 1365 broadcast in the UK were included. 52-61% were for "less healthy" products; 5-11% were OPAT children. Around 5% of food advertisements would have been prohibited under the new UK regulations. There were few differences in the nutritional content of food described in advertisements that were and were not OPAT children. There was little evidence that food described in advertisements OPAT children were any less healthy than those that were not. Few food advertisements are likely to be prohibited by the new UK regulations.

  8. canada : tous les projets | Page 19 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: International cooperation, ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE. Région: Canada. Programme: Fondements pour l'innovation. Financement total : CA$ 609,600.00. Faire en sorte que la recherche en santé influence les politiques. Projet. Le fait que les taux de mortalité et de morbidité demeurent élevés dans de nombreux ...

  9. All projects related to Canada | Page 7 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Project. In Mali and Burkina Faso, maternal and child mortality rates remain high. Topic: MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH, HEALTH SERVICES, INFORMATION DISSEMINATION, HEALTH FINANCING, PUBLICATIONS, AFRICA. Region: Burkina Faso, Mali, Canada. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ ...

  10. canada : tous les projets | Page 15 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le code barre ADN est un nouvel outil de recherche taxinomique. Date de début : 1 avril 2010. End Date: 1 octobre 2013. Sujet: BIOLOGY, BIODIVERSITY, ECOLOGY. Région: Argentina, South America, Costa Rica, North and Central America, Kenya, Peru, South Africa, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Mexico, Canada.

  11. Portrayal of Canada in the Dutch print media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    d'Haenens, L.S.J.; Bosman, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    This article is devoted to the nature of recent news coverage of Canada in the on-line versions of eight Dutch newspapers. The research literature points to five recurrent frames in news reporting: conflict, human interest, economic impact, morality, and responsibility. Our central research question

  12. All projects related to Canada | Page 17 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Project. Under "Healthy China 2020," universal basic healthcare coverage will be provided to all Chinese by 2020. Topic: CASE STUDIES, ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE, HEALTH SYSTEM, PUBLIC HEALTH, HEALTH POLICY. Region: China, Canada. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 1,874,950.00.

  13. Checklist of the Coleoptera of New Brunswick, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Reginald P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract All 3,062 species of Coleoptera from 92 families known to occur in New Brunswick, Canada, are recorded, along with their author(s) and year of publication using the most recent classification framework. Adventive and Holarctic species are indicated. There are 366 adventive species in the province, 12.0% of the total fauna. PMID:27110174

  14. Case report: Coccidiosis and lead poisoning in Canada geese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, L.N.; Bagley, George E.

    1967-01-01

    Four dead Canada geese (Branta canadensis L.) collected at the Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Delaware were found to have both marked duodenal lesions of coccidiosis and high levels of lead in the liver. Although only one goose had lead shot in the gizzard, all four had levels of lead in the liver suggestive of lead poisoning.

  15. Offering sanctuary to failed refugee claimants in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Marshall

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the anti-refugee sentiment demonstrated by Canada’s recent legislative changes and the government’s hardening attitude towards those in sanctuary, the spirit of resistance and community engagement is alive and well in Canada.

  16. All projects related to Canada | Page 8 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-01-26

    The flood-prone Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China, accounting for 9% of the drainage area of the Yangtze River Basin. End Date: January 26, 2017. Topic: WATER MANAGEMENT, AGRICULTURE, POLICY MAKING, Climate change, ADAPTATION. Region: China, Canada. Program: Climate Change.

  17. Constructing Bullying in Ontario, Canada: A Critical Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Sue; Tuters, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    As the prevalence and negative effects of bullying become widely known, people around the world seem desperate to solve the bullying "problem". A sizeable body of research about many aspects of bullying and a plethora of anti-bullying programmes and policies now exist. This critical policy analysis asks: how does Ontario, Canada's…

  18. Drama and Theatre Education in Canada: A Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Mindy R.

    2014-01-01

    This "Note from the Field" provides an overview of what is happening in Kindergarten to University drama and theatre education across Canada. In addition to this snapshot I offer some considerations for extending this discipline and its potential impact on curriculum, policy and practice.

  19. The Gender Wage Gap: A Comparison of Australia and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Michael P.; Shannon, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Data from the 1989 Canadian Labour Market Activity Survey and 1989-90 Australian Income Distribution Survey suggest that a lower rate of return to education and labor market experience and a lower level of wage inequality in Australia are responsible for the smaller gender wage gap in Australia than in Canada. (SK)

  20. Hierarchical den selection of Canada lynx in western Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Squires; Nicholas J. Decesare; Jay A. Kolbe; Leonard F. Ruggiero

    2008-01-01

    We studied den selection of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis; hereafter lynx) at multiple ecological scales based on 57 dens from 19 females located in western Montana, USA, between 1999 and 2006. We considered 3 spatial scales in this analysis, including den site (11-m-radius circle surrounding dens), den area (100-m-radius circle), and den environ (1-...

  1. Careers Canada, Volume 9: Careers in the Hospitality Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Manpower and Immigration, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet, designed for prospective job seekers, describes occupational opportunities within the food service, food preparation and hotel/motel industries in Canada. The preparatory training and job descriptions of cooks, chefs, tourist guides, waiters, hotel and restaurant managers, bartenders and front desk clerks are highlighted.…

  2. All projects related to Canada | Page 25 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS, UNIVERSITIES, International cooperation. Region: North and Central America, South America, Canada. Program: Foundations for Innovation. Total Funding: CA$ 315,000.00. Linkage for Education and Research in Nursing (LEARN) : a Caribbean Initiative. Project. Nurses are the largest ...

  3. Measuring the Rheumatology Workforce in Canada: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Julie; Marshall, Deborah A; Badley, Elizabeth M; Hanly, John G; Averns, Henry; Ellsworth, Janet; Pope, Janet E; Barber, Claire E H

    2016-06-01

    The number of rheumatologists per capita has been proposed as a performance measure for arthritis care. This study reviews what is known about the rheumatologist workforce in Canada. A systematic search was conducted in EMBASE and MEDLINE using the search themes "rheumatology" AND "workforce" AND "Canada" from 2000 until December 2014. Additionally, workforce databases and rheumatology websites were searched. Data were abstracted on the numbers of rheumatologists, demographics, retirement projections, and barriers to healthcare. Twenty-five sources for rheumatology workforce information were found: 6 surveys, 14 databases, 2 patient/provider resources, and 3 epidemiologic studies. Recent estimates say there are 398 to 428 rheumatologists in Canada, but there were limited data on allocation of time to clinical practice. Although the net number of rheumatologists has increased, the mean age was ≥ 47.7 years, and up to one-third are planning to retire in the next decade. There is a clustering of rheumatologists around academic centers, while some provinces/territories have suboptimal ratios of rheumatologists per capita (range 0-1.1). Limited information was found on whether rural areas are receiving adequate services. The most consistent barrier reported by rheumatologists was lack of allied health professionals. In Canada there are regional disparities in access to rheumatologist care and an aging rheumatologist workforce. To address these workforce capacity issues, better data are needed including information on clinical full-time equivalents, delivery of care to remote communities, and use of alternative models of care to increase clinical capacity.

  4. Ebola and beyond: How Canada backs African problem-solvers ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-10-10

    Oct 10, 2014 ... Canada is forging important links with the next generation of African leaders through our commitment to helping AIMS expand. AIMS is producing highly motivated problem-solvers with the advanced mathematical skills needed to confront the tremendous challenges facing Africa, and the world. We can take ...

  5. 9 CFR 93.418 - Cattle from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; the date of such vaccination; the dosage of vaccine used; and the age of each animal on the date of... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle from Canada. 93.418 Section 93.418 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  6. All projects related to Canada | Page 9 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: NUTRITION, Food security, WOMEN, FOOD PRODUCTION, DIET, FOOD SHORTAGE. Region: Cambodia, Canada, United States. Program: Agriculture and Food Security. Total Funding: CA$ 4,500,000.00. Science Granting Councils Initiative in Sub-Saharan Africa: Strengthening Research Capacity. Project.

  7. Establishment of Canada's National Forest Inventory: Approach and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Y. Omule; Mark D. Gillis

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes Canada's National Forest Inventory (NFI) sampling design and implementation. It also describes issues related to annualizing the NFI using the approach of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Enhanced Forest Inventory and Analysis program as a model. It concludes with an outline of plans to address the inventory annualization...

  8. History of Education in Canada: Historiographic "Turns" and Widening Horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno-Jofré, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores major historiographic "turns" in history of education with a focus, although not exclusively, on English-speaking Canada. It addresses the transformative intellectual impact of the turn toward social history on the history of education, the impact of cultural history and the linguistic turn, the reception of Michel…

  9. The Very Essentials of Fitness for Trial Assessment in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Diana; Faltin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Fitness for trial constitutes the most frequent referral to forensic assessment services. Several approaches to this evaluation exist in Canada, including the Fitness Interview Test and Basic Fitness for Trial Test. The following article presents a review of the issues and a method for basic fitness for trial evaluation.

  10. Mounting ground sections of teeth: Cyanoacrylate adhesive versus Canada balsam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangala, Manogna Rl; Rudraraju, Amrutha; Subramanyam, R V

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues can be studied by either decalcification or by preparing ground sections. Various mounting media have been tried and used for ground sections of teeth. However, there are very few studies on the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive as a mounting medium. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) as a mounting medium for ground sections of teeth and to compare these ground sections with those mounted with Canada balsam. Ground sections were prepared from twenty extracted teeth. Each section was divided into two halves and mounted on one slide, one with cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) and the other with Canada balsam. Scoring for various features in the ground sections was done by two independent observers. Statistical analysis using Student's t-test (unpaired) of average scores was performed for each feature observed. No statistically significant difference was found between the two for most of the features. However, cyanoacrylate was found to be better than Canada balsam for observing striae of Retzius (P enamel lamellae (P < 0.036), dentinal tubules (P < 0.0057), interglobular dentin (P < 0.0001), sclerotic dentin - transmitted light (P < 0.00001), sclerotic dentin - polarized light (P < 0.0002) and Sharpey's fibers (P < 0.0004). This initial study shows that cyanoacrylate is better than Canada balsam for observing certain features of ground sections of teeth. However, it remains to be seen whether it will be useful for studying undecalcified sections of carious teeth and for soft tissue sections.

  11. The Audioconference: Delivering Continuing Education for Addictions Workers in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, E. J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used audio conferencing for continuing education of Francophone and Anglophone addictions workers across Canada. Evaluation revealed that program design enabled cost-effective, real-time linking of local groups of professionals with their peers and with external expert colleagues. Found that such contact promoted social goals of networking and…

  12. All projects related to Canada | Page 21 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: AIDS PREVENTION, PROPHYLAXIS, VACCINES, TESTING, RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS. Region: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Canada. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 1,265,640.00. Ethnic and Gender Discrimination in the Americas : the Case of Indigenous Women. Project.

  13. All projects related to canada | Page 13 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: AIDS PREVENTION, PROPHYLAXIS, VACCINES, TESTING, RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS. Region: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Canada. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 1,265,640.00. Ethnic and Gender Discrimination in the Americas : the Case of Indigenous Women. Project.

  14. All projects related to canada | Page 11 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: HIV, AIDS, PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, VACCINES, TESTING, Disease control. Region: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia, Canada, United States. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 1,317,190.00. Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative (KAVI) : a Centre of Excellence for East ...

  15. All projects related to canada | Page 19 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: HIV, AIDS, PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, VACCINES, TESTING, Disease control. Region: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia, Canada, United States. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 1,317,190.00. Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative (KAVI) : a Centre of Excellence for East ...

  16. [The prescribing rights of registered nurses in Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Josette

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of the healthcare system in Canada, registered nurses have been given the right to prescribe. The Canadian Nurses Association played a central role in the implementation of this change by developing a national reference framework, now available to Canadian provinces and territories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Internationalization in Australia and Canada: Lessons for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the internationalization of postsecondary education in Australia and Canada. The author discusses the contextual similarities and differences between the two countries, the shifting rationale "from aid to trade" behind Australia's internationalization attempts and some of the reasons for Australia's success.…

  18. All projects related to Canada | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Region: Mozambique, Canada. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 843,040.00. Agricultural water innovations in the tropics – AgWIT. Project. This project seeks to contribute to agricultural resilience to climate change in Costa Rica and Brazil by developing more sustainable soil and water management ...

  19. All projects related to canada | Page 2 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Project. This innovative project will address the problem of rising obesity and overweight rates in Ecuador through a civil society-led marketing campaign on responsible food consumption. Topic: LATIN AMERICA, Health, FOOD CONSUMPTION, MARKETING, DIET, Civil society. Region: Ecuador, Canada. Program: Food ...

  20. Canada-South Africa bilateral mobility grants for research chairs ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The bilateral mobility awards span a range of natural sciences and engineering disciplines across 11 different universities in Canada and South Africa. They include: an analysis of neuroimaging and genetic data (University of Victoria and University of Pretoria); double field theory (McGill University and University of Cape ...

  1. Identity, Good Language Learning, and Adult Immigrants in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervatiuc, Andreea

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the process of linguistic-and-cultural-identity formation as experienced by adult immigrants to Canada who consider themselves professionally successful and highly proficient in the target language. It addresses the characteristics of "good language learners" by determining how they negotiated their marginal standing…

  2. All projects related to Canada | Page 18 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results. Displaying 171 - 180 of 251. Integrated Nutrient and Water Management for Sustainable Food Production in the Sahel (CIFSRF) ... Region: Nigeria, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Canada. Program: Agriculture and Food ... Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change on Water Resources. Project. Significant gaps ...

  3. Mental health of Latin Americans in Canada: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginieniewicz, Jorge; McKenzie, Kwame

    2014-05-01

    Latin Americans represent one of the fastest-growing immigrant populations in Canada. But very little is known about their mental health. This paper reviews the literature on the mental health of Latin American immigrants to Canada. The paper also identifies potential areas to expand the research agenda. Twenty-five papers were identified by a comprehensive electronic search undertaken in medical- and humanities-related databases. s are reported in three sections: (1) the rates of mental illness; (2) the risk factors that affect mental health; and (3) the access and barriers to care and services. Findings indicate that despite the diversity of immigration from Latin America to Canada, much of the information on mental health focuses on Central American refugees. The most frequently examined risk factor is displacement as a consequence of political persecution and torture in the home country. Access to mental health services in this population seems to be limited by cultural differences and language barriers. New research on this topic should reflect the growing diversity and heterogeneity of the Latin American population in Canada.

  4. All projects related to Canada | Page 4 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Fourth Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, to be held in Vancouver from November 14-18, 2016, will be the largest global health conference held in Canada in recent years. Topic: MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, CAUSES OF DEATH, HEALTH PERSONNEL, INFANT ...

  5. All projects related to Canada | Page 22 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-04-30

    Since 1978, IDRC has enabled the International Relations Division (IRD) of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) to provide Canadian universities with liaison and information services on international development. Start Date: April 30, 2009. End Date: June 1, 2011. Topic: UNIVERSITIES ...

  6. Canada Selects African Health Organizations to Help Save the Lives ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC-CRDI

    working with policymakers and decision-makers to help make the best health policy decisions, and,. • identifying how nurses, doctors, and other health professionals can better deliver the care that is needed. Global Health Research Initiative. International Development Research Centre. PO Box 8500, Ottawa, ON, Canada ...

  7. Financing Aboriginal Government: The Case of Canada's Eastern Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzetto, Don

    1992-01-01

    Describes financial strategies that promote financial autonomy of Native governments. Discusses the creation of trust funds with cash settlements of land claims, continued program funding by the federal government, and financial training for Native peoples in relation to the Nunavut agreement, which created an autonomous Inuit territory in Canada.…

  8. Canada's health care system: A relevant approach for South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. While countries such as the USA, South Africa and China debate health reforms to improve access to care while rationalising costs, Canada's health care system has emerged as a notable option. In the USA, meaningful discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the Canadian system has been ...

  9. PUBLIC SECTOR OF CANADA: RATING RESEARCH OF LABOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Leontiivna TOTSKA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available n this article an author conducted the analysis of labour in the public sector of Canada after such nine subgroups of establishments: 1 federal general government; 2 provincial and territorial general government; 3 health and social service institutions (provincial and territorial; 4 universities, colleges, vocational and trade institutes (provincial and territorial; 5 local general government; 6 local school boards; 7 federal government business enterprises; 8 provincial and territorial government business enterprises; 9 local government business enterprises. On the basis of statistical information about these sub-groups for 2007-2011 from a web-site «Statistics Canada» the maximal and minimum values of such three indexes are found: amount of employees, general annual sums of wages and annual sums of wages per employee. Rating for nine sub-groups of establishments of public sector of Canada on these indexes is certain. The got results testify, that during an analysable period most of the employees of public sector was concentrated in health and social service institutions, the least – in local government business enterprises. In 2007– 2011 a most general sum was earned also by the employees of health and social service institutions, the least – by the employees of local government business enterprises. At the same time in an analysable period among the state employees of Canada a most wage in a calculation on one person was got by the employees of federal general government, the least – by the employees of local general government.

  10. canada : tous les projets | Page 20 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: Science and Technology, MEDICAL RESEARCH, HUMAN GENETICS, GENETIC ENGINEERING, BIOTECHNOLOGY. Région: Brazil, South America, China, Far East Asia, India, South Africa, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, North and Central America, Central Asia, South Asia, Canada. Programme: Économies en ...

  11. Our children's future: child care policy in Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cleveland, Gordon; Krashinsky, Michael

    2001-01-01

    ... of child care policy and asked them to consider a number of important questions. Based on a symposium on the topic held in 1998, Our Children's Future makes a significant contribution to understanding how Canada, with its particular institutions, history, politics, and values, should design a national child care strategy. Presenting a healthy and vigo...

  12. Entrepreneurship Education and Training in Canada: A Critical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, A. B.; Soufani, K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes providers of entrepreneurship education in Canada: universities, small business centers, banks, nongovernmental organizations, and federal and provincial governments. Presents a conceptual model for entrepreneurship education and training that identifies traits and skills of entrepreneurs, addresses whether these are predictable, and…

  13. All projects related to Canada | Page 14 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: WATER MANAGEMENT, Climate change, STRATEGIC PLANNING, ADAPTATION, LATIN AMERICA. Region: Bolivia, Canada. Program: Climate Change. Total Funding: CA$ 1,077,600.00. Improving Flood Management Planning in Thailand. Project. Thailand experienced its worst flooding disaster in half a century in ...

  14. Comparing population health in the United States and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huguet Nathalie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the paper is to compare population health in the United States (US and Canada. Although the two countries are very similar in many ways, there are potentially important differences in the levels of social and economic inequality and the organization and financing of and access to health care in the two countries. Methods Data are from the Joint Canada/United States Survey of Health 2002/03. The Health Utilities Index Mark 3 (HUI3 was used to measure overall health-related quality of life (HRQL. Mean HUI3 scores were compared, adjusting for major determinants of health, including body mass index, smoking, education, gender, race, and income. In addition, estimates of life expectancy were compared. Finally, mean HUI3 scores by age and gender and Canadian and US life tables were used to estimate health-adjusted life expectancy (HALE. Results Life expectancy in Canada is higher than in the US. For those Conclusions The population of Canada appears to be substantially healthier than the US population with respect to life expectancy, HRQL, and HALE. Factors that account for the difference may include access to health care over the full life span (universal health insurance and lower levels of social and economic inequality, especially among the elderly.

  15. 50 CFR 21.26 - Special Canada goose permit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... instructions, gathering and maintaining data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information... information and certification required by § 13.12(a) of this subchapter plus the following information: (1) A... limitations on management and control activities? (i) Take of resident Canada geese as a management tool under...

  16. The Education of the Gifted Child in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Chris, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen articles on the education of the gifted child in Canada are presented. Topics addressed include the giftedness construct, Canadian law and policy, integrative program policy, program planning and evaluation, teacher training, disabled gifted students, psychosocial dimensions of giftedness, the Ontario experience, innovative and…

  17. Canada and Missions for Peace: Lessons from Nicaragua ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... recommendations to guide future policy and programing in peacebuilding. Perhaps it is too early to tell if a concern for international security can be combined with a concern for human security and well-being to form a new peacebuilding "architecture." The lessons and insight contained in Canada and Missions for Peace, ...

  18. Steroid responsive mononeuritis multiplex in the Cronkhite-Canada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YL Lo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS is a rare disorder of unknown origin characterized by generalized gastrointestinal polyposis, alopecia, hyperpigmentation and onychodystrophy. We report a case of CCS with concomitant presentation of mononeuritis multiplex. The electrophysiological findings and steroid responsiveness suggests presence of an autoimmune mechanism.

  19. HISTORIOGRAPHIES ET FÉDÉRALISME AU CANADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Dionne

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the historical representation of the two main national communities in Canada; that is, the English-Canadian and the French-Canadian.Throughout the history of the English Canadian community, one cansee an ambitious national project. The national construction of Canada suggests the existence of a neutral model of government but, when looking at this carefully, it is possible to see something quite different. English-speaking historians from Canada have normally introduced the concept of a unitary federalism as the most perfect form of the Canadian integration project. This integrating federalism, that does not lead to emancipation, stems from thecentralist views of John Macdonald, one of the fathers of Canadian federalism. This approach has been kept for over 140 years of common history and, to this date, continues to be one of the main obstacles for minority nations within Canada. To strengthen their thesis, the authors base their work on an extensive analysis exploring the three big strategies used by the central government to assert its authority on the member States of the Canadian Federation in the long term: using the judicial power, centralizing powers andglobalization. The strategies used have varied depending on the economic scenario, political leaders and the political power relations regarding the links between the Federation and the provinces.

  20. All projects related to Canada | Page 6 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: SMALL FARMS, MEDIUM SCALE INDUSTRY, Evaluation, CANADA, EAST AFRICA. Region: Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, ... Total Funding: CA$ 1,025,419.00. Youth employment to reduce violence in Central America ... Topic: VIOLENCE, EMPLOYMENT CREATION, YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT. Region: Costa Rica, El ...

  1. Highlight: Forging the new Indonesia-Canada partnership | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Apr 15, 2016 ... Canada and Indonesia share a mutual interest in building a stronger relationship and closer business ties, a recent high-level meeting in Jakarta heard. Areas identified for collaboration include trade, regional security, education, transport infrastructure, and agriculture and food security.

  2. The Impact of Teacher Collaboration on School Management in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchamma, Yamina; Savoie, Andrea A.; Basque, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the level of collaboration between Francophone and Anglophone language teachers of 13- and 16- year-old Canadian students (N = 4,494) using data from the 2002 SAIP (School Achievement Indicators Program) of the Council of Ministers of Education of Canada. Among 32 factors, logistic regression identified six predictors of…

  3. Student Organizations in Canada and Quebec's "Maple Spring"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégin-Caouette, Olivier; Jones, Glen A.

    2014-01-01

    This article has two major objectives: to describe the structure of the student movement in Canada and the formal role of students in higher education governance, and to describe and analyze the "Maple Spring," the dramatic mobilization of students in opposition to proposed tuition fee increases in Quebec that eventually led to a…

  4. 77 FR 26943 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Turboprop Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... Canada Turboprop Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request... series turboprop engines. This AD requires removal from service of certain part manufacturer approval... which will result in an engine in-flight shut down, possible uncontained engine failure, aircraft damage...

  5. Canada : tous les projets | Page 8 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA, WOMEN, SMALL SCALE INDUSTRY, AFRICA, ECONOMIC GROWTH, EMPOWERMENT, ARTISINAL AND SMALL SCALE GOLD MINING (ASGM). Région: Rwanda, Canada, United Kingdom. Programme: Croissance de l'économie et débouchés économiques des femmes.

  6. Canada's NHI needs fiscal realism, hospital autonomy, consumer responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiller, L F

    1980-04-01

    Government-sponsored health care programs must have limits if they are to be effective and cost-cutting. Canada's experience with a national health insurance plan indicates that long-range planning, a measurable definition of health, and consumer responsibility are necessary ingredients.

  7. Home leaving trajectories in Canada: exploring cultural and gendered dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Gee

    2003-12-01

    leaving trajectory are larger among the Chinese and Indo-Canadians than among persons of European origins. Overall, we conclude that the theorized trend of the individualized family life course holds for only some ethnocultural groups in Canada. We conclude with suggestions for future research directions on the topic of ethnicity and the home leaving life course transitions.

  8. All projects related to Canada | Page 9 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-02-05

    Start Date: February 5, 2015 ... sciences at the University of Limpopo, South Africa, to prepare students and faculty to better meet the demands of mining on society, the environment, and the economy. Topic: SOUTH AFRICA, Mining, Economic and social development, CANADA, UNIVERSITIES, RESEARCH, TRAINING.

  9. All projects related to canada | Page 17 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2007-01-01

    Partnership Africa Canada (PAC) undertakes research and policy dialogue on priority issues affecting Africa, in collaboration with partner organizations in Africa and internationally. Start Date: January 1, 2007. End Date: June 30, 2010. Topic: DIAMONDS, MINING DEVELOPMENT, MINING POLICY. Region: North of Sahara ...

  10. Canada to scale agricultural innovations to improve food security ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-03-03

    Mar 3, 2016 ... OTTAWA – The International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and Global Affairs Canada have announced six new projects to be supported under the Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF). The projects will develop, test and apply ways to scale up innovations in food ...

  11. Primary Health Care in Canada: Systems in Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchison, Brian; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Strumpf, Erin; Coyle, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Context: During the 1980s and 1990s, innovations in the organization, funding, and delivery of primary health care in Canada were at the periphery of the system rather than at its core. In the early 2000s, a new policy environment emerged.

  12. 75 FR 75157 - Importation of Wood Packaging Material From Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-02

    ...). Introductions into the United States of exotic plant pests such as the pine shoot beetle (Tomicus piniperda... provide more consistent regulation of WPM from Canada as well as to reduce the risk of the introduction of... Coffee, Cotton, Fruits, Imports, Logs, Nursery stock, Plant diseases and pests, Quarantine, Reporting and...

  13. All projects related to canada | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    People living in informal urban settings in Latin America and the Caribbean are highly vulnerable to water-related risks associated with climate change. Region: Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Haiti, Canada. Program: Climate Change. Total Funding: CA$ 1,149,100.00. The Bolivian public justice performance research study.

  14. canada : tous les projets | Page 5 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Région: Middle East, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Central Asia, Far East Asia, South Asia, North and Central America, South America, Canada, Sweden, Switzerland. Programme: Networked Economies. Financement total : CA$ 230,500.00. Amélioration de la santé des mères et des enfants dans les régions rurales ...

  15. National Human Resources Survey of Clinical Neurophysiologists in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K Ming; Young, G Bryan; Warren, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    Although electromyography (EMG), electroencephalography (EEG) and evoked potential (EP) studies are common investigation tools for patients with neurologic illnesses, no formal data on the manpower supply in Canada exists. Because of the importance of these on training requirements and future planning, the purpose of this study was to establish a comprehensive profile of the human resources situation in clinical neurophysiological services across Canada. A questionnaire was sent to all clinical neurophysiologists in Canada. To capture the maximal number of respondents, a total of three rounds of mail out were done. In addition, to obtain accurate demographic data on supporting technologists, a separate survey was also carried out by the Association of Electrophysiological Technologists of Canada. Of the 450 clinical neurophysiologists identified and surveyed, the provincial response rate was 59 +/- 14% (mean +/- SD). Of these, the vast majority practiced in urban centres. There was substantial regional disparity in different provinces. While the wait time for most EEG and EP laboratories was less than six weeks, the wait time for EMG was substantially longer. With the age of the largest number of practitioners in their sixth decade, projected retirement over the next 15 years was 58%. The demographic distribution of the supporting technologists showed a similar trend. In addition to considerable regional disparity and urban/rural divide, a large percentage of clinical neurophysiologists and supporting technologists planned to retire within the coming decade. To ensure secure and high standard services to Canadians, solutions to fill this void are urgently needed.

  16. International medical graduates: learning for practice in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Hofmeister, Marianna; Crutcher, Rodney; Klein, Douglas; Fidler, Herta

    2007-01-01

    There is little known about the learning that is undertaken by physicians who graduate from a World Health Organization-listed medical school outside Canada and who migrate to Canada to practice. What do physicians learn and what resources do they access in adapting to practice in Alberta, a province of Canada? Telephone interviews with a theoretical sample of 19 IMG physicians were analyzed using a grounded theory constant comparative approach to develop categories, central themes, and a descriptive model. The physicians described two types of learning: learning associated with studying for Canadian examinations required to remain and practice in the province and learning that was required to succeed at clinical work in a new setting. This second type of learning included regulations and systems, patient expectations, new disease profiles, new medications, new diagnostic procedures, and managing the referral process. The physicians "settled" into their new setting with the help of colleagues; the Internet, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and computers; reading; and continuing medical education programs. Patients both stimulated learning and were a resource for learning. Settling into Alberta, Canada, physicians accommodated and adjusted to their settings with learning activities related to the clinical problems and situations that presented themselves. Collegial support in host communities appeared to be a critical dimension in how well physicians adjusted. The results suggest that mentoring programs may be a way of facilitating settlement.

  17. Canada : tous les projets | Page 4 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ce projet vise à atténuer l'insécurité alimentaire et la malnutrition en Colombie. Sujet: AGRICULTURE, MALNUTRITION. Région: Colombia, Canada. Programme: Agriculture and Food Security. Financement total : CA$ 1,497,700.00. ​Passage à grande échelle de la production d'aliments enrichis et thérapeutiques au ...

  18. Organized Crime Offenders in Canada: Risk, Reform, and Recidivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stys, Yvonne; Ruddell, Rick

    2013-01-01

    This study extends our knowledge about the rehabilitation of criminal organization offenders by focusing on their community outcomes upon release, and identifying the risk factors related to reoffending for 332 organized crime offenders released from federal penitentiaries in Canada prior to March 31, 2009. Of that group, 12.7% were readmitted to…

  19. All projects related to canada | Page 24 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: Science and Technology, MEDICAL RESEARCH, HUMAN GENETICS, GENETIC ENGINEERING, BIOTECHNOLOGY. Region: Brazil, South America, China, Far East Asia, India, South Africa, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, North and Central America, Central Asia, South Asia, Egypt, Canada. Program: Networked ...

  20. An insight into environmental laws in Canada | Jhansi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    People in Canada are gradually becoming more aware of the urgent need to protect the environment. Canadians are involved with many projects to protect fragile ecosystems and stop further environmental destruction. Some projects are individual efforts and some are carried out through Non- Governmental Organizations ...

  1. All projects related to canada | Page 20 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Online Learning for Mobile Technology Applications in Health Surveys. Project. In light of the increased use of personal digital assistants (PDIs) in data collection and management, HealthBridge Foundation of Canada (HealthBridge) is developing online training for mobile technology applications in health research.

  2. The Online Promotion of Entrepreneurship Education: A View from Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro Milian, Roger; Gurrisi, Marc

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine how entrepreneurship education is being marketed to students within the Canadian university sector. Design/methodology/approach: A content analysis of the webpages representing 66 entrepreneurship education programs in Canada is performed. Findings: Entrepreneurship education is found to…

  3. Academic Experiences of War-Zone Students in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stermac, Lana; Elgie, Susan; Clarke, Allyson; Dunlap, Hester

    2012-01-01

    This research examined educational outcomes and experiences of late adolescent immigrant students who entered the Canadian educational system following residence in global war-zone regions or areas of extreme civil unrest. Data from a Statistics Canada data-set of 18- to 20-year-old respondents (N = 658) were used to compare the academic…

  4. Teacher Racist Speech; A Canada-United States Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menacker, Julius

    1996-01-01

    Given the common English legal traditions in Canada and the United States, it is not surprising that the courts in both nations have been asked to find the balance between the free speech interests of teachers and their responsibilities as role models. Compares and contrasts court ruling in both countries. (47 footnotes) (Author/MLF)

  5. The Coercive Sterilization of Aboriginal Women in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stote, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the coercive sterilization of Aboriginal women in legislated and non-legislated form in Canada. I provide an historical and materialist critique of coercive sterilization. I argue for coercive sterilization to be understood as one of many policies employed to undermine Aboriginal women, to separate Aboriginal peoples from…

  6. All projects related to canada | Page 7 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: INFORMATION DISSEMINATION, VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ABUSE, WOMEN, GIRLS, METHODOLOGY, MEDIA, POLICY MAKING. Region: South Africa, Canada. Program: Foundations for Innovation. Total Funding: CA$ 2,400,000.00. Urban Climate Resilience in Southeast Asia Partnership. Project. Planning for climate ...

  7. Understanding Aggressive Girls in Canada: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Sibylle; Nicholson, Diana

    This review of the literature on aggression and violence in girls, especially girls in Canada, begins with data showing increasing rates of assault and other violent crimes by Canadian girls, although the rate for girls continues to be much less than for boys (a fact possibly responsible for the small amount of research on this population). The…

  8. Decreasing Rates of Neomycin Sensitization in Western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John F; Abbas, Mariam; Hull, Peter; de Gannes, Gillian; Toussi, Reza; Milani, Azita

    2016-09-01

    Neomycin contact sensitization rates in North America range from 7% to 13%, whereas in Europe they average approximately 1.9%. Given that topical neomycin products are no longer readily available in Canada, the aim of this study was to examine what influence this may have had on neomycin sensitization rates in the 3 western provinces. On the basis of an observation originally communicated by L. M. Parsons and C. Zhang of the University of Calgary, which suggested significantly reduced rates of neomycin sensitization in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, a multicenter study of patch test results from 5690 patient charts was undertaken. Data from 3 other western Canadian Universities (the University of Saskatchewan, the University of Alberta, and the University of British Colombia) were analyzed. Data were available from 2001 to 2013 for the University of Saskatchewan (except 2006), whereas the University of Alberta and the University of British Columbia had data from 2009 to 2013. Descriptive statistics, trend analysis, and risk estimates were determined using SPSS version 20. Sensitization rates for neomycin have decreased in western Canada and are now similar to those of Europe. This trend is likely influenced by the reduced availability of over-the-counter and prescription neomycin products in Canada. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Wood and Other Materials Used to Construct Nonresidential Buildings - Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. McKeever; Joe Elling

    2014-01-01

    Low-rise nonresidential building construction is an important market in Canada for lumber, engineered wood products, structural wood panels, and nonstructural wood panels. This report examines wood products consumption in 2012 for construction of selected low-rise nonresidential buildings types that have six or fewer stories. Buildings with more than six stories are...

  10. Citizenship Education: Canada Dabbles while the World Plays On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Andrew S.; Sears, Alan

    2006-01-01

    The summer of 2006 saw the eyes of the world, including those of Canadians, transfixed on Germany as 32 teams from across the globe competed for the World Cup of football--but due to the lack of capacity to support the development of world class Canadian players and teams, Canada perennially cannot mount a team able to qualify for World Cup…

  11. "In Canada Even History Divides": Unique Features of Canadian Citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Explores the unique features of Canadian history and society that influence the conception of Canadian citizenship. These include the historical development of Canada as a frontier crown territory, the search for an elusive national identity, the decentralized political structure, and the proximity to the United States. (MJP)

  12. What Research Tells Us About Citizenship in English Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Reviews recent research on citizenship education in Canada. Discovers that, although citizenship education is widely promoted, little is known about actual classroom practices, and wide disparities exist about the very definition of citizenship. Some evidence suggests improvement; however, more research is needed. (MJP)

  13. Production of bio-synthetic natural gas in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacatoglu, Kevork; McLellan, P James; Layzell, David B

    2010-03-15

    Large-scale production of renewable synthetic natural gas from biomass (bioSNG) in Canada was assessed for its ability to mitigate energy security and climate change risks. The land area within 100 km of Canada's network of natural gas pipelines was estimated to be capable of producing 67-210 Mt of dry lignocellulosic biomass per year with minimal adverse impacts on food and fiber production. Biomass gasification and subsequent methanation and upgrading were estimated to yield 16,000-61,000 Mm(3) of pipeline-quality gas (equivalent to 16-63% of Canada's current gas use). Life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of bioSNG-based electricity were calculated to be only 8.2-10% of the emissions from coal-fired power. Although predicted production costs ($17-21 GJ(-1)) were much higher than current energy prices, a value for low-carbon energy would narrow the price differential. A bioSNG sector could infuse Canada's rural economy with $41-130 billion of investments and create 410,000-1,300,000 jobs while developing a nation-wide low-carbon energy system.

  14. The Mythology of Canada's War, 1939-1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, Norman; Sarty, Roger

    1985-01-01

    Myths that have grown up and persisted about Canada's involvement in World War II are examined. It is a mythodology heavy in self-congratulation, contemptous of politicians, suspicious of outsiders, and uncertain about the possibilities for Canadian independence in a complicated world. (RM)

  15. Canada : tous les projets | Page 20 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le Partenariat Afrique Canada (PAC) collabore avec des organisations partenaires d'Afrique et d'ailleurs pour établir un dialogue sur les enjeux prioritaires qui touchent le continent africain. Date de début : 1 janvier 2007. End Date: 30 juin 2010. Sujet: DIAMONDS, MINING DEVELOPMENT, MINING POLICY. Région: North ...

  16. All projects related to Canada | Page 22 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: Civil society, SOCIAL PARTICIPATION, Governance, Economic and social development. Region: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Canada. Program: Foundations for Innovation. Total Funding: CA$ 250,000.00. Crimes against Women in the Name of Honour : Women's Rights and Citizenship in South Asia. Project.

  17. Psychiatry Residency Education in Canada: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saperson, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article provides a brief overview of the history of psychiatry residency training in Canada,and outlines the rationale for the current training requirements, changes to the final certification examination,and factors influencing future trends in psychiatry education and training. Method: The author compiled findings and reports on…

  18. Amish Schools in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewalt, Mark W.

    A 15-year study of Amish schools in the United States and Canada found that the number of Amish schools has grown dramatically from 1940 through the present. The Amish provide formal schooling only up to the eighth grade, after which adolescents are engaged in mastering a trade before entering into adulthood. The Amish once supported public…

  19. Postgraduate Wage Premiums and the Gender Wage Gap in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1990s, enrolment in postgraduate programs has increased significantly in Canada. In more recent years, this has led to concerns regarding overproduction and the labour market outcomes of those with postgraduate education. Women have played an important role in this growth, but questions remain as to whether women's progress into the…

  20. Predicting the need for vascular surgeons in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Shamim; Jetty, Prasad; Petrcich, William; Hajjar, George; Hill, Andrew; Kubelik, Dalibor; Nagpal, Sudhir; Brandys, Tim

    2017-03-01

    With the introduction of direct entry (0+5) residency programs in addition to the traditional (5+2) programs, the number of vascular surgery graduates across Canada is expected to increase significantly during the next 5 to 10 years. Society's need for these newly qualified surgeons is unclear. This study evaluated the predicted requirement for vascular surgeons across Canada to 2021. A program director survey was also performed to evaluate program directors' perceptions of the 0+5 residency program, the expected number of new trainees, and faculty recruitment and retirement. The estimated and projected Canadian population numbers for each year between 2013 and 2021 were determined by the Canadian Socio-economic Information and Management System (CANSIM), Statistics Canada's key socioeconomic database. The number of vascular surgery procedures performed from 2008 to 2012 stratified by age, gender, and province was obtained from the Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database. The future need for vascular surgeons was calculated by two validated methods: (1) population analysis and (2) workload analysis. In addition, a 12-question survey was sent to each vascular surgery program director in Canada. The estimated Canadian population in 2013 was 35.15 million, and there were 212 vascular surgeons performing a total of 98,339 procedures. The projected Canadian population by 2021 is expected to be 38.41 million, a 9.2% increase from 2013; however, the expected growth rate in the age group 60+ years, who are more likely to require vascular procedures, is expected to be 30% vs 3.4% in the age group Canada by 2021; however, using workload analysis modeling (which accounts for the more rapid growth and larger proportion of procedures performed in the 60+ age group), there will be a deficit of 11 vascular surgeons by 2021. Program directors in Canada have a positive outlook on graduating 0+5 residents' skill, and the majority of programs will be

  1. Les missions de paix et le Canada : Enseignements des conflits au ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les missions de paix et le Canada analyse la participation du Canada aux récents efforts internationaux pour résoudre les conflits qui ont ravagé le Nicaragua, ... la Fondation Azrieli et les Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada annoncent l'appel de propositions pour la quatrième ronde du Programme conjoint canado.

  2. 75 FR 27489 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. PW615F-A Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... Canada Corp. ASB No. PW600-72-A63071 instructions. You may obtain further information by examining the MCAI in the AD docket. Relevant Service Information Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. has issued ASB No... proposing this AD because we evaluated all information provided by Transport Canada and determined the...

  3. 77 FR 11421 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada, Auxiliary Power Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    .... For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp., 1000... Canada, they have notified us of the unsafe condition described in the MCAI and service information referenced above. We are proposing this AD because we evaluated all information provided by Canada, and...

  4. 76 FR 52593 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Canada Ltd. Model BO 105 LS A-3 Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ..., and issued revised service information related to the life limit of the TT strap. Transport Canada... compliance with that AD. Related Service Information Eurocopter Canada Limited issued Alert Service Bulletin... this AD because we evaluated all information provided by EASA and Transport Canada and determined the...

  5. 75 FR 70900 - Certain Iron Construction Castings From Brazil, Canada, and the People's Republic of China...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-19

    ..., Canada, and the PRC and the CVD order on castings from Brazil. U.S. Customs and Border Protection will... International Trade Administration Certain Iron Construction Castings From Brazil, Canada, and the People's... certain iron construction castings (``castings'') from Brazil, Canada, and the People's Republic of China...

  6. 19 CFR 123.63 - Examination of baggage from Canada or Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examination of baggage from Canada or Mexico. 123...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Baggage § 123.63 Examination of baggage from Canada or Mexico. (a) Opening vehicle or compartment to examine baggage. Customs officers are...

  7. Acidification of lakes in Canada by acid precipitation and the resulting effects on fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard J. Beamish

    1976-01-01

    There are several areas in Canada that could receive acidic fallout. Only in the area that produces Canada's largest single source of sulfur oxides has there been appreciable research. In the Sudbury region of Ontario, Canada, fallout of sulfur oxides has been shown to be responsible for damage to vegetation, lakes and fishes. The acidic fallout has been shown to...

  8. Media divides: communication rights and the right to communicate in Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raboy, Marc; McIver, William J; Shtern, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 4 3 2 1 Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Raboy, Marc, 1948Media divides : communication rights and the right to communicate in Canada / Marc Raboy and Jeremy Shtern ; with William J. McIver ... [et al.]. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-7748-1774-5 1. Communication policy - Canada. 2. Mass media ...

  9. Nesting biology of Lesser Canada Geese, Branta canadensis parvipes, along the Tanana River, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig R. Ely; John M. Pearce; Roger W. Ruess

    2008-01-01

    Lesser Canada Geese (Brania canadensis parvipes) are widespread throughout interior regions of Alaska and Canada, yet there have been no published studies documenting basic aspects of their nesting biology. We conducted a study to determine reproductive parameters of Lesser Canada Geese nesting along the Tanana River near the city of Fairbanks, in...

  10. Injuries related to off-road vehicles in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlaar, Ward; McAteer, Heather; Brown, Steve; Crain, Jennifer; McFaull, Steven; Hing, Marisela Mainegra

    2015-02-01

    Off-road vehicles (ORVs; this includes snowmobiles, all-terrain vehicles or ATVs and dirt bikes) were once used primarily for work and travel. Such use remains common in Canada, although their recreational use has also gained popularity in recent years. An epidemiological injury profile of ORV users is important for better understanding injuries and their risk factors to help inform injury prevention initiatives. The Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) partnered with the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) to analyze the epidemiology of ORV-related injuries. The primary aim was to assess crashes and injuries in Canada, including the extent of alcohol involvement. Secondly, the burden of injury among children and teen ORV drivers in Canada, as well as passengers, was investigated. Descriptive and inferential epidemiological statistics were generated using the following data sources: first, TIRF's National Fatality Database, which is a comprehensive, pan-Canadian, set of core data on all fatal motor vehicle crashes; second, TIRF's Serious Injury Database, which contains information on persons seriously injured in crashes; and, third, PHAC's Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program (CHIRPP), a surveillance system currently operating in the emergency departments of some pediatric and general hospitals across Canada. Exposure data have been used in the analyzes where available. Between 1990 and 2010, fatality rates increased among ATV and dirt bike operators. The fatality rate among snowmobilers declined during this period. Of particular concern, among fatally injured female ATV users, children aged 0-15 years comprised the highest proportion of any age group at 33.8%. Regarding alcohol use, among fatally injured snowmobile and ATV/dirt bike operators tested for alcohol, 66% and 55% tested positive, respectively. Alcohol involvement in adult ORV crashes remains an important factor. In light of the growing popularity of ORVs, prevention and

  11. Information Literacy Policy Development in Canada: Is It Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Bradley

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines policy issues related to information literacy in Canada. It provides some background on the information literacy concept, reflecting on popular definitions offered by American, British, and Australian library associations, before advocating for a broader definition that views information literacy as a human right. Information literacy is also considered in relationship to the proliferation of other “literacies,” such as digital, web, media, and information technology, that are the subject of increased advocacy and attention from interest groups and educators. The ongoing need for improved information literacy levels is analyzed not only in the context of inputs (the increasing complexity of the information environment but also in terms of potential personal, social, and economic outcomes that can be realized through widespread information literacy education efforts. The paper argues that information literacy must become a priority not only among academic librarians but also school, public, and special librarians, as well as others outside of the library sector, if significant improvements in information literacy levels are to be realized. Such a coordinated approach can only be achieved in the context of policies that require, and adequately support, widespread efforts at improving information literacy levels. After a review of the ad-hoc state of information literacy education in Canada today, this paper analyzes information literacy-related policy development efforts in Canada to date in the four arenas where one would expect to see such activity: the Government of Canada, provincial governments, library associations, and other stakeholder groups. This article aims to start a wide-reaching discussion about information literacy and associated policy issues in Canada.

  12. Trends in high-dose opioid prescribing in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Tara; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Paterson, J Michael; Dhalla, Irfan A; Juurlink, David N

    2014-09-01

    To describe trends in rates of prescribing of high-dose opioid formulations and variations in opioid product selection across Canada. Population-based, cross-sectional study. Canada. Retail pharmacies dispensing opioids between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Opioid dispensing rates, reported as the number of units dispensed per 1000 population, stratified by province and opioid type. The rate of dispensing high-dose opioid formulations increased 23.0%, from 781 units per 1000 population in 2006 to 961 units per 1000 population in 2011. Although these rates remained relatively stable in Alberta (6.3% increase) and British Columbia (8.4% increase), rates in Newfoundland and Labrador (84.7% increase) and Saskatchewan (54.0% increase) rose substantially. Ontario exhibited the highest annual rate of high-dose oxycodone and fentanyl dispensing (756 tablets and 112 patches per 1000 population, respectively), while Alberta's rate of high-dose morphine dispensing was the highest in Canada (347 units per 1000 population). Two of the highest rates of high-dose hydromorphone dispensing were found in Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia (258 and 369 units per 1000 population, respectively). Conversely, Quebec had the lowest rate of high-dose oxycodone and morphine dispensing (98 and 53 units per 1000 population, respectively). We found marked interprovincial variation in the dispensing of high-dose opioid formulations in Canada, emphasizing the need to understand the reasons for these differences, and to consider developing a national strategy to address opioid prescribing. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  13. Trends in alcohol-impaired driving in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlaar, Ward; Robertson, Robyn; Marcoux, Kyla; Mayhew, Daniel; Brown, Steve; Boase, Paul

    2012-09-01

    While a general decreasing trend in the number of persons killed in a traffic crash involving a drinking driver has occurred in Canada since the 1980s, it is evident that much of this decrease occurred in the 1990s. Since 2002, less progress has been made as the number of persons killed in crashes involving drinking drivers remains high. To better understand the current situation, this paper describes trends in drinking and driving in Canada from 1998 to 2011 using multiple indicators based on data collected for the Traffic Injury Research Foundation's (TIRF) Road Safety Monitor (RSM), the National Opinion Poll on Drinking and Driving, and trends in alcohol-related crashes based on data collected for TIRF's national Fatality Database in Canada. There has been a continued and consistent decrease in the number of fatalities involving a drinking driver in Canada. This remains true when looking at the number of fatalities involving a drinking driver per 100,000 population and per 100,000 licensed drivers. This decreasing trend is also still apparent when considering the percentage of persons killed in a traffic crash in Canada involving a drinking driver although less pronounced. Data from the RSM further show that the percentage of those who reported driving after they thought they were over the legal limit has also declined. However, regardless of the apparent decreasing trend in drinking driving fatalities and behaviour, reductions have been relatively modest, and fatalities in crashes involving drivers who have consumed alcohol remain high at unacceptable levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bilinguisme et traduction au Canada. Role sociolinguistique du traducteur. (Bilingualism and Translation in Canada. The Sociolinguistic Role of the Translator).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhel, Denis

    This study concerns the problems posed by modes of interlinguistic communication, translation, and individual bilingualism, on which depend the quality of relationships between two ethnic communities belonging to a single political entity. It also addresses a frequent question about the need for translation in a bilingual country like Canada. The…

  15. Internationally educated nurses in Canada: predictors of workforce integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, Christine L; Primeau, Marie-Douce; Kilpatrick, Kelley; St-Pierre, Isabelle

    2017-04-04

    Global trends in migration accompanied with recent changes to the immigrant selection process may have influenced the demographic and human capital characteristics of internationally educated nurses (IENs) in Canada and in turn the assistance required to facilitate their workforce integration. This study aimed to describe the demographic and human capital profile of IENs in Canada, to explore recent changes to the profile, and to identify predictors of IENs' workforce integration. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational survey design was used. Eligible IENs were immigrants, registered and employed as regulated nurses in Canada. Data were collected in 2014 via online and paper questionnaires. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the data by year of immigration. Logistic regression modeling was employed to identify predictors of IENs' workforce integration measured as passing the licensure exam to acquire professional recertification and securing employment. The sample consisted of 2280 IENs, representative of all Canadian provincial jurisdictions. Since changes to the immigrant selection process in 2002, the IEN population in Canada has become more racially diverse with greater numbers emigrating from developing countries. Recent arrivals (after 2002) had high levels of human capital (knowledge, professional experience, language proficiency). Some, but not all, benefited from the formal and informal assistance available to facilitate their workforce integration. Professional experience and help studying significantly predicted if IENs passed the licensure exam on their first attempt. Bridging program participation and assistance from social networks in Canada were significant predictors if IENs had difficulty securing employment. Nurses will continue to migrate from a wide variety of countries throughout the world that have dissimilar nursing education and health systems. Thus, IENs are not a homogenous group, and a "one size fits all" model may not be

  16. Birth outcomes in the Inuit-inhabited areas of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Senécal, Sacha; Simonet, Fabienne; Guimond, Éric; Penney, Christopher; Wilkins, Russell

    2010-01-01

    Background Information on health disparities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal populations is essential for developing public health programs aimed at reducing such disparities. The lack of data on disparities in birth outcomes between Inuit and non-Inuit populations in Canada prompted us to compare birth outcomes in Inuit-inhabited areas with those in the rest of the country and in other rural and northern areas of Canada. Methods We conducted a cohort study of all births in Canada during 1990–2000 using linked vital data. We identified 13 642 births to residents of Inuit-inhabited areas and 4 054 489 births to residents of all other areas. The primary outcome measures were preterm birth, stillbirth and infant death. Results Compared with the rest of Canada, Inuit-inhabited areas had substantially higher rates of preterm birth (risk ratio [RR] 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.38–1.52), stillbirth (RR 1.68, 95% CI 1.38–2.04) and infant death (RR 3.61, 95% CI 3.17–4.12). The risk ratios and absolute differences in risk for these outcomes changed little over time. Excess mortality was observed for all major causes of infant death, including congenital anomalies (RR 1.64), immaturity-related conditions (RR 2.96), asphyxia (RR 2.43), sudden infant death syndrome (RR 7.15), infection (RR 8.32) and external causes (RR 7.30). Maternal characteristics accounted for only a small part of the risk disparities. Substantial risk ratios for preterm birth, stillbirth and infant death remained when the comparisons were restricted to other rural or northern areas of Canada. Interpretation The Inuit-inhabited areas had much higher rates of preterm birth, stillbirth and infant death compared with the rest of Canada and with other rural and northern areas. There is an urgent need for more effective interventions to improve maternal and infant health in Inuit-inhabited areas. PMID:20100852

  17. Prevalence of weather sensitivity in Germany and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackensen, Sylvia; Hoeppe, Peter; Maarouf, Abdel; Tourigny, Pierre; Nowak, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have shown that atmospheric conditions can affect well-being or disease, and that some individuals seem to be more sensitive to weather than others. Since epidemiological data on the prevalence of weather-related health effects are lacking, two representative weather sensitivity (WS) surveys were conducted independently in Germany and Canada. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to identify the prevalence of WS in Germany and Canada, (2) to describe weather-related symptoms and the corresponding weather conditions, and (3) to compare the findings in the two countries. In Germany 1,064 citizens (age >16 years) were interviewed in January 2001, and in Canada 1,506 persons (age >18 years) were interviewed in January 1994. The results showed that 19.2% of the German population thought that weather affected their health “to a strong degree,” 35.3% that weather had “some influence on their health” (sum of both = 54.5% weather sensitive), whereas the remaining 45.5% did not consider that weather had an effect on their health status. In Canada 61% of the respondents considered themselves to be sensitive to the weather. The highest prevalence of WS (high + some influence) in Germans was found in the age group older than 60 years (68%), which was almost identical in the Canadian population (69%). The highest frequencies of weather-related symptoms were reported in Germany for stormy weather (30%) and when it became colder (29%). In Canada mainly cold weather (46%), dampness (21%) and rain (20%) were considered to affect health more than other weather types. The most frequent symptoms reported in Germany were headache/migraine (61%), lethargy (47%), sleep disturbances (46%), fatigue (42%), joint pain (40%), irritation (31%), depression (27%), vertigo (26%), concentration problems (26%) and scar pain (23%). Canadian weather-sensitive persons reported colds (29%), psychological effects (28%) and painful joints, muscles or arthritis (10%). In Germany 32

  18. 19 CFR 123.64 - Baggage in transit through the United States between ports in Canada or in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... between ports in Canada or in Mexico. 123.64 Section 123.64 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND... baggage card, Customs Form 7512-B (Canada 81/2) or Customs Form 7533-C (Canada A4-1/2), shall be used. The...

  19. Nuclear waste management in Canada : critical issues, critical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, D.; Fuji Johnson, G. (eds.)

    2009-07-01

    As Canada plans to build more nuclear reactors to increase energy production, the benefits and hazards of nuclear power and nuclear waste management continue to be debated. This book provided a discerning opposition to the supportive position taken by government and industry regarding the management of high-level nuclear fuel waste and the nuclear generation of electricity. The contributors explored key issues associated with nuclear energy development, such as safety, risk assessment, site selection and the public consultation process in Canada and its failure to address ethical and social issues. The technical challenges of nuclear waste management were reviewed along with the nature and means of developing social and ethical frameworks within which to assess technical options, consultative practices and decision-making processes. Strategies for thinking of the long term were also discussed. refs.

  20. Lobbying act of Canada: preconditions and stages of enactment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Trofymenko

    2014-06-01

    In the present study process of enactment and reformation of legal basis for lobbying in Canada has been considered. The author has divided this process into three stages. The first stage includes development and enactment of Lobbyists Registration Act. The second one is connected with widening of legal base through enactment of amendments and additions to the Act, as well as with legal regulation of lobbying on the level of provinces and cities. The third stage covers scale reformation of legal acts regarding lobbying and enactment of Canadian Lobbying Act. Obligations and status of lobbying supervision body has been also changed along with the Lobbying Act. Office of Registrar, founded in 1989, has been transformed to independent agent of the Parliament of Canada. In its turn, Lobbyists Registration Office has been transformed to independent body of state power.

  1. International trade regulation and publicly funded health care in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostry, A S

    2001-01-01

    The World Trade Organization (WTO) creates new challenges for the Canadian health care system, arguably one of the most "socialized" systems in the world today. In particular, the WTO's enhanced trade dispute resolution powers, enforceable with sanctions, may make Canadian health care vulnerable to corporate penetration, particularly in the pharmaceutical and private health services delivery sectors. The Free Trade Agreement and its extension, the North American Free Trade Agreement, gave multinational pharmaceutical companies greater freedom in Canada at the expense of the Canadian generic drug industry. Recent challenges by the WTO have continued this process, which will limit the health care system's ability to control drug costs. And pressure is growing, through WTO's General Agreement on Trade in Services and moves by the Alberta provincial government to privatize health care delivery, to open up the Canadian system to corporate penetration. New WTO agreements will bring increasing pressure to privatize Canada's public health care system and limit government's ability to control pharmaceutical costs.

  2. The Structure of Aboriginal Child Welfare in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandna Sinha

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aboriginal children are currently overrepresented in out-of-home care in Canada; this extends a historical pattern of child removal that began with the residential school system. The overrepresentation of Aboriginal children persists despite legislative and structural changes intended to reduce the number of Aboriginal children in care. Several recent developments suggest potential for improvement in services for Aboriginal children and families in the near future. However, greater information about the structure of Aboriginal child welfare in Canada is needed to support program and policy development. We present a broad overview of the variation in Aboriginal child welfare legislation and standards, service delivery models, and funding formulas across Canadian provinces and territories. We draw on this review to suggest specific priorities for future research.

  3. Chinese health beliefs of older Chinese in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel W L; Surood, Shireen

    2009-02-01

    Objectives. This study examines the cultural health beliefs held by older Chinese in Canada. Methods. Chinese surnames are randomly selected from the local Chinese telephone directories. Telephone screening is then conducted to identify eligible Chinese people 55 years of age or older to take part in a face-to-face interview to complete a structured survey questionnaire. Results. The results of exploratory factor analysis indicate that the health beliefs of the older Chinese are loaded onto three factors related to beliefs about traditional health practices, beliefs about traditional Chinese medicine, and beliefs about preventive diet. Education, religion, country of origin, length of residency in Canada, and city of residency are the major correlates of the various Chinese health beliefs scales. Discussion. The findings support the previous prescriptive knowledge about Chinese health beliefs and illustrate the intragroup sociocultural diversity that health practitioners should acknowledge in their practice.

  4. Canada's humanitarian community calls for innovative responses to ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-27

    Apr 27, 2016 ... Further, she pointed out, “rising insecurity and instability caused by the growth of terrorist and armed groups,” are putting an additional strain on the system. In fact, “the average length of time a person is displaced is 17 years.” The 2014 conference brought together a diverse cross-section of Canada's ...

  5. Global Entrepreneurship Monitor - étude au Canada | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    La compréhension de l'entrepreneuriat à l'échelle mondiale permet aux chercheurs d'analyser les tendances en matière de politiques et de pratiques ainsi que de tirer des leçons permettant d'améliorer l'entrepreneuriat. Cette étude sur trois ans générera des renseignements précieux sur l'entrepreneuriat au Canada et ...

  6. Herbivory by Canada Geese: Diet Selection and Effect on Lawns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Michael R

    1991-05-01

    Flocks of free-ranging Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) often are considered nuisances when they graze on lawns because they litter the sites with fecal material, and their grazing often is perceived to be detrimental to the turf. I tested whether goose grazing had changed the composition of grass species at 20 sites in Connecticut where geese were considered nuisances. At these sites Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) was less prevalent in areas grazed heavily by geese than in areas of the same lawn that received light grazing. At six sites where up to several hundred geese wait daily for food handouts, 46% of the ground was devoid of vegetation except for a moss. I examined the palatability of different grass species to Canada Geese by giving captive birds the opportunity to feed in plots of five cool-season turf-grass species. The birds spent more time feeding in plots of Kentucky bluegrass and less time feeding in plots of tall fescue (Festuca Araneidae cv. K-31) that would have been expected if the geese were grazing among plots at random. Time spent grazing in plots of colonial bent grass (Agrostis tenuis cv. Highland), perennial ryegrass (Lolium peatland), and red fescue (F. rubra) did not differ from the expected. Feeding preferences for grass species were negatively correlated with the ash content of the leaves and with the amount of force required to sever a specific leaf mass. Captive Canada Geese would not feed on common periwinkle (Inca minor), Japanese pachydermum (pachydermum terminals), or English ivy (headnotes helix). These results suggest that Canada Goose numbers can be reduced at sites where they are foraging on turf if lawns are replaced by an unpalatable ground cover, or, to a lesser extent, with a tough-leaf grass species such as tall fescue. © 1991 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. Computer use in primary care practices in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimowicz, Yvonne; Bowes, Andrea E; Thompson, Ashley E; Miedema, Baukje; Hogg, William E; Wong, Sabrina T; Katz, Alan; Burge, Fred; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Yelland, Gregory S; Wodchis, Walter P

    2017-05-01

    To examine the use of computers in primary care practices. The international Quality and Cost of Primary Care study was conducted in Canada in 2013 and 2014 using a descriptive cross-sectional survey method to collect data from practices across Canada. Participating practices filled out several surveys, one of them being the Family Physician Survey, from which this study collected its data. All 10 Canadian provinces. A total of 788 family physicians. A computer use scale measured the extent to which family physicians integrated computers into their practices, with higher scores indicating a greater integration of computer use in practice. Analyses included t tests and 2 tests comparing new and traditional models of primary care on measures of computer use and electronic health record (EHR) use, as well as descriptive statistics. Nearly all (97.5%) physicians reported using a computer in their practices, with moderately high computer use scale scores (mean [SD] score of 5.97 [2.96] out of 9), and many (65.7%) reported using EHRs. Physicians with practices operating under new models of primary care reported incorporating computers into their practices to a greater extent (mean [SD] score of 6.55 [2.64]) than physicians operating under traditional models did (mean [SD] score of 5.33 [3.15]; t 726.60 = 5.84; P computer use across provinces. Most family physicians in Canada have incorporated computers into their practices for administrative and scholarly activities; however, EHRs have not been adopted consistently across the country. Physicians with practices operating under the new, more collaborative models of primary care use computers more comprehensively and are more likely to use EHRs than those in practices operating under traditional models of primary care. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  8. If the U.S. had Canada's stumpage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Spelter

    2006-01-01

    North American log markets function on different principles -- a profit allowance for the wood processor plays a role in timber pricing in Canada, while in the United States, it is a byproduct of the give and take of arm’s-length market negotiations. The former is characterized by high elasticities of price transmission and, at times of market weakness, by low...

  9. Barriers and facilitators to family planning access in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Jennifer; Dunn, Sheila; Guilbert, Edith; Soon, Judith; Norman, Wendy

    2015-02-01

    Contraceptives are underutilized in Canada, and nearly one in three Canadian women will have an abortion in her lifetime. To help delineate a national family planning research agenda, the authors interviewed healthcare providers and organizational stakeholders to explore their perspective on barriers to contraception across regions of Canada. Semi-structured interviews were conducted based on validated frameworks for assessing family planning access and quality. The authors purposefully selected 14 key stakeholders from government agencies, professional organizations and non-governmental organizations for in-person interviews. Fifty-eight healthcare providers and representatives of stakeholder organizations in reproductive health who self-selected through an online survey were also interviewed. Transcripts were analyzed for repeated and saturated themes. Cost was the most important barrier to contraception. Sexual health education was reported as inconsistent, even within provinces. Regional differences were highlighted, including limited access to family physicians in rural Canada and throughout Quebec. Physician bias and outdated practices were cited as significant barriers to quality. New immigrants, youth, young adults and women in small rural, Northern and Aboriginal communities were all identified as particularly vulnerable. Informants identified multiple opportunities for health policy and system restructuring, including subsidized contraception, and enhancing public and healthcare provider education. Sexual health clinics were viewed as a highly successful model. Task-sharing and expanded scope of practice of nurses, nurse practitioners and pharmacists, alongside telephone and virtual healthcare consultations, were suggested to create multiple points of entry into the system. Results underscore the need for a national strategic approach to family planning health policy and health services delivery in Canada. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  10. Drug research and treatment for children in Canada: A challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Historically, children have been ‘therapeutic orphans’. Many drugs have not been studied or labelled for use in children and adolescents, making the development and definition of optimally safe and effective drug therapies for the paediatric age group an ongoing challenge. Over the past decade, networks have developed in the United States and Europe to enhance drug research for this group, while no comparable evolution has occurred in Canada. The present statement provides context for the Can...

  11. Le ministre du Commerce international du Canada rencontre des ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    17 juil. 2017 ... La promotion de l'entrepreneuriat, la façon dont le commerce peut profiter aux femmes et à leur famille, et la création d'emplois pour les plus vulnérables étaient au coeur de la discussion en table ronde du ministre du Commerce international du Canada, l'honorable François-Philippe Champagne, et des ...

  12. Mounting ground sections of teeth: Cyanoacrylate adhesive versus Canada balsam

    OpenAIRE

    Manogna R.L. Vangala; Amrutha Rudraraju; Subramanyam, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hard tissues can be studied by either decalcification or by preparing ground sections. Various mounting media have been tried and used for ground sections of teeth. However, there are very few studies on the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive as a mounting medium. Aims: The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of cyanoacrylate adhesive (Fevikwik™) as a mounting medium for ground sections of teeth and to compare these ground sections with those mounted with Canada balsam. Mat...

  13. Agrogeology in East Africa: the Tanzania-Canada project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesworth, W.; van Straaten, P.; Semoka, J. M. R.

    Fertilizer self sufficiency is a necessary prerequisite for food security in a nation. In promoting this, the role of the geologist is to find raw materials farmers can use to increase the productivity of their soils. The Tanzania-Canada agrogeology project is the first of its kind wherein geologists, soil scientist and agronomists are working together to find and test materiaks of a geological provenance, that small scale farmers can use to improve the food carrying capacity of their land.

  14. Towards 250 m mapping of terrestrial primary productivity over Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsamo, A.; Chen, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are an important part of the climate and global change systems. Their role in climate change and in the global carbon cycle is yet to be well understood. Dataset from satellite earth observation, coupled with numerical models provide the unique tools for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of territorial carbon cycle. The Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) is a remote sensing based approach to quantifying the terrestrial carbon cycle by that gross and net primary productivity (GPP and NPP) and terrestrial carbon sinks and sources expressed as net ecosystem productivity (NEP). We have currently implemented a scheme to map the GPP, NPP and NEP at 250 m for first time over Canada using BEPS model. This is supplemented by improved mapping of land cover and leaf area index (LAI) at 250 m over Canada from MODIS satellite dataset. The results from BEPS are compared with MODIS GPP product and further evaluated with estimated LAI from various sources to evaluate if the results capture the trend in amount of photosynthetic biomass distributions. Final evaluation will be to validate both BEPS and MODIS primary productivity estimates over the Fluxnet sites over Canada. The primary evaluation indicate that BEPS GPP estimates capture the over storey LAI variations over Canada very well compared to MODIS GPP estimates. There is a large offset of MODIS GPP, over-estimating the lower GPP value compared to BEPS GPP estimates. These variations will further be validated based on the measured values from the Fluxnet tower measurements over Canadian. The high resolution GPP (NPP) products at 250 m will further be used to scale the outputs between different ecosystem productivity models, in our case the Canadian carbon budget model of Canadian forest sector CBM-CFS) and the Integrated Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon model (InTEC).

  15. Evaluating the Cost-effectiveness of Pharmaceuticals in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Boothe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Canada adopted guidelines for the economic evaluation of pharmaceuticals in 1994, and a central process for drug assessment in 2003. The context and the way the issue reached the agenda in the two time periods differed. The guidelines were adopted amidst growing academic interest in methods for economic evaluation of pharmaceuticals in Canada and internationally, and were first promoted by an entrepreneur from the pharmaceutical industry. The Common Drug Review (CDR was adopted in a context of broader intergovernmental negotiations over health reforms, and came onto the agenda as a policy option that addressed pharmaceuticals but avoided the fraught question of public insurance. Both processes aim to harmonize drug assessment in Canada and ensure that publicly reimbursed drugs are cost-effective. Neither is the subject of legislation or regulation, but the CDR enjoys greater uptake as a result of an intergovernmental agreement that all new drugs will be subject to its review. Evaluation of the CDR has been more robust, and finds a split in opinion among stakeholders concerning the CDR’s benefits. This article describes the reforms using information drawn from government and CCOHTA/CADTH documents, published reflections of participants and secondary literature, and nine expert interviews. It finds that although the CDR’s design and implementation respond to some of the shortcomings of the Canadian guidelines, there are still important unresolved tensions between harmonization and transparency in drug assessment, and new challenges regarding pharmaceutical pricing and use of evidence. The way these tensions are resolved has important implications for broader attempts to reform public drug coverage in Canada.

  16. Canada : tous les projets | Page 10 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le CRDI administre l'apport de 20 millions de dollars du gouvernement du Canada à l'expansion du réseau de centre AIMS, l'objectif de l'initiative Next Einstein de l'Institut Africain des Sciences Mathématiques (AIMS-NEI). Sujet: SCIENCE. Région: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Benin, Ethiopia, Ghana, Senegal, ...

  17. The dilemma of physician shortage and international recruitment in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Nazrul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of physician shortage in Canada is widespread. Absolute shortages and relative discrepancies, both specialty-wise and in urban-rural distribution, have been a daunting policy challenge. International Medical Graduates (IMGs) have been at the core of mitigating this problem, especially as long as shortage of physicians in rural areas is concerned. Considering such recruitment as historical reality is naïve annotation, but when it is recommended per se, then the indication of int...

  18. The use of Traditional Medicine by Ghanaians in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Teijlingen Edwin R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research into health and health-care seeking behaviour amongst immigrant populations suggests that culturally-based behaviours change over time towards those prevalent in the host culture. Such acculturation of immigrant groups occurs as part of the interaction of immigrants with mainstream culture. This study examined the acculturation of Ghanaian immigrants in Greater Toronto Area (Canada focusing particularly on attitudes towards and usage of Ghanaian traditional medicine (TRM. Methods The study used both quantitative and qualitative methods. Structured questionnaire interviews were conducted with a sample of Ghanaians in active collaboration with the Ghanaian-Canadian Association in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA. A total of 512 questionnaire interviews were conducted. In addition, three focus groups of nine participants each were conducted with a sub-sample of Ghanaians in Canada. Results Both the questionnaire and the focus groups indicated that nearly 73% of the Ghanaian immigrants in Canada have a positive attitude toward Ghanaian TRM. This is in comparison with less than 30% who have changed their attitude for various reasons. Some of the attraction of TRM lies in its holistic origin. Ghanaians in the GTA have been pursuing 'integration' and 'assimilation' in their acculturation in Canada. Some have given up or modified some of their attitudes and opinions toward TRM to embrace the 'modern' or 'civilized' way of living. Conclusion There is the need for health care providers and other stakeholders to be aware of the influence of religion on African immigrants during their acculturation process. Although modernity is said to be founded on the 'ruthless undermining of tradition', there is no evidence to suggest that Ghanaian traditional religion has been undermined to such an extent that there is a major change in attitudes towards TRM.

  19. Trends in extinction risk for imperiled species in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Favaro

    Full Text Available Protecting and promoting recovery of species at risk of extinction is a critical component of biodiversity conservation. In Canada, the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC determines whether species are at risk of extinction or extirpation, and has conducted these assessments since 1977. We examined trends in COSEWIC assessments to identify whether at-risk species that have been assessed more than once tended to improve, remain constant, or deteriorate in status, as a way of assessing the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation in Canada. Of 369 species that met our criteria for examination, 115 deteriorated, 202 remained unchanged, and 52 improved in status. Only 20 species (5.4% improved to the point where they were 'not at risk', and five of those were due to increased sampling efforts rather than an increase in population size. Species outcomes were also dependent on the severity of their initial assessment; for example, 47% of species that were initially listed as special concern deteriorated between assessments. After receiving an at-risk assessment by COSEWIC, a species is considered for listing under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA, which is the primary national tool that mandates protection for at-risk species. We examined whether SARA-listing was associated with improved COSEWIC assessment outcomes relative to unlisted species. Of 305 species that had multiple assessments and were SARA-listed, 221 were listed at a level that required identification and protection of critical habitat; however, critical habitat was fully identified for only 56 of these species. We suggest that the Canadian government should formally identify and protect critical habitat, as is required by existing legislation. In addition, our finding that at-risk species in Canada rarely recover leads us to recommend that every effort be made to actively prevent species from becoming at-risk in the first place.

  20. canada : tous les projets | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les économies à faible revenu dépendent énormément de l'agriculture, et la croissance dans ce secteur est responsable d'une plus grande réduction de la pauvreté que dans tout autre secteur. Région: Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Viet Nam, Thailand, Canada. Programme: Employment and Growth. Financement total : CA$ ...

  1. CANADA - INCLUSIVE DISTANCE EDUCATION: Experiences of Four Canadian Women

    OpenAIRE

    VASKOVICS, Christine; SMITH, Fiona L.

    2015-01-01

    Women's participation in higher education in Canada has changed over the past two decades and no longer is the gender gap in university attainment in favour of men. Today young women are graduating from university in higher numbers than are men. Even those women who, for one reason or other, are unable to attend traditional universities are also choosing to participate in higher education. Women not only make up the majority of university graduates they also make up the majority of dista...

  2. Asthma-related productivity losses in Alberta, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Thanh, Nguyen,

    2009-01-01

    Nguyen X Thanh, Arto Ohinmaa, Charles YanInstitute of Health Economics, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaObjectives: To estimate the number and cost of asthma-related productivity loss days due to absenteeism and presenteeism (at work but not fully functioning) in Alberta in 2005.Methods: Using data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study focused on people of working age (18–64 years), who reported having an asthma diagnosis. Total asthma-related disability days, includin...

  3. Colonial Copyright and the Photographic Image: Canada in the Frame

    OpenAIRE

    Hatfield, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Under Colonial Copyright Law, the British Museum Library acquired a substantial collection of Canadian photographs between 1895 and 1924, taken by a variety ofamateurs and professionals across Canada. Due to the agency of individual photographers, the requirements of copyright legislation and the accumulating principleof the archive, the Collection displays multiple geographies and invites variousinterpretations. Chapter 1 discusses the development of Colonial Copyright Law and its ...

  4. Technology Adoption: A Comparison Between Canada and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, John R.; Sabourin, David

    1999-01-01

    This study examines differences in technology use in Canada as opposed to the United States as well as reasons for these differences. It examines different aspects of technology use-numbers of technologies used, types of technologies used, as well as regional, size and industry variations in their use. It then investigates differences in benefits that plant managers perceive stem from advanced technology use and differences in the factors that managers assess as impediments. While managers in...

  5. On The Eve Of IYA2009 In Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, James E.; Breland, K.; Hay, K.; Lane, D.; Lacasse, R.; Lemay, D.; Langill, P.; Percy, J.; Welch, D.; Woodsworth, A.

    2009-01-01

    Local events organized by astronomy clubs, colleges and universities across Canada will softly launch IYA on Saturday, 10 January and begin building awareness of opportunities for every Canadian to experience a `Galileo Moment’ in 2009. The launch typifies our `grass roots’ philosophy based upon our strong partnership of amateurs and professionals which already represents an IYA legacy. In this poster we anticipate the activities of the first half of 2009 and exhibit the educational and public outreach materials and programs we have produced in both official languages, e.g., Astronomy Trading Cards, Mary Lou's New Telescope, Star Finder, etc. Some of these play central roles in our tracking of participation, including allowing people to register to have their name launched into space in 2010. Several contests for youth are underway, with the prize in one being an hour of Gemini telescope observing. In the first half of 2009 some 30,000 grade 6 students will experience `Music of the Spheres’ astronomical orchestral programming conducted by Galileo (a.k.a. Tania Miller, Victoria Symphony). Audiences in Canada and the US will experience Taflemusik's marvelous new soundscape of music and words exploring the deep connections between astronomy and Baroque-era music. An Astronomy Kit featuring Galileoscope for classroom and astronomy club EPO will be tested. Canada Post will issue two stamps during 100 Hours of Astronomy. A new production, Galileo Live!, by Canadian planetaria involving live actors will premier, as will the national Galileo Legacy Lectures in which top astronomers familiarize the public with forefront research being done in Canada. Image exhibits drawing upon material generated by Canadian astronomers and artists, as well as from the IAU Cornerstones, FETTU and TWAN, are opening in malls and airports early in 2009. We will present the latest information about these and other events.

  6. Retail availability and marketing of electronic cigarettes in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, David; White, Christine M; Czoli, Christine D; Martin, Christina L; Magennis, Paul; Shiplo, Samantha

    2015-10-09

    Canada is among an increasing number of countries with restrictions on the sale of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). In Canada, e-cigarettes containing nicotine have not been approved for sale; however, e-cigarettes that do not contain nicotine and do not make health claims can be sold. To date, there is little empirical evidence assessing the retail availability and marketing of e-cigarettes in countries such as Canada. Audits were conducted at 59 brick-and-mortar retail outlets (grocery stores, convenience stores, tobacconist shops and vape shops) in four cities (Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal and Halifax) in August-October 2014. In addition, a total of 21 e-cigarette manufacturer/retailer websites were audited, and inquiries were made as to whether the companies sold nicotine-containing products. Overall, 76% of the retail outlets sold e-cigarette products. Of convenience stores, grocery stores and tobacconist shops with e-cigarettes for sale, the vast majority (94%) sold nicotine-free products only; in contrast, all the vape shops sold at least one nicotine-containing e-cigarette product. Front counter displays were the most common form of in-store promotions and were present in virtually all convenience stores, tobacconist shops and vape shops. Nicotine-containing e-cigarettes were available for purchase at approximately half (52%) of the online e-cigarette retailers surveyed. E-cigarettes with and without nicotine are widely available and marketed at a variety of retail outlets in Canada. "Illegal" sales of nicotinecontaining e-cigarettes were predominantly found at vape shops and online outlets, suggesting limited compliance with existing regulations.

  7. The role of the 'builder' in community sport in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Sport in Canada is led mostly led by volunteers and accounts for the largest proportion of volunteers in the country. Much of our sport infrastructure, especially in terms of the establishment of community sport facilities, and continued operation of organizations, depends on volunteers. Trends of declining and changing types of volunteering have profoundly negative potential consequences for community sport, especially if the key volunteers of our sport system are not replaced. For sport and...

  8. Declines in outpatient antimicrobial use in Canada (1995-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Finley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With rising reports of antimicrobial resistance in outpatient communities, surveillance of antimicrobial use is imperative for supporting stewardship programs. The primary objective of this article is to assess the levels of antimicrobial use in Canada over time. METHODS: Canadian antimicrobial use data from 1995 to 2010 were acquired and assessed by four metrics: population-adjusted prescriptions, Defined Daily Doses, spending on antimicrobials (inflation-adjusted, and average Defined Daily Doses per prescription. Linear mixed models were built to assess significant differences among years and antimicrobial groups, and to account for repeated measurements over time. Measures were also compared to published reports from European countries. RESULTS: Temporal trends in antimicrobial use in Canada vary by metric and antimicrobial grouping. Overall reductions were seen for inflation-adjusted spending, population-adjusted prescription rates and Defined Daily Doses, and increases were observed for the average number of Defined Daily Doses per prescription. The population-adjusted prescription and Defined Daily Doses values for 2009 were comparable to those reported by many European countries, while the average Defined Daily Dose per prescription for Canada ranked high. A significant reduction in the use of broad spectrum penicillins occurred between 1995 and 2004, coupled with increases in macrolide and quinolone use, suggesting that replacement of antimicrobial drugs may occur as new products arrive on the market. CONCLUSIONS: There have been modest decreases of antimicrobial use in Canada over the past 15 years. However, continued surveillance of antimicrobial use coupled with data detailing antimicrobial resistance within bacterial pathogens affecting human populations is critical for targeting interventions and maintaining the effectiveness of these products for future generations.

  9. canada : tous les projets | Page 13 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Subvention de partenariat à l'AUCC 2011-2013 - nouveaux modèles de partenariat en faveur de l'internationalisation. Projet. Depuis la fin des années 1970, l'Association des universités et collèges du Canada (AUCC) a reçu diverses subventions du CRDI en vue de favoriser la compréhension et la mobilisation de ses ...

  10. Affaires mondiales Canada | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Par exemple, des équipes de recherche vietnamiennes et canadiennes ont mis au point des farines instantanées et des céréales pour bébés enrichies de micronutriments, et ce, au moyen de cultures et d'installations de transformation locales. Affaires mondiales Canada, le CRDI et les Instituts de recherche en santé du ...

  11. Canada : tous les projets | Page 3 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Formation de circuits par contrôle spatio-temporel de la traduction de l'ARN messager. Projet. À l'intérieur du cerveau, les connexions doivent être branchées de manière précise durant le développement pour assurer son bon fonctionnement. Région: Chile, Canada, Israel. Programme: Foundations for Innovation.

  12. Spatial distribution of carbon sources and sinks in Canada's forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing M.; Ju, Weimin; Cihlar, Josef; Price, David; Liu, Jane; Chen, Wenjun; Pan, Jianjun; Black, Andy; Barr, Alan

    2003-04-01

    Annual spatial distributions of carbon sources and sinks in Canada's forests at 1 km resolution are computed for the period from 1901 to 1998 using ecosystem models that integrate remote sensing images, gridded climate, soils and forest inventory data. GIS-based fire scar maps for most regions of Canada are used to develop a remote sensing algorithm for mapping and dating forest burned areas in the 25 yr prior to 1998. These mapped and dated burned areas are used in combination with inventory data to produce a complete image of forest stand age in 1998. Empirical NPP age relationships were used to simulate the annual variations of forest growth and carbon balance in 1 km pixels, each treated as a homogeneous forest stand. Annual CO2 flux data from four sites were used for model validation. Averaged over the period 1990-1998, the carbon source and sink map for Canada's forests show the following features: (i) large spatial variations corresponding to the patchiness of recent fire scars and productive forests and (ii) a general south-to-north gradient of decreasing carbon sink strength and increasing source strength. This gradient results mostly from differential effects of temperature increase on growing season length, nutrient mineralization and heterotrophic respiration at different latitudes as well as from uneven nitrogen deposition. The results from the present study are compared with those of two previous studies. The comparison suggests that the overall positive effects of non-disturbance factors (climate, CO2 and nitrogen) outweighed the effects of increased disturbances in the last two decades, making Canada's forests a carbon sink in the 1980s and 1990s. Comparisons of the modeled results with tower-based eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem exchange at four forest stands indicate that the sink values from the present study may be underestimated.

  13. Canada : tous les projets | Page 3 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ce projet produira des données probantes pour aider à orienter les stratégies de traitement chez les patients atteints de déficits de la mémoire et à réduire les symptômes associés à la maladie d'Alzheimer. Région: India, Canada, Israel. Programme: Foundations for Innovation. Financement total : CA$ 669,937.00.

  14. canada : tous les projets | Page 7 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Région: Tanzania, Canada. Programme: Maternal and Child Health. Financement total : CA$ 995,940.00 ... L'Éthiopie présente l'un des taux de prévalence les plus élevés au monde quant à la malnutrition protéinocalorique et aux carences en micronutriments. Date de début : 5 février 2015. Sujet: MALNUTRITION. Région: ...

  15. Pediatric neurology training in Canada: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif

    2012-05-01

    Child neurology training in Canada has changed considerably over time, with increasing requirements for standardized teaching of the fundamentals of child neurology and the CanMEDS competencies. We sought to determine the current status of child neurology training in Canada as well future directions for training. A web-based survey was sent to program directors (PD's) of active pediatric neurology training programs. General questions about the programs were asked, as well as about success at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) exam, breakdown of rotations, views on CanMEDS roles and questions on the future of pediatric neurology. 9/9 PD's completed the survey. 96.5% of all trainees successfully passed their RCPSC exam from 2001-2006. Breakdowns of the number and type of rotations for each year of training were provided. All CanMEDS roles were deemed to be important by PD's and programs have developed unique strategies to teach and assess these roles.92.6% of trainees chose to go into academic practice, with the most popular subspecialty being epilepsy. All PD's favour joint training sessions particularly for neurogenetics and neuromuscular disease. Overall, PD's suggest recruitment for future child neurologists at the medical student level but are divided as to whether we are currently training too few or too many child neurologists. This survey provides a view of the current state of pediatric neurology training in Canada and suggestions for further development of post-graduate training. In particular, attention should be given to joint educational programs as well as urgently assessing the manpower needs of child neurologists.

  16. Measuring Innovation in Canada: The Tale Told by Patent Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Dachis; Robbie Brydon; Nicholas Chesterley

    2014-01-01

    Alberta and Ontario are leading the pack in innovation as measured by patents filed per capita, according to a new report from the C.D. Howe Institute. In “Measuring Innovation in Canada: The Tale Told by Patent Applications,” authors Robbie Brydon, Nicholas Chesterley, Benjamin Dachis and Aaron Jacobs show for the first time which provinces and which sectors are leading or lagging in Canadian-led innovation for the Canadian market.

  17. Phylogeography of Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) in western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, K.T.; Talbot, S.L.; Pearce, J.M.; Pierson, Barbara J.; Bollinger, K.S.; Derksen, D.V.

    2003-01-01

    Using molecular genetic markers that differ in mode of inheritance and rate of evolution, we examined levels and partitioning of genetic variation for seven nominal subspecies (11 breeding populations) of Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) in western North America. Gene trees constructed from mtDNA control region sequence data show that subspecies of Canada Geese do not have distinct mtDNA. Large- and small-bodied forms of Canada Geese were highly diverged (0. 077 average sequence divergence) and represent monophyletic groups. A majority (65%) of 20 haplotypes resolved were observed in single breeding locales. However, within both large- and small-bodied forms certain haplotypes occurred across multiple subspecies. Population trees for both nuclear (microsatellites) and mitochondrial markers were generally concordant and provide resolution of population and subspecific relationships indicating incomplete lineage sorting. All populations and subspecies were genetically diverged, but to varying degrees. Analyses of molecular variance, nested-clade and coalescence-based analyses of mtDNA suggest that both historical (past fragmentation) and contemporary forces have been important in shaping current spatial genetic distributions. Gene flow appears to be ongoing though at different rates, even among currently recognized subspecies. The efficacy of current subspecific taxonomy is discussed in light of hypothesized historical vicariance and current demographic trends of management and conservation concern.

  18. Status of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina in Atlantic Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike O Hammill

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Harbour seals are associated with small islets, reefs and rocks exposed at low tide and estuarine habitats throughout eastern Canada. Evidence of harvesting by indigenous people has been found in pre-European contact archaeological excavations. A bounty harvest as well as subsistence and commercial hunting probably lead to a decline in the population from 1949 to the early 1970s. The bounty was removed in 1976, and harbour seals, in the southern parts of their range have been protected since then. There is little information available on total abundance and current population trend. Mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA research has shown separation between Northeast and Northwest Atlantic harbour seals. Within Canada, the subspecies Phoca vitulina concolor shows some population sub-structure with three distinct units that could be separated into Hudson Bay, Gulf of St. Lawrence and Sable Island. Urban development resulting in habitat degradation is probably the most important factor affecting harbour seal populations in AtlanticCanada, although other factors such as incidental catches in commercial fisheries and competition with grey seals may also be important.

  19. The dilemma of physician shortage and international recruitment in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazrul

    2014-06-01

    The perception of physician shortage in Canada is widespread. Absolute shortages and relative discrepancies, both specialty-wise and in urban-rural distribution, have been a daunting policy challenge. International Medical Graduates (IMGs) have been at the core of mitigating this problem, especially as long as shortage of physicians in rural areas is concerned. Considering such recruitment as historical reality is naïve annotation, but when it is recommended per se, then the indication of interest overweighs the intent of ethically justified solution. Such a recommendation has not only invited policy debate and disagreement, but has also raised serious ethical concerns. Canadian healthcare policy-makers were put into a series of twisting puzzles-recruiting IMGs in mitigating physician shortage was questioned by lack of vision for Canada's self-sufficiency. In-migration of IMGs was largely attributed to Canada's point-based physician-friendly immigration system without much emphasizing on IMGs' home countries' unfavorable factors and ignoring their basic human rights and choice of livelihood. While policy-makers' excellence in integrating the already-migrated IMGs into the Canadian healthcare is cautiously appraised, its logical consequence in passively drawing more IMGs is loudly criticised. Even the passive recruitment of IMGs raised the ethical concern of source countries' (which are often developing countries with already-compromised healthcare system) vulnerability. The current paper offers critical insights juxtaposing all these seemingly conflicting ideas and interests within the scope of national and transnational instruments.

  20. The economic benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Hans; Koot, Jacqueline; Andres, Ellie

    2017-06-16

    The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of the population that meets or exceeds Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations regarding the number of daily servings of fruits and vegetables (F/V), to assess trends in this proportion between 2000 and 2013, to estimate the annual economic burden attributable to inadequate F/V consumption within the context of other important risk factors, and to estimate the short- and long-term costs that could be avoided if modest improvements were made to F/V consumption in Canada. We used a previously developed methodology based on population-attributable fractions and a prevalence-based cost-of-illness approach to estimate the economic burden associated with low F/V consumption. Over three quarters of Canadians are not meeting CFG recommendations regarding the number of daily servings of F/V, leading to an annual economic burden of $4.39 billion. If a 1% relative increase in F/V consumption occurred annually between 2013 and 2036, the cumulative reduction in economic burden over the 23-year period would reach $8.4 billion. Consumption levels of F/V, and the resulting economic burden, varied by sex, age and province. A significant majority of Canadians are not consuming the recommended daily servings of F/V, with important consequences to their health and the Canadian economy. Programs and policies are required to encourage F/V consumption in Canada.

  1. Value for money: an evaluation of health spending in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariste, Ruolz; Di Matteo, Livio

    2017-01-03

    The long-term increase in international health spending sparked concerns about sustainability of health care systems but also the impact of such spending and the value for money from health spending. The period since 1975 has witnessed an increase in per capita health spending in Canada along with improvements in health outcomes. This paper is an economic evaluation of health spending in Canada-an analysis of the cost-effectiveness of aggregate health spending. Estimates of the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) are made for the whole 1980-2012 period and for four sub-periods of time-1980-1989; 1989-1998; 1998-2007 and 2007-2012. This is done for both the general population as well as Canadian seniors. Under a medium contribution of health spending to life expectancy scenario for the 1980-2012 period, the costs per QALY gained averaged $16,977 and $14,968, respectively for the general population and the seniors. This suggests that the Canadian health system produces relatively good value for money, especially for the seniors. After applying separate adjustments to match total health spending in the US and NHS health spending in the UK, we found that costs per QALY gained in Canada were generally lower than those found for the US, but not for the UK.

  2. Public health nutrition practice in Canada: a situational assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ann; Chenhall, Cathy; Traynor, Marie; Scythes, Cindy; Bellman, Jane

    2008-08-01

    Renewed focus on public health has brought about considerable interest in workforce development among public health nutrition professionals in Canada. The present article describes a situational assessment of public health nutrition practice in Canada that will be used to guide future workforce development efforts. A situational assessment is a planning approach that considers strengths and opportunities as well as needs and challenges, and emphasizes stakeholder participation. This situational assessment consisted of four components: a systematic review of literature on public health nutrition workforce issues; key informant interviews; a PEEST (political, economic, environmental, social, technological) factor analysis; and a consensus meeting. Information gathered from these sources identified key nutrition and health concerns of the population; the need to define public health nutrition practice, roles and functions; demand for increased training, education and leadership opportunities; inconsistent qualification requirements across the country; and the desire for a common vision among practitioners. Findings of the situational assessment were used to create a three-year public health nutrition workforce development strategy. Specific objectives of the strategy are to define public health nutrition practice in Canada, develop competencies, collaborate with other disciplines, and begin to establish a new professional group or leadership structure to promote and enhance public health nutrition practice. The process of conducting the situational assessment not only provided valuable information for planning purposes, but also served as an effective mechanism for engaging stakeholders and building consensus.

  3. Falling behind - Canada's lost clean energy jobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    With the depletion of conventional resources and the increasing concerns about the environment, emphasis has been put on developing clean energy. Clean energy is expected to become one of the main industrial sectors within the next decade, thus creating numerous jobs. While significant investments have been made by several countries to shift to clean energy, Canada is investing in highly polluting resources such as the tar sands. It is shown that if Canada were to match U.S. efforts in terms of clean energy on a per person basis, they would need to invest 11 billion additional dollars and this would result in the creation of 66,000 clean energy jobs. This paper showed that Canada is falling behind in terms of clean energy and the authors recommend that the Canadian government match U.S. investments and design policies in support of clean energy and put a price on carbon so as to favor the development of the clean energy sector and its consequent job creation.

  4. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  5. 2014-2015 CAUT Almanac of Post-Secondary Education in Canada = 2014-2015 Almanach de l'enseignement postsecondaire au Canada de l'ACPPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Association of University Teachers, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The "Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) Almanac of Post-Secondary Education in Canada" is a source for the most current statistical information available on post-secondary education in Canada. The Almanac provides statistics on the following: (1) university and college finances; (2) academic staff salaries and gender; (3)…

  6. A Synthesis of Human-related Avian Mortality in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Calvert

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many human activities in Canada kill wild birds, yet the relative magnitude of mortality from different sources and the consequent effects on bird populations have not been systematically evaluated. We synthesize recent estimates of avian mortality in Canada from a range of industrial and other human activities, to provide context for the estimates from individual sources presented in this special feature. We assessed the geographic, seasonal, and taxonomic variation in the magnitude of national-scale mortality and in population-level effects on species or groups across Canada, by combining these estimates into a stochastic model of stage-specific mortality. The range of estimates of avian mortality from each source covers several orders of magnitude, and, numerically, landbirds were the most affected group. In total, we estimate that approximately 269 million birds and 2 million nests are destroyed annually in Canada, the equivalent of over 186 million breeding individuals. Combined, cat predation and collisions with windows, vehicles, and transmission lines caused > 95% of all mortality; the highest industrial causes of mortality were the electrical power and agriculture sectors. Other mortality sources such as fisheries bycatch can have important local or species-specific impacts, but are relatively small at a national scale. Mortality rates differed across species and families within major bird groups, highlighting that mortality is not simply proportional to abundance. We also found that mortality is not evenly spread across the country; the largest mortality sources are coincident with human population distribution, while industrial sources are concentrated in southern Ontario, Alberta, and southwestern British Columbia. Many species are therefore likely to be vulnerable to cumulative effects of multiple human-related impacts. This assessment also confirms the high uncertainty in estimating human-related avian mortality in terms of species

  7. From sea to sea: Canada's three oceans of biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Archambault

    Full Text Available Evaluating and understanding biodiversity in marine ecosystems are both necessary and challenging for conservation. This paper compiles and summarizes current knowledge of the diversity of marine taxa in Canada's three oceans while recognizing that this compilation is incomplete and will change in the future. That Canada has the longest coastline in the world and incorporates distinctly different biogeographic provinces and ecoregions (e.g., temperate through ice-covered areas constrains this analysis. The taxonomic groups presented here include microbes, phytoplankton, macroalgae, zooplankton, benthic infauna, fishes, and marine mammals. The minimum number of species or taxa compiled here is 15,988 for the three Canadian oceans. However, this number clearly underestimates in several ways the total number of taxa present. First, there are significant gaps in the published literature. Second, the diversity of many habitats has not been compiled for all taxonomic groups (e.g., intertidal rocky shores, deep sea, and data compilations are based on short-term, directed research programs or longer-term monitoring activities with limited spatial resolution. Third, the biodiversity of large organisms is well known, but this is not true of smaller organisms. Finally, the greatest constraint on this summary is the willingness and capacity of those who collected the data to make it available to those interested in biodiversity meta-analyses. Confirmation of identities and intercomparison of studies are also constrained by the disturbing rate of decline in the number of taxonomists and systematists specializing on marine taxa in Canada. This decline is mostly the result of retirements of current specialists and to a lack of training and employment opportunities for new ones. Considering the difficulties encountered in compiling an overview of biogeographic data and the diversity of species or taxa in Canada's three oceans, this synthesis is intended to

  8. From Sea to Sea: Canada's Three Oceans of Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Philippe; Snelgrove, Paul V. R.; Fisher, Jonathan A. D.; Gagnon, Jean-Marc; Garbary, David J.; Harvey, Michel; Kenchington, Ellen L.; Lesage, Véronique; Levesque, Mélanie; Lovejoy, Connie; Mackas, David L.; McKindsey, Christopher W.; Nelson, John R.; Pepin, Pierre; Piché, Laurence; Poulin, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating and understanding biodiversity in marine ecosystems are both necessary and challenging for conservation. This paper compiles and summarizes current knowledge of the diversity of marine taxa in Canada's three oceans while recognizing that this compilation is incomplete and will change in the future. That Canada has the longest coastline in the world and incorporates distinctly different biogeographic provinces and ecoregions (e.g., temperate through ice-covered areas) constrains this analysis. The taxonomic groups presented here include microbes, phytoplankton, macroalgae, zooplankton, benthic infauna, fishes, and marine mammals. The minimum number of species or taxa compiled here is 15,988 for the three Canadian oceans. However, this number clearly underestimates in several ways the total number of taxa present. First, there are significant gaps in the published literature. Second, the diversity of many habitats has not been compiled for all taxonomic groups (e.g., intertidal rocky shores, deep sea), and data compilations are based on short-term, directed research programs or longer-term monitoring activities with limited spatial resolution. Third, the biodiversity of large organisms is well known, but this is not true of smaller organisms. Finally, the greatest constraint on this summary is the willingness and capacity of those who collected the data to make it available to those interested in biodiversity meta-analyses. Confirmation of identities and intercomparison of studies are also constrained by the disturbing rate of decline in the number of taxonomists and systematists specializing on marine taxa in Canada. This decline is mostly the result of retirements of current specialists and to a lack of training and employment opportunities for new ones. Considering the difficulties encountered in compiling an overview of biogeographic data and the diversity of species or taxa in Canada's three oceans, this synthesis is intended to serve as a

  9. From sea to sea: Canada's three oceans of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, Philippe; Snelgrove, Paul V R; Fisher, Jonathan A D; Gagnon, Jean-Marc; Garbary, David J; Harvey, Michel; Kenchington, Ellen L; Lesage, Véronique; Levesque, Mélanie; Lovejoy, Connie; Mackas, David L; McKindsey, Christopher W; Nelson, John R; Pepin, Pierre; Piché, Laurence; Poulin, Michel

    2010-08-31

    Evaluating and understanding biodiversity in marine ecosystems are both necessary and challenging for conservation. This paper compiles and summarizes current knowledge of the diversity of marine taxa in Canada's three oceans while recognizing that this compilation is incomplete and will change in the future. That Canada has the longest coastline in the world and incorporates distinctly different biogeographic provinces and ecoregions (e.g., temperate through ice-covered areas) constrains this analysis. The taxonomic groups presented here include microbes, phytoplankton, macroalgae, zooplankton, benthic infauna, fishes, and marine mammals. The minimum number of species or taxa compiled here is 15,988 for the three Canadian oceans. However, this number clearly underestimates in several ways the total number of taxa present. First, there are significant gaps in the published literature. Second, the diversity of many habitats has not been compiled for all taxonomic groups (e.g., intertidal rocky shores, deep sea), and data compilations are based on short-term, directed research programs or longer-term monitoring activities with limited spatial resolution. Third, the biodiversity of large organisms is well known, but this is not true of smaller organisms. Finally, the greatest constraint on this summary is the willingness and capacity of those who collected the data to make it available to those interested in biodiversity meta-analyses. Confirmation of identities and intercomparison of studies are also constrained by the disturbing rate of decline in the number of taxonomists and systematists specializing on marine taxa in Canada. This decline is mostly the result of retirements of current specialists and to a lack of training and employment opportunities for new ones. Considering the difficulties encountered in compiling an overview of biogeographic data and the diversity of species or taxa in Canada's three oceans, this synthesis is intended to serve as a

  10. Canada and access to medicines in developing countries: intellectual property rights first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel

    2013-09-03

    Canadian reports have recommended that health as a human right must be Canada's overarching global commitment and that the primacy of human rights should be prioritized over other elements of international law including international trade and investment law as it applies to access to pharmaceuticals. This paper uses a series of case reports to examine Canada's commitment to this goal. Specifically it examines cases where improved access has been in conflict with increased intellectual property rights. The 6 cases are: Canada's position when 39 pharmaceutical companies took South Africa to court in 1998 over its legislation to allow parallel importation of patented medicines and to regulate the price of medications; the stance that Canada took in the negotiations around the Doha Declaration in 2001; the passage of Canada's Access to Medicines Regime in 2004 and subsequent attempts to amend the legislation in 2011 and 2012; Canada's involvement in the final declaration at the United Nations High-Level meeting on non-communicable diseases in 2012; Canada's views about the terms in the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement as expressed in 2009; and Canada's 2013 position on the extension of the exemption for least developed countries from having to comply with the terms of the Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement. In the first case Canada was neutral but in the remaining 5 cases Canada prioritized intellectual property rights over access. This position is consistent with how Canada has acted around domestic issues involving intellectual property rights for pharmaceutical products. Canada has supported strengthened rights despite the fact that their touted benefits have not been realized either domestically or in developing countries. As a result Canada has failed in its humanitarian duty to protect the human right to health in the form of safe and low cost medicines for the people in developing countries.

  11. Patterns of ovarian and luteal activity in captive and wild Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanson, Kerry V; Wielebnowski, Nadja C; Shenk, Tanya M; Vashon, Jennifer H; Squires, John R; Lucas, Jeffrey R

    2010-12-01

    Canada lynx face some unique breeding restrictions, which may have implications for population viability and captive management. The goal of this study was to improve our understanding of basic reproductive physiology in Canada lynx. Using fecal hormone metabolite analysis, we established normative patterns of fecal estrogen (fE) and progestagen (fP) expression in captive and wild female Canada lynx. Our results indicate that Canada lynx have persistent corpora lutea, which underlie their uncharacteristic fP profiles compared to other felids. Thus, fP are not useful for diagnosing pregnancy in Canada lynx. We also found that Canada lynx are capable of ovulating spontaneously. Captive females had higher concentrations of fE and fP than wild females. Both populations exhibit a seasonal increase in ovarian activity (as measured by fE) between February and April. Finally, there was evidence of ovarian suppression when females were housed together. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Closed windows, open doors: geopolitics and post-1949 mainland Chinese immigration to Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu X-f; Norcliffe, G

    1996-01-01

    "Since 1949 there have been dramatic changes in the flow of migrants from Mainland China to Canada.... Even though Canada in theory opened a window for family reunification in the postwar era by removing long-standing discriminatory clauses blocking Chinese immigration, in practice cold war geopolitics led the Chinese to shut that window, blocking nearly all emigration. Changing geopolitical circumstances led China to develop an open-door policy between 1973 and 1989, leading to increasing flows of migrants to Canada. The political response in Canada to the Tiananmen Square massacre of 1989 was to allow all Chinese students and workers in Canada to stay, if they so wished.... The result was a large inflow making MCIs [mainland Chinese immigrants] the third-largest group of immigrants to Canada in the early 1990s." (EXCERPT)

  13. Legalizing and Regulating Marijuana in Canada: Review of Potential Economic, Social, and Health Impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hajizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Notwithstanding a century of prohibition, marijuana is the most widely used illicit substance in Canada. Due to the growing public acceptance of recreational marijuana use and ineffectiveness of the existing control system in Canada, the issue surrounding legalizing this illicit drug has received considerable public and political attentions in recent years. Consequently, the newly elected Liberal Government has formally announced that Canada will introduce legislation in the spring of 2017 to...

  14. The nature and scope of gambling in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Garry

    2014-05-01

    This paper provides a historical review of gambling in Canada and examines the benefits and shortcomings of present-day Canadian gambling policies and practices. This includes a discussion of provincial and federal government roles in gambling regulation and an overview of problem gambling prevention and treatment initiatives. The gambling studies literature was probed for pertinent information on factors such as historical development, legislative changes, economic conditions and cultural influences that have affected gambling participation and social responsibility strategies in Canada. Two major Criminal Code of Canada amendments (in 1969 and 1985) were pivotal in Canadian gambling expansion. The first decriminalized lotteries and casinos, while the second allowed electronic gambling devices and authorized provinces to operate and regulate gambling. These changes resulted in a radical gambling expansion which, in addition to raising provincial revenues, created public policy concerns. Varying provincial government interpretations of the ambiguous Criminal Code gambling statutes led to a lack of uniformity in how provinces regulate and operate gambling; when gambling expanded, there were no legislative safeguards in place to deal with the personal and societal effects of problem gambling. Subsequent programs designed to prevent and treat problem gambling have not been overly effective. Canadian provinces have a monopoly on gambling within their borders and treat the activity as a profit-driven business enterprise. Problems associated with widespread gambling such as addiction, increased crime, bankruptcy and suicide are seen as minor concerns and not addressed in an aggressive fashion. Given the Canadian federal government's detachment from gambling policy and Canadian provinces' heavy reliance on gambling revenues, little change in the Canadian gambling landscape is anticipated in the near future. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Adapting online learning for Canada's Northern public health workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie Bell

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Canada's North is a diverse, sparsely populated land, where inequalities and public health issues are evident, particularly for Aboriginal people. The Northern public health workforce is a unique mix of professional and paraprofessional workers. Few have formal public health education. From 2009 to 2012, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC collaborated with a Northern Advisory Group to develop and implement a strategy to strengthen public health capacity in Canada's 3 northern territories. Access to relevant, effective continuing education was identified as a key issue. Challenges include diverse educational and cultural backgrounds of public health workers, geographical isolation and variable technological infrastructure across the north. Methods . PHAC's Skills Online program offers Internet-based continuing education modules for public health professionals. In partnership with the Northern Advisory Group, PHAC conducted 3 pilots between 2008 and 2012 to assess the appropriateness of the Skills Online program for Northern/Aboriginal public health workers. Module content and delivery modalities were adapted for the pilots. Adaptations included adding Inuit and Northern public health examples and using video and teleconference discussions to augment the online self-study component. Results . Findings from the pilots were informative and similar to those from previous Skills Online pilots with learners in developing countries. Online learning is effective in bridging the geographical barriers in remote locations. Incorporating content on Northern and Aboriginal health issues facilitates engagement in learning. Employer support facilitates the recruitment and retention of learners in an online program. Facilitator assets included experience as a public health professional from the north, and flexibility to use modified approaches to support and measure knowledge acquisition and application, especially for First Nations, Inuit and

  16. The evolution of integrated chronic disease prevention in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbeck Minke, Sharlene; Smith, Cynthia; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Khalema, Ernest; Raine, Kim

    2006-07-01

    Recognition of the common risk factors for leading chronic diseases in Canada has contributed to the development of integrated chronic disease prevention and health promotion approaches. The Alberta Heart Health Project studied the capacity of health organizations in Alberta, Canada, to engage in heart health promotion. This article describes how the Alberta Heart Health Project acted on emerging research findings describing the preliminary stages of integrated chronic disease prevention in Alberta to provide leadership to encourage provincial chronic disease prevention efforts. Political support for integrated chronic disease prevention was evident at the provincial and federal levels in Canada. As a result of organizational restructuring, loss of key health promotion champions, and decreased funding allocations, Alberta's regional health authorities sought increased efficiency in their chronic disease prevention efforts. Descriptive data were derived from a brief questionnaire on regional health authorities' chronic disease prevention priorities and activities, an inventory of regional health authority health promotion programs and services, content analysis of key regional health authority documents, and focus groups with regional health authority staff, management, and policymakers. In 2002, the Alberta Heart Health Project data revealed that many regional health authorities were beginning to engage in integrated chronic disease prevention. However, little collaboration occurred across the health organizations; provincial leadership to facilitate collaboration and networking for integrated chronic disease prevention was needed. Results supported the growing momentum for provincial leadership to enhance collaboration for integrated chronic disease prevention, which contributed to the development of the Alberta Healthy Living Network. The government's assistance is also needed to support the intersectoral collaborations essential for integrated chronic disease

  17. Trends in the study of Aboriginal health risks in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgal, Chris M; Garvin, Theresa D; Jardine, Cynthia G

    2010-09-01

    To identify trends in the study of health risk in peer-reviewed and grey literature in Canadian Aboriginal populations from 1960 to 2007. Systematic literature review and analysis. Peer-reviewed literature was searched using 5 electronic library databases. The grey literature was searched using 3 online search engines, 4 agency websites and 2 online compiled databases. The search terms used were "Canada," synonyms for Canadian Aboriginal peoples and "risk." Citations were screened for relevance to Aboriginal populations and risks to aspects of human health. Both literatures show an exponential growth in risk-focused study of Canadian Aboriginal health issues over time. There is a geographic foci in the North with the Prairies and the West under-represented. Risk is most commonly used in relation to general health, environmental, zoonotic infections and chronic diseases in the peer-reviewed literature, and general health or environment in the grey literature. Most publications in both literatures are on generalized Aboriginal populations. When specified, a larger proportion of the publications relate to First Nations people, followed by Inuit. Little literature exists on Métis health risks in Canada. There has been an increase in publications about Aboriginal health risk in Canada over time. Trends reflect a research focus on the North and an increased interest in environment and health issues. Greater attention to mental health, addictions and Métis health is required. The increasing use of a risk-based analytical focus has potential implications for understanding the nature of Aboriginal health today and in the future.

  18. Simulation Training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residency Programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ari; Wilson, R Douglas

    2015-11-01

    The integration of simulation into residency programs has been slower in obstetrics and gynaecology than in other surgical specialties. The goal of this study was to evaluate the current use of simulation in obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs in Canada. A 19-question survey was developed and distributed to all 16 active and accredited obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs in Canada. The survey was sent to program directors initially, but on occasion was redirected to other faculty members involved in resident education or to senior residents. Survey responses were collected over an 18-month period. Twelve programs responded to the survey (11 complete responses). Eleven programs (92%) reported introducing an obstetrics and gynaecology simulation curriculum into their residency education. All respondents (100%) had access to a simulation centre. Simulation was used to teach various obstetrical and gynaecological skills using different simulation modalities. Barriers to simulation integration were primarily the costs of equipment and space and the need to ensure dedicated time for residents and educators. The majority of programs indicated that it was a priority for them to enhance their simulation curriculum and transition to competency-based resident assessment. Simulation training has increased in obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs. The development of formal simulation curricula for use in obstetrics and gynaecology resident education is in early development. A standardized national simulation curriculum would help facilitate the integration of simulation into obstetrics and gynaecology resident education and aid in the shift to competency-based resident assessment. Obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs need national collaboration (between centres and specialties) to develop a standardized simulation curriculum for use in obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs in Canada.

  19. Stigma in Canada: Results From a Rapid Response Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Heather; Patten, Scott B; Koller, Michelle; Modgill, Geeta; Liinamaa, Tiina

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our paper presents findings from the first population survey of stigma in Canada using a new measure of stigma. Empirical objectives are to provide a descriptive profile of Canadian’s expectations that people will devalue and discriminate against someone with depression, and to explore the relation between experiences of being stigmatized in the year prior to the survey among people having been treated for a mental illness with a selected number of sociodemographic and mental health–related variables. Method: Data were collected by Statistics Canada using a rapid response format on a representative sample of Canadians (n = 10 389) during May and June of 2010. Public expectations of stigma and personal experiences of stigma in the subgroup receiving treatment for a mental illness were measured. Results: Over one-half of the sample endorsed 1 or more of the devaluation discrimination items, indicating that they believed Canadians would stigmatize someone with depression. The item most frequently endorsed concerned employers not considering an application from someone who has had depression. Over one-third of people who had received treatment in the year prior to the survey reported discrimination in 1 or more life domains. Experiences of discrimination were strongly associated with perceptions that Canadians would devalue someone with depression, younger age (12 to 15 years), and self-reported poor general mental health. Conclusions: The Mental Health Experiences Module reflects an important partnership between 2 national organizations that will help Canada fulfill its monitoring obligations under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and provide a legacy to researchers and policy-makers who are interested in monitoring changes in stigma over time. PMID:25565699

  20. Framing ethical acceptability: a problem with nuclear waste in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Ethan T

    2012-06-01

    Ethical frameworks are often used in professional fields as a means of providing explicit ethical guidance for individuals and institutions when confronted with ethically important decisions. The notion of an ethical framework has received little critical attention, however, and the concept subsequently lends itself easily to misuse and ambiguous application. This is the case with the 'ethical framework' offered by Canada's Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO), the crown-corporation which owns and is responsible for the long-term management of Canada's high-level nuclear fuel waste. It makes a very specific claim, namely that it is managing Canada's long-lived radioactive nuclear fuel waste in an ethically responsible manner. According to this organization, what it means to behave in an ethically responsible manner is to act and develop policy in accordance with its ethical framework. What, then, is its ethical framework, and can it be satisfied? In this paper I will show that the NWMO's ethical and social framework is deeply flawed in two respects: (a) it fails to meet the minimum requirements of a code of ethic or ethical framework by offering only questions, and no principles or rules of conduct; and (b) if posed as principles or rules of conduct, some of its questions are unsatisfiable. In particular, I will show that one of its claims, namely that it seek informed consent from individuals exposed to risk of harm from nuclear waste, cannot be satisfied as formulated. The result is that the NWMO's ethical framework is not, at present, ethically acceptable.

  1. An assessment of antimicrobial resistant disease threats in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Michael J; Carson, Carolee; Lingohr, Erika J; Fazil, Aamir; Edge, Victoria L; Trumble Waddell, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) of infectious agents is a growing concern for public health organizations. Given the complexity of this issue and how widespread the problem has become, resources are often insufficient to address all concerns, thus prioritization of AMR pathogens is essential for the optimal allocation of risk management attention. Since the epidemiology of AMR pathogens differs between countries, country-specific assessments are important for the determination of national priorities. To develop a systematic and transparent approach to AMR risk prioritization in Canada. Relevant AMR pathogens in Canada were selected through a transparent multi-step consensus process (n=32). Each pathogen was assessed using ten criteria: incidence, mortality, case-fatality, communicability, treatability, clinical impact, public/political attention, ten-year projection of incidence, economic impact, and preventability. For each pathogen, each criterion was assigned a numerical score of 0, 1, or 2, and multiplied by criteria-specific weighting determined through researcher consensus of importance. The scores for each AMR pathogen were summed and ranked by total score, where a higher score indicated greater importance. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effects of changing the criteria-specific weights. The AMR pathogen with the highest total weighted score was extended spectrum B-lactamase-producing (ESBL) Enterobacteriaceae (score=77). When grouped by percentile, ESBL Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium difficile, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were in the 80-100th percentile. This assessment provides useful information for prioritising public health strategies regarding AMR resistance at the national level in Canada. As the AMR environment and challenges change over time and space, this systematic and transparent approach can be adapted for use by other stakeholders domestically and

  2. An assessment of antimicrobial resistant disease threats in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Garner

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance (AMR of infectious agents is a growing concern for public health organizations. Given the complexity of this issue and how widespread the problem has become, resources are often insufficient to address all concerns, thus prioritization of AMR pathogens is essential for the optimal allocation of risk management attention. Since the epidemiology of AMR pathogens differs between countries, country-specific assessments are important for the determination of national priorities.To develop a systematic and transparent approach to AMR risk prioritization in Canada.Relevant AMR pathogens in Canada were selected through a transparent multi-step consensus process (n=32. Each pathogen was assessed using ten criteria: incidence, mortality, case-fatality, communicability, treatability, clinical impact, public/political attention, ten-year projection of incidence, economic impact, and preventability. For each pathogen, each criterion was assigned a numerical score of 0, 1, or 2, and multiplied by criteria-specific weighting determined through researcher consensus of importance. The scores for each AMR pathogen were summed and ranked by total score, where a higher score indicated greater importance. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the effects of changing the criteria-specific weights.The AMR pathogen with the highest total weighted score was extended spectrum B-lactamase-producing (ESBL Enterobacteriaceae (score=77. When grouped by percentile, ESBL Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridium difficile, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were in the 80-100th percentile.This assessment provides useful information for prioritising public health strategies regarding AMR resistance at the national level in Canada. As the AMR environment and challenges change over time and space, this systematic and transparent approach can be adapted for use by other stakeholders domestically and

  3. The characteristics of psychiatrists disciplined by professional colleges in Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Alam

    Full Text Available The identification of health care professionals who are incompetent, impaired, exploitative or have criminal intent is important for public safety. It is unclear whether psychiatrists are more likely to commit medical misconduct offences than non-psychiatrists, and if the nature of these offences is different.The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of psychiatrists disciplined in Canada and the nature of their offences and disciplinary sentences for the ten years from 2000 through 2009 to other physicians disciplined during that timeframe.Utilizing a retrospective cohort design, we constructed a database of all physicians disciplined by provincial licensing authorities in Canada for the ten years from 2000 through 2009. Demographic variables and information on type of misconduct violation and penalty imposed were also collected for each physician disciplined. We compared psychiatrists to non-psychiatrists for the various outcomes.There were 82 (14% psychiatrists of 606 physicians disciplined in Canada in the ten years from 2000 through 2009, double the national proportion of psychiatrists. Of those disciplined psychiatrists, 8 (9.6% were women compared to 29% in the national cohort. A total of 5 (6% psychiatrists committed at least two separate offenses, accounting for approximately 11% of the total violations. A higher proportion of psychiatrists were disciplined for sexual misconduct (OR 3.62 [95% Confidence Interval [CI] 2.45-5.34], fraudulent behavior (OR 2.32 [95% CI 1.20-4.40] and unprofessional conduct (OR 3.1 [95% CI 1.95-4.95]. As a result, psychiatrists had between 1.85-4.35 greater risk of having disciplinary penalties in almost all categories in comparison to other physicians.Psychiatrists differ from non-psychiatrist physicians in the prevalence and nature of medical misconduct. Efforts to decrease medical misconduct by psychiatrists need to be conducted and systematically evaluated.

  4. Disease burden of chronic hepatitis C among immigrants in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Krahn, M

    2015-12-01

    Immigrants with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in Canada have doubled risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. To measure the burden of CHC among immigrants in Canada. A decision analytic model was developed to compare immigrants with CHC and age-matched immigrants without CHC for survival years, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and medical costs per life year. Hepatitis C epidemiology among immigrants was based on hepatitis C prevalence in their home countries. A cohort of immigrant patients was retrospectively followed up to estimate fibrosis stage distribution, treatment patterns and prognosis of compensated cirrhosis. Other model variables were based on published sources. Base case analysis, one-way sensitivity analysis and probabilistic sensitivity analysis were performed to measure the burden of CHC and assess the impact of uncertainty associated with model variables on the burden of CHC. CHC could reduce survival by 9.6 years [95% credible interval (CI): 8.0-10.9 years], reduce QALYs by 9.5 years (95% CI: 6.0-13.8 years) and increase medical costs per life year by $1950 (95% CI: $1518 to $2486, 2006 Canadian dollars). Because nearly half of immigrants with CHC were not diagnosed until the development of cirrhosis, the burden of CHC was highly sensitive to the risks of liver-related complications and mortality but insensitive to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin. The burden of CHC among immigrants in Canada is substantial mainly due to liver-related complications and mortality. The delay in diagnosis was another important contributor to the burden of CHC among immigrants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Getting SaaSy: The Implementation of Magazine Manager at Canada Wide Media

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischmann, Ariane Louise

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, Canada Wide Media (Canada Wide), a regional magazine publisher based out of Vancouver, BC, upgraded its Customer Relationship Management (CRM) from outdated proprietary software – Media Services Group – to a Software-as-a-service (SaaS) vendor – Magazine Manager. Its implementation was considered a failure (by 2014 Canada Wide scrapped Magazine Manager in favour of Media Services Group’s later CRM iteration, Élan) and this report seeks to answer why. Through an examination of Canada ...

  6. Regional and Temporal Variations in Transportation Costs for U.S. Imports from Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Globerman, Steven; Storer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of transportation costs associated with U.S. imports from Canada. In particular, it evaluates whether transportation costs for U.S. imports from Canada increased in the post-9/11 period, thereby contributing to a “thickening†of the Canada-U.S. border. It also identifies whether changes in transportation costs varied across U.S. customs districts encompassing land ports along the Canada-U.S. border. The evidence indicates that an earlier declining trend in ...

  7. Health Inequalities, Deprivation, Immigration and Aboriginality in Canada: A Geographic Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert Pampalon; Denis Hamel; Philippe Gamache

    2010-01-01

    .... It is hypothesized that differences in the magnitude of survival inequalities according to deprivation across Canada are attenuated when immigration and Aboriginal status are accounted for. Methods...

  8. Jordan's principle and Indigenous children with disabilities in Canada: jurisdiction, advocacy, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shelly

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses Indigenous (1) (1)In this article, the terms Indigenous, First Nations, Aboriginal, and Treaty Indian are used interchangeably, and as needed to describe the political reality of the First Peoples of Canada. children with disabilities in Canada and examines their experiences with federal and provincial jurisdictional and funding disputes. It explores Canada's adversarial legal and policy techniques to delay implementation and funding of Jordan's Principle, a Canadian Human Rights Tribunal action seeking to address the delays, and the recommendations of a recent independent Canadian research project. Finally, it suggests ways to advance Jordan's Principle in Canada and elsewhere.

  9. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) MANUAL PRECIPITATION MEASUREMENTS GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Manual Precipitation Measurements GCPEx dataset was collected during the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment...

  10. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) PRECIPITATION OCCURRENCE SENSOR SYSTEM (POSS) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Precipitation Occurrence Sensor System (POSS) GCPEx dataset is comprised of data gathered during the GPM...

  11. Geological setting of vertebrate microfossil localities across the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Redman, Cory M; Scott, Craig S; Gardner, James D; Braman, Dennis R

    2015-01-01

    The Frenchman and Ravenscrag formations of southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, record an apparently continuous sequence of nonmarine clastic sediments across the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary...

  12. Ceftiofur resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg from chicken meat and humans, Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutil, Lucie; Irwin, Rebecca; Finley, Rita; Ng, Lai King; Avery, Brent; Boerlin, Patrick; Bourgault, Anne Marie; Cole, Linda; Daignault, Danielle; Desruisseau, Andrea; Demczuk, Walter; Hoang, Linda; Horsman, Greg B; Ismail, Johanne; Jamieson, Frances; Maki, Anne; Pacagnella, Ana; Pillai, Dylan R

    2010-01-01

    ...) between ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Heidelberg isolated from retail chicken and incidence of ceftiofur-resistant Salmonella serovar Heidelberg infections in humans across Canada...

  13. Organic parasite control for poultry and rabbits in British Columbia, Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    ...), Chenopodium album (lambsquarters) and C. ambrosioides (epazote), Cirsium arvense (Canada thistle), Juniperus spp. (juniper), Mentha piperita (peppermint), Nicotiana sp. (tobacco), Papaver somniferum...

  14. Silalirijiit Project: Kangiqtugaapik (Clyde River), Nunavut, Canada, Weather Station Network, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Kangiqtugaapik (Clyde River), Nunavut, Canada, Weather Station Network is a collection of weather station data from the locations of Akuliaqattak,...

  15. Checklist of beetles (Coleoptera of Canada and Alaska. Second edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Bousquet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available All 8237 species-group taxa of Coleoptera known to occur in Canada and Alaska are recorded by province/territory or state, along with their author(s and year of publication, in a classification framework. Only presence of taxa in each Canadian province or territory and Alaska is noted. Labrador is considered a distinct geographical entity. Adventive and Holarctic species-group taxa are indicated. References to pertinent identification keys are given under the corresponding supraspecific taxa in the data archive.

  16. Bringing patient centricity to diabetes medication access in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glennie JL

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Judith L Glennie,1 Katharina Kovacs Burns,2,3 Paul Oh4,5 1J. L. Glennie Consulting Inc., Aurora, ON, 2School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 3Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, 4Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention Program, UHN, 5Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Canada must become proactive in addressing type 2 diabetes. With the second highest rate of diabetes prevalence in the developed world, the number of Canadians living with diabetes will soon reach epidemic levels. Against international comparisons, Canada also performs poorly with respect to diabetes-related hospitalizations, mortality rates, and access to medications. Diabetes and its comorbidities pose a significant burden on people with diabetes (PWD and their families, through out-of-pocket expenses for medications, devices, supplies, and the support needed to manage their illness. Rising direct and indirect costs of diabetes will become a drain on Canada’s economy and undermine the financial stability of our health care system. Canada’s approach to diabetes medication assessment and funding has created a patchwork of medication access across provinces. Access to treatments for those who rely on public programs is highly restricted compared to Canadians with private drug plans, as well in contrast with public payers in other countries. Each person living with diabetes has different needs, so a “patient-centric” approach ensures treatment focused on individual circumstances. Such tailoring is difficult to achieve, with the linear approach required by public payers. We may be undermining optimal care for PWD because of access policies that are not aligned with individualized approaches – and increasing overall health care costs in the process. The scope of Canada’s diabetes challenge demands holistic and proactive solutions. Canada needs to get out from “behind the eight ball” and get

  17. New Coleoptera records from New Brunswick, Canada: Lycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Webster

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Eight species of Lycidae are newly recorded from New Brunswick, Canada, bringing the total number of species known from the province to 16. The first documented records from New Brunswick are provided for Greenarius thoracicus (Randall Erotides scuptilis (Say, and Calopteron terminale (Say reported by Majka et al. (2011. Eropterus arculus Green, Lopheros crenatus (Germar, and Calochromus perfacetus (Say are reported for the first time in the Maritime provinces. Collection data, habitat data, and distribution maps are presented for all these species.

  18. A Brief Review of Bovine Coccidiosis in Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radostits, O. M.; Stockdale, P. H. G.

    1980-01-01

    Coccidiosis of beef cattle, in both its enteric and nervous forms, seen in feedlots in Western Canada is discussed. Cases of coccidiosis accompanied by nervous signs, occasionally up to 30% of those affected enterically, are most common during the coldest winter months. The pathogenesis of the nervous form of the disease is unknown. Clinical management of disease outbreaks using various chemotherapeutics is described. The importance of using anticoccidial drugs before the onset of clinical signs in cattle in contact with sick animals is discussed. PMID:7000331

  19. Canada's Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Proceedings and Intellectual Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Henry; McCourt, Conor

    2015-01-08

    Canada's Patent Register is a tool created by the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations to help innovators protect their inventions relating to pharmaceuticals. This tool exists at the intersection between the intellectual property and drug approval regimes. By listing a patent on the Patent Register, an innovator can prevent a generic manufacturer from entering the marketplace rather than having to wait for his or her patent to be infringed. This article provides information on the requirements for listing a patent on the Patent Register and an overview of how the Patent Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations affect the drug approval process. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Checklist of beetles (Coleoptera) of Canada and Alaska. Second edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Yves; Bouchard, Patrice; Davies, Anthony E.; Sikes, Derek S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract All 8237 species-group taxa of Coleoptera known to occur in Canada and Alaska are recorded by province/territory or state, along with their author(s) and year of publication, in a classification framework. Only presence of taxa in each Canadian province or territory and Alaska is noted. Labrador is considered a distinct geographical entity. Adventive and Holarctic species-group taxa are indicated. References to pertinent identification keys are given under the corresponding supraspecific taxa in the data archive. PMID:24363590

  1. Moving forward to improve migraine management in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Werner J; Giammarco, Rose; Wiebe, Valerie

    2007-11-01

    The goal of the Canadian Migraine Forum was to work towards improving the lives of Canadians with migraine by reducing their migraine-related disability. Migraine has been ranked 19th by the World Health Organization among causes of years of life lived with disability. To improve management of migraine in Canada, the participants in the forum identified several important needs and strategies. There is a need for more leaders in the field of migraine to work with other stakeholders to obtain funding and develop treatment programs across Canada. Leadership is also required to address the under use of both migraine specific symptomatic medications and prophylactic medications in Canada. More non-physician health professionals are required to work with physicians in migraine treatment teams. This could assist with a shortage of physician resources, and could also help to better meet the needs of the migraine patient. Individuals with migraine need to be identified who could work with health care professionals to help meet the needs of the migraine patients in our communities. Application of the chronic disease management model for migraine treatment was also seen as an important factor for the management of migraine. Programs are needed to promote earlier diagnosis, long-term follow-up, comprehensive patient education, and the use of multidisciplinary treatment teams where appropriate. Also considered important was the need to increase knowledge about migraine through public awareness campaigns, websites, medical education, and appropriate reading material for patients. The public needs to be aware that migraine is a biological disorder that can cause significant disability and suffering. Lastly, there is a pressing need to promote more migraine research, including careful outcome assessments for treatment programs that involve non-pharmacological treatments and a team based approach to migraine management. There are many challenges that must be overcome if we are to

  2. Canada in Afghanistan: 2001-2010. A Military Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    authoritative source on these events is U.S. Government The 9/11 Commission Report (New York: W.W. Norton, 2004). 2 Schmemann, Serge , “Hijacked Jets...0,9171,1001390-1,00.html on 3 February 2010. 37 Pigott, Canada in Afghanistan, p. 65. 38 Stein, Janice Gross, and Eugene Lang , The Unexpected War...www.undemocracy.com/S-RES-1386(2001).pdf on 27 January 2010. 45 Stein and Lang , The Unexpected War, p. 11. 46 CBC, “JTF2,” 2005. 47 CTV, “Canadian Commandos in

  3. A research review: exploring the health of Canada's Aboriginal youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Ning

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the current state of health research on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth in Canada. Design. A search of published academic literature on Canadian Aboriginal youth health, including a comprehensive review of both non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal youth research, was conducted using MEDLINE and summarized. Methodology. A MEDLINE search was conducted for articles published over a 10-year period (2000–2010. The search was limited to research articles pertaining to Canadian youth, using various synonyms for “Canada,” “youth,” and “Aboriginal.” Each article was coded according to 4 broad categories: Aboriginal identity, geographic location, research topic (health determinants, health status, health care, and the 12 key determinants of health proposed by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC. Results. Of the 117 articles reviewed, only 34 pertained to Aboriginal youth, while the remaining 83 pertained to non-Aboriginal youth. The results revealed major discrepancies within the current body of research with respect to the geographic representation of Aboriginal youth, with several provinces missing from the literature, including the northern territories. Furthermore, the current research is not reflective of the demographic composition of Aboriginal youth, with an under-representation of Métis and urban Aboriginal youth. Health status of Aboriginal youth has received the most attention, appearing in 79% of the studies reviewed compared with 57% of the non-Aboriginal studies. The number of studies that focus on health determinants and health care is comparable for both groups, with the former accounting for 62 and 64% and the latter comprising 26 and 19% of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal studies, respectively. However, this review reveals several differences with respect to specific focus on health determinants between the two populations. In non-Aboriginal youth studies, all the 12 key determinants of health of PHAC

  4. The Development and Role of the Court Administrator in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Ryder-Lahey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available By the turn of the millennium most courts in Canada had court administrators managing their operations and their staff. As a rule, the court administrators worked in a partnership with the chairmen of their courts, who typically delegated some of their official responsibilities. But the mere presence of court administrators, not to speak of their broad range of functions, was still relatively new. Only in the 1970s did most courts acquire administrators, and it took at least another decade before they were fully accepted by judges and entered into a position of equality with some, if not many, chairs of courts.

  5. Characterizing the forest fragmentation of Canada's national parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soverel, Nicholas O; Coops, Nicholas C; White, Joanne C; Wulder, Michael A

    2010-05-01

    Characterizing the amount and configuration of forests can provide insights into habitat quality, biodiversity, and land use. The establishment of protected areas can be a mechanism for maintaining large, contiguous areas of forests, and the loss and fragmentation of forest habitat is a potential threat to Canada's national park system. Using the Earth Observation for Sustainable Development of Forests (EOSD) land cover product (EOSD LC 2000), we characterize the circa 2000 forest patterns in 26 of Canada's national parks and compare these to forest patterns in the ecological units surrounding these parks, referred to as the greater park ecosystem (GPE). Five landscape pattern metrics were analyzed: number of forest patches, mean forest patch size (hectare), standard deviation of forest patch size (hectare), mean forest patch perimeter-to-area ratio (meters per hectare), and edge density of forest patches (meters per hectare). An assumption is often made that forests within park boundaries are less fragmented than the surrounding GPE, as indicated by fewer forest patches, a larger mean forest patch size, less variability in forest patch size, a lower perimeter-to-area ratio, and lower forest edge density. Of the 26 national parks we analyzed, 58% had significantly fewer patches, 46% had a significantly larger mean forest patch size (23% were not significantly different), and 46% had a significantly smaller standard deviation of forest patch size (31% were not significantly different), relative to their GPEs. For forest patch perimeter-to-area ratio and forest edge density, equal proportions of parks had values that were significantly larger or smaller than their respective GPEs and no clear trend emerged. In summary, all the national parks we analyzed, with the exception of the Georgian Bay Islands, were found to be significantly different from their corresponding GPE for at least one of the five metrics assessed, and 50% of the 26 parks were significantly

  6. Behavioural science at work for Canada: National Research Council laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, Jennifer A

    2007-03-01

    The National Research Council is Canada's principal research and development agency. Its 20 institutes are structured to address interdisciplinary problems for industrial sectors, and to provide the necessary scientific infrastructure, such as the national science library. Behavioural scientists are active in five institutes: Biological Sciences, Biodiagnostics, Aerospace, Information Technology, and Construction. Research topics include basic cellular neuroscience, brain function, human factors in the cockpit, human-computer interaction, emergency evacuation, and indoor environment effects on occupants. Working in collaboration with NRC colleagues and with researchers from universities and industry, NRC behavioural scientists develop knowledge, designs, and applications that put technology to work for people, designed with people in mind.

  7. Psychology departments in medical schools: there's one in Canada, eh?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwraith, Robert D

    2014-12-01

    Comments on the original article by Robiner et al. (see record 2014-07939-001) regarding psychologists in medical schools and academic medical center settings. Robiner et al. reported that their extensive review "revealed no independent departments of psychology in U.S. medical schools." The current authors note north of the border in Canada there is one department of psychology in a medical school. The Department of Clinical Health Psychology has been a department within the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Manitoba since 1995. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Risk Assessment of Exposure to Trans Fat in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Krenosky, Sara; L’Abbé, Mary; Lee, Nora; Underhill, Lynne; Vigneault, Michel; Godefroy, Samuel; Ratnayake, Nimal

    2012-01-01

    Trans fats are undesirable because they raise LDL-cholesterol and lower HDL-cholesterol levels in the blood, which can lead to an increased risk of coronary heart disease. In the mid-1990’s, researchers estimated that Canadians had one of the highest average trans fat intakes in the world, estimated to be approximately 3.7% of energy. The World Health Organization recommends that average intakes of trans fats should be less than 1% of total energy. As such Canada has pursued a multi-faceted ...

  9. Risk assessment of use of cracked eggs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, E C

    1996-06-01

    In 1992, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) amended its Egg Regulations to restrict movement of Canada C eggs (cracks) to federally registered processed egg stations for pasteurization. This was questioned by egg producers and some provinces on economic grounds. It was also in conflict with long-standing practices of marketing eggs in some provinces to retail stores, bakeries, restaurants and institutions or at the farm gate. In order to determine how much of a risk these eggs were to human health, AAFC requested that the Health Protection Branch (HPB) of Health Canada (HC) conduct a risk assessment. On the basis of outbreak data, the main hazard in these eggs was identified as Salmonella. Salmonellae may occasionally be present on shell eggs even after washing, and any Salmonella reaching the membranes can be transferred to an egg mixture through breaking, and will rapidly grow under improper storage conditions. A Relative Risk analysis showed that cracked eggs are 3 to 93 times more likely than uncracked shell eggs to cause outbreaks. A probability of illness of 1 in 3800 was derived from the 40 million cracked eggs produced in Canada and not pasteurized and the probable 10,500 illnesses arising from these. This was for the general population, but this would be greater for those who consume many shell eggs or would do so in an unsafe manner, or are more likely to be infected (5% of consumers who eat raw or lightly cooked eggs daily, rural communities with more opportunities for obtaining cracked eggs, and those who are immunocompromised and in institutions). Even though it is not possible to precisely determine the risk of salmonellosis through cracked eggs, this assessment indicated that there was enough of a concern that a management strategy was needed. Eight options for managing the risk were considered and ranked for acceptability by both HC and AAFC. Ideally, all cracked eggs should be broken and pasteurized, but this is impractical in certain regions

  10. A typology of migration in Canada based on migrants' characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P; Krishnan, P

    1994-01-01

    "Data from the 1981 Census of Canada are used to develop a typology of migrants on the basis of their personal characteristics. Migrants are defined as those individuals who have changed their residence since the 1976 Census, crossing at least a municipal boundary. Socio-economic and demographic characteristics are perceived to differentiate stayers from movers, and to distinguish each migrant type [that is to say] intraprovincial, interprovincial and international. Discriminant analysis is applied to classify people into migrant types based on their personal characteristics and the typology developed." excerpt

  11. Multicultural Media in a Post-Multicultural Canada? Rethinking Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augie Fleras

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the post-multicultural challenges that confront the integrative logic of Canada’s multicultural media. Multicultural (or ethnic media once complemented the integrative agenda of Canada’s official multiculturalism, but the drift toward a post-multicultural Canada points to the possibility of a post-multicultural media that capitalizes on the positive aspects of multicultural media. The argument is predicated on the following assumption: an evolving context that no longer is multicultural but increasingly transnational, multiversal, and post-ethnic exposes the shortcomings of a multicultural media when applied to the lived-realities of those who resent being boxed into ethnic silos that gloss over multiple connections and multidimensional crossings. According to this line of argument, both diversity governance and ethnic media must reinvent themselves along more post-multicultural lines to better engage the transnational challenges and multiversal demands of a post-multicultural turn. Time will tell if a post-multicultural media can incorporate the strengths of a multicultural media, yet move positively forward in capturing the nuances of complex diversities and diverse complexities. Evidence would suggest “yes”, and that a post-multicultural media may well represent an ideal that reflects and reinforces the new integrative realities of a post-ethnic Canada.

  12. Health information support provided by professional associations in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterley, Trish; Storie, Dale; Chambers, Thane; Buckingham, Jeanette; Shiri, Ali; Dorgan, Marlene

    2012-09-01

    Healthcare practitioners in Alberta and across Canada have varying levels of access to information resources depending on their institutional and professional affiliations, yet access to current health information is critical for all. To determine what information resources and services are provided by Albertan and Canadian professional health associations to their members. Representatives of professional colleges and associations were interviewed regarding information resources and services offered to members and perceptions of their members' information needs. National-level associations are more likely to provide resources than provincial ones. There is a clear distinction between colleges and associations in terms of information offered: colleges provide regulatory information, while associations are responsible for provision of clinical information resources. Only half of the associations interviewed provide members with access to licensed databases, with cost being a major barrier. There is considerable variation in the number of electronic resources and the levels of information support provided by professional health associations in Alberta and Canada. Access and usage vary among the health professions. National licensing of resources or creation of a portal linking to freely available alternatives are potential options for increasing access and awareness. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  13. Guidelines for legalized euthanasia in Canada: a proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T O

    1998-10-01

    Arguments for liberty, mercy, and dignity support the legalization of euthanasia, but there remains a possibility of undesirable social consequences should this occur. Accordingly, proposals must prevent involuntary euthanasia, prevent unconscious coercion of the terminally ill to request euthanasia, protect and enshrine the availability of first-class palliative care, ensure documentation for purposes of enforcement and study, and spell out enforceable consequences for violations. Guidelines set by the Royal Dutch Medical Association have largely failed to meet these requirements. In North America, proposals for legalization, such as Oregon's Measure 16 and the minority opinion in Canada's Rodriguez case, also have flaws in meeting these criteria. Legislation in the Northern Territory of Australia came closest to meeting the requirements outlined, but was overruled after a brief period in effect. In Canada, a comprehensive survey of current euthanasia practices and improved availability of palliative care must precede attempts at legalization. A specific proposal is made for ethics committees operating at a regional health board level to approve legal euthanasia fitting within careful guidelines. Composition, procedures and mandate are described. If a set of guidelines, balancing any right there is "to die with dignity" with a responsibility to protect the weakest in society, is proposed first by the medical community, Parliament may have the courage to enact legislation.

  14. Climate Change, Drought and Human Health in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusa, Anna; Berry, Peter; J Cheng, June; Ogden, Nicholas; Bonsal, Barrie; Stewart, Ronald; Waldick, Ruth

    2015-07-17

    Droughts have been recorded all across Canada and have had significant impacts on individuals and communities. With climate change, projections suggest an increasing risk of drought in Canada, particularly in the south and interior. However, there has been little research on the impacts of drought on human health and the implications of a changing climate. A review of the Canadian, U.S. and international literature relevant to the Canadian context was conducted to better define these impacts and adaptations available to protect health. Drought can impact respiratory health, mental health, illnesses related to exposure to toxins, food/water security, rates of injury and infectious diseases (including food-, water- and vector-borne diseases). A range of direct and indirect adaptation (e.g., agricultural adaptation) options exist to cope with drought. Many have already been employed by public health officials, such as communicable disease monitoring and surveillance and public education and outreach. However, gaps exist in our understanding of the impacts of short-term vs. prolonged drought on the health of Canadians, projections of drought and its characteristics at the regional level and the effectiveness of current adaptations. Further research will be critical to inform adaptation planning to reduce future drought-related risks to health.

  15. Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, Laura C; Wilson, Kathi

    2013-08-01

    Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Summertime tropospheric ozone distributions over central and eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. E.; Gregory, G. L.; Barrick, J. D.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Sachse, G. W.; Shipham, M. C.; Hudgins, C. H.

    1994-01-01

    Ozone measurements were obtained between the surface and the 6-km altitude on aircraft flights over central and eastern Canada during the summer 1990 NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (GTE/ABLE 3B). Tropospheric O3 budgets for these regions were observed to be highly variable and significantly impacted by long-range transport and regional scale air mass modification processes. For example, integrated O3 abundance below 5-km altitude averaged 40% and 30% greater in air masses influenced by anthropogenic sources and biomass burning, respectively, than in background (polar) air. Conversely, aged air transported from subtropical areas of the Pacific at times reduced O3 abundance in this height interval by up to 20%. Though intrusion of anthropogenic air was infrequent during the experiment period, the influence of biomass-burning emissions was particularly notable as two thirds of the flights sampled air influenced by plumes from fires burning in Alaska and western Canada. The impinging pollution, both natural and anthropogenic, not only elevated O3 levels directly but also was a source of reactive nitrogen (and nonmethane hydrocarbons) which generally increases the tropospheric lifetime of O3 via moderation of photochemical destruction rates.

  17. Catch history of ringed seals (Phoca hispida in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall R Reeves

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The ringed seal (Phoca hispida has always been a staple in the diet and household economy of Inuit in Canada. The present paper was prepared at the request of the NAMMCO Scientific Committee to support their assessment of ringed seal stocks in the North Atlantic Basin and adjacent arctic and subarctic waters. Specifically, our objective was to evaluate recent and current levels of use of ringed seals by Canadian Inuit. Annual removals probably were highest (possibly greater than 100,000 in the 1960s and 1970s, a period when sealskin prices were particularly strong. Catches declined substantially in the 1980s following a collapse in sealskin prices, presumably related to the European trade ban on skins from newborn harp and hooded seals (Phoca groenlandica and Cystophora cristata, respectively. Recent catch levels throughout Canada (1980s and early 1990s are believed to be in the order of 50,000 to 65,000 ringed seals, with a total average annual kill (including hunting loss in the high tens of thousands. No reliable system is in place to monitor catches of ringed seals, so any estimate must be derived from a heterogeneous array of sources.

  18. Stealth Advertising: The Commercialization of Television News Broadcasts in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy Chernov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This two-phase study deals with the phenomenon of “stealth advertising” in Canada. This concept refers to the encroachment of commercially tinted messages into broadcast news segments. Different theories of commercial speech were used as a theoretical framework. The study combined mixed methods, content analysis and in-depth interviews. The first phase concentrated on the frequency and actual time spent airing commercially influenced messages in television newscast segments. The sample consisted of eight randomly selected English-language markets across Canada including news stations affiliated with CBC, CTV and Global. Seventy-five newscasts were recorded and content-analyzed. The analysis demonstrated that private television stations used more explicit and aggressive stealth advertising than publicly owned ones. In subsequent interviews, the news directors and sales managers of some of these stations denied that they yield to outside commercial pressures but admitted they may include messages with commercial content if these have public interest value. In the second phase thirty-nine newscasts of a news station affiliated with Global were recorded and content-analyzed, showing high numbers of commercially influenced messages and corroborating previous research findings. Subsequent interviews showed some news decision-makers accept the inclusion of commercially tinted news segments, thus eroding the divide between editorial and commercial contents. This study is intended to contribute to the empirical basis for pursuing the question of corruption of news by surreptitious commercial content.

  19. Progress toward a full scale mobile satellite system for Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Orest S.

    The MSAT satellite, planned for launch in early 1994, will provide full scale, satellite based, mobile voice and data communication services to Canada. The MSAT system will provide mobile telephone, mobile radio and mobile data services to customers on the move in any part of North America. The Telesat Mobile Inc. (TMI) satellite will be backed up by a similar satellite to be operated by the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) in the United States. An early entry mobile data service was inaugurated in the second quarter of 1990 using channels leased from INMARSAT on Marisat or Marecs-B. The baseline TMI system is described, beginning with the MSAT satellite under contract. The network architecture and the control system that are under development to support the mobile services are discussed. Since it is clearly desirable to have a North American system, such that customers may buy a mobile earth terminal (MET) from a number of qualified suppliers and be able to use it either in Canada or the U.S., TMI and AMSC are cooperating closely in the development of the space and ground segments of the system. The time scale for the procurement of all the elements of the systems is discussed.

  20. A Bibliometric Analysis of Digestive Health Research in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Désirée Tuitt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the impact and influence of medical/scientific journals, and of individual researchers has become more widely practiced in recent decades. This is driven, in part, by the increased availability of data regarding citations of research articles, and by increased competition for research funding. Digestive disease research has been identified as a particularly strong discipline in Canada. The authors collected quantitative data on the impact and influence of Canadian digestive health research. The present study involved an analysis of the research impact (Hirsch factor and research influence (Influence factor of 106 digestive health researchers in Canada. Rankings of the top 25 researchers on the basis of the two metrics were dominated by the larger research groups at the University of Toronto (Toronto, Ontario, McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, and the Universities of Calgary (Calgary, Alberta and Alberta (Edmonton, Alberta, but with representation by other research groups at the Universities of Manitoba (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Western Ontario (London, Ontario and McGill University (Montreal, Quebec. Female and male researchers had similar scores for the two metrics, as did basic scientists versus clinical investigators. Strategic recruitment, particularly of established investigators, can have a major impact on the ranking of research groups. Comparing these metrics over different time frames can provide insights into the vulnerabilities and strengths of research groups.

  1. Increasing diversion of methadone in Vancouver, Canada, 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddon, Hudson; Ho, Joel; DeBeck, Kora; Milloy, M-J; Liu, Yang; Dong, Huiru; Ahamad, Keith; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas; Hayashi, Kanna

    2018-02-01

    Although methadone, an opioid agonist, has been an effective medication used to treat opioid use disorder for over 40years, recent studies have found that methadone was identified in more than a quarter of prescription opioid-related deaths among people who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada. Thus, we sought to longitudinally examine the availability of diverted methadone among people who inject drugs (PWID). Data were collected from three prospective cohorts of PWID in Vancouver, Canada between December 2005 and May 2015. Multivariable generalized estimating equation logistic regression was used to identify temporal trends in the immediate availability of diverted methadone (defined as the ability to acquire illicit methadone in <10min). A total of 2092 participants, including 727 (34.8%) women, were included in the present study. In the multivariable analyses after adjusting for a range of potential confounders, later calendar year (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.21 per year; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19-1.23) was independently and positively associated with reporting immediate availability of diverted methadone. We observed a significant increase in the reported availability of diverted methadone among PWID over a ten-year follow-up period. Further research is needed to identify strategies to limit methadone diversion and assess the impact of alternative medications that are equally effective but safer, such as buprenorphine/naloxone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The regulation of oil and gas activity in northern Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, A.W. [Lawson Lundell, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The legal aspects regarding Aboriginal rights and the duty by the petroleum industry to consult First Nations regarding treaty rights was discussed with reference to land claim issues in the Yukon and Northwest Territories. The paper presents an update on the status and devolution of responsibilities from the federal government to the territorial governments. The paper also described the procedures in place for the disposition of oil and gas interests, and access to Crown-owned subsurface resources on First Nations' lands. The author described the principle terms of the land claim agreements with Yukon First Nations as set out in the Umbrella Final Agreement (UFA). Other topics of discussion included access to settlement land, land management processes, development assessment, land use planning, water management, and transboundary land claims agreements. The Canada-Yukon Oil and Gas Accord Implementation Act gave the responsibility of managing oil and gas resources in the Yukon to the Yukon government. Administrative procedures for minerals, water forestry and land management remain with the federal government. In the Northwest Territories, Crown lands and resources, including oil and gas resources in the Northwest Territories are owned by Canada and subject to regulation under federal laws. 170 refs.

  3. Drought causes reduced growth of trembling aspen in western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Jian-Guo; Alam, Syed Ashraful; Zhai, Lihong; Dawson, Andria; Stadt, Kenneth J; Comeau, Philip G

    2017-07-01

    Adequate and advance knowledge of the response of forest ecosystems to temperature-induced drought is critical for a comprehensive understanding of the impacts of global climate change on forest ecosystem structure and function. Recent massive decline in aspen-dominated forests and an increased aspen mortality in boreal forests have been associated with global warming, but it is still uncertain whether the decline and mortality are driven by drought. We used a series of ring-width chronologies from 40 trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) sites along a latitudinal gradient (from 52° to 58°N) in western Canada, in an attempt to clarify the impacts of drought on aspen growth by using Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). Results indicated that prolonged and large-scale droughts had a strong negative impact on trembling aspen growth. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal variability of drought indices is useful for explaining the spatial heterogeneity in the radial growth of trembling aspen. Due to ongoing global warming and rising temperatures, it is likely that severer droughts with a higher frequency will occur in western Canada. As trembling aspen is sensitive to drought, we suggest that drought indices could be applied to monitor the potential effects of increased drought stress on aspen trees growth, achieve classification of eco-regions and develop effective mitigation strategies to maintain western Canadian boreal forests. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Developing a prelicensure exam for Canada: an international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbins, Bonnie; Bradley, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Nine previously conducted studies indicate that Elsevier's HESI Exit Exam (E(2)) is 96.36%-99.16% accurate in predicting success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. No similar standardized exam is available in Canada to predict Canadian Registered Nurse Examination (CRNE) success. Like the E(2), such an exam could be used to evaluate Canadian nursing students' preparedness for the CRNE, and scores on the numerous subject matter categories could be used to guide students' remediation efforts so that, ultimately, they are successful on their first attempt at taking the CRNE. The international collaboration between a HESI test construction expert and a nursing faculty member from Canada, who served as the content expert, resulted in the development of a 180-item, multiple-choice/single-answer prelicensure exam (PLE) that was pilot tested with Canadian nursing students (N = 175). Item analysis data obtained from this pilot testing were used to develop a 160-item PLE, which includes an additional 20 pilot test items. The estimated reliability of this exam is 0.91, and it exhibits congruent validity with the CRNE because the PLE test blueprint mimics the CRNE test blueprint. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Climate Change, Drought and Human Health in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Yusa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Droughts have been recorded all across Canada and have had significant impacts on individuals and communities. With climate change, projections suggest an increasing risk of drought in Canada, particularly in the south and interior. However, there has been little research on the impacts of drought on human health and the implications of a changing climate. A review of the Canadian, U.S. and international literature relevant to the Canadian context was conducted to better define these impacts and adaptations available to protect health. Drought can impact respiratory health, mental health, illnesses related to exposure to toxins, food/water security, rates of injury and infectious diseases (including food-, water- and vector-borne diseases. A range of direct and indirect adaptation (e.g., agricultural adaptation options exist to cope with drought. Many have already been employed by public health officials, such as communicable disease monitoring and surveillance and public education and outreach. However, gaps exist in our understanding of the impacts of short-term vs. prolonged drought on the health of Canadians, projections of drought and its characteristics at the regional level and the effectiveness of current adaptations. Further research will be critical to inform adaptation planning to reduce future drought-related risks to health.

  6. Forensic Occupational Therapy in Canada: The Current State of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Adora L Y; Wong, Chantal Isabelle; Maraj, Sara A; Fry, Danielle; Jecker, Justine; Jung, Bonny

    2016-09-01

    Although occupational therapists have been practicing in forensic settings for many years, there is a paucity of literature regarding the nature of this practice in Canada. The purpose of this study was to describe the practices of Canadian occupational therapists in forensic mental health. An online survey was designed based on the Canadian Practice Process Framework. Following purposive and snowball sampling, responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and content analysis. Twenty-seven clinicians responded (56% response rate). Respondents indicated commonalities in workplaces, client caseloads and practice challenges. The outstanding need in Canada to demonstrate client outcomes through the use of evaluation instruments reflects those practice gaps identified internationally. Education, advocacy and research are critical areas for the development of Canadian forensic occupational therapy. Although findings heavily reflect one provincial context and may not be generalizable to nonhospital settings, a number of priority areas were identified. Future efforts should clarify the role of forensic occupational therapy to stakeholders, and validate their contributions through research that evaluates intervention efficacy and meaningful outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Demands of immigration among nurses from Canada and the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beechinor, Linda A Victorino; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the demands of immigration on nurses from Canada and those from the Philippines, who immigrate to the USA and work in Hawaii. The findings can assist policy-makers in formulating plans to alleviate the shortage of nurses through effective immigration recruitment practices. Nurse educators can gain support for the recruitment of students from a diverse array of cultures. Managers and nursing leaders can use this information in designing recruitment, orientation, support and retention programmes for nurses that are specific to their cultural needs. The two groups of nurses were sampled from acute care staff nurse populations in Hawaii. Aroian's instrument, the Demands of Immigration scale, was used to measure and compare the distress levels of the nurses. The findings include a higher level of distress experienced by nurses from Canada compared with nurses from the Philippines. This might be attributed to a preponderance of social and collegial support available to the Philippine nurses in Hawaii where one-fourth of the population is derived from their country of origin.

  8. Immigrant Rights in Iran and Canada and International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forouzan Lotfi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available After World War II, migration, particularly in the post-Cold War became a global challenge. Today, there are 191 million migrants around the world that constitutes 3 percent of the world's total population. And it is a fact that has various social, economic, humanitarian, political and especially juridical dimensions and effects at the international level as an international issue. National Immigration Law is a part of the legal system governing the strangers in the host state whose provisions are determined by the domestic legal system of the recent state. Although the standards of international law are intended to govern migration, but in this case, however, the regulation of the source government is ineffective. Unless there are specific treaty arrangements while global recruits in the field of migration are specifically impossible and regional multilateral treaties can only be cited. This article tries to review and analyze the immigrant rights in Iran as a source country and Canada as a host country with their own different rights regarding the immigrants by a descriptive - analytical approach. Because of tangible vacuum in the literature of international law and the need to explore other sources of international law, according to the first paragraph of Article 38 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice, on the one hand and the necessity of this article in Iran as a transit country for migration and particularly to Canada on the other hand, conducting this research is of great importance.

  9. Epidemiology of Lyme Disease, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2002–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, B. Lynn; Schleihauf, Emily; Mask, Angela; Haldane, David; Drebot, Michael; Baikie, Maureen; Cole, Teri J.; Fleming, Sarah; Gould, Richard; Lindsay, Robbin

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis ticks, which transmit Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease (LD), are endemic to at least 6 regions of Nova Scotia, Canada. To assess the epidemiology and prevalence of LD in Nova Scotia, we analyzed data from 329 persons with LD reported in Nova Scotia during 2002–2013. Most patients reported symptoms of early localized infection with rash (89.7%), influenza-like illness (69.6%), or both; clinician-diagnosed erythema migrans was documented for 53.2%. In a separate serosurvey, of 1,855 serum samples screened for antibodies to B. burgdorferi, 2 were borderline positive (both with an indeterminate IgG on Western blot), resulting in an estimated seroprevalence of 0.14% (95% CI 0.02%–0.51%). Although LD incidence in Nova Scotia has risen sharply since 2002 and is the highest in Canada (16/100,000 population in 2013), the estimated number of residents with evidence of infection is low, and risk is localized to currently identified LD-endemic regions. PMID:26401788

  10. Epidemiology of Lyme Disease, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2002-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchette, Todd F; Johnston, B Lynn; Schleihauf, Emily; Mask, Angela; Haldane, David; Drebot, Michael; Baikie, Maureen; Cole, Teri J; Fleming, Sarah; Gould, Richard; Lindsay, Robbin

    2015-10-01

    Ixodes scapularis ticks, which transmit Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease (LD), are endemic to at least 6 regions of Nova Scotia, Canada. To assess the epidemiology and prevalence of LD in Nova Scotia, we analyzed data from 329 persons with LD reported in Nova Scotia during 2002-2013. Most patients reported symptoms of early localized infection with rash (89.7%), influenza-like illness (69.6%), or both; clinician-diagnosed erythema migrans was documented for 53.2%. In a separate serosurvey, of 1,855 serum samples screened for antibodies to B. burgdorferi, 2 were borderline positive (both with an indeterminate IgG on Western blot), resulting in an estimated seroprevalence of 0.14% (95% CI 0.02%-0.51%). Although LD incidence in Nova Scotia has risen sharply since 2002 and is the highest in Canada (16/100,000 population in 2013), the estimated number of residents with evidence of infection is low, and risk is localized to currently identified LD-endemic regions.

  11. Industrial sustainability of competing wood energy options in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackom, Emmanuel K; Mabee, Warren E; Saddler, John N

    2010-12-01

    The amount of sawmill residue available in Canada to support the emerging cellulosic ethanol industry was examined. A material flow analysis technique was employed to determine the amount of sawmill residue that could possibly be available to the ethanol industry per annum. A combination of two key trends--improved efficiency of lumber recovery and increased uptake of sawmill residues for self-generation and for wood pellet production--have contributed to a declining trend of sawmill residue availability. Approximately 2.3 x 10⁶ bone-dry tons per year of sawmill residue was estimated to be potentially available to the cellulosic ethanol industry in Canada, yielding 350 million liters per year of cellulosic ethanol using best practices. An additional 2.7 billion liters of cellulosic ethanol might be generated from sawmill residue that is currently used for competing wood energy purposes, including wood pellet generation. Continued competition between bioenergy options will reduce the industrial sustainability of the forest industry. Recommendations for policy reforms towards improved industrial sustainability practices are provided.

  12. Carbon monoxide and methane over Canada: July - August 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriss, R. C.; Sachse, G. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Wade, L.; Bartlett, K. B.; Talbot, R. W.; Browell, E. V.; Barrie, L. A.; Hill, G. F.; Burney, L. G.

    1994-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) were measured in the 0.15- to 6-km portion of the troposphere over subarctic and boreal landscapes of midcontinent and eastern Canada during July - August 1990. In the mid-continent region, Arctic air entering the region was characterized by relatively uniform CO concentrations (86-108 parts per billion by volume (ppbv)) and CH4 concentrations (1729-1764 ppbv). Local biomass burning and long-range transport of CO into the area from industrial/urban sources and distant fires did frequently produce enhanced and variable concentrations. Emissions of CH4 from the Hudson Bay lowlands was the primary source for enhanced and variable concentrations, especially at altitudes of 0.15-1 km. In eastern Canada, most of the observed variability in CO and CH4 was similar in origin to the phenomena described for the midcontinent region. However, unexpectedly low concentrations of CO (51 ppbv) and CH4 (1688 ppbv) were measured in the midtroposphere on several flights. Combined meteorological and chemical data indicated that the low CO-CH4 events were the result of long-range transport of tropical Pacific marine air to subarctic latitudes.

  13. Hydro-Quebec and Environment Canada wind energy forecasting project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forcione, A.; Roberge, G. [Hydro-Quebec, Saguenay, PQ (Canada). IREQ; Petrucci, F.; Yu, W. [Environment Canada, Gatineau, PQ (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation outlined a joint wind energy forecasting project currently being conducted by Hydro-Quebec and Environment Canada. The aim of the project is to provide high quality next day hourly forecasts to permit optimal planning and scheduling of wind balancing needs. The quality of next day hourly forecasts depends on the availability of high quality numerical weather prediction modelling output. The model currently being developed by the researchers has been designed to provide 48-hour high resolution, hourly wind forecasts. The Systeme de Provision Eolienne (SPEO) uses mesoscale and microscale operational forecast components from Environment Canada as well as local meteorological observations to provide the wind forecast. Operational forecasts are generated using a global environmental multi-scale model (GEM). Digital elevation models are used to provide high resolution physical data. Case studies of wind forecasts made using the model were provided, as well as flow charts describing a chronology of processes used by the model. It was concluded that the model provides accurate next day wind forecasts. tabs., figs.

  14. Climate Change, Drought and Human Health in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusa, Anna; Berry, Peter; Cheng, June J.; Ogden, Nicholas; Bonsal, Barrie; Stewart, Ronald; Waldick, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Droughts have been recorded all across Canada and have had significant impacts on individuals and communities. With climate change, projections suggest an increasing risk of drought in Canada, particularly in the south and interior. However, there has been little research on the impacts of drought on human health and the implications of a changing climate. A review of the Canadian, U.S. and international literature relevant to the Canadian context was conducted to better define these impacts and adaptations available to protect health. Drought can impact respiratory health, mental health, illnesses related to exposure to toxins, food/water security, rates of injury and infectious diseases (including food-, water- and vector-borne diseases). A range of direct and indirect adaptation (e.g., agricultural adaptation) options exist to cope with drought. Many have already been employed by public health officials, such as communicable disease monitoring and surveillance and public education and outreach. However, gaps exist in our understanding of the impacts of short-term vs. prolonged drought on the health of Canadians, projections of drought and its characteristics at the regional level and the effectiveness of current adaptations. Further research will be critical to inform adaptation planning to reduce future drought-related risks to health. PMID:26193300

  15. Health care technology in Canada (with special reference to Quebec).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, R N; Jacob, R; Hodge, M J

    1994-01-01

    In Canada, all citizens are insured for health services. Health care is a provincial responsibility. The federal role is limited to health care financing, health protection including regulation of pharmaceuticals, and environmental health. The health care system represents a balance among government direction, consumer choice, and provider autonomy. Canada has largely controlled the costs of health care by funding and management mechanisms, the most important of which is the global budget formula used to fund hospitals. This paper discusses the Canadian health care system, with particular emphasis on the province of Quebec. In 1988, the provincial government of Quebec established the first Canadian body dedicated to technology assessment. Since then, a national coordinating office and several other provincial bodies have developed. The work of these and other evaluation efforts has had a growing influence on technology management decisions, particularly those dealing with procurement of capital-intensive technologies. Expanding this influence into the realm of technology use, especially for low-cost, high-volume technologies, remains a challenge.

  16. Babcock and Wilcox Canada steam generators past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.C. [Babcock and Wilcox Canada, Cambridge, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    The steam generators in all of the domestic CANDU Plants, and most of the foreign CANDU plants, were supplied by Babcock and Wilcox Canada, either on their own or in co-operation with local manufacturers. More than 200 steam generators have been supplied. In addition, Babcock and Wilcox Canada has taken the technology which evolved out of the CANDU steam generators and has adapted the technology to supply of replacement steam generators for PWR's. There is enough history and operating experience, plus laboratory experience, to point to the future directions which will be taken in steam generator design. This paper documents the steam generators which have been supplied, the experience in operation and maintenance, what has worked and not worked, and how the design, materials, and operating and maintenance philosophy have evolved. The paper also looks at future requirements in the market, and the continuing research and product development going on at Babcock and Wilcox to address the future steam generator requirements. (author)

  17. Establishing trees on cut-over peatlands in eastern Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bussières

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Four major tree-planting trials on cut-over peatlands in eastern Canada were surveyed in 2002, in order to evaluate the potential use of trees in rehabilitation following horticultural peat extraction. At one of the sites, an experiment to determine the appropriate fertilisation rate for trees planted on cut-over peatlands was also conducted over several years. Tree performance was assessed by measuring survival, total height and annual growth of red maple (Acer rubrum L., tamarack (Larix laricina (Du Roi Koch., black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. B.S.P., jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb. and hybrid poplar (Populus spp.. Establishment and growth of tamarack and black spruce in cut-over peatlands showed good potential when compared to performance in conventional forestry plantations. Red maple and jack pine gave poor productivity but promising survival, whilst hybrid poplar plantings failed. Adding nutrients was essential for growth but dosages above 122.5 g of 3.4N-8.3P-24.2K per tree gave no further improvement. Therefore, several different tree species can be planted to reclaim cut-over peatlands in eastern Canada, so long as the appropriate species are chosen and nutrients are provided.

  18. Climatic and Environmental Changes Affecting Communities in Atlantic Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liette Vasseur

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Small rural coastal communities located in Atlantic Canada are vulnerable to the effects of climate and environmental changes. Major storms have impounded the coastline, causing much physical damage and affecting the socioeconomics of these communities that are composed of an aging population. The current study relays findings based on interviews completed in 2011–2012, following the 2010 winter storms in Atlantic Canada. It portrays the physical and social–ecological impacts affecting 10 coastal communities located in the provinces of Québec, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. Semi-structured interviews held in these provinces are the basis for the contributions of this research. The findings reveal physical changes related to coastal erosion from high-wave impacts and storm surge causing flooding of the coastal zone. Also considered are strategies preferred and actually implemented by residents, such as building of protection walls, although undesirable. Due to funding constraints, however, many of these large-scale flood protection projects are not possible without governmental support. Instead, it is suggested that development be controlled and some respondents in this study upheld that relocation be used to alleviate the situation. Finally, more work is required to improve emergency planning. Better concerted short- and long-term responses need to be coordinated by local authorities and higher up in the government in order to ensure the sustainability of these coastal communities.

  19. The Federal Features of the EU: Lessons from Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Verdun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been a rise and fall in interest in federalism in the context of European integration. This article assesses the federal nature of the EU. It draws in particular on the work of Michael Burgess who has been one of the key thinkers on this issue. Because there are many types of ‘federalisms’ available across the globe, it is helpful to make a comparison with another political system to offer a base line. In this article I explore to what extent the EU already has federal features. With the help of the work of Burgess I seek to look beyond the specific characteristics of the EU and reflect on how a comparison with this other polity can offer us insights into what is going on within the EU political system. Drawing on the comparison with Canada, I seek to identify the characteristics of the EU that are already those of a federation. Therefore, the guiding question of this article is: compared to Canada, what particular features does the EU have that reminds us of a federation and what features is it still lacking? It finds that the EU has a considerable amount of federal features (federation, but that a federal tradition, a federal ideology and advocacy to a federal goal (federalism are mostly absent.

  20. Environmental Justice, Place and Nuclear Fuel Waste Management in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Richard G. [Univ. of Guelph (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Murphy, Brenda L. [Wilfrid Launer Univ., Brantford (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the basis of a Nuclear Fuel Waste management strategy for Canada, taking into account the unique legal tenets (Aboriginal rights; federal - provincial jurisdiction) and the orientation that the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) has taken to date. The focus of the paper are grounded in notions of environmental justice. Bullard's definition provides a useful guideline: 'the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, colour, national origin or income with respect to the development, implementation and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies'. The overriding concern is to work towards a process that is inclusive and just. Prior to developing a specific strategy to site a NFW disposal facility, we maintain that the NWMO needs to first address three fundamental issues: Expand its mandate to include the future of nuclear energy in Canada; Provide an inclusive role for First Nations (Aboriginal people) in all stages of the process; Adhere to the requirement of specifying an economic region and deal more overtly with the transportation of NF.